WorldWideScience

Sample records for source light scattered

  1. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  2. Light source distribution and scattering phase function influence light transport in diffuse multi-layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Askoura, Mohamed Lamine

    2017-06-01

    Red and near-Infrared light is often used as a useful diagnostic and imaging probe for highly scattering media such as biological tissues, fruits and vegetables. Part of diffusively reflected light gives interesting information related to the tissue subsurface, whereas light recorded at further distances may probe deeper into the interrogated turbid tissues. However, modelling diffusive events occurring at short source-detector distances requires to consider both the distribution of the light sources and the scattering phase functions. In this report, a modified Monte Carlo model is used to compute light transport in curved and multi-layered tissue samples which are covered with a thin and highly diffusing tissue layer. Different light source distributions (ballistic, diffuse or Lambertian) are tested with specific scattering phase functions (modified or not modified Henyey-Greenstein, Gegenbauer and Mie) to compute the amount of backscattered and transmitted light in apple and human skin structures. Comparisons between simulation results and experiments carried out with a multispectral imaging setup confirm the soundness of the theoretical strategy and may explain the role of the skin on light transport in whole and half-cut apples. Other computational results show that a Lambertian source distribution combined with a Henyey-Greenstein phase function provides a higher photon density in the stratum corneum than in the upper dermis layer. Furthermore, it is also shown that the scattering phase function may affect the shape and the magnitude of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution (BRDF) exhibited at the skin surface.

  3. Intrabeam scattering studies at the Swiss light source

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Aiba, M; Boege, M; Milas, N; Streun, A; Demma, T

    2012-01-01

    The target parameters of modern ultra-low emittance rings are entering into a regime where Intra-beam Scattering (IBS) becomes important and, in the case of linear collider damping rings, even a limitation for the delivered emittances. The Swiss Light Source (SLS) storage ring, as it has achieved a vertical geometrical emittance of around 1 pm at 2.4 GeV [1], and it has the ability to run at even lower energies, and the availability of emittance monitoring diagnostics, is an ideal testbed for IBS studies. Simulations using the classical IBS theories and tracking codes are undertaken in order to explore the possibilities and limitations for IBS measurements at the SLS. In this respect, comparison between the theories and codes is first discussed. The dependence of the output emittances, taking into account the effect of IBS, with respect to energy, bunch charge and zero current vertical and longitudinal emittance is also studied, in order to define the regimes where the IBS effect can be significant. First mea...

  4. Visible light scatter as quantitative information source on milk constituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melentiyeva, Anastasiya; Kucheryavskiy, Sergey; Bogomolov, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    analysis. The main task here is to extract individual quantitative information on milk fat and total protein content from spectral data. This is particularly challenging problem in the case of raw natural milk, where the fat globule sizes may essentially differ depending on source. Fig. 1. Spots of light...... designed set of raw milk samples with simultaneously varying fat, total protein and particle size distribution has been analyzed in the Vis spectral region. The feasibility of raw milk analysis by PLS regression on spectral data has been proved. The root mean-square errors below 0.10% and 0.04% for fat....... 3J&M Analytik AG, Willy-Messerschmitt-Strasse 8, 73457 Essingen, Germany. bogomolov@j-m.de Fat and protein are two major milk nutrients that are routinely analyzed in the dairy industry. Growing food quality requirements promote the dissemination of spectroscopic analysis, enabling real...

  5. Contribution to the study of the molecular scattering of light. Use of a laser as light source (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, L.

    1963-01-01

    The experiments of the molecular scattering of light have been repeated using a ruby laser as a light source. The angular distribution of the scattered light intensity has been measured when the electric vector of the incident beam is either in the plane of observation or perpendicular to that plane. In the first case a good agreement with the Rayleigh theory has been found but this is not true in the second case. The differential cross sections for scattering have been measured for various gases. The values found are two or three times larger than the ones deduced from the classical theory. The possible effect of a variation of the beam intensity upon the linearity of the scattering process has been looked for. (author) [fr

  6. LIGHT SOURCE: A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Huang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Huai-Bi; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Du, Tai-Bin; He, Xiao-Zhong; Hua, Jian-Fei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Qian, Hou-Jun; Shi, Jia-Ru; Xiang, Dao; Yan, Li-Xin; Yu, Pei-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and affordable facilities that produce short duration, high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies, and also medical and industrial applications. Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University, and upgrade is in progress. In this paper, we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation, aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness, and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam. Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  7. The use of lasers as sources for Raman spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, and light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Plus, R.

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the laboratory is principally centred on the determination of molecular structures and the study of molecular interactions in solution by infrared and Raman spectrometry. With the development of work on relatively large molecules, particularly biological molecules, it became necessary to complete information on the molecular weight and on the intra and intermolecular geometry and interactions of these bodies. In order to obtain these informations Rayleigh scattering and resonance Raman spectrometry were used. The advantages of using vibrational spectrometry, particularly Raman, in conjunction with the diffusion of light for these structural and molecular interaction studies is emphasized. It is shown that these two techniques could not have developed as they have done in the last few years without the use of lasers as light source [fr

  8. The current status of small-angle x-ray scattering beamline at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Katsuaki; Doutch, James; Terrill, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) covers the major disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics delivering structural and dynamic information in nanoscience, mesoscopic architectures, supramolecular structures, and nucleation/growth of crystals. SAXS is also proving to be important in archaeological, environmental, and conservation sciences, and has further indicated its ability to span wide-ranging scientific disciplines. Thus, strong needs for SAXS studies are increasing significantly in a broad range of scientific fields year by year. Based on such a background, the demand for high throughput SAXS experiments is increasing. At the synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, one SAXS beamline, Non-crystalline diffraction I22 is now operational and highly automated throughput small-angle X-ray scattering (HATSAXS) beamline B21 is now under construction. I22 is the Undulator beamline and wide varieties of experiments, including time-resolved experiments are attempted. Based on the concept of HATSAXS, the key feature of B21 will focuses on the automation of end-station equipment. A automated sample changer has been purchased for solution SAXS measurements on biomolecules. A robotic-arm-type automated sample changer that is capable of handling several kinds of samples in material science is also being constructed. B21 is expected to successfully provide all users highly automated throughput measurements with the highest possible reliability and accuracy. Construction of this beamline will end in the second half of 2012, and will be open for users in the early summer of 2013 after commissioning. (author)

  9. The high-energy x-ray diffraction and scattering beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, A.; Dina, G.; Kycia, S.

    2018-06-01

    The optical design for the high-energy x-ray diffraction and scattering beamline of the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian Light Source is described. The design is based on a single side-bounce silicon focusing monochromator that steers the central part of a high-field permanent magnet wiggler beam into the experimental station. Two different configurations are proposed: a higher energy resolution with vertical focusing and a lower energy resolution with horizontal and vertical focusing. The monochromator will have the possibility of mounting three crystals: one crystal optimized for 35 keV that focuses in the horizontal and vertical directions using reflection (1,1,1) and two other crystals both covering the energies above 40 keV: one with only vertical focusing and another one with horizontal and vertical focusing. The geometry of the last two monochromator crystals was optimized to use reflections (4,2,2) and (5,3,3) to cover the broad energy range from 40 to 95 keV.

  10. Light Scattering in Solid IX

    CERN Document Server

    Cardona, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    This is the ninth volume of a well-established series in which expert practitioners discuss topical aspects of light scattering in solids. It reviews recent developments concerning mainly semiconductor nanostructures and inelastic x-ray scattering, including both coherent time-domain and spontaneous scattering studies. In the past few years, light scattering has become one of the most important research and characterization methods for studying carbon nanotubes and semiconducting quantum dots, and a crucial tool for exploring the coupled exciton--photon system in semiconductor cavities. Among the novel techniques discussed in this volume are pump--probe ultrafast measurements and those which use synchrotron radiation as light source. The book addresses improvements in the intensity, beam quality and time synchronization of modern synchrotron sources, which made it possible to measure the phonon dispersion in very small samples and to determine electronic energy bands as well as enabling real-time observations...

  11. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  12. Light scattering reviews 8 radiative transfer and light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Light scattering review (vol 8) is aimed at the presentation of recent advances in radiative transfer and light scattering optics. The topics to be covered include: scattering of light by irregularly shaped particles suspended in atmosphere (dust, ice crystals), light scattering by particles much larger as compared the wavelength of incident radiation, atmospheric radiative forcing, astrophysical radiative transfer, radiative transfer and optical imaging in biological media, radiative transfer of polarized light, numerical aspects of radiative transfer.

  13. Light scattering studies at UNICAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.; Cerdeira, H.A.; Salzberg, J.; Vasconcellos, A.R.; Frota Pessoa, S.; Reis, F.G. dos; Ferrari, C.A.; Algarte, C.A.S.; Tenan, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Current theoretical studies on light scattering spectroscopy at UNICAMP is presented briefly, such as: inelastic scattering of radiation from a solid state plasma; resonant Ramman scattering; high excitation effects; saturated semiconductors and glasses

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, H.N.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup is demonstra......A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup...

  15. Light scattering by small particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hulst, H C van de

    1981-01-01

    ""A must for researchers using the techniques of light scattering."" ? S. C. Snowdon, Journal of the Franklin InstituteThe measurement of light scattering of independent, homogeneous particles has many useful applications in physical chemistry, meteorology and astronomy. There is, however, a sizeable gap between the abstract formulae related to electromagnetic-wave-scattering phenomena, and the computation of reliable figures and curves. Dr. van de Hulst's book enables researchers to bridge that gap. The product of twelve years of work, it is an exhaustive study of light-scattering properties

  16. Light scattering reviews 9 light scattering and radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book details modern methods of the radiative transfer theory. It presents recent advances in light scattering (measurements and theory) and highlights the newest developments in remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties.

  17. Light scattering by soap films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrij, A.

    A theory is constructed describing the scattering from a liquid film (e.g., a soap film) of a light beam polarized normal to the plane of incidence. This scattering is due to the small irregular corrugations caused by thermal motion. The interference of the reflected incident beam with its multiple

  18. Inelastic light scattering in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushchinskii, M. M.

    The papers presented in this volume are concerned with a variety of problems in optics and solid state physics, such as Raman scattering of light in crystals and disperse media, Rayleigh and inelastic scattering during phase transitions, characteristics of ferroelectrics in relation to the general soft mode concept, and inelastic spectral opalescence. A group-theory approach is used to classify the vibrational spectra of the crystal lattice and to analyze the properties of idealized crystal models. Particular attention is given to surface vibrational states and to the study of the surface layers of crystals and films by light scattering methods.

  19. Light Scattering at Various Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Paul; Pyle, B. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Mie theory of scattering is used to provide new information on how changes in particle volume, with no change in dry weight, should influence light scattering for various scattering angles and particle sizes. Many biological cells (e.g., algal cells, erythrocytes) and large subcellular structures (e.g., chloroplasts, mitochondria) in suspension undergo this type of reversible volume change, a change which is related to changes in the rates of cellular processes. A previous study examined the effects of such volume changes on total scattering. In this paper scattering at 10° is found to follow total scattering closely, but scattering at 45°, 90°, 135°, and 170° behaves differently. Small volume changes can cause very large observable changes in large angle scattering if the sample particles are uniform in size; however, the natural particle size heterogeneity of most samples would mask this effect. For heterogeneous samples of most particle size ranges, particle shrink-age is found to increase large angle scattering. PMID:4556610

  20. Scattered light characterization of FORTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Carter, Anna; Redwine, Keith; Teste, Stephane; Pelton, Russell; Hagopian, John; Kutyrev, Alexander; Li, Mary J.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2017-08-01

    We describe our efforts to build a Wide-Field Lyman alpha Geocoronal simulator (WFLaGs) for characterizing the end-to-end sensitivity of FORTIS (Far-UV Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) to scattered Lyman α emission from outside of the nominal (1/2 degree)2 field-of-view. WFLaGs is a 50 mm diameter F/1 aluminum parabolic collimator fed by a hollow cathode discharge lamp with a 80 mm clear MgF2 window housed in a vacuum skin. It creates emission over a 10 degree FOV. WFLaGS will allow us to validate and refine a recently developed scattered light model and verify our scatter light mitigation strategies, which will incorporate low scatter baffle materials, and possibly 3-d printed light traps, covering exposed scatter centers. We present measurements of scattering intensity of Lyman alpha as a function of angle with respect to the specular reflectance direction for several candidate baffle materials. Initial testing of WFLaGs will be described.

  1. Contribution to the study of the molecular scattering of light. Use of a laser as light source (1963); Contribution a l'etude de la diffusion moleculaire de la lumiere. Utilisation d'un laser comme source lumineuse (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slama, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The experiments of the molecular scattering of light have been repeated using a ruby laser as a light source. The angular distribution of the scattered light intensity has been measured when the electric vector of the incident beam is either in the plane of observation or perpendicular to that plane. In the first case a good agreement with the Rayleigh theory has been found but this is not true in the second case. The differential cross sections for scattering have been measured for various gases. The values found are two or three times larger than the ones deduced from the classical theory. The possible effect of a variation of the beam intensity upon the linearity of the scattering process has been looked for. (author) [French] Les experiences sur la diffusion moleculaire de la lumiere ont ete reprises en utilisant un laser a rubis comme source lumineuse. La distribution angulaire de l'intensite diffusee a ete mesuree dans le cas ou le vecteur electrique de l'onde lumineuse incidente est soit dans le plan, soit perpendiculaire a ce plan. Dans le premier cas un bon accord est observe avec la theorie de Rayleigh, ce qui n'est plus vrai dans le second cas. Des sections efficaces differentielles de diffusion ont ete mesurees pour differents gaz. Les valeurs trouvees sont 2 a 3 fois plus grandes que celles prevues par la theorie classique. On a recherche enfin l'effet d'une variation d'intensite du faisceau du laser sur la linearite du phenomene de diffusion. (auteur)

  2. Laser light scattering basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Benjamin

    1994-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, this text introduces the interdisciplinary area of laser light scattering, focusing chiefly on theoretical concepts of quasielastic laser scattering.

  3. Light sources and light pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, G.

    2005-01-01

    From the dawn of mankind fire and light sources in general played an essential role in everyday life and protection over night. The development of new light sources went through many stages and is now an immense technological achievement, but also a threat for the wildlife at night, mainly because of the so-called light pollution. This paper discusses several very successful light sources connected with low pressure mercury and sodium vapour electric discharges. The luminous efficacy, colour rendering index and other lighting features cannot be always satisfactory, but at least some of the features can be much better than those met by the standard tungsten filament bulbs. High-pressure metal-vapour discharge lamps definitely have a good colour rendering index and a relatively high luminosity. Different light sources with burners at high pressure are discussed, paying special attention to their spectrum. The paper investigates new trends in development through a number of examples with non-toxic elements and pulsed electric discharge, which may be good news in terms of clean environment and energy savings. Light emitting diodes have recently appeared as worthy competitors to conventional light sources. White LEDs have approached 100 lumen/Watt efficacy in laboratories. This suggests that in some not very distant future they could completely replace high-pressure lamps, at least in indoor lighting. The article speculates on new developments which combine trends in nano technology and material science. The paper concludes with light pollution in view of several recent observations of plant and animal life at night in the vicinity of strong light sources. Photo-induced changes at the cell level may completely alter the normal life of plants and animals.(author)

  4. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Bennett N., E-mail: bennett.walker@fda.hhs.gov [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K. [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Calogero, Don [Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  5. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Bennett N.; James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Calogero, Don

    2015-01-01

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter

  6. Advanced Light Source (ALS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a world leader in soft x-ray science, generates light in the wavelengths needed for examining the atomic and electronic structure of...

  7. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  8. Light scattering near phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, HZ

    1983-01-01

    Since the development of the laser in the early 1960's, light scattering has played an increasingly crucial role in the investigation of many types of phase transitions and the published work in this field is now widely dispersed in a large number of books and journals.A comprehensive overview of contemporary theoretical and experimental research in this field is presented here. The reviews are written by authors who have actively contributed to the developments that have taken place in both Eastern and Western countries.

  9. Light Sources and Lighting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisashi; Suwa, Takumi; Yasuda, Takeo; Ohtani, Yoshihiko; Maehara, Akiyoshi; Okada, Atsunori; Komatsu, Naoki; Mannami, Tomoaki

    According to the Machinery Statistics of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the production of incandescent lamps in Japan in 2007 was 990 million units (90.0% of the previous year's total), in which the production of incandescent lamps for general lighting was 110 million units (90.0% of the previous year's total) and of tungsten-halogen lamps was 44 million units (96.6% of the previous year's total). The production of fluorescent lamps was 927 million units (93.9% of the previous year's total), in which general fluorescent lamps, excluding those for LCD back lighting, was 320 million units (87.2% of the previous year's total). Also, the production of HID lamps was 10 million units (101.5% of the previous year's total). On the other hand, when the numbers of sales are compared with the sales of the previous year, incandescent lamps for general use was 99.8%, tungsten-halogen lamps was 96.9%, fluorescent lamps was 95.9%, and HID lamps was 98.9%. Self-ballasted fluorescent lamps alone showed an increase in sales as strong as 29 million units, or 121.7% of the previous year's sales. It is considered that the switchover of incandescent lamps to HID lamps was promoted for energy conservation and carbon dioxide reduction with the problem of global warming in the background. In regard to exhibitions, Lighting Fair 2007 was held in Tokyo in March, and LIGHTFAIR INTERNATIONAL 2007 was held in New York in May. Regarding academic conferences, LS:11 (the 11th International Symposium on the Science & Technology of Light Sources) was held in Shanghai in May, and the First International Conference on White LEDs and Solid State Lighting was held in Tokyo in November. Both conferences suggested that there are strong needs and concerns now about energy conservation, saving natural resources, and restrictions of hazardous materials. In regard to incandescent lamps, the development of products aiming at higher efficacy, electric power savings, and longer life was advanced by

  10. Dynamic light scattering. Observation of polymer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic light scattering is a technique to measure properties of polymer solutions such as size distribution. Principle of dynamic light scattering is briefly explained. Sometime dynamic light scattering is regarded as the observation of Doppler shift of scattered light. First, the difficulty for the direct observation of this Doppler shift is mentioned. Then the measurement by using a time correlation function is introduced. Measuring techniques for dynamic light scattering are also introduced. In addition to homodyne and heterodyne detection techniques, the technique called partial heterodyne method is also introduced. This technique is useful for the analysis of nonergodic medium such as polymer gels. Then the application of this technique to condensed suspension is briefly reviewed. As one of the examples, a dynamic light scattering microscope is introduced. By using this apparatus, we can measure the concentration dependence of the size distribution of polymer solutions. (author)

  11. Scattering theory of stochastic electromagnetic light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhao, Daomu

    2010-07-15

    We generalize scattering theory to stochastic electromagnetic light waves. It is shown that when a stochastic electromagnetic light wave is scattered from a medium, the properties of the scattered field can be characterized by a 3 x 3 cross-spectral density matrix. An example of scattering of a spatially coherent electromagnetic light wave from a deterministic medium is discussed. Some interesting phenomena emerge, including the changes of the spectral degree of coherence and of the spectral degree of polarization of the scattered field.

  12. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have developed a simultaneous measurement system of CARS and CSRS. ► We can obtain information on the electronic resonance effect with the measurement. ► The simultaneous measurement provides us with more reliable spectral information. - Abstract: We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ (3) without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM)

  13. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, S; Castelletto, S; Aruldoss, C; Scholten, R E; Roberts, A

    2007-01-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres

  14. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, S; Castelletto, S; Aruldoss, C; Scholten, R E; Roberts, A [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  15. Fusion pumped light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1991-04-01

    This report discussion research being conducted at the National Synchrotron light source. In particular, this report contains operations summaries; symposia, workshops, and projects; NSLS highlights; and abstracts of science at the NSLS

  17. Miniature radioactive light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Dooley, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature radioactive light source for illuminating digital watches is described consisting of a glass tube with improved laser sealing and strength containing tritium gas and a transducer responsive to the gas. (U.K.)

  18. Light scattering from crystals, glasses and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaswamy, K.R.

    1984-09-01

    The theory of inelastic light scattering from a model system in the crystalline, disordered and liquid phases is analyzed. The roles of disorder induced first order scattering and second order scattering are clarified in the context of the classical liquid. The correlation functions appropriate for the various contributions are identified and useful ways of processing experimental data are pointed out. (author)

  19. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, E; Young, A T; Collins, B A; Yan, H; Nasiatka, J; Padmore, H A; Ade, H; Hexemer, A; Wang, C

    2012-04-01

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge (∼285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  20. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, E.; Young, A. T.; Collins, B. A.; Yan, H.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Ade, H.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge (˜285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

  1. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, E.; Collins, B. A.; Ade, H.; Young, A. T.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C.; Yan, H.

    2012-01-01

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge (∼285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

  2. Electromagnetic theory of plasma light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.

    1969-01-01

    The theory of light scattering by a plasma is formulated using Klimontovich's microscopic distribution functions and Landau method to solve linear kinetic equations. First, Salpeter's derivation and results are given for the spectrum of light scattered by a collisionless plasma. Then, the influence of collision is investigated through B.G.K. kinetic equation. (author) [fr

  3. Scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kerker, Milton

    1969-01-01

    The Scattering of Light and Other Electromagnetic Radiation discusses the theory of electromagnetic scattering and describes some practical applications. The book reviews electromagnetic waves, optics, the interrelationships of main physical quantities and the physical concepts of optics, including Maxwell's equations, polarization, geometrical optics, interference, and diffraction. The text explains the Rayleigh2 theory of scattering by small dielectric spheres, the Bessel functions, and the Legendre functions. The author also explains how the scattering functions for a homogenous sphere chan

  4. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  5. Controlled light scattering in transparent polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, A.S.; Grodnenskij, I.M.; Sonin, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering indicatrices, birefringence, attenuation factor and time characteristics of the light scattering effect have been investigated in a polycrystal solid solution of Pbsub(0.92)Lasub(0.08)(Zrsub(0.65)Tisub(0.35))Osub(3) with the crystallite dimension 4-5 μm. The measurements have been taken for longitudinal and transverse scattering effects in the visible range of spectrum in the temperature range 20-200 deg C. The time characteristics of the scattering effect have been found to be significantly different when a sample transfers from a thermally depolarized state to an electrically polarized one and from an electrically polarized state to an electrically depolarized one. The shape of the scattering indicatrices depends on the polarization state of a sample. The distribution of the scattered light intensity in the part of the indicatrix characterizing the fundamental scattering is satisfactorily described by the Rayleigh-Hans theory. The diameter of scattering centres responsible for the scattering has been determined to be 6-7 μm. The experimental data show that there are different types of scattering centres, in the material. The fundamental scattering is caused by centres arising irreversibly during initial polarization of the sample. The second type of centres is responsible for the controlled part of scattering during repolarization

  6. Light-scattering theory of diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Since diffraction is a scattering process in principle, light propagation through one aperture in a screen is discussed in the light-scattering theory. Through specific calculation, the expression of the electric field observed at an observation point is obtained and is used not only to explain why Kirchhoff's diffraction theory is a good approximation when the screen is both opaque and sufficiently thin but also to demonstrate that the mathematical and physical problems faced by Kirchhoff's theory are avoided in the light-scattering theory.

  7. Locally-enhanced light scattering by a monocrystalline silicon wafer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the optical properties of light scattering by a monocrystalline silicon wafer, by using transparent material to replicate its surface structure and illuminating a fabricated sample with a laser source. The experimental results show that the scattering field contains four spots of concentrated intensity with high local energy, and these spots are distributed at the four vertices of a square with lines of intensity linking adjacent spots. After discussing simulations of and theory about the formation of this light scattering, we conclude that the scattering field is formed by the effects of both geometrical optics and physical optics. Moreover, we calculate the central angle of the spots in the light field, and the result indicates that the locally-enhanced intensity spots have a definite scattering angle. These results may possibly provide a method for improving energy efficiency within mono-Si based solar cells.

  8. BERKELEY: Light Source anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The staff of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been too busy to celebrate the first anniversary of the facility's transition from a US Department of Energy construction project to operating third-generation synchrotron radiation source. Based on a 1.5-GeV, low-emittance electron storage ring that accommodates up to ten insertion-device radiation sources optimized primarily for the soft X-ray and vacuum ultra-violet regions of the spectrum, the ALS has completed

  9. BERKELEY: Light Source anniversary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-10-15

    The staff of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been too busy to celebrate the first anniversary of the facility's transition from a US Department of Energy construction project to operating third-generation synchrotron radiation source. Based on a 1.5-GeV, low-emittance electron storage ring that accommodates up to ten insertion-device radiation sources optimized primarily for the soft X-ray and vacuum ultra-violet regions of the spectrum, the ALS has completed.

  10. The Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source comprises two high intensity electron storage rings for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength domain (700 MeV e - ring) and in the x-ray wavelength domain (2.5 GeV e - ring). A description is presented of the basic facility and the characteristics of the synchrotron radiation sources. The present plans for specific beam lines will be enumerated and the planned use of beam wigglers and undulators will be discussed

  12. Ultrasonic trap for light scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Petr; Pavlu, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    Light scattering is complex phenomenon occurring widely in space environments, including the dense dusty clouds, nebulas or even the upper atmosphere of the Earth. However, when the size of the dust (or of other scattering center) is close to the incident light wavelength, theoretical determination is difficult. In such case, Mie theory is to be used but there is a lack of the material constants for most space-related materials. For experimental measurement of light scattering, we designed unique apparatus, based on ultrasonic trap. Using acoustic levitation we are able to capture the dust grain in midair, irradiate it with laser, and observe scattering directly with goniometer-mounted photodiode. Advantage of this approach is ability to measure directly in the air (thus, no need for the carrier medium) and possibility to study non-spherical particles. Since the trap development is nearly finished and initial experiments are carried out, the paper presents first tests on water droplets.

  13. Entanglement degradation in depolarizing light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, A.; Woerdman, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the classical regime, when a beam of light is scattered by a medium, it may emerge partially or completely depolarized depending on the optical properties of the medium. Correspondingly, in the quantum regime, when an entangled two-photon pair is scattered, the classical depolarization may result in an entanglement degradation. Here, relations between photon scattering, entanglement and multi-mode detection are investigated. We establish a general framework in which one- and two-photon elastic scattering processes can be discussed, and we focus on the study of the intrinsic entanglement degradation caused by a multi-mode detection. We show that any multi-mode scattered state cannot maximally violate the Bell-CHSH inequality because of the momentum spread. The results presented here have general validity and can be applied to both deterministic and random scattering processes. (author)

  14. Stray light reduction for Thomson scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Doebele, H.F.; Muraoka, K.

    1999-01-01

    In order to perform Thomson scattering in a gas discharge tube, the reduction of stray light is very important because of the very small Thomson cross-section. By introducing a sodium absorption cell as a notch filter, we can reduce the measured stray light considerably. Then we have to use a dye

  15. The Whiteness of Things and Light Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Calza, G.; Oss, S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss some simple experiments dealing with intriguing properties of light and its interaction with matter. In particular, we show how to emphasize that light reflection, refraction and scattering can provide a proper, physical description of human perception of the "colour" white. These experiments can be used in the classroom with an enquiry…

  16. Collinear light scattering using electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.E.; Sokolov, A.V.; Walker, D.R.; Yavuz, D.D.; Yin, G.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes two types of nonlinear optical processes which are based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These are: (1) Collinear generation of FM-like Raman sidebands and (2) a type of pondermotive light scattering which is inherent to the interaction of slow light with cold atoms. Connections to other areas of EIT-based nonlinear optics are also described

  17. Light scattering from superfluid fog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heetae; Lemieux, P.-A.Pierre-Anthony; Durian, Douglas; Williams, G.A.Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the droplets of superfluid 4 He fog created by an ultrasonic transducer are investigated using a laser scattering technique. Diffusing-wave spectroscopy probes the motion of the droplets, which is found to be ballistic for times shorter than a characteristic viscous time τ v =10 -5 s. The average relative velocity between the droplets is small compared to the velocity that the droplets are ejected from the surface into the fog, but increases proportionally to it

  18. Light scattering from superfluid fog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heetae; Lemieux, P.-A.Pierre-Anthony; Durian, Douglas; Williams, G.A.Gary A

    2003-05-01

    The dynamics of the droplets of superfluid {sup 4}He fog created by an ultrasonic transducer are investigated using a laser scattering technique. Diffusing-wave spectroscopy probes the motion of the droplets, which is found to be ballistic for times shorter than a characteristic viscous time {tau}{sub v}=10{sup -5} s. The average relative velocity between the droplets is small compared to the velocity that the droplets are ejected from the surface into the fog, but increases proportionally to it.

  19. Ocular forward light scattering and corneal backward light scattering in patients with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Shizuka; Maeda, Naoyuki; Ikeda, Chikako; Asonuma, Sanae; Mitamura, Hayato; Oie, Yoshinori; Soma, Takeshi; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Nishida, Kohji

    2014-09-18

    To evaluate ocular forward light scattering and corneal backward light scattering in patients with dry eye. Thirty-five eyes in 35 patients with dry eye and 20 eyes of 20 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The 35 dry eyes were classified into two groups according to whether superficial punctate keratopathy in the central 6-mm corneal zone (cSPK) was present or not. Ocular forward light scattering was quantified with a straylight meter. Corneal backward light scattering from the anterior, middle, and posterior corneal parts was assessed with a corneal densitometry program using the Scheimpflug imaging system. Both dry eye groups had significantly higher intraocular forward light scattering than the control group (both Pdry eye group with cSPK had significantly higher values in anterior and total corneal backward light scattering than the other two groups. Moderate positive correlations were observed between the cSPK score and corneal backward light scattering from the anterior cornea (R=0.60, Pdry eyes than in normal eyes. Increased corneal backward light scattering in dry eye at least partially results from cSPK overlying the optical zone. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  20. Light Scattering Reviews, Vol 6 Light Scattering and Remote Sensing of Atmosphere and Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2012-01-01

    This is the next volume in series of Light Scattering Reviews. Volumes 1-5 have already been printed by Springer. The volume is composed of several papers ( usually, 10) of leading researchers in the respective field. The main focus of this book is light scattering, radiative transfer and optics of snow.

  1. Raman scattering of light off a superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuden, C.B.

    1976-01-01

    Raman scattering off a superconducting surface is formulated using Kubo's nonlinear response theory in a form suitable for systematic diagrammatic expansion. The effects of the sample surface are correctly taken into account. It is shown that in the presence of vacuum polarization processes, the contribution to the scattering efficiency from the density-density correlation function considered in the literature, is reduced. The relevant four-vertex parts, describing inelastic scattering of light by electronic excitations via intermediate interband states in a superconductor, are calculated. Frequency and temperature dependence of the relative scattering efficiency for the large momentum transfer (Pippard limit), and constant transition matrix elements, are obtained. The estimated magnitude of the total scattering efficiency is of the order of 10 -11

  2. Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a new synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS will be a key component in a major new research facility, the National Center for Advanced Materials. The ALS will consist of an electron linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron, a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring, and a number of photon beam lines. Most or all photon beam lines will originate from wiggler and undulator magnets placed in the 12 long straight sections of the ALS. A very low electron beam emittance will provide photon beams of unsurpassed spectral brilliance from specially-designed undulators, and a high radiofrequency will produce very short pulse lengths

  3. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  4. Laser light scattering in Brownian medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwono; Santoso, Budi; Baiquni, A.

    1983-01-01

    The principle of laser light scattering in Brownian medium and photon correlation spectroscopy are described in detail. Their application to the study of the behaviour of a polystyrene latex solution are discussed. The auto-correlation function of light scattered by the polystyrene latex solution in various angle, various temperature and in various sample times, have been measured. Information on the translation diffusion coefficient and size on the particle can be obtained from the auto-correlation function. Good agreement between the available data and experiment is shown. (author)

  5. Source distribution dependent scatter correction for PVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, J.S.; Harrop, R.; Dykstra, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Source distribution dependent scatter correction methods which incorporate different amounts of information about the source position and material distribution have been developed and tested. The techniques use image to projection integral transformation incorporating varying degrees of information on the distribution of scattering material, or convolution subtraction methods, with some information about the scattering material included in one of the convolution methods. To test the techniques, the authors apply them to data generated by Monte Carlo simulations which use geometric shapes or a voxelized density map to model the scattering material. Source position and material distribution have been found to have some effect on scatter correction. An image to projection method which incorporates a density map produces accurate scatter correction but is computationally expensive. Simpler methods, both image to projection and convolution, can also provide effective scatter correction

  6. Swiss Light Source SLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institute has begun work on the implementation of the Swiss Synchrotron Light Source (SLS). The construction of this facility, which will have international scope, is intended to provide a national focus for co-operation between various disciplines and for research in material sciences. Although basic research in physics and chemistry, biology, medicine and environmental sciences would seem to be in the foreground, industrial users also have an interest in the SLS. At present, this mainly centres on investigations into the structure of biological and chemical molecules, the use of high-performance methods of analysis, and the manufacture and investigation of microstructures. SLS is planned to be taken into service with an initial experimental installation by the middle of 2001. In this brochure an overview is presented on the main characteristics of the SLS facility and on its significance as a tool for interdisciplinary research

  7. Swiss Light Source SLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institute has begun work on the implementation of the Swiss Synchrotron Light Source (SLS). The construction of this facility, which will have international scope, is intended to provide a national focus for co-operation between various disciplines and for research in material sciences. Although basic research in physics and chemistry, biology, medicine and environmental sciences would seem to be in the foreground, industrial users also have an interest in the SLS. At present, this mainly centres on investigations into the structure of biological and chemical molecules, the use of high-performance methods of analysis, and the manufacture and investigation of microstructures. SLS is planned to be taken into service with an initial experimental installation by the middle of 2001. In this brochure an overview is presented on the main characteristics of the SLS facility and on its significance as a tool for interdisciplinary research.

  8. Light-like scattering in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.; Donoghue, John F.; Holstein, Barry R.; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We consider scattering in quantum gravity and derive long-range classical and quantum contributions to the scattering of light-like bosons and fermions (spin-0, spin-(1/2), spin-1) from an external massive scalar field, such as the Sun or a black hole. This is achieved by treating general relativity as an effective field theory and identifying the non-analytic pieces of the one-loop gravitational scattering amplitude. It is emphasized throughout the paper how modern amplitude techniques, involving spinor-helicity variables, unitarity, and squaring relations in gravity enable much simplified computations. We directly verify, as predicted by general relativity, that all classical effects in our computation are universal (in the context of matter type and statistics). Using an eikonal procedure we confirm the post-Newtonian general relativity correction for light-like bending around large stellar objects. We also comment on treating effects from quantum ℏ dependent terms using the same eikonal method.

  9. Light-like scattering in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J. [Niels Bohr International Academy & Discovery Center, Niels Bohr Institute,University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, Copenhagen Ø, DK-2100 (Denmark); Donoghue, John F. [Department of Physics-LGRT, University of Massachusetts,Amherst, MA, 01003 (United States); Holstein, Barry R. [Department of Physics-LGRT, University of Massachusetts,Amherst, MA, 01003 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA, 93016 (United States); Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre [CEA, DSM, Institut de Physique Théorique, IPhT, CNRS MPPU, URA2306,Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France)

    2016-11-21

    We consider scattering in quantum gravity and derive long-range classical and quantum contributions to the scattering of light-like bosons and fermions (spin-0, spin-(1/2), spin-1) from an external massive scalar field, such as the Sun or a black hole. This is achieved by treating general relativity as an effective field theory and identifying the non-analytic pieces of the one-loop gravitational scattering amplitude. It is emphasized throughout the paper how modern amplitude techniques, involving spinor-helicity variables, unitarity, and squaring relations in gravity enable much simplified computations. We directly verify, as predicted by general relativity, that all classical effects in our computation are universal (in the context of matter type and statistics). Using an eikonal procedure we confirm the post-Newtonian general relativity correction for light-like bending around large stellar objects. We also comment on treating effects from quantum ℏ dependent terms using the same eikonal method.

  10. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  11. Protoplanetary disks and exoplanets in scattered light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, T.

    2017-01-01

    High-contrast imaging facilitates the direct detection of protoplanetary disks in scattered light and self-luminous exoplanets on long-period orbits. The combined power of extreme adaptive optics and differential imaging techniques delivers high spatial resolution images of disk morphologies down to

  12. Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering in Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.

    The eye is not just a "window to the soul"; it can also be a "window to the human body." The eye is built like a camera. Light which travels from the cornea to the retina traverses through tissues that are representative of nearly every tissue type and fluid type in the human body. Therefore, it is possible to diagnose ocular and systemic diseases through the eye. Quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) also known as dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a laboratory technique routinely used in the characterization of macromolecular dispersions. QELS instrumentation has now become more compact, sensitive, flexible, and easy to use. These developments have made QELS/DLS an important tool in ophthalmic research where disease can be detected early and noninvasively before the clinical symptoms appear.

  13. Light scattering by surface phonons in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, E.L. de

    1981-01-01

    A theory of inelastic light scattering by surface acoustic phonons in homogeneous crystals is presented. The Green functions are determined by the use of a classical linear response method and used to evaluate the Brillouin cross section. The acoustic modes are found from solutions to the acoustical-wave equation and boundary conditions appropriated. Two light-scattering mechanisms, namely the surface corrugation and bulk elasto-optic effect are analyzed by deriving optical fields which satisfy both the acousto-optically driven wave equation and the electromagnetic boundary conditions. No restrictions are imposed concerning the angle of incidence of the light. Some representative computed Brillouin lineshapes are also presented and their features discussed. (Author) [pt

  14. Light scattering by surface phonons in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Theory of inelastic light scattering by surface acoustic phonons homogeneous crystals is presented. The Green functions are determined by the use of a classical linear response method and used to evaluate the Brillouin cross section. The acoustic modes are found from solutions to the acoustical-wave equation and boundary conditions appropriated. Two light-scattering mechanisms, amely the surface corrugation and bulk elasto-optic effect are analyzed by deriving optical fields which satisfy both the acousto-optically driven wave equation and the electromagnetic boundary conditions. No restrictions are imposed concerning the angle of incidence of the light. Some representative computed Brillouin ineshapes are also presented and their features discussed. (author) [pt

  15. Static and dynamic properties of multiple light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánek, Petr

    1993-11-01

    We have examined the onset and evolution of multiple scattering of light on a series of latex dispersions as a function of increasing volume concentration φ of particles. We have shown that using vertically polarized incident light, the static scattered intensity becomes progressively depolarized, with increasing φ. The polarization of scattered light is completely random in the limit of strong multiple scattering. The spectra of decay times of dynamic light scattering display a region of oligo scattering at intermediate φ where both the single and multiple scattering components can be dynamically identified. For φ≳0.03 the limit of diffusive transport of light is attained. The obtained results confirm that our earlier measurements of dynamic light scattering on systems exhibiting critical opalescence are not influenced by multiple light scattering.

  16. Light scattering measurement of sodium polyacrylate products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David; Boone, Steven; Massie-Boyer, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    In the presentation, we will describe the use of a multi-detector HPLC incorporating the DAWN EOS multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector to measure the properties such as molecular weight, RMS radius, contour and persistence length and polydispersity of sodium polyacrylate products. The samples of sodium polyacrylate are used in various industries as thickening agents, coating dispersants, artificial snow, laundry detergent and disposable diapers. Data and results obtained from the experiment will be presented.

  17. LIGHT SCATTERING FROM EXOPLANET OCEANS AND ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zugger, M. E.; Kane, T. J.; Kasting, J. F.; Williams, D. M.; Philbrick, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Orbital variation in reflected starlight from exoplanets could eventually be used to detect surface oceans. Exoplanets with rough surfaces, or dominated by atmospheric Rayleigh scattering, should reach peak brightness in full phase, orbital longitude (OL) = 180 0 , whereas ocean planets with transparent atmospheres should reach peak brightness in crescent phase near OL = 30 0 . Application of Fresnel theory to a planet with no atmosphere covered by a calm ocean predicts a peak polarization fraction of 1 at OL = 74 0 ; however, our model shows that clouds, wind-driven waves, aerosols, absorption, and Rayleigh scattering in the atmosphere and within the water column dilute the polarization fraction and shift the peak to other OLs. Observing at longer wavelengths reduces the obfuscation of the water polarization signature by Rayleigh scattering but does not mitigate the other effects. Planets with thick Rayleigh scattering atmospheres reach peak polarization near OL = 90 0 , but clouds and Lambertian surface scattering dilute and shift this peak to smaller OL. A shifted Rayleigh peak might be mistaken for a water signature unless data from multiple wavelength bands are available. Our calculations suggest that polarization alone may not positively identify the presence of an ocean under an Earth-like atmosphere; however, polarization adds another dimension which can be used, in combination with unpolarized orbital light curves and contrast ratios, to detect extrasolar oceans, atmospheric water aerosols, and water clouds. Additionally, the presence and direction of the polarization vector could be used to determine planet association with the star, and constrain orbit inclination.

  18. Dynamic light scattering optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Jiang, James Y; Zhu, Bo; Boas, David A

    2012-09-24

    We introduce an integration of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high-resolution 3D imaging of heterogeneous diffusion and flow. DLS analyzes fluctuations in light scattered by particles to measure diffusion or flow of the particles, and OCT uses coherence gating to collect light only scattered from a small volume for high-resolution structural imaging. Therefore, the integration of DLS and OCT enables high-resolution 3D imaging of diffusion and flow. We derived a theory under the assumption that static and moving particles are mixed within the OCT resolution volume and the moving particles can exhibit either diffusive or translational motion. Based on this theory, we developed a fitting algorithm to estimate dynamic parameters including the axial and transverse velocities and the diffusion coefficient. We validated DLS-OCT measurements of diffusion and flow through numerical simulations and phantom experiments. As an example application, we performed DLS-OCT imaging of the living animal brain, resulting in 3D maps of the absolute and axial velocities, the diffusion coefficient, and the coefficient of determination.

  19. ATLAS Event Display: Light-by-Light Scattering

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An event display of light-by-light scattering in ultra-peripheral lead+lead collisions at 5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The event 461251458 from run 287931 recorded on 13 December 2015 at 09:51:07 is shown. Two back-to-back photons with an invariant mass of 24 GeV with no additional activity in the detector are presented. All calorimeter cells with E>500 MeV are shown.

  20. The SAGA Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.; Okajima, S.; Setoyama, H.; Takabayashi, Y.; Tomimasu, T.; Yoshimura, D.; Ohgaki, H.

    2007-01-01

    Saga prefectural government operates a synchrotron light facility mainly for industrial applications of the synchrotron light. The facility comprises a 1.4 GeV storage ring, a 250 MeV linac as an electron injector and beamlines. The lattice of the storage ring is designed to perform as small emittance as 25 nm-radian and has long straight sections of 2.9 m length for installing insertion devices. Three beam lines have been prepared by Saga prefectural government and one by Saga University

  1. Point spread function due to multiple scattering of light in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pękala, J.; Wilczyński, H.

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric scattering of light has a significant influence on the results of optical observations of air showers. It causes attenuation of direct light from the shower, but also contributes a delayed signal to the observed light. The scattering of light therefore should be accounted for, both in simulations of air shower detection and reconstruction of observed events. In this work a Monte Carlo simulation of multiple scattering of light has been used to determine the contribution of the scattered light in observations of a point source of light. Results of the simulations and a parameterization of the angular distribution of the scattered light contribution to the observed signal (the point spread function) are presented. -- Author-Highlights: •Analysis of atmospheric scattering of light from an isotropic point source. •Different geometries and atmospheric conditions were investigated. •A parameterization of scattered light distribution has been developed. •The parameterization allows one to easily account for the light scattering in air. •The results will be useful in analyses of observations of extensive air shower

  2. Light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities based on hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with radiosity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Peng, Zhen; Wang, Xiaorui; Ripoll, Jorge; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling light propagation in the whole body is essential and necessary for optical imaging. However, non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption regions commonly exist in biological tissues, which lead to inaccuracy of the existing light transport models. In this paper, a novel hybrid light transport model that couples the simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN) with the radiosity theory (HSRM) was presented, to accurately describe light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities. In the model, the radiosity theory was used to characterize the light transport in non-scattering regions and the SPN was employed to handle the scattering problems, including subsets of low-scattering and high absorption. A Neumann source constructed by the light transport in the non-scattering region and formed at the interface between the non-scattering and scattering regions was superposed into the original light source, to couple the SPN with the radiosity theory. The accuracy and effectiveness of the HSRM was first verified with both regular and digital mouse model based simulations and a physical phantom based experiment. The feasibility and applicability of the HSRM was then investigated by a broad range of optical properties. Lastly, the influence of depth of the light source on the model was also discussed. Primary results showed that the proposed model provided high performance for light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities.

  3. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  4. Light Focusing through Scattering Media by Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Hui-Ling; Chen Zi-Yang; Sun Cun-Zhi; Liu Ji-Lin; Pu Ji-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate light focusing through scattering media by introducing particle swarm optimization for modulating the phase wavefront. Light refocusing is simulated numerically based on the angular spectrum method and the circular Gaussian distribution model of the scattering media. Experimentally, a spatial light modulator is used to control the phase of incident light, so as to make the scattered light converge to a focus. The influence of divided segments of input light and the effect of the number of iterations on light intensity enhancement are investigated. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical analysis for light refocusing. (paper)

  5. Magneto-optical light scattering from ferromagnetic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.U.; Armelles, G.; Martinez Boubeta, C.; Cebollada, A.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the optical and magneto-optical components of the light scattered by the surface of several Fe films with different morphologies. We present a method, based on the ratio between the optical and magneto-optical components of the scattered intensity, to discern the physical origin, either structural or magnetic corrugation, of the light scattered by these ferromagnetic surfaces. Surface versus bulk magnetic information can be separated by magneto-optical light scattering measurements, the scattered light being more sensitive to magnetization differences between surface and bulk than the reflected one

  6. How to distinguish elastically scattered light from Stokes shifted light for solid-state lighting?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meretska, Maryna; Lagendijk, Aart; Thyrrestrup Nielsen, Henri; Mosk, Allard; IJzerman, W.L.; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the transport of light through phosphor diffuser plates that are used in commercial solid-state lighting modules (Fortimo). These polymer plates contain YAG:Ce+3phosphor particles that both elastically scatter and Stokes shift light in the visible wavelength range (400–700 nm). We

  7. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  8. Time Dependence of Aerosol Light Scattering Downwind of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Wang, J.; Lewis, E. R.; Springston, S. R.; Chand, D.; Shilling, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Freedman, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Zhang, Q.; Yokelson, R. J.; Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    In the first phase of BBOP (Biomass Burn Observation Project), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study, wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest were sampled from the G-1 aircraft via sequences of transects that encountered emission whose age (time since emission) ranged from approximately 15 minutes to four hours. Comparisons between transects allowed us to determine the near-field time evolution of trace gases, aerosol particles, and optical properties. The fractional increase in aerosol concentration with plume age was typically less than a third of the fractional increase in light scattering. In some fires the increase in light scattering exceeded a factor of two. Two possible causes for the discrepancy between scattering and aerosol mass are i) the downwind formation of refractory tar balls that are not detected by the AMS and therefore contribute to scattering but not to aerosol mass and ii) changes to the aerosol size distribution. Both possibilities are considered. Our information on tar balls comes from an analysis of TEM grids. A direct determination of size changes is complicated by extremely high aerosol number concentrations that caused coincidence problems for the PCASP and UHSAS probes. We instead construct a set of plausible log normal size distributions and for each member of the set do Mie calculations to determine mass scattering efficiency (MSE), angstrom exponents, and backscatter ratios. Best fit size distributions are selected by comparison with observed data derived from multi-wavelength scattering measurements, an extrapolated FIMS size distribution, and mass measurements from an SP-AMS. MSE at 550 nm varies from a typical near source value of 2-3 to about 4 in aged air.

  9. Synchrotron light source data book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''Synchrotron Light Source Data Book'' is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-ray Data Booklet, edited by D. Vaughan (LBL PUB-490), address the 'use' of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in 'practical units' and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices

  10. Calibration and check light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejedla, B; Krotil, J

    1979-02-15

    The light source is designed for calibrating photomultipliers and checking the function of the thermoluminescent dosemeters evaluation equipment. The check light source consists of a polymer material-based (polyvinyl toluene) plastic scintillator and a 2-phenyl-5-(4-bisphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol and/or paraterphenyl activator, and of emission spectrum shifters for response in the green and the blue light regions. The plastic scintillator is sealed in a case to whose bottom a radiation source is fixed, such as a /sup 90/Sr-/sup 90/Y source of an activity of 1.85x10/sup 3/s/sup -1/ to 0.74x10/sup 9/s/sup -1/.

  11. Light-by-light scattering and muon's anomalous magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauk, Vladyslav

    2014-01-01

    A study of hadron production by photons opens unique ways to address a number of fundamental problems in strong interaction physics as well as fundamental questions in Quantum Field Theory. In particular, an understanding of two-photon processes is of crucial importance for constraining the hadronic uncertainties in precision measurements and in searches for new physics. The process of γ * γ * fusion (by quasi-real photons γ or virtual photons γ * ) into leptons and hadrons has been observed and studied in detail at nearly all high-energy colliders. From the theoretical point of view two-photon processes are very complicated. One of approaches which may be efficiently used to study non-perturbative features of two-photon production is based on a dispersion theory. Using general properties of relativistic quantum field theory we relate in this work the forward light-by-light scattering to energy weighted integrals of the γ * γ fusion cross sections. The first type of new relations derived in this work have the form of exact super-convergence sum rules. The second type involves the effective constants of the low-energy photon-photon interaction and allow to define them in terms of two-photon production cross sections. We subsequently test and verify these sum rules exactly at tree and one-loop level in scalar and spinor QED. Furthermore, we test the criterium of the tree-level unitarity imposed by the sum rules on the example of the massive spin-1 QED. Next, we apply the sum rules for the forward light-by-light scattering process within the context of the φ 4 quantum field theory. Within this theory, we present a stringent causality criterion and apply it to a particular non-perturbative resummation of graphs. Applied to the γ * γ production of mesons, the superconvergence sum rules lead to intricate relations between theγγ decay widths and the γ * γ transition form factors for (pseudo-) scalar, axial-vector and tensor mesons. We discuss the

  12. The generalized multipole technique for light scattering recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, Yuri

    2018-01-01

    This book presents the Generalized Multipole Technique as a fast and powerful theoretical and computation tool to simulate light scattering by nonspherical particles. It also demonstrates the considerable potential of the method. In recent years, the concept has been applied in new fields, such as simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy and has been used to extend other methods, like the null-field method, making it more widely applicable. The authors discuss particular implementations of the GMT methods, such as the Discrete Sources Method (DSM), Multiple Multipole Program (MMP), the Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS), the Filamentary Current Method (FCM), the Method of Fictitious Sources (MFS) and the Null-Field Method with Discrete Sources (NFM-DS). The Generalized Multipole Technique is a surface-based method to find the solution of a boundary-value problem for a given differential equation by expanding the fields in terms of fundamental or other singular solutions of this equation. The amplitudes ...

  13. Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD algorithms with CPML absorbing boundary conditions for light scattering by aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Fu, Qiang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2013-01-01

    As fundamental parameters for polarized-radiative-transfer calculations, the single-scattering phase matrix of irregularly shaped aerosol particles must be accurately modeled. In this study, a scattered-field finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model and a scattered-field pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) model are developed for light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric aerosols. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. It is found that the PSTD method is generally more accurate than the FDTD in calculation of the single-scattering properties given similar spatial cell sizes. Since the PSTD can use a coarser grid for large particles, it can lower the memory requirement in the calculation. However, the Fourier transformations in the PSTD need significantly more CPU time than simple subtractions in the FDTD, and the fast Fourier transform requires a power of 2 elements in calculations, thus using the PSTD could not significantly reduce the CPU time required in the numerical modeling. Furthermore, because the scattered-field FDTD/PSTD equations include incident-wave source terms, the FDTD/PSTD model allows for the inclusion of an arbitrarily incident wave source, including a plane parallel wave or a Gaussian beam like those emitted by lasers usually used in laboratory particle characterizations, etc. The scattered-field FDTD and PSTD light-scattering models can be used to calculate single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped aerosol particles over broad size and wavelength ranges. -- Highlights: • Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD models are developed for light scattering by aerosols. • Convolutional perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition is used. • PSTD is generally more accurate than FDTD in calculating single-scattering properties. • Using same spatial resolution, PSTD requires much larger CPU time than FDTD

  14. Hyperspectral microscopy to identify foodborne bacteria with optimum lighting source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral microscopy is an emerging technology for rapid detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Since scattering spectral signatures from hyperspectral microscopic images (HMI) vary with lighting sources, it is important to select optimal lights. The objective of this study is to compare t...

  15. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  16. Positron Production in Multiphoton Light-by-Light Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffas, Thomas

    2003-07-28

    We present the results of an experimental study on e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production during the collision of a low emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam with terawatt laser pulses from a Nd:glass laser at 527 nm wavelength and with linear polarization. The experiment was conducted at the Final Focus Test Beam facility in the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results with a 49.1 GeV electron beam are also included. A signal of 106 {+-} 14 positrons for the 46.6 GeV electron beam case and of 22 {+-} 10 positrons for the 49.1 GcV case above background, has been detected. We interpret the positrons as the products of a two-step process during which laser photons are backscattered to high energy gamma photons that absorb in their turn several laser photons in order to produce a e{sup +}e{sup -} pair. The data compare well with the existing theoretical models. This is the first observation in the laboratory of inelastic Light-by-Light scattering with only real photons. Alternatively, the data are interpreted as a manifestation of the spontaneous breakdown of the vacuum under the influence of an intense external alternating electric field.

  17. Light scattering of thin azobenzene side-chain polyester layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerekes, Á.; Lörincz, E.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    Light scattering properties of liquid crystalline and amorphous azobenzene side-chain polyester layers used for optical data storage were examined by means of transmissive scatterometry. Comparative experiments show that the amorphous polyester has significantly lower light scattering...... characteristics than the liquid crystalline polyester. The amorphous samples have negligible polarization part orthogonal to the incident beam. the liquid crystalline samples have relative high orthogonal polarization part in light scattering, The light scattering results can be used to give a lower limit...... for the domain size in thin liquid crystalline polyester layers being responsible for the dominant light scattering. The characteristic domain Sizes obtained from the Fourier transformation of polarization microscopic Pictures confirm these values....

  18. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  19. Photon Science at Modern Light Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, John

    2009-12-01

    More than 50 large x-ray and UV light sources based on high-energy electron accelerators are in operation around the world, serving a scientific community numbering in the tens of thousands. These sources generate synchrotron radiation from accelerated electrons or positrons. The development of synchrotron light sources over the last 40 years has fueled an exponential increase in x-ray source brightness of more than 10 orders of magnitude. The next large advance in source potential is now underway, with the commissioning of the first x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) sources. Using high-energy electron linear accelerators, these facilities produce sub-picosecond pulses of hard x-rays with peak brightness more than 10 orders of magnitude greater than current synchrotron facilities. FEL x-ray facilities will soon be operational in the US, Japan, and Germany. Research at modern light sources makes use of a wide range of experimental techniques. Many experiments are designed to study the structure of matter at the atomic scale using elastic x-ray scattering. This technique has been particularly effective for determining the structures of biological molecules, such as proteins, viruses, and drugs. Inelastic x-ray scattering, or x-ray absorption followed by emission of electrons or photons, can give information about the electronic structures of atoms, which can be used to deduce local environment information such as atomic species, bonding state, geometry of neighboring atoms, or magnetic state. For some techniques involving x-ray emission from a sample, cryogenic detectors with energy resolution at the ˜10 eV level or better would be very helpful. Shifts in electron energy levels associated with bonding states and magnetic states are typically several eV, while the energy structure associated with Compton inelastic scattering is typically in the range of a few tens of eV. Current energy-resolving detectors used at synchrotron light sources are hampered by either poor

  20. Evaluation of aggregate stability of Haplic Stagnosols using dynamic light scattering, phase analysis light scattering and color coordinates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Artemyeva, Z.; Žigová, Anna; Kirillova, N.; Šťastný, Martin; Holubík, O.; Podrázský, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 13 (2017), s. 1838-1851 ISSN 0365-0340 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : land use * aggregate stability * organo-clay complexes * dynamic light scattering * phase analysis light scattering * color coordinates Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science OBOR OECD: Soil science Impact factor: 2.137, year: 2016

  1. Light scattering in plane dielectric layers: Modeling in the 2d reciprocal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, Alexey A.; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.

    2012-01-01

    The generalized source method previously developed for the light diffraction calculation on periodic dielectric structures is applied for the light scattering calculation in non-periodic planar media. This significantly enlarges the domain of applicability of Fourier-methods in light scattering modeling since the generalized source method is of much less numerical complexity than other rigorous methods used. -- Highlights: ► Method for light scattering simulation in planar layers. ► The approach is fairly independent of scattering particles’ shape. ► The method is based on the rigorous solution of Maxwell's equations. ► Each calculation stage allows the accuracy control by the convergence monitoring. ► Possibility to consider any practically possible dielectric materials.

  2. An analysis of scattered light in low dispersion IUE spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, G.; Clarke, J. T.; Haisch, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of light scattering from the low-resolution grating in the short wavelength spectrograph of the IUE Observatory was developed, in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of scattering on both continuum and line emission spectra. It is found that: (1) the redistribution of light by grating scattering did not appreciably alter either the shape or the absolute flux level of continuum spectra for A-F stars; (2) late-type stellar continua showed a tendency to flatten when observed in scattered light toward the shorter wavelengths; and (3) the effect of grating scattering on emission lines is to decrease measured line intensities by an increasing percentage toward the shorter wavelengths. The spectra obtained from scattering experiments for solar-type and late type stars are reproduced in graphic form.

  3. Absorption and scattering of light by small particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bohren, Craig F

    1983-01-01

    Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles. Treating absorption and scattering in equal measure, this self-contained, interdisciplinary study examines and illustrates how small particles absorb and scatter light. The authors emphasize that any discussion of the optical behavior of small particles is inseparable from a full understanding of the optical behavior of the parent material-bulk matter. To divorce one concept from the other is to render any study on scattering theory seriously incomplete. Special features and important topics covered in this book include:. * Classical theor

  4. Light scattering by nonspherical particles theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Travis, Larry D

    1999-01-01

    There is hardly a field of science or engineering that does not have some interest in light scattering by small particles. For example, this subject is important to climatology because the energy budget for the Earth's atmosphere is strongly affected by scattering of solar radiation by cloud and aerosol particles, and the whole discipline of remote sensing relies largely on analyzing the parameters of radiation scattered by aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The scattering of light by spherical particles can be easily computed using the conventional Mie theory. However, most small solid part

  5. Pion scattering from very light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, B.

    1993-01-01

    Selected recent elastic and inelastic pion-scattering experiments on 3 H, 3 He, and 4 He will be reviewed. Particular attention will be given to multinucleon or cluster aspects of the data, and to possible comparisons with electron-scattering results. From elastic scattering from 3 H and 3 He at forward angles, one can extract the matter distribution of the paired neutrons in 3 H as well as that of the paired protons in 3 He. At backward angles, scattering from correlated nucleon pairs and/or two-step processes play an important role. For inelastic scattering, the momentum-transfer dependence of the cross section varies strongly with incident energy. Elastic scattering from a polarized 3 He target shows a strong asymmetry near 90 degrees. Elastic scattering from 4 He yields results which cannot be fitted with a simple optical model. An for inelastic scattering from 4 He, analysis of the data requires an important contribution from direct triton knockout

  6. Aspects of a new light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source, under construction at Brookhaven Laboratory, will be a uniquely copious source of x-ray and ultraviolet photons with a wide spectrum. Some of the potential uses of this intense radiation include studies of absorption spectra, photoemission of electrons, x-ray scattering, biochemical studies and other areas of basic research. It can also be used for micro-lithography of integrated circuits for ultra dense semiconductor devices. The basic operation of the electron synchrotron is described. This includes the three step acceleration of the electrons thru a linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron and finally in a synchrotron storage ring. The synchrotron magnet power system, the responsibility of a black engineer, is described. An SCR chopper approach is used with precision components to achieve current stability and repeatability of .01%. This current generates the magnetic fields which bend and focus the electron beam

  7. Aspects of a new light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source, under construction at Brookhaven Laboratory, will be a uniquely copious source of x-ray and ultraviolet photons with a wide spectrum. Some of the potential uses of this intense radiation include studies of absorption spectra, photo-emission of electrons, x-ray scattering, biochemical studies and other areas of basic research. It can also be used for micro-lithography of integrated circuits for ultra dense semiconductor devices. The basic operation of the electron synchrotron is described. This includes the three step acceleration of the electrons through a linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron and finally in a synchrotron storage ring. The synchrotron magnet power system, the responsibility of a black engineer, is described. An SCR chopper approach is used with precision components to achieve current stability and repeatability of 0.01 percent. This current generates the magnetic fields which bend and focus the electron beam

  8. Light scattering by particles in water theoretical and experimental foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasz, Miroslaw

    2007-01-01

    Light scattering-based methods are used to characterize small particles suspended in water in a wide range of disciplines ranging from oceanography, through medicine, to industry. The scope and accuracy of these methods steadily increases with the progress in light scattering research. This book focuses on the theoretical and experimental foundations of the study and modeling of light scattering by particles in water and critically evaluates the key constraints of light scattering models. It begins with a brief review of the relevant theoretical fundamentals of the interaction of light with condensed matter, followed by an extended discussion of the basic optical properties of pure water and seawater and the physical principles that explain them. The book continues with a discussion of key optical features of the pure water/seawater and the most common components of natural waters. In order to clarify and put in focus some of the basic physical principles and most important features of the experimental data o...

  9. Iranian Light Source Facility, A third generation light source laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rahighi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF project is the first large scale accelerator facility which is currently under planning in Iran. On the basis of the present design, circumference of the 3 GeV storage ring is 528 m. Beam current and natural beam emittance are 400 mA and 0.477 nm.rad, respectively. Some prototype accelerator components such as high power solid state radio frequency amplifiers, low level RF system, thermionic RF gun, H-type dipole and quadruple magnets, magnetic measurement laboratory and highly stable magnet power supplies have been constructed at ILSF R&D laboratory

  10. Time-slicing subsystem of the biology small-angle x-ray scattering station at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1985-11-01

    The time-slicing subsystem of the Biology Small-Angle X-ray Scattering divides the time period during which the data for small-angle x-ray diffraction patterns from biological samples is collected into time slices (or frames). The subsystem, being part of a multiprocessor experiment control and data acquisition system, has its own dedicated processor; it also has special-purpose front-end electronics sufficient to generate the gating and other control signals required to produce a sequence of as many as 256 time slices, measured with a basic time unit of 1 μsec. The electronics also synchronizes with execution of the time slice sequence the application of stimuli to the biological sample, the measurement of voltages generated by the sample, and the application of auxiliary device trigger pulses and routes detector data and auxiliary scaler data into appropriate time-slice-indexed buffers in a large external data memory array. The structure of the entire experiment control and data acquisition system is briefly reviewed. Details of the structure and operation of the time slice subsystem are presented. 7 refs., 5 figs

  11. Light Scattering by Optically Soft Particles Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Subodh K

    2006-01-01

    The present monograph deals with a particular class of approximation methods in the context of light scattering by small particles. This class of approximations has been termed as eikonal or soft particle approximations. The eikonal approximation was studied extensively in the potential scattering and then adopted in optical scattering problems. In this context, the eikonal and other soft particle approximations pertain to scatterers whose relative refractive index compared to surrounding medium is close to unity. The study of these approximations is very important because soft particles occur abundantly in nature. For example, the particles that occur in ocean optics, biomedical optics, atmospheric optics and in many industrial applications can be classified as soft particles. This book was written in recognition of the long-standing and current interest in the field of scattering approximations for soft particles. It should prove to be a useful addition for researchers in the field of light scattering.

  12. Focusing of light energy inside a scattering medium by controlling the time-gated multiple light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seungwon; Lee, Ye-Ryoung; Choi, Wonjun; Kang, Sungsam; Hong, Jin Hee; Park, Jin-Sung; Lim, Yong-Sik; Park, Hong-Gyu; Choi, Wonshik

    2018-05-01

    The efficient delivery of light energy is a prerequisite for the non-invasive imaging and stimulating of target objects embedded deep within a scattering medium. However, the injected waves experience random diffusion by multiple light scattering, and only a small fraction reaches the target object. Here, we present a method to counteract wave diffusion and to focus multiple-scattered waves at the deeply embedded target. To realize this, we experimentally inject light into the reflection eigenchannels of a specific flight time to preferably enhance the intensity of those multiple-scattered waves that have interacted with the target object. For targets that are too deep to be visible by optical imaging, we demonstrate a more than tenfold enhancement in light energy delivery in comparison with ordinary wave diffusion cases. This work will lay a foundation to enhance the working depth of imaging, sensing and light stimulation.

  13. Optical fibre probes in the measurement of scattered light ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... light reflected/scattered/fluoresced from the sample containing the .... Turbidity of water, for example, is determined by the amount of particulate matter such as soil, sand, ... These packets take random steps whose step size.

  14. Light scattering from polymer solutions and nanoparticle dispersions

    CERN Document Server

    Schärtl, Wolfgang; Janca, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Light scattering is a very powerful method to characterize the structure of polymers and nanoparticles in solution. Recent technical developments have strongly enhanced the possible applications of this technique, overcoming previous limitations like sample turbidity or insufficient experimental time scales. However, despite their importance, these new developments have not yet been presented in a comprehensive form. In addition, and maybe even more important to the broad audience, there lacks a simple-to-read textbook for students and non-experts interested in the basic principles and fundamental techniques of light scattering. As part of the Springer Laboratory series, this book tries not only to provide such a simple-to-read and illustrative textbook about the seemingly very complicated topic of light scattering from polymers and nanoparticles in dilute solution, but also intends to cover some of the newest technical developments in experimental light scattering.

  15. Propagation and scattering of light in fluctuating media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz'min, V. L.; Romanov, V. P.; Zubkov, L. A.

    1994-11-01

    The monograph deals with the problems of the propagation and scattering of light in molecular media. The explicit statistical mechanical averaging procedure for the equations of electrodynamics is developed. It permits to transform the molecular level description into the macroscopic one for the electrodynamics of the fluctuating media. In the framework of such an approach, the problems of the molecular correlation contribution into the dielectric permeability, of the calculation of the reflection coefficients with an account of surface layers and of the multiple light scattering are considered. The developed theory is applied to the description of the critical opalescence, the coherent backscattering enhancement, the light scattering depolarization phenomena and the propagation and scattering of light in anisotropic media, including the case of liquid crystals.

  16. Light Scattering Spectroscopies of Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Peter Y; Gardner, Grat; Nozaki, Shinji; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    We review the study of nanocrystals or quantum dots using inelastic light scattering spectroscopies. In particular recent calculations of the phonon density of states and low frequency Raman spectra in Ge nanocrystals are presented for comparison with experimental results

  17. Statistical properties of laser light scattering in Brownian medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwono; Santoso, Budi; Baiquni, A.

    1983-01-01

    Relationship between statistical properties of laser light scattering in Brownian medium and photon-counting distributions are described in detail. A coherence optical detection has been constructed and by using photon-counting technique the ensemble distribution of the scattered field within space and time coherence has been measured. Good agreement between theory and experiment is shown. (author)

  18. Surface magnetism studied by polarized light emission after He+ scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manske, J; Dirska, M; Lubinski, G; Schleberger, M; Narmann, A; Hoekstra, R

    Surface magnetism is studied by means of an ion beam of low energy (2-15 keV) scattered off the surface under grazing incidence conditions. During the scattering, a small fraction of the ions is neutralized into excited states which decay subsequently by light emission. The circular polarization of

  19. Design of fiber optic probes for laser light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Chu, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the role of optical fibers in laser light scattering. Design of a general fiber optic/microlens probe by means of ray tracing is described. Several different geometries employing an optical fiber of the type used in lightwave communications and a graded index microlens are considered. Experimental results using a nonimaging fiber optic detector probe show that due to geometrical limitations of single mode fibers, a probe using a multimode optical fiber has better performance, for both static and dynamic measurements of the scattered light intensity, compared with a probe using a single mode fiber. Fiber optic detector probes are shown to be more efficient at data collection when compared with conventional approaches to measurements of the scattered laser light. Integration of fiber optic detector probes into a fiber optic spectrometer offers considerable miniaturization of conventional light scattering spectrometers, which can be made arbitrarily small. In addition static and dynamic measurements of scattered light can be made within the scattering cell and consequently very close to the scattering center.

  20. The synchrotron light source ROSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einfeld, D.; Buettig, H.; Dienel, S.; Glaeser, W.; Goetz, T.; Guratzsch, H.; Hartmann, B.; Janssen, D.; Krug, H.; Linnemann, J.; Matz, W.; Murphy, J.B.; Neumann, W.; Oehme, W.; Picard, M.; Plesko, M.; Proehl, D.; Schlenk, R.; Tomassini, D.; Tyrroff, H.

    1994-01-01

    ROSY, a 3rd generation synchrotron light source, has been proposed to be built at the Research Center Rossendorf/Dresden in Germany. With its low emittance and optimized space for installing insertion devices ROSY will be the first synchrotron radiation source in the 3 GeV range in Europe, dedicated to materials research and industrial application. The critical wavelength of the synchrotron radiation spectra was designed to be 0.15 nm corresponding to a critical photon energy of 8.4 keV. It is proposed to use a ''modified multiple bend achromat'' (MBA) lattice in order to get a compact machine as well as a low emittance. For 3 GeV an emittance smaller than 30π nm rad can be obtained. With a fourfold symmetry and two larger straight sections within the achromatic arcs the circumference is 148 m. 23% of the circumference can be used for installing insertion devices. (orig.)

  1. Intermediate energy proton and light-ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of recent (1979-81) developments in the field of intermediate-energy proton and light-ion scattering from nuclei. New theoretical and calculational techniques of particular interest to experimentalists are discussed. Emphasis is placed on topics in nuclear structure physics - giant resonances, pion-condensation precursor phenomena, and polarization transfer (spin-flip) experiments - where intermediate energy proton and light-ion scattering has made new and unique contributions

  2. Scattering of light at the growing solid-melt interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontijo, I.

    1987-12-01

    The scattering of light at the growing solid-melt interface of biphenyl and naphthalene was studied using the Photon Correlation Spectroscopy technique. The origin of this light scattering remained without a satisfactory explanation since its discovery at the ice-water interface in 1978. Recently, a model based on the segregation of gaseous impurities at the interface and subsequent precipitation of microbubbles was proposed to explain this phenomenon. We report here the first experimental results that confirm the microbbubles hypothesis. (author)

  3. Synthesis of aerogel tiles with high light scattering length

    CERN Document Server

    Danilyuk, A F; Okunev, A G; Onuchin, A P; Shaurman, S A

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of aerogel tiles production for RICH detectors is described. Monolithic blocks of silica aerogel were synthesized by two-step sol-gel processing of tetraethoxysilane Si(OEt) sub 4 followed by high temperature supercritical drying with organic solvent. The important characteristic of aerogel is the light scattering length. In the wide range of refraction indexes the light scattering length exceeds 4 cm at 400 nm.

  4. High-angle scattering events strongly affect light collection in clinically relevant measurement geometries for light transport through tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canpolat, M.; Mourant, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of light transport in tissue has the potential to be an inexpensive and practical tool for non-invasive tissue diagnosis in medical applications because it can provide information on both morphological and biochemical properties. To capitalize on the potential of light transport as a diagnostic tool, an understanding of what information can be gleaned from light transport measurements is needed. We present data concerning the sensitivity of light transport measurements, made in clinically relevant geometries, to scattering properties. The intensity of the backscattered light at small source-detector separations is shown to be sensitive to the phase function, and furthermore the collected light intensity is found to be correlated with the amount of high-angle scattering in the medium. (author)

  5. Light Sources and Ballast Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Sakai, Makoto; Yasuda, Takeo; Maehara, Akiyoshi; Okada, Atsunori; Gouriki, Takeshi; Mannami, Tomoaki

    discharge models were reported. Further, studies on ultra high-pressure mercury lamps as light sources for projectors are becoming the mainstream of HID lamp related researches. For high-pressure sodium lamps, many studies on plant growing and pest control utilizing low insect attracting aspects were also reported in 2006. Additionally, for discharge lamps, the minimum sustaining electric power for arc tubes employed in electrode-less compact fluorescent lamps was investigated. For Hg-free rare-gas fluorescent lamps, a luminance of 10,000cd/m2 was attained by a 1 meter-long external duplex spiral electrode prototype using Xe/Ne barrier discharge. As to startup circuits, the commercialization of energy saving and high value added products mainly associated with fluorescent lamps and HID lamps are becoming common. Further, the miniaturization of startup circuits for self electronic-ballasted lamps has advanced. Speaking of the overall light sources and startup circuits in 2006 and with the enforcement of RoHS in Europe in July, the momentum toward hazardous substance-free and energy saving initiatives has been enhanced from the perspective of protecting the global environment. It is anticipated that similar restrictions will be globally enforced in the future.

  6. Application of light scattering to coatings a user's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Diebold, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The book begins with the fundamentals of light scattering, first by individual particles, then by small groups of particles, and finally by the trillions of particles present in a real-life paint film. From there, Dr. Diebold focuses on application of these fundamentals to paint formulation. The scope includes both theory and practice with an emphasis on application (from both performance and cost standpoints). The book gives a clear understanding of light scattering principles and application of these principles to paint formulation (with a focus on TiO2 - the strongest scattering material a

  7. Effects of temperature and salinity on light scattering by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Lianbo

    2010-04-01

    A theoretical model on light scattering by water was developed from the thermodynamic principles and was used to evaluate the effects of temperature and salinity. The results agreed with the measurements by Morel within 1%. The scattering increases with salinity in a non-linear manner and the empirical linear model underestimate the scattering by seawater for S < 40 psu. Seawater also exhibits an 'anomalous' scattering behavior with a minimum occurring at 24.64 °C for pure water and this minimum increases with the salinity, reaching 27.49 °C at 40 psu.

  8. Interactive directional subsurface scattering and transport of emergent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Mosegaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    need to store elements of irradiance from specific directions. To include changes in subsurface scattering due to changes in the direction of the incident light, we instead sample incident radiance and store scattered radiosity. This enables us to accommodate not only the common distance....... To build our maps of scattered radiosity, we progressively render the model from different directions using an importance sampling pattern based on the optical properties of the material. We obtain interactive frame rates, our subsurface scattering results are close to ground truth, and our technique...

  9. Magnon and phonon thermometry with inelastic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Kevin S.; An, Kyongmo; Li, Xiaoqin

    2018-04-01

    Spin caloritronics investigates the interplay between the transport of spin and heat. In the spin Seebeck effect, a thermal gradient across a magnetic material generates a spin current. A temperature difference between the energy carriers of the spin and lattice subsystems, namely the magnons and phonons, is necessary for such thermal nonequilibrium generation of spin current. Inelastic light scattering is a powerful method that can resolve the individual temperatures of magnons and phonons. In this review, we discuss the thermometry capabilities of inelastic light scattering for measuring optical and acoustic phonons, as well as magnons. A scattering spectrum offers three temperature sensitive parameters: frequency shift, linewidth, and integrated intensity. We discuss the temperatures measured via each of these parameters for both phonon and magnons. Finally, we discuss inelastic light scattering experiments that have examined the magnon and phonon temperatures in thermal nonequilibrium which are particularly relevant to spin caloritronic phenomena.

  10. ANGULAR LIGHT-SCATTERING STUDIES ON ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotterer, Gerald S.; Thompson, Thomas E.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1961-01-01

    Angular light-scattering studies have been carried out on suspensions of isolated rat liver mitochondria. The angular scatter pattern has a large forward component, typical of large particles. Changes in dissymmetry and in the intensity of light scattered at 90° have been correlated with changes in optical density during the course of mitochondrial swelling and contraction. Such changes can be measured at mitochondrial concentrations much below those required for optical density measurements. Changes in mitochondrial geometry caused by factors "leaking" from mitochondria, not detectable by optical density measurements, have been demonstrated by measuring changes in dissymmetry. Angular light-scattering measurements therefore offer the advantages of increased sensitivity and of added indices of changes in mitochondrial conformation. PMID:19866589

  11. Single particle analysis with a 3600 light scattering photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholdi, M.F.

    1979-06-01

    Light scattering by single spherical homogeneous particles in the diameter range 1 to 20 μm and relative refractive index 1.20 is measured. Particle size of narrowly dispersed populations is determined and a multi-modal dispersion of five components is completely analyzed. A 360 0 light scattering photometer for analysis of single particles has been designed and developed. A fluid stream containing single particles intersects a focused laser beam at the primary focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector ring. The light scattered at angles theta = 2.5 0 to 177.5 0 at phi = 0 0 and 180 0 is reflected onto a circular array of photodiodes. The ellipsoidal reflector is situated in a chamber filled with fluid matching that of the stream to minimize refracting and reflecting interfaces. The detector array consists of 60 photodiodes each subtending 3 0 in scattering angle on 6 0 centers around 360 0 . 32 measurements on individual particles can be acquired at rates of 500 particles per second. The intensity and angular distribution of light scattered by spherical particles are indicative of size and relative refractive index. Calculations, using Lorenz--Mie theory, of differential scattering patterns integrated over angle corresponding to the detector geometry determined the instrument response to particle size. From this the expected resolution and experimental procedures are determined.Ultimately, the photometer will be utilized for identification and discrimination of biological cells based on the sensitivity of light scattering to size, shape, refractive index differences, internal granularity, and other internal morphology. This study has demonstrated the utility of the photometer and indicates potential for application to light scattering studies of biological cells

  12. Australian synchrotron light source - (boomerang)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian National Synchrotron Light Source - (Boomerang) is to be installed at the Monash University in Victoria. This report provides some background to the proposed facility and discusses aspects of a prospective design. Recently, significant effort was devoted to refining the in principle design and a lattice providing an emittance od 18 nm rad was obtained with a distributed dispersion in the straight section of 0.29m. Exhaustive studies have been made of the economic benefits that would accrue to Australia to Australia following the installation of this facility. This design is a refinement of the design concept presented to the SRI -2000, Berlin (Boldeman, Einfeld et al), to the meeting of the 4th Asian Forum and the Preliminary Design Study presented to the Australian Synchrotron Research Program

  13. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Adamovics, J; Cheeseborough, J C; Chao, K S; Wuu, C S, E-mail: yx2010@columbia.ed

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS' optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  14. Imaging back scattered and near back scattered light in ignition scale plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, R.K.; Back, C.A.; Glenzer, S.H.; Moody, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostics have been developed and fielded at the Nova laser facility that image scattered light in the vicinity of the final laser focusing lens. The absolute calibration of optical components exposed to the target debris have been achieved by a combination of routine in situ calibration and maintenance. The scattering observed from plasmas relevant to ignition experiments indicates that light scattered just outside the lens can be larger than that collected by the lens, and is a significant factor in the energy balance when the f number is high

  15. Elastic and quasielastic scattering of light nuclei in the theory of multiple scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismatov, E.I.; Kuterbekov, K.A.; Dzhuraev, Sh.Kh.; Ehsaniyazov, Sh.P.; Zholdasova, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    In the work the calculation method for diffraction scattering amplitudes of light nuclei by heavy nuclei is developed. For A 1 A 2 -scattering effects of pair-, three-fold, and four-fold screenings are estimated. It is shown, that in amplitude calculations for A 1 A 2 elastic scattering it is enough come to nothing more than accounting of total screenings in the first order. Analysis of nucleus-nucleus scattering sensitive characteristics to choice of single-particle nuclear densities parametrization is carried out

  16. The Advanced Light Source Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benjamin; Hussain, Zahid; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

    2003-01-01

    The ALS, a third-generation synchrotron light source at Berkeley Lab, has been operating for almost a decade and is generating forefront science by exploiting the high brightness of a third-generation source in three areas: (1) high resolving power for spectroscopy; (2) high spatial resolution for microscopy and spectromicroscopy; and (3) high coherence for experiments such as speckle. However, the ALS was one of the first third-generation machines to be designed, and accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since its conception. As a result, its performance will inevitably be outstripped by newer, more advanced sources. To remain competitive and then set a new standard, the performance of the ALS, in particular its brightness, must be enhanced. Substantial improvements in brightness and current have always been feasible in principle, but they incur the penalty of a much reduced lifetime, which is totally unacceptable to our users. Significant brightness improvements can be realized in the core soft x-ray region by going to top-off operation, where injection would be quasi-continuous and the lifetime objections disappear. In top-off mode with higher average current, a reduced vertical emittance and beta function, and small-gap permanent-magnet or superconducting insertion devices, one to two orders of magnitude improvement in brightness can be had in the soft x-ray range. These improvements also extend the high energy range of the undulator radiation beyond the current limit of 2000 eV. Descriptions of the upgrade and the important new science achievable are presented

  17. Advanced Light Source control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source designed to provide ports for 60 beamlines. It uses a 50 MeV electron linac and 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron for injection into a 1--2 GeV storage ring. Interesting control problems are created because of the need for dynamic closed beam orbit control to eliminate interaction between the ring tuning requirements and to minimize orbit shifts due to ground vibrations. The extremely signal sensitive nature of the experiments requires special attention to the sources of electrical noise. These requirements have led to a control system design which emphasizes connectivity at the accelerator equipment end and a large I/O bandwidth for closed loop system response. Not overlooked are user friendliness, operator response time, modeling, and expert system provisions. Portable consoles are used for local operation of machine equipment. Our solution is a massively parallel system with >120 Mbits/sec I/O bandwidth and >1500 Mips computing power. At the equipment level connections are made using over 600 powerful Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC-s) mounted in 3U size Eurocard slots using fiber-optic cables between rack locations. In the control room, personal computers control and display all machine variables at a 10 Hz rate including the scope signals which are collected though the control system. Commercially available software and industry standards are used extensively. Particular attention is paid to reliability, maintainability and upgradeability. 10 refs., 11 figs

  18. Experimental light scattering by positionally-controlled small particles — Implications for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttilä, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Martikainen, J.; Markkanen, J.; Vaisanen, T.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Electromagnetic scattering is a fundamental physical process that allows inferring characteristics of an object studied remotely. This possibility is enhanced by obtaining the light-scattering response at multiple wavelengths and viewing geometries, i.e., by considering a wider range of the phase angle (the angle between the incident light and the light reflected from the object) in the experiment. Within the ERC Advanced Grant project SAEMPL (http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/107666_en.html) we have assembled an interdisciplinary group of scientists to develop a fully automated, 3D scatterometer that can measure scattered light at different wavelengths from small particulate samples. The setup comprises: (a) the PXI Express platform to synchronously record data from several photomultiplier tubes (PMTs); (b) a motorized rotation stage to precisely control the azimuthal angle of the PMTs around 360°; and (c) a versatile light source, whose wavelength, polarization, intensity, and beam shape can be precisely controlled. An acoustic levitator is used to hold the sample without touching it. The device is the first of its kind, since it measures controlled spectral angular scattering including all polarization effects, for an arbitrary object in the µm-cm size scale. It permits a nondestructive, disturbance-free measurement with control of the orientation and location of the scattering object. To demonstrate our approach we performed detailed measurements of light scattered by a Chelyabinsk LL5 chondrite particle, derived from the light-colored lithology sample of the meteorite. These measurements are cross-validated against the modeled light-scattering characteristics of the sample, i.e., the intensity and the degree of linear polarization of the reflected light, calculated with state-of-the-art electromagnetic techniques (see Muinonen et al., this meeting). We demonstrate a unique non-destructive approach to derive the optical properties of small grain samples

  19. Scattering of light by nonspherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, K.L.

    1985-12-01

    Methods of computing scattering by non-spherical particles are reviewed for the Mie theory, the Rayleigh-Gans approximation, the geometric optics method, the extended boundary condition method, the anamalous diffraction, the suppression of resonances, the statistical approach, the expansion of vector wave equations in spheroidal coordinates, and the semi-emperical theory of Pollack and Cuzzi. The results of computations for nonspherical particles are compared for prolate and oblate spheroids, homogeneous sphere with holes, rough particles made of stacked cylinders, irregular particles of various shapes, and particles of carbonaceous smokes. Conclusions are presented in the context of nuclear winter

  20. Light-scattering evolution from particles to regolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videen, Gorden; Muinonen, Karri

    2015-01-01

    The radiative-transfer coherent-backscattering (RT–CB) model is unique among light-scattering methodologies as it can be used to calculate accurate light-scattering properties of sparsely populated particle volumes with sizes ranging from subwavelength to infinity. We use the RT–CB model to examine the evolution of light-scattering properties as a volume of particles increases from wavelength-sized to several hundreds of wavelengths. We examine the evolution of light-scattering intensity phase function and polarization, as well as linear and circular polarization ratios. We confirm the expected trends for backscattering features to shift to smaller phase angles as the volume increases. In addition, we also see the amplitude of these features increases to some maximum for volumes having size parameters kR∼100, before decaying to less than half this amplitude as their volumes approach infinity. - Highlights: • We use the RT–CB method to examine how gross light-scattering properties evolve as particle size increases. • The transition from a wavelength-sized particle to a large particle is not monotonic. • Backscattering properties associated with the CB mechanism appear to have a peak value before decaying asymptotically

  1. Light scattering in additively colored alkali-halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakhbrot, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied is extinction in ultra-violet, visible and infrared spectrum ranges, caused by light scattering in additively colored KCl and KBr crystals. The crystals were prepared of the powder. The specimens were annealed in saturated potassium vapours: KBr - at 600-630 deg C, KCl - at 700 deg C. While investigating the spectra it is observed that the optical density of the specimens processed in such a regime is more than 2 in the ultraviolet and visible spectrum ranges at the 0.1-0.05 cm thickness of the specimens. In the infrared spectra the growth of the extinction coefficient with the wave length decrease is observed. The spectrum character shows IR radiation scattering by the defects in the crystal lattice. The attempt of determination of the scattering centres nature is taken. It is shown that the possible centres causing the light scattering observed can be colloid and quasicolloid centres in the additively colored materials

  2. EDITORIAL: LED light sources (light for the future) LED light sources (light for the future)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, N.

    2010-09-01

    comprehensive review of the different localization mechanisms and their implication for internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is proposed by Oliver and co-workers from Cambridge University. When discussing IQE in InGaN-based LEDs, the efficiency droop at high-current injection always emerges, which is a major concern for the future of SSL technology. Here, a collaborative work between Samsung and the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea) proves that a specific design of the active region can limit this detrimental effect. Once the issue of the IQE is solved, one still has to let the photons out of the chip. Matioli and Weisbuch from the University of California at Santa Barbara introduce the use of photonic crystals (PhCs) to improve light extraction efficiency. They describe different approaches to overcoming the main limitation of LEDs when implementing surface PhCs. The technology of SSL, and in particular of colour rendering, is tackled by Zukauskas et al who studied in detail different white light sources. They show that extreme colour-fidelity indices need to cover the entire spectrum, with a broad-band at 530-610 nm and a component beyond 610 nm. Then, the reliability of GaN-based LEDs is discussed in the paper of Meneghesso and co-workers. The authors consider the most important physical mechanisms that are (i) the degradation of the active layer of LEDs, (ii) the degradation of the package/phosphor system, (iii) the failure of GaN-based LEDs against electrostatic discharge. Finally, GaN LEDs on silicon developed in the group of Egawa at the Nagoya Institute of Technology are presented. This technology could allow a significant decrease in the fabrication cost of white LEDs.

  3. Rayleigh scattering under light-atom coherent interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Shimoda, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Semi-classical calculation of an oscillating dipole induced in a two-level atom indicates that spherical radiation from the dipole under coherent interaction, i.e., Rayleigh scattering, has a power level comparable to that of spontaneous emission resulting from an incoherent process. Whereas spontaneous emission is nearly isotropic and has random polarization generally, Rayleigh scattering is strongly anisotropic and polarized in association with incident light. In the case where Rabi frequen...

  4. A Theory of Exoplanet Transits with Light Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Tyler D., E-mail: tydrobin@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    Exoplanet transit spectroscopy enables the characterization of distant worlds, and will yield key results for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope . However, transit spectra models are often simplified, omitting potentially important processes like refraction and multiple scattering. While the former process has seen recent development, the effects of light multiple scattering on exoplanet transit spectra have received little attention. Here, we develop a detailed theory of exoplanet transit spectroscopy that extends to the full refracting and multiple scattering case. We explore the importance of scattering for planet-wide cloud layers, where the relevant parameters are the slant scattering optical depth, the scattering asymmetry parameter, and the angular size of the host star. The latter determines the size of the “target” for a photon that is back-mapped from an observer. We provide results that straightforwardly indicate the potential importance of multiple scattering for transit spectra. When the orbital distance is smaller than 10–20 times the stellar radius, multiple scattering effects for aerosols with asymmetry parameters larger than 0.8–0.9 can become significant. We provide examples of the impacts of cloud/haze multiple scattering on transit spectra of a hot Jupiter-like exoplanet. For cases with a forward and conservatively scattering cloud/haze, differences due to multiple scattering effects can exceed 200 ppm, but shrink to zero at wavelength ranges corresponding to strong gas absorption or when the slant optical depth of the cloud exceeds several tens. We conclude with a discussion of types of aerosols for which multiple scattering in transit spectra may be important.

  5. The ALS [Advanced Light Source]: A third generation light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-09-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in April 1993. Based on a low- emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 11 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers). Undulators will generate high- brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation; wigglers will extend the spectrum generated into the hard x-ray region, but at a lower brightness. Up to 48 bending-magnet ports will also be available. Engineering design has begun on a complement of three undulators with periods of 8.0, 5.0, and 3.9 cm that between them will cover the photon-energy range from 5.4 eV to 2.5 keV when the first, third, and fifth harmonics are used, as well as a wiggler with a critical energy of 3.1 keV. Undulator beam lines will be based on high-resolution spherical-grating monochromators. A Call for Proposals has been issued for those who wish to participate in the design, development, commissioning, and operation of the initial complement of ALS experimental facilities (insertion devices, beam lines, and experimental stations) as members of a participating research team. The deadline for receipt of proposals was August 15, 1989. Proposals are expected to reflect the Letters of Interest received from potential PRTs during the previous year. 6 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Light and neutron scattering study of strongly interacting ionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgio, V.; Corti, M.; Piazza, R.

    1989-01-01

    Dilute solutions of ionic micelles formed by biological glycolipids (gangliosides) have been investigated at various ionic strengths by static and dynamic light scaterring and by small-angle neutron scattering. The size and shape of the micelle is not appreciably affected by the added salt concentration in the range 0-100 mM NaCL. From the measured intensity of scattered light we derive the electric charge Z of the micelle by fitting the data to a theoretical calculation which uses a screened Coulomb potential for the intermicellar interaction, and the hypernetted chain approximation for the calculation of the radial distribution function. The correlation function derived from dynamic light scattering shows the long time contribution typical of concentrated polydisperse systems (author). 15 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Experimental light scattering by small particles in Amsterdam and Granada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volten H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on two light scattering instruments located in Amsterdam and Granada, respectively. These instruments enable measuring scattering matrices as functions of the scattering angle of collections of randomly orieneted irregular particles. In the past decades, the experimental setup located in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, has produced a significant amount of experimental data. Unfortunately, this setup was officially closed a couple of years ago. We also present a modernized descendant of the Dutch experimental setup recently constructed at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA in Granada, Spain. We give a brief description of the instruments, and present some representative results.

  8. Development of a circadian light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David B.; Ferguson, Ian T.

    2002-11-01

    Solid state lighting presents a new paradigm for lighting - controllability. Certain characteristics of the lighting environment can be manipulated, because of the possibility of using multiple LEDs of different emission wavelengths as the illumination source. This will provide a new, versatile, general illumination source due to the ability to vary the spectral power distribution. New effects beyond the visual may be achieved that are not possible with conventional light sources. Illumination has long been the primary function of lighting but as the lighting industry has matured the psychological aspects of lighting have been considered by designers; for example, choosing a particular lighting distribution or color variation in retail applications. The next step in the evolution of light is to consider the physiological effects of lighting that cause biological changes in a person within the environment. This work presents the development of a source that may have important bearing on this area of lighting. A circadian light source has been developed to provide an illumination source that works by modulating its correlated color temperature to mimic the changes in natural daylight through the day. In addition, this source can cause or control physiological effects for a person illuminated by it. The importance of this is seen in the human circadian rhythm's peak response corresponding to blue light at ~460 nm which corresponds to the primary spectral difference in increasing color temperature. The device works by adding blue light to a broadband source or mixing polychromatic light to mimic the variation of color temperature observed for the Planckian Locus on the CIE diagram. This device can have several applications including: a tool for researchers in this area, a general illumination lighting technology, and a light therapy device.

  9. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  10. Dynamic light scattering with applications to chemistry, biology, and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, Bruce J

    2000-01-01

    Lasers play an increasingly important role in a variety of detection techniques, making inelastic light scattering a tool of growing value in the investigation of dynamic and structural problems in chemistry, biology, and physics. Until the initial publication of this work, however, no monograph treated the principles behind current developments in the field.This volume presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles underlying laser light scattering, focusing on the time dependence of fluctuations in fluid systems; it also serves as an introduction to the theory of time correlation f

  11. How to distinguish scattered and absorbed light from re-emitted light for white LEDs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meretska, Maryna; Lagendijk, Aart; Thyrrestrup Nielsen, Henri; Mosk, Allard; IJzerman, Wilbert; Vos, Willem L.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the light transport through phosphor diffuser plates that are used in commercial solid-state lighting modules (Fortimo). These polymer plates contain YAG:Ce+3 phosphor particles that scatter, absorb and re-emit incident light in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm). To

  12. Overview of light sources powered by tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jian; Lei Jiarong; Liu Wenke

    2012-01-01

    Due to their long lifespan and stable intensity, light sources initiated by tritium instead of electricity or batteries are suitable for low level lighting applications. Therefore, tritium-based radioluminescent (RL) light sources are widely used in both military and civil applications. However, traditional tritium lights with the gas tube structure have several shortcomings: (1) the phosphors are opaque; (2) the glass tube is fragile and easily broken; and (3) the beta kinetic energy is attenuated due to the sorption by the gas; etc. As a result, further application of the tritium lights is limited. In this paper, the lighting mechanism and radiation safety of tritium-based RL light sources are briefly reviewed. Besides, the history and prospects of the development of tritium-based RL light source are discussed. Due to their long lifespan and stable intensity, light sources initiated by tritium instead of electricity or batteries are suitable for low level lighting applications. Therefore, tritium- based radioluminescent (RL) light sources are widely used in both military and civil applications. However, traditional tritium lights with the gas tube structure have several short- comings: (1) the phosphors are opaque; (2) the glass tube is fragile and easily broken; and (3) the beta kinetic energy is attenuated due to the sorption by the gas; etc. As a result, further application of the tritium lights is limited. In this paper, the lighting mechanism and radiation safety of tritium-based RL, light sources are briefly reviewed. Besides, the history and prospects of the development of tritium-based RL light source are discussed. (authors)

  13. Increasing the Brightness of Light Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Ling

    2006-01-01

    In modern illumination systems, compact size and high brightness are important features. Light recycling allows an increase of the spectral radiance (brightness) emitted by a light source for the price of reducing the total radiant power. Light recycling means returning part of the emitted light to the source where part of it will escape absorption. As a result, the output brightness can be increased in a restricted phase space, ...

  14. An empirical correction for moderate multiple scattering in super-heterodyne light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botin, Denis; Mapa, Ludmila Marotta; Schweinfurth, Holger; Sieber, Bastian; Wittenberg, Christopher; Palberg, Thomas

    2017-05-28

    Frequency domain super-heterodyne laser light scattering is utilized in a low angle integral measurement configuration to determine flow and diffusion in charged sphere suspensions showing moderate to strong multiple scattering. We introduce an empirical correction to subtract the multiple scattering background and isolate the singly scattered light. We demonstrate the excellent feasibility of this simple approach for turbid suspensions of transmittance T ≥ 0.4. We study the particle concentration dependence of the electro-kinetic mobility in low salt aqueous suspension over an extended concentration regime and observe a maximum at intermediate concentrations. We further use our scheme for measurements of the self-diffusion coefficients in the fluid samples in the absence or presence of shear, as well as in polycrystalline samples during crystallization and coarsening. We discuss the scope and limits of our approach as well as possible future applications.

  15. Shaping the light for the investigation of depth-extended scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, W.; Frenner, K.; Pedrini, G.; Singh, A. K.; Schindler, J.; Takeda, M.

    2018-02-01

    Scattering media are an ongoing challenge for all kind of imaging technologies including coherent and incoherent principles. Inspired by new approaches of computational imaging and supported by the availability of powerful computers, spatial light modulators, light sources and detectors, a variety of new methods ranging from holography to time-of-flight imaging, phase conjugation, phase recovery using iterative algorithms and correlation techniques have been introduced and applied to different types of objects. However, considering the obvious progress in this field, several problems are still matter of investigation and their solution could open new doors for the inspection and application of scattering media as well. In particular, these open questions include the possibility of extending the 2d-approach to the inspection of depth-extended objects, the direct use of a scattering media as a simple tool for imaging of complex objects and the improvement of coherent inspection techniques for the dimensional characterization of incoherently radiating spots embedded in scattering media. In this paper we show our recent findings in coping with these challenges. First we describe how to explore depth-extended objects by means of a scattering media. Afterwards, we extend this approach by implementing a new type of microscope making use of a simple scatter plate as a kind of flat and unconventional imaging lens. Finally, we introduce our shearing interferometer in combination with structured illumination for retrieving the axial position of fluorescent light emitting spots embedded in scattering media.

  16. BOOMERANG - the Australian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.W.; Garrett, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    A proposal has been prepared for the installation in Australia of a national high performance synchrotron light facility called Boomerang. The Boomerang proposal had its origin in the establishment of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) which was one of the seven Major National Research Facilities announced by the Federal Government in December 1995. The ASRP provides the opportunity and funding for Australian researchers to access international synchrotron facilities, specifically two consortia at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA and continued interaction with the Photon Factory at the KEK Laboratory in Japan. The ASRP was the successor to the Australian National Beamline Facility project (ANBF) which began in 1991 following the ASTEC inquiry titled 'Small Country - Big Science'. The Federal Government also provided funding for a Feasibility Study to determine the value of establishing an Australian-based synchrotron radiation facility. The Feasibility Study was completed in August 1998 and endorsed by the institutional members of the ASRP and the research community in general. The study concluded that, on the data available in Australia, there was a strong case for the installation of an Australian-based facility. The study considered several options for an Australian-based facility and recommended that these options and the data supporting the general conclusions receive further investigation. A mission was arranged to a select group of overseas laboratories to explore these questions in detail. The review team included a mix of scientific and industrial experience and also represented the interests of the ASRP and an Industrial Synchrotron Consortium based in Victoria. Based on the conclusions of the overseas mission and incorporating the advice of all international specialists in the design and use of synchrotron facilities consulted during the mission, the most cost-effective option was an extended

  17. Radioisotope-powered light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haff, K.W.; Case, F.N.; Tompkins, J.A.; Remini, W.C.

    1981-11-01

    Significant progress has been made in the past year to improve the geometry of 85 Kr-powered lights, making it possible to acquire the lights from a greater distance than was previously possible. This paper is an update and current status report on the work being done and the improvements made in both 85 Kr and tritium lights since the report made by F.N. Case and W.C. Remini at the November 1980 IES meeting

  18. Continuous-wave spatial quantum correlations of light induced by multiple scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Huck, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    and reflectance. Utilizing frequency-resolved quantum noise measurements, we observe that the strength of the spatial quantum correlation function can be controlled by changing the quantum state of an incident bright squeezed-light source. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with the developed......We present theoretical and experimental results on spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light. A continuous-mode quantum theory is derived that enables determining the spatial quantum correlation function from the fluctuations of the total transmittance...... theory and form a basis for future research on, e. g., quantum interference of multiple quantum states in a multiple scattering medium....

  19. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). NIF and Photon Sciences; Thomas, A. G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences; Mangles, S. P.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Corde, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flacco, A. [ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Neely, D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Viera, J. [Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). GoLP-Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Lab. Associado; Najmudin, Z. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Bingham, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Katsouleas, T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Platt School of Engineering

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  20. Optical Asymmetry and Nonlinear Light Scattering from Colloidal Gold Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Miao-Bin; Kim, Ji-Young; Han, Myung-Geun; Chang, You-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chung; Ferguson, Heather J; Zhu, Yimei; Herzing, Andrew A; Schotland, John C; Kotov, Nicholas A; Norris, Theodore B

    2017-06-27

    A systematic study is presented of the intensity-dependent nonlinear light scattering spectra of gold nanorods under resonant excitation of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The spectra exhibit features due to coherent second and third harmonic generation as well as a broadband feature that has been previously attributed to multiphoton photoluminescence arising primarily from interband optical transitions in the gold. A detailed study of the spectral dependence of the scaling of the scattered light with excitation intensity shows unexpected scaling behavior of the coherent signals, which is quantitatively accounted for by optically induced damping of the SPR mode through a Fermi liquid model of the electronic scattering. The broadband feature is shown to arise not from luminescence, but from scattering of the second-order longitudinal SPR mode with the electron gas, where efficient excitation of the second order mode arises from an optical asymmetry of the nanorod. The electronic-temperature-dependent plasmon damping and the Fermi-Dirac distribution together determine the intensity dependence of the broadband emission, and the structure-dependent absorption spectrum determines the spectral shape through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Hence a complete self-consistent picture of both coherent and incoherent light scattering is obtained with a single set of physical parameters.

  1. Light absorption and scattering mechanisms in laser fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.; Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Max, C.E.; Randall, C.; Thomson, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The picture of laser light absorption and scattering which is emerging from theory and computer simulation studies of laser-plasma interactions is described. On the subject of absorption, we discuss theoretical and experimental evidence that resonance absorption in a steepened density profile is a dominant absorption mechanism. Recent work also indicates the presence of critical surface ripples, which we study using two and three dimensional computer simulations. Predictions of hot electron spectra due to resonance absorption are described, as are effects of plasma outflow. We then discuss two regimes where stimulated scattering may occur. Brillouin scattering is expected in the underdense target blow-off, for long laser pulses, and is limited by ion heating. Raman scattering in the background gas of a reactor target chamber is predicted to be at most a 10 percent effect for 1 μm lasers

  2. Laser light scatter experiments on plasma focus plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, N.

    1985-01-01

    The plasma focus plant is an experiment on nuclear fusion, which is distinguished by a high neutron yield. Constituting an important method of diagnosis in plasma focussing, the laser light scatter method makes it possible, apart from finding the electron temperature and density, to determine the ion temperature resolved according to time and place and further, to study the occurrence of micro-turbulent effects. Starting from the theoretical basis, this dissertation describes light scatter measurements with ruby lasers on the POSEIDON plasma focus. They are given, together with earlier measurements on the Frascati 1 MJ plant and the Heidelberg 12 KJ plant. The development of the plasma parameters and the occurrence of superthermal light scatter events are discussed in connection with the dynamics of the plasma and the neutron emission characteristics of the individual plants. The results support the view that the thermo-nuclear neutron production at the plasma focus is negligible. Although the importance of micro-turbulent mechanisms in producing neutrons cannot be finally judged, important guidelines are given for the spatial and time relationships with plasma dynamics, plasma parameters and neutron emission. The work concludes with a comparison of all light scatter measurements at the plasma focus described in the literature. (orig.) [de

  3. Insulin association in neutral solutions studied by light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, S.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular weights and weight distributions of sulfated, Zn-free, and 2Zn insulins have been measured at pH 7.3 as a function of concentration from 0.1 to 2 mg/ml by use of a combination of light scattering, refractometry, and size-exclusion chromatography. Results show that sulfated insulin...

  4. Light scattering from a binary-liquid entanglement gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, K.-Q.; Maher, J. V.

    1987-09-01

    Light-scattering experiments have been carried out on an entanglement gel with a binary-liquid mixture as solvent. The onset temperature for critical opalescence has a composition dependence which is similar to the coexistence curve of the free-liquid mixture. This system resembles previously reported work on the cross-linked gel polyacrylamide in two ways: (1) As temperature is lowered toward the critical temperature of the free-liquid mixture, the binary-fluid gel exhibits a strong and increasing light scattering over a broad temperature region of several kelvins, and (2) no appreciable temporal fluctuations are observed throughout this temperature region. Two added features are observed in the present, entanglement-gel measurements: (a) Gel samples with solvent composition both near and off the critical composition of the free-liquid mixture exhibit similar light-scattering behavior, and (b) a Lorentzian-squared fit to the light-scattering angular distributions yields a characteristic wave number which does not change with temperature and an amplitude which shows a very strong dependence on the temperature.

  5. HeNe-laser light scattering by human dental enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijp, [No Value; tenBosch, JJ; Groenhuis, RAJ

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of tooth enamel and an understanding of the origin of these properties are necessary for the development of new optical methods for caries diagnosis and the measurement of tooth color. We measured the scattering intensity functions for HeNe-laser light of 80- to

  6. Simulating elastic light scattering using high performance computing methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Verbraeck, A.; Kerckhoffs, E.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Coupled Dipole method, as originally formulated byPurcell and Pennypacker, is a very powerful method tosimulate the Elastic Light Scattering from arbitraryparticles. This method, which is a particle simulationmodel for Computational Electromagnetics, has one majordrawback: if the size of the

  7. Polarized Light Scattering from Perfect and Perturbed Surfaces and Fundamental Scattering Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-29

    ob- one frequency, an extension of it to multiple-field interac- served in the elastically scattered light emitted from glass tions would follow the...that 8. V CeIll . A. A. Maradudin, A. M. Marvin, and A. R. McGurn, can explain only gross scattering features. It is inde "Some aspects of light...and a surface of index n a 10.0 - 0.01. Such a surface could be made with a series of 1/4-wave dielectric layers on a glass substrate. It Is more

  8. A compact, coherent light source system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, S. G.; Dattoli, G.; DiPalma, E.; Einstein, J.; Milton, S. V.; Petrillo, V.; Rau, J. V.; Sabia, E.; Spassovsky, I. P.; van der Slot, P. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    Our team has been examining several architectures for short-wavelength, coherent light sources. We are presently exploring the use and role of advanced, high-peak power lasers for both accelerating the electrons and generating a compact light source with the same laser. Our overall goal is to devise light sources that are more accessible by industry and in smaller laboratory settings. Although we cannot and do not want to compete directly with sources such as third-generation light sources or that of national-laboratory-based free-electron lasers, we have several interesting schemes that could bring useful and more coherent, short-wavelength light source to more researchers. Here, we present and discuss several results of recent simulations and our future steps for such dissemination.

  9. Light Sources Technologies and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kitsinelis, Spyridon

    2010-01-01

    From the dialogues of the ancient Greek philosophers right up through the physical laws of Newton, the experiments of Thomas Young and the quantum physics pioneers, the study of light was all about observing its characteristics and defining its behavior. At the end of the 19th century, wicks, wax, and oil gave way to electricity, filaments, and gases, and scientific minds began to focus on the technological creation of light, as well as its control and diverse uses. Yet, despite more than a century of profound research and development, until now, the most complete resources on lighting technol

  10. Light extraction enhancement from organic light-emitting diodes with randomly scattered surface fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Gao, Chun-Hong; Cai, Shi-Duan; Jin, Yue; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A combination of scattering layer and roughened substrate is used for light extraction from OLEDs. • The scattering layer is readily achieved by spin-coating the TiO{sub 2} sol. • The enhancement relying scattering depends on the size of TiO{sub 2} nano particles. • With the light extraction techniques the uniform emission is achieved. - Abstract: A combination of a scattering medium layer and a roughened substrate was proposed to enhance the light extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Comparing with a reference OLED without any scattering layer, 65% improvement in the forward emission has been achieved with a scattering layer formed on an intentionally roughened external substrate surface of the OLED by spin-coating a sol–gel fabricated matrix containing well dispersed titania (TiO{sub 2}) particles. Such a combination method not only demonstrated efficient extraction of the light trapped in the glass substrate but also achieved homogenous emission from the OLED panel. The proposed technique, convenient and inexpensive, is believed to be suitable for the large area OLED production in lighting applications.

  11. Point sources and multipoles in inverse scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Potthast, Roland

    2001-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, the growing availability of computing power has had an enormous impact on the classical fields of direct and inverse scattering. The study of inverse scattering, in particular, has developed rapidly with the ability to perform computational simulations of scattering processes and led to remarkable advances in a range of applications, from medical imaging and radar to remote sensing and seismic exploration. Point Sources and Multipoles in Inverse Scattering Theory provides a survey of recent developments in inverse acoustic and electromagnetic scattering theory. Focusing on methods developed over the last six years by Colton, Kirsch, and the author, this treatment uses point sources combined with several far-reaching techniques to obtain qualitative reconstruction methods. The author addresses questions of uniqueness, stability, and reconstructions for both two-and three-dimensional problems.With interest in extracting information about an object through scattered waves at an all-ti...

  12. Light scattering studies of solids and atomic vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, T.C.

    1978-09-01

    The general technique of light scattering and luminescence was used to study the properties of a number of material systems. First, multi-phonon resonant Raman scattering up to four phonons in GaSe and one- and two-phonon resonant Raman scattering in the mixed GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ crystals with x 2 is reported. The result is used to determine the position of the direct gap of HfS 2 . Third, the first observation of the π-polarized one-magnon luminescence sideband of the 4 T/sub lg/ ( 4 G) → 6 A/sub lg/( 6 S) excitonic transition in antiferromagnetic MnF 2 is presented. An effective temperature of the crystal is deduced from the simultaneously observed anti-Stokes sideband emission. Multi-magnon ( 2 , KMnF 2 , and RbMnF 3 using pulsed excitation and detection. A simple model based on two-ion local exchange is proposed to explain the results qualitatively. Fourth, the first observation of two-magnon resonant Raman scattering in MnF 2 around the magnon sidebands is reported. A simple theoretical description explains the experimental observations. Fifth, a detailed theory of exciton-exciton interaction in MnF 2 is developed to explain and to predict the experimental results on two-exciton absorption, high level excitation, and exciton--exciton scattering. Sixth, Brillouin scattering was used to obtain the five independent elastic constants of the layered compound GaSe. The results show clear elastic anisotropy of the crystal. Resonant Brillouin scattering near the absorption edge was also studied, but no resonant enhancement was found. Seventh, two-photon parametric scattering in sodium vapor was studied. Phase matching angles and scattering cross sections are calculated for a given set of experimental conditions

  13. Standard light source utilizing spontaneous radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Takenaga, M.; Tsujimoto, Y.

    1975-01-01

    A standard light source is described utilizing spontaneous radiation made by mixing a fluorescent substance LnVO 4 :X (wherein Ln is Y or Gd, and X is Dy or Eu) with a radioactive substance containing a radioactive isotope which is less in the degree of temperature variation of the intensity of emitted light and excellent in stability. Particularly when used in a light-receiving device having photomultiplier tubes, the said light source emits light quite similar to that of a thermoluminescent substance such as CaSO 4 :X (wherein X is Im, Dy, Sm or Mn), LiF or Mg 2 SiO 4 :Tb, and is excellent as a calibration high-stability standard light source for use in the above-mentioned light-receiving device. (auth)

  14. LIGHT SCATTERING BY FRACTAL DUST AGGREGATES. I. ANGULAR DEPENDENCE OF SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazaki, Ryo [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Okuzumi, Satoshi; Nomura, Hideko [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kataoka, Akimasa, E-mail: rtazaki@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, Heidelberg University, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-01

    In protoplanetary disks, micron-sized dust grains coagulate to form highly porous dust aggregates. Because the optical properties of these aggregates are not completely understood, it is important to investigate how porous dust aggregates scatter light. In this study, the light scattering properties of porous dust aggregates were calculated using a rigorous method, the T -matrix method, and the results were then compared with those obtained using the Rayleigh–Gans–Debye (RGD) theory and Mie theory with the effective medium approximation (EMT). The RGD theory is applicable to moderately large aggregates made of nearly transparent monomers. This study considered two types of porous dust aggregates—ballistic cluster–cluster agglomerates (BCCAs) and ballistic particle–cluster agglomerates. First, the angular dependence of the scattered intensity was shown to reflect the hierarchical structure of dust aggregates; the large-scale structure of the aggregates is responsible for the intensity at small scattering angles, and their small-scale structure determines the intensity at large scattering angles. Second, it was determined that the EMT underestimates the backward scattering intensity by multiple orders of magnitude, especially in BCCAs, because the EMT averages the structure within the size of the aggregates. It was concluded that the RGD theory is a very useful method for calculating the optical properties of BCCAs.

  15. Chemical reaction dynamics using the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Blank, D.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.; Lin, J.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The recently commissioned Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley provides a high brightness, tunable VUV light source for chemical dynamics studies. A dedicated chemical dynamics beamline has been built at the ALS for studies of fundamental chemical processes. High flux (10(sup 16) photon/s with 2% bandwidth) VUV synchrotron radiation from 5 to 30 eV can be obtained from the beamline, whose source is the U8/10 undulator. Three endstations will be in operation for studies ranging from crossed beam reaction dynamics and photodissociation to high resolution photoionization dynamics and spectroscopy. A rotatable source crossed molecular beam apparatus (endstation one) has been established for unimolecular and bimolecular reactive scattering studies. Photodissociation of methylamine and ozone were carried out using VUV synchrotron radiation as the ionization detection technique at this endstation. Results show the advantages of the new endstation using VUV ionization as the detection scheme over similar machines using electron bombardment as the ionization source

  16. Chemical reaction dynamics using the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Blank, D.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.; Lin, J.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1995-09-01

    The recently commissioned Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley provides a high brightness, tunable VUV light source for chemical dynamics studies. A dedicated chemical dynamics beamline has been built at the ALS for studies of fundamental chemical processes. High flux (10 16 photon/s with 2% bandwidth) VUV synchrotron radiation from 5 to 30 eV can be obtained from the beamline, whose source is the U8/10 undulator. Three endstations will be in operation for studies ranging from crossed beam reaction dynamics and photodissociation to high resolution photoionization dynamics and spectroscopy. A rotatable source crossed molecular beam apparatus (endstation one) has been established for unimolecular and bimolecular reactive scattering studies. Photodissociation of methylamine and ozone were carried out using VUV synchrotron radiation as the ionization detection technique at this endstation. Results show the advantages of the new endstation using VUV ionization as the detection scheme over similar machines using electron bombardment as the ionization source

  17. Use of polarization to separate on-axis scattered and unscattered light in red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Dhiraj K.; Nemati, Babak; Barrera, Frederick J.

    1991-06-01

    The separation of on-axis scattered and unscattered transmission through turbid media has been a difficult experimental task in recent years. This study suggests the use of a polarimeter to filter out the contribution of scattered light to the net on-axis transmission. Red blood cells (RBC) were used to produce the scattering effect. The scattering level was varied by: (1) altering the distance of the detector from the sample, (2) using erythrocytes from three different species, e.g., the dog, goat, and human, which are know to have different RBC sizes, and (3) allowing the RBCs from each species to shrink and swell osmotically. An He-Ne laser was used as the source of the radiation so that data were obtained at a wavelength in the spectral region used in oximetry and hemoglobinometry. In each case, the difference in the scattering cross sections obtained for each sample, with and without polarization filtering, gave us a measure of the filtered scattered light. The results obtained were in close agreement with the expected contribution of scattered radiation to the net axial transmission. This method may be used effectively for all studies involving measurements of on-axis transmission through turbid media, such as biological tissue.

  18. Practical way to avoid spurious geometrical contributions in Brillouin light scattering experiments at variable scattering angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, Andrea; Bencivenga, Filippo; Fioretto, Daniele; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2014-10-15

    In this Letter, we present a simple method to avoid the well-known spurious contributions in the Brillouin light scattering (BLS) spectrum arising from the finite aperture of collection optics. The method relies on the use of special spatial filters able to select the scattered light with arbitrary precision around a given value of the momentum transfer (Q). We demonstrate the effectiveness of such filters by analyzing the BLS spectra of a reference sample as a function of scattering angle. This practical and inexpensive method could be an extremely useful tool to fully exploit the potentiality of Brillouin acoustic spectroscopy, as it will easily allow for effective Q-variable experiments with unparalleled luminosity and resolution.

  19. A review of the light scattering properties of cirrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    In this review paper the light scattering properties of naturally occurring ice crystals that are found in cirrus are discussed. Cirrus, also referred to as ice crystal clouds, due to their cold temperatures, consist of a variety of non-spherical ice particles which may take on a variety of geometrical forms. These geometrical forms can range from symmetric pristine hexagonal ice columns and plates, single bullets and bullet-rosettes to non-symmetric aggregates of these shapes. These aggregates may also consist of highly complex three-dimensional structures, which may themselves consist of symmetric components. Not only does cirrus consist of a wide variety of shapes but also sizes too, and these sizes can range between <10 μm to over 1 cm. With such a variety of shapes and sizes predicting the light scattering properties from such an ensemble of ice crystals is the current challenge. This challenge is important to overcome since with cirrus being so high in the Earth's atmosphere it has an important influence on the Earth-atmosphere radiation balance and consequently adds to the uncertainty of predicting climate change. This is why it is important to represent as accurately as possible the single-scattering properties of cirrus ice crystals within general circulation models so that uncertainties in climate change predictions can be reduced. In this review paper the current measurements and observations of ice crystal size and shape are discussed and how these observations relate to current ice crystal models is reviewed. The light scattering properties of the current ice crystal models are also discussed and it is shown how space-based instruments may be used to test these models. The need for particular microphysical and space-based measurements is stressed in order to further constrain ice crystal light scattering models.

  20. Electron scattering and correlation structure of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodhi, M.A.K.

    1976-01-01

    It has been known for some time that the short-range correlations due to the repulsive part of the nuclear interaction is exhibited in the nuclear form factors as obtained from high energy electron scattering. In this work the harmonic oscillator basis functions are used. The nuclear form factors as obtained from elastic electron scattering are calculated, with Jastrow's technique by means of the cluster expansion of Iwamoto Yamada, in the Born approximation. The correlated wave function is given. The results for nuclear form factors calculated with the wave function are presented for some light nuclei. (Auth.)

  1. Interference of conically scattered light in surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Aaron; Vollmer, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons on thin metal films are a well studied phenomena when excited using prism coupled geometries such as the Kretschmann attenuated total reflection configuration. Here we describe a novel interference pattern in the conically scattered light emanating from such a configuration when illuminated by a focused beam. We observe conditions indicating only self-interference of scattered surface plasmon polaritions without any contributions from specular reflection. The spatial evolution of this field is described in the context of Fourier optics and has applications in highly sensitive surface plasmon based biosensing.

  2. General theory of intensity correlation on light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaeys, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    A general theory for spatio-temporal intensity correlations measurements for a scattered beam is developed. A completely quantum mechanical description for both excitation and detection set up is used. This description is essentially valid for weak incident light beams and single photon absorption processes. From a unified point of view both, stationary as well as, time resolved experiments are described. The interest for such experiments in the study of processes like resonance raman scattering and resonance fluorescence is emphasized. Also an observable coherent contribution associated to different final levels of the target-atoms or molecules is obtained a result which cannot be reached by intensity measurements

  3. Dust grain characterization — Direct measurement of light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    BartoÅ, P.; Pavlů, J.

    2018-01-01

    Dust grains play a key role in dusty plasma since they interact with the plasma we can use them to study plasma itself. The grains are illuminated by visible light (e.g., a laser sheet) and the situation is captured with camera. Despite of simplicity, light scattering on similar-to-wavelength sized grains is complex phenomenon. Interaction of the electromagnetic wave with material has to be computed with respect to Maxwell equations — analytic solution is nowadays available only for several selected shapes like sphere, coated sphere, or infinite cylinder. Moreover, material constants needed for computations are usually unknown. For computation result verification and material constant determination, we designed and developed a device directly measur­ing light scattering profiles. Single dust grains are trapped in the ultrasonic field (so called "acoustic levitation") and illuminated by the laser beam. Scattered light is then measured by a photodiode mounted on rotating platform. Synchronous detection is employed for a noise reduction. This setup brings several benefits against conventional methods: (1) it works in the free air, (2) the measured grain is captured for a long time, and (3) the grain could be of arbitrary shape.

  4. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to macrophytes, have been measured and have been found to vary with time possibly due to nonphotochemical quenching

  5. Protein aggregation studied by forward light scattering and light transmission analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, A.; Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2007-12-01

    The aggregation of the circadian blue-light photo-receptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) is studied by transmission and forward light scattering measurement in the protein transparent wavelength region. The light scattering in forward direction is caused by Rayleigh scattering which is proportional to the degree of aggregation. The light transmission through the samples in the transparent region is reduced by Mie light scattering in all directions. It depends on the degree of aggregation and the monomer volume fill factor of the aggregates (less total scattering with decreasing monomer volume fill factor of protein globule) allowing a distinction between tightly packed protein aggregation (monomer volume fill factor 1) and loosely packed protein aggregation (monomer volume fill factor less than 1). An increase in aggregation with temperature, concentration, and blue-light exposure is observed. At a temperature of 4 °C and a protein concentration of less than 0.135 mM no dCry aggregation was observed, while at 24 °C and 0.327 mM gelation occurred (loosely packed aggregates occupying the whole solution volume).

  6. Ring insertions as light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.

    1975-01-01

    Bending magnets can be inserted in the long straight sections of electron storage rings to produce synchrotron radiation. If the design is carefully proportioned, the bending magnets create only a small perturbation of the properties of the ring. The resulting spectra have favorable optical properties as sources for spectroscopy and diffraction studies. The characteristics of the source are discussed, and the geometrical requirements of the magnets are presented

  7. Radio-isotope powered light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spottiswoode, N.L.; Ryden, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The light source described comprises a radioisotope fuel source, thermal insulation against heat loss, a biological shield against the escape of ionizing radiation and a material having a surface which attains incandescence when subject to isotope decay heat. There is then a means for transferring this heat to produce incandescence of the surface and thus emit light. A filter associated with the surface permits a relatively high transmission of visible radiation but has a relatively high reflectance in the infra red spectrum. Such light sources require the minimum of attention and servicing and are therefore suitable for use in navigational aids such as lighthouses and lighted buoys. The isotope fuel sources and thus the insulation and shielding and the incandescent material can be chosen for the use required and several sources, materials, means of housing etc. are detailed. Operation and efficiency are discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Radioactive starting aids for electrodeless light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proud, J.M.; Regan, R.J.; Haugsjaa, P.O.; Baird, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive sources of α particles, β particles or γ rays as aids in starting a discharge in an electrodeless light source is discussed. The advantages of siting the sources at various positions in the device are discussed. Preferred materials are 85 Kr and 241 Am. (U.K.)

  9. High-intensity sources for light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.

    1995-10-01

    The use of the multicusp plasma generator as a source of light ions is described. By employing radio-frequency induction discharge, the performance of the multicusp source is greatly improved, both in lifetime and in high brightness H + and H - beam production. A new technique for generating multiply-charged ions in this type of ion source is also presented

  10. Parhelic-like circle from light scattering in Plateau borders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Tufaile, A.P.B.

    2015-03-06

    We are reporting a new simple optical element to generate halos. We have observed interesting patterns of light scattering in Plateau borders in foams. In analogy to the atmospheric phenomena known as parhelic circle, sun dogs, and sun pillars, we have named the features of the patterns observed as parlaseric circle, laser dogs, and laser pillars. The triangular symmetry of the Plateau borders is analogous to the hexagonal symmetry of ice crystals which produce these atmospheric phenomena. Working with one Plateau border at a time, we have observed wave optics phenomena that are not perceived in the atmospheric phenomena, such as diffraction and interference. - Highlights: • We obtained halo formation from light scattering in a Plateau border using an experiment. • We explained halo formation using geometrical theory of diffraction. • An optical element based on a Plateau border is proposed. • We compared some aspects of the parhelic circle with the parlaseric circle.

  11. Characterization of thermal plasmas by laser light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.C.; Lassahn, G.D.; Reynolds, L.D.; Fincke, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Characterization of an atmospheric pressure free-burning arc discharge and a plasma jet by lineshape analysis of scattered laser light is described. Unlike emission spectroscopy, this technique provides direct measurement of plasma gas temperature, electron temperature and electron density without the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Plasma gas velocity can also be determined from the Doppler shift of the scattered laser light. Radial gas temperature, electron temperature and electron density profiles are presented for an atmospheric pressure argon free-burning arc discharge. These results show a significant departure from LTE in the arc column, contradicting results obtained from emission spectroscopy. Radial gas temperature and gas velocity profiles in the exit plane of a subsonic atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet are also presented. In this case, the results show the plasma jet is close to LTE in the center, but not in the fringes. The velocity profile is parabolic

  12. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model.

  13. Quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of quadrature squeezed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Propagating quadrature squeezed light through a multiple scattering random medium is found to induce pronounced spatial quantum correlations that have no classical analogue. The correlations are revealed in the number of photons transported through the sample that can be measured from the intensity...... fluctuations of the total transmission or reflection. In contrast, no pronounced spatial quantum correlations appear in the quadrature amplitudes where excess noise above the shot noise level is found....

  14. Dust Evolution Can Produce Scattered Light Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M.; Pinilla, Paola; Kama, Mihkel

    2015-01-01

    Recent imaging of protoplanetary disks with high resolution and contrast have revealed a striking variety of substructure. Of particular interest are cases where near-infrared scattered light images show evidence for low-intensity annular "gaps." The origins of such structures are still uncertain, but the interaction of the gas disk with planets is a common interpretation. We study the impact that the evolution of the solid material can have on the observable properties of disks in a simple s...

  15. Measurement of molecular polarizability on Rayleigh light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerushev, O.A.; Novopashin, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The installation for measuring the polarizability of atoms and molecules on Rayleigh light scattering is described. The measurements in gases with the known polarizability are used for a calibration. Test measurements are carried out on nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, vapours of water and acetone. The results of measurements are compared with the table data. The technique is used for measuring the polarizability of fullerene molecules. 6 refs., 2 figs

  16. The self-association of acebutolol: Conductometry and light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M.; López-Fontán, José L.; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2003-04-01

    The association characteristics of an amphiphilic beta-blocker drug, acebutolol hydrochloride, in aqueous solution containing high concentrations of electrolyte and at different temperatures have been examined by static and dynamic light scattering and electrical conductivity. Time averaged light scattering measurements on aqueous solutions of acebutolol at 298.15 K in the presence of added electrolyte (0.4-1.0 mol kg-1 NaCl) have shown discontinuities which reflect the appearance of aggregates. The critical micelle concentration, aggregation numbers, effective micelle charges, and degree of micellar ionization were calculated. Dynamic light scattering has shown an increase in micellar size with increase in concentration of added electrolyte. Data have been interpreted using the DLVO theory to quantify the interaction between the drug aggregates and the colloidal stability. Critical micelle concentrations in water have been calculated from conductivity measurements over the temperature range 288.15-313.15 K. The variation in critical concentration with temperature passes through a minimum close to 294 K. Thermodynamic parameters of aggregate formation (ΔGm0,ΔHm0,ΔSm0) were obtained from a variation of the mass action model applicable to systems of low aggregation number.

  17. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  19. Synchrotron light sources in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtingwa, Sekazi K.; Winick, Herman

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the role that synchrotron light sources, such as SESAME, could play in improving the socioeconomic conditions in developing countries. After providing a brief description of a synchrotron light source, we discuss the important role that they played in the development of several economically emerging countries. Then we describe the state of synchrotron science in South Africa and that country’s leadership role in founding the African Light Source initiative. Next, we highlight a new initiative called Lightsources for Africa, the Americas & Middle East Project, which is a global initiative led by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and the International Union of Crystallography, with initial funding provided by the International Council for Science. Finally, we comment on a new technology called the multibend achromat that has launched a new paradigm for the design of synchrotron light sources that should be attractive for construction in developing countries.

  20. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori

    2003-01-01

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information

  1. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  2. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-01-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself

  3. Identification and mitigation of stray laser light in the Thomson scattering system on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, C. M.; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Morton, L. A.; Thomas, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) records excessive levels of stray Nd:YAG laser light. Stray light saturates the 1064 nm spectral channel in all polychromators, which prevents absolute electron density measurements via Rayleigh scattering calibration. Furthermore, stray light contaminates adjacent spectral channels for r/a ≥ 0.75, which renders the diagnostic unable to make electron temperature measurements at these radii. In situ measurements of stray light levels during a vacuum vessel vent are used to identify stray light sources and strategies for reduction of stray light levels. Numerical modeling using Zemax OpticStudio supports these measurements. The model of the vacuum vessel and diagnostic includes synthetic collection optics to enable direct comparison of measured and simulated stray light levels. Modeling produces qualitatively similar stray light distributions to MST measurements, and quantifies the mitigation effects of stray light mitigation strategies prior to implementation.

  4. Identification and mitigation of stray laser light in the Thomson scattering system on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, C. M., E-mail: cjacobson@wisc.edu; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Morton, L. A.; Thomas, M. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) records excessive levels of stray Nd:YAG laser light. Stray light saturates the 1064 nm spectral channel in all polychromators, which prevents absolute electron density measurements via Rayleigh scattering calibration. Furthermore, stray light contaminates adjacent spectral channels for r/a ≥ 0.75, which renders the diagnostic unable to make electron temperature measurements at these radii. In situ measurements of stray light levels during a vacuum vessel vent are used to identify stray light sources and strategies for reduction of stray light levels. Numerical modeling using Zemax OpticStudio supports these measurements. The model of the vacuum vessel and diagnostic includes synthetic collection optics to enable direct comparison of measured and simulated stray light levels. Modeling produces qualitatively similar stray light distributions to MST measurements, and quantifies the mitigation effects of stray light mitigation strategies prior to implementation.

  5. Photobiocatalytic alcohol oxidation using LED light sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauch, M.C.R.; Schmidt, S.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; oppelt, K.; Kara, S; Hollmann, F.

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of NADH using a flavin photocatalyst and a simple blue LED light source is reported. This in situ NAD+ regeneration system can be used to promote biocatalytic, enantioselective oxidation reactions. Compared to the traditional use of white light bulbs this method enables

  6. White light photothermal lens spectrophotometer for the determination of absorption in scattering samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano, Aristides; Alvarado, Salvador; Meng, Junwei; Caballero, Daniel; Moares, Ernesto Marín; Edziah, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We developed a pump-probe photothermal lens spectrophotometer that uses a broadband arc-lamp and a set of interference filters to provide tunable, nearly monochromatic radiation between 370 and 730 nm as the pump light source. This light is focused onto an absorbing sample, generating a photothermal lens of millimeter dimensions. A highly collimated monochromatic probe light from a low-power He-Ne laser interrogates the generated lens, yielding a photothermal signal proportional to the absorption of light. We measure the absorption spectra of scattering dye solutions using the device. We show that the spectra are not affected by the presence of scattering, confirming that the method only measures the absorption of light that results in generation of heat. By comparing the photothermal spectra with the usual absorption spectra determined using commercial transmission spectrophotometers, we estimate the quantum yield of scattering of the sample. We discuss applications of the device for spectroscopic characterization of samples such as blood and gold nanoparticles that exhibit a complex behavior upon interaction with light.

  7. Ideas for future synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meddahi, M.

    1992-03-01

    Synchrotron light sources have advanced in the past two-to-three decades through three ''generations,'' from irritating parasitic sources on high-energy physics accelerators to dedicated electron and position storage rings of unprecedented low emittance, utilizing undulator and wiggler magnets. The evolution through these three generations followed a predicable, science-driven, course towards brighter beams of VUV- and x-radiation. The requirements of future light sources is not so clear. The limit on how emittance has certainly not been reached, and diffraction-limited sources at shorter wavelengths would be the natural progression from previous generations. However, scientists are now looking at other radiation characteristics that might better serve their needs, for example, more coherent power, fast switching polarization, ultra-short (sub-picosecond) time structure, and synchronized beams for pump-probe experiments. This paper discusses some current ideas that might drive the fourth-generation synchrotron light source

  8. Source of scattering in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruault, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Variations concerning emission and detection of ionizing radiations in industrial radiography are reviewed. Sources of errors come from emulsion and emulsion processing (fabrication, aging, processing, chemicals, temperature, development time, shaking down, drying, delay for processing), from emission (X ray generators, emission spectra, voltage, angular repartition of photon fluence, radioactive sources) and also from radiation measurement (dosimetry and spectrometry). Influence of all these parameters on sensitivity is examined [fr

  9. Scattering and absorption of particles emitted by a point source in a cluster of point scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljequist, D.

    2012-01-01

    A theory for the scattering and absorption of particles isotropically emitted by a point source in a cluster of point scatterers is described and related to the theory for the scattering of an incident particle beam. The quantum mechanical probability of escape from the cluster in different directions is calculated, as well as the spatial distribution of absorption events within the cluster. A source strength renormalization procedure is required. The average quantum scattering in clusters with randomly shifting scatterer positions is compared to trajectory simulation with the aim of studying the validity of the trajectory method. Differences between the results of the quantum and trajectory methods are found primarily for wavelengths larger than the average distance between nearest neighbour scatterers. The average quantum results include, for example, a local minimum in the number of absorption events at the location of the point source and interference patterns in the angle-dependent escape probability as well as in the distribution of absorption events. The relative error of the trajectory method is in general, though not generally, of similar magnitude as that obtained for beam scattering.

  10. Light and Light Sources High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Flesch, Peter G

    2006-01-01

    Light and Light Sources gives an introduction to the working principles of high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps and points out challenges and problems associated with the development and operation of HID lamps. The state-of-the-art in electrode and plasma diagnostics as well as numerical methods used for the understanding of HID lamps are described. This volume addresses students as well as scientists and researchers at universities and in industry.

  11. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy of semiconductor nitride nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, J.M.; Lazic, S.; Sanchez-Paramo, J. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agullo-Rueda, F. [Materials Science Institute of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cerutti, L.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSIT, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Trampert, A.; Jahn, U. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    A review of inelastic light scattering measurements on group III-nitride nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The nanocolumns are hexagonal, high quality single crystals with diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm, with no traces of extended defects. GaN nanocolumns grown on bare Si substrates with both (111) and (100) orientation display narrow phonon peaks, indicating the absence of strain inhomogeneities. This opens the possibility of efficient integration of the nanocolumns as optoelectronic devices with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements of the E{sub 2} phonon frequency on AlGaN nanocolumns indicate a linear dependence of the Al concentration on the Al relative flux, up to 60%. The E{sub 2} peak width increases with Al content due to phonon damping by alloy scattering. Inelastic light scattering measurements in InN nanocolumns display a coupled LO phonon-plasmon mode together with uncoupled phonons. The coupled mode is not observed in a reference compact sample. The origin of the coupled mode is attributed to spontaneous accumulation of electrons at the lateral surfaces of the nanocolumns. The presence of free electrons in the nanocolumns is confirmed by infrared reflectance measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy of semiconductor nitride nanocolumns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, J.M.; Lazic, S.; Sanchez-Paramo, J.; Agullo-Rueda, F.; Cerutti, L.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E.; Trampert, A.; Jahn, U.

    2007-01-01

    A review of inelastic light scattering measurements on group III-nitride nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented. The nanocolumns are hexagonal, high quality single crystals with diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm, with no traces of extended defects. GaN nanocolumns grown on bare Si substrates with both (111) and (100) orientation display narrow phonon peaks, indicating the absence of strain inhomogeneities. This opens the possibility of efficient integration of the nanocolumns as optoelectronic devices with the complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements of the E 2 phonon frequency on AlGaN nanocolumns indicate a linear dependence of the Al concentration on the Al relative flux, up to 60%. The E 2 peak width increases with Al content due to phonon damping by alloy scattering. Inelastic light scattering measurements in InN nanocolumns display a coupled LO phonon-plasmon mode together with uncoupled phonons. The coupled mode is not observed in a reference compact sample. The origin of the coupled mode is attributed to spontaneous accumulation of electrons at the lateral surfaces of the nanocolumns. The presence of free electrons in the nanocolumns is confirmed by infrared reflectance measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Light scattering in porous materials: Geometrical optics and stereological approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinka, Aleksey V.

    2014-01-01

    Porous material has been considered from the point of view of stereology (geometrical statistics), as a two-phase random mixture of solid material and air. Considered are the materials having the refractive index with the real part that differs notably from unit and the imaginary part much less than unit. Light scattering in such materials has been described using geometrical optics. These two – the geometrical optics laws and the stereological approach – allow one to obtain the inherent optical properties of such a porous material, which are basic in the radiative transfer theory: the photon survival probability, the scattering phase function, and the polarization properties (Mueller matrix). In this work these characteristics are expressed through the refractive index of the material and the random chord length distribution. The obtained results are compared with the traditional approach, modeling the porous material as a pack of particles of different shapes. - Highlights: • Porous material has been considered from the point of view of stereology. • Properties of a two-phase random mixture of solid material and air are considered. • Light scattering in such materials has been described using geometrical optics. • The inherent optical properties of such a porous material have been obtained

  14. Light scattering influence in cyanobacteria suspensions inside a photobioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    The application of biotechnology is increasing in areas such as agriculture, biochemistry or biomedicine. Growing bacteria or algae could be beneficial for supplying fuel, drugs, food or oxygen, among other products. An adequate knowledge of biological processes is becoming essential to estimate and control products production. Cyanobacteria are particularly appropriate for producing oxygen and biomass, by consuming mainly carbon dioxide and light irradiation. These capacities could be employed to provide human subsistence in adverse environments, as basic breathing and food needs would be satisfied. Cyanobacteria growing is carried out in bioreactors. As light irradiation is quite relevant for their behavior, photobioreactors are needed. Photobioreactors are designed to supply and control the amounts of elements they need, in order to maximize growth. The adequate design of photobioreactors greatly influences production throughput. This design includes, on the optical side, optical illumination and optical measurement of cyanobacteria growth. The influence of optical scattering is fundamental for maximizing cyanobacteria growing, as long as for adequately measure this growth. In this work, optical scattering in cyanobacteria suspensions is analyzed. Optical properties of cyanobacteria and its relationship with concentration is taken into account. Several types of cyanobacteria are considered. The influence of different beam spatial profiles and irradiances is studied by a Monte Carlo approach. The results would allow the consideration of the influence of optical scattering in the detected optical signal employed for growth monitoring, as a function of cyanobacteria type and optical beam parameters.

  15. Ultraviolet refractometry using field-based light scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Oh, Seungeun; Yaqoob, Zahid; Park, YongKeun; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate refractive index measurement in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range is important for the separate quantification of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA in biology. This task is demanding and has not been fully exploited so far. Here we report a new method of measuring refractive index using field-based light scattering spectroscopy, which is applicable to any wavelength range and suitable for both solutions and homogenous objects with well-defined shape such as microspheres. The angular scattering distribution of single microspheres immersed in homogeneous media is measured over the wavelength range 260 to 315 nm using quantitative phase microscopy. By least square fitting the observed scattering distribution with Mie scattering theory, the refractive index of either the sphere or the immersion medium can be determined provided that one is known a priori. Using this method, we have measured the refractive index dispersion of SiO2 spheres and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions in the deep UV region. Specific refractive index increments of BSA are also extracted. Typical accuracy of the present refractive index technique is ≤0.003. The precision of refractive index measurements is ≤0.002 and that of specific refractive index increment determination is ≤0.01 mL/g. PMID:20372622

  16. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscope/microscope based on a widely tunable laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dementjev, A.; Gulbinas, V.; Serbenta, A.; Kaucikas, M.; Niaura, G.

    2010-03-01

    We present a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope based on a robust and simple laser source. A picosecond laser operating in a cavity dumping regime at the 1 MHz repetition rate was used to pump a traveling wave optical parametric generator, which serves as a two-color excitation light source for the CARS microscope. We demonstrate the ability of the presented CARS microscope to measure CARS spectra and images by using several detection schemes.

  17. Transmission grid requirements with scattered and flutuating renewable electricity sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2002-01-01

    Denmark is in a situation with many scattered sources of electricity, that are not controlled by the central load dispatch. At the same time, Denmark is being used as an electricity transit corridor between Norway/Sweden and Germany. Through energy systems analyses and load-flow analyses......, it is determined that if scattered load balancing is introduced, electricity transit is enabled to a higher degree than if central load balancing is maintained....

  18. Boomerang - the Australian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.W.; Garrett, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) was one of seven major national research facilities funded by the Federal Government in December 1995. The program provides guaranteed access and travel funds for Australian scientists to conduct synchrotron radiation-based research at two overseas facilities - the Photon Factory at Tsukuba in Japan and the Advanced Photon Source at the Argonne National Laboratory in the US. The Federal Government also provided funding of $100K to carry out a Feasibility Study for an Australian-based facility. This has been completed and included a mission to a number of laboratories overseas that were or had recently constructed a facility that could be considered for Australia. Following the mission, consensus was achieved within the community for the specifications of a proposed Australian facility. The proposed facility, Boomerang, has an energy of 3 GeV, an emittance of 16 nm rad and will be equipped in the first phase with 9 instrument stations. Boomerang will be competitive in performance with other facilities currently under construction overseas. A detailed proposal has been submitted to the Federal Government for funding. No site has been specified in the proposal. The proposal was prepared within the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) following extensive consultation with industrial and scientific groups in all Australian states. Valuable contributions have been made by members of all the committees of the ASRP, the Australian synchrotron research community that works through the ASRP and the National Synchrotron Steering Committee. Important contributions have also been made by many industrial groups including consortia in Victoria, Queensland and New South Wales. The input from the ANKA staff at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and, in particular. Professor Einfeld has been a critical component. The estimated capital cost of a no frills laboratory has been estimated to be $100M in 1999 dollars. The

  19. Light scattering techniques for the characterization of optical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptvogel, M.; Schröder, S.; Herffurth, T.; Trost, M.; von Finck, A.; Duparré, A.; Weigel, T.

    2017-11-01

    The rapid developments in optical technologies generate increasingly higher and sometimes completely new demands on the quality of materials, surfaces, components, and systems. Examples for such driving applications are the steadily shrinking feature sizes in semiconductor lithography, nanostructured functional surfaces for consumer optics, and advanced optical systems for astronomy and space applications. The reduction of surface defects as well as the minimization of roughness and other scatter-relevant irregularities are essential factors in all these areas of application. Quality-monitoring for analysing and improving those properties must ensure that even minimal defects and roughness values can be detected reliably. Light scattering methods have a high potential for a non-contact, rapid, efficient, and sensitive determination of roughness, surface structures, and defects.

  20. GPC light shaping a supercontinuum source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2015-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is a versatile tool for efficiently rerouting and managing photon energy into speckle-free contiguous spatial light distributions. We have previously shown theoretically and numerically that a GPC Light Shaper shows robustness to shift in wavelength and can maintain...... both projection length scale and high efficiency over a range [0.75λ0; 1.5λ0] with λ0 as the characteristic design wavelength. With this performance across multiple wavelengths and the recent availability of tabletop supercontinuum lasers, GPC light shaping opens the possibility for creatively...... incorporating various multi-wavelength approaches into spatially shaped excitations that can enable new broadband light applications. We verify this new approach using a supercontinuum light source, interfaced with a compact GPC light shaper. Our experiments give ~70% efficiency, ~3x intensity gain, and ~85...

  1. Propagation and scattering of optical light beams in free space, in atmosphere and in biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Serkan

    With their first production implemented around 1960's, lasers have afterwards proven to be excellent light sources in building the technology. Subsequently, it has been shown that the extraordinary properties of lasers are related to their coherence properties. Recent developments in optics make it possible to synthesize partially coherent light beams from fully coherent ones. In the last several decades it was seen that using partially coherent light sources may be advantageous, in the areas such as laser surface processing, fiber and free-space optical communications, and medical diagnostics. In this thesis, I study extensively the generation, the propagation in different media, and the scattering of partially coherent light beams with respect to their spectral polarization and coherence states. For instance, I analyze the evolution of recently introduced degree of cross-polarization of light fields in free space; then develop a novel partially coherent light source which acquires and keeps a flat intensity profile around the axis at any distance in the far field; and investigate the interaction of electromagnetic random light with the human eye lens. A part of the thesis treats the effect of atmospheric turbulence on random light beams. Due to random variations in the refractive index, atmospheric turbulence modulates all physical and statistical properties of propagating beams. I have explored the possibility of employing the polarimetric domain of the beam for scintillation reduction, which positively affects the performance of free-space communication systems. I also discuss novel techniques for the sensing of rough targets in the turbulent atmosphere by polarization and coherence properties of light. The other contribution to the thesis is the investigation of light scattering from deterministic or random collections of particles, within the validity of first Born approximation. In the case of a random collection, I introduce and model the new quantity

  2. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  3. Population of collective modes in light scattering by many atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, William; Kaiser, Robin

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of light with an atomic sample containing a large number of particles gives rise to many collective (or cooperative) effects, such as multiple scattering, superradiance, and subradiance, even if the atomic density is low and the incident optical intensity weak (linear optics regime). Tracing over the degrees of freedom of the light field, the system can be well described by an effective atomic Hamiltonian, which contains the light-mediated dipole-dipole interaction between atoms. This long-range interaction is at the origin of the various collective effects, or of collective excitation modes of the system. Even though an analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of these collective modes does allow distinguishing superradiant modes, for instance, from other collective modes, this is not sufficient to understand the dynamics of a driven system, as not all collective modes are significantly populated. Here, we study how the excitation parameters, i.e., the driving field, determines the population of the collective modes. We investigate in particular the role of the laser detuning from the atomic transition, and demonstrate a simple relation between the detuning and the steady-state population of the modes. This relation allows understanding several properties of cooperative scattering, such as why superradiance and subradiance become independent of the detuning at large enough detuning without vanishing, and why superradiance, but not subradiance, is suppressed near resonance. We also show that the spatial properties of the collective modes allow distinguishing diffusive modes, responsible for radiation trapping, from subradiant modes.

  4. Plant Growth Absorption Spectrum Mimicking Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jwo-Huei Jou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant factories have attracted increasing attention because they can produce fresh fruits and vegetables free from pesticides in all weather. However, the emission spectra from current light sources significantly mismatch the spectra absorbed by plants. We demonstrate a concept of using multiple broad-band as well as narrow-band solid-state lighting technologies to design plant-growth light sources. Take an organic light-emitting diode (OLED, for example; the resulting light source shows an 84% resemblance with the photosynthetic action spectrum as a twin-peak blue dye and a diffused mono-peak red dye are employed. This OLED can also show a greater than 90% resemblance as an additional deeper red emitter is added. For a typical LED, the resemblance can be improved to 91% if two additional blue and red LEDs are incorporated. The approach may facilitate either an ideal use of the energy applied for plant growth and/or the design of better light sources for growing different plants.

  5. Experimental study of Rayleigh scattering with a ruby laser beam: relative variation of scattered light with the number of scattering center and the gases nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Charles

    1973-06-01

    The experimental variation of the scattered light with the number of scattering centers and with the refraction index of gases is in agreement with the theoretical Rayleigh scattering. A direct calibration System gives the absolute value of the Rayleigh ratio. The experimental value appears to be half of the theoretical one. (author) [fr

  6. Computation of bessel functions in light scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, W D

    1972-09-01

    Computations of light scattering require finding Bessel functions of a series of orders. These are found most easily by recurrence, but excessive rounding errors may accumulate. Satisfactory procedures for cylinder and sphere functions are described. If argument z is real, find Y(n)(z) by recurrence to high orders. From two high orders of Y(n)(z) estimate J(n)(z). Use backward recurrence to maximum J(n)(z). Correct by forward recurrence to maximum. If z is complex, estimate high orders of J(n)(z) without Y(n)(z) and use backward recurrence.

  7. A preview of a microgravity laser light scattering instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W. V.; Ansari, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a versatile, miniature, modular light scattering instrument to be used in microgravity is described. The instrument will measure microscopic particles in the size range of thirty angstroms to above three microns. This modular instrument permits several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. In particular, a multiangle instrument will probably be mounted in a rack in the Space Shuttle and on the Space Station. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations.

  8. Submicron scale tissue multifractal anisotropy in polarized laser light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan Kumar; Dey, Rajib; Chakraborty, Semanti; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Meglinski, Igor; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2018-03-01

    The spatial fluctuations of the refractive index within biological tissues exhibit multifractal anisotropy, leaving its signature as a spectral linear diattenuation of scattered polarized light. The multifractal anisotropy has been quantitatively assessed by the processing of relevant Mueller matrix elements in the Fourier domain, utilizing the Born approximation and subsequent multifractal analysis. The differential scaling exponent and width of the singularity spectrum appear to be highly sensitive to the structural multifractal anisotropy at the micron/sub-micron length scales. An immediate practical use of these multifractal anisotropy parameters was explored for non-invasive screening of cervical precancerous alterations ex vivo, with the indication of a strong potential for clinical diagnostic purposes.

  9. Spectral analysis of scattered light from flowers' petals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Atsumi; Uehara, Tomomi; Sekiguchi, Fumihiko; Imai, Hajime

    2009-07-01

    A new method was developed for studying absorption characteristics of opaque samples based on the light scattering spectroscopy. Measurements were made in white, red and violet petals of Petunia hybrida, and gave the absorption spectra in a non-destructive manner without damaging the cell structures of the petal. The red petal has absorption peak at 550 nm and the violet has three absorption peaks: at 450, 670, and 550 nm. The results were discussed in correlation with the microscopic cell structures of the petal observed with optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Only the cells placed in the surface have the pigments giving the color of the petal.

  10. Light-scattering models applied to circumstellar dust properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Melanie; Mann, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    Radiation pressure force, Poynting-Robertson effect, and collisions are important to determine the size distribution of dust in circumstellar debris disks with the two former parameters depending on the light-scattering properties of grains. We here present Mie and discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) calculations to describe the optical properties of dust particles around β Pictoris, Vega, and Fomalhaut in order to study the influence of the radiation pressure force. We find that the differences between Mie and DDA calculations are lower than 30% for all porosities. Therefore, Mie calculations can be used to determine the cut-off limits which contribute to the size distribution for the different systems

  11. Sources of the X-rays Based on Compton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.; Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Mytsykov, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of the intense X-rays generation by laser beam scattering on a relativistic electron beam are described and description of facilities assigned to produce the X-rays based on Compton scattering is presented. The possibilities of various types of such facilities are estimated and discussed. The source of the X-rays based on a storage ring with low beam energy is described in details and advantages of the sources of such type are discussed.The results of calculation and numerical simulation carried out for laser electron storage ring NESTOR that is under development in NSC KIPT show wide prospects of the accelerator facility of such type

  12. Neutron scattering instruments for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.K.; Fornek, T.; Herwig, K.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a 1 MW pulsed spallation source for neutron scattering planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This facility is being designed as a 5-laboratory collaboration project. This paper addresses the proposed facility layout, the process for selection and construction of neutron scattering instruments at the SNS, the initial planning done on the basis of a reference set of ten instruments, and the plans for research and development (R and D) to support construction of the first ten instruments and to establish the infrastructure to support later development and construction of additional instruments

  13. Physics Challenges for ERL Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia Merminga

    2004-07-01

    We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of Energy Recovering Linac (ERL) based light sources. These challenges include the generation and preservation of low emittance, high-average current beams, manipulating and preserving the transverse and longitudinal phase space, control of the multipass beam breakup instability, efficient extraction of higher order mode power and RF control and stability of the superconducting cavities. These key R&D issues drive the design and technology choices for proposed ERL light sources. Simulations and calculations of these processes will be presented and compared with experimental data obtained at the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in commissioning, and during a 1 GeV demonstration of energy recovery at CEBAF.

  14. Robust photometric stereo using structural light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian-Qi; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Hui-Liang; Du, Xin

    2014-05-01

    We propose a robust photometric stereo method by using structural arrangement of light sources. In the arrangement, light sources are positioned on a planar grid and form a set of collinear combinations. The shadow pixels are detected by adaptive thresholding. The specular highlight and diffuse pixels are distinguished according to their intensity deviations of the collinear combinations, thanks to the special arrangement of light sources. The highlight detection problem is cast as a pattern classification problem and is solved using support vector machine classifiers. Considering the possible misclassification of highlight pixels, the ℓ1 regularization is further employed in normal map estimation. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world scenes verify that the proposed method can robustly recover the surface normal maps in the case of heavy specular reflection and outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques.

  15. Behavior of Layers under Different Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BO Tavares

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Light is an important factor in the management of laying poultry. The ideal lamp spectrum that provides the best welfare conditions still needs to be determined. Wavelength and light intensity influence poultry behavior and their welfare. This study evaluated the influence of four lamps types with different light spectra on the behavior of seventy 52-week laying hens. Incandescent, fluorescent, and sodium and mercury vapor lamps were set in a different poultry house each and supplied similar light intensities. Layer behavior was video-recorded three times weekly using video cameras installed on the ceiling. The effects of different wavelengths emitted by the light sources on layer behavior were evaluated by the Kruskal-Wallis median test. Results indicated that incandescent and sodium vapor lamps increased the occurrence of nesting, and of active behaviors, such as floor-scratching and pecking.

  16. Collision induced light-scattering from gaseous sulphurhexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleich, R.

    1983-10-01

    Modern laser technology permits the measurement of collision induced light-scattering spectra from molecular gases at low densities. Measurements of this type provide a test for the separation dependent pair polarizabilities and pair potentials. For this work the octahedral molecule sulphurhexafluoride (SF 6 , point group symmetry 0sub(h)) has been chosen for which the permanent polarizability anisotropy vanishes. For the experiment an argon ion laser in combination with a double grating monochromator and standard photon counting techniques were used. Both the polarized and depolarized scattering cross sections were obtained. The point dipole-induced-dipole (DID) effect is shown to account for the most of the total scattered intensity. At low frequency shifts the line shape of the SF 6 spectrum is dominated by bound dimers, whereas the intermediate frequency range up to 50 cm -1 is well described by a DID free trajectory binary collision model. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision induced rotational Raman (CIRR) effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability E are obtained both from the spectral distribution and from the depolarization ratio. It is demonstrated that the hierarchy of effects constituting the CIRR-model converges slowly for large frequency shifts. (Author)

  17. Total internal reflection and dynamic light scattering microscopy of gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Brian F.

    Two different techniques which apply optical microscopy in novel ways to the study of biological systems and materials were built and applied to several samples. The first is a system for adapting the well-known technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to an optical microscope. This can detect and scatter light from very small volumes, as compared to standard DLS which studies light scattering from volumes 1000x larger. The small scattering volume also allows for the observation of nonergodic dynamics in appropriate samples. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM) forms a gel at low pH which lines the epithelial cell layer and acts as a protective barrier against the acidic stomach environment. The dynamics and microscopic viscosity of PGM at different pH levels is studied using polystyrene microspheres as tracer particles. The microscopic viscosity and microrheological properties of the commercial basement membrane Matrigel are also studied with this instrument. Matrigel is frequently used to culture cells and its properties remain poorly determined. Well-characterized and purely synthetic Matrigel substitutes will need to have the correct rheological and morphological characteristics. The second instrument designed and built is a microscope which uses an interferometry technique to achieve an improvement in resolution 2.5x better in one dimension than the Abbe diffraction limit. The technique is based upon the interference of the evanescent field generated on the surface of a prism by a laser in a total internal reflection geometry. The enhanced resolution is demonstrated with fluorescent samples. Additionally. Raman imaging microscopy is demonstrated using the evanescent field in resonant and non-resonant samples, although attempts at applying the enhanced resolution technique to the Raman images were ultimately unsuccessful. Applications of this instrument include high resolution imaging of cell membranes and macroscopic structures in gels and proteins. Finally, a third

  18. Polarized scattered light from self-luminous exoplanets. Three-dimensional scattering radiative transfer with ARTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolker, T.; Min, M.; Stam, D. M.; Mollière, P.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Direct imaging has paved the way for atmospheric characterization of young and self-luminous gas giants. Scattering in a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere causes the disk-integrated polarization of the thermal radiation to be linearly polarized, possibly detectable with the newest generation of high-contrast imaging instruments. Aims: We aim to investigate the effect of latitudinal and longitudinal cloud variations, circumplanetary disks, atmospheric oblateness, and cloud particle properties on the integrated degree and direction of polarization in the near-infrared. We want to understand how 3D atmospheric asymmetries affect the polarization signal in order to assess the potential of infrared polarimetry for direct imaging observations of planetary-mass companions. Methods: We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (ARTES) for scattered light simulations in (exo)planetary atmospheres. The code is applicable to calculations of reflected light and thermal radiation in a spherical grid with a parameterized distribution of gas, clouds, hazes, and circumplanetary material. A gray atmosphere approximation is used for the thermal structure. Results: The disk-integrated degree of polarization of a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere is maximal when the planet is flattened, the optical thickness of the equatorial clouds is large compared to the polar clouds, and the clouds are located at high altitude. For a flattened planet, the integrated polarization can both increase or decrease with respect to a spherical planet which depends on the horizontal distribution and optical thickness of the clouds. The direction of polarization can be either parallel or perpendicular to the projected direction of the rotation axis when clouds are zonally distributed. Rayleigh scattering by submicron-sized cloud particles will maximize the polarimetric signal whereas the integrated degree of polarization is significantly reduced with micron

  19. Assessment of Coulomb shifts in nucleon scattering resonances on light nuclei at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takibaev, N.Zh.; Uzakova, Zh.; Abdanova, L.

    2003-01-01

    The assessments of the Coulomb forces contribution to position and width of the resonances at nucleons scattering on light nuclei within low energy field are given. In particular the shifts of resonances in amplitudes arising in the processes protons scattering on light nuclei relatively neutrons scattering resonance characteristics on these nuclei are considered

  20. Flow speed measurement using two-point collective light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemeier, N.P.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of turbulence in plasmas and fluids using the technique of collective light scattering have always been plagued by very poor spatial resolution. In 1994, a novel two-point collective light scattering system for the measurement of transport in a fusion plasma was proposed. This diagnostic method was design for a great improvement of the spatial resolution, without sacrificing accuracy in the velocity measurement. The system was installed at the W7-AS steallartor in Garching, Germany, in 1996, and has been operating since. This master thesis is an investigation of the possible application of this new method to the measurement of flow speeds in normal fluids, in particular air, although the results presented in this work have significance for the plasma measurements as well. The main goal of the project was the experimental verification of previous theoretical predictions. However, the theoretical considerations presented in the thesis show that the method can only be hoped to work for flows that are almost laminar and shearless, which makes it of very small practical interest. Furthermore, this result also implies that the diagnostic at W7-AS cannot be expected to give the results originally hoped for. (au)

  1. Fining of Red Wine Monitored by Multiple Light Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrentino, Giovanna; Ramezani, Mohsen; Morozova, Ksenia; Hafner, Daniela; Pedri, Ulrich; Pixner, Konrad; Scampicchio, Matteo

    2017-07-12

    This work describes a new approach based on multiple light scattering to study red wine clarification processes. The whole spectral signal (1933 backscattering points along the length of each sample vial) were fitted by a multivariate kinetic model that was built with a three-step mechanism, implying (1) adsorption of wine colloids to fining agents, (2) aggregation into larger particles, and (3) sedimentation. Each step is characterized by a reaction rate constant. According to the first reaction, the results showed that gelatin was the most efficient fining agent, concerning the main objective, which was the clarification of the wine, and consequently the increase in its limpidity. Such a trend was also discussed in relation to the results achieved by nephelometry, total phenols, ζ-potential, color, sensory, and electronic nose analyses. Also, higher concentrations of the fining agent (from 5 to 30 g/100 L) or higher temperatures (from 10 to 20 °C) sped up the process. Finally, the advantage of using the whole spectral signal vs classical univariate approaches was demonstrated by comparing the uncertainty associated with the rate constants of the proposed kinetic model. Overall, multiple light scattering technique showed a great potential for studying fining processes compared to classical univariate approaches.

  2. Flow speed measurement using two-point collective light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemeier, N.P

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of turbulence in plasmas and fluids using the technique of collective light scattering have always been plagued by very poor spatial resolution. In 1994, a novel two-point collective light scattering system for the measurement of transport in a fusion plasma was proposed. This diagnostic method was design for a great improvement of the spatial resolution, without sacrificing accuracy in the velocity measurement. The system was installed at the W7-AS steallartor in Garching, Germany, in 1996, and has been operating since. This master thesis is an investigation of the possible application of this new method to the measurement of flow speeds in normal fluids, in particular air, although the results presented in this work have significance for the plasma measurements as well. The main goal of the project was the experimental verification of previous theoretical predictions. However, the theoretical considerations presented in the thesis show that the method can only be hoped to work for flows that are almost laminar and shearless, which makes it of very small practical interest. Furthermore, this result also implies that the diagnostic at W7-AS cannot be expected to give the results originally hoped for. (au) 1 tab., 51 ills., 29 refs.

  3. High gradient accelerators for linear light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs powered by relativistic klystrons appear to be able to provide compact sources of radiation at XUV and soft x-ray wavelengths with a duration of 1 picosecond or less. This paper provides a tutorial review of the physics applicable to scaling the present experience of the accelerator community to the regime applicable to compact linear light sources. 22 refs., 11 figs., 21 tabs

  4. Radiation effects on light sources and detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of optoelectronics includes a wide variety of both military and non-military applications in which the systems must meet radiation exposure requirements. Herein, we review the work on radiation effects on sources and detectors for such optoelectronic systems. For sources the principal problem is permanent damage-induced light output degradation, while for detectors it is ionizing radiation-induced photocurrents

  5. Tunable light source for fiber optic lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Nadarajah; Bierman, Andrew; Finney, Mark J.; Edwards, Ian K.

    1997-09-01

    This paper examines the possibility of tuning the lamp spectrum to compensate for color distortions in fiber optic lighting systems. Because most optical fibers have strong absorption in the blue and red wavelength regions, white light entering and propagating down an optical fiber suffers varied amounts of attenuation as a function of wavelength. As a result, the light exiting the optical fiber has a greenish tint that the lighting design community considers undesirable in interior lighting applications. HID lamps are commonly used for the light source in this industry. Certain classes of HID lamps tend to shift in color when their operating position or the input voltage to the lamp is changed. An experimental study is being conducted to characterize the color shift properties of a small HID lamp as a function of tilt and input voltage. The study also examines the possibility of exploiting this color shift to compensate for the color distortions caused by optical fibers. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  6. Long-pulse Supercontinuum Light Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moselund, Peter M.

    A Supercontinuum (SC) is a broad spectrum generated from a narrow light source through non-linear effects. This thesis describes SC generation based on 1064 nm ps pulses in PCF fibres. We investigate how the SC spectrum can be modified and intensity noise reduced by feeding back part of the SC...

  7. Direct Detection of Polarized, Scattered Light from Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Gregory

    We propose to radically advance the state of exoplanet characterization, which lags dramatically behind exoplanet discovery. We propose to directly detect scattered light from the atmospheres of close-in, highly eccentric, and extended/non-spherical exoplanets and thereby determine the following: orbital inclination (and therefore masses free of the M sin i mass ambiguity), geometric albedo, presence or lack of hazes and cloud layers, and scattering particle size and composition. Such measurements are crucial to the understanding of exoplanet atmospheres, because observations with NASA s Hubble, Spitzer, and Kepler space telescopes present the following questions: 1) Do exoplanets have highly reflective haze layers? 2) How does the upper atmospheric composition differ between exoplanets with and without thermal inversions? 3) What are the optical manifestations of the extreme heating of highly eccentric exoplanets? 4) Are the atmospheres of certain exoplanets truly escaping their Roche lobes? Using the POLISH2 polarimeter developed by the Postdoctoral Associate (Wiktorowicz) for the Lick 3-m telescope, we propose to monitor the linear polarization state of exoplanet host stars at the part per million level. POLISH2 consistently delivers nearly photon shot noise limited measurements with this precision. In addition, the simultaneous full-Stokes measurements of POLISH2 and the equatorial mount of the Lick 3-m telescope ensure that systematic effects are mitigated to the part per million level. Indeed, we find the accuracy of the POLISH2 polarimeter to be 0.1 parts per million. This instrument and telescope represent the highest precision polarimeter in the world for exoplanet research. We present potential detection of polarized, scattered light from the HD 189733b, Tau Boo b, and WASP-12b exoplanets. We propose to observe hot Jupiters on circular orbits, highly eccentric exoplanets, exoplanets with extended or non-spherical scattering surfaces, and 55 Cnc e, the

  8. Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    contrast sensitivity with glare. This study measured angular scatter in the test articles , and showed that the cumulative (total) scatter beyond...Sample under laser illumination for angular scatter measurements ................................4  Figure 3: Scatter measurement system at a small...scatter effects image quality , visual performance and user acceptance. The purpose of the present effort was to develop a computational model that

  9. Modelling Elastic Scattering and Light Transport in 3D Collagen Gel Constructs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bixio, L

    2001-01-01

    A model of elastic scattering and light propagation is presented, which can be used to obtain the scattering coefficient, the index of refraction and the distribution of the collagen fibrils in a gel...

  10. An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz, Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

    2004-01-01

    One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades

  11. Study on the Light Scattering from Random Rough Surfaces by Kirrhoff Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keding Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the space distribution characteristics of light scattering from random rough surfaces, the linear filtering method is used to generate a series of Gaussian randomly rough surfaces, and the Kirchhoff Approximation is used to calculate the scattered light intensity distribution from random metal and dielectric rough surfaces. The three characteristics of the scattered light intensity distribution peak, the intensity distribution width and the position of peak are reviewed. Numerical calculation results show that significant differences between scattering characteristics of metal surfaces and the dielectric surfaces exist. The light scattering characteristics are jointly influenced by the slope distribution and reflectance of surface element. The scattered light intensity distribution is affected by common influence of surface local slope distribution and surface local reflectivity. The results can provide a basis theory for the research to lidar target surface scattering characteristics.

  12. Tunable white light source for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczak, Urszula J.; Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Development of light-emitting diodes has brought new possibilities in many applications, especially in terms of flexible adjustment of light spectra. This feature is very useful in construction of many devices, for example for medical diagnosis and treatment. It was proved, that in some cases LEDs can easily replace lasers during therapy of cancer without reduction of efficiency of this process. On the other hand during diagnosis process LED-based constructions can provide unique ability to adjust the color temperature of the output light while maintaining high color rendering. It allows for optimum surface contrast and enhanced tissue differentiation at the operator site. In the paper we describe the construction of the tunable LED-based source designed for application in endoscopy. It was optimized from the point of view of the color rendition for 5 different correlated color temperatures (illuminant A, D55, D65, 3500K and 4500K) with the restriction of very high (>90) values of general and specific color rendering indexes (according to Ra method). The source is composed of 13 light-emitting diodes from visible region mounted on the common radiator and controlled by dedicated system. Spectra of the components are mixed and the spectra of output light is analyzed. On the basis of obtained spectra colorimetric parameters are calculated and compared with the results of theoretical analysis.

  13. Light--light scattering tensor and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuraev, E.A.; Silagadze, Z.K.; Cheshel', A.A.; Schiller, A.

    1989-01-01

    A general expression is obtained for the tensor that describes the effect of light--light scattering on the anomalous magnetic moment of leptons. An explicit expression is derived for the electron-loop contribution, for which an analytic evaluation is carried out of the coefficient in front of the logarithm of the ratio of the muon mass to the electron mass in the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Logarithmic contributions due to radiative corrections are shown to originate exclusively from the inclusion of the polarization of the vacuum of virtual photons

  14. Supercontinuum light sources for food analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe Visbech; Petersen, Christian Rosenberg; Kubat, Irnis

    2014-01-01

    . One track of Light & Food will target the mid-infrared spectral region. To date, the limitations of mid-infraredlight sources, such as thermal emitters, low-power laser diodes, quantum cascade lasers and synchrotron radiation, have precluded mid-IR applications where the spatial coherence, broad...... bandwidth,high brightness and portability of a supercontinuum laser are all required. DTU Fotonik has now demonstrated the first optical fiber based broadband supercontinuum light souce, which covers 1.4-13.3μm and thereby most of the molecular fingerprint region....

  15. Elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup of light exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolata, J.J. [University of Notre Dame, Physics Department, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Guimaraes, V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguilera, E.F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Aceleradores, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2016-05-15

    The present status of fusion reactions involving light (A< 20) radioactive projectiles at energies around the Coulomb barrier (E<10 MeV per nucleon) is reviewed, emphasizing measurements made within the last decade. Data on elastic scattering (providing total reaction cross section information) and breakup channels for the involved systems, demonstrating the relationship between these and the fusion channel, are also reviewed. Similarities and differences in the behavior of fusion and total reaction cross section data concerning halo nuclei, weakly-bound but less exotic projectiles, and strongly-bound systems are discussed. One difference in the behavior of fusion excitation functions near the Coulomb barrier seems to emerge between neutron-halo and proton-halo systems. The role of charge has been investigated by comparing the fusion excitation functions, properly scaled, for different neutron- and proton-rich systems. Possible physical explanations for the observed differences are also reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-10-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  17. Cell light scattering characteristic numerical simulation research based on FDTD algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Zhu, Hao; Weng, Lingdong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm has been used to work out the cell light scattering problem. Before beginning to do the simulation contrast, finding out the changes or the differences between normal cells and abnormal cells which may be cancerous or maldevelopment is necessary. The preparation of simulation are building up the simple cell model of cell which consists of organelles, nucleus and cytoplasm and setting up the suitable precision of mesh. Meanwhile, setting up the total field scattering field source as the excitation source and far field projection analysis group is also important. Every step need to be explained by the principles of mathematic such as the numerical dispersion, perfect matched layer boundary condition and near-far field extrapolation. The consequences of simulation indicated that the position of nucleus changed will increase the back scattering intensity and the significant difference on the peak value of scattering intensity may result from the changes of the size of cytoplasm. The study may help us find out the regulations based on the simulation consequences and the regulations can be meaningful for early diagnosis of cancers.

  18. Excitation of anodized alumina films with a light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin; Canulescu, Stela; Rechendorff, K.

    Optical properties of anodized aluminium alloys were determined by optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of such films. Samples with different concentrations of dopants were excited with a white-light source combined with an integrating sphere for fast determination of diffuse reflectance....... The UV-VIS reflectance of Ti-doped anodized aluminium films was measured over the wavelength range of 200 nm to 900 nm. Titanium doped-anodized aluminium films with 5-15 wt% Ti were characterized. Changes in the diffuse light scattering of doped anodized aluminium films, and thus optical appearance......, with doping are discussed. Using the Kubelka-Munk model on the diffuse reflectance spectra of such films, the bandgap Eg of the oxide alloys can be determined....

  19. Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world's brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director's message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users' executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff

  20. Advanced Light Source beam diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, has been recently commissioned. Beam diagnostics were very important to the success of the operation. Each diagnostic system is described in this paper along with detailed discussion of its performance. Some of the systems have been in operation for two years. Others, in the storage ring, have not yet been fully commissioned. These systems were, however, working well enough to provide the essential information needed to store beam. The devices described in this paper include wall current monitors, a beam charge monitor, a 50 ohm Faraday cup, DC current transformers, broad-hand striplines, fluorescence screens, beam collimators and scrapers, and beam position monitors. Also, the means by which waveforms are digitized and displayed in the control room is discussed

  1. PREFACE: Diagnostics for electrical discharge light sources: pushing the limits Diagnostics for electrical discharge light sources: pushing the limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissis, Georges; Haverlag, Marco

    2010-06-01

    Light sources play an indispensable role in the daily life of any human being. Quality of life, health and urban security related to traffic and crime prevention depend on light and on its quality. In fact, every day approximately 30 billion electric light sources operate worldwide. These electric light sources consume almost 19% of worldwide electricity production. Finding new ways to light lamps is a challenge where the stakes are scientific, technological, economic and environmental. The production of more efficient light sources is a sustainable solution for humanity. There are many opportunities for not only enhancing the efficiency and reliability of lighting systems but also for improving the quality of light as seen by the end user. This is possible through intelligent use of new technologies, deep scientific understanding of the operating principles of light sources and knowledge of the varied human requirements for different types of lighting in different settings. A revolution in the domain of light source technology is on the way: high brightness light emitting diodes arriving in the general lighting market, together with organic LEDs (OLEDs), are producing spectacular advances. However, unlike incandescence, electrical discharge lamps are far from disappearing from the market. In addition, new generations of discharge lamps based on molecular radiators are becoming a reality. There are still many scientific and technological challenges to be raised in this direction. Diagnostics are important for understanding the fundamental mechanisms taking place in the discharge plasma. This understanding is an absolute necessity for system optimization leading to more efficient and high quality light sources. The studied medium is rather complex, but new diagnostic techniques coupled to innovative ideas and powerful tools have been developed in recent years. This cluster issue of seven papers illustrates these efforts. The selected papers cover all domains, from

  2. Basic experiment on scattering type level gauge using neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazaki, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Ryoichi; Horiguchi, Yasuhiro

    1984-01-01

    The level gauges using sealed radiation sources have been utilized for pulp and chemical industries, however, for those gauges, transmission type gamma sources are used, which require considerably large radioactivity, and it hinders the spread to medium and small enterprises. Recently, Cf-252 has become easily available, and various He-3 counters are on the market, consequently, the scattering type level gauges combining them have been examined. With the level gauges of this type, the judgement of level can be made sufficiently with the Cf-252 below 3.7 x 10 6 Bq, therefore, if the practical instruments are made, they seem to spread into medium and small enterprises because of the safety and the chief handling radiation being unnecessary. For the purpose of developing and manufacturing for trial this scattering type level gauge, the basic experiment was carried out to examine the effects of the change of salt content and the thickness of vessels and the effect of scattering materials. The possibility of the on-off operation as level gauges was also examined. The experimental method and the results are reported. The count considerably decreased with increasing salt content. Scattering materials worked effectively to increase the count. (Kako, I.)

  3. Pioneering SESAME light source officially opened

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    Allan, Jordan, 16 May 2017. The SESAME light source was today officially opened by His Majesty King Abdullah II. An intergovernmental organization, SESAME is the first regional laboratory for the Middle East and neighbouring regions The laboratory’s official opening ushers in a new era of research covering fields ranging from medicine and biology, through materials science, physics and chemistry to healthcare, the environment, agriculture and archaeology.

  4. High resolution Thomson scattering system for steady-state linear plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Kim, J. H.; Lho, T.

    2018-01-01

    The high resolution Thomson scattering system with 63 points along a 25 mm line measures the radial electron temperature (Te) and its density (ne) in an argon plasma. By using a DC arc source with lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) electrode, plasmas with electron temperature of over 5 eV and densities of 1.5 × 1019 m-3 have been measured. The system uses a frequency doubled (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser with 0.25 J/pulse at 20 Hz. The scattered light is collected and sent to a triple-grating spectrometer via optical-fibers, where images are recorded by an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. Although excellent in stray-light reduction, a disadvantage comes with its relatively low optical transmission and in sampling a tiny scattering volume. Thus requires accumulating multitude of images. In order to improve photon statistics, pixel binning in the ICCD camera as well as enlarging the intermediate slit-width inside the triple-grating spectrometer has been exploited. In addition, the ICCD camera capture images at 40 Hz while the laser is at 20 Hz. This operation mode allows us to alternate between background and scattering shot images. By image subtraction, influences from the plasma background are effectively taken out. Maximum likelihood estimation that uses a parameter sweep finds best fitting parameters Te and ne with the incoherent scattering spectrum.

  5. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon g-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyffeler, A.

    2010-01-01

    We review recent developments concerning the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. We first discuss why fully off-shell hadronic form factors should be used for the evaluation of this contribution to the g-2. We then reevaluate the numerically dominant pion-exchange contribution in the framework of large-N C QCD, using an off-shell pion-photon-photon form factor which fulfills all QCD short-distance constraints,in particular, a new short-distance constraint on the off-shell form factor at the external vertex in g-2, which relates the form factor to the quark condensate magnetic susceptibility in QCD. Combined with available evaluations of the other contributions to hadronic light-by-light scattering this leads to the new result α μ LbyL;had =(116 ± 40) x 10 -11 , with a conservative error estimate in view of the many still unsolved problems. Some potential ways for further improvements are briefly discussed as well. For the electron we obtain the new estimate α e LbyL;had =(3.9 ± 1.3) x 10 -14 . (author)

  6. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  7. Toward a fourth-generation light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    Historically, x-ray research has been propelled by the existence of urgent and compelling scientific questions and the push of powerful and exquisite source technology. These two factors have gone hand in hand since Rontgen discovered x-rays. Here we review the progress being made with existing third-generation synchrotron-radiation light sources and the prospects for a fourth-generation light source with dramatically improved laser-like beam characteristics. The central technology for high-brilliance x-ray beams is the x-ray undulator, a series of alternating-pole magnets situated above and below the particle beam. When the particle beam is oscillated by the alternating magnetic fields, a set of. interacting and interfering wave fronts is produced, which leads to an x-ray beam with extraordinary properties. Third-generation sources of light in the hard x-ray range have been constructed at three principal facilities: the European Synchrotrons Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France; the Super Photon Ring 8-GeV (or Spring-8) in Japan; and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the US. Undulator technology is also used on a number of low-energy machines for radiation in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regimes. At the APS, these devices exceed all of our original expectations for beam brilliance, tunability, spectral range, and operational flexibility. Shown in Fig. 1 are the tuning curves of the first few harmonics, showing x-ray production from a few kV to better than 40 keV. High-brilliance radiation extends to over 100 keV

  8. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  9. Multi-channel normal speed gated integrator in the measurement of the laser scattering light energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dong; Yu Xiaoqi; Hu Yuanfeng

    2005-01-01

    With the method of integration in a limited time, a Multi-channel normal speed gated integrator based on VXI system has been developed for measuring the signals with changeable pulse width in laser scattering light experiment. It has been tested with signal sources in ICF experiment. In tests, the integral nonlinearity between the integral results of the gated integrator and that of an oscilloscope is less than 1%. In the ICF experiments the maximum error between the integral results of the gated integrator and that of oscilloscope is less than 3% of the full scale range of the gated integrator. (authors)

  10. Optimization of virtual source parameters in neutron scattering instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habicht, K; Skoulatos, M

    2012-01-01

    We report on phase-space optimizations for neutron scattering instruments employing horizontal focussing crystal optics. Defining a figure of merit for a generic virtual source configuration we identify a set of optimum instrumental parameters. In order to assess the quality of the instrumental configuration we combine an evolutionary optimization algorithm with the analytical Popovici description using multidimensional Gaussian distributions. The optimum phase-space element which needs to be delivered to the virtual source by preceding neutron optics may be obtained using the same algorithm which is of general interest in instrument design.

  11. Dual wavelength multiple-angle light scattering system for cryptosporidium detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaprathoom, S.; Pedley, S.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple, dual wavelength, multiple-angle, light scattering system has been developed for detecting cryptosporidium suspended in water. Cryptosporidium is a coccidial protozoan parasite causing cryptosporidiosis; a diarrheal disease of varying severity. The parasite is transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water, particularly drinking-water, but also accidental ingestion of bathing-water, including swimming pools. It is therefore important to be able to detect these parasites quickly, so that remedial action can be taken to reduce the risk of infection. The proposed system combines multiple-angle scattering detection of a single and two wavelengths, to collect relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering phase functions from tested suspension, and multivariate data analysis techniques to obtain characterizing information of samples under investigation. The system was designed to be simple, portable and inexpensive. It employs two diode lasers (violet InGaN-based and red AlGaInP-based) as light sources and silicon photodiodes as detectors and optical components, all of which are readily available. The measured scattering patterns using the dual wavelength system showed that the relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering pattern of cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly different from other particles (e.g. polystyrene latex sphere, E.coli). The single wavelength set up was applied for cryptosporidium oocysts'size and relative refractive index measurement and differential measurement of the concentration of cryptosporidium oocysts suspended in water and mixed polystyrene latex sphere suspension. The measurement results showed good agreement with the control reference values. These results indicate that the proposed method could potentially be applied to online detection in a water quality control system.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  14. The JLab high power ERL light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, G.R.; Behre, C.; Benson, S.V.

    2006-01-01

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160MeV electron beam and an average current of 10mA in 75MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz ∼ half cycle pulse whose average brightness is >5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20W of average power extracted [Carr, et al., Nature 420 (2002) 153]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100fs pulses with >200W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [Neil, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 662]: up to 10kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14μm in 400fs pulses at up to 74.85MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000nm light at up to 3kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10ms long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and

  15. The JLab high power ERL light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made

  16. Sources of scattering in vegetarian and other surfaces and objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    The sources of scattering in vegetation and other surfaces and objects were studied. A special radar, SOURCESCAT, that could resolve a cylindrical volume 18 cm in diameter and 11 cm long was built. This system provided the first really fine-resolution measurements of radar backscatter from vegetation. The measurements showed that many of the assumptions used previously in modeling vegetation backscatter were false. Vegetation studied included various field crops, prairie grass, and various trees. Major differences were found in the roles of leaves, branches, stems, and trunks for different species. An artificial tree was studied in the laboratory using the systems. The most significant findings were that the average radar volume scattering coefficient is independent of azimuth, and that slanting of the polarization vector can give useful information not available with ordinary vertical and horizontal polarization. A model for scattering from a single leaf was developed. This model, for the first time, took into account the presence of veins in leaves. The pattern of scatter from a leaf was shown quite different from that for which the veins are ignored. A list of publications and presentations resulting from this project are attached.

  17. Endoscopic hyperspectral imaging: light guide optimization for spectral light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Craig M.; Mayes, Samuel; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technology used in remote sensing, food processing and documentation recovery. Recently, this approach has been applied in the medical field to spectrally interrogate regions of interest within respective substrates. In spectral imaging, a two (spatial) dimensional image is collected, at many different (spectral) wavelengths, to sample spectral signatures from different regions and/or components within a sample. Here, we report on the use of hyperspectral imaging for endoscopic applications. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd leading cancer for incidences and deaths in the US. One factor of severity is the miss rate of precancerous/flat lesions ( 65% accuracy). Integrating HSI into colonoscopy procedures could minimize misdiagnosis and unnecessary resections. We have previously reported a working prototype light source with 16 high-powered light emitting diodes (LEDs) capable of high speed cycling and imaging. In recent testing, we have found our current prototype is limited by transmission loss ( 99%) through the multi-furcated solid light guide (lightpipe) and the desired framerate (20-30 fps) could not be achieved. Here, we report on a series of experimental and modeling studies to better optimize the lightpipe and the spectral endoscopy system as a whole. The lightpipe was experimentally evaluated using an integrating sphere and spectrometer (Ocean Optics). Modeling the lightpipe was performed using Monte Carlo optical ray tracing in TracePro (Lambda Research Corp.). Results of these optimization studies will aid in manufacturing a revised prototype with the newly designed light guide and increased sensitivity. Once the desired optical output (5-10 mW) is achieved then the HIS endoscope system will be able to be implemented without adding onto the procedure time.

  18. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedl, G.L.

    1987-10-01

    MATRIX is a group of scientists who have common interests in utilizing x-ray synchrotron radiation for materials research. This group has developed a specialized beam line (X-18A) for x-ray scattering studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The beam line was designed to optimize experimental conditions for diffuse scattering and surface/interface studies. An extension of diffuse scattering to provide better quantitative data has been shown as well as a unique application to the solution of the phase problem. In the x-ray surface scattering area the first reported experiment to illustrate the capabilities for studying monolayers on water was performed. Current beam line upgrade projects are also described. In addition to a change to a UHV system and improvements dictated by operational experience, two new systems are described, a unique small angle scattering chamber (SAXS) for dynamic studies of nucleation and growth and a surface scattering chamber. 5 figs

  19. Neutron scattering and muon spin rotation as probes of light interstitial transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of light interstitials, specifically of hydrogen isotopes and the positive muon, is studied with the help of microscopic transport models. The principal observables are the differential neutron scattering cross section of the hydrogen isotopes and the muon spin rotation signal of the positive muon. The transport feature of primary interest is coherence arising as a result of persistence of quantum mechanical phase memory. Evaluation of observables is based on the generalized master equation, or alternatively, the stochastic Liouville equation. The latter is applied to obtain the neutron scattering lineshapes for local tunneling systems as well as for extended Bravais and non-Bravais lattices. It is found that the usual form of the stochastic Liouville equation does not address adequately transport among non-degenerate site-states. An appropriate modification is suggested and employed to obtain scattering lineshapes applicable to recent experiments on impurity-trapped hydrogen. The muon spin rotation signal is formulated under the assumption that spin interactions constitute a negligible source of scattering for muon transport. The depolarization function is evaluated for the cases of local tunneling systems and simple models of spatially extended transport. The former addresses consequences of coherence and both address the consequences of the spatial extent of the muon wavefunction. It is found that the depolarization function is sensitive to the wave function extent, and the detail attributable to it is characterized

  20. Compton scattering of photons from electrons bound in light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A brief introduction to the topic of Compton scattering from bound electrons is presented. The fundamental nature of this process in understanding quantum phenomena is reviewed. Methods for accurate theoretical evaluation of the Compton scattering cross section are presented. Examples are presented for scattering of several keV photons from helium

  1. Advanced Light Source beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a synchrotron radiation facility nearing completion at LBL. As a third-generation machine, the ALS is designed to produce intense light from bend magnets, wigglers, and undulators (insertion devices). The facility will include a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron, beam transport lines, a 1--2 GeV storage ring, insertion devices, and photon beam lines. Currently, the beam injection systems are being commissioned, and the storage ring is being installed. Electron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics. The design of the BPM instruments is complete, and 50 units have been constructed for use in the injector systems. We are currently fabricating 100 additional instruments for the storage ring. In this paper I discuss engineering fabrication, testing and performance of the beam pickup electrodes and the BPM electronics

  2. Plasma-based EUV light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumlak, Uri; Golingo, Raymond; Nelson, Brian A.

    2010-11-02

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  3. Multiple scattering of polarized light: comparison of Maxwell theory and radiative transfer theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Florian; Hohmann, Ansgar; Schäfer, Jan; Kienle, Alwin

    2012-04-01

    For many research areas in biomedical optics, information about scattering of polarized light in turbid media is of increasing importance. Scattering simulations within this field are mainly performed on the basis of radiative transfer theory. In this study a polarization sensitive Monte Carlo solution of radiative transfer theory is compared to exact Maxwell solutions for all elements of the scattering Müller matrix. Different scatterer volume concentrations are modeled as a multitude of monodisperse nonabsorbing spheres randomly positioned in a cubic simulation volume which is irradiated with monochromatic incident light. For all Müller matrix elements effects due to dependent scattering and multiple scattering are analysed. The results are in overall good agreement between the two methods with deviations related to dependent scattering being prominent for high volume concentrations and high scattering angles.

  4. Validation of in-line surface characterization by light scattering in Robot Assisted Polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of a commercial scattered light sensor for in-line characterization of fine surfaces in the roughness range Sa 1 – 30 nm generated by the Robot Assisted Polishing (RAP) was investigated and validated. A number of surfaces were generated and directly measured with the scattered light...

  5. Plasmonic scattering back reflector for light trapping in flat nano-crystalline silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.; van de Groep, J.; Veldhuizen, L.W.; Di Vece, M.; Polman, A.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2016-01-01

    Most types of thin film solar cells require light management to achieve sufficient light absorptance. We demonstrate a novel process for fabricating a scattering back reflector for flat, thin film hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cells. This scattering back reflector consists of

  6. The effect of scattered light sensor orientation on roughness measurement of curved polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    directions, and its acquisition within ± 16º angular range with a linear detector array. From the distribution of the acquired scattered light intensity, a number of statistical parameters describing the surface texture are calculated, where the Aq parameter (variance of the scattered light distribution...

  7. A rotational diffusion coefficient of the 70s ribosome determined by depolarized laser light scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, J.; Fijnaut, H.M.

    We have obtained a rotational diffusion coefficient of the 70S ribosome isolated from Escherichia-coli (MRE-600), from the depolarized light scattering spectrum measured by photon correlation spectroscopy. The intensity correlation function of depolarized scattered light contains contributions due

  8. Discrimination of human cytotoxic lymphocytes from regulatory and B-lymphocytes by orthogonal light scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; de Grooth, B.G.; ten Napel, C.H.H.; van Berkel, W.; Greve, Jan

    1986-01-01

    Light scattering properties of human lymphocyte subpopulations selected by immunofluorescence were studied with a flow cytometer. Regulatory and B-lymphocytes showed a low orthogonal light scatter signal, whereas cytotoxic lymphocytes identified with leu-7, leu-11 and leu-15 revealed a large

  9. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  10. Magnet costs for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, J.; Krupnick, J.; Hoyer, E.; Paterson, A.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerator is now completed. The numerous conventional magnets required for the booster ring, the storage ring and the low and high energy transfer lines were installed during the last two years. This paper summarizes the various costs associated with the quantity fabrication of selected magnet families. These costs include the costs of prototypes, tooling, coil and core fabrication, assembly and magnetic measurements. Brief descriptions of the magnets and specialized requirements for magnetic measurements are included in order to associate the costs with the relative complexities of the various magnet systems

  11. Chemical Dynamics at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, T.; Berrah, N.; Fadley, C.; Moore, C.B.; Neumark, D.M.; Ng, C.Y.; Ruscic, B.; Smith, N.V.; Suits, A.G.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    A day-long retreat was held January 15, 1999 to chart the future directions for chemical dynamics studies at the Advanced Light Source. This represents an important period for the Chemical Dynamics Beamline, as the hardware is well-developed, most of the initial experimental objectives have been realized and the mission is now to identify the future scientific priorities for the beamline and attract users of the highest caliber. To this end, we have developed a detailed scientific program for the near term; identified and prioritized the long range scientific opportunities, identified essential new hardware, and outlined an aggressive outreach program to involve the chemical physics community

  12. Integrated source of broadband quadrature squeezed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Ulrich Busk; Nielsen, Bo Melholt; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2015-01-01

    An integrated silicon nitride resonator is proposed as an ultracompact source of bright single-mode quadrature squeezed light at 850 nm. Optical properties of the device are investigated and tailored through numerical simulations, with particular attention paid to loss associated with interfacing...... the device. An asymmetric double layer stack waveguide geometry with inverse vertical tapers is proposed for efficient and robust fibre-chip coupling, yielding a simulated total loss of -0.75 dB/facet. We assess the feasibility of the device through a full quantum noise analysis and derive the output...

  13. RAMAN LIGHT SCATTERING IN PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON MODEL AT STRONG PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S.Mysakovych

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anharmonic phonon contributions to Raman scattering in locally anharmonic crystal systems in the framework of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels are investigated. The case of strong pseudospin-electron coupling is considered. Pseudospin and electron contributions to scattering are taken into account. Frequency dependences of Raman scattering intensity for different values of model parameters and for different polarization of scattering and incident light are investigated.

  14. Static and dynamic light scattering studies on dilute polyrotaxane solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tetsuya; Araki, Jun; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mayumi, Koichi; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Hideaki; Ito, Kohzo

    2009-08-01

    Static and dynamic light scattering measurements were performed for dilute polyrotaxane solutions in different types of solvent systems, i.e. dimethylacetamide (DMAc) or dimethylformamide (DMF) containing 1-6 wt% lithium chloride (LiCl), 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). No aggregation of the polyrotaxane in DMF/LiCl was confirmed in the present study. Radius of gyration of the dissolved polyrotaxane was largest in NaOHaq., followed by values in amide solvents/LiCl and that in DMSO, and was probably dominated not by Coulombic repulsion but by the mutual affinity between solvent and polyrotaxane. Ratio of radius of gyration to hydrodynamic radius suggested the flexible random-coiled conformation in DMSO and relatively more extended, semi-flexible ones in amide solvents/LiCl and NaOHaq. The obtained values of second virial coefficient and weight average molecular weight seemed to be affected by a potential change in differential refractive index increments, caused by selective macrocationization or ionization.

  15. Light Scattering Characterization of Elastin-Like Polypeptide Trimer Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuper, Ilona; Terrano, Daniel; Maraschky, Adam; Holland, Nolan; Streletzky, Kiril

    The elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) nanoparticles are composed of three-armed star polypeptides connected by a negatively charged foldon. Each of the three arms extending from the foldon domain includes 20 repeats of the (GVGVP) amino acid sequence. The ELP polymer chains are soluble at room temperature and become insoluble at the transition temperature (close to 50 ° C), forming micelles. The size and shape of the micelle are dependent on the temperature and the pH of the solution, and on the concentration of the phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) was employed to study the structure and dynamics of micelles at 62 ° C. The solution was maintained at an approximate pH level of 7.3 - 7.5, while varying PBS concentration. At low salt concentrations (60 mM) displayed an apparent elongation of the micelles evident by a significant VH signal, along with a surge in the apparent Rh. A model of micelle growth (and potential elongation) with increase in salt concentration is considered.

  16. Static and dynamic light scattering studies on dilute polyrotaxane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tetsuya; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mayumi, Koichi; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Hideaki; Ito, Kohzo; Araki, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Static and dynamic light scattering measurements were performed for dilute polyrotaxane solutions in different types of solvent systems, i.e. dimethylacetamide (DMAc) or dimethylformamide (DMF) containing 1-6 wt% lithium chloride (LiCl), 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). No aggregation of the polyrotaxane in DMF/LiCl was confirmed in the present study. Radius of gyration of the dissolved polyrotaxane was largest in NaOHaq., followed by values in amide solvents/LiCl and that in DMSO, and was probably dominated not by Coulombic repulsion but by the mutual affinity between solvent and polyrotaxane. Ratio of radius of gyration to hydrodynamic radius suggested the flexible random-coiled conformation in DMSO and relatively more extended, semi-flexible ones in amide solvents/LiCl and NaOHaq. The obtained values of second virial coefficient and weight average molecular weight seemed to be affected by a potential change in differential refractive index increments, caused by selective macrocationization or ionization.

  17. Portable bacterial identification system based on elastic light scatter patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bae Euiwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional diagnosis and identification of bacteria requires shipment of samples to a laboratory for genetic and biochemical analysis. This process can take days and imposes significant delay to action in situations where timely intervention can save lives and reduce associated costs. To enable faster response to an outbreak, a low-cost, small-footprint, portable microbial-identification instrument using forward scatterometry has been developed. Results This device, weighing 9 lb and measuring 12 × 6 × 10.5 in., utilizes elastic light scatter (ELS patterns to accurately capture bacterial colony characteristics and delivers the classification results via wireless access. The overall system consists of two CCD cameras, one rotational and one translational stage, and a 635-nm laser diode. Various software algorithms such as Hough transform, 2-D geometric moments, and the traveling salesman problem (TSP have been implemented to provide colony count and circularity, centering process, and minimized travel time among colonies. Conclusions Experiments were conducted with four bacteria genera using pure and mixed plate and as proof of principle a field test was conducted in four different locations where the average classification rate ranged between 95 and 100%.

  18. Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Using Forward Laser Light Scatter Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Randall T; Clinton, Lani K; Hewitt, Carolyn; Koyamatsu, Terri; Sun, Yilun; Jamison, Ginger; Perkins, Rosalie; Tang, Li; Pounds, Stanley; Bankowski, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    The delayed reporting of antimicrobial susceptibility testing remains a limiting factor in clinical decision-making in the treatment of bacterial infection. This study evaluates the use of forward laser light scatter (FLLS) to measure bacterial growth for the early determination of antimicrobial susceptibility. Three isolates each (two clinical isolates and one reference strain) of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were tested in triplicate using two commercial antimicrobial testing systems, the Vitek2 and the MicroScan MIC panel, to challenge the BacterioScan FLLS. The BacterioScan FLLS showed a high degree of categorical concordance with the commercial methods. Pairwise comparison with each commercial system serving as a reference standard showed 88.9% agreement with MicroScan (two minor errors) and 72.2% agreement with Vitek (five minor errors). FLLS using the BacterioScan system shows promise as a novel method for the rapid and accurate determination of antimicrobial susceptibility. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. A study of light scattering of mononuclear blood cells with scanning flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharinov, Alexey; Tarasov, Peter; Shvalov, Alexander; Semyanov, Konstantin; Bockstaele, Dirk R. van; Maltsev, Valeri

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the measurement of light scattering of human mononuclear blood cells, the development of an appropriate optical model for those cells, and solution of the inverse light-scattering problem. The angular dependency of light-scattering intensity of mononuclear blood cells was experimentally measured by means of scanning flow cytometry. A sphere consisting of several concentric homogeneous layers with different refractive indices was tested as an optical model for mononuclear blood cells. A five-layer model has given the best agreement between experimental and theoretical light-scattering profiles. The inverse light-scattering problem was solved for a five-layer model with an optimization procedure that allows one to retrieve cell parameters: cell size relates to the outer diameter of the fifth layer; size of the nucleus relates to the outer diameter of the third layer. Mean values of cell size, nuclear size, refractive indices of nucleus and cellular cytoplasm were determined for blood monocytes and lymphocytes

  20. Angular-dependent light scattering from cancer cells in different phases of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhou, Yong

    2017-10-10

    Cancer cells in different phases of the cell cycle result in significant differences in light scattering properties. In order to harvest cancer cells in particular phases of the cell cycle, we cultured cancer cells through the process of synchronization. Flow cytometric analysis was applied to check the results of cell synchronization and prepare for light scattering measurements. Angular-dependent light scattering measurements of cancer cells arrested in the G1, S, and G2 phases have been performed. Based on integral calculations for scattering intensities from 5° to 10° and from 110° to 150°, conclusions have been reached. Clearly, the sizes of the cancer cells in different phases of the cell cycle dominated the forward scatter. Accompanying the increase of cell size with the progression of the cell cycle, the forward scattering intensity also increased. Meanwhile, the DNA content of cancer cells in every phase of the cell cycle is responsible for light scattering at large scatter angles. The higher the DNA content of cancer cells was, the greater the positive effect on the high-scattering intensity. As expected, understanding the relationships between the light scattering from cancer cells and cell cycles will aid in the development of cancer diagnoses. Also, it may assist in the guidance of antineoplastic drugs clinically.

  1. Electrodeless light source provided with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used to assist in starting a discharge in an electrodeless light source. The radioactive emissions predispose on the inner surface of the lamp envelope loosely bound charges which thereafter assist in initiating discharge. The radioactive material can be enclosed within the lamp envelope in gaseous or non-gaseous form. Preferred materials are krypton 85 and americium 241. In addition, the radioactive material can be dispersed in the lamp envelope material or can be a pellet imbedded in the envelope material. Finally, the radioactive material can be located in the termination fixture. Sources of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays are suitable. Because charges accumulate with time on the inner surface of the lamp envelope, activity levels as low as 10 -8 curie are effective as starting aids. (Auth.)

  2. Listening to light scattering in turbid media: quantitative optical scattering imaging using photoacoustic measurements with one-wavelength illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Li, Xiaoqi; Xi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a potential imaging modality, can visualize tissue structure and function with high spatial resolution and excellent optical contrast. It is widely recognized that the ability of quantitatively imaging optical absorption and scattering coefficients from photoacoustic measurements is essential before PAT can become a powerful imaging modality. Existing quantitative PAT (qPAT), while successful, has been focused on recovering absorption coefficient only by assuming scattering coefficient a constant. An effective method for photoacoustically recovering optical scattering coefficient is presently not available. Here we propose and experimentally validate such a method for quantitative scattering coefficient imaging using photoacoustic data from one-wavelength illumination. The reconstruction method developed combines conventional PAT with the photon diffusion equation in a novel way to realize the recovery of scattering coefficient. We demonstrate the method using various objects having scattering contrast only or both absorption and scattering contrasts embedded in turbid media. The listening-to-light-scattering method described will be able to provide high resolution scattering imaging for various biomedical applications ranging from breast to brain imaging. (papers)

  3. Chiral symmetry and dispersion relations: from $\\pi \\pi$ scattering to hadronic light-by-light.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Chiral symmetry provides strong constraints on hadronic matrix elements at low energy, which are most efficiently derived with chiral perturbation theory. As an effective quantum field theory the latter also accounts for rescattering or unitarity effects, albeit only perturbatively, via the loop expansion. In cases where rescattering effects are important it becomes necessary to go beyond the perturbative expansion, e.g. by using dispersion relations. A matching between the chiral and the dispersive representation provides in several cases results of high precision. I will discuss this approach with the help of a few examples, like $\\pi \\pi$ scattering (which has been tested successfully by CERN experiments like NA48/2 and DIRAC), $\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$ and the hadronic light-by-light contribution to $(g-2)_\\mu$. For the latter quantity the implementation of the dispersive approach has opened up the way to a model-independent calculation and the concrete possibility to significantly reduce the theoretical uncertain...

  4. Measuring light-by-light scattering at the LHC and FCC

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    Elastic light-by-light scattering, $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\gamma\\gamma$, can be measured in electromagnetic interactions of lead (Pb) ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC), using the large (quasi)real photon fluxes available in ultraperipheral collisions. The $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ cross sections for diphoton masses m$_{\\gamma\\gamma}>$ 5 GeV in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at LHC ($\\sqrt{\\rm s_{_{NN}}}$ = 5.5, 8.8, 14 TeV) and FCC ($\\sqrt{\\rm s_{_{NN}}}$ = 39, 63, 100 TeV) center-of-mass energies are presented. The measurement has controllable backgrounds in PbPb collisions, and one expects about 70 and 2500 signal events per year at the LHC and FCC respectively, after typical detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency selections.

  5. Towards a data-driven analysis of hadronic light-by-light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin; Kubis, Bastian; Procura, Massimiliano; Stoffer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon was recently analyzed in the framework of dispersion theory, providing a systematic formalism where all input quantities are expressed in terms of on-shell form factors and scattering amplitudes that are in principle accessible in experiment. We briefly review the main ideas behind this framework and discuss the various experimental ingredients needed for the evaluation of one- and two-pion intermediate states. In particular, we identify processes that in the absence of data for doubly-virtual pion-photon interactions can help constrain parameters in the dispersive reconstruction of the relevant input quantities, the pion transition form factor and the helicity partial waves for γ*γ* → ππ.

  6. Towards a data-driven analysis of hadronic light-by-light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin; Kubis, Bastian; Procura, Massimiliano; Stoffer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon was recently analyzed in the framework of dispersion theory, providing a systematic formalism where all input quantities are expressed in terms of on-shell form factors and scattering amplitudes that are in principle accessible in experiment. We briefly review the main ideas behind this framework and discuss the various experimental ingredients needed for the evaluation of one- and two-pion intermediate states. In particular, we identify processes that in the absence of data for doubly-virtual pion–photon interactions can help constrain parameters in the dispersive reconstruction of the relevant input quantities, the pion transition form factor and the helicity partial waves for γ * γ * →ππ

  7. Towards a data-driven analysis of hadronic light-by-light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Kubis, Bastian [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Procura, Massimiliano; Stoffer, Peter [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-10

    The hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon was recently analyzed in the framework of dispersion theory, providing a systematic formalism where all input quantities are expressed in terms of on-shell form factors and scattering amplitudes that are in principle accessible in experiment. We briefly review the main ideas behind this framework and discuss the various experimental ingredients needed for the evaluation of one- and two-pion intermediate states. In particular, we identify processes that in the absence of data for doubly-virtual pion–photon interactions can help constrain parameters in the dispersive reconstruction of the relevant input quantities, the pion transition form factor and the helicity partial waves for γ{sup *}γ{sup *}→ππ.

  8. Light-by-Light Scattering Constraint on Born-Infeld Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E; You, Tevong

    2017-06-30

    The recent measurement by ATLAS of light-by-light scattering in LHC Pb-Pb collisions is the first direct evidence for this basic process. We find that it excludes a range of the mass scale of a nonlinear Born-Infeld extension of QED that is ≲100  GeV, a much stronger constraint than those derived previously. In the case of a Born-Infeld extension of the standard model in which the U(1)_{Y} hypercharge gauge symmetry is realized nonlinearly, the limit on the corresponding mass reach is ∼90  GeV, which, in turn, imposes a lower limit of ≳11  TeV on the magnetic monopole mass in such a U(1)_{Y} Born-Infeld theory.

  9. Static and dynamic light scattering by red blood cells: A numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Johannes; Peltomäki, Matti; Poblete, Simón; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2017-01-01

    Light scattering is a well-established experimental technique, which gains more and more popularity in the biological field because it offers the means for non-invasive imaging and detection. However, the interpretation of light-scattering signals remains challenging due to the complexity of most biological systems. Here, we investigate static and dynamic scattering properties of red blood cells (RBCs) using two mesoscopic hydrodynamics simulation methods-multi-particle collision dynamics and dissipative particle dynamics. Light scattering is studied for various membrane shear elasticities, bending rigidities, and RBC shapes (e.g., biconcave and stomatocyte). Simulation results from the two simulation methods show good agreement, and demonstrate that the static light scattering of a diffusing RBC is not very sensitive to the changes in membrane properties and moderate alterations in cell shapes. We also compute dynamic light scattering of a diffusing RBC, from which dynamic properties of RBCs such as diffusion coefficients can be accessed. In contrast to static light scattering, the dynamic measurements can be employed to differentiate between the biconcave and stomatocytic RBC shapes and generally allow the differentiation based on the membrane properties. Our simulation results can be used for better understanding of light scattering by RBCs and the development of new non-invasive methods for blood-flow monitoring.

  10. Through-transmission laser welding of glass fibre composite: Experimental light scattering identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Benoit; Asséko, André Chateau Akué; Dauphin, Myriam

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a cost-effective, efficient and quick to implement experimental optical method in order to predict the optical properties (extinction coefficient) of semi-transparent polymer composites. The extinction coefficient takes into account the effects due to the absorption and the scattering phenomena in a semi-transparent component during the laser processes, i.e. TTLW (through-transmission laser welding). The present method used a laser as light source and a reflex camera equipped with a macro lens as a measurement device and is based on the light transmission measurement through different thickness samples. The interaction between the incident laser beam and the semi-transparent composite is exanimated. The results are presented for the case of a semi-transparent composite reinforced with the unidirectional glass fiber (UD). A numerical method, ray tracing, is used to validate the experimental results. The ray tracing method is appropriate to characterize the light-scattering phenomenon in semi-transparent materials.

  11. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, L.

    2005-01-01

    for the environmental science community, is also very important, as it will help to satisfy the large over subscription rate for this technique at the NSLS. Two other important upgrades that were initiated this past year are the replacement of the X25 wiggler with an undulator and the construction of the X9 undulator beamline for small-angle scattering, with an emphasis on nanoscience research. Another key activity that will benefit all users was the restoration of the x-ray ring lattice symmetry, which reduced the horizontal emittance and made the operational lattice more robust. Similarly, all users will benefit from the introduction of the PASS (Proposal Allocation Safety Scheduling) system this past year, which has greatly improved the process of proposal submission, review, allocation, and scheduling. This coming year we will work to add Rapid Access to the capabilities of PASS. Overall, the success of these and the many other projects that space does not permit listing is a testament to the dedication, hard work, and skill of the NSLS staff. Safety has always been an important issue at a large, complex scientific facility like the NSLS and in 2004 it received renewed attention. Safety is our highest priority and we spent a great deal of time reviewing and refining our safety practices and procedures. A new 'Safety Highlights' web page was created for safety news, and a large number of safety meetings and discussions were held. These reviews and meetings generated many ideas on how the NSLS might improve its safety practices, and we are committed to putting these in place and improving our already very good safety program. We had no lost-time accidents in 2004, which is a notable accomplishment. Our goal is to be best in class and I'm confident that by working together we can achieve that status. Several activities took place this past year to advance our proposal to replace the NSLS with a new National Synchrotron Light Source-II facility. These included a major

  12. Light Conversion and Scattering in UV Protective Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grancarić Ana Marija

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation in the population. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence 80% of UV-R gets absorbed, whilst in the remaining 20% gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Textile and clothing are the most suitable interface between environment and human body. It can show UV protection, but in most cases it does not provide full sun screening properties. UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fibre, fabric surface and construction, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agent (FWA, UV-B protective agents, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. Based on electronically excited state by energy of UV-R (usually 340-370 nm, the molecules of FWAs show the phenomenon of fluorescence giving to white textiles high whiteness of outstanding brightness by reemitting the energy at the blue region (typically 420-470 nm of the spectrum. By absorbing UV-A radiation, optical brightened fabrics transform this radiation into blue fluorescence, which leads to better UV protection. Natural zeolites are rock-forming, microporous silicate minerals. Applied as nanoparticles to textile surface, it scatters the UV-R resulting in lower UV-A and UV-B transmission. If applied with other UV absorbing agents, e.g. FWAs, synergistic effect occurs. Silicones are inert, synthetic compounds with a variety of forms and uses. It provides a unique soft touch, is very resistant to washing and improves the property of fabric to protect against UV radiation. Therefore, the UV protective properties of cotton fabric achieved by light conversion and scattering was researched in this paper. For that purpose, the stilbene-derived FWAs were applied on cotton fabric in wide concentration

  13. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon g - 2 on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Nils; Gérardin, Antoine; Green, Jeremy; Gryniuk, Oleksii; von Hippel, Georg; Meyer, Harvey B.; Nyffeler, Andreas; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Wittig, Hartmut

    2018-05-01

    We briefly review several activities at Mainz related to hadronic light-by-light scattering (HLbL) using lattice QCD. First we present a position-space approach to the HLbL contribution in the muon g̅2, where we focus on exploratory studies of the pion-pole contribution in a simple model and the lepton loop in QED in the continuum and in infinite volume. The second part describes a lattice calculation of the double-virtual pion transition form factor Fπ0γ*γ* (q21; q21) in the spacelike region with photon virtualities up to 1.5 GeV2 which paves the way for a lattice calculation of the pion-pole contribution to HLbL. The third topic involves HLbL forward scattering amplitudes calculated in lattice QCD which can be described, using dispersion relations (HLbL sum rules), by γ*γ* → hadrons fusion cross sections and then compared with phenomenological models.

  14. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierker, S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, G.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (1). These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  15. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z. -X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Stohr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  16. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  17. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Zhenyu [Wuhan University, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Han, Junbo [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-15

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√(E(MeV)) required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments. (orig.)

  18. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiang, E-mail: xiangzhou@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072, Wuhan (China); Liu, Qian, E-mail: liuqian@ucas.ac.cn [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Han, Junbo [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Zhenyu [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Zheng, Yangheng [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-21

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√(E(MeV)) required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  19. Light-by-light scattering and muon's anomalous magnetic moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauk, Vladyslav

    2014-07-01

    A study of hadron production by photons opens unique ways to address a number of fundamental problems in strong interaction physics as well as fundamental questions in Quantum Field Theory. In particular, an understanding of two-photon processes is of crucial importance for constraining the hadronic uncertainties in precision measurements and in searches for new physics. The process of γ{sup *}γ{sup *} fusion (by quasi-real photons γ or virtual photons γ{sup *}) into leptons and hadrons has been observed and studied in detail at nearly all high-energy colliders. From the theoretical point of view two-photon processes are very complicated. One of approaches which may be efficiently used to study non-perturbative features of two-photon production is based on a dispersion theory. Using general properties of relativistic quantum field theory we relate in this work the forward light-by-light scattering to energy weighted integrals of the γ{sup *}γ fusion cross sections. The first type of new relations derived in this work have the form of exact super-convergence sum rules. The second type involves the effective constants of the low-energy photon-photon interaction and allow to define them in terms of two-photon production cross sections. We subsequently test and verify these sum rules exactly at tree and one-loop level in scalar and spinor QED. Furthermore, we test the criterium of the tree-level unitarity imposed by the sum rules on the example of the massive spin-1 QED. Next, we apply the sum rules for the forward light-by-light scattering process within the context of the φ{sup 4} quantum field theory. Within this theory, we present a stringent causality criterion and apply it to a particular non-perturbative resummation of graphs. Applied to the γ{sup *}γ production of mesons, the superconvergence sum rules lead to intricate relations between theγγ decay widths and the γ{sup *}γ transition form factors for (pseudo-) scalar, axial-vector and tensor

  20. The potential and limitations of third generation light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormes, Josef

    2011-01-01

    To date, 3rd generation Light Sources, i.e. electron storage rings where mainly radiation from insertion devices (wigglers and undulators) is used for synchrotron radiation experiments are the 'workhorses' for basic and applied VUV/X-ray research. Several machine parameters. i.e. the energy of the electrons, the emittance and the circumference of the machine, together with the specification of the corresponding insertion devices determine the 'quality' of a facility and a specific beamline. In this talk, several of these aspects are discussed mainly from a users' point of view, i.e. what are the required specifications to carry out 'state-of-the-art' experiments in various areas, e.g. protein crystallography, Resonant Elastic and Inelastic X-ray Scattering (REIXS), Micro-/nanospectroscopy, and time resolved experiments in the femtosecond time domain. (author)

  1. Shape dependent resonance light scattering properties of gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jian; Huang Liqing; Zhao Junwu; Wang Yongchang; Zhao Yanrui; Hao Limei; Lu Yimin

    2005-01-01

    Suspended gold nanorods with mean aspect ratio 2.5 have been synthesized via electrochemical method. Resonance scattering properties have been studied. Two scattering peaks fixed at 400 and 640 nm are due to the scattering of the gold nanorods via coupling to the transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance. The quasi-static calculation results indicate that with the increasing aspect ratio of the nanorods, the longer wavelength scattering peak red shifts linearly and the shorter wavelength peak blue shifts non-linearly. When aspect ratio a/b = 1.0, ellipse degenerate to sphere and the two peaks unite into one peak at 450 nm

  2. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  3. Nano-particle based scattering layers for optical efficiency enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong-Wei; Lee, Jonghee; Hofmann, Simone; Hyun Kim, Yong; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lüssem, Björn; Wu, Chung-Chih; Leo, Karl; Gather, Malte C.

    2013-05-01

    The performance of both organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSC) depends on efficient coupling between optical far field modes and the emitting/absorbing region of the device. Current approaches towards OLEDs with efficient light-extraction often are limited to single-color emission or require expensive, non-standard substrates or top-down structuring, which reduces compatibility with large-area light sources. Here, we report on integrating solution-processed nano-particle based light-scattering films close to the active region of organic semiconductor devices. In OLEDs, these films efficiently extract light that would otherwise remain trapped in the device. Without additional external outcoupling structures, translucent white OLEDs containing these scattering films achieve luminous efficacies of 46 lm W-1 and external quantum efficiencies of 33% (both at 1000 cd m-2). These are by far the highest numbers ever reported for translucent white OLEDs and the best values in the open literature for any white device on a conventional substrate. By applying additional light-extraction structures, 62 lm W-1 and 46% EQE are reached. Besides universally enhancing light-extraction in various OLED configurations, including flexible, translucent, single-color, and white OLEDs, the nano-particle scattering film boosts the short-circuit current density in translucent organic solar cells by up to 70%.

  4. Intraocular light scatter, reflections, fluorescence and absorption: what we see in the slit lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Thomas J T P

    2018-01-01

    Much knowledge has been collected over the past 20 years about light scattering in the eye- in particular in the eye lens- and its visual effect, called straylight. It is the purpose of this review to discuss how these insights can be applied to understanding the slit lamp image. The slit lamp image mainly results from back scattering, whereas the effects on vision result mainly from forward scatter. Forward scatter originates from particles of about wavelength size distributed throughout the lens. Most of the slit lamp image originates from small particle scatter (Rayleigh scatter). For a population of middle aged lenses it will be shown that both these scatter components remove around 10% of the light from the direct beam. For slit lamp observation close to the reflection angles, zones of discontinuity (Wasserspalten) at anterior and posterior parts of the lens show up as rough surface reflections. All these light scatter effects increase with age, but the correlations with age, and also between the different components, are weak. For retro-illumination imaging it will be argued that the density or opacity seen in areas of cortical or posterior subcapsular cataract show up because of light scattering, not because of light loss. NOTES: (1) Light scatter must not be confused with aberrations. Light penetrating the eye is divided into two parts: a relatively small part is scattered, and removed from the direct beam. Most of the light is not scattered, but continues as the direct beam. This non-scattered part is the basis for functional imaging, but its quality is under the control of aberrations. Aberrations deflect light mainly over small angles (light scatter is important because of the straylight effects over large angles (>1°), causing problems like glare and hazy vision. (2) The slit lamp image in older lenses and nuclear cataract is strongly influenced by absorption. However, this effect is greatly exaggerated by the light path lengths concerned. This

  5. Light scattering and transmission measurement using digital imaging for online analysis of constituents in milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pranay; Sarma, Sanjay E.

    2015-05-01

    Milk is an emulsion of fat globules and casein micelles dispersed in an aqueous medium with dissolved lactose, whey proteins and minerals. Quantification of constituents in milk is important in various stages of the dairy supply chain for proper process control and quality assurance. In field-level applications, spectrophotometric analysis is an economical option due to the low-cost of silicon photodetectors, sensitive to UV/Vis radiation with wavelengths between 300 - 1100 nm. Both absorption and scattering are witnessed as incident UV/Vis radiation interacts with dissolved and dispersed constituents in milk. These effects can in turn be used to characterize the chemical and physical composition of a milk sample. However, in order to simplify analysis, most existing instrument require dilution of samples to avoid effects of multiple scattering. The sample preparation steps are usually expensive, prone to human errors and unsuitable for field-level and online analysis. This paper introduces a novel digital imaging based method of online spectrophotometric measurements on raw milk without any sample preparation. Multiple LEDs of different emission spectra are used as discrete light sources and a digital CMOS camera is used as an image sensor. The extinction characteristic of samples is derived from captured images. The dependence of multiple scattering on power of incident radiation is exploited to quantify scattering. The method has been validated with experiments for response with varying fat concentrations and fat globule sizes. Despite of the presence of multiple scattering, the method is able to unequivocally quantify extinction of incident radiation and relate it to the fat concentrations and globule sizes of samples.

  6. 4th generation light source instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A.

    1998-01-01

    This working group on 4th Generation Light Source (4GLS) Instrumentation was a follow-up to the opening-discussion on Challenges in Beam Profiling. It was in parallel with the Feedback Systems session. We filled the SSRL Conference Room with about 25 participants. The session opened with an introduction by Lumpkin. The target beam parameter values for a few-angstrom, self-amplified spontaneous emissions (SASE) experiment and for a diffraction-limited soft x-ray storage ring source were addressed. Instrument resolution would of course need to be 2-3 times better than the value measured, if possible. The nominal targeted performance parameters are emittance (1-2π mm mrad), bunch length (100 fs), peak-current (l-5 kA), beam size (10 microm), beam divergence (1 microrad), energy spread (2 x 10 -4 ), and beam energy (10's of GeV). These are mostly the SASE values, and the possible parameters for a diffraction-limited soft x-ray source would be relaxed somewhat. Beam stability and alignment specifications in the sub-micron domain for either device are anticipated

  7. Q-space analysis of light scattering by ice crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinson, Yuli W.; Maughan, Justin B.; Ding, Jiachen; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Yang, Ping; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2016-12-01

    Q-space analysis is applied to extensive simulations of the single-scattering properties of ice crystals with various habits/shapes over a range of sizes. The analysis uncovers features common to all the shapes: a forward scattering regime with intensity quantitatively related to the Rayleigh scattering by the particle and the internal coupling parameter, followed by a Guinier regime dependent upon the particle size, a complex power law regime with incipient two dimensional diffraction effects, and, in some cases, an enhanced backscattering regime. The effects of significant absorption on the scattering profile are also studied. The overall features found for the ice crystals are similar to features in scattering from same sized spheres.

  8. Application of the weighted total field-scattering field technique to 3D-PSTD light scattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Taichang; Liu, Lei; Li, Hao; Chen, Ming; Yang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    PSTD (Pseudo Spectral Time Domain) is an excellent model for the light scattering simulation of nonspherical aerosol particles. However, due to the particularity of its discretization form of the Maxwell's equations, the traditional Total Field/Scattering Field (TF/SF) technique for FDTD (Finite Differential Time Domain) is not applicable to PSTD, and the time-consuming pure scattering field technique is mainly applied to introduce the incident wave. To this end, the weighted TF/SF technique proposed by X. Gao is generalized and applied to the 3D-PSTD scattering model. Using this technique, the incident light can be effectively introduced by modifying the electromagnetic components in an inserted connecting region between the total field and the scattering field region with incident terms, where the incident terms are obtained by weighting the incident field by a window function. To optimally determine the thickness of connection region and the window function type for PSTD calculations, their influence on the modeling accuracy is firstly analyzed. To further verify the effectiveness and advantages of the weighted TF/SF technique, the improved PSTD model is validated against the PSTD model equipped with pure scattering field technique in both calculation accuracy and efficiency. The results show that, the performance of PSTD seems to be not sensitive to variation of window functions. The number of the connection layer required decreases with the increasing of spatial resolution, where for spatial resolution of 24 grids per wavelength, a 6-layer region is thick enough. The scattering phase matrices and integral scattering parameters obtained by the improved PSTD show an excellent consistency with those well-tested models for spherical and nonspherical particles, illustrating that the weighted TF/SF technique can introduce the incident precisely. The weighted TF/SF technique shows higher computational efficiency than pure scattering technique.

  9. Nonclassical light sources for silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoni, Daniele; Galli, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Quantum photonics has recently attracted a lot of attention for its disruptive potential in emerging technologies like quantum cryptography, quantum communication and quantum computing. Driven by the impressive development in nanofabrication technologies and nanoscale engineering, silicon photonics has rapidly become the platform of choice for on-chip integration of high performing photonic devices, now extending their functionalities towards quantum-based applications. Focusing on quantum Information Technology (qIT) as a key application area, we review recent progress in integrated silicon-based sources of nonclassical states of light. We assess the state of the art in this growing field and highlight the challenges that need to be overcome to make quantum photonics a reliable and widespread technology.

  10. Scientific opportunities at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Advaned Light Source (ALS) is a national used facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent X-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with a projected completion date of September 1992, the ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in eleven long straight sections. It will also have up to 48 bending-magnet ports. Scientific opportunities in materials science, surface science, chemistry, atomic and molecular physics, life science, and other fields are reflected in Letters of Interest received for the establishment of beamlines. (orig.)

  11. Status of the CAMD Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Suller, Victor P; Fedurin, Mikhail; Jines, Paul; Launey, Daren; Miller, Toby; Wang, Yanshan

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing diversity of its research program, the CAMD Light Source has improved its beam brightness and quality. Using a well calibrated model of the lattice, the ring optic has been refined to generate a lower beam emittance of 150 nm.rad and this has been confirmed by measuring the beta values with the modulated quadrupole shunt system. The beam sizes have also been measured with an X-ray pinhole camera and compared to the calculated emittance. The beam orbit is corrected to a standard position referenced to the quadrupole centers to a precision better than 0.5 mm, using a suite of well localized bumps which can also flexibly steer the user photon beams to their requirements. Beam reliability has been improved by bringing into use a VME control system for the energy ramp.

  12. Status of the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, J.N.

    1990-06-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent soft x-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 10 long straight sections and 24 premier bend-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams, from less than 10 eV to more than 2 keV, will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in materials and surface science, biology, atomic physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bend magnets will provide high-flux, broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. The advanced light source control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

    1990-01-01

    The criteria for the design of a modern control system are discussed in the context of the special requirements for the control of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This is followed by the description of the system being built, which has a number of special features. The emphasis has been placed on providing an extremely wide I/O and CPU bandwidth (greater than 120 Mbits/s and 1200 Mips, respectively) and on using commercially available hardware and software. The only major custom design item is the Intelligent Local Controller (ILC), of which about 600 will be used to interface to the hardware. The use of personal computers for the operator stations allows the use of a wealth of industrial standards for windows, languages and tools. (orig.)

  14. Commissioning the Linac Coherent Light Source injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Akre

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Linac Coherent Light Source is a SASE x-ray free-electron laser (FEL project presently under construction at SLAC [J. Arthur et al., SLAC-R-593, 2002.]. The injector section, from drive laser and rf photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in the fall of 2006. The initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August of 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photocathode drive laser, rf gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band rf systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, P.A.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in biological, chemical, physical and engineering research mandates that all intense neutron sources be equipped with SANS instruments. Four existing instruments at pulsed sources are described and the general differences between pulsed-source and reactor-based instrument designs are discussed. The basic geometries are identical, but dynamic range is generally achieved by using a broad band of wavelengths (with time-of-flight analysis) rather than by moving the detector. This allows optimization for maximum beam intensity at a given beam size over the full dynamic range with fixed collimation. Data-acquisition requirements at a pulsed source are more severe, requiring large fast histrograming memories. Data reduction is also more complex, as all wavelength-dependent and angle-dependent backgrounds and nonlinearities must be accounted for before data can be transformed to intensity vs momentum transfer (Q). A comparison is shown between the Los Alamos pulsed instrument and D11 (Institut Laue-Langevin) and examples from the four major topics of the conference are shown. The general conclusion is that reactor-based instruments remain superior at very low Q or if only a narrow range of Q is required, but that the current generation of pulsed-source instruments is competitive of moderate Q and may be faster when a wide range of Q is required. (orig.)

  16. Operating experience with existing light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1985-01-01

    It is instructive to consider what an explosive growth there has been in the development of light sources using synchrotron radiation. This is well illustrated by the list of facilities given in Table I. In many cases, synchrotron light facilities have been obtained by tacking on parasitic beam lines to rings that were built for high energy physics. Of the twenty-three facilities in this table, however, eleven were built explicitely for this synchrotron radiation. Another seven have by now been converted for use as dedicated facilities leaving only five that share time with high energy physics. These five parasitically operated facilities are still among our best sources of hard x-rays, however, and their importance to the fields of science where these x-rays are needed must be emphasized. While the number of facilities in this table is impressive, it is even more impressive to add up the total number of user beam lines. Most of these rings are absolutely surrounded by beam lines and finding real estate on the experimental floor of one of these facilities for adding a new experiment looks about as practical as adding a farm in the middle of Manhattan. Nonetheless, the managers of these rings seem to have an attitude of ''always room for one more'' and new experimental beam lines do appear. This situation is necessary because the demand for beam time has exploded at an even faster rate than the development of the facilities. The field is not only growing, it can be expected to continue to grow for some time. Some of the explicit plans for future development will be discussed in the companion paper by Lee Teng

  17. Fiber-based broadband black-light source

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvestre , Thibaut; Lee , Min Won; Ragueh , A. R.; Stiller , Birgit; Fanjoux , Gil; Barviau , B.; Mussot , A.; Kudlinski , A.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Black-Light or Wood's lamp refers to sources that emit long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) from 315 nm and little visible light till 410 nm (blue). In this paper, we present a new fibre-based source of "black light", a source that emits broadband ultraviolet radiation but only small amounts of visible light and no infrared light. We made this source by pumping a specially designed silica photonic crystal fibre (PCF) with 355 nm light pulses from a Q-switched f...

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering at pulsed sources compared to reactor sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed comparisons of measurements made on small-angle neutron scattering instruments at pulsed spallation and reactor sources show that the results from the two types of instruments are comparable. It is further demonstrated that spallation instruments are preferable for measurements in the mid-momentum transfer domain or when a large domain is needed. 8 refs., 2 figs

  19. Leveraging brightness from transportation lighting systems through light source color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Roadway transportation lighting is installed for multiple reasons including traffic safety and pedestrian : security. Judgments of pedestrian safety and security along roadways are not strictly correlated to : specified light levels, but the color of...

  20. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  1. Ribosome formation from subunits studied by stopped-flow and Rayleigh light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoun Ayman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering and standard stopped-flow techniques were used to monitor rapid association of ribosomal subunits during initiation of eubacterial protein synthesis. The effects of the initiation factors IF1, IF2, IF3 and buffer conditions on subunit association were studied along with the role of GTP in this process. The part of light scattering theory that is essential for kinetic measurements is high-lighted in the main text and a more general treatment of Rayleigh scattering from macromolecules is given in an appendix.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasta, K.

    2009-01-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R and D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for

  4. Diamond Light Source: status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materlik, Gerhard; Rayment, Trevor; Stuart, David I

    2015-03-06

    Diamond Light Source, a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facility in the UK, celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2012. A private limited company was set up in April 2002 to plan, construct and operate the new user-oriented SR facility, called in brief Diamond. It succeeded the Synchrotron Radiation Source in Daresbury, a second-generation synchrotron that opened in 1980 as the world's first dedicated X-ray-providing facility, closing finally in 2008, by which time Diamond's accelerators and first beamlines were operating and user experiments were under way. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A gives some examples of the rich diversity of research done in the initial five years, with some glimpses of activity up to 2014. Speakers at the 10 year anniversary symposium were drawn from a small number of major thematic areas and each theme was elaborated by a few speakers whose contributions were placed into a broader context by a leading member of the UK academic community in the role of rapporteur. This introduction gives a summary of the design choices and strategic planning of Diamond as a coherent user facility, a snapshot of its present status and some consideration of future perspectives. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Daniel Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  6. Near-IR Polarized Scattered Light Imagery of the DoAr 28 Transitional Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Evan A.; Wisiniewski, John P.; Mayama, Satoshi; Brandt, Timothy D.; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Espaillat, Catherine; Serabyn, Eugene; Grady, Carol A.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We present the first spatially resolved polarized scattered light H-band detection of the DoAr 28 transitional disk. Our two epochs of imagery detect the scattered light disk from our effective inner working angle of 0 double prime.10 (13 AU) out to 0double prime.50 (65 AU). This inner working angle is interior to the location of the system's gap inferred by previous studies using spectral energy distribution modeling (15 AU). We detected a candidate point source companion 1 double prime.08 northwest of the system; however, our second epoch of imagery strongly suggests that this object is a background star. We constructed a grid of Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer models of the system, and our best fit models utilize a modestly inclined (50 degrees), 0.01 solar mass disk that has a partially depleted inner gap from the dust sublimation radius out to approximately 8 AU. Subtracting this best fit, axi-symmetric model from our polarized intensity data reveals evidence for two small asymmetries in the disk, which could be attributable to a variety of mechanisms.

  7. Here Be Dragons: Characterization of ACS/WFC Scattered Light Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, B.; Coe, D.; Gonzaga, S.; Anderson, J.; Grogin, N.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study characterizing scattered light anomalies that occur near the edges of Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) images. We inspected all 8,573 full-frame ACS/WFC raw images with exposure times longer than 350 seconds obtained in the F606W and F814W filters from 2002 to October 2013. We visually identified two particular scattered light artifacts known as "dragon's breath" and edge glow. Using the 2MASS point source catalog and Hubble Guide Star Catalog (GSC II), we identified the stars that caused these artifacts. The stars are all located in narrow bands ( 3" across) just outside the ACS/WFC field of view (2" - 16" away). We provide a map of these risky areas around the ACS/WFC detectors - users should avoid positioning bright stars in these regions when designing ACS/WFC imaging observations. We also provide interactive webpages which display all the image artifacts we identified, allowing users to see examples of the severity of artifacts they might expect for a given stellar magnitude at a given position relative to the ACS/WFC field of view. On average, 10th (18th) magnitude stars produce artifacts about 1,000 (100) pixels long. But the severity of these artifacts can vary strongly with small positional shifts (∼ 1"). The results are similar for both filters (F606W and F814W) when expressed in total fluence, or flux multiplied by exposure time.

  8. The Sun: the Earth light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  9. Small-angle neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, P.A.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in biological, chemical, physical, and engineering research mandates that all intense neutron sources be equipped with SANS instruments. Four existing instruments are described, and the general differences between pulsed-source and reactor-based instrument designs are discussed. The basic geometries are identical, but dynamic range is achieved by using a broad band of wavelengths (with time-of-flight analysis) rather than by moving the detector. This allows a more optimized collimation system. Data acquisition requirements at a pulsed source are more severe, requiring large, fast histogramming memories. Data reduction is also more complex, as all wave length-dependent and angle-dependent backgrounds and non-linearities must be accounted for before data can be transformed to intensity vs Q. A comparison is shown between the Los Alamos pulsed instrument and D-11 (Institute Laue-Langevin), and examples from the four major topics of the conference are shown. The general conclusion is that reactor-based instruments remain superior at very low Q or if only a narrow range of Q is required, but that the current generation of pulsed-source instruments is competitive at moderate Q and may be faster when a wide range of Q is required. In principle, a user should choose which facility to use on the basis of optimizing the experiment; in practice the tradeoffs are not severe and the choice is usually made on the basis of availability

  10. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-01-01

    A number of 'Grand Challenges' in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources

  11. The rapid determination of fat and protein content in fresh raw milk using the laser light scattering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Qi; Zhi Ling, Hou; Jian Long, Tian; Zhu, Yu

    2006-08-01

    The aim was to develop a simple and rapid method for determination of fat and protein content in milk. Based on the laser light scattering theory, the ratio of the scattered light (at 90±0.05° scattering angles) intensity to the transmitted light intensity, which is called scattered-transmitted-ratio method, is adopted as the optical parameter representing the milk fat content and the protein content. In this way, the influence of the fluctuation of the power of the light source is eliminated and the accuracy of determination is improved accordingly. The system we use is real-time and can satisfy the challenging requirements of dairy farming. Results of this study indicate the feasibility of using this technology for fresh milk fat and protein analysis. The fat contents and protein contents of 50 milk samples determined by this method were consistent with the values obtained by the reference methods based on Rose-Gottlieb method and Kjeldahl determination of N method. In this paper, the operating principle of the instrument is introduced and the influence of the environmental conditions, such as the homogenization pressure and homogenization temperature, etc. on the result of the test is analyzed. Through data analysis, the concrete schemes for testing the fat using the curve fitting and testing the protein using the surface fitting technique are determined. Finally, the difference from the reference values of the test is discussed.

  12. FIRST SCATTERED-LIGHT IMAGE OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND HD 131835 WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Li-Wei; Arriaga, Pauline; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Esposito, Thomas M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Duchêne, Gaspard; Kalas, Paul G.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Graham, James R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720-3411 (United States); Maire, Jérôme; Chilcote, Jeffrey K. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Marois, Christian [National Research Council of Canada Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bruzzone, Sebastian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Planetary and Space Exploration, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Rajan, Abhijith [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent; Wolff, Schuyler G.; Chen, Christine H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Konopacky, Quinn [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Ammons, S. Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94040 (United States); Draper, Zachary H. [University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); and others

    2015-12-10

    We present the first scattered-light image of the debris disk around HD 131835 in the H band using the Gemini Planet Imager. HD 131835 is a ∼15 Myr old A2IV star at a distance of ∼120 pc in the Sco-Cen OB association. We detect the disk only in polarized light and place an upper limit on the peak total intensity. No point sources resembling exoplanets were identified. Compared to its mid-infrared thermal emission,  in scattered light the disk shows similar orientation but different morphology. The scattered-light disk extends from ∼75 to ∼210 AU in the disk plane with roughly flat surface density. Our Monte Carlo radiative transfer model can describe the observations with a model disk composed of a mixture of silicates and amorphous carbon. In addition to the obvious brightness asymmetry due to stronger forward scattering, we discover a weak brightness asymmetry along the major axis, with the northeast side being 1.3 times brighter than the southwest side at a 3σ level.

  13. FDTD analysis of the light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with a random scattering layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Whee; Jang, Ji-Hyang; Oh, Min-Cheol; Shin, Jin-Wook; Cho, Doo-Hee; Moon, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-01-13

    The light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with a nano-sized random scattering layer (RSL-OLEDs) was analyzed using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. In contrast to periodic diffraction patterns, the presence of an RSL suppresses the spectral shift with respect to the viewing angle. For FDTD simulation of RSL-OLEDs, a planar light source with a certain spatial and temporal coherence was incorporated, and the light extraction efficiency with respect to the fill factor of the RSL and the absorption coefficient of the material was investigated. The design results were compared to the experimental results of the RSL-OLEDs in order to confirm the usefulness of FDTD in predicting experimental results. According to our FDTD simulations, the light confined within the ITO-organic waveguide was quickly absorbed, and the absorption coefficients of ITO and RSL materials should be reduced in order to obtain significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency (EQE). When the extinction coefficient of ITO was 0.01, the EQE in the RSL-OLED was simulated to be enhanced by a factor of 1.8.

  14. Multiple scattering of elliptically polarized light in two-dimensional medium with large inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorodnichev, E. E., E-mail: gorodn@theor.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    For elliptically polarized light incident on a two-dimensional medium with large inhomogeneities, the Stokes parameters of scattered waves are calculated. Multiple scattering is assumed to be sharply anisotropic. The degree of polarization of scattered radiation is shown to be a nonmonotonic function of depth when the incident wave is circularly polarized or its polarization vector is not parallel to the symmetry axis of the inhomogeneities.

  15. Light scattering in ecology and bio medicine; Rasejanje svetlosti u ekologiji i biomedicini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreckovic, M [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Elektrotehnicki Fakultet; Ostojic, S [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Tehnolosko-Metalurski Fakultet; Mamula-Tartalja, D [Visa Tehnicka PPT skola, Belgrade(Yugoslavia); Arandjelovic, S [Zavod za DDD, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Stekovic, M [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Elektrotehnicki Fakultet

    1996-07-01

    In the paper chosen experiments of application of light scattering in ecology and medicine are considered. Based on experimental curves, distribution of micro scatterers in micrometer and manometer particle size area is estimated and the question of corresponding mathematics devices for representing the given distribution is considered. For obtained distributions some definition parameters and needed number of parameters in order to distinguish certain categories of scatterers have been discussed. (author)

  16. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  17. Estimation of light source colours for light pollution assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziou, D; Kerouh, F

    2018-05-01

    The concept of the smart city raised several technological and scientific issues including light pollution. There are various negative impacts of light pollution on economy, ecology, and heath. This paper deals with the census of the colour of light emitted by lamps used in a city environment. To this end, we derive a light bulb colour estimator based on Bayesian reasoning, directional data, and image formation model in which the usual concept of reflectance is not used. All choices we made are devoted to designing an algorithm which can be run almost in real-time. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In vivo diagnosis of skin cancer using polarized and multiple scattered light spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Matthew Allen

    This thesis research presents the development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for distinguishing between skin cancer, moles, and normal skin using polarized and multiple scattered light spectroscopy. Polarized light incident on the skin is single scattered by the epidermal layer and multiple scattered by the dermal layer. The epidermal light maintains its initial polarization while the light from the dermal layer becomes randomized and multiple scattered. Mie theory was used to model the epidermal light as the scattering from the intercellular organelles. The dermal signal was modeled as the diffusion of light through a localized semi-homogeneous volume. These models were confirmed using skin phantom experiments, studied with in vitro cell cultures, and applied to human skin for in vivo testing. A CCD-based spectroscopy system was developed to perform all these experiments. The probe and the theory were tested on skin phantoms of latex spheres on top of a solid phantom. We next extended our phantom study to include in vitro cells on top of the solid phantom. Optical fluorescent microscope images revealed at least four distinct scatterers including mitochondria, nucleoli, nuclei, and cell membranes. Single scattering measurements on the mammalian cells consistently produced PSD's in the size range of the mitochondria. The clinical portion of the study consisted of in vivo measurements on cancer, mole, and normal skin spots. The clinical study combined the single scattering model from the phantom and in vitro cell studies with the diffusion model for multiple scattered light. When parameters from both layers were combined, we found that a sensitivity of 100% and 77% can be obtained for detecting cancers and moles, respectively, given the number of lesions examined.

  19. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy. Center for Accelerator Science and Education

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  20. Neutron and photon (light) scattering on solitons in the quasi-one-dimensional magnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulloev, K O

    1999-01-01

    The general expression we have found earlier for the dynamics form-factor is used to analyse experiments on the neutron and photon (light) scattering by the gas of solitons in quasi-one-dimensional magnetics (Authors)

  1. Light scattering properties of bovine muscle tissue in vitro, a comparison of methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijp, J.R.; ten Bosch, JJ; Benaron, DA; Chance, B; Ferrari, M; Kohl, M

    1998-01-01

    We measured the light scattering properties of muscular tissue using several methods, and compared the obtained results. Calculation of the extinction coefficient by using collimated transmission measurements and applying Beer's law is not appropriate. Probably surface roughness of the sample

  2. Light scattering reviews 7 radiative transfer and optical properties of atmosphere and underlying surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    This book describes modern advances in radiative transfer and light scattering. Coverage includes fast radiative transfer techniques, use of polarization in remote sensing and recent developments in remote sensing of snow properties from space observations.

  3. Experimental demonstration of singular-optical colouring of regularly scattered white light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O.V.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Maksimyak, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental interference modelling of the effects of colouring of a beam traversing a light-scattering medium is presented. It is shown that the result of colouring of the beam at the output of the medium depends on the magnitudes of the phase delays of the singly forward scattered partial signa...

  4. Finite-difference time domain solution of light scattering by arbitrarily shaped particles and surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    for particle and surface scattering calculations and the uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary conditions for truncation of the FDTD grid. We show that the FDTD approach has a significant potential for studying the light scattering by cloud, dust, and biological particles. The applications...

  5. Scattering of light by a periodic structure in the presence of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the method developed till now, the detection of periodic structures involves the detection of the central peak, first peak and second peak in the scattered intensity of light, located at scattering wave vectors = 0, , 2, respectively, where = 2/, their distinct identities being obfuscated by the fact that the peaks have ...

  6. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthemore, a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, is included in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (author) [es

  7. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomerz, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthermore, we have included a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (Author) 13 refs

  8. Spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering of ultraviolet light in nitrogen, dry air and moist air,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witschas, B.; Vieitez, M.O.; Duijn, van E.-J.; Reitebuch, O.; Water, van de W.; Ubachs, W.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric lidar techniques for the measurement of wind, temperature, and optical properties of aerosols rely on the exact knowledge of the spectral line shape of the scattered laser light on molecules. We report on spontaneous Rayleigh–Brillouin scattering measurements in the ultraviolet at a

  9. Effects of absorption on coherence domain path length resolved dynamic light scattering in the diffuse regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petoukhova, A. L.; Steenbergen, W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; de Mul, F. F. M.

    2002-01-01

    A low coherence Mach-Zehnder interferometer is developed for path length resolved dynamic light scattering in highly turbid media. The path length distribution of multiply scattered photons in Intralipid is changed by the addition of absorbing dyes. Path length distributions obtained for various

  10. TOOTH COLOR AND REFLECTANCE AS RELATED TO LIGHT-SCATTERING AND ENAMEL HARDNESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBOSCH, JJ; COOPS, JC

    Tooth color is determined by the paths of light inside the tooth and absorption along these paths. This paper tests the hypothesis that, since the paths are determined by scattering, a relation between color and scattering coefficients exists. One hundred and two extracted incisors were fixed in

  11. Light Scattering by Ice Crystals Containing Air Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Panetta, R. L.; Yang, P.; Bi, L.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative effects of ice clouds are often difficult to estimate accurately, but are very important for interpretation of observations and for climate modeling. Our understanding of these effects is primarily based on scattering calculations, but due to the variability in ice habit it is computationally difficult to determine the required scattering and absorption properties, and the difficulties are only compounded by the need to include consideration of air and carbon inclusions of the sort frequently observed in collected samples. Much of the previous work on effects of inclusions in ice particles on scattering properties has been conducted with variants of geometric optics methods. We report on simulations of scattering by ice crystals with enclosed air bubbles using the pseudo-spectral time domain method (PSTD) and improved geometric optics method (IGOM). A Bouncing Ball Model (BBM) is proposed as a parametrization of air bubbles, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations. Consistent with earlier studies, we find that air inclusions lead to a smoothing of variations in the phase function, weakening of halos, and a reduction of backscattering. We extend these studies by examining the effects of the particular arrangement of a fixed number of bubbles, as well as the effects of splitting a given number of bubbles into a greater number of smaller bubbles with the same total volume fraction. The result shows that the phase function will not change much for stochastic distributed air bubbles. It also shows that local maxima of phase functions are smoothed out for backward directions, when we break bubbles into small ones, single big bubble scatter favors more forward scattering than multi small internal scatters.

  12. SCATTER: Source and Transport of Emplaced Radionuclides: Code documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longsine, D.E.

    1987-03-01

    SCATTER simulated several processes leading to the release of radionuclides to the site subsystem and then simulates transport via the groundwater of the released radionuclides to the biosphere. The processes accounted for to quantify release rates to a ground-water migration path include radioactive decay and production, leaching, solubilities, and the mixing of particles with incoming uncontaminated fluid. Several decay chains of arbitrary length can be considered simultaneously. The release rates then serve as source rates to a numerical technique which solves convective-dispersive transport for each decay chain. The decay chains are allowed to have branches and each member can have a different radioactive factor. Results are cast as radionuclide discharge rates to the accessible environment

  13. Diagnostics for electrical discharge light sources : pushing the limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zissis, G.; Haverlag, M.

    2010-01-01

    Light sources play an indispensable role in the daily life of any human being. Quality of life, health and urban security related to traffic and crime prevention depend on light and on its quality. In fact, every day approximately 30 billion electric light sources operate worldwide. These electric

  14. The scatter of light of different colour in the atmosphere.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    It is often claimed (Devaux) that yellow light is superior to white light for vehicle headlamps. This claim is supported by evidence of a physical, physiological and psychological nature. In most cases, it appears that the advantages of yellow light are small, and can usually be neglected

  15. Matrix light and pixel light: optical system architecture and requirements to the light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinger, Benno; Timinger, Andreas L.

    2015-09-01

    Modern Automotive headlamps enable improved functionality for more driving comfort and safety. Matrix or Pixel light headlamps are not restricted to either pure low beam functionality or pure high beam. Light in direction of oncoming traffic is selectively switched of, potential hazard can be marked via an isolated beam and the illumination on the road can even follow a bend. The optical architectures that enable these advanced functionalities are diverse. Electromechanical shutters and lens units moved by electric motors were the first ways to realize these systems. Switching multiple LED light sources is a more elegant and mechanically robust solution. While many basic functionalities can already be realized with a limited number of LEDs, an increasing number of pixels will lead to more driving comfort and better visibility. The required optical system needs not only to generate a desired beam distribution with a high angular dynamic, but also needs to guarantee minimal stray light and cross talk between the different pixels. The direct projection of the LED array via a lens is a simple but not very efficient optical system. We discuss different optical elements for pre-collimating the light with minimal cross talk and improved contrast between neighboring pixels. Depending on the selected optical system, we derive the basic light source requirements: luminance, surface area, contrast, flux and color homogeneity.

  16. The Injection System of SAGA Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Okajima, Toshihiro; Takabayashi, Yuichi; Tomimasu, Takio; Yoshida, Katuhide

    2005-01-01

    Saga light Source is a 1.4-GeV electron storage ring with a circumference of 75.6m. The injector is a 250-MeV linac producing 1 ms macro-pulse with a peak current of 12mA and repetition rate of 1Hz. The output beam from the linac is transported though a transport line, and injected into the ring though a septum magnet with a bending angle of 20-degree. The transport line consists of two bending magnets, two quadrupole doublelets, and a quadrupole singlet. The bump orbit is formed by four kicker magnets, two of which are installed at both sides of septum magnet, and other two are positioned apart by one magnet cell of the ring. They are excited by sinusoidal electric currents with a half width of 0.5 ms. The beam optics for the injection trajectory is computed and shown at control room, the parameters for which are provided directly from the power supply control server PC. The operator is able to see real-time result of the beam trajectory calculation. This tool is quite effective to optimize the magnets param...

  17. First undulators for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Chin, J.

    1993-05-01

    The first three undulators, each 4.6 m in length, for the Advanced Light source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are near completion and are undergoing qualification tests before installation into the storage ring. Two devices have 5.0-cm period lengths, 89 periods, and achieve an effective field of 0.85 T at the 14 mm minimum magnetic gap. The other device has a period length of 8.0 cm, 55 periods, and an effective field of 1.2 T at the minimum 14 mm gap. Measurements on the first 5 cm period device show the uncorrelated field errors to be 0.23%, which is less than the required 0.25%. Measurements of gap control show reproducibility of ±5 microns or better. The first vacuum chamber, 5.0 m long, is flat to within 0.53 mm over the 4.6 m magnetic structure section and a 4 x 10 -11 Torr pressure was achieved during vacuum tests. Device description, fabrication, and measurements are presented

  18. Phosphor converted laser diode light source for endoscopic diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasnoshchoka, Anastasiia; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    of the generated white light into thin optical fibres. The development involves designing optics for optimizing the light extraction efficiency and guiding of light to the area of interest. In this paper we compared the developed light source to the current standard in endoscopy – xenon arc lamps. Detailed...

  19. Inverse compton light source: a compact design proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitrick, Kirsten Elizabeth [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing demand for a compact Inverse Compton Light Source (ICLS) which is capable of producing high-quality X-rays by colliding an electron beam and a high-quality laser. It is only in recent years when both SRF and laser technology have advanced enough that compact sources can approach the quality found at large installations such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Previously, X-ray sources were either high flux and brilliance at a large facility or many orders of magnitude lesser when produced by a bremsstrahlung source. A recent compact source was constructed by Lyncean Technologies using a storage ring to produce the electron beam used to scatter the incident laser beam. By instead using a linear accelerator system for the electron beam, a significant increase in X-ray beam quality is possible, though even subsequent designs also featuring a storage ring offer improvement. Preceding the linear accelerator with an SRF reentrant gun allows for an extremely small transverse emittance, increasing the brilliance of the resulting X-ray source. In order to achieve sufficiently small emittances, optimization was done regarding both the geometry of the gun and the initial electron bunch distribution produced off the cathode. Using double-spoke SRF cavities to comprise the linear accelerator allows for an electron beam of reasonable size to be focused at the interaction point, while preserving the low emittance that was generated by the gun. An aggressive final focusing section following the electron beam's exit from the accelerator produces the small spot size at the interaction point which results in an X-ray beam of high flux and brilliance. Taking all of these advancements together, a world class compact X-ray source has been designed. It is anticipated that this source would far outperform the conventional bremsstrahlung and many other compact ICLSs, while coming closer to performing at the

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of

  2. Inelastic electron and light scattering from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wells: Zero magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most fundamental approach to an understanding of electronic, optical, and transport phenomena which the condensed matter physics (of conventional as well as nonconventional systems offers is generally founded on two experiments: the inelastic electron scattering and the inelastic light scattering. This work embarks on providing a systematic framework for the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering from the electronic excitations in GaAs/Ga1−xAlxAs quantum wells. To this end, we start with the Kubo's correlation function to derive the generalized nonlocal, dynamic dielectric function, and the inverse dielectric function within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. This is followed by a thorough development of the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering. The methodological part is then subjected to the analytical diagnoses which allow us to sense the subtlety of the analytical results and the importance of their applications. The general analytical results, which know no bounds regarding, e.g., the subband occupancy, are then specified so as to make them applicable to practicality. After trying and testing the eigenfunctions, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum made up of intrasubband and intersubband – single-particle and collective (plasmon – excitations, the loss functions for all the principal geometries envisioned for the inelastic electron scattering, and the Raman intensity, which provides a measure of the real transitions induced by the (laser probe, for the inelastic light scattering. It is found that the dominant contribution to both the loss peaks and the Raman peaks comes from the collective (plasmon excitations. As to the single-particle peaks, the analysis indicates a long-lasting lack of quantitative comparison between theory and experiments. It is inferred that the inelastic electron

  3. Current-controlled light scattering and asymmetric plasmon propagation in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Tobias; Viola, Giovanni; Kinaret, Jari; Fogelström, Mikael; Tassin, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate that plasmons in graphene can be manipulated using a dc current. A source-drain current lifts the forward/backward degeneracy of the plasmons, creating two modes with different propagation properties parallel and antiparallel to the current. We show that the propagation length of the plasmon propagating parallel to the drift current is enhanced, while the propagation length for the antiparallel plasmon is suppressed. We also investigate the scattering of light off graphene due to the plasmons in a periodic dielectric environment and we find that the plasmon resonance separates in two peaks corresponding to the forward and backward plasmon modes. The narrower linewidth of the forward propagating plasmon may be of interest for refractive index sensing and the dc current control could be used for the modulation of mid-infrared electromagnetic radiation.

  4. Scattered light evidence for short density scale heights near critical density in laser-irradiated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillion, D.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Rupert, V.C.; Haas, R.A.; Boyle, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented of a steepened electron density profile near critical density obtained from studying the time-integrated scattered light from targets illuminated by linearly polarized, 1.06 μ light. Both 10 μ thick disks and DT-filled glass microshells were irradiated by light focused by f/1 or f/2.5 lenses in one and two-beam experiments, respectively. From the dependence of the asymmetry of the scattered light about the beam axis upon the scattering angle, we infer scale lengths on the order of one micron. Scale lengths have also been deduced from measurements on the polarization state of the reflected light. Both analytic and numerical results are presented to show how the polarization state varies with the incidence angle and the scale length

  5. Scattered light evidence for short density heights near critical density in laser-irradiated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillion, D.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Rupert, V.C.; Haas, R.A.; Boyle, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented of a steepened electron density profile near critical density obtained from studying the time-integrated scattered light from targets illuminated by linearly polarized, 1.06 μ light. Both 10 μ thick disks and DT-filled glass microshells were irradiated by light focused by f/1 or f/2.5 lenses in one and two-beam experiments, respectively. From the dependence of the asymmetry of the scattered light about the beam axis upon the scattering angle, scale lengths on the order of one micron are inferred. Scale lengths have also been deduced from measurements on the polarization state of the reflected light. Both analytic and numerical results are presented to show how the polarization state varies with the incidence angle and the scale length

  6. Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Cao, Hui (Yale)

    2010-07-28

    We investigate the physical mechanism for color production by isotropic nanostructures with short-range order in bird feather barbs. While the primary peak in optical scattering spectra results from constructive interference of singly-scattered light, many species exhibit secondary peaks with distinct characteristic. Our experimental and numerical studies show that these secondary peaks result from double scattering of light by the correlated structures. Without an analog in periodic or random structures, such a phenomenon is unique for short-range ordered structures, and has been widely used by nature for non-iridescent structural coloration.

  7. Observation of spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2009-01-01

    and negative spatial quantum correlations are observed when varying the quantum state incident to the multiple scattering medium, and the strength of the correlations is controlled by the number of photons. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical proposals by implementing......We present the experimental realization of spatial quantum correlations of photons that are induced by multiple scattering of squeezed light. The quantum correlation relates photons propagating along two different light paths through the random medium and is infinite in range. Both positive...... the full quantum model of multiple scattering....

  8. Microchip Flow Cytometer with Integrated Polymer Optical Elements for Measurement of Scattered Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; El-Ali, Jamil; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan Ryberg

    2004-01-01

    channels to form a complete microchip flow cytometer. All the optical elements, the microfluidic system, and the fiber-to-waveguide couplers were defined in one layer of polymer (SU-8, negative photoresist) by standard photolithography. With only one single mask procedure, all the fabrication and packaging...... processes can be finished in one day. Polystyrene beads were measured in the microchip flow cytometer, and three signals (forward scattering, large angle scattering and extinction) were measured simultaneously for each bead. The average intensities of the forward Scattered light and the incident light...

  9. Spectrum of an electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Ji, Xiaoling; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-04-01

    Spectral shifts and spectral switches of a polychromatic electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium are discussed. It is shown that both the property of the incident field and the character of the scattering medium play roles in the change of the spectrum of the far-zone scattered field. It is also shown that the distribution of the far-zone scattered spectrum, including the magnitude of the spectral shift and the direction at which the spectral switch occurs, is rotationally nonsymmetric.

  10. Ocular exposure to ultraviolet and visible radiation from light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietanen, M.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of the eyes to UV radiation and blue light of artificial light sources and the sun was evaluated. A spectroradiometer was used to determine the spectral irradiance at 1 nm intervals from 250 to 800 nm. Various groups of workers are at risk of ocular over-exposure to optical radiation, outdoor workers maintenance personnel of bright light source as and wear eye-protectors with effective filtering of UV radiation and blue light. (author)

  11. Light emitting diodes as a plant lighting source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bula, R.J.; Tennessen, D.J.; Morrow, R.C. [Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, Madison, WI (United States); Tibbitts, T.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Electroluminescence in solid materials is defined as the generation of light by the passage of an electric current through a body of solid material under an applied electric field. A specific type of electroluminescence, first noted by Lossew in 1923, involves the generation of photons when electrons are passed through a p-n junction of certain solid materials (junction of a n-type semiconductor, an electron donor, and a p-type semiconductor, an electron acceptor). Development efforts to translate these observations into visible light emitting devices, however, was not undertaken until the 1950s. The term, light emitting diode (LEDs), was first used in a report by Wolfe, et al., in 1955. The development of this light emitting semiconductor technology dates back less than 30 years. During this period of time, the LED has evolved from a rare and expensive light generating device to one of the most widely used electronic components. The most popular applications of the LED are as indicators or as optoelectronic switches. However, several recent advances in LED technology have made possible the utilization of LEDs for applications that require a high photon flux, such as for plant lighting in controlled environments. The new generation of LEDs based on a gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAS) semiconductor material fabricated as a double heterostructure on a transparent substrate has opened up many new applications for these LEDs.

  12. Light Scattering of Rough Orthogonal Anisotropic Surfaces with Secondary Most Probable Slope Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hai-Xia; Cheng Chuan-Fu

    2011-01-01

    We study the light scattering of an orthogonal anisotropic rough surface with secondary most probable slope distribution. It is found that the scattered intensity profiles have obvious secondary maxima, and in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence, the secondary maxima are oriented in a curve on the observation plane, which is called the orientation curve. By numerical calculation of the scattering wave fields with the height data of the sample, it is validated that the secondary maxima are induced by the side face element, which constitutes the prismoid structure of the anisotropic surface. We derive the equation of the quadratic orientation curve. Experimentally, we construct the system for light scattering measurement using a CCD. The scattered intensity profiles are extracted from the images at different angles of incidence along the orientation curves. The experimental results conform to the theory. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  13. Barium light source method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  14. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the next generation of synchrotron light sources designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion-free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (σ n ) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to φ ≅ 180 degrees between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small σ n is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180 degrees horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small σ n limits the range of tune, since μ x ≅ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for σ n near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance

  16. [Light scattering extinction properties of atmospheric particle and pollution characteristics in hazy weather in Hangzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Ye, Hui; Shen, Jian-Dong; Sun, Hong-Liang; Hong, Sheng-Mao; Jiao, Li; Huang, Kan

    2014-12-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of particle scattering on visibility, light scattering coefficient, particle concentrations and meteorological factor were simultaneously monitored from July 2011 to June 2012 in Hangzhou. Daily scattering coefficients ranged from 108.4 to 1 098.1 Mm(-1), with an annual average concentration of 428.6 Mm(-1) ± 200.2 Mm(-1). Seasonal variation of scattering coefficients was significant, with the highest concentrations observed in autumn and winter and the lowest in summer. It was found there were two peaks for the average diurnal variations of the scattering coefficient, which could be observed at 08:00 and 21:00. The scattering efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM10 were 7.6 m2 x g(-1) and 4.4 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The particle scattering was about 90.2 percent of the total light extinction. The scattering coefficients were 684.4 Mm(-1) ± 218.1 Mm(-1) and 1 095.4 Mm(-1) ± 397.7 Mm(-1) in hazy and heavy hazy days, respectively, which were 2.6 and 4.2 times as high as in non-hazy weather, indicating that particle scattering is the main factor for visibility degradation and the occurrence of hazy weather in Hangzhou.

  17. Dispersion relation for hadronic light-by-light scattering: two-pion contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, Gilberto [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Hoferichter, Martin [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1550 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Procura, Massimiliano [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Stoffer, Peter [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theory)and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2017-04-27

    In this third paper of a series dedicated to a dispersive treatment of the hadronic light-by-light (HLbL) tensor, we derive a partial-wave formulation for two-pion intermediate states in the HLbL contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (g−2){sub μ}, including a detailed discussion of the unitarity relation for arbitrary partial waves. We show that obtaining a final expression free from unphysical helicity partial waves is a subtle issue, which we thoroughly clarify. As a by-product, we obtain a set of sum rules that could be used to constrain future calculations of γ{sup ∗}γ{sup ∗}→ππ. We validate the formalism extensively using the pion-box contribution, defined by two-pion intermediate states with a pion-pole left-hand cut, and demonstrate how the full known result is reproduced when resumming the partial waves. Using dispersive fits to high-statistics data for the pion vector form factor, we provide an evaluation of the full pion box, a{sub μ}{sup π-box}=−15.9(2)×10{sup −11}. As an application of the partial-wave formalism, we present a first calculation of ππ-rescattering effects in HLbL scattering, with γ{sup ∗}γ{sup ∗}→ππ helicity partial waves constructed dispersively using ππ phase shifts derived from the inverse-amplitude method. In this way, the isospin-0 part of our calculation can be interpreted as the contribution of the f{sub 0}(500) to HLbL scattering in (g−2){sub μ}. We argue that the contribution due to charged-pion rescattering implements corrections related to the corresponding pion polarizability and show that these are moderate. Our final result for the sum of pion-box contribution and its S-wave rescattering corrections reads a{sub μ}{sup π-box}+a{sub μ,J=0}{sup ππ,π-pole} {sup LHC}=−24(1)×10{sup −11}.

  18. The accuracy of liquid-liquid phase transition temperatures determined from semiautomated light scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kevin M.; Babayco, Christopher B.; Sluss, Daniel R. B.; Williamson, J. Charles

    2010-08-01

    The synthetic-method determination of liquid-liquid coexistence curves using semiautomated light scattering instrumentation and stirred samples is based on identifying the coexistence curve transition temperatures (Tcx) from sudden changes in turbidity associated with droplet formation. Here we use a thorough set of such measurements to evaluate the accuracy of several different analysis methods reported in the literature for assigning Tcx. More than 20 samples each of weakly opalescent isobutyric acid+water and strongly opalescent aniline+hexane were tested with our instrumentation. Transmitted light and scattering intensities at 2°, 24°, and 90° were collected simultaneously as a function of temperature for each stirred sample, and the data were compared with visual observations and light scattering theory. We find that assigning Tcx to the onset of decreased transmitted light or increased 2° scattering has a potential accuracy of 0.01 K or better for many samples. However, the turbidity due to critical opalescence obscures the identification of Tcx from the light scattering data of near-critical stirred samples, and no simple rule of interpretation can be applied regardless of collection geometry. At best, when 90° scattering is collected along with transmitted or 2° data, the accuracy of Tcx is limited to 0.05 K for near-critical samples. Visual determination of Tcx remains the more accurate approach in this case.

  19. The Peculiar Light Curve of J1415+1320: A Case Study in Extreme Scattering Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Hovatta, T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Pearson, T. J.; Blandford, R. D.; Gurwell, M. A.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pavlidou, V.; Ravi, V.; Reeves, R. A.; Richards, J. L.; Tornikoski, M.; Zensus, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    The radio light curve of J1415+1320 (PKS 1413+135) shows time-symmetric and recurring U-shaped features across the centimeter-wave and millimeter-wave bands. The symmetry of these features points to lensing by an intervening object as the cause. U-shaped events in radio light curves in the centimeter-wave band have previously been attributed to Extreme scattering events (ESE). ESEs are thought to be the result of lensing by compact plasma structures in the Galactic interstellar medium, but the precise nature of these plasma structures remains unknown. Since the strength of a plasma lens evolves with wavelength λ as {λ }2, the presence of correlated variations at over a wide wavelength range casts doubt on the canonical ESE interpretation for J1415+1320. In this paper, we critically examine the evidence for plasma lensing in J1415+1320. We compute limits on the lensing strength and the associated free-free opacity of the putative plasma lenses. We compare the observed and model ESE light curves, and also derive a lower limit on the lens distance based on the effects of parallax due to the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. We conclude that plasma lensing is not a viable interpretation for J1415+1320's light curves and that symmetric U-shaped features in the radio light curves of extragalactic sources do not present prima facie evidence for ESEs. The methodology presented here is generic enough to be applicable to any plasma-lensing candidate.

  20. Surface roughness studies with DALLAS-detector array for laser light angular scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Teague, E. C.; Scire, F. E.; Mclay, M. J.; Gilsinn, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a better mathematical description of optical scattering phenomena, in order to construct an optical scattering apparatus for reliable and routine measurements of roughness parameters without resorting to comparator standards. After a brief outline of optical scattering theory, a description is presented of an experimental instrument for measuring surface roughness which incorporates optical scattering principles. The instrument has a He-Ne laser which illuminates the test surface at a variable angle of incidence. Scattered light distribution is detected by an array of 87 fiber-optic sensors positioned in a rotating semicircular yoke. The output from the detector is digitized and analyzed in a laboratory computer. For a comparison with experimental data, theoretical distributions are calculated by substituting the roughness profiles into the operand of and integral equation for electromagnetic scattering developed by Beckmann and Spizzichino (1963). A schematic diagram of the instrument is provided and the general implications of the experimental results are discussed.

  1. Conical light scattering in strontium barium niobate crystals related to an intrinsic composition inhomogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastwoeste, K; Sander, U; Imlau, M

    2007-01-01

    Conical light scattering is uncovered in poly- and mono-domain, nominally pure and Eu-doped strontium barium niobate (SBN) crystals over a wide temperature regime. The appearance of two scattering cones, a scattering line and a corona is observed and can be explained comprehensively within the Ewald sphere concept. Photorefraction, scattering from domain boundaries or from growth striations can be excluded from explaining the origin of the scattering. It is shown that the temperature-persistent scattering process is related to a growth-induced seeding rod, i.e. a composition inhomogeneity primarily localized at the centre of the SBN sample. The rod is directed parallel to the c axis and yields a refractive-index inhomogeneity with spatial frequencies on the micro-scale

  2. Maximizing the information transfer in a quantum-limited light-scattering system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    1990-01-01

    A quantum-limited light-scattering system is considered. The spatial configuration that maximizes a given figure of merit is investigated, assuming that the emitted light has Poisson photon statistics. A specific system for measuring the velocity of a small particle is considered as an example. A...

  3. Impact of polishing on the light scattering at aerogel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnyakov, A.Yu.; Barnyakov, M.Yu.; Bobrovnikov, V.S.; Buzykaev, A.R.; Danilyuk, A.F.; Katcin, A.A.; Kononov, S.A.; Kirilenko, P.S.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Kuyanov, I.A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Ovtin, I.V.; Predein, A.Yu.; Protsenko, R.S.

    2016-01-01

    Particle identification power of modern aerogel RICH detectors strongly depends on optical quality of radiators. It was shown that wavelength dependence of aerogel tile transparency after polishing cannot be described by the standard Hunt formula. The Hunt formula has been modified to describe scattering in a thin layer of silica dust on the surface of aerogel tile. Several procedures of polishing of aerogel tile have been tested. The best result has been achieved while using natural silk tissue. The resulting block has optical smooth surfaces. The measured decrease of aerogel transparency due to surface scattering is about few percent. This result could be used for production of radiators for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detectors.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source: vacuum system for National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchman, J.C.; Godel, J.B.; Jordan, W.; Oversluizen, T.

    1978-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a 24 million dollar project under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is a research facility dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is that radiation produced by the acceleration of charged particles at near the speed of light. This facility will provide a continuous spectrum of radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the hard x-ray range. The radiation will be highly intense, 100% polarized, extremely well collimated and will have a pulsed time structure. The radiation will be produced in two electron storage rings at energies of 700 MeV and 2.5 GeV, respectively. A maximum of one ampere at 2 GeV, or one-half ampere at 2.5 GeV, of electron beam will be stored

  5. Light scattering by cubical particle in the WKB approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    redouane lamsoudi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we determined the analytical expressions of the form factor of a cubical particle in the WKB approximation. We adapted some variables (size parameter, refractive index, the scattering angle and found the form factor in the approximation of Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD, Anomalous Diffraction (AD, and determined the efficiency factor of the extinction. Finally, to illustrate our formalism, we analyzed some numerical examples

  6. Effects of read-out light sources and ambient light on radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Yu, Peter K.N.; Metcalfe, Peter E.

    1998-01-01

    Both read-out light sources and ambient light sources can produce a marked effect on coloration of radiochromic film. Fluorescent, helium neon laser, light emitting diode (LED) and incandescent read-out light sources produce an equivalent dose coloration of 660 cGy h -1 , 4.3 cGy h -1 , 1.7 cGy h -1 and 2.6 cGy h -1 respectively. Direct sunlight, fluorescent light and incandescent ambient light produce an equivalent dose coloration of 30 cGy h -1 , 18 cGy h -1 and 0 cGy h -1 respectively. Continuously on, fluorescent light sources should not be used for film optical density evaluation and minimal exposure to any light source will increase the accuracy of results. (author)

  7. Light scattering by rough surfaces for increase of absorption of low band gap light in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloppstech, Konstantin; Knabe, Sebastian; Bauer, Gottfried H. [Institute of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Scattering of low band gap light for the increase of the absorption of low band gap photons is commonly formulated in phenomenological magnitudes such as haze factors resulting from experiments at particular scattering media. We have formulated analytically and described by numerical simulations the scattering of light by the interaction of photons with rough surfaces based on wave numbers of photons k{sub {lambda}} and wave numbers of the topological surface contour k{sub s} that has been derived in 2 dimensions via AFM analyses of the contour function h(x,y) of the scattering medium, e.g. a glassy diffusor. We have distinguished two regimes: i) k{sub {lambda}}scattering has been formulated on Huygens' Principle with generation of spherical waves at the respective position h(x,y). The experimental scattering of photons with different wavelengths - recorded with a standard type goniometer - are compared with the simulation of numerically generated far field results in dependence of distance r from the scattering medium and scattering angle {beta}. In particular for the wave optical approach we find a ''scattering function'' that contains the contour function h(x,y) however that substantially departs from its puristic Fourier Transform.

  8. Light scattering by coated sphere immersed in absorbing medium: a comparison between the FDTD and analytic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Wenbo E-mail: w.sun@larc.nasa.gov; Loeb, Norman G.; Fu Qiang

    2004-02-01

    A recently developed finite-difference time domain scheme is examined using the exact analytic solutions for light scattering by a coated sphere immersed in an absorbing medium. The relative differences are less than 1% in the extinction, scattering, and absorption efficiencies and less than 5% in the scattering phase functions. The definition of apparent single-scattering properties is also discussed.

  9. Theory of disorder-induced coherent scattering and light localization in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M; Hughes, S

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a theoretical formalism to describe disorder-induced extrinsic scattering in slow light photonic crystal waveguides. This work details and extends the optical scattering theory used in a recent issue of Physics Review Letters (Patterson et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 253903) to describe coherent scattering phenomena and successfully explain related experimental measurements. Our presented theory, which combines Green function and coupled mode methods, allows us to self-consistently account for arbitrary multiple scattering for the propagating electric field and recover experimental features such as resonances near the band edge. The technique is fully three-dimensional and can calculate the effects of disorder on the propagating field over thousands of unit cells. As an application of this theory, we explore various sample lengths and disordered instances, and demonstrate the profound effect of multiple scattering in the waveguide transmission. The spectra yield rich features associated with disorder-induced localization and multiple scattering, which are shown to be exacerbated in the slow light propagation regime

  10. Plasmonics for solid-state lighting : enhanced excitation and directional emission of highly efficient light sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Louwers, Davy J.; Rodriguez, S.R.K.; Murai, S.; Jansen, O.T.A.; Verschuuren, M.A.; Gomez Rivas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Light sources based on reliable and energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are instrumental in the development of solid-state lighting (SSL). Most research efforts in SSL have focused on improving both the intrinsic quantum efficiency (QE) and the stability of light emitters. For this reason,

  11. Calculations of light scattering matrices for stochastic ensembles of nanosphere clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkin, N.F.; Shkirin, A.V.; Suyazov, N.V.; Starosvetskiy, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    Results of the calculation of the light scattering matrices for systems of stochastic nanosphere clusters are presented. A mathematical model of spherical particle clustering with allowance for cluster–cluster aggregation is used. The fractal properties of cluster structures are explored at different values of the model parameter that governs cluster–cluster interaction. General properties of the light scattering matrices of nanosphere-cluster ensembles as dependent on their mean fractal dimension have been found. The scattering-matrix calculations were performed for finite samples of 10 3 random clusters, made up of polydisperse spherical nanoparticles, having lognormal size distribution with the effective radius 50 nm and effective variance 0.02; the mean number of monomers in a cluster and its standard deviation were set to 500 and 70, respectively. The implemented computation environment, modeling the scattering matrices for overall sequences of clusters, is based upon T-matrix program code for a given single cluster of spheres, which was developed in [1]. The ensemble-averaged results have been compared with orientation-averaged ones calculated for individual clusters. -- Highlights: ► We suggested a hierarchical model of cluster growth allowing for cluster–cluster aggregation. ► We analyzed the light scattering by whole ensembles of nanosphere clusters. ► We studied the evolution of the light scattering matrix when changing the fractal dimension

  12. Skeletal light-scattering accelerates bleaching response in reef-building corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; DuBois, Emily; Gomes, Andrew; Stoyneva, Valentina P; Radosevich, Andrew J; Henss, Jillian; Wagner, Michelle E; Derbas, Justin; Grooms, Hannah W; Velazquez, Elizabeth M; Traub, Joshua; Kennedy, Brian J; Grigorescu, Arabela A; Westneat, Mark W; Sanborn, Kevin; Levine, Shoshana; Schick, Mark; Parsons, George; Biggs, Brendan C; Rogers, Jeremy D; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa A

    2016-03-21

    At the forefront of ecosystems adversely affected by climate change, coral reefs are sensitive to anomalously high temperatures which disassociate (bleaching) photosynthetic symbionts (Symbiodinium) from coral hosts and cause increasingly frequent and severe mass mortality events. Susceptibility to bleaching and mortality is variable among corals, and is determined by unknown proportions of environmental history and the synergy of Symbiodinium- and coral-specific properties. Symbiodinium live within host tissues overlaying the coral skeleton, which increases light availability through multiple light-scattering, forming one of the most efficient biological collectors of solar radiation. Light-transport in the upper ~200 μm layer of corals skeletons (measured as 'microscopic' reduced-scattering coefficient, μ'(S,m)), has been identified as a determinant of excess light increase during bleaching and is therefore a potential determinant of the differential rate and severity of bleaching response among coral species. Here we experimentally demonstrate (in ten coral species) that, under thermal stress alone or combined thermal and light stress, low-μ'(S,m) corals bleach at higher rate and severity than high-μ'(S,m) corals and the Symbiodinium associated with low-μ'(S,m) corals experience twice the decrease in photochemical efficiency. We further modelled the light absorbed by Symbiodinium due to skeletal-scattering and show that the estimated skeleton-dependent light absorbed by Symbiodinium (per unit of photosynthetic pigment) and the temporal rate of increase in absorbed light during bleaching are several fold higher in low-μ'(S,m) corals. While symbionts associated with low-[Formula: see text] corals receive less total light from the skeleton, they experience a higher rate of light increase once bleaching is initiated and absorbing bodies are lost; further precipitating the bleaching response. Because microscopic skeletal light-scattering is a robust predictor

  13. Quantum theory of dynamic multiple light scattering in fluctuating disordered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    We formulate a quantum theory of dynamic multiple light scattering in fluctuating disordered media and calculate the fluctuation and the autocorrelation function of the photon number operator for light transmitted through a disordered slab. The effect of disorder on the information capacity of a quantum communication channel operating in a disordered environment is estimated, and the use of squeezed light in diffusing-wave spectroscopy is discussed

  14. Reflection Matrix Method for Controlling Light After Reflection From a Diffuse Scattering Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    of Philosophy Kenneth W. Burgi, BS, MS Major, USAF 22 December 2016 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT...refocusing light through thin films of a turbid medium. When coherent light is trans- mitted through a stationary diffuser (i.e. a turbid medium), a fine...resultant light scatter [14, 15, 21, 23]. Transmission matrices were measured with microscopic objectives and thin films of turbid media, resulting in

  15. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems. PMID:26606898

  16. Light-scattering study of the glass transition in lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, M. A.; Winer, W. O.; Medina, F. D.; Oshea, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    The sound velocity of four lubricants has been measured as a function of temperature and pressure using Brillouin scattering. A change in slope of the velocity as a function of temperature or pressure allowed the determination of the glass transition temperature and pressure. The glass transition data were used to construct a phase diagram for each lubricant. The data indicate that the glass transition temperature increased with pressure at a rate which ranged from 120 to 200 C/GPa. The maximum pressure attained was 0.69 GPa and the temperature range was from 25 to 100 C.

  17. Quantum Interference and Entanglement Induced by Multiple Scattering of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report on the effects of quantum interference induced by the transmission of an arbitrary number of optical quantum states through a multiple-scattering medium. We identify the role of quantum interference on the photon correlations and the degree of continuous variable entanglement between two...... output modes. It is shown that quantum interference survives averaging over all ensembles of disorder and manifests itself as increased photon correlations due to photon antibunching. Furthermore, the existence of continuous variable entanglement correlations in a volume speckle pattern is predicted. Our...

  18. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    potentially revolutionary science involves soft excitations such as magnons and phonons; in general, these are well below the resolution that can be probed by today’s optical systems. The study of these low-energy excitations will only move forward if advances are made in high-resolution gratings for the soft X-ray energy region, and higher-resolution crystal analyzers for the hard X-ray region. In almost all the forefront areas of X-ray science today, the main limitation is our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate X-rays at the level required for these advanced measurements. To address these issues, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) sponsored a workshop, X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities, which was held March 27–29, 2013, near Washington, D.C. The workshop addressed a wide range of technical and organizational issues. Eleven working groups were formed in advance of the meeting and sought over several months to define the most pressing problems and emerging opportunities and to propose the best routes forward for a focused R&D program to solve these problems. The workshop participants identified eight principal research directions (PRDs), as follows: Development of advanced grating lithography and manufacturing for high-energy resolution techniques such as soft X-ray inelastic scattering. Development of higher-precision mirrors for brightness preservation through the use of advanced metrology in manufacturing, improvements in manufacturing techniques, and in mechanical mounting and cooling. Development of higher-accuracy optical metrology that can be used in manufacturing, verification, and testing of optomechanical systems, as well as at wavelength metrology that can be used for quantification of individual optics and alignment and testing of beamlines. Development of an integrated optical modeling and design framework that is designed and maintained specifically for X-ray optics. Development of

  19. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Dennis; Padmore, Howard; Lessner, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    and potentially revolutionary science involves soft excitations such as magnons and phonons; in general, these are well below the resolution that can be probed by today's optical systems. The study of these low-energy excitations will only move forward if advances are made in high-resolution gratings for the soft X-ray energy region, and higher-resolution crystal analyzers for the hard X-ray region. In almost all the forefront areas of X-ray science today, the main limitation is our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate X-rays at the level required for these advanced measurements. To address these issues, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) sponsored a workshop, X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities, which was held March 27-29, 2013, near Washington, D.C. The workshop addressed a wide range of technical and organizational issues. Eleven working groups were formed in advance of the meeting and sought over several months to define the most pressing problems and emerging opportunities and to propose the best routes forward for a focused R&D program to solve these problems. The workshop participants identified eight principal research directions (PRDs), as follows: Development of advanced grating lithography and manufacturing for high-energy resolution techniques such as soft X-ray inelastic scattering. Development of higher-precision mirrors for brightness preservation through the use of advanced metrology in manufacturing, improvements in manufacturing techniques, and in mechanical mounting and cooling. Development of higher-accuracy optical metrology that can be used in manufacturing, verification, and testing of optomechanical systems, as well as at wavelength metrology that can be used for quantification of individual optics and alignment and testing of beamlines. Development of an integrated optical modeling and design framework that is designed and maintained specifically for X-ray optics. Development of

  20. Simulations of the Light Scattering Properties of Metal/Oxide Core/Shell Nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, F.; Piccitto, G.; Grimaldi, M.G.; Ruffino, F.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of the optical properties of metal/dielectric core/shell nanoparticles, in this work we focus our attention on the light scattering properties, within the Mie framework, of some specific categories of these noteworthy nano structures. In particular, we report theoretical results of angle-dependent light scattering intensity and scattering efficiency for Ag/Ag 2 O, Al/Al 2 O 2 , Cu/Cu 2 O, Pd/PdO, and Ti/TiO 2 core/shell nanoparticles as a function of the core radius/shell thickness ratio and on a relative comparison. The results highlight the light scattering characteristics of these systems as a function of the radius/shell thickness ratio, helping in the choice of the more suitable materials and sizes for specific applications (i.e., dynamic light scattering for biological and molecular recognition, increasing light trapping in thin-film silicon, organic solar cells for achieving a higher photocurrent).

  1. Laser driven white light source for BRDF measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a setup with laser driven light source (LDLS) for measuring a 2D bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). We have carried out measurements to acquire the BRDF of different samples based on our setup: which consists of a new laser driven broadband light...... source (UV-VIS-NIR), spectroradiometer and sample holder stepper motor in a dark UV-protected environment. Here, we introduced a special kind of light source which has a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light output to give a very good angular resolution. The experimental results...

  2. Polarized Light Sources for photocathode electron guns at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.; Frisch, J.; Witte, K.; Zolotorev, M.

    1992-12-01

    We describe current and future Polarized Light Sources at SLAC for use with photocathode electron guns to produce polarized electron beams. The SLAC experiments SLD and E142 are considered, and are used to define the required parameters for the Polarized Light Sources

  3. New Storage Ring Light Sources on the Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Podobedov, Boris

    2005-01-01

    The world's appetite for light sources keeps growing as new ones are under construction or being proposed for every continent but Antarctica. While some viable alternatives are emerging, the great majority of new light sources are based on mature electron storage ring technology. We review the design and performance of the new machines worldwide and speculate on the future directions.

  4. Measuring spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S; Marschner, Steve

    2013-05-20

    Light interacts with an organism's integument on a variety of spatial scales. For example in an iridescent bird: nano-scale structures produce color; the milli-scale structure of barbs and barbules largely determines the directional pattern of reflected light; and through the macro-scale spatial structure of overlapping, curved feathers, these directional effects create the visual texture. Milli-scale and macro-scale effects determine where on the organism's body, and from what viewpoints and under what illumination, the iridescent colors are seen. Thus, the highly directional flash of brilliant color from the iridescent throat of a hummingbird is inadequately explained by its nano-scale structure alone and questions remain. From a given observation point, which milli-scale elements of the feather are oriented to reflect strongly? Do some species produce broader "windows" for observation of iridescence than others? These and similar questions may be asked about any organisms that have evolved a particular surface appearance for signaling, camouflage, or other reasons. In order to study the directional patterns of light scattering from feathers, and their relationship to the bird's milli-scale morphology, we developed a protocol for measuring light scattered from biological materials using many high-resolution photographs taken with varying illumination and viewing directions. Since we measure scattered light as a function of direction, we can observe the characteristic features in the directional distribution of light scattered from that particular feather, and because barbs and barbules are resolved in our images, we can clearly attribute the directional features to these different milli-scale structures. Keeping the specimen intact preserves the gross-scale scattering behavior seen in nature. The method described here presents a generalized protocol for analyzing spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from complex biological materials at multiple

  5. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, poweful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia

  6. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia

  7. Spectral blueshifts in laser light scattered from argon-gas-cluster plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, H.; Arora, V.; Naik, P.A.; Gupta, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study is presented on scattering of laser light from argon gas clusters irradiated by multipicosecond Nd:glass laser pulses at moderate intensity of 10 15 W/cm 2 . Space-resolved side-scattered laser light has a predominantly blueshifted and broadened spectrum (up to ∼8 nm). The scattered signal intensity and average blueshift exhibit a marked dependence on the backing pressure of the gas. The results are explained by self-phase modulation of the laser radiation due to changing polarizability as the heated clusters pass through resonance at 3 times the critical density during which intense absorption and scattering occurs. The observed blueshift may be useful in diagnostics of this important phase of laser-cluster interactions

  8. An Analytical Method of Auxiliary Sources Solution for Plane Wave Scattering by Impedance Cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Analytical Method of Auxiliary Sources solutions for plane wave scattering by circular impedance cylinders are derived by transformation of the exact eigenfunction series solutions employing the Hankel function wave transformation. The analytical Method of Auxiliary Sources solution thus obtained...

  9. Investigation of rf plasma light sources for dye laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.S.; Jaminet, J.F.

    1975-06-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to assess the applicability of radio frequency (rf) induction heated plasma light sources for potential excitation of continuous dye lasers. Experimental efforts were directed toward development of a continuous light source having spectral flux and emission characteristics approaching that required for pumping organic dye lasers. Analytical studies were performed to investigate (1) methods of pulsing the light source to obtain higher radiant intensity and (2) methods of integrating the source with a reflective cavity for pumping a dye cell. (TFD)

  10. Light penetration structures the deep acoustic scattering layers in the global ocean.

    KAUST Repository

    Aksnes, Dag L.

    2017-05-01

    The deep scattering layer (DSL) is a ubiquitous acoustic signature found across all oceans and arguably the dominant feature structuring the pelagic open ocean ecosystem. It is formed by mesopelagic fishes and pelagic invertebrates. The DSL animals are an important food source for marine megafauna and contribute to the biological carbon pump through the active flux of organic carbon transported in their daily vertical migrations. They occupy depths from 200 to 1000 m at daytime and migrate to a varying degree into surface waters at nighttime. Their daytime depth, which determines the migration amplitude, varies across the global ocean in concert with water mass properties, in particular the oxygen regime, but the causal underpinning of these correlations has been unclear. We present evidence that the broad variability in the oceanic DSL daytime depth observed during the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition is governed by variation in light penetration. We find that the DSL depth distribution conforms to a common optical depth layer across the global ocean and that a correlation between dissolved oxygen and light penetration provides a parsimonious explanation for the association of shallow DSL distributions with hypoxic waters. In enhancing understanding of this phenomenon, our results should improve the ability to predict and model the dynamics of one of the largest animal biomass components on earth, with key roles in the oceanic biological carbon pump and food web.

  11. Light penetration structures the deep acoustic scattering layers in the global ocean.

    KAUST Repository

    Aksnes, Dag L.; Rø stad, Anders; Kaartvedt, Stein; Martinez, Udane; Duarte, Carlos M.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2017-01-01

    The deep scattering layer (DSL) is a ubiquitous acoustic signature found across all oceans and arguably the dominant feature structuring the pelagic open ocean ecosystem. It is formed by mesopelagic fishes and pelagic invertebrates. The DSL animals are an important food source for marine megafauna and contribute to the biological carbon pump through the active flux of organic carbon transported in their daily vertical migrations. They occupy depths from 200 to 1000 m at daytime and migrate to a varying degree into surface waters at nighttime. Their daytime depth, which determines the migration amplitude, varies across the global ocean in concert with water mass properties, in particular the oxygen regime, but the causal underpinning of these correlations has been unclear. We present evidence that the broad variability in the oceanic DSL daytime depth observed during the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition is governed by variation in light penetration. We find that the DSL depth distribution conforms to a common optical depth layer across the global ocean and that a correlation between dissolved oxygen and light penetration provides a parsimonious explanation for the association of shallow DSL distributions with hypoxic waters. In enhancing understanding of this phenomenon, our results should improve the ability to predict and model the dynamics of one of the largest animal biomass components on earth, with key roles in the oceanic biological carbon pump and food web.

  12. DETERMINATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS OF β-LACTOGLOBULIN AGGREGATION USING ULTRA VIOLET LIGHT SCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Belton, Daniel; Austerberry, James

    2018-01-01

    The problem of protein aggregation is widely studied across a number of disciplines, where understanding the behaviour of the protein monomer, and its behaviour with co-solutes is imperative in order to devise solutions to the problem. Here we present a method for measuring the kinetics of protein aggregation based on ultra violet light scattering spectroscopy (UVLSS) across a range of NaCl conditions. Through measurement of wavelength dependant scattering and using the model protein β-lactog...

  13. A semiclassical method in the theory of light scattering by semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, I. G.; Korovin, L. I.; Pavlov, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    A semiclassical method is proposed for the theoretical description of elastic light scattering by arbitrary semiconductor quantum dots under conditions of size quantization. This method involves retarded potentials and allows one to dispense with boundary conditions for electric and magnetic fields. Exact results for the Umov-Poynting vector at large distances from quantum dots in the case of monochromatic and pulsed irradiation and formulas for differential scattering cross sections are obtained

  14. Taking apart the enhanced backscattering cone: Interference fringes from reciprocal paths in multiple light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, Boris P. J.; Ferreira, Flavio P.; Nunes-Pereira, Eduardo J.; Belsley, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We report the decomposition of the enhanced backscattering cone into its constitutive interference fringes. These fringes are due to the constructive interference between reciprocal paths of any multiply scattered wave after ensemble averaging. An optical setup combining a two-point continuous-wave illumination and matching detection allows the observation of the fringes and, therefore, the quantitative characterization of the Green's function for light propagation between the two points in a multiple-scattering media.

  15. Control and Driving Methods for LED Based Intelligent Light Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Beczkowski, Szymon

    2012-01-01

    High power light-emitting diodes allow the creation of luminaires capable of generating saturated colour light at very high efficacies. Contrary to traditional light sources like incandescent and high-intensity discharge lamps, where colour is generated using filters, LEDs use additive light mixing, where the intensity of each primary colour diode has to be adjusted to the needed intensity to generate specified colour. The function of LED driver is to supply the diode with power needed to ach...

  16. Coherent scattering of CO2 light from ion-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peratt, A.L.; Watterson, R.L.; Derfler, H.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering of laser radiation from ion-acoustic waves in a plasma is investigated analytically and experimentally. The formulation predicts a coherent component of the scattered power on a largely incoherent background spectrum when the acoustic analog of Bragg's law and Doppler shift conditions are satisfied. The experiment consists of a hybrid CO 2 laser system capable of either low power continuous wave or high power pulsed mode operation. A heterodyne light mixing scheme is used to detect the scattered power. The proportionality predicted by the theory is verified by scattering from externally excited acoustic and ion-acoustic waves; continuous wave and pulsed modes in each case. Measurement of the ion-acoustic dispersion relation by continuous wave scattering is also presented

  17. Characterization of the angular memory effect of scattered light in biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Sam; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Léger, Jean-Francois; Bourdieu, Laurent; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-05-18

    High resolution optical microscopy is essential in neuroscience but suffers from scattering in biological tissues and therefore grants access to superficial brain layers only. Recently developed techniques use scattered photons for imaging by exploiting angular correlations in transmitted light and could potentially increase imaging depths. But those correlations ('angular memory effect') are of a very short range and should theoretically be only present behind and not inside scattering media. From measurements on neural tissues and complementary simulations, we find that strong forward scattering in biological tissues can enhance the memory effect range and thus the possible field-of-view by more than an order of magnitude compared to isotropic scattering for ∼1 mm thick tissue layers.

  18. Generation of Light Scattering States in Cholesteric Liquid Crystals by Optically Controlled Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Bunning

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Circularly polarized light was previously employed to stimulate the reversible and reconfigurable writing of scattering states in cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC cells constructed with a photosensitive layer. Such dynamic photodriven responses have utility in remotely triggering changes in optical constructs responsive to optical stimulus and applications where complex spatial patterning is required. Writing of scattering regions required the handedness of incoming radiation to match the handedness of the CLC and the reflection bandwidth of the CLC to envelop the wavelength of the incoming radiation. In this paper, the mechanism of transforming the CLC into a light scattering state via the influence of light on the photosensitive alignment layer is detailed. Specifically, the effects of: (i the polarization state of light on the photosensitive alignment layer; (ii the exposure time; and (iii the incidence angle of radiation on domain formation are reported. The photogenerated light-scattering domains are shown to be similar in appearance between crossed polarizers to a defect structure that occurs at a CLC/air interface (i.e., a free CLC surface. This observation provides strong indication that exposure of the photosensitive alignment layer to the circularly polarized light of appropriate wavelength and handedness generates an out-of-plane orientation leading to a periodic distortion of the original planar structure.

  19. Light scattering by microstructures in plastic nuclear track detector plane surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipasuramonton, O.

    1985-01-01

    The angular distributions of light elastically scattered by finite dielectric conical and cylindrical microstructures in plastic nuclear track detector plane surfaces have been measured. These microstructures are the chemically etched tracks of various nuclei, viz., protons, neutrons, 3 He, alphas, and 56 Fe. The base diameters of the structures are larger than twice the wavelength of the incident light. The results show the dependence of the scattering patterns on shape, size, orientation, and refractive index of the structures as well as the polarization of the incident light. It is also observed that in the single and independent scattering regime, the intensity at the intermediate angular region exhibits linear proportionality to the number of the microstructures per unit area. 84 refs., 96 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Sensitivity of a fibre scattered-light interferometer to external phase perturbations in an optical fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T [V.A.Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Gorshkov, B G [OOO ' Petrofaiber' , Russia, Tula region, Novomoskovsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    Sensitivity of a fibre scattered-light interferometer to external phase perturbations is studied for the first time. An expression is derived for an average power of a useful signal at the interferometer output under external harmonic perturbations in a signal fibre of the interferometer. It is shown that the maximum sensitivity of the scattered-light interferometer depends on the dispersion of the interferogram intensity. An average signal-to-noise ratio is determined theoretically and experimentally at the output of the interferometer at different amplitudes of external perturbations. Using the measured dependences of the signal-to-noise ratio, the threshold sensitivity of the fibre scattered-light interferometer to external phase perturbations is found. The results obtained can be used to optimise characteristics of optical time-domain reflectometers and to design individual phase-sensitive fibre-optic sensors. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Inelastic light scattering by low-lying excitations of electrons in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, V. [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Pinczuk, A. [Department of Physics, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The low-dimensional electron systems that reside in artificial semiconductor heterostructures of great perfection are a contemporary materials base for explorations of collective phenomena. Studies of low-lying elementary excitations by inelastic light scattering offer insights on properties such energetics, interactions and spin magnetization. We review here recent light scattering results obtained from two-dimensional (2D) quantum fluids in semiconductor heterostructures under extreme conditions of low temperature and large magnetic field, where the quantum Hall phases are archetypes of novel behaviors. We also consider recent light scattering experiments that have probed the excitation spectra of few-electron states in semiconductor quantum dots. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Structural study of concentrated micelle-solutions of sodium octanoate by light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1982-05-01

    Structural investigation of sodium octanoate (CH 3 -(CH 2 ) 6 -COONa) by light scattering has been made to study properties of concentrated aqueous micelle-solutions. From static light scattering data, the micellar weight and shape have been determined. The monomer aggregation number and the apparent micellar charge have been confirmed. Quasi-elastic light scattering, has been used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the volume fraction. Extrapolation to the c.m.c. give the hydrodynamic radius of the micelles. At low micelle-concentration, strong exchange reaction between monomers and micelles affects the Brownian motion and resulting is an increase in the diffusion coefficient. The experimental data show a strong hydrodynamic contribution to S(q) (factor structure) and D(q) (effective diffusion coefficient) arising from hard spheres interactions with a large repulsive potential. (author) [fr

  3. Field-based dynamic light scattering microscopy: theory and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Chulmin; de Boer, Johannes F

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical framework for field-based dynamic light scattering microscopy based on a spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) platform. SD-OCPM is an interferometric microscope capable of quantitative measurement of amplitude and phase of scattered light with high phase stability. Field-based dynamic light scattering (F-DLS) analysis allows for direct evaluation of complex-valued field autocorrelation function and measurement of localized diffusive and directional dynamic properties of biological and material samples with high spatial resolution. In order to gain insight into the information provided by F-DLS microscopy, theoretical and numerical analyses are performed to evaluate the effect of numerical aperture of the imaging optics. We demonstrate that sharp focusing of fields affects the measured diffusive and transport velocity, which leads to smaller values for the dynamic properties in the sample. An approach for accurately determining the dynamic properties of the samples is discussed.

  4. Deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering from the light-cone quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boqiang Ma; Ji Sun

    1990-01-01

    We show that for deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, the conditions which validate the impulse approximation are hardly satisfied when using ordinary instant form dynamics in the rest frame of the nucleus, whereas they are well satisfied when using instant form dynamics in the infinite-momentum frame, or using light-front form dynamics in an ordinary frame. Therefore a reliable theoretical treatment of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering should be performed in the time-ordered perturbation theory in the infinite-momentum frame, or its equivalent, the light-cone perturbation theory in an ordinary frame. To this end, we extend the light-cone quantum field theory to the baryon-meson field to establish a relativistic composite model of nuclei. We then apply the impulse approximation to deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in this model.(author)

  5. View From a Megacity: Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments, MIRAGE-Mex deployment to Mexico City in the period of 30 days, March 2006, a suite of photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) were installed to measure at ground level the light absorption and scattering by aerosols at four sites: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP), a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac, a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch, and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 40 and 250 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering and Aetholemeter absorption measurements at the T0 site will be presented. We will present a broad overview of the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site. Insight on the dynamical connections will be discussed.

  6. Light focusing through a multiple scattering medium: ab initio computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, Oleksandr; Danko, Volodymyr; Kovalenko, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    The present study considers ab initio computer simulation of the light focusing through a complex scattering medium. The focusing is performed by shaping the incident light beam in order to obtain a small focused spot on the opposite side of the scattering layer. MSTM software (Auburn University) is used to simulate the propagation of an arbitrary monochromatic Gaussian beam and obtain 2D distribution of the optical field in the selected plane of the investigated volume. Based on the set of incident and scattered fields, the pair of right and left eigen bases and corresponding singular values were calculated. The pair of right and left eigen modes together with the corresponding singular value constitute the transmittance eigen channel of the disordered media. Thus, the scattering process is described in three steps: 1) initial field decomposition in the right eigen basis; 2) scaling of decomposition coefficients for the corresponding singular values; 3) assembling of the scattered field as the composition of the weighted left eigen modes. Basis fields are represented as a linear combination of the original Gaussian beams and scattered fields. It was demonstrated that 60 independent control channels provide focusing the light into a spot with the minimal radius of approximately 0.4 μm at half maximum. The intensity enhancement in the focal plane was equal to 68 that coincided with theoretical prediction.

  7. Comparison of forward light scatter estimations using Shack-Hartmann spot patterns and a straylight meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito Lopez, Pablo; Radhakrishnan, Hema; Nourrit, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether an unmodified commercial wavefront aberrometer (irx3) can be used to estimate forward light scattering and how this assessment matches estimations obtained from the C-Quant straylight meter. University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. Prospective comparative study. Measurements obtained with a straylight meter and with Shack-Hartmann spot patterns using a previously reported metric were compared. The method was first validated in a model eye by spraying an aerosol over 4 contact lenses to generate various levels of scattering. Measurements with both methods were subsequently obtained in healthy eyes. The study comprised 33 healthy participants (mean age 38.9 years ± 13.1 [SD]). A good correlation was observed between the density of droplets over the contact lenses and the objective scatter value extracted from the hartmanngrams (r = 0.972, P meter and the metric derived from the Shack-Hartmann method (r = 0.133, P = .460). The hartmanngrams provided a valid objective measurement of the light scatter in a model eye; the measurements in human eyes were not significantly correlated with those of the light scatter meter. The straylight meter assesses large-angle scattering, while the Shack-Hartmann method collates information from a narrow angle around the center of the point-spread function; this could be the reason for the difference in measurements. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. New light Sources for Biomedical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini

    .9%) on mature biofilms was only achieved after a novel treatment was invented, namely “light assisted antibiotics”. Additionally, significant vitamin D enrichment of various food products was achieved. Especially the content of vitamin D in pig skin could reach 0.5 μg/cm2 after 7 sec. exposure versus the 0...

  9. [Multiple scattering of visible and infrared light by sea fog over wind driving rough sea surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian-Ming; Wang, Hai-Hua; Lei, Cheng-Xin; Shen, Jin

    2013-08-01

    The present paper is concerned with computing the multiple scattering characteristics of a sea fog-sea surface couple system within this context. The single scattering characteristics of sea fog were studied by Mie theory, and the multiple scattering of sunlight by single sea fog layer was studied by radiative transfer theory. The reflection function of a statistically rough ocean surface was obtained using the standard Kirchhoff formulation, with shadowing effects taken into account. The reflection properties of the combined sea fog and ocean surface were obtained employing the adding method, and the results indicated that the reflected light intensity of sea fog increased with the sea background.

  10. Four-photon parametric light scattering of ultrashort laser pulses in water in case of weak self-phase modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, V A; Sychev, Andrei A

    2009-01-01

    The hyper-Raman scattering (HRS) of light in water is detected reliably by the active spectroscopy method of coherent light scattering, in particular, by the method of four-photon parametric light scattering in a medium in which HRS is a 'signal' wave in the parametric process involving simultaneously two high-power laser photons and IR photons of an 'idler' wave. Hyper-Raman scattering by libration vibrations of water molecules, which virtually cannot be detected by conventional methods of Raman scattering, was observed. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  11. Femtosecond Light Source for Phase-Controlled Multiphoton Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Walker, D. R.; Yavuz, D. D.; Yin, G. Y.; Harris, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a femtosecond Raman light source with more than an octave of optical bandwidth. We use this source to demonstrate phase control of multiphoton ionization under conditions where ionization requires eleven photons of the lowest frequency of the spectrum or five photons of the highest frequency. The nonlinearity of the photoionization process allows us to characterize the light source. Experiment-to-theory comparison implies generation of a near single-cycle waveform

  12. A new storage-ring light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  13. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  14. Modal evaluation of the anthropogenic night sky brightness at arbitrary distances from a light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bará, Salvador; Ribas, Salvador J; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The artificial emissions of light contribute to a high extent to the observed brightness of the night sky in many places of the world. Determining the all-sky radiance of anthropogenic origin requires solving the radiative transfer equation for ground-level light sources, generally resorting to a double-scattering approximation in order to account for the observed radiance patterns with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Since the all-sky radiance distribution produced by an elementary light source depends on the distance to the observer in a way that is not immediately obvious, the contributions of sources located at different distances have to be computed on an individual basis, solving for each one the corresponding scattering integrals. In this paper we show that these calculations may be significantly alleviated by using a modal approach, whereby the hemispheric night-sky radiance is expanded in terms of a convenient basis of two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal functions. Since the modal coefficients of this expansion do vary smoothly with the distance to the observer, the all-sky brightness distributions produced by light sources located at arbitrary intermediate distances can be efficiently estimated by interpolation, provided that the coefficients at a discrete set of distances are accurately determined beforehand. (paper)

  15. PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY USING A SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JACKSON, R.S.; MICHAELIAN, K.H.; HOMES, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the use of a synchrotron as a source for infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. A synchrotron has an intrinsically high radiance, which is beneficial when photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied to small samples, especially at long wavelengths

  16. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berginc, G [THALES, 2 avenue Gay-Lussac 78995 ELANCOURT (France)

    2013-11-30

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell – Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength. (coherent light scattering)

  17. Enhanced light scattering in Si nanostructures produced by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sberna, P. M.; Scapellato, G. G.; Boninelli, S.; Miritello, M.; Crupi, I.; Bruno, E.; Privitera, V.; Simone, F.; Mirabella, S. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Piluso, N. [IMM-CNR, VIII strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2013-11-25

    An innovative method for Si nanostructures (NS) fabrication is proposed, through nanosecond laser irradiation (λ = 532 nm) of thin Si film (120 nm) on quartz. Varying the laser energy fluences (425–1130 mJ/cm{sup 2}) distinct morphologies of Si NS appear, going from interconnected structures to isolated clusters. Film breaking occurs through a laser-induced dewetting process. Raman scattering is enhanced in all the obtained Si NS, with the largest enhancement in interconnected Si structures, pointing out an increased trapping of light due to multiple scattering. The reported method is fast, scalable and cheap, and can be applied for light management in photovoltaics.

  18. Polydisperse-particle-size-distribution function determined from intensity profile of angularly scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new method for determining the particle-size-distribution function of a polydispersion of spherical particles is presented. The inversion technique for the particle-size-distribution function is based upon matching the measured intensity profile of angularly scattered light with a summation of the intensity contributions of a series of appropriately spaced, narrowband, size-distribution functions. A numerical optimization technique is used to determine the strengths of the individual bands that yield the best agreement with the measured scattered-light-intensity profile. Because Mie theory is used, the method is applicable to spherical particles of all sizes. Several numerical examples demonstrate the application of this inversion method

  19. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  20. Physics Model-Based Scatter Correction in Multi-Source Interior Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Li, Bin; Jia, Xun; Cao, Guohua

    2018-02-01

    Multi-source interior computed tomography (CT) has a great potential to provide ultra-fast and organ-oriented imaging at low radiation dose. However, X-ray cross scattering from multiple simultaneously activated X-ray imaging chains compromises imaging quality. Previously, we published two hardware-based scatter correction methods for multi-source interior CT. Here, we propose a software-based scatter correction method, with the benefit of no need for hardware modifications. The new method is based on a physics model and an iterative framework. The physics model was derived analytically, and was used to calculate X-ray scattering signals in both forward direction and cross directions in multi-source interior CT. The physics model was integrated to an iterative scatter correction framework to reduce scatter artifacts. The method was applied to phantom data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical experimentation that were designed to emulate the image acquisition in a multi-source interior CT architecture recently proposed by our team. The proposed scatter correction method reduced scatter artifacts significantly, even with only one iteration. Within a few iterations, the reconstructed images fast converged toward the "scatter-free" reference images. After applying the scatter correction method, the maximum CT number error at the region-of-interests (ROIs) was reduced to 46 HU in numerical phantom dataset and 48 HU in physical phantom dataset respectively, and the contrast-noise-ratio at those ROIs increased by up to 44.3% and up to 19.7%, respectively. The proposed physics model-based iterative scatter correction method could be useful for scatter correction in dual-source or multi-source CT.

  1. Time-dependent scattering of incident light of various wavelengths in ferrofluids under external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingyu; Song, Dongxing; Geng, Jiafeng; Jing, Dengwei

    2018-02-01

    Ferrofluids can exhibit the anisotropic thermodynamic properties under magnetic fields. The dynamic optical properties of ferrofluids in the presence of magnetic fields are of particular interest due to their potential application as various optical devices. Although time-dependent light scattering by ferrofluids have been extensively studied, the effect of wavelength of incident light have been rarely considered. Here, for the first time, we investigated both the time- and wavelength-dependent light scattering in water based ferrofluids containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles under an external magnetic field. The field-induced response behavior of the prepared ferrofluid samples was determined and verified first by thermal conductivity measurement and numerical simulation. Double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer was employed to record the temporal evolution of transmitted intensity of incident light of various wavelengths passing through the ferrofluid sample and propagating parallel to the applied field. As expected, the light intensity decreases to a certain value right after the field is turned on due to the thermal fluctuation induced disorder inside the flexible particle chains. Then the light intensity further decreases with time until the appearance of a minimum at time τ0 followed by an inversed increase before finally reaches equilibrium at a particular time. More importantly, the characteristic inversion time τ0 was found to follow a power law increase with the wavelength of incident light (τ0 ∼ λα, where α = 2.07). A quantitative explanation for the wavelength dependence of characteristic time was proposed based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The simulation results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. The time-dependent light scattering in ferrofluids under different incident wavelengths was rationalized by considering both the coarsening process of the particle chains and the occurrence of resonance within the

  2. Crossing statistics of laser light scattered through a nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi Pirlar, M; Movahed, S M S; Razzaghi, D; Karimzadeh, R

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the crossing statistics of speckle patterns formed in the Fresnel diffraction region by a laser beam scattering through a nanofluid. We extend zero-crossing statistics to assess the dynamical properties of the nanofluid. According to the joint probability density function of laser beam fluctuation and its time derivative, the theoretical frameworks for Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes are revisited. We count the number of crossings not only at zero level but also for all available thresholds to determine the average speed of moving particles. Using a probabilistic framework in determining crossing statistics, a priori Gaussianity is not essentially considered; therefore, even in the presence of deviation from Gaussian fluctuation, this modified approach is capable of computing relevant quantities, such as mean value of speed, more precisely. Generalized total crossing, which represents the weighted summation of crossings for all thresholds to quantify small deviation from Gaussian statistics, is introduced. This criterion can also manipulate the contribution of noises and trends to infer reliable physical quantities. The characteristic time scale for having successive crossings at a given threshold is defined. In our experimental setup, we find that increasing sample temperature leads to more consistency between Gaussian and perturbative non-Gaussian predictions. The maximum number of crossings does not necessarily occur at mean level, indicating that we should take into account other levels in addition to zero level to achieve more accurate assessments.

  3. Scattered-Light Echoes from the Historical Galactic Supernovae Cassiopeia A and Tycho (SN 1572)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A; Welch, D L; Suntzeff, N B; Oaster, L; Lanning, H; Olsen, K; Smith, R C; Becker, A C; Bergmann, M; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Cook, K H; Damke, G; Garg, A; Huber, M E; Matheson, T; Minniti, D; Prieto, J L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2008-05-06

    We report the discovery of an extensive system of scattered light echo arclets associated with the recent supernovae in the local neighborhood of the Milky Way: Tycho (SN 1572) and Cassiopeia A. Existing work suggests that the Tycho SN was a thermonuclear explosion while the Cas A supernova was a core collapse explosion. Precise classifications according to modern nomenclature require spectra of the outburst light. In the case of ancient SNe, this can only be done with spectroscopy of their light echo, where the discovery of the light echoes from the outburst light is the first step. Adjacent light echo positions suggest that Cas A and Tycho may share common scattering dust structures. If so, it is possible to measure precise distances between historical Galactic supernovae. On-going surveys that alert on the development of bright scattered-light echo features have the potential to reveal detailed spectroscopic information for many recent Galactic supernovae, both directly visible and obscured by dust in the Galactic plane.

  4. Scattered-Light Echoes from the Historical Galactic Supernovae Cassiopeia A and Tycho (SN 1572)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, A.; Welch, D.L.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Oaster, L.; Lanning, H.; Olsen, K.; Smith, R.C.; Becker, A.C.; Bergmann, M.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Cook, K.H.; Damke, G.; Garg, A.; Huber, M.E.; Matheson, T.; Minniti, D.; Prieto, J.L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of an extensive system of scattered light echo arclets associated with the recent supernovae in the local neighborhood of the Milky Way: Tycho (SN 1572) and Cassiopeia A. Existing work suggests that the Tycho SN was a thermonuclear explosion while the Cas A supernova was a core collapse explosion. Precise classifications according to modern nomenclature require spectra of the outburst light. In the case of ancient SNe, this can only be done with spectroscopy of their light echo, where the discovery of the light echoes from the outburst light is the first step. Adjacent light echo positions suggest that Cas A and Tycho may share common scattering dust structures. If so, it is possible to measure precise distances between historical Galactic supernovae. On-going surveys that alert on the development of bright scattered-light echo features have the potential to reveal detailed spectroscopic information for many recent Galactic supernovae, both directly visible and obscured by dust in the Galactic plane

  5. Deep inelastic scattering and light-cone wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.M.; Johnson, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of light-cone QCD rules, we study the valence quark distribution function q(x B ) of a pion for moderate x B . The sum rule with the leading twist-2 wave function gives q(x B ) = φ π (x B ). Twist-4 wave functions give about 30% for x B ∼0.5. It is shown that QCD sum rule predictions, with the asymptotic pion wave function, are in good agreement with experimental data. We found that a two-hump profile for the twist-2 wave function leads to a valence quark distribution function that contradicts experimental data

  6. Research Update: A minimal region of squid reflectin for vapor-induced light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick B. Dennis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reflectins are a family of proteins found in the light manipulating cells of cephalopods. These proteins are made up of a series of conserved repeats that contain highly represented amino acids thought to be important for function. Previous studies demonstrated that recombinant reflectins cast into thin films produced structural colors that could be dynamically modulated via changing environmental conditions. In this study, we demonstrate light scattering from reflectin films following exposure to a series of water vapor pulses. Analysis of film surface topography shows that the induction of light scatter is accompanied by self-assembly of reflectins into micro- and nanoscale features. Using a reductionist strategy, we determine which reflectin repeats and sub-repeats are necessary for these events following water vapor pulsing. With this approach, we identify a singly represented, 23-amino acid region in reflectins as being sufficient to recapitulate the light scattering properties observed in thin films of the full-length protein. Finally, the aqueous stability of reflectin films is leveraged to show that pre-exposure to buffers of varying pH can modulate the ability of water vapor pulses to induce light scatter and protein self-assembly.

  7. Quantitative photoplethysmography: Lambert-Beer law or inverse function incorporating light scatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejnar, M; Kobler, H; Hunyor, S N

    1993-03-01

    Finger blood volume is commonly determined from measurement of infra-red (IR) light transmittance using the Lambert-Beer law of light absorption derived for use in non-scattering media, even when such transmission involves light scatter around the phalangeal bone. Simultaneous IR transmittance and finger volume were measured over the full dynamic range of vascular volumes in seven subjects and outcomes compared with data fitted according to the Lambert-Beer exponential function and an inverse function derived for light attenuation by scattering materials. Curves were fitted by the least-squares method and goodness of fit was compared using standard errors of estimate (SEE). The inverse function gave a better data fit in six of the subjects: mean SEE 1.9 (SD 0.7, range 0.7-2.8) and 4.6 (2.2, 2.0-8.0) respectively (p < 0.02, paired t-test). Thus, when relating IR transmittance to blood volume, as occurs in the finger during measurements of arterial compliance, an inverse function derived from a model of light attenuation by scattering media gives more accurate results than the traditional exponential fit.

  8. Research Update: A minimal region of squid reflectin for vapor-induced light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Patrick B.; Singh, Kristi M.; Vasudev, Milana C.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J.

    2017-12-01

    Reflectins are a family of proteins found in the light manipulating cells of cephalopods. These proteins are made up of a series of conserved repeats that contain highly represented amino acids thought to be important for function. Previous studies demonstrated that recombinant reflectins cast into thin films produced structural colors that could be dynamically modulated via changing environmental conditions. In this study, we demonstrate light scattering from reflectin films following exposure to a series of water vapor pulses. Analysis of film surface topography shows that the induction of light scatter is accompanied by self-assembly of reflectins into micro- and nanoscale features. Using a reductionist strategy, we determine which reflectin repeats and sub-repeats are necessary for these events following water vapor pulsing. With this approach, we identify a singly represented, 23-amino acid region in reflectins as being sufficient to recapitulate the light scattering properties observed in thin films of the full-length protein. Finally, the aqueous stability of reflectin films is leveraged to show that pre-exposure to buffers of varying pH can modulate the ability of water vapor pulses to induce light scatter and protein self-assembly.

  9. Electrical discharge light sources: a challenge for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissis, G.

    2001-01-01

    The first electric powder lamp operated that 150 years ago, since then the evolution of light sources is astonishing. Today, more than 10 % of the global electric power produced worldwide serve fore light production from several billions lamps. Since last three decades incandescent lamps are gradually replaced by more energy efficient discharge lamps. In parallel, new generation of light emitting diodes, producing bright colours (including white) with luminous efficacy challenging even discharge lamps, appeared in past years. The objective of this paper is to focus on the state of art in the domain of light sources and discuss the challenges for the near future. (author)

  10. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton [MagiQ Technologies, Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  11. Influence of pump-field scattering on nonclassical-light generation in a photonic-band-gap nonlinear planar waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perina, Jan Jr.; Sibilia, Concita; Tricca, Daniela; Bertolotti, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Optical parametric process occurring in a nonlinear planar waveguide can serve as a source of light with nonclassical properties. The properties of the generated fields are substantially modified by scattering of the nonlinearly interacting fields in a photonic-band-gap structure inside the waveguide. A general quantum model of linear operator amplitude corrections to the amplitude mean values and its numerical analysis provide conditions for efficient squeezed-light generation as well as generation of light with sub-Poissonian photon-number statistics. The destructive influence of phase mismatch of the nonlinear interaction can fully be compensated using a suitable photonic-band-gap structure inside the waveguide. Also an increase of the signal-to-noise ratio of the incident optical field can be reached in the waveguide

  12. Permanent magnet based dipole magnets for next generation light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Watanabe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed permanent magnet based dipole magnets for the next generation light sources. Permanent magnets are advantageous over electromagnets in that they consume less power, are physically more compact, and there is a less risk of power supply failure. However, experience with electromagnets and permanent magnets in the field of accelerators shows that there are still challenges to replacing main magnets of accelerators for light sources with permanent magnets. These include the adjustability of the magnetic field, the temperature dependence of permanent magnets, and the issue of demagnetization. In this paper, we present a design for magnets for future light sources, supported by experimental and numerical results.

  13. Potential Sources of Polarized Light from a Plant Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements have demonstrated that sunlight polarized during a first surface reflection by shiny leaves dominates the optical polarization of the light reflected by shiny-leafed plant canopies having approximately spherical leaf angle probability density functions ("Leaf Angle Distributions" - LAD). Yet for other canopies - specifically those without shiny leaves and/or spherical LADs - potential sources of optically polarized light may not always be obvious. Here we identify possible sources of polarized light within those other canopies and speculate on the ecologically important information polarization measurements of those sources might contain.

  14. VCSELs and silicon light sources exploiting SOI grating mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    In this talk, novel vertical-cavity laser structure consisting of a dielectric Bragg reflector, a III-V active region, and a high-index-contrast grating made in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer will be presented. In the Si light source version of this laser structure, the SOI...... the Bragg reflector. Numerical simulations show that both the silicon light source and the VCSEL exploiting SOI grating mirrors have superior performances, compared to existing silicon light sources and long wavelength VCSELs. These devices are highly adequate for chip-level optical interconnects as well...

  15. Light scattering at small angles by atmospheric irregular particles: modelling and laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurton, T.; Renard, J.-B.; Vignelles, D.; Jeannot, M.; Akiki, R.; Mineau, J.-L.; Tonnelier, T.

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated the behaviour of light scattering by particulates of various sizes (0.1 μm to 100 μm) at a small scattering angle (below 20°). It has been previously shown that, for a small angle, the scattered intensities are weakly dependent upon the particulates' composition (Renard et al., 2010). Particles found in the atmosphere exhibit roughness that leads to large discrepancies with the classical Mie solution in terms of scattered intensities in the low angular set-up. This article focuses on building an effective theoretical tool to predict the behaviour of light scattering by real particulates at a small scattering angle. We present both the classical Mie theory and its adaptation to the case of rough particulates with a fairly simple roughness parameterisation. An experimental device was built, corresponding to the angular set-up of interest (low scattering angle and therefore low angular aperture). Measurements are presented that confirm the theoretical results with good agreement. It was found that differences between the classical Mie solution and actual measurements - especially for large particulates - can be attributed to the particulate roughness. It was also found that, in this low angular set-up, saturation of the scattered intensities occurs for relatively small values of the roughness parameter. This confirms the low variability in the scattered intensities observed for atmospheric particulates of different kinds. A direct interest of this study is a broadening of the dynamic range of optical counters: using a small angle of aperture for measurements allows greater dynamics in terms of particle size. Thus it allows a single device to observe a broad range of particle sizes whilst utilising the same electronics.

  16. Selective Rayleigh light scattering determination of trace quercetin with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usoltseva, Liliya O.; Samarina, Tatiana O. [Department of Chemistry, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 GSP-1 Moscow (Russian Federation); Abramchuk, Sergei S. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds (INEOS), Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Prokhorova, Aleksandra F. [Department of Chemistry, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 GSP-1 Moscow (Russian Federation); Beklemishev, Mikhail K., E-mail: mkb@analyt.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 GSP-1 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Rayleigh light scattering (RLS) is a simple technique with a high potential of sensitive determination of small organic molecules. We have found that ppb amounts of quercetin (Qu) greatly enhance the RLS of the solution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Enhancement of light scattering is observed only in the presence of an excess of AgNO{sub 3}, which implies that it is a result of nanoparticle growth; another reason for the enhanced scattering is the aggregation of AgNPs by the analyte that was confirmed by dynamic light scattering technique. The conditions were chosen for the determination of Qu in aqueous solution with the detection limits of 0.01 and 0.03 μmol L{sup −1} and linear ranges of 0.1–1.3 and 0.1–2.0 μmol L{sup −1} for SDS- and CTAB-stabilized AgNPs, respectively; the intra-day RSDs did not exceed 7%. Unexpectedly, other bioflavonoids (rutin, dihydroquercetin, and naringenin) did not change the signal of Qu and did not interfere with its determination in 1:1 M ratio (0.5 μmol L{sup −1} each). Other compounds (asparagin, uric acid, urea and some inorganic ions) were also tolerated in high amounts. - Highlights: • Low concentrations of quercetin enhance the light scattering by silver nanoparticles. • Main processes are aggregation, nanoparticle growth and formation of new particles. • Other compounds exert a weaker effect on the light scattering signal.

  17. Robust sensor for turbidity measurement from light scattering and absorbing liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontturi, Ville; Turunen, Petri; Uozumi, Jun; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2009-12-01

    Internationally standardized turbidity measurements for probing solid particles in liquid are problematic in the case of simultaneous light scattering and absorption. A method and a sensor to determine the turbidity in the presence of light absorption are presented. The developed sensor makes use of the total internal reflection of a laser beam at the liquid-prism interface, and the turbidity is assessed using the concept of laser speckle pattern. Using average filtering in speckle data analyzing the observed dynamic speckle pattern, which is due to light scattering from particles and the static speckle due to stray light of the sensor, can be separated from each other. Good correlation between the standard deviation of dynamic speckle and turbidity value for nonabsorbing and for absorbing liquids was observed. The sensor is suggested, for instance, for the measurement of ill-behaved as well as small-volume turbid liquids in both medicine and process industry.

  18. Determination of illuminants representing typical white light emitting diodes sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jost, S.; Ngo, M.; Ferrero, A.

    2017-01-01

    is to develop LED-based illuminants that describe typical white LED products based on their Spectral Power Distributions (SPDs). Some of these new illuminants will be recommended in the update of the CIE publication 15 on colorimetry with the other typical illuminants, and among them, some could be used......Solid-state lighting (SSL) products are already in use by consumers and are rapidly gaining the lighting market. Especially, white Light Emitting Diode (LED) sources are replacing banned incandescent lamps and other lighting technologies in most general lighting applications. The aim of this work...... to complement the CIE standard illuminant A for calibration use in photometry....

  19. Irradiation Pattern Analysis for Designing Light Sources-Based on Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, E.; Stolik, S.; La Rosa, J. de; Valor, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays it is possible to design light sources with a specific irradiation pattern for many applications. Light Emitting Diodes present features like high luminous efficiency, durability, reliability, flexibility, among others as the result of its rapid development. In this paper the analysis of the irradiation pattern of the light emitting diodes is presented. The approximation of these irradiation patterns to both, a Lambertian, as well as a Gaussian functions for the design of light sources is proposed. Finally, the obtained results and the functionality of bringing the irradiation pattern of the light emitting diodes to these functions are discussed. (Author)

  20. Focused fluorescence excitation with time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light and imaging in thick scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01

    Scattering dominates light propagation in biological tissue, and therefore restricts both resolution and penetration depth in optical imaging within thick tissue. As photons travel into the diffusive regime, typically 1 mm beneath human skin, their trajectories transition from ballistic to diffusive due to the increased number of scattering events, which makes it impossible to focus, much less track, photon paths. Consequently, imaging methods that rely on controlled light illumination are ineffective in deep tissue. This problem has recently been addressed by a novel method capable of dynamically focusing light in thick scattering media via time reversal of ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) diffused light. Here, using photorefractive materials as phase conjugate mirrors, we show a direct visualization and dynamic control of optical focusing with this light delivery method, and demonstrate its application for focused fluorescence excitation and imaging in thick turbid media. These abilities are increasingly critical for understanding the dynamic interactions of light with biological matter and processes at different system levels, as well as their applications for biomedical diagnosis and therapy. (letter)

  1. Characterization of highly scattering media by measurement of diffusely backscattered polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Mourant, Judith R.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for recording spatially dependent intensity patterns of polarized light that is diffusely backscattered from highly scattering media are described. These intensity patterns can be used to differentiate different turbid media, such as polystyrene-sphere and biological-cell suspensions. Polarized light from a He-Ne laser (.lambda.=543 nm) is focused onto the surface of the scattering medium, and a surface area of approximately 4.times.4 cm centered on the light input point is imaged through polarization analysis optics onto a CCD camera. A variety of intensity patterns may be observed by varying the polarization state of the incident laser light and changing the analyzer configuration to detect different polarization components of the backscattered light. Experimental results for polystyrene-sphere and Intralipid suspensions demonstrate that the radial and azimuthal variations of the observed pattern depend on the concentration, size, and anisotropy factor, g, of the particles constituting the scattering medium. Measurements performed on biological cell suspensions show that intensity patterns can be used to differentiate between suspensions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Introduction of the Mueller-matrix for diffusely backscattered light, permits the selection of a subset of measurements which comprehensively describes the optical properties of backscattering media.

  2. A simple and convenient set-up for high-temperature Brillouin light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerette, Michael; Huang Liping

    2012-01-01

    An emulated platelet geometry (or reflection-induced platelet geometry) is employed to collect photons scattered from both longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves travelling within a bulk transparent sample sitting on a reflective Pt plate. Temperature of the sample was controlled with a Linkam TS1500 optical furnace (maximum temperature of 1500 °C). This simple and convenient set-up allows a full determination of elastic constants of transparent materials in situ as a function of temperature from Brillouin light scattering. Structural information can be gained at the same time by guiding the scattered light into a Raman spectrometer using a flipping mirror or a beam splitter. We will demonstrate the applications of this set-up in transparent inorganic glasses, but it can be easily extended to any other transparent materials, either crystalline or amorphous in nature. (paper)

  3. A high-power spatial filter for Thomson scattering stray light reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, J. P.; Litzner, K. D.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.

    2011-03-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) is routinely used to measure electron temperature and density during plasma discharges. Avalanche photodiodes in a five-channel interference filter polychromator measure scattered light from a 6 ns, 800 mJ, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. A low cost, high-power spatial filter was designed, tested, and added to the laser beamline in order to reduce stray laser light to levels which are acceptable for accurate Rayleigh calibration. A detailed analysis of the spatial filter design and performance is given. The spatial filter can be easily implemented in an existing Thomson scattering system without the need to disturb the vacuum chamber or significantly change the beamline. Although apertures in the spatial filter suffer substantial damage from the focused beam, with proper design they can last long enough to permit absolute calibration.

  4. A method and algorithm for correlating scattered light and suspended particles in polluted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami Gumaan Daraigan; Mohd Zubir Matjafri; Khiruddin Abdullah; Azlan Abdul Aziz; Abdul Aziz Tajuddin; Mohd Firdaus Othman

    2005-01-01

    An optical model has been developed for measuring total suspended solids TSS concentrations in water. This approach is based on the characteristics of scattered light from the suspended particles in water samples. An optical sensor system (an active spectrometer) has been developed to correlate pollutant (total suspended solids TSS) concentration and the scattered radiation. Scattered light was measured in terms of the output voltage of the phototransistor of the sensor system. The developed algorithm was used to calculate and estimate the concentrations of the polluted water samples. The proposed algorithm was calibrated using the observed readings. The results display a strong correlation between the radiation values and the total suspended solids concentrations. The proposed system yields a high degree of accuracy with the correlation coefficient (R) of 0.99 and the root mean square error (RMS) of 63.57 mg/l. (Author)

  5. Photoionization of multiply charged ions at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.; Aguilar, A.; Gharaibeh, M.F.; Emmons, E.D.; Scully, S.W.J.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Muller, A.; Schippers, S.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Hinojosa, G.; McLaughlin, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Photoionization of multiply charged ions is studied using the merged-beams technique at the Advanced Light Source. Absolute photoionization cross sections have been measured for a variety of ions along both isoelectronic and isonuclear sequences

  6. Status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) control system. The current status, performance data, and future plans will be discussed. Manpower, scheduling, and costs issues are addressed. (author)

  7. Different light sources in photodynamic therapy for use in photorejuvenation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Kets, V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently emerged as a treatment modality for photorejuvenation of the skin. This study is a preliminary investigation into the effect of different light sources to activate hypericin, a plant-derived photosensitizer...

  8. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  9. A compact X-ray source based on Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Grigor' ev, Yu.; Guk, I.; Karnaukhov, I.; Khodyachikh, A.; Kononenko, S.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A. E-mail: shcherbakov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A

    2001-07-21

    The main parameters of Kharkov electron storage ring N-100 with a beam energy range from 70 to 150 MeV are presented. The main results that were obtained in experimental researches are briefly described. The future of the N-100 upgrade to the development of the X-ray generator based on Compton back-scattering are presented. The electron beam energy range will be extended up to 250 MeV and the circumference of the storage ring will be 13.72 m. The lattice, parameters of the electron beam and the Compton back-scattering photons flux are described.

  10. A compact X-ray source based on Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulyak, E.; Gladkikh, P.; Grigor'ev, Yu.; Guk, I.; Karnaukhov, I.; Khodyachikh, A.; Kononenko, S.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.; Tarasenko, A.; Telegin, Yu.; Zelinsky, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main parameters of Kharkov electron storage ring N-100 with a beam energy range from 70 to 150 MeV are presented. The main results that were obtained in experimental researches are briefly described. The future of the N-100 upgrade to the development of the X-ray generator based on Compton back-scattering are presented. The electron beam energy range will be extended up to 250 MeV and the circumference of the storage ring will be 13.72 m. The lattice, parameters of the electron beam and the Compton back-scattering photons flux are described

  11. High Precision Stokes Polarimetry for Scattering Light using Wide Dynamic Range Intensity Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a Stokes polarimetry for scattering light from a sample surface. To achieve a high accuracy measurement two approaches of an intensity detector and analysis algorism of a Stokes parameter were proposed. The dynamic range of this detector can achieve up to 1010 by combination of change of neutral-density (ND filters having different density and photon counting units. Stokes parameters can be measured by dual rotating of a retarder and an analyzer. The algorism of dual rotating polarimeter can be calibrated small linear diattenuation and linear retardance error of the retarder. This system can measured Stokes parameters from −20° to 70° of its scattering angle. It is possible to measure Stokes parameters of scattering of dust and scratch of optical device with high precision. This paper shows accuracy of this system, checking the polarization change of scattering angle and influence of beam size.

  12. Spectral characteristics of light sources for S-cone stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelmilch, F; Nolte, R; Schellhorn, K; Husar, P; Henning, G; Tornow, R P

    2002-11-01

    Electrophysiological investigations of the short-wavelength sensitive pathway of the human eye require the use of a suitable light source as a S-cone stimulator. Different light sources with their spectral distribution properties were investigated and compared with the ideal S-cone stimulator. First, the theoretical background of the calculation of relative cone energy absorption from the spectral distribution function of the light source is summarized. From the results of the calculation, the photometric properties of the ideal S-cone stimulator will be derived. The calculation procedure was applied to virtual light sources (computer generated spectral distribution functions with different medium wavelengths and spectrum widths) and to real light sources (blue and green light emitting diodes, blue phosphor of CRT-monitor, multimedia projector, LCD monitor and notebook display). The calculated relative cone absorbencies are compared to the conditions of an ideal S-cone stimulator. Monochromatic light sources with wavelengths of less than 456 nm are close to the conditions of an ideal S-cone stimulator. Spectrum widths up to 21 nm do not affect the S-cone activation significantly (S-cone activation change < 0.2%). Blue light emitting diodes with peak wavelength at 448 nm and spectrum bandwidth of 25 nm are very useful for S-cone stimulation (S-cone activation approximately 95%). A suitable display for S-cone stimulation is the Trinitron computer monitor (S-cone activation approximately 87%). The multimedia projector has a S-cone activation up to 91%, but their spectral distribution properties depends on the selected intensity. LCD monitor and notebook displays have a lower S-cone activation (< or = 74%). Carefully selecting the blue light source for S-cone stimulation can reduce the unwanted L-and M-cone activation down to 4% for M-cones and 1.5% for L-cones.

  13. Scattering of light by a periodic structure in the presence of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    extended matched filtering method, and try to reach the lowest possible value of detection in (r0/Λ) by ... technique allows ease of measurement and analysis. ... In this particular case of scattering of light from a periodic surface in the presence.

  14. Light scattering from thermal density fluctuations using a CW-CO2-laser and heterodyne detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massig, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    The ion feature in the scattered light spectrum of an arc plasma was measured using heterodyne detection. A low-power CW-CO 2 -laser was employed. The weak signals were discriminated against noise by lock-in technique. (orig.) [de

  15. On the interpolation of light-scattering responses from irregularly shaped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videen, Gorden; Zubko, Evgenij; Arnold, Jessica A.; MacCall, Benjamin; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Muñoz, Olga

    2018-05-01

    Common particle characteristics needed for many applications may include size, eccentricity, porosity and refractive index. Determining such characteristics from scattered light is a primary goal of remote sensing. For other applications, like differentiating a hazardous particle from the natural background, information about higher fidelity particle characteristics may be required, including specific shape or chemical composition. While a complete characterization of a particle system from its scattered light through the inversion process remains unachievable, great strides have been made in providing information in the form of constraints on particle characteristics. Recent advances have been made in quantifying the characteristics of polydispersions of irregularly shaped particles by making comparisons of the light-scattering signals from model simulant particles. We show that when the refractive index is changed, the light-scattering characteristics from polydispersions of such particles behave monotonically over relatively large parameter ranges compared with those of monodisperse distributions of particles having regular shapes, like spheres, spheroids, etc. This allows for their properties to be interpolated, which results in a significant reduction of the computational load when performing inversions.

  16. Light Scattering of TiO2 Nanoparticles Embedded in Polyurethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Canulescu, Stela; Johansen, Villads Egede

    A new approach of enhancing light scattering in polyurethane polymer through the effect of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) is explored. The TiO2 NP with sizes of 360 nm, 410 nm and 500 nm were dispersed in polyurethane polymer in concentrations ranging from 0.25 wt% up to 2 wt%. Reflectivity and UV-visible...

  17. Surface plasmon polariton generation by light scattering off aligned organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Søndergaard, Thomas; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Leakage radiation spectroscopy has been applied to study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) generation by light scattered off aligned organic nanofibers deposited on a thin silver film. The efficiency of SPP generation was studied by angularly resolved leakage radiation spectroscopy as a function of...

  18. Mirror System for Collecting Thomson-Scattered Light in a Tangential Direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, C. J.; Grobben, B. J. J.; Verhaag, G. C. H. M.

    1994-01-01

    We describe an optical system for collecting Thomson-scattering light in the tangential direction of a tokamak. The key part of the optics is a set of mirrors arranged as a Venetian blind. This system makes it possible to look around the corner of the tokamak vessel. Design considerations and test

  19. Optical Imaging of Cells with Gold Nanoparticle Clusters as Light Scattering Contrast Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter has two main objectives. First, to review a number of examples illustrating the application of the FDTD approach to the modeling of some typical light scattering configurations that could be associated with flow cytometry. Second, to provide a thorough discussion of these new develop...

  20. Spectroscopy of scattered light for the characterization of micro and nanoscale objects in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Qiu, Le; Itzkan, Irving; Novikov, Andrei A; Kotelev, Mikhail S; Getmanskiy, Michael; Vinokurov, Vladimir A; Muradov, Alexander V; Perelman, Lev T

    2014-01-01

    The biomedical uses for the spectroscopy of scattered light by micro and nanoscale objects can broadly be classified into two areas. The first, often called light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), deals with light scattered by dielectric particles, such as cellular and sub-cellular organelles, and is employed to measure their size or other physical characteristics. Examples include the use of LSS to measure the size distributions of nuclei or mitochondria. The native contrast that is achieved with LSS can serve as a non-invasive diagnostic and scientific tool. The other area for the use of the spectroscopy of scattered light in biology and medicine involves using conducting metal nanoparticles to obtain either contrast or electric field enhancement through the effect of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Gold and silver metal nanoparticles are non-toxic, they do not photobleach, are relatively inexpensive, are wavelength-tunable, and can be labeled with antibodies. This makes them very promising candidates for spectrally encoded molecular imaging. Metal nanoparticles can also serve as electric field enhancers of Raman signals. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful method for detecting and identifying molecules down to single molecule concentrations. In this review, we will concentrate on the common physical principles, which allow one to understand these apparently different areas using similar physical and mathematical approaches. We will also describe the major advancements in each of these areas, as well as some of the exciting recent developments.