WorldWideScience

Sample records for sounding rocket motor

  1. Development and Performance of the 10 kN Hybrid Rocket Motor for the Stratos II Sounding Rocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, R.M.; Knop, T.R.; Wink, J; Ehlen, J; Huijsman, R; Powell, S; Florea, R.; Wieling, W; Cervone, A.; Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development work of the 10 kN hybrid rocket motor DHX-200 Aurora. The DHX-200 Aurora was developed by Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering (DARE) to power the Stratos II and Stratos II+ sounding rocket, with the later one being launched in October 2015. Stratos II and Stratos

  2. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  3. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  4. Peregrine 100-km Sounding Rocket Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilliac, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University, and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of this technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, and fly a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked off in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. This research group began studying liquifying hybrid rocket fuel technology more than a decade ago. The overall goal of the research was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental physics of the liquid layer entrainment process responsible for the large increase in regression rate observed in these fuels, and to demonstrate the effect of increased regression rate on hybrid rocket motor performance. At the time of this reporting, more than 400 motor tests were conducted with a variety of oxidizers (N2O, GOx, LOx) at ever increasing scales with thrust levels from 5 to over 15,000 pounds (22 N to over 66 kN) in order to move this technology from the laboratory to practical applications. The Peregrine program is the natural next step in this development. A number of small sounding rockets with diameters of 3, 4, and 6 in. (7.6, 10.2, and 15.2 cm) have been flown, but Peregrine at a diameter of 15 in. (38.1 cm) and 14,000-lb (62.3-kN) thrust is by far the largest system ever attempted and will be one of the largest hybrids ever flown. Successful Peregrine flights will set the stage for a wide range of applications of this technology.

  5. NASA Sounding Rocket Program Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Sat-C elements of the "pipeline" have been successfully demonstrated by five annual flights thus far from Wallops Flight Facility. RockSat-X has successfully flown twice, also from Wallops. The NSRP utilizes launch vehicles comprised of military surplus rocket motors (Terrier-Improved Orion and Terrier-Improved Malemute) to execute these missions. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  6. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  7. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-08-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  8. Development of small solid rocket boosters for the ILR-33 sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Okninski, Adam; Pakosz, Michal; Cieslinski, Dawid; Bartkowiak, Bartosz; Wolanski, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a 6000 Newton-class solid rocket motor for suborbital applications. The design configuration and results of interior ballistics calculations are given. The initial use of the motor as the main propulsion system of the H1 experimental in-flight test platform, within the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program, is presented. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental performance are shown. Both on-ground and in-flight tests are discussed. A novel composite-case manufacturing technology, which enabled to reach high propellant mass fractions, was validated and significant cost-reductions were achieved. This paper focuses on the process of adapting the design for use as the booster stage of the ILR-33 sounding rocket, under development at the Institute of Aviation in Warsaw, Poland. Parallel use of two of the flight-proven rocket motors along with the main stage is planned. The process of adapting the rocket motor for booster application consists of stage integration, aerothermodynamics and reliability analyses. The separation mechanism and environmental impact are also discussed within this paper. Detailed performance analysis with focus on propellant grain geometry is provided. The evolution of the design since the first flights of the H1 rocket is covered and modifications of the manufacturing process are described. Issues of simultaneous ignition of two motors and their non-identical performance are discussed. Further applications and potential for future development are outlined. The presented results are based on the initial work done by the Rocketry Group of the Warsaw University of Technology Students' Space Association. The continuation of the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program on a larger scale at the Institute of Aviation proves the value of the outcomes of the initial educational project.

  9. Premature ignition of a rocket motor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Darlene Ruth

    2010-10-01

    During preparation for a rocket sled track (RST) event, there was an unexpected ignition of the zuni rocket motor (10/9/08). Three Sandia staff and a contractor were involved in the accident; the contractor was seriously injured and made full recovery. The data recorder battery energized the low energy initiator in the rocket.

  10. Numerical Simulation Method for Combustion in a Oxyhydrogen Rocket Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Taki, Shiro; Fujiwara, Toshitaka; 滝, 史郎; 藤原, 俊隆

    1984-01-01

    Numerical simulations of unsteady phenomena in the combustion chamber of an oxyhydrogen rocket motor were made in an attempt to develop a computer code for use in investigating such phenomena as vibrating combustion. The combustion in this system is controlled by diffusion, the effect of which works much slower than sound or pressure waves, so that diffusions are usually solved using the implicit finite difference method for unlimited time step size caused by stability criterion. However, the...

  11. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  12. The FOXSI Solar Sounding Rocket Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is, in its initial form, a sounding rocket experiment designed to apply the technique of focusing hard X-ray (HXR) optics to the study of fundamental questions about the high-energy Sun. Solar HXRs arise via bremsstrahlung from energetic electrons and hot plasma produced in solar flares and thus are one of the most direct diagnostics of flare-accelerated electrons and the impulsive heating of the solar corona. Previous missions have always been limited in sensitivity and dynamic range by the use of indirect (Fourier) imaging due to the lack of availability of direct focusing optics, but technological advances now make direct focusing accessible in the HXR regime (as evidenced by the NuSTAR spacecraft and several suborbital missions). The FOXSI rocket experiment develops and optimizes HXR focusing telescopes for the unique scientific requirements of the Sun. To date, FOXSI has completed two successful flights on 2012 November 02 and 2014 December 11 and is funded for a third flight. This paper gives a brief overview of the experiment, which is sensitive to solar HXRs in the 4-20 keV range, describes its first two flights, and gives a preview of plans for FOXSI-3.

  13. Annular Hybrid Rocket Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Engineers at SpaceDev have conducted a preliminary design and analysis of a proprietary annular design concept for a hybrid motor. A U.S. Patent application has been...

  14. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  15. CIV Interferometer for a Solar Sounding Rocket Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, G. A.; West, E. A.; Davis, J. M.; Rees, D.

    2007-01-01

    A sounding rocket instrument consisting of two vacuum ultraviolet Fabry-Perot filters in series would allow high-spectral resolution over an extended field of view for solar observations of the transition region between the chromosphere and the corona.

  16. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  17. Seal testing of large diameter rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N. B.; Hellums, John W.; Bechtel, Thomas; Kittredge, Ken; Crossfield, Craig

    1991-01-01

    This investigative program examines leakage testing of elastomeric O-ring seals for a solid rocket casing and provides direction towards an improved nondestructive postassembly test. It also details test equipment for the Space Shuttle systems solid rocket boosters (SRB). The results are useful to designers of hardware for pressure containment vessels which use O-ring seals. Using several subscale seal and groove configuration test fixtures equipped with either two or three O-ring seals in series, seal integrity is investigated with both a pressure decay and flowmeter methods. Both types of test equipment adequately detect the practical range of expected seal leak rates of 1 to 0.0001 sccs. The flowmeter leak test equipment appears to reduce testing time substantially. Limited seal leakage testing is performed on full-sized rocket motor segment seals, a pre-Challenger short stack, providing comparison of bore seals to test specimen bore and face seals. The conclusions are that seal reliability, verified via a performance pressure test, can be affected by temperature, quantity of grease, test pressure, and seal pressure load direction. Potential seal failure scenarios including contamination, seal damage, and sealing surface damage are discussed. Recommendations are made for an improved test procedure.

  18. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-12-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  19. Solid Rocket Motor Design Using Hybrid Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Albarado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A particle swarm/pattern search hybrid optimizer was used to drive a solid rocket motor modeling code to an optimal solution. The solid motor code models tapered motor geometries using analytical burn back methods by slicing the grain into thin sections along the axial direction. Grains with circular perforated stars, wagon wheels, and dog bones can be considered and multiple tapered sections can be constructed. The hybrid approach to optimization is capable of exploring large areas of the solution space through particle swarming, but is also able to climb “hills” of optimality through gradient based pattern searching. A preliminary method for designing tapered internal geometry as well as tapered outer mold-line geometry is presented. A total of four optimization cases were performed. The first two case studies examines designing motors to match a given regressive-progressive-regressive burn profile. The third case study studies designing a neutrally burning right circular perforated grain (utilizing inner and external geometry tapering. The final case study studies designing a linearly regressive burning profile for right circular perforated (tapered grains.

  20. Sounding rocket activities of Japan in 2003 and 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Nonaka, Satoshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Takumi, Abe; Yuichi, Tsuda; Yamagami, Takamasa

    2005-08-01

    In October 2003, a new space agency, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) was reorganized and started as a primary space agency to promote all space activities in Japan. The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) belonged to JAXA and continued to promote space science and technologies using unique scientific satellites, sounding rockets and balloons. This paper summarizes sounding rocket and ballooning activities of ISAS in the fiscal year of 2003 and 2004, associated with satellite launch programs. In this time period, three sounding rockets and nineteen balloons were launched by ISAS. One of the sounding rocket, S-310-35 was an international collaboration between Japan and Norway, which was launched from Andoya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Norway, so as to study the upper atmospheric dynamics and energetics associated with the auroral energy in the polar lower thermosphere. Through the combination with the national researchers and the cooperation with international organizations, ISAS will keep its own flight opportunities and be able to obtain many new scientific findings.

  1. 78 FR 40196 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... government agencies, and educational institutions have conducted suborbital rocket launches from the PFRR...-latitude, auroral-zone rocket launching facility in the United States where a sounding rocket can readily... environmental consequences of five alternative means for continuing sounding rocket launches at PFRR. The...

  2. Numerical Exploration of Solid Rocket Motor Blast Tube Flow Field

    OpenAIRE

    Afroz Javed; Sinha, P.K.; Debasis Chakraborty

    2013-01-01

    The blast tube flowfield of a solid rocket motor is explored numerically by solving 3-D RANS equations with SST Turbulence model using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software CFX-10. Parametric studies are carried out to find out the effect of the blast tube diameter on the total pressure loss in the rocket motor. It is observed that the total pressure loss in the rocket motor is less than 4 per cent and the blast tube is contributing less than 1 per cent. It is also found ou...

  3. Electron beam sounding rocket experiments for probing the distant magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron accelerators on sounding rockets have injected 8-40-keV electrons on closed magnetospheric tail field lines near 250 km altitude in the northern auroral zone. These beams mirrored at the southern conjugate point ad returned as 'echoes' which were detected on the rocket system. The 20 percent of the beam that returned was sufficient to measure field line lengths and verify magnetospheric magnetic models, to measure fluctuating electric fields, and electron pitch angle scattering (6-10) R(E) distant, and to identify 10-100 V field-aligned potentials above the rocket. The experiment gives new insight into the motion of natural electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  4. Hybrid rocket motor testing at Nammo Raufoss A/S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønningen, Jan-Erik; Kubberud, Nils

    2005-08-01

    Hybrid rocket motor technology and the use of hybrid rockets have gained increased interest in recent years in many countries. A typical hybrid rocket consists of a tank containing the oxidizer in either liquid or gaseous state connected to the combustion chamber containing an injector, inert solid fuel grain and nozzle. Nammo Raufoss A/S has for almost 40 years designed and produced high-performance solid propellant rocket motors for many military missile systems as well as solid propellant rocket motors for civil space use. In 2003 an in-house technology program was initiated to investigate and study hybrid rocket technology. On 23 September 2004 the first in-house designed hybrid test rocket motor was static test fired at Nammo Raufoss Test Center. The oxidizer was gaseous oxygen contained in a tank pressurized to 10MPa, flow controlled through a sonic orifice into the combustion chamber containing a multi port radial injector and six bore cartridge-loaded fuel grain containing a modified HTPB fuel composition. The motor was ignited using a non-explosive heated wire. This paper will present what has been achieved at Nammo Raufoss since the start of the program.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Hybrid Rocket Motors Transient Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Barato, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    As the space business is shifting from pure performances to affordability a renewed interest is growing about hybrid rocket propulsion. Hybrid rocket motors are attractive for their inherent advantages like simplicity, reliability, safety and reduced costs. Moreover hybrid motors are easy to throttle and thus they are ideal candidate when soft-landing or energy management capabilities are required. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical/numerical study of hybrid transie...

  6. Workshop on the Suborbital Science Sounding Rocket Program, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The unique characteristics of the sounding rocket program is described, with its importance to space science stressed, especially in providing UARS correlative measurements. The program provided opportunities to do innovative scientific studies in regions not other wise accessible; it was a testbed for developing new technologies; and its key attributes were flexibility, reliability, and economy. The proceedings of the workshop are presented in viewgraph form, including the objectives of the workshop and the workshop agenda.

  7. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 16 June 2015 – 31 July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motor... Rockets , Volume 52 Issue 4 July 2015 (AIAA 2015-1605) PA Case Number: #15348; Clearance Date: 6/26/2015 ©2015 AIAA The U.S. Government is joint author...of the work and has the right to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or 14. ABSTRACT In a solid rocket motor (SRM), when the

  8. 77 FR 61642 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ..., and educational institutions have conducted suborbital rocket launches from the PFRR. While the PFRR...-zone rocket launching facility in the United States where a sounding rocket can readily study the... rockets are launched and within which spent stages and payloads impact the ground. Within these flight...

  9. Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) locomotion during a sounding rocket flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark S.; Keller, Tony S.

    2008-05-01

    The locomotor activity of young Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) was studied during a Nike-Orion sounding rocket flight, which included a short-duration microgravity exposure. An infrared monitoring system was used to determine the activity level, instantaneous velocity, and continuous velocity of 240 (120 male, 120 female) fruit flies. Individual flies were placed in chambers that limit their motion to walking. Chambers were oriented both vertically and horizontally with respect to the rocket's longitudinal axis. Significant changes in Drosophila locomotion patterns were observed throughout the sounding rocket flight, including launch, microgravity exposure, payload re-entry, and after ocean impact. During the microgravity portion of the flight (3.8 min), large increases in all locomotion measurements for both sexes were observed, with some measurements doubling compared to pad (1 G) data. Initial effects of microgravity were probably delayed due to large accelerations from the payload despining immediately before entering microgravity. The results indicate that short-duration microgravity exposure has a large effect on locomotor activity for both males and females, at least for a short period of time. The locomotion increases may explain the increased male aging observed during long-duration exposure to microgravity. Studies focusing on long-duration microgravity exposure are needed to confirm these findings, and the relationship of increased aging and locomotion.

  10. Design and qualification of an UHV system for operation on sounding rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Jens, E-mail: jens.grosse@dlr.de; Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Bremen, 28359, Germany and German Aerospace Center (DLR) Bremen, Bremen, 28359 (Germany); Seidel, Stephan Tobias; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike Diana [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz University Hanover, Hanover, 30167 (Germany); Scharringhausen, Marco [German Aerospace Center (DLR) Bremen, Bremen, 28359 (Germany); Rasel, Ernst Maria [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz University Hanover, Hanover, 30167, Bremen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The sounding rocket mission MAIUS-1 has the objective to create the first Bose–Einstein condensate in space; therefore, its scientific payload is a complete cold atom experiment built to be launched on a VSB-30 sounding rocket. An essential part of the setup is an ultrahigh vacuum system needed in order to sufficiently suppress interactions of the cooled atoms with the residual background gas. Contrary to vacuum systems on missions aboard satellites or the international space station, the required vacuum environment has to be reached within 47 s after motor burn-out. This paper contains a detailed description of the MAIUS-1 vacuum system, as well as a description of its qualification process for the operation under vibrational loads of up to 8.1 g{sub RMS} (where RMS is root mean square). Even though a pressure rise dependent on the level of vibration was observed, the design presented herein is capable of regaining a pressure of below 5 × 10{sup −10} mbar in less than 40 s when tested at 5.4 g{sub RMS}. To the authors' best knowledge, it is the first UHV system qualified for operation on a sounding rocket.

  11. High Pressure Pumps for Rocket Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barske, U. M

    1950-01-01

    .... A simplified type of open impeller centrifugal pump which has been operated successfully in some short and medium range rockets is recommended as the most suitable type at the present state of development...

  12. Musical Sounds, Motor Resonance, and Detectable Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Launay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the paradox that while human music making evolved and spread in an environment where it could only occur in groups, it is now often apparently an enjoyable asocial phenomenon. Here I argue that music is, by definition, sound that we believe has been in some way organized by a human agent, meaning that listening to any musical sounds can be a social experience. There are a number of distinct mechanisms by which we might associate musical sound with agency. While some of these mechanisms involve learning motor associations with that sound, it is also possible to have a more direct relationship from musical sound to agency, and the relative importance of these potentially independent mechanisms should be further explored. Overall, I conclude that the apparent paradox of solipsistic musical engagement is in fact unproblematic, because the way that we perceive and experience musical sounds is inherently social.

  13. Weak Equivalence Principle Test on a Sounding Rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, James D; Popescu, Eugeniu M; Rocco, Emanuele; Thapa, Rajesh; Reasenberg, Robert D; Lorenzini, Enrico C

    2010-01-01

    SR-POEM, our principle of equivalence measurement on a sounding rocket, will compare the free fall rate of two substances yielding an uncertainty of E-16 in the estimate of \\eta. During the past two years, the design concept has matured and we have been working on the required technology, including a laser gauge that is self aligning and able to reach 0.1 pm per root hertz for periods up to 40 s. We describe the status and plans for this project.

  14. Status of the Micro-X Sounding Rocket Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, David; Micro-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that uses Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters to provide superior energy resolution. Micro-X has a variety of applications with plans to observe the Puppis A supernova remnant during its first flight, as well as future observations of the Milky Way to search for X-ray signals from decaying dark matter. Commissioning and functionality testing are complete and this project is now in the calibration and performance optimization phase. We present an overview of the instrument and an update on ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch. NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  15. Parameters Affecting the Erosive Burning of Solid Rocket Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Almostafa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the velocity of gases inside solid rocket motors with low port-to-throat area ratios, leading to increased occurrence and severity of burning rate augmentation due to flow of propellant products across burning propellant surfaces (erosive burning, erosive burning of high energy composite propellant was investigated to supply rocket motor design criteria and to supplement knowledge of combustion phenomena, pressure, burning rate and high velocity of gases all of these are parameters affect on erosive burning. Investigate the phenomena of the erosive burning by using the 2’inch rocket motor and modified one. Different tests applied to fulfil all the parameters that calculated out from the experiments and by studying the pressure time curve and erosive burning phenomena.

  16. Numerical simulations of a sounding rocket in ionospheric plasma: Effects of magnetic field on the wake formation and rocket potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darian, D.; Marholm, S.; Paulsson, J. J. P.; Miyake, Y.; Usui, H.; Mortensen, M.; Miloch, W. J.

    2017-09-01

    The charging of a sounding rocket in subsonic and supersonic plasma flows with external magnetic field is studied with numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A weakly magnetized plasma regime is considered that corresponds to the ionospheric F2 layer, with electrons being strongly magnetized, while the magnetization of ions is weak. It is demonstrated that the magnetic field orientation influences the floating potential of the rocket and that with increasing angle between the rocket axis and the magnetic field direction the rocket potential becomes less negative. External magnetic field gives rise to asymmetric wake downstream of the rocket. The simulated wake in the potential and density may extend as far as 30 electron Debye lengths; thus, it is important to account for these plasma perturbations when analyzing in situ measurements. A qualitative agreement between simulation results and the actual measurements with a sounding rocket is also shown.

  17. Scientific Experiences Using Argentinean Sounding Rockets in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Peña, Miguel

    2000-07-01

    Argentina in the sixties and seventies, had experience for developing and for using sounding rockets and payloads to perform scientific space experiments. Besides they have several bases in Antarctica with adequate premises and installations, also duly equipped aircrafts and trained crews to flight to the white continent. In February 1965, scientists and technical people from the "Instituto de Investigacion Aeronáutica y Espacial" (I.I.A.E.) with the cooperation of the Air Force and the Tucuman University, conducted the "Matienzo Operation" to measure X radiation and temperature in the upper atmosphere, using the Gamma Centauro rocket and also using big balloons. The people involved in the experience, the launcher, other material and equipment flew from the south tip of Argentina to the Matienzo base in Antarctica, in a C-47 aircraft equipped with skies an additional jet engine Marbore 2-C. Other experience was performed in 1975 in the "Marambio" Antartic Base, using the two stages solid propellent sounding rocket Castor, developed in Argentina. The payload was developed in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute of Germany. It consist of a special mixture including a shape charge to form a ionized cloud producing a jet of electrons travelling from Marambio base to the conjugate point in the Northern hemisphere. The cloud was observed by several ground stations in Argentina and also by a NASA aircraft with TV cameras, flying at East of New York. The objective of this experience was to study the electric and magnetic fields in altitude, the neutral points, the temperature and electrons profile. The objectives of both experiments were accomplished satisfactorily.

  18. Rocket motors incorporating basalt fiber and nanoclay compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor with the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber, basalt fibers, and nanoclay is disclosed. Further disclosed is an insulation composition that comprises polybenzimidazole fibers, basalt fibers, and nanoclay. The basalt fibers may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 1% by weight to approximately 6% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. The nanoclay may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 5% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. Rocket motors including the insulation compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  19. Direct Electrical Arc Ignition of Hybrid Rocket Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Judson, Michael I., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid rockets motors provide distinct safety advantages when compared to traditional liquid or solid propellant systems, due to the inherent stability and relative inertness of the propellants prior to established combustion. As a result of this inherent propellant stability, hybrid motors have historically proven dicult to ignite. State of the art hybrid igniter designs continue to require solid or liquid reactants distinct from the main propellants. These ignition methods however, reintrod...

  20. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  1. Health Monitoring and Diagnosis of Solid Rocket Motors with Bore Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2014-February 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Health Monitoring and Diagnosis of Solid Rocket Motors with... rocket motors at various storage temperatures. Capabilities of a rocket motor health monitoring system are assessed based on the assumption that the...system can detect critical bore cracks in solid rocket motors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS structural health monitoring (SHM) · structural integrity · damage

  2. Launch summary for 1978 - 1982. [sounding rockets, space probes, and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Data pertinent to the launching of space probes, soundings rockets, and satellites presented in tables include launch date, time, and site; agency rocket identification; sponsoring country or countries; instruments carried for experiments; the peak altitude achieved by the rockets; and the apoapsis and periapsis for satellites. The experimenter or institution involved in the launching is also cited.

  3. CANSAT: Design of a Small Autonomous Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Joshua; Duda, Michael; Garnand-Royo, Jeff; Jones, Alexa; Pickering, Todd; Tutko, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    CanSat is an international student design-build-launch competition organized by the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The competition is also sponsored by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), AGI, Orbital Sciences Corporation, Praxis Incorporated, and SolidWorks. Specifically, the 2009 Virginia Tech CanSat Team is funded by BAE Systems, Incorporated of Manassas, Virginia. The objective of the 2009 CanSat competition is to complete remote sensing missions by designing a small autonomous sounding rocket payload. The payload designed will follow and perform to a specific set of mission requirements for the 2009 competition. The competition encompasses a complete life-cycle of one year which includes all phases of design, integration, testing, reviews, and launch.

  4. Sounding Rocket Instrument Development at UAHuntsville/NASA MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Savage, Sabrina; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; DePontieu, Bart; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of solar sounding rocket instruments developed jointly by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) is an EUV (19.3 nm) imaging telescope which was flown successfully in July 2012. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a Lyman Alpha (121.6 nm) spectropolarimeter developed jointly with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and scheduled for launch in 2015. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrograph is a soft X-ray (0.5-1.2 keV) stigmatic spectrograph designed to achieve 5 arcsecond spatial resolution along the slit.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flow in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, A.; Favini, B.; Di Giacinto, M.; Serraglia, F.

    2009-01-01

    In the paper a general mathematical description of the flow in the internal chamber of solid rocket motors is presented. The formulation adopted take into account the multi-species and multiphase, reactive, multidimensional characteristics of the flow. The grain combustion is described by a pressure dependent law; aluminum droplet are modelled by a Lagrangian approach, coupled with the Eulerian formulation adopted for the gas phase. The mathematical model has been implemented in a simulation code and several simulations have been performed; in particular in the paper the re- sults for two geometries are described: a simple cylindrical port-area rocket and the Zefiro 9 SRM.

  6. Performance Investigation of Solid-Rocket Motor with Nozzle Throat Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Suwicha Chankapoe; Nattawat Winya; Narupon Pittayaprasertkul

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine the performance and key design parameters of rocket, the erosion of nozzle throat during solid rocket motor burning have to be calculated. This study aims to predict the nozzle throat erosion in solid rocket motors according to the thrust profile of motor in operating conditions and develop a model for optimum performance of rocket. We investigate the throat radius change in the static test programs. The standard method and thrust coefficient are used for adjusting into...

  7. Reseach on the reduction of rocket motor jet noise by water injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injecting water in the mixing layer of rocket motor jets is a means to reduce jet noise. The calculation of the sound pressure signals at the prescribed receivers was performed by FW-H acoustics model under the condition of water injection and without water injection. The calculation results show that the jet noise is with obvious directivity. The total sound pressure levels are obviously much higher in 10° to 30° direction than that in other direction. The sound pressure levels at the condition of water injected are lower than that of without water injection at the all receiver points, which indicates that water injection can reduce jet noise effectively.

  8. Initial Ion Results from the RENU2 Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, M.; Lessard, M.; Lynch, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    RENU2 (Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling 2) is a multiple investigator sounding rocket campaign that was designed to transit the cusp region between 200 and 600 km and study particle processes during a neutral upwelling event. The RENU2 payload dayside observations will be compared with measurements made by the EISCAT Svalbard radars. This project aims to investigate the connection between ion upflows and outflows, and neutral upwelling from the topside ionosphere. Low-earth orbiting satellites are affected by these regions of enhanced neutral densities which decay their orbits due to satellite drag. Three electrostatic analyzers were flown to measure 2D ion distribution functions, providing observations of temperature enhancements, bulk velocity moments, anisotropy and conics. The thermal energy ion detector (HT) sweeps over an energy range of .12 to 22 eV and the medium energy detector (HM) has an energy range from 3.6 to 790 eV. The thermal mass ion detector (BPS) sweeps over the same energy range as the thermal energy detector, but also has a crude mass discriminator separating atomic oxygen from hydrogen. All of the detectors provide two dimensional phase space distributions; the thermal detectors have a cadence of 128 ms while the medium energy detector provides a distribution every 64 ms. These measurements of the upwelling process will be used as input for coupled models or be used as a metric to compare to what the models predict. During initial data analysis, we found nongyrotropy in the medium energy ions, a proton enhancement during an otherwise uneventful region, and three ion upflow events which will be further investigated.

  9. Critical evaluation of thermodynamic design procedures for rocket motor igniters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Knoetze

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available There are different methods that can be used for the thermodynamic design of igniters for solid rocket motors. These methods are mostly empirically based and can easily lead to an under-designed or over-designed igniter. The best-known methods are the free volume method, the surface area method, the critical pressure, the Bryan-Lawrence equation, the ignition delay-free volume method, the mass discharge coefficient method and the heat flux method.

  10. The identification of parameter of solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dingyou

    1992-08-01

    An end-burning grain in which long metal wires are embedded is used here as an example of parameter identification in solid rocket motors. The results indicate that when the deposition and erosion at the nozzle throat are not considered or the characteristic velocity is inaccurate or the identification technique of identification and parameter initial value identification are inaccurate, the identification results are all inaccurate. Parameters measured and information obtained experimentally can be used to check the credibility of identified parameters.

  11. Using PDV to Understand Damage in Rocket Motor Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tear, Gareth; Chapman, David; Ottley, Phillip; Proud, William; Gould, Peter; Cullis, Ian

    2017-06-01

    There is a continuing requirement to design and manufacture insensitive munition (IM) rocket motors for in-service use under a wide range of conditions, particularly due to shock initiation and detonation of damaged propellant spalled across the central bore of the rocket motor (XDT). High speed photography has been crucial in determining this behaviour, however attempts to model the dynamic behaviour are limited by the lack of precision particle and wave velocity data with which to validate against. In this work Photonic Doppler Velocimetery (PDV) has been combined with high speed video to give accurate point velocity and timing measurements of the rear surface of a propellant block impacted by a fragment travelling upto 1.4 km s-1. By combining traditional high speed video with PDV through a dichroic mirror, the point of velocity measurement within the debris cloud has been determined. This demonstrates a new capability to characterise the damage behaviour of a double base rocket motor propellant and hence validate the damage and fragmentation algorithms used in the numerical simulations.

  12. On Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    All liquid propellant rocket instability calculations in current use have limited value in the predictive sense and serve mainly as a correlating framework for the available data sets. The well-known n-t model first introduced by Crocco and Cheng in 1956 is still used as the primary analytical tool of this type. A multitude of attempts to establish practical analytical methods have achieved only limited success. These methods usually produce only stability boundary maps that are of little use in making critical design decisions in new motor development programs. Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of combustion instability in solid propellant rockets"' provides a firm foundation for a new approach to prediction, diagnosis, and correction of the closely related problems in liquid motor instability. For predictive tools to be useful in the motor design process, they must have the capability to accurately determine: 1) time evolution of the pressure oscillations and limit amplitude, 2) critical triggering pulse amplitude, and 3) unsteady heat transfer rates at injector surfaces and chamber walls. The method described in this paper relates these critical motor characteristics directly to system design parameters. Inclusion of mechanisms such as wave steepening, vorticity production and transport, and unsteady detonation wave phenomena greatly enhance the representation of key features of motor chamber oscillatory behavior. The basic theoretical model is described and preliminary computations are compared to experimental data. A plan to develop the new predictive method into a comprehensive analysis tool is also described.

  13. Fluid-Structure Interaction Effects on Mass Flow Rates in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-02

    in Solid Rocket Motors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) William Harrigan 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Determination of mass flow rate in a solid rocket motor is critical in the design of a new motor due to its effect on the thrust produced. Fluid...mass flow rates. The FSI analyses with two‐way coupling provided a more accurate assessment of solid rocket motor internal ballistics. 15. SUBJECT

  14. DAQ: Software Architecture for Data Acquisition in Sounding Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Tran, Thanh; Nichols, Heidi; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.

    2011-01-01

    A multithreaded software application was developed by Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) to collect a set of correlated imagery, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS data for a Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) sounding rocket flight. The data set will be used to advance Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) technology algorithms being researched at JPL. This paper describes the software architecture and the tests used to meet the timing and data rate requirements for the software used to collect the dataset. Also discussed are the challenges of using commercial off the shelf (COTS) flight hardware and open source software. This includes multiple Camera Link (C-link) based cameras, a Pentium-M based computer, and Linux Fedora 11 operating system. Additionally, the paper talks about the history of the software architecture's usage in other JPL projects and its applicability for future missions, such as cubesats, UAVs, and research planes/balloons. Also talked about will be the human aspect of project especially JPL's Phaeton program and the results of the launch.

  15. Integration of Flex Nozzle System and Electro Hydraulic Actuators to Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayani, Kishore Nath; Bajaj, Dinesh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    A rocket motor assembly comprised of solid rocket motor and flex nozzle system. Integration of flex nozzle system and hydraulic actuators to the solid rocket motors are done after transportation to the required place where integration occurred. The flex nozzle system is integrated to the rocket motor in horizontal condition and the electro hydraulic actuators are assembled to the flex nozzle systems. The electro hydraulic actuators are connected to the hydraulic power pack to operate the actuators. The nozzle-motor critical interface are insulation diametrical compression, inhibition resin-28, insulation facial compression, shaft seal `O' ring compression and face seal `O' ring compression.

  16. Direct electrical arc ignition of hybrid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Michael I., Jr.

    Hybrid rockets motors provide distinct safety advantages when compared to traditional liquid or solid propellant systems, due to the inherent stability and relative inertness of the propellants prior to established combustion. As a result of this inherent propellant stability, hybrid motors have historically proven difficult to ignite. State of the art hybrid igniter designs continue to require solid or liquid reactants distinct from the main propellants. These ignition methods however, reintroduce to the hybrid propulsion system the safety and complexity disadvantages associated with traditional liquid or solid propellants. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of a novel direct electrostatic arc ignition method for hybrid motors. A series of small prototype stand-alone thrusters demonstrating this technology were successfully designed and tested using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic and Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) as propellants. Measurements of input voltage and current demonstrated that arc-ignition will occur using as little as 10 watts peak power and less than 5 joules total energy. The motor developed for the stand-alone small thruster was adapted as a gas generator to ignite a medium-scale hybrid rocket motor using nitrous oxide /and HTPB as propellants. Multiple consecutive ignitions were performed. A large data set as well as a collection of development `lessons learned' were compiled to guide future development and research. Since the completion of this original groundwork research, the concept has been developed into a reliable, operational igniter system for a 75mm hybrid motor using both gaseous oxygen and liquid nitrous oxide as oxidizers. A development map of the direct spark ignition concept is presented showing the flow of key lessons learned between this original work and later follow on development.

  17. Test of Re-Entry Systems at Estrange Using Sounding Rockets and Stratospheric Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockowandt, C.; Abrahamsson, M.; Florin, G.

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets can provide an ideal in-flight platform for performing re-entry and other high speed tests off different types of vehicles and techniques. They are also ideal platforms for testing different types of recovery systems such as airbrakes and parachutes. This paper expands on some examples of platforms and missions for drop tests from balloons as well as sounding rockets launched from Esrange Space Center, a facility run by Swedish Space Corporation SSC in northern Sweden.

  18. Multiple Changes to Reusable Solid Rocket Motors, Identifying Hidden Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.; McCann, Bradley Q.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) baseline is subject to various changes. Changes are necessary due to safety and quality improvements, environmental considerations, vendor changes, obsolescence issues, etc. The RSRM program has a goal to test changes on full-scale static test motors prior to flight due to the unique RSRM operating environment. Each static test motor incorporates several significant changes and numerous minor changes. Flight motors often implement multiple changes simultaneously. While each change is individually verified and assessed, the potential for changes to interact constitutes additional hidden risk. Mitigating this risk depends upon identification of potential interactions. Therefore, the ATK Thiokol Propulsion System Safety organization initiated the use of a risk interaction matrix to identify potential interactions that compound risk. Identifying risk interactions supports flight and test motor decisions. Uncovering hidden risks of a full-scale static test motor gives a broader perspective of the changes being tested. This broader perspective compels the program to focus on solutions for implementing RSRM changes with minimal/mitigated risk. This paper discusses use of a change risk interaction matrix to identify test challenges and uncover hidden risks to the RSRM program.

  19. Development of miniaturised low cost attitude determination system for sounding rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkeng, Jan Kenneth; Booij, Wilfred; Moen, J.

    2005-08-01

    Spacecraft attitude (orientation) information is needed in order to transform scientific vector measurements in the reference frame of the rocket into a more meaningful Earth-fixed reference frame. By fusing data from a 3-axial magnetometer, a sun sensor and three rate gyros the rockets attitude can be determined (reconstructed). Since the system does not need to determine the attitude in real time (the attitude data is not used to control the rocket orientation), all data from the attitude sensors can be transmitted back to ground, where they are fused to estimate an absolute orientation of the rocket. A prototype inertial measurement unit and a miniature high accuracy lens-less sun sensor for spinning rocket is under development. A test version of both instruments will be launched on a single stage Hotel Payload sounding rocket from Andøya Rocket Range in July 2005.

  20. The "Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling 2 (RENU2)" Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, M.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Clemmons, J. H.; Crowley, G.; Ellingsen, P. G.; Fritz, B.; Harrington, M. I.; Hatch, S.; Hecht, J. H.; Hysell, D. L.; Kenward, D. R.; Labelle, J. W.; Lynch, K. A.; Moen, J.; Oksavik, K.; Otto, A.; Partamies, N.; Powell, S. P.; Sadler, B.; Sigernes, F.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2016-12-01

    Thermospheric upwelling has been known to exist since the earliestdays of the space program, when observers noted increased satellite dragassociated with solar activity. Scientists quickly attributed the upwelling toJoule heating effects, explaining that increased solar activity results inincreased Joule heating, which can couple energy to the ambient neutral gasesto cause the upwelling. Observations by the CHAMP satellite, however, haveshown that neutral upwelling often occurs on much smaller scales and is highlycorrelated with small-scale field-aligned currents in the vicinity of the cuspregion. Several theories have since been put forward that seek to explain thisphenomenon. Motivated by these competing theories and outfitted with acomprehensive suite of instruments, the RENU2 sounding rocket was launched intoa Poleward Moving Auroral Form (PMAF) in the cusp region on December 13, 2015.In this highly successful mission, instruments on the payload did, in fact,record neutral atomic oxygen above the payload at 350 km as it passed throughthe PMAF. In addition, signatures of N2+ ions also appeared above the PMAF,evidence of so-called "sunlit aurora". In this presentation, initial resultswill be presented from this mission and discussed in the context describedabove.

  1. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    During my Spring 2016 internship, my two major contributions were the design of the Commodities Exchange Pallet and the design of a test stand for a 100 pounds-thrust sounding rocket. The Commodities Exchange Pallet is a prototype developed for the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program. Under the HESTIA initiative the Commodities Exchange Pallet was developed as a method for demonstrating multi-system integration thru the transportation of In-Situ Resource Utilization produced oxygen and water to a human habitat. Ultimately, this prototype's performance will allow for future evaluation of integration, which may lead to the development of a flight capable pallet for future deep-space exploration missions. For HESTIA, my main task was to design the Commodities Exchange Pallet system to be used for completing an integration demonstration. Under the guidance of my mentor, I designed, both, the structural frame and fluid delivery system for the commodities pallet. The fluid delivery system includes a liquid-oxygen to gaseous-oxygen system, a water delivery system, and a carbon-dioxide compressors system. The structural frame is designed to meet safety and transportation requirements, as well as the ability to interface with the ER division's Portable Utility Pallet. The commodities pallet structure also includes independent instrumentation oxygen/water panels for operation and system monitoring. My major accomplishments for the commodities exchange pallet were the completion of the fluid delivery systems and the structural frame designs. In addition, parts selection was completed in order to expedite construction of the prototype, scheduled to begin in May of 2016. Once the commodities pallet is assembled and tested it is expected to complete a fully integrated transfer demonstration with the ISRU unit and the Environmental Control and Life Support System test chamber in September of 2016. In addition to the development of

  2. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  3. The calculation of the thrust of a rocket motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Knoetze

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally the thrust of a rocket motor is calculated by first calculating the thrust coefficient and then multiplying it by the product of the throat area and pressure. The thrust coefficient is calculated using a standard gas dynamics equation. This equation assumes that the combustion products are a single component, non-reacting ideal gas and that the flow through the nozzle is isentropic. The thrust coefficient is a function of the ratio of specific heats, y, the area ratio of the nozzle and the motor and ambient pressures. Standard methods exist for calculating the tosses due to deviations from the assumed flow. The combustion products of modern composite propellants contain a significant portion of condensed species (primarily A1₂O₃, while the composition of the combustion products changes continuously as the products move throught the nozzle. Some uncertainty therefore exists with regard to which value of y to use and how to handle the condensed species. The assumption o f an ideat, non-reacting gas can be el iminated hy as.mming the process to he isentropic and to calculate the thrust hy using the thermodynamic state and composition of the combustion products in the motor and nozzle exit. This can be achieved by using any of the standard thermochemistry programs available in the rocket industry. It is thus possible to use the results of a standard thermochemistry program directly in an alternative method for calculating thrust. Using this method only the mass flow rate (which is a function of pressure, throat area and effective caracteristic velocity and the results from the thermochemistry program are needed to calculate the thrust. The advantages of the alternative method are illustrated by comparing the results of the two methods with a measured thrust curve.

  4. Hotel Payload - a low-cost sounding rocket concept - for middle atmosphere and ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglund, Kenneth; Hansen, Gudmund

    2005-08-01

    European scientists are invited to utilize the "Hotel Payload" concept developed at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) for scientific research in Middle Atmosphere and Ionosphere. The concept is shaped to give scientists predictability and assurance on configuration, costs and timeframe for their projects. The scientists are offered one sounding rocket partner from planning till launch - so they can focus on their instruments. To demonstrate the capabilities, this paper presents the "Hotel Payload" concept, its configurations and specific projects with instrumentation.

  5. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fellowship Program (SFFP). V REFERENCES                                                                  1 Xiao, Y.M., R.S. Amano, " Aluminized ...Motors," Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol.11, pp. 10-23, 1995. 8 Hess, E., Chen, K., Acosta, P., Brent, D., Fendell, F.; "Effect of Aluminized ...No. 9, pp. 1763-1770, September 2003. 11 Bandera, A., Maggi, F., and Deluca, L.T., "Agglomeration of Aluminized Solid Rocket Propellants," in 45th

  6. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeilipoor, Naeem; Pizzolato, Fabio; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Cesari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1), and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  7. Spatial and temporal turbulence evolution as inferred from the WADIS sounding rocket project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Asmus, Heiner; Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Baumgarten, Gerd; Hildebrand, Jens; Höffner, Josef; Wörl, Raimund; Rapp, Markus; Friedrich, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The WADIS project (Wave propagation and dissipation in the middle atmosphere: energy budget and distribution of trace constituents) aimed at studying waves, their dissipation, and effects on trace constituents. The project comprised two sounding rocket campaigns conducted at the Andøya Space Center (69 °N, 16 °E). One sounding rocket was launched in summer 2013 and one in winter 2015. The WADIS-1 sounding rocket was launched on 27 of June 2013 into Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo (PMSE). Ground based PMSE observations were conducted using the MAARSY VHF- and the EISCAT-Tromsø radars. IAP RMR-lidar observed NLC colocated with PMSE. The WADIS-2 sounding rocket was launched on 5 of March of 2015 and had the same instrumentation on board. ALOMAR RMR- and IAP Fe-lidars and SAURA-MF radar measured mesospheric temperatures and winds throughout the launch window. In-situ measurements delivered high resolution altitude-profiles of neutral and plasma densities, neutral air temperature and turbulence. Extensive turbulence measurements were conducted employing different techniques. In-situ measurements were done on both upleg and downleg, implying that two profiles of each quantity were near simultaneously measured with high altitude resolution at ˜30 km horizontal distance. The measurements with MAARSY cover both up- and downleg parts of the rocket trajectory and the EISCAT-Tromsø radar is located 100 km away of the launch site. We discuss these turbulence measurements and its spatial and time evolution.

  8. Elastomeric Thermal Insulation Design Considerations in Long, Aluminized Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2017-01-01

    An all-new sounding rocket was designed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center that featured an aft finocyl, aluminized solid propellant grain and silica-filled ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (SFEPDM) internal insulation. Upon the initial static firing of the first of this new design, the solid rocket motor (SRM) case failed thermally just upstream of the aft closure early in the burn time. Subsequent fluid modeling indicated that the high-velocity combustion-product jets emanating from the fin-slots in the propellant grain were likely inducing a strongly swirling flow, thus substantially increasing the severity of the convective environment on the exposed portion of the SFEPDM insulation in this region. The aft portion of the fin-slots in another of the motors were filled with propellant to eliminate the possibility of both direct jet impingement on the exposed SFEPDM and the appearance of strongly swirling flow in the aft region of the motor. When static-fired, this motor's case still failed in the same axial location, and, though somewhat later than for the first static firing, still in less than 1/3rd of the desired burn duration. These results indicate that the extreme material decomposition rates of the SFEPDM in this application are not due to gas-phase convection or shear but rather to interactions with burning aluminum or alumina slag. Further comparisons with between SFEPDM performance in this design and that in other hot-fire tests provide insight into the mechanisms of SFEPDM decomposition in SRM aft domes that can guide the upcoming redesign effort, as well as other future SRM designs. These data also highlight the current limitations of modeling elastomeric insulators solely with diffusion-controlled, gas-phase thermochemistry in SRM regions with significant viscous shear and/or condense-phase impingement or flow.

  9. Development of a reclosable clamshell nose fairing for sounding rocket NASA 21.003UI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, N. J.; Rast, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reclosable clamshell noise fairing system was developed and successfully flown on a Black Brant VC sounding rocket. The clamshell system involved the design of unique structural and mechanical subsystems to meet the experimenters requirements, withstand environmental conditions of sounding rocket flight and recovery, and be relatively easy to maintain with a clean interface between the experiment detectors and instrumentation section of the payload. The development of the equations of motion of the mechanism are illustrated and results of the test of the Engineering Test Model (ETM) are shown.

  10. Application of boost guidance to NASA sounding rocket launch operations at the White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, W. H.; Detwiler, D. F., Jr.; Hall, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the unique problems associated with launching the Black Brant V, VIII, and IX sounding rocket vehicles at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and the significance of the introduction of the S19 to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility sounding rocket program in terms of launch flexibility, improved impact dispersion, higher flight reliability, and reduced program costs. This paper also discusses salient flight results from NASA 36.011UL (the first S19 guided Black Brant launched at WSMR) and the NASA Comet Halley missions (36.010DL and 36.017DL).

  11. Making Ultraviolet Spectro-Polarimetry Polarization Measurements with the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program. This paper will concentrate on SUMI's VUV optics, and discuss their spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics. While SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria, there are several areas that will be improved for its second and third flights. This paper will emphasize the MgII linear polarization measurements and describe the changes that will be made to the sounding rocket and how those changes will improve the scientific data acquired by SUMI.

  12. Flight demonstration of flight termination system and solid rocket motor ignition using semiconductor laser initiated ordnance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Maxfield, B.; Boucher, C.

    1995-01-01

    Solid State Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) offers new technology having potential for enhanced safety, reduced costs, and improved operational efficiency. Concerns over the absence of programmatic applications of the technology, which has prevented acceptance by flight programs, should be abated since LIO has now been operationally implemented by the Laser Initiated Ordnance Sounding Rocket Demonstration (LOSRD) Program. The first launch of solid state laser diode LIO at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) occurred on March 15, 1995 with all mission objectives accomplished. This project, Phase 3 of a series of three NASA Headquarters LIO demonstration initiatives, accomplished its objective by the flight of a dedicated, all-LIO sounding rocket mission using a two-stage Nike-Orion launch vehicle. LIO flight hardware, made by The Ensign-Bickford Company under NASA's first Cooperative Agreement with Profit Making Organizations, safely initiated three demanding pyrotechnic sequence events, namely, solid rocket motor ignition from the ground and in flight, and flight termination, i.e., as a Flight Termination System (FTS). A flight LIO system was designed, built, tested, and flown to support the objectives of quickly and inexpensively putting LIO through ground and flight operational paces. The hardware was fully qualified for this mission, including component testing as well as a full-scale system test. The launch accomplished all mission objectives in less than 11 months from proposal receipt. This paper concentrates on accomplishments of the ordnance aspects of the program and on the program's implementation and results. While this program does not generically qualify LIO for all applications, it demonstrated the safety, technical, and operational feasibility of those two most demanding applications, using an all solid state safe and arm system in critical flight applications.

  13. Status Update Report for the Peregrine 100km Sounding Rocket Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Jonny; Zilliac, Greg; Doran, Eric; Marzona, Mark Thadeus; Lohner, Kevin; Karlik, Evan; Cantwell, Brian; Karabeyoglu, Arif

    2008-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of liquifying hybrid technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, test and y a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked o in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. Two virtually identical vehicles will be constructed and own out of the NASA Sounding Rocket Facility at Wallops Island. This paper presents the current status of the project as of June 2008. For background on the project, the reader is referred to last year's paper.

  14. Firing Tests of Thrust Controllable Solid Rocket Motors Part 1:300-mm-Diameter End-Burning Grain Motors

    OpenAIRE

    GODAI, Tomifumi; SHIMIZU, Morio; Ito, Katsuya; Tanemura, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; KUSAKA, Kazuo; Kisara, Katsuto; Sato, Masahiro; Takahashi, Mamoru; Izumikawa, Muneo; 五代, 富文; 清水, 盛生; 伊藤, 克弥; 種村, 利春; 藤原, 勉

    1980-01-01

    300-mm-diameter thrust controllable solid rocket motors were successfully fired under atmospheric conditions. Thrust magnitude control was attained by changing the flow rate of the hydrogen peroxide decomposition gas injected into the solid rocket motor. Incomplete combustion termination that occurred earlier than expected was due to the excessive heat flux irradiated from the hot surfaces of the ablative insulation liner towards the extinguished propellant surface. More effective liner mater...

  15. Excitability of Motor Cortices as a Function of Emotional Sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komeilipoor, N.; Pizzolato, F.; Daffertshofer, A.; Cesari, P.

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right

  16. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-4 Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and test verification of a thermal model used for prediction of joint heating environments, structural temperatures and seal erosions in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzle Joint-4. The heating environments are a result of rapid pressurization of the joint free volume assuming a leak path has occurred in the filler material used for assembly gap close out. Combustion gases flow along the leak path from nozzle environment to joint O-ring gland resulting in local heating to the metal housing and erosion of seal materials. Analysis of this condition was based on usage of the NASA Joint Pressurization Routine (JPR) for environment determination and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) for structural temperature prediction. Model generated temperatures, pressures and seal erosions are compared to hot fire test data for several different leak path situations. Investigated in the hot fire test program were nozzle joint-4 O-ring erosion sensitivities to leak path width in both open and confined joint geometries. Model predictions were in generally good agreement with the test data for the confined leak path cases. Worst case flight predictions are provided using the test-calibrated model. Analysis issues are discussed based on model calibration procedures.

  17. Applied algorithm in the liner inspection of solid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Luiz Felipe Simões; Bizarria, Francisco Carlos Parquet; Bizarria, José Walter Parquet

    2018-03-01

    In rocket motors, the bonding between the solid propellant and thermal insulation is accomplished by a thin adhesive layer, known as liner. The liner application method involves a complex sequence of tasks, which includes in its final stage, the surface integrity inspection. Nowadays in Brazil, an expert carries out a thorough visual inspection to detect defects on the liner surface that may compromise the propellant interface bonding. Therefore, this paper proposes an algorithm that uses the photometric stereo technique and the K-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier to assist the expert in the surface inspection. Photometric stereo allows the surface information recovery of the test images, while the KNN method enables image pixels classification into two classes: non-defect and defect. Tests performed on a computer vision based prototype validate the algorithm. The positive results suggest that the algorithm is feasible and when implemented in a real scenario, will be able to help the expert in detecting defective areas on the liner surface.

  18. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solid rocket motor cases are subject to a variety of external environmental and loading conditions from cradle-to-grave. These conditions can significantly impact...

  19. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubelka-Lange, André, E-mail: andre.kubelka@zarm.uni-bremen.de; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Rasel, Ernst M. [Institut für Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Welfengarten 1, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  20. Experimental validation of solid rocket motor damping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, Cristina; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Mastroddi, Franco; Coppotelli, Giuliano; Trequattrini, Francesco; De Vivo, Alessio

    2017-12-01

    In design and certification of spacecraft, payload/launcher coupled load analyses are performed to simulate the satellite dynamic environment. To obtain accurate predictions, the system damping properties must be properly taken into account in the finite element model used for coupled load analysis. This is typically done using a structural damping characterization in the frequency domain, which is not applicable in the time domain. Therefore, the structural damping matrix of the system must be converted into an equivalent viscous damping matrix when a transient coupled load analysis is performed. This paper focuses on the validation of equivalent viscous damping methods for dynamically condensed finite element models via correlation with experimental data for a realistic structure representative of a slender launch vehicle with solid rocket motors. A second scope of the paper is to investigate how to conveniently choose a single combination of Young's modulus and structural damping coefficient—complex Young's modulus—to approximate the viscoelastic behavior of a solid propellant material in the frequency band of interest for coupled load analysis. A scaled-down test article inspired to the Z9-ignition Vega launcher configuration is designed, manufactured, and experimentally tested to obtain data for validation of the equivalent viscous damping methods. The Z9-like component of the test article is filled with a viscoelastic material representative of the Z9 solid propellant that is also preliminarily tested to investigate the dependency of the complex Young's modulus on the excitation frequency and provide data for the test article finite element model. Experimental results from seismic and shock tests performed on the test configuration are correlated with numerical results from frequency and time domain analyses carried out on its dynamically condensed finite element model to assess the applicability of different equivalent viscous damping methods to describe

  1. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Schkolnik, V; Wenzlawski, A; Grosse, J; Kohfeldt, A; Döringshoff, K; Wicht, A; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K; Braxmaier, C; Krutzik, M; Peters, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone towards space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 liters and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technol...

  2. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  3. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Komeilipoor

    Full Text Available We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST. While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally, single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1, and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  4. Detailed modal testing of a solid rocket motor using a portable test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozman, Vladimir; Brillhart, Ralph D.

    1990-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have expended the ability to evaluate solid rocket motors used in launch vehicles. As more detailed models of solid rocket motors were developed, testing methods were required to verify the models. Experimental modal analysis (modal testing) of space structures and launch vehicles has been a requirement for model validation for many years. However, previous testing of solid rocket motors has not typically involved dynamic modal testing of full scale motors for verification of solid propellant or system assembly properties. Innovative approaches to the testing of solid rocket motors were developed and modal testing of a full scale, two segment Titan 34D Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) was performed to validate detailed computer modeling. Special modifications were made to convert an existing facility into a temporary modal test facility which would accommodate the test article. The assembly of conventional data acquisition equipment into a multiple channel count portable system has made modal testing in the field feasible. Special purpose hydraulic exciters were configured to apply the dynamic driving forces required. All instrumentation and data collection equipment were installed at the test site for the duration of the test program and removed upon completion. Conversion of an existing test facility into a temporary modal test facility, and use of a multiple channel count portable test data acquisition system allowed all test objectives to be met and resulted in validation of the computer model in a minimum time.

  5. Modulations of MLT turbulence by waves observed during the WADIS sounding rocket project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Baumgarten, Gerd; Rapp, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The WADIS project (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere) aimed at studying waves, their dissipation, and effects on trace constituents. Among other things, it addressed the question of the variability of MLT turbulence, both in time and space. A unique feature of the WADIS project was multi-point turbulence sounding applying different measurement techniques including rocket-borne ionization gauges, VHF MAARSY radar, and VHF EISCAT radar in Tromsø. The project comprised two sounding rocket campaigns conducted at the Andøya Space Center (69 °N, 16 °E). One sounding rocket was launched in summer 2013 and one in winter 2015. The joint in-situ and ground-based observations showed horizontal variability of the turbulence field in the MLT at scales from a few to 100 km. We found that the turbulence dissipation rate varied in space in a wave-like manner both horizontally and in the vertical direction. This wave-like modulation reveals the same vertical wavelengths as those seen in gravity waves. We also found that vertical mean value of radar turbulence observations reveals wave-like modulation in time domain. This time variability results in up to two orders of magnitude change of the energy dissipation values with periods of 24 h. It also shows 12 h and shorter ( hours) modulations resulting in one decade variation. In this paper we present recent measurement results of turbulence-mean flow interaction and discuss possible reasons of the observed modulations.

  6. Aerodynamic study of sounding rocket flows using Chimera and patched multiblock meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alves de Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic flow simulations over a typical sounding rocket are presented in this paper. The work is inserted in the effort of developing computational tools necessary to simulate aerodynamic flows over configurations of interest for Instituto de Aeronáutica e Espaço of Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Aeroespacial. Sounding rocket configurations usually require fairly large fins and, quite frequently, have more than one set of fins. In order to be able to handle such configurations, the present paper presents a novel methodology which combines both Chimera and patched multiblock grids in the discretization of the computational domain. The flows of interest are modeled using the 3-D Euler equations and the work describes the details of discretization procedure, which uses a finite difference approach for structure, body-conforming, multiblock grids. The method is used to calculate the aerodynamics of a sounding rocket vehicle. The results indicate that the present approach can be a powerful aerodynamic analysis and design tool.

  7. National Report Switzerland: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Activities and Related Research in Switzerland 2013-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    During the period from 2013 to 2015, many Swiss researchers conducted studies on research platforms such as balloons or sounding rockets, or at the high altitude research stations of Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat. Researchers ‘ increased interest in sounding rockets during the two-year period is especially noteworthy. The use of the high altitude research stations, in contrast, has a long tradition in Switzerland and is, thus, frequently occupied by scientists. An advantage of these stations is the ideal set-up for researchers interested in the long-term measurement of the upper atmosphere, for example. Therefore, numcrous experiments in this particular research field were conducted and published in scientific journals. After a pause, several Swiss scientists became engaged in sounding rocket experiments. RUAG Space in Nyon, for instance, in collaboration with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and University of Freiburg, is focusing on the effect of gravity on plant roots. In order to investigate a gravity-dependent influence, two experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings are being planned for execution during the upcoming MASTER 1 3 campaign. A team of students from HES-SO Geneva were chosen to participate in the REXUS program with their experiment called CAESAR. A new concept of a propellant management device for space vehicles was introduced and tested on the REXUS 14 rocket by the team from Geneva in the spring of 20 1 3 . Last year, another student team, now from the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, was selected to fly their experiment on another REXUS rocket. Their proposed biological study is called CEMIOS and pertains to biochemical properties of the cell membrane. Once more the high altitude research stations of Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat welcomed many national—as well as international—scientists in the past two years. The hours that the researchers spent in either station reached a record high despite the poor weather conditions

  8. Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

  9. Ispitivanje piropatrona i raketnog motora pilotskog sedišta / Testing pyrocartridges and the rocket motor of the ejection seat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milorad Savković

    2008-01-01

    .... U radu je prikazan teorijski model kretanja sedišta. / Due to a complex geometrical shape of the rocket motor of the ejection seat, the rocket motor thrust occurs under certain angle in relation to the plane of symmetry of the ejection seat...

  10. Regarding the perturbed operating process of DB propellant rocket motor at extreme initial grain temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan ION

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite many decades of study, the combustion instability of several DB propellants is still of particular concern, especially at extreme grain temperature conditions of rocket motor operating. The purpose of the first part of the paper is to give an overview of our main experimental results on combustion instabilities and pressure oscillations in DB propellant segmented grain rocket motors (SPRM-01, large L/D ratio, working at extreme initial grain temperatures. Thus, we recorded some particular pressure-time traces with significant perturbed pressure signal that was FFT analysed. An updated mathematical model incorporating transient frequency-dependent combustion response, in conjunction with pressure-dependent burning, is applied to investigate and predict the DB propellant combustion instability phenomenon. The susceptibility of the tested motor SPRM-01 with DB propellant to get a perturbed working and to go unstable with pressure was evidenced and this risk has to be evaluated. In the last part of our paper we evaluated the influence of recorded perturbed thrust on the rocket behaviour on the trajectory. The study revealed that at firing-table initial conditions, this kind of perturbed motor operating may not lead to an unstable rocket flight, but the ballistic parameters would be influenced in an unacceptable manner.

  11. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishments, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dennis R.; Phelps, Willie J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor represents the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the only human rated solid motor. Each Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) provides approximately 3-million lb of thrust to lift the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle from the launch pad. The motors burn out approximately 2 minutes later, separate from the vehicle and are recovered and refurbished. The size of the motor and the need for high reliability were challenges. Thrust shaping, via shaping of the propellant grain, was needed to limit structural loads during ascent. The motor design evolved through several block upgrades to increase performance and to increase safety and reliability. A major redesign occurred after STS-51L with the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor. Significant improvements in the joint sealing systems were added. Design improvements continued throughout the Program via block changes with a number of innovations including development of low temperature o-ring materials and incorporation of a unique carbon fiber rope thermal barrier material. Recovery of the motors and post flight inspection improved understanding of hardware performance, and led to key design improvements. Because of the multidecade program duration material obsolescence was addressed, and requalification of materials and vendors was sometimes needed. Thermal protection systems and ablatives were used to protect the motor cases and nozzle structures. Significant understanding of design and manufacturing features of the ablatives was developed during the program resulting in optimization of design features and processing parameters. The project advanced technology in eliminating ozone-depleting materials in manufacturing processes and the development of an asbestos-free case insulation. Manufacturing processes for the large motor components were unique and safety in the manufacturing environment was a special concern. Transportation and handling approaches were also needed for the large

  12. Ignition transient modelling for the Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, M. A.; Luke, G. D.; Stockham, L. W.

    1993-06-01

    Prediction of the ignition transient for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) for the Space Shuttle presents an unusual set of modelling challenges because of its high length-to-diameter ratio and complex internal flow environment. A review of ignition modelling experience on the Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), which is similar in size and configuration to the ASRM, reveals that classical igniter design theory and modelling methods under-predict, by a factor of two, the measured pressure and thrust rise rates experienced on the RSRM. This paper (1) reviews the Titan and Shuttle SRM test experience, (2) presents the results of 0-Dimensional (0-D) and 1-Dimensional (1-D) analysis of the RSRM and ASRM motors, and (3) addresses the need for advanced analysis techniques, as they relate to ASRM ignition transient modelling requirements and igniter design drivers.

  13. Laser welding of maraging steel rocket motor casing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This presentation looks at the experimental procedure and results of laser welding of maraging steel rocker motor casing. It concludes that a fracture occurred in weld metal of autogenous welding and that a fracture occurred in base material when...

  14. The Extended Duration Sounding Rocket (EDSR): Low Cost Science and Technology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruddace, R. G.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cash, W.; Eberspeaker, P.; Figer, D.; Figueroa, O.; Harris, W.; Kowalski, M.; Maddox, R.; Martin, C.; McCammon, D.; Nordsieck, K.; Polidan, R.; Sanders, W.; Wilkinson, E.; Asrat

    2011-12-01

    The 50-year old NASA sounding rocket (SR) program has been successful in launching scientific payloads into space frequently and at low cost with a 85% success rate. In 2008 the NASA Astrophysics Sounding Rocket Assessment Team (ASRAT), set up to review the future course of the SR program, made four major recommendations, one of which now called Extended Duration Sounding Rocket (EDSR). ASRAT recommended a system capable of launching science payloads (up to 420 kg) into low Earth orbit frequently (1/yr) at low cost, with a mission duration of approximately 30 days. Payload selection would be based on meritorious high-value science that can be performed by migrating sub-orbital payloads to orbit. Establishment of this capability is a essential for NASA as it strives to advance technical readiness and lower costs for risk averse Explorers and flagship missions in its pursuit of a balanced and sustainable program and achieve big science goals within a limited fiscal environment. The development of a new generation of small, low-cost launch vehicles (SLV), primarily the SpaceX Falcon 1 and the Orbital Sciences Minotaur I has made this concept conceivable. The NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF)conducted a detailed engineering concept study, aimed at defining the technical characteristics of all phases of a mission, from design, procurement, assembly, test, integration and mission operations. The work was led by Dr. Raymond Cruddace, a veteran of the SR program and the prime mover of the EDSR concept. The team investigated details such as, the "FAA licensed contract" for launch service procurement, with WFF and NASA SMD being responsible for mission assurance which results in a factor of two cost savings over the current approach. These and other creative solutions resulted in a proof-of-concept Class D mission design that could have a sustained launch rate of at least 1/yr, a mission duration of up to about 3 months, and a total cost of $25-30 million for each mission

  15. Trajectory Reconstruction of the ST-9 Sounding Rocket Experiment Using IMU and Landmark Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ryan S.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Bordi, John J.; Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Lisano, Michael E.; Owen, William M.; Wolf, Aron A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents trajectory reconstruction of the ST-9 sounding rocket experiment using the onboard IMU data and descent imagery. The raw IMU accelerometer measurements are first converted into inertial acceleration and then used in trajectory integration. The descent images are pre-processed using a map-matching algorithm and unique landmarks for each image are created. Using the converted IMU data and descent images, the result from dead-reckoning and the kinematic-fix approaches are first compared with the GPS measurements. Then, both the IMU data and landmarks are processed together using a batch least-squares filter and the position, velocity, stochastic acceleration, and camera orientation of each image are estimated. The reconstructed trajectory is compared with the GPS data and the corresponding formal uncertainties are presented. The result shows that IMU data and descent images processed with a batch filter algorithm provide the trajectory accuracy required for pin-point landing.

  16. JOKARUS - design of a compact optical iodine frequency reference for a sounding rocket mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schkolnik, Vladimir; Doeringshoff, Klaus; Gutsch, Franz Balthasar; Krutzik, Markus [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Oswald, Markus [Universitaet Bremen, Zentrum fuer angewandte Raumfahrttechnologie und Mikrogravitation (ZARM), Bremen (Germany); Schuldt, Thilo [Institut fuer Raumfahrtsysteme, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Bremen (Germany); Braxmaier, Claus [Universitaet Bremen, Zentrum fuer angewandte Raumfahrttechnologie und Mikrogravitation (ZARM), Bremen (Germany); Institut fuer Raumfahrtsysteme, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Bremen (Germany); Lezius, Matthias; Holzwarth, Ronald [Menlo Systems GmbH, Martinsried (Germany); Kuerbis, Christian; Bawamia, Ahmad [Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Peters, Achim [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    We present the design of a compact absolute optical frequency reference for space applications based on hyperfine transitions in molecular iodine with a targeted fractional frequency instability of better than 3 x 10{sup -14} after 1 s. It is based on a micro-integrated extended cavity diode laser with integrated optical amplifier, fiber pigtailed second harmonic generation wave-guide modules, and a quasi-monolithic spectroscopy setup with operating electronics. The instrument described here is scheduled for launch end of 2017 aboard the TEXUS 54 sounding rocket as an important qualification step towards space application of iodine frequency references and related technologies. The payload will operate autonomously and its optical frequency will be compared to an optical frequency comb during its space flight. (orig.)

  17. Status of the Micro-X Sounding Rocket X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, D. C.; Adams, J. S.; Baker, R.; Bandler, S. R.; Danowski, M. E.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubbard, A. J. F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that utilizes transition edge sensors to perform imaging spectroscopy with a high level of energy resolution. Its 2.1m focal length X-ray optic has an effective area of 300 sq cm, a field of view of 11.8 arcmin, and a bandpass of 0.12.5 keV. The detector array has 128 pixels and an intrinsic energy resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM. The integration of the system has progressed with functional tests of the detectors and electronics complete, and performance characterization of the detectors is underway. We present an update of ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch of the instrument.

  18. Prospects for Sterile Neutrino Observations with the Micro-X Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Antonia; Micro-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Micro-X sounding rocket uses a Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array to make X-ray observations. The improved energy resolution of TESs compared to traditional space-based X-ray detectors brings new precision to both supernova observations and the X-ray search for sterile neutrino dark matter. Current X-ray observations disagree over the potential presence of a 3.5 keV X-ray line consistent with a sterile neutrino interaction, and Micro-X is in a unique position to establish or refute the presence of this line. We present the design considerations of the instrument and expectations for flight observations, with special emphasis given to the prospects of sterile neutrino studies.

  19. A quick test of the WEP enabled by a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Reasenberg, Robert D; Patla, Biju R; Phillips, James D; Popescu, Eugeniu E; Rocco, Emanuele; Thapa, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    We describe SR-POEM, a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle, which is to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. This test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of \\sigma(\\eta) < 10-16 after averaging the results of eight separate drops, each of 40 s duration. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm/\\sqrt{Hz}. We address the two sources of systematic error that are currently of greatest concern, magnetic force and electrostatic (patch effect) force on the test mass assemblies. The discovery of a violation (\\eta \

  20. Design and characteristics of a WEP test in a sounding-rocket payload

    CERN Document Server

    Reasenberg, Robert D; Phillips, James D; Thapa, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    We describe SR-POEM, a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle that is to be conducted during the free fall portion of the flight of a sounding rocket payload. This test of a single pair of substances will have a measurement uncertainty of {\\sigma}({\\eta}) < 2 10^17 after averaging the results of eight separate drops, each of 120 s duration. The entire payload is inverted between successive drops to cancel potential sources of systematic error. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four of the SAO laser gauges, which have achieved an Allan deviation of 0.04 pm for an averaging time of 30 s. We discuss aspects of the current design with an emphasis on those that bear on the accuracy of the determination of {\\eta}. The discovery of a violation ({\\eta} \

  1. A quick test of the WEP enabled by a sounding rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reasenberg, Robert D; Patla, Biju R; Phillips, James D; Popescu, Eugeniu E; Rocco, Emanuele; Thapa, Rajesh [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lorenzini, Enrico C, E-mail: reasenberg@cfa.harvard.edu [Faculty of Engineering, Universita di Padova, Padova I-35122 (Italy)

    2011-05-07

    We describe SR-POEM, a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle (WEP), which is to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. This test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of {sigma}({eta}) < 10{sup -16} after averaging the results of eight separate drops, each of 40 s duration. The WEP measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm Hz{sup -1/2}. We address the two sources of systematic error that are currently of greatest concern: magnetic force and electrostatic (patch effect) force on the test mass assemblies. The discovery of a violation ({eta} {ne} 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

  2. The Transition-Edge-Sensor Array for the Micro-X Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, Sarah Elizabeth; Chervenak J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J. P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Micro-X sounding rocket program will fly a 128-element array of transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to enable high-resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. To match the angular resolution of the optics while maximizing the field-of-view and retaining a high energy resolution (< 4 eV at 1 keV), we have designed the pixels using 600 x 600 sq. micron Au/Bi absorbers, which overhang 140 x 140 sq. micron Mo/Au sensors. The data-rate capabilities of the rocket telemetry system require the pulse decay to be approximately 2 ms to allow a significant portion of the data to be telemetered during flight. Here we report experimental results from the flight array, including measurements of energy resolution, uniformity, and absorber thermalization. In addition, we present studies of test devices that have a variety of absorber contact geometries, as well as a variety of membrane-perforation schemes designed to slow the pulse decay time to match the telemetry requirements. Finally, we describe the reduction in pixel-to-pixel crosstalk afforded by an angle-evaporated Cu backside heatsinking layer, which provides Cu coverage on the four sidewalls of the silicon wells beneath each pixel.

  3. Second flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager sounding rocket [FOXSI-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Krucker, S.; Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Ramsey, B.; Foster, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket experiment that has flown twice to test a direct focusing method for measuring solar hard X-rays (HXRs). These HXRs are associated with particle acceleration mechanisms at work in powering solar flares and aid us in investigating the role of nanoflares in heating the solar corona. FOXSI-1 successfully flew for the first time on November 2, 2012. After some upgrades including the addition of extra mirrors to two optics modules and the inclusion of new fine-pitch CdTe strip detectors, in addition to the Si detectors from FOXSI-1, the FOXSI-2 payload flew successfully again on December 11, 2014. During the second flight four targets on the Sun were observed, including at least three active regions, two microflares, and ~1 minute of quiet Sun observation. This work is focused in giving an overview of the FOXSI rocket program and a detailed description of the upgrades for the second flight. In addition, we show images and spectra investigating the presence of no thermal emission for each of the flaring targets that we observed during the second flight.

  4. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  5. ROCKET

    OpenAIRE

    CRUZ BARCELÓ, JULIA

    2015-01-01

    [In] The main objective of this project was to perform a stop-motion animation short film with my colleague Marta Soriano Gil, student of Fine Arts Degree at the Polytechnic University of Valencia, like myself. This project collects a year’s work developing the film, from the origins of the idea and the early stages of production to the final editing and audiovisual document. Rocket, is a project that has encompassed many disciplines, from the initial draws, designs and conc...

  6. Sounding-Rocket Studies of Langmuir-Wave Microphysics in the Auroral Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Micah P.

    Since their discovery in laboratory plasmas in the 1920s, Langmuir waves have been observed to be ubiquitous in plasma environments, particularly in space plasmas. From the greater solar wind to planetary foreshocks and the auroral ionosphere, Langmuir waves are a key factor mediating electron temperature, and controlling electron beam propagation and beam-plasma energy transfer. Because they are so important, Langmuir waves in the space environment have been intensively investigated; however, there remain two challenging types of experiments that are relatively lacking: three-dimensional measurements of Langmuir-wave fields, and measurements of Langmuir wave-electron correlations. This thesis works on filling these two gaps, plus development of new Langmuir-wave instrumentation. The CHARM-II wave-particle Correlator instrument was designed to study the energy transfer between electron beams and plasmas via the sorting of incoming particles by concurrent Langmuir-wave phase, allowing for direct observation of electron bunching. Data from the CHARM-II sounding rocket comprises the first such observations with statistical levels of events, revealing an association between the polarity of the resistive component of the electron phase-bunching and changes in the electron flux at the associated energy, such that a negative resistive component goes with an increase in electron flux, and vice versa, effectively showing energy flow from the beam to the waves, and subsequent enhancements of wave damping. Surprisingly, the results also show comparable amounts of resistive and reactive activity. A test-particle simulation was developed to confirm the details of the theoretical explanation for the observed effect. A three-dimensional Langmuir-wave receiver flown on the TRICE sounding rocket mission reveals the beat signature of the amplitude-modulated 'bursty' form of Langmuir waves which has been observed in many environments. An analysis of the three-dimensional data shows

  7. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    OpenAIRE

    David Greatrix

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave ...

  8. Finite element analysis of propellant of solid rocket motor during ship motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Qu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate the stress and strain of solid rocket motors (SRMs, a finite element analysis model was established. The stress spectra of the SRM elements with respect to time in the case that the vessel cruises under a certain shipping condition were obtained by simulation. According to the analysis of the simulation results, a critical zone was confirmed, and the Mises stress amplitudes of the different critical zones were acquired. The results show that the maximum stress and strain of SRM are less than the maximum tensile strength and elongation, respectively, of the propellant. The cumulative damage of the motor must also be evaluated by random fatigue loading.

  9. The NRL Solar Physics Sounding Rocket Program: Trailblazers for the Solar-C and Solar Orbiter Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, D. H.; Korendyke, C.; Vourlidas, A.; Moses, J.; Brown, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Space Science Division (SSD) sounding rocket program enables cutting-edge scientific research through the development of low-cost, short-schedule, highly advanced suborbital payloads. Each sounding rocket campaign provides a low-cost and accordingly low-risk test bed for the technology development of future flight projects. Our approach is to maintain a continuous hardware development program through a successful cycle of concept inception, competition in the NASA LCAS (Low-Cost Access to Space) program, instrument development, launch, and science analysis. Currently, SSD has three active sounding rocket programs. HERSCHEL (HElium Resonance Scattering in the Corona & HELio-sphere) was successfully flown in 2010 and measured the global helium absolute abundance in the solar corona for the first time, linking solar surface and in-situ abundance. The HERSCHEL experiment served as the pathfinder for the METIS coronagraph that will fly on Solar Orbiter. VERIS (VEry high Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) is scheduled for launch in August 2013 and will provide the first spectroscopic observations of the solar atmosphere at spatial scales not yet observed by previous EUV spectrographs. VERIS is the test bed for a flight hardware concept to be proposed to NASA for the upcoming JAXA Solar-C mission. VAULT (Very high Angular resolution Ultraviolet Telescope), scheduled for re-flight in Fall 2013, will provide ultra high-resolution images of the Lyman-alpha layer of the upper chromosphere where much of the energy required for explosive events is stored. Previous VAULT sounding rocket flights provided the first sub-arcsecond solar images from space and led to the development of a Lyman-alpha telescope for the Solar Orbiter mission. Through these next sounding rocket flights NRL SSD will provide scientific leadership in the budding field of upper chromospheric research.

  10. Experimental study on multiple-pulse performance characteristics of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum powder rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Hu, Chunbo; Deng, Zhe; Li, Chao; Sun, Haijun; Cai, Yupeng

    2017-04-01

    The performance characteristics of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum powder rocket motor were investigated experimentally based on a powder rocket testing system. Three-pulse experiment with one hour interval and four-pulse experiment with 15 s interval were conducted with a bi-propellant powder feed system. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the powder rocket for the multiple-pulse operation and the synchronization of powder feed method. The multiple-pulse performance characteristics were analyzed accordingly. It shows that the motor initiates steadily with the mass flow rate of 2.5 g/s for oxidizer powder fluidization gas and 2.0 g/s for fuel powder fluidization gas. The relative standard deviation was adopted to describe the repeatability characteristics of the pulses. The relative standard deviation of ammonium perchlorate and aluminum pistons velocity is 0.072 and 0.007, and that of oxidizer-fuel mass feed ratio is 0.052. The motor performed well with good repeatability of combustor pressure, start-up response and combustion efficiency during the multiple-pulse tests. Low frequency combustion pressure oscillations,3.6-4.2 Hz with amplitudes up to 18.7% of mean combustor pressure, were encountered. The phenomenon appeared seriously at first pulse, then alleviated at the following pulses. Further analysis of test results showed that increasing chamber pressure could ameliorate the oscillation.

  11. Performance of reinforced polymer ablators exposed to a solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, C.; Burgess, T.; Bowen, J.; Deloach, K.; Talmy, I.

    1992-10-01

    Summarized in this report is the effort by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) and FMC Corporation (a launcher manufacturer) to identify new high performance ablators suitable for use on Navy guided missile launchers (GML) and ships' structures. The goal is to reduce ablator erosion by 25 to 50 percent compared to that of the existing ablators such as MXBE350 (rubbermodified phenolic containing glass fiber reinforcement). This reduction in erosion would significantly increase the number of new missiles with higher-thrust, longer burn rocket motors that can be launched prior to ablator refurbishment. In fact, there are a number of new Navy missiles being considered for development and introduction into existing GML: e.g., the Antisatellite Missile (ASM) and the Theater High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Missile. The U.S. Navy experimentally evaluated the eight best fiber-reinforced, polymer composites from a possible field of 25 off-the-shelf ablators previously screened by FMC Corporation. They were tested by the Navy in highly aluminized solid rocket motor exhaust plumes to determine their ability to resist erosion and to insulate.... Ablator, Guided Missile Launchers, Erosion, Tactical missiles, Convective heating, Solid rocket motors, Aluminum oxide particles.

  12. Numerical investigation on the regression rate of hybrid rocket motor with star swirl fuel grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Hu, Fan; Zhang, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Although hybrid rocket motor is prospected to have distinct advantages over liquid and solid rocket motor, low regression rate and insufficient efficiency are two major disadvantages which have prevented it from being commercially viable. In recent years, complex fuel grain configurations are attractive in overcoming the disadvantages with the help of Rapid Prototyping technology. In this work, an attempt has been made to numerically investigate the flow field characteristics and local regression rate distribution inside the hybrid rocket motor with complex star swirl grain. A propellant combination with GOX and HTPB has been chosen. The numerical model is established based on the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence, combustion, and coupled gas/solid phase formulations. The calculated fuel regression rate is compared with the experimental data to validate the accuracy of numerical model. The results indicate that, comparing the star swirl grain with the tube grain under the conditions of the same port area and the same grain length, the burning surface area rises about 200%, the spatially averaged regression rate rises as high as about 60%, and the oxidizer can combust sufficiently due to the big vortex around the axis in the aft-mixing chamber. The combustion efficiency of star swirl grain is better and more stable than that of tube grain.

  13. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishment, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D. R.; Phelps, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) represents the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) ever flown and the only human-rated solid motor. High reliability of the RSRM has been the result of challenges addressed and lessons learned. Advancements have resulted by applying attention to process control, testing, and postflight through timely and thorough communication in dealing with all issues. A structured and disciplined approach was taken to identify and disposition all concerns. Careful consideration and application of alternate opinions was embraced. Focus was placed on process control, ground test programs, and postflight assessment. Process control is mandatory for an SRM, because an acceptance test of the delivered product is not feasible. The RSRM maintained both full-scale and subscale test articles, which enabled continuous improvement of design and evaluation of process control and material behavior. Additionally RSRM reliability was achieved through attention to detail in post flight assessment to observe any shift in performance. The postflight analysis and inspections provided invaluable reliability data as it enables observation of actual flight performance, most of which would not be available if the motors were not recovered. RSRM reusability offered unique opportunities to learn about the hardware. NASA is moving forward with the Space Launch System that incorporates propulsion systems that takes advantage of the heritage Shuttle and Ares solid motor programs. These unique challenges, features of the RSRM, materials and manufacturing issues, and design improvements will be discussed in the paper.

  14. Test and Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved measurement of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero-thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  15. Validation of a Solid Rocket Motor Internal Environment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2017-01-01

    In a prior effort, a thermal/fluid model of the interior of Penn State University's laboratory-scale Insulation Test Motor (ITM) was constructed to predict both the convective and radiative heat transfer to the interior walls of the ITM with a minimum of empiricism. These predictions were then compared to values of total and radiative heat flux measured in a previous series of ITM test firings to assess the capabilities and shortcomings of the chosen modeling approach. Though the calculated fluxes reasonably agreed with those measured during testing, this exercise revealed means of improving the fidelity of the model to, in the case of the thermal radiation, enable direct comparison of the measured and calculated fluxes and, for the total heat flux, compute a value indicative of the average measured condition. By replacing the P1-Approximation with the discrete ordinates (DO) model for the solution of the gray radiative transfer equation, the radiation intensity field in the optically thin region near the radiometer is accurately estimated, allowing the thermal radiation flux to be calculated on the heat-flux sensor itself, which was then compared directly to the measured values. Though the fully coupling the wall thermal response with the flow model was not attempted due to the excessive computational time required, a separate wall thermal response model was used to better estimate the average temperature of the graphite surfaces upstream of the heat flux gauges and improve the accuracy of both the total and radiative heat flux computations. The success of this modeling approach increases confidence in the ability of state-of-the-art thermal and fluid modeling to accurately predict SRM internal environments, offers corrections to older methods, and supplies a tool for further studies of the dynamics of SRM interiors.

  16. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 - 75 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, S.; Gausa, M. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 75 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on the two sounding rockets of the CHAMPS (CHarge And mass of Meteoritic smoke ParticleS) rocket campaign which were launched into the mesosphere in October 2011 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void beneath an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed above an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened on the downleg to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region below. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ~75 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  17. Experimental Study of the Swirling Oxidizer Flow in HTPB/N2O Hybrid Rocket Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdi Heydari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of swirling oxidizer flow on the performance of a HTPB/N2O Hybrid rocket motor were studied. A hybrid propulsion laboratory has been developed, to characterize internal ballistics characteristics of swirl flow hybrid motors and to define the operating parameters, like fuel regression rate, specific impulse, and characteristics velocity and combustion efficiency. Primitive variables, like pressure, thrust, temperature, and the oxidizer mass flow rate, were logged. A modular motor with 70 mm outer diameter and variable chamber length is designed for experimental analysis. The injector module has four tangential injectors and one axial injector. Liquid nitrous oxide (N2O as an oxidizer is injected at the head of combustion chamber into the motor. The feed system uses pressurized air as the pressurant. Two sets of tests have been performed. Some tests with axial and tangential oxidizer injection and a test with axial oxidizer injection were done. The test results show that the fuel grain regression rate has been improved by applying tangential oxidizer injection at the head of the motor. Besides, it was seen that combustion efficiency of motors with the swirl flow was about 10 percent more than motors with axial flow.

  18. Use of a personal computer for the real-time reception and analysis of data from a sounding rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, W. D.; Penegor, G. T.; Cotton, D. M.; Kaplan, G. C.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1988 the Earth and Planetary Atmospheres Group of the Space Sciences Laboratory of the University of California at Berkeley flew an experiment on a high-altitude sounding rocket launched from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The experiment, BEARS (Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer), was designed to obtain spectroscopic data on the composition and structure of the earth's upper atmosphere. Consideration is given to the objectives of the BEARS experiment; the computer interface and software; the use of remote data transmission; and calibration, integration, and flight operations.

  19. Investigation of the flow turning loss in unstable solid propellant rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Lawrence Mark

    The goal of this study was to improve the understanding of the flow turning loss, which contributes to the damping of axial acoustic instabilities in solid propellant rocket motors. This understanding is needed to develop practical methods for designing motors that do not exhibit such instabilities. The flow turning loss results from the interaction of the flow of combustion products leaving the surface of the propellant with the acoustic field in an unstable motor. While state of the art solid rocket stability models generally account for the flow turning loss, its magnitude and characteristics have never been fully investigated. This thesis describes a combined theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigation of the flow turning loss and its dependence upon various motor design and operating parameters. First, a one dimensional acoustic stability equation that verifies the existence of the flow turning loss was derived for a chamber with constant mean pressure and temperature. The theoretical development was then extended to include the effects of mean temperature gradients to accommodate combustion systems in which mean temperature gradients and heat losses are significant. These analyses provided the background and expressions necessary to guide an experimental study. The relevant equations were then solved for the developed experimental setup to predict the behavior of the flow turning loss and the other terms of the developed acoustic stability equation. This was followed by and experimental study in which the flow turning region of an unstable solid propellant rocket motor was simulated. The setup was used, with and without combustion, to determine the dependence of the flow turning loss upon operating conditions. These studies showed that the flow turning loss strongly depends upon the gas velocity at the propellant surface and the location of the flow turning region relative to the standing acoustic wave. The flow turning loss measured in the

  20. Thermo-Structural Response Caused by Structure Gap and Gap Design for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-structural response of solid rocket motor nozzles is widely investigated in the design of modern rockets, and many factors related to the material properties have been considered. However, little work has been done to evaluate the effects of structure gaps on the generation of flame leaks. In this paper, a numerical simulation was performed by the finite element method to study the thermo-structural response of a typical nozzle with consideration of the structure gap. Initial boundary conditions for thermo-structural simulation were defined by a quasi-1D model, and then coupled simulations of different gap size matching modes were conducted. It was found that frictional interface treatment could efficiently reduce the stress level. Based on the defined flame leak criteria, gap size optimization was carried out, and the best gap matching mode was determined for designing the nozzle. Testing experiment indicated that the simulation results from the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results. It is believed that the simulation method is effective for investigating thermo-structural responses, as well as designing proper gaps for solid rocket motor nozzles.

  1. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-07-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  2. Attention fine-tunes auditory-motor processing of speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möttönen, Riikka; van de Ven, Gido M; Watkins, Kate E

    2014-03-12

    The earliest stages of cortical processing of speech sounds take place in the auditory cortex. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have provided evidence that the human articulatory motor cortex contributes also to speech processing. For example, stimulation of the motor lip representation influences specifically discrimination of lip-articulated speech sounds. However, the timing of the neural mechanisms underlying these articulator-specific motor contributions to speech processing is unknown. Furthermore, it is unclear whether they depend on attention. Here, we used magnetoencephalography and TMS to investigate the effect of attention on specificity and timing of interactions between the auditory and motor cortex during processing of speech sounds. We found that TMS-induced disruption of the motor lip representation modulated specifically the early auditory-cortex responses to lip-articulated speech sounds when they were attended. These articulator-specific modulations were left-lateralized and remarkably early, occurring 60-100 ms after sound onset. When speech sounds were ignored, the effect of this motor disruption on auditory-cortex responses was nonspecific and bilateral, and it started later, 170 ms after sound onset. The findings indicate that articulatory motor cortex can contribute to auditory processing of speech sounds even in the absence of behavioral tasks and when the sounds are not in the focus of attention. Importantly, the findings also show that attention can selectively facilitate the interaction of the auditory cortex with specific articulator representations during speech processing.

  3. A Rocket Measurement of Ozone Concentration Profile Over the Korean Peninsula Using the Korean Sounding Rocket KSR-420S: Ozone Detector, its Calibration and Data Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhoon Kim

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The first sounding rocket in Korea, KSR-420S has been under the development at Korea Aerospace Research Institute(KARI, and is expected to launched on 1993 to measure the vertical ozone profile over the Korean Peninsula. The KSR-420S is expected to provide the first in situ measurement of ozone concentrations over the Korean Peninsula. An optical ozone detector has been developed at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS, and its calibration has been completed recently. In this paper, measurement principles of the ozone detector in KSR-420S, its calibration data, ozone measurement procedure and data reduction algorithm are presented with sample calculations.

  4. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D. L.; Blacklock, K.; Langhenry, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The recertification of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) has included an extensive rewriting of the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The evolution of the groundrules and methodology used in the analysis is discussed and compared to standard FMEA techniques. Especially highlighted are aspects of the FMEA/CIL which are unique to the analysis of an SRM. The criticality category definitions are presented and the rationale for assigning criticality is presented. The various data required by the CIL and contribution of this data to the retention rationale is also presented. As an example, the FMEA and CIL for the SRM nozzle assembly is discussed in detail. This highlights some of the difficulties associated with the analysis of a system with the unique mission requirements of the Space Shuttle.

  5. Indirect and direct methods for measuring a dynamic throat diameter in a solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbaugh, Lauren

    In a solid rocket motor, nozzle throat erosion is dictated by propellant composition, throat material properties, and operating conditions. Throat erosion has a significant effect on motor performance, so it must be accurately characterized to produce a good motor design. In order to correlate throat erosion rate to other parameters, it is first necessary to know what the throat diameter is throughout a motor burn. Thus, an indirect method and a direct method for determining throat diameter in a solid rocket motor are investigated in this thesis. The indirect method looks at the use of pressure and thrust data to solve for throat diameter as a function of time. The indirect method's proof of concept was shown by the good agreement between the ballistics model and the test data from a static motor firing. The ballistics model was within 10% of all measured and calculated performance parameters (e.g. average pressure, specific impulse, maximum thrust, etc.) for tests with throat erosion and within 6% of all measured and calculated performance parameters for tests without throat erosion. The direct method involves the use of x-rays to directly observe a simulated nozzle throat erode in a dynamic environment; this is achieved with a dynamic calibration standard. An image processing algorithm is developed for extracting the diameter dimensions from the x-ray intensity digital images. Static and dynamic tests were conducted. The measured diameter was compared to the known diameter in the calibration standard. All dynamic test results were within +6% / -7% of the actual diameter. Part of the edge detection method consists of dividing the entire x-ray image by an average pixel value, calculated from a set of pixels in the x-ray image. It was found that the accuracy of the edge detection method depends upon the selection of the average pixel value area and subsequently the average pixel value. An average pixel value sensitivity analysis is presented. Both the indirect

  6. Development of Quartz Friction Gauge on Board Balloon and Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Junichi; Abe, Takumi; Murata, Isao; Sato, Kaoru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    The on-board small vacuum gauge developed in this study is the quartz friction gauge, which is based on the principle that the resonance impedance of a quartz oscillator varies with the pressure of ambient gas. The gauge has a wide measuring range (105-10-2 Pa), which corresponds to the atmospheric pressure from the ground to an altitude of about 100 km. The sensor part and data processing part weigh 136 g and 210 g, respectively. In addition, the gauge can operate at a power consumption level of less than 1W. The gauge is suited for high altitude balloon experiments where the weight of on-board instruments must be kept to a minimum. The tuning-fork-shaped quartz oscillator in the gauge is widely used for wrist watches and has high resistance to vibration and shock, and thus the gauge is applicable to sounding rocket experiments that require on-board instruments with high resistance to the environment.

  7. Free Flight Ground Testing of ADEPT in Advance of the Sounding Rocket One Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. P.; Dutta, S.

    2017-01-01

    The Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) project will be conducting the first flight test of ADEPT, titled Sounding Rocket One (SR-1), in just two months. The need for this flight test stems from the fact that ADEPT's supersonic dynamic stability has not yet been characterized. The SR-1 flight test will provide critical data describing the flight mechanics of ADEPT in ballistic flight. These data will feed decision making on future ADEPT mission designs. This presentation will describe the SR-1 scientific data products, possible flight test outcomes, and the implications of those outcomes on future ADEPT development. In addition, this presentation will describe free-flight ground testing performed in advance of the flight test. A subsonic flight dynamics test conducted at the Vertical Spin Tunnel located at NASA Langley Research Center provided subsonic flight dynamics data at high and low altitudes for multiple center of mass (CoM) locations. A ballistic range test at the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamics Facility (HFFAF) located at NASA Ames Research Center provided supersonic flight dynamics data at low supersonic Mach numbers. Execution and outcomes of these tests will be discussed. Finally, a hypothesized trajectory estimate for the SR-1 flight will be presented.

  8. Calibration of the hard x-ray detectors for the FOXSI solar sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Bergstedt, Kendra; Vievering, Juliana; Musset, Sophie; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Courtade, Sasha; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Säm.; Goetz, Keith; Monson, Steven

    2017-08-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment conducts direct imaging and spectral observation of the Sun in hard X-rays, in the energy range 4 to 20 keV. These high-sensitivity observations are used to study particle acceleration and coronal heating. FOXSI is designed with seven grazing incidence optics modules that focus X-rays onto seven focal plane detectors kept at a 2m distance. FOXSI-1 was flown with seven Double-sided Si Strip Detectors (DSSD), and two of them were replaced with CdTe detectors for FOXSI-2. The upcoming FOXSI-3 flight will carry DSSD and CdTe detectors with upgraded optics for enhanced sensitivity. The detectors are calibrated using various radioactive sources. The detector's spectral response matrix was constructed with diagonal elements using a Gaussian approximation with a spread (sigma) that accounts for the energy resolution of the detector. Spectroscopic studies of past FOXSI flight data suggest that the inclusion of lower energy X-rays could better constrain the spectral modeling to yield a more precise temperature estimation of the hot plasma. This motivates us to carry out an improved calibration to better understand the finer-order effects on the spectral response, especially at lower energies. Here we report our improved calibration of FOXSI detectors using experiments and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  9. Pulsating Heat pipe Only for Space (PHOS): results of the REXUS 18 sounding rocket campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Manzoni, M.; Marengo, M.

    2015-11-01

    Two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) are tested on board REXUS 18 sounding rocket in order to obtain data over a relatively long microgravity period (approximately 90 s). The CLPHPs are partially filled with FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 mm) and slightly smaller (1.6 mm) than the critical diameter evaluated in static Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP effectively works as a Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the characteristic slug and plug flow pattern forms inside the tube and the heat exchange is triggered by thermally driven self-sustained oscillations of the working fluid. On the other hand, the large diameter CLPHP works as a two- phase thermosyphon in vertical position and doesn't work in horizontal position: in this particular condition, the working fluid stratifies within the device as the surface tension force is no longer able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs in reduced gravity conditions: as the gravity reduces the buoyancy forces becomes less intense and it is possible to recreate the typical PHP flow pattern also for larger inner tube diameters. This allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience low gravity conditions due to a failure in the yoyo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  10. Introduction of laser initiation for the 48-inch Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) test motors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Chris J.; Litzinger, Gerald E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor is a new design for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The new design will provide more thrust and more payload capability, as well as incorporating many design improvements in all facets of the design and manufacturing process. A 48-inch (diameter) test motor program is part of the ASRM development program. This program has multiple purposes for testing of propellent, insulation, nozzle characteristics, etc. An overview of the evolution of the 48-inch ASRM test motor ignition system which culminated with the implementation of a laser ignition system is presented. The laser system requirements, development, and operation configuration are reviewed in detail.

  11. Ionospheric E–F valley observed by a sounding rocket at the low-latitude station Hainan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the sounding rocket experiment conducted at Hainan ionospheric observatory (19.5° N, 109.1° E, a valley between the E layer and F layer in the ionospheric electron density profile is observed and presented. The sounding rocket was launched in the morning (06:15 LT on 7 May 2011, and the observed electron density profile outside the valley agrees with the simultaneous observation by the DPS-4 digisonde at the same station. The width of the observed valley was about 42 km, the depth almost 50%, and the altitude of the electron density minimum 123.5 km. This is the first observation of the E–F valley in the low-latitude region in the East Asian sector. The results are also compared with models, and the physical mechanism of the observed valley is discussed in this paper.

  12. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  13. Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Harris, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible inhibitors are generally used in solid rocket motors (SRMs) as a means to control the burning of propellant. Vortices generated by the flow of propellant around the flexible inhibitors have been identified as a driving source of instabilities that can lead to thrust oscillations in launch vehicles. Potential coupling between the SRM thrust oscillations and structural vibration modes is an important risk factor in launch vehicle design. As a means to predict and better understand these phenomena, a multidisciplinary simulation capability that couples the NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This capability is crucial to the development of NASA's new space launch system (SLS). This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the coupled software to demonstrate and investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena between pressure waves and flexible inhibitors inside reusable solid rocket motors (RSRMs). The features of the fluid and structural solvers are described in detail, and the coupling methodology and interfacial continuity requirements are then presented in a general Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The simulations presented herein utilize production level CFD with hybrid RANS/LES turbulence modeling and grid resolution in excess of 80 million cells. The fluid domain in the SRM is discretized using a general mixed polyhedral unstructured mesh, while full 3D shell elements are utilized in the structural domain for the flexible inhibitors. Verifications against analytical solutions for a structural model under a steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic modal analysis show excellent agreement in terms of displacement distribution and eigenmode frequencies. The preliminary coupled results indicate that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor

  14. Parametric study and performance analysis of hybrid rocket motors with double-tube configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanjia; Zhao, Bo; Lorente, Arnau Pons; Wang, Jue

    2017-03-01

    The practical implementation of hybrid rocket motors has historically been hampered by the slow regression rate of the solid fuel. In recent years, the research on advanced injector designs has achieved notable results in the enhancement of the regression rate and combustion efficiency of hybrid rockets. Following this path, this work studies a new configuration called double-tube characterized by injecting the gaseous oxidizer through a head end injector and an inner tube with injector holes distributed along the motor longitudinal axis. This design has demonstrated a significant potential for improving the performance of hybrid rockets by means of a better mixing of the species achieved through a customized injection of the oxidizer. Indeed, the CFD analysis of the double-tube configuration has revealed that this design may increase the regression rate over 50% with respect to the same motor with a conventional axial showerhead injector. However, in order to fully exploit the advantages of the double-tube concept, it is necessary to acquire a deeper understanding of the influence of the different design parameters in the overall performance. In this way, a parametric study is carried out taking into account the variation of the oxidizer mass flux rate, the ratio of oxidizer mass flow rate injected through the inner tube to the total oxidizer mass flow rate, and injection angle. The data for the analysis have been gathered from a large series of three-dimensional numerical simulations that considered the changes in the design parameters. The propellant combination adopted consists of gaseous oxygen as oxidizer and high-density polyethylene as solid fuel. Furthermore, the numerical model comprises Navier-Stokes equations, k-ε turbulence model, eddy-dissipation combustion model and solid-fuel pyrolysis, which is computed through user-defined functions. This numerical model was previously validated by analyzing the computational and experimental results obtained for

  15. Modified computation of the nozzle damping coefficient in solid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peijin; Wang, Muxin; Yang, Wenjing; Gupta, Vikrant; Guan, Yu; Li, Larry K. B.

    2018-02-01

    In solid rocket motors, the bulk advection of acoustic energy out of the nozzle constitutes a significant source of damping and can thus influence the thermoacoustic stability of the system. In this paper, we propose and test a modified version of a historically accepted method of calculating the nozzle damping coefficient. Building on previous work, we separate the nozzle from the combustor, but compute the acoustic admittance at the nozzle entry using the linearized Euler equations (LEEs) rather than with short nozzle theory. We compute the combustor's acoustic modes also with the LEEs, taking the nozzle admittance as the boundary condition at the combustor exit while accounting for the mean flow field in the combustor using an analytical solution to Taylor-Culick flow. We then compute the nozzle damping coefficient via a balance of the unsteady energy flux through the nozzle. Compared with established methods, the proposed method offers competitive accuracy at reduced computational costs, helping to improve predictions of thermoacoustic instability in solid rocket motors.

  16. A Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    A capability to couple NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the installed coupling software to demonstrate/investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between pressure wave and flexible inhibitor inside reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM). First a unified governing equation for both fluid and structure is presented, then an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework is described to satisfy the interfacial continuity requirements. The features of fluid solver, Loci/CHEM and structural solver, CoBi, are discussed before the coupling methodology of the solvers is described. The simulation uses production level CFD LES turbulence model with a grid resolution of 80 million cells. The flexible inhibitor is modeled with full 3D shell elements. Verifications against analytical solutions of structural model under steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic condition of modal analysis show excellent agreements in terms of displacement distribution and eigen modal frequencies. The preliminary coupled result shows that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor.

  17. O-ring sealing verification for the space shuttle redesign solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1989-01-01

    As a part of the redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor, the field and nozzle-to-case joints were redesigned to minimize the dynamic flexure caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the joints were designed to accommodate both structural deflections and to promote pressure assistance. A test program was conducted to determine if a fluorocarbon elastomeric O-ring could meet this criteria in the redesigned gland. Resiliency tests were used to investigate the O-ring response to gap motion while static seal tests were used to verify design criteria of pressure assistance for sealing. All tests were conducted in face seal fixtures mounted in servo-hydraulic test machines. The resiliency of the O-ring was found to be extremely sensitive to the effects of temperature. The External Tank/Solid Rocket Booster attach strut loads had a negligible affect on the ability of the O-ring to track the simulated SRB field joint deflection. In the static pressure-assisted seal tests, as long as physical contact was maintained between the O-ring and the gland sealing surface, pressure assistance induced instantaneous sealing.

  18. Real-Time Measurements of Aft Dome Insulation Erosion on Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Bruce; Ewing, Mark; Albrechtsen, Kevin; Noble, Todd; Longaker, Matt

    2004-01-01

    Real-time erosion of aft dome internal insulation was measured with internal instrumentation on a static test of a lengthened version of the Space Shuffle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). This effort marks the first time that real-time aft dome insulation erosion (Le., erosion due to the combined effects of thermochemical ablation and mechanical abrasion) was measured in this kind of large motor static test [designated as Engineering Test Motor number 3 (ETM3)I. This paper presents data plots of the erosion depth versus time. The data indicates general erosion versus time behavior that is in contrast to what would be expected from earlier analyses. Engineers have long known that the thermal environment in the aft dome is severe and that the resulting aft dome insulation erosion is significant. Models of aft dome erosion involve a two-step process of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and material ablation modeling. This modeling effort is complex. The time- dependent effects are difficult to verify with only prefire and postfire insulation measurements. Nozzle vectoring, slag accumulation, and changing boundary conditions will affect the time dependence of aft dome erosion. Further study of this data and continued measurements on future motors will increase our understanding of the aft dome flow and erosion environment.

  19. Basalt fiber and nanoclay compositions, articles incorporating the same, and methods of insulating a rocket motor with the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber, basalt fibers, and nanoclay is disclosed. Further disclosed is an insulation composition that comprises polybenzimidazole fibers, basalt fibers, and nanoclay. The basalt fibers may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 1% by weight to approximately 6% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. The nanoclay may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 5% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. Rocket motors including the insulation compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  20. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  1. An Analysis of the Orbital Distribution of Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Mulrooney, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The contribution made by orbiting solid rocket motors (SRMs) to the orbital debris environment is both potentially significant and insufficiently studied. A combination of rocket motor design and the mechanisms of the combustion process can lead to the emission of sufficiently large and numerous by-products to warrant assessment of their contribution to the orbital debris environment. These particles are formed during SRM tail-off, or the termination of burn, by the rapid expansion, dissemination, and solidification of the molten Al2O3 slag pool accumulated during the main burn phase of SRMs utilizing immersion-type nozzles. Though the usage of SRMs is low compared to the usage of liquid fueled motors, the propensity of SRMs to generate particles in the 100 m and larger size regime has caused concern regarding their contributing to the debris environment. Particle sizes as large as 1 cm have been witnessed in ground tests conducted under vacuum conditions and comparable sizes have been estimated via ground-based telescopic and in-situ observations of sub-orbital SRM tail-off events. Using sub-orbital and post recovery observations, a simplistic number-size-velocity distribution of slag from on-orbit SRM firings was postulated. In this paper we have developed more elaborate distributions and emission scenarios and modeled the resultant orbital population and its time evolution by incorporating a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and likely location and time of particulate deposition. From this analysis a more comprehensive understanding has been obtained of the role of SRM ejecta in the orbital debris environment, indicating that SRM slag is a significant component of the current and future population.

  2. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  3. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Greatrix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave development in the motor chamber flow. With the focus of the present study placed on reactive particles, a numerical internal ballistic model incorporating relevant elements, such as a transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to axial pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of using aluminum particles within the central internal flow (particles whose surfaces nominally regress with time, as a function of current particle size, as they move downstream as a means of suppressing instability-related symptoms in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the loading percentage and starting size of the aluminum particles have a significant influence on reducing the resulting transient pressure wave magnitude.

  4. A robust ballistic design approach for the Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, M. A.; Jordan, F. W.; Stockham, L. W.

    1993-06-01

    A robust design approach has been developed for the Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that enhances the potential for program success. This is accomplished by application of state of the art ballistic modelling techniques coupled with an aggressive contingency planning methodology. Application of this approach addresses the design challenges associated with development of the ASRM because of it's large size, high length to diameter ratio, and demanding thrust-time trace shape requirements. Advanced ballistic modelling techniques applied include deformed grain modelling, spatial burn rate mapping, erosive burning response characterization, and ballistic/structural/CFD flow-grain interactions. Model fidelity is further improved by utilizing the extensive RSRM experience base for validation proposes. In addition to this modelling approach, development of contingency plans covers the remaining prediction uncertainties, and readily allows fine tuning of the propellant grain configuration to meet design objectives after the first motor firing. This approach promises to produce an optimum flight motor design that meets all performance objectives while accommodating program development uncertainties.

  5. Can listening to sound sequences facilitate movement? The potential for motor rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodak, Rebeka; Stewart, Lauren; Stephan, Marianne

    One of the obstacles preventing patients from effective motor recovery following stroke is low frequency of sessions. What if listening to sounds between physical rehabilitation sessions could yield motor improvement? Our study provides a stepping stone to answering that question, by first...... examining the impact of auditory exposure on the formation of new motor memories in healthy nonmusicians. Following an audiomotor mapping session, participants will be asked to listen to and memorise sequence A or sequence B in a sound-only task. Employing a congruent/incongruent crossover design...... the potential to be useful in motor rehabilitation settings where the coupling of sound and movement patterns might help patients relearn motor tasks relevant to activities of daily living, particularly when regular physical practice is not possible....

  6. Effect of grain port length-diameter ratio on combustion performance in hybrid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guobiao; Zhang, Yuanjun; Tian, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Yu, Nanjia

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop a more accurate regression rate considering the oxidizer mass flow and the fuel grain geometry configuration with numerical and experimental investigations in polyethylene (PE)/90% hydrogen peroxide (HP) hybrid rocket. Firstly, a 2-D axisymmetric CFD model with turbulence, chemistry reaction, solid-gas coupling is built to investigate the combustion chamber internal flow structure. Then a more accurate regression formula is proposed and the combustion efficiency changing with the length-diameter ratio is studied. A series experiments are conducted in various oxidizer mass flow to analyze combustion performance including the regression rate and combustion efficiency. The regression rates are measured by the fuel mass reducing and diameter changing. A new regression rate formula considering the fuel grain configuration is proposed in this paper. The combustion efficiency increases with the length-diameter ratio changing. To improve the performance of a hybrid rocket motor, the port length-diameter ratio is suggested 10-12 in the paper.

  7. Uncertainty analysis and design optimization of hybrid rocket motor powered vehicle for suborbital flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an uncertainty analysis and design optimization method and its applications on a hybrid rocket motor (HRM powered vehicle. The multidisciplinary design model of the rocket system is established and the design uncertainties are quantified. The sensitivity analysis of the uncertainties shows that the uncertainty generated from the error of fuel regression rate model has the most significant effect on the system performances. Then the differences between deterministic design optimization (DDO and uncertainty-based design optimization (UDO are discussed. Two newly formed uncertainty analysis methods, including the Kriging-based Monte Carlo simulation (KMCS and Kriging-based Taylor series approximation (KTSA, are carried out using a global approximation Kriging modeling method. Based on the system design model and the results of design uncertainty analysis, the design optimization of an HRM powered vehicle for suborbital flight is implemented using three design optimization methods: DDO, KMCS and KTSA. The comparisons indicate that the two UDO methods can enhance the design reliability and robustness. The researches and methods proposed in this paper can provide a better way for the general design of HRM powered vehicles.

  8. Autonomous frequency stabilization of two extended-cavity diode lasers at the potassium wavelength on a sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelaker, Aline N.; Schiemangk, Max; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Kenyon, Andrew; Lampmann, Kai; Wenzlawski, André; Windpassinger, Patrick; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wendrich, Thijs; Rasel, Ernst M.; Giunta, Michele; Deutsch, Christian; Kürbis, Christian; Smol, Robert; Wicht, Andreas; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2017-02-01

    We have developed, assembled, and flight-proven a stable, compact, and autonomous extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) system designed for atomic physics experiments in space. To that end, two micro-integrated ECDLs at 766.7 nm were frequency stabilized during a sounding rocket flight by means of frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) of 39^K and offset locking techniques based on the beat note of the two ECDLs. The frequency stabilization as well as additional hard- and software to test hot redundancy mechanisms were implemented as part of a state-machine, which controlled the experiment completely autonomously throughout the entire flight mission.

  9. Autonomous frequency stabilization of two extended cavity diode lasers at the potassium wavelength on a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Dinkelaker, Aline N; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Kenyon, Andrew; Lampmann, Kai; Wenzlawski, André; Windpassinger, Patrick; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wendrich, Thijs; Rasel, Ernst M; Giunta, Michele; Deutsch, Christian; Kürbis, Christian; Smol, Robert; Wicht, Andreas; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2016-01-01

    We have developed, assembled, and flight-proven a stable, compact, and autonomous extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) system designed for atomic physics experiments in space. To that end, two micro-integrated ECDLs at 766.7 nm were frequency stabilized during a sounding rocket flight by means of frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) of 39^K and offset locking techniques based on the beat note of the two ECDLs. The frequency stabilization as well as additional hard- and software to test hot redundancy mechanisms were implemented as part of a state-machine, which controlled the experiment completely autonomously throughout the entire flight mission.

  10. Pressure oscillations and instability of working processes in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, V. N.; Teterina, I. V.; Volkov, K. N.; Garkushev, A. U.

    2017-06-01

    Metal particles are widely used in space engineering to increase specific impulse and to supress acoustic instability of intra-champber processes. A numerical analysis of the internal injection-driven turbulent gas-particle flows is performed to improve the current understanding and modeling capabilities of the complex flow characteristics in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors (SRMs) in presence of forced pressure oscillations. The two-phase flow is simulated with a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and transport equations of k - ε model are solved numerically for the gas. The particulate phase is simulated through a Lagrangian deterministic and stochastic tracking models to provide particle trajectories and particle concentration. The results obtained highlight the crucial significance of the particle dispersion in turbulent flowfield and high potential of statistical methods. Strong coupling between acoustic oscillations, vortical motion, turbulent fluctuations and particle dynamics is observed.

  11. Hydromining a full-scale class 1.1 solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. F.; Chleborad, O. W.; Cova, P. J.; Eccli, D. B.; Glad, T. J.; Kunkle, D. M.

    1993-11-01

    A class 1.1 full-scale Stage 2 Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (SICBM) was successfully deloaded using high pressure water jets at approximately 689 N (10,000 psia). The SICBM Stage 2 rocket motor contains approximately 2948 kg (6500 lb) of Class 1.1 propellant (nitrato ester polyester based propellant). A vertical hydromining facility was constructed to simulate a production operational mode in which the system water was continuously recycled to the high pressure water jet nozzles. A series of four in-line carbon absorption filter pairs were used to reduce nitrato ester concentrations to acceptable safety levels (e.g., less than 1 ppm of nitroglycerin). This paper will summarize the operating conditions used and the results of the successful study.

  12. Ignition of a polymer propellant of hybrid rocket motor by a hot particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    The ignition of polymethylmethacrylate (typical model propellant of the hybrid rocket motor) by a hot particle in a shape of parallelepiped, polyhedron, disk is investigated numerically. The initial temperature of a heat source varied within the range 950-1150 K, size of particle - within the range 2-6 mm. It is established that varying these parameters influenced significantly the main characteristic of the process - ignition delay time under ignition conditions close to critical. For considered shape of particles, ignition delay time is in ascending sequence: parallelepiped, polyhedron, disk. Three polymer ignition regimes, which characterized by the initial temperature of a heat source, ignition delay time and a location of an ignition zone in a vicinity of a hot particle, are emphasized. It is illustrated that taking into account the dependence of thermal and physical characteristics of polymethylmethacrylate on temperature, the ignition delay time increased due to augmentation of energy accumulated by a subsurface layer.

  13. Qualification of Magnesium/Teflon/Viton Pyrotechnic Composition Used in Rocket Motors Ignition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana de Barros

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluoropolymers in high-energy-release pyrotechnic compositions is common in the space and defense areas. Pyrotechnic compositions of magnesium/Teflon/Viton are widely used in military flares and pyrogen igniters for igniting the solid propellant of a rocket motor. Pyrotechnic components are considered high-risk products as they may cause catastrophic accidents if initiated or ignited inadvertently. To reduce the hazards involved in the handling, storage and transportation of these devices, the magnesium/Teflon/Viton composition was subjected to various sensitivity tests, DSC and had its stability and compatibility tested with other materials. This composition obtained satisfactory results in all the tests, which qualifies it as safe for production, handling, use, storage and transportation.

  14. Numerical and experimental study of liquid breakup process in solid rocket motor nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yi-Hsin

    Rocket propulsion is an important travel method for space exploration and national defense, rockets needs to be able to withstand wide range of operation environment and also stable and precise enough to carry sophisticated payload into orbit, those engineering requirement makes rocket becomes one of the state of the art industry. The rocket family have been classified into two major group of liquid and solid rocket based on the fuel phase of liquid or solid state. The solid rocket has the advantages of simple working mechanism, less maintenance and preparing procedure and higher storage safety, those characters of solid rocket make it becomes popular in aerospace industry. Aluminum based propellant is widely used in solid rocket motor (SRM) industry due to its avalibility, combusion performance and economical fuel option, however after aluminum react with oxidant of amonimum perchrate (AP), it will generate liquid phase alumina (Al2O3) as product in high temperature (2,700˜3,000 K) combustion chamber enviornment. The liquid phase alumina particles aggromorate inside combustion chamber into larger particle which becomes major erosion calprit on inner nozzle wall while alumina aggromorates impinge on the nozzle wall surface. The erosion mechanism result nozzle throat material removal, increase the performance optimized throat diameter and reduce nozzle exit to throat area ratio which leads to the reduction of exhaust gas velocity, Mach number and lower the propulsion thrust force. The approach to avoid particle erosion phenomenon taking place in SRM's nozzle is to reduce the alumina particle size inside combustion chamber which could be done by further breakup of the alumina droplet size in SRM's combustion chamber. The study of liquid breakup mechanism is an important means to smaller combustion chamber alumina droplet size and mitigate the erosion tack place on rocket nozzle region. In this study, a straight two phase air-water flow channel experiment is set up

  15. Rocket motor exhaust products generated by the space shuttle vehicle during its launch phase (1976 design data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The principal chemical species emitted and/or entrained by the rocket motors of the space shuttle vehicle during the launch phase of its trajectory are considered. Results are presented for two extreme trajectories, both of which were calculated in 1976.

  16. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  17. Spatial sound in the use of multimodal interfaces for the acquisition of motor skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential effectiveness of spatial sound in the use of multimodal interfaces and virtual environment technologies for the acquisition of motor skills. Because skills are generally of multimodal nature, spatial sound is discussed in terms of the role that it may play...... in facilitating skill acquisition by complementing, or substituting, other sensory modalities. An overview of related research areas on audiovisual and audiotactile interaction is given in connection to the potential benefits of spatial sound as a means to improve the perceptual quality of the interfaces as well...... as to convey information considered critical for the transfer of motor skills....

  18. Parametric investigation of secondary injection in post-chamber on combustion performance for hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guobiao; Cao, Binbin; Zhu, Hao; Tian, Hui; Ma, Xuan

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this effort is to study the combustion performance of a hybrid rocket motor with the help of 3D steady-state numerical simulation, which applies 90% hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene as the fuel. A method of secondary oxidizer injection in post-chamber is introduced to investigate the flow field characteristics and combustion efficiency. The secondary injection medium is the mixed gas coming from liquid hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition. The secondary injectors are uniformly set along the circumferential direction of the post-chamber. The simulation results obtained by above model are verified by experimental data. Three influencing parameters are considered: secondary injection diameter, secondary injection angle and secondary injection numbers. Simulation results reveals that this design could improve the combustion efficiency with respect to the same motor without secondary injection. Besides, the secondary injection almost has no effect on the regression rate and fuel sueface temperature distribution. It is also presented that the oxidizer is injected by 8 secondary injectors with a diameter of 7-8 mm in the direction of 120°in post-chamber is identified as the optimized secondary injection pattern, through which combustion efficiency, specific impulse efficiency as well as utilization of propellants are all improved obviously.

  19. Effects of gas temperature on nozzle damping experiments on cold-flow rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing-bing; Li, Shi-peng; Su, Wan-xing; Li, Jun-wei; Wang, Ning-fei

    2016-09-01

    In order to explore the impact of gas temperature on the nozzle damping characteristics of solid rocket motor, numerical simulations were carried out by an experimental motor in Naval Ordnance Test Station of China Lake in California. Using the pulse decay method, different cases were numerically studied via Fluent along with UDF (User Defined Functions). Firstly, mesh sensitivity analysis and monitor position-independent analysis were carried out for the computer code validation. Then, the numerical method was further validated by comparing the calculated results and experimental data. Finally, the effects of gas temperature on the nozzle damping characteristics were studied in this paper. The results indicated that the gas temperature had cooperative effects on the nozzle damping and there had great differences between cold flow and hot fire test. By discussion and analysis, it was found that the changing of mainstream velocity and the natural acoustic frequency resulted from gas temperature were the key factors that affected the nozzle damping, while the alteration of the mean pressure had little effect. Thus, the high pressure condition could be replaced by low pressure to reduce the difficulty of the test. Finally, the relation of the coefficients "alpha" between the cold flow and hot fire was got.

  20. Arc Jet Test and Analysis of Asbestos Free Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Dome Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were recently tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Arc Jet Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for solid rocket motor analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Active instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, in-depth thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for in-situ surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved determination of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  1. Laser Shearography Inspection of TPS (Thermal Protection System) Cork on RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingbloom, Mike; Plaia, Jim; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    Laser Shearography is a viable inspection method for detection of de-bonds and voids within the external TPS (thermal protection system) on to the Space Shuttle RSRM (reusable solid rocket motors). Cork samples with thicknesses up to 1 inch were tested at the LTI (Laser Technology Incorporated) laboratory using vacuum-applied stress in a vacuum chamber. The testing proved that the technology could detect cork to steel un-bonds using vacuum stress techniques in the laboratory environment. The next logical step was to inspect the TPS on a RSRM. Although detailed post flight inspection has confirmed that ATK Thiokol's cork bonding technique provides a reliable cork to case bond, due to the Space Shuttle Columbia incident there is a great interest in verifying bond-lines on the external TPS. This interest provided and opportunity to inspect a RSRM motor with Laser Shearography. This paper will describe the laboratory testing and RSRM testing that has been performed to date. Descriptions of the test equipment setup and techniques for data collection and detailed results will be given. The data from the test show that Laser Shearography is an effective technology and readily adaptable to inspect a RSRM.

  2. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  3. Asbestos Free Insulation Development for the Space Shuttle Solid Propellant Rocket Motor (RSRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Larry D.; Eddy, Norman F.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Asbestos has been used for many years as an ablation inhibitor in insulating materials. It has been a constituent of the AS/NBR insulation used to protect the steel case of the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor) since its inception. This paper discusses the development of a potential replacement RSRM insulation design, several of the numerous design issues that were worked and processing problems that were resolved. The earlier design demonstration on FSM-5 (Flight Support Motor) of the selected 7% and 11% Kevlar(registered) filled EPDM (KF/EPDM) candidate materials was expanded. Full-scale process simulation articles were built and FSM-8 was manufactured using multiple Asbestos Free (AF) components and materials. Two major problems had to be overcome in developing the AF design. First, bondline corrosion, which occurred in the double-cured region of the aft dome, had to be eliminated. Second, KF/EPDM creates high levels of electrostatic energy (ESE), which does not readily dissipate from the insulation surface. An uncontrolled electrostatic discharge (ESD) of this surface energy during many phases of production could create serious safety hazards. Numerous processing changes were implemented and a conductive paint was developed to prevent exposed external insulation surfaces from generating ESE/ESD. Additionally, special internal instrumentation was incorporated into FSM-8 to record real-time internal motor environment data. These data included inhibitor insulation erosion rates and internal thermal environments. The FSM-8 static test was successfully conducted in February 2000 and much valuable data were obtained to characterize the AF insulation design.

  4. Numerical simulations on unsteady operation processes of N2O/HTPB hybrid rocket motor with/without diaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Hu, Fan; Wang, Donghui; Okolo, N. Patrick; Zhang, Weihua

    2017-07-01

    Numerical simulations on processes within a hybrid rocket motor were conducted in the past, where most of these simulations carried out majorly focused on steady state analysis. Solid fuel regression rate strongly depends on complicated physicochemical processes and internal fluid dynamic behavior within the rocket motor, which changes with both space and time during its operation, and are therefore more unsteady in characteristics. Numerical simulations on the unsteady operational processes of N2O/HTPB hybrid rocket motor with and without diaphragm are conducted within this research paper. A numerical model is established based on two dimensional axisymmetric unsteady Navier-Stokes equations having turbulence, combustion and coupled gas/solid phase formulations. Discrete phase model is used to simulate injection and vaporization of the liquid oxidizer. A dynamic mesh technique is applied to the non-uniform regression of fuel grain, while results of unsteady flow field, variation of regression rate distribution with time, regression process of burning surface and internal ballistics are all obtained. Due to presence of eddy flow, the diaphragm increases regression rate further downstream. Peak regression rates are observed close to flow reattachment regions, while these peak values decrease gradually, and peak position shift further downstream with time advancement. Motor performance is analyzed accordingly, and it is noticed that the case with diaphragm included results in combustion efficiency and specific impulse efficiency increase of roughly 10%, and ground thrust increase of 17.8%.

  5. Ispitivanje piropatrona i raketnog motora pilotskog sedišta / Testing pyrocartridges and the rocket motor of the ejection seat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad Savković

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Raketni motor pilotskog sedišta ima složen geometrijski oblik, tako da njegov potisak deluje pod određenim uglom u odnosu na ravan simetrije pilotskog sedišta. Radi određivanja intenziteta i napadne linije potiska izvršen je veći broj eksperimenata. Meren je potisak raketnog motora na višekomponentnom opitnom stolu. Letno ispitivanje pilotskog sedišta obavljeno je pomoću lutke koja simulira masu pilota. Takođe, analizirano je letno ispitivanje pilotskog sedišta u početnom periodu katapultiranja za vreme rada raketnog motora. Obrađeni su i rezultati merenja ubrzanja, koji su korišćeni za određivanje karakteristika leta pilotskog sedišta. U radu je prikazan teorijski model kretanja sedišta. / Due to a complex geometrical shape of the rocket motor of the ejection seat, the rocket motor thrust occurs under certain angle in relation to the plane of symmetry of the ejection seat. A number of tests were carried out in order to determine thrust intensity and angle of attack. The rocket motor thrust was measured on the multicomponent test stand. The ejection seat whit a dummy simulating a mass of a pilot was tested during ejection. The paper presents an analysis of the ejection seat flight in the initial phase of ejection, during the rocket motor running. The results of the acceleration read-outs were processed and then used for the determination of the characteristics of the ejection seat flight. A theoretical model of the ejection seat flight is given in the paper.

  6. IR radiation characteristics of rocket exhaust plumes under varying motor operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin NIU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The infrared (IR irradiance signature from rocket motor exhaust plumes is closely related to motor type, propellant composition, burn time, rocket geometry, chamber parameters and flight conditions. In this paper, an infrared signature analysis tool (IRSAT was developed to understand the spectral characteristics of exhaust plumes in detail. Through a finite volume technique, flow field properties were obtained through the solution of axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations with the Reynolds-averaged approach. A refined 13-species, 30-reaction chemistry scheme was used for combustion effects and a k-ε-Rt turbulence model for entrainment effects. Using flowfield properties as input data, the spectrum was integrated with a line of sight (LOS method based on a single line group (SLG model with Curtis-Godson approximation. The model correctly predicted spectral distribution in the wavelengths of 1.50–5.50 μm and had good agreement for its location with imaging spectrometer data. The IRSAT was then applied to discuss the effects of three operating conditions on IR signatures: (a afterburning; (b chamber pressure from ignition to cutoff; and (c minor changes in the ratio of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB binder to ammonium perchlorate (AP oxidizer in propellant. Results show that afterburning effects can increase the size and shape of radiance images with enhancement of radiation intensity up to 40%. Also, the total IR irradiance in different bands can be characterized by a non-dimensional chamber pressure trace in which the maximum discrepancy is less than 13% during ignition and engine cutoff. An increase of chamber pressure can lead to more distinct diamonds, whose distance intervals are extended, and the position of the first diamond moving backwards. In addition, an increase in HTPB/AP causes a significant jump in spectral intensity. The incremental rates of radiance intensity integrated in each band are linear with the increase of HTPB

  7. Treatment of Solid Rocket Motors that Complies with Established Protocols to Ensure Planetary Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Philip L.; Soler-Luna, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This presentation discusses recent work being conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate various methods that could be employed to provide for planetary protection of those solar system bodies that are candidates for extraterrestrial life, thus preventing contamination of such bodies. MSFC is presently involved in the development phase of the Europa Lander De-Orbital Stage (DOS) braking motor. In order to prevent bio-contamination of this Jovian satellite, three paths are currently being considered. The first is (1) Bio-Reduction of those microscopic organisms in or on the vehicle (in this case a solid rocket motor (SRM)) that might otherwise be transported during the mission. Possible methods being investigated include heat sterilization, application or incorporation of biocide materials, and irradiation. While each method can be made to work, effects on the SRM's components (propellant, liner, insulation, etc.) could well prove deleterious. A second path would be use of (2) Bio-Barrier material(s). So long as such barrier(s) can maintain their integrity, planetary protection should be afforded. Under the harsh conditions encountered during extended spaceflight (vacuum, temperature extremes, radiation), however, such barrier(s) could well experience a breach. Finally, a third path would be to perform (3) Pyrotechnic Sterilization of the SRM during its end-of-mission phase. Multiple pyrotechnic units would be triggered to ensure activation of such an event and provide for a final sterilization before vehicle impact. In light of Europa's stringent bio-reduction targets, the final and best choice to minimize risk will probably be some combination of the above.

  8. Non-speech oral motor treatment for developmental speech sound disorders in children (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Alice S.; Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with developmental speech sound disorders have difficulties in producing the speech sounds of their native language. These speech difficulties could be due to structural, sensory or neurophysiological causes (e.g. hearing impairment), butmore often the cause of the problem is unknown. One treatment approach used by speech-language therapists/pathologists is non-speech oral motor treatment (NSOMT). NSOMTs are non-speech activities that aim to stimulate or improve speech pr...

  9. A Mathematical and Numerical Model for the Analysis of Hybrid Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MINGIREANU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid rocket motors (HRM use a two-phase propellant system. This offers some remarkable advantages but also arises some difficulties like the neutralization of their instabilities. The non-acoustic combustion instabilities are high-amplitude pressure oscillations that have too low frequencies to be associated with acoustics. Acoustic type combustion instabilities are self-excited oscillations generated by the interaction between acoustic waves and combustion. The goal of the present work is to develop a simplified model of the coupling of the hybrid combustion process with the complete unsteady flow, starting from the combustion port and ending with the nozzle. This model must be useful for transient and stability analysis and also for scaling of HRMs. The numerical results obtained with our model show a good agreement with published experimental and numerical results. The computational and stability analysis models developed in this work are simple, computationally efficient and offer the advantage of taking into account a large number of functional and constructive parameters that are used by the engineers.

  10. Three-dimensional numerical and experimental studies on transient ignition of hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Yu, Ruipeng; Zhu, Hao; Wu, Junfeng; Cai, Guobiao

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents transient simulations and experimental studies of the ignition process of the hybrid rocket motors (HRMs) using 90% hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the oxidizer and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Polyethylene (PE) as fuels. A fluid-solid coupling numerically method is established based on the conserved form of the three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, considering gas fluid with chemical reactions and heat transfer between the fluid and solid region. Experiments are subsequently conducted using high-speed camera to record the ignition process. The flame propagation, chamber pressurizing process and average fuel regression rate of the numerical simulation results show good agreement with the experimental ones, which demonstrates the validity of the simulations in this study. The results also indicate that the flame propagation time is mainly affected by fluid dynamics and it increases with an increasing grain port area. The chamber pressurizing process begins when the flame propagation completes in the grain port. Furthermore, the chamber pressurizing time is about 4 times longer than the time of flame propagation.

  11. Study of plasticizer diffusion in a solid rocket motor´s bondline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Libardi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to determine the diffusion coefficient of the plasticizers dibutyl phthalate (DBP, dioctyl phthalate (DOP and dioctyl azelate (DOZ on the internal insulating layer of solid rocket motors. These plasticizers are originally present in the layers of rubber, liner and propellant, respectively. This species are not chemically bonded and tend to diffuse from propellant to insulating and vice versa. A computer program based on the mathematical model of Fick’s second Law of diffusion was developed to perform the calculus from the concentration data obtained by gas chromatographic (GC analyses. The samples were prepared with two different adhesive liners; one conventional (LHNA and the other with barrier properties (LHNT. A common feature of both liners was that they were synthesized by the reaction of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB and diisocyanates. However, a bond promoter was used to increase the crosslink density of the LHNT liner and to improve its performance as barrier against the diffusion. The effects of the diffusion of the plasticizers were also investigated by hardness analyses, which were executed on samples aged at room temperature and at 80ºC. The results showed an increase trend for the samples aged at room temperature and an opposite behavior for the tests carried out at 80ºC.

  12. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 2; Sub-Scale Air Flow Simulation of Port Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y. P.; Ramandran, N.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The injection-flow issuing from a porous medium in the cold-flow simulation of internal port flows in solid rocket motors is characterized by a spatial instability termed pseudoturbulence that produces a rather non-uniform (lumpy) injection-velocity profile. The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction between the injection- and the developing axial-flows. The findings show that this interaction generally weakens the lumpy injection profile and affects the subsequent development of the axial flow. The injection profile is found to depend on the material characteristics, and the ensuing pseudoturbulence is a function of the injection velocity, the axial position and the distance from the porous wall. The flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) of the axial-flow is accelerated in flows emerging from smaller pores primarily due to the higher pseudoturbulence produced by the smaller pores in comparison to that associated with larger pores. In flows with rather uniform injection-flow profiles (weak or no pseudoturbulence), the axial and transverse velocity components in the porous duct are found to satisfy the sine/cosine analytical solutions derived from inviscid assumptions. The transition results from the present study are compared with previous results from surveyed literature, and detailed flow development measurements are presented in terms of the blowing fraction, and characterizing Reynolds numbers.

  13. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  14. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  15. X-Ray Radiographic Observation of Directional Solidification Under Microgravity: XRMON-GF Experiments on MASER12 Sounding Rocket Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, G.; NguyenThi, H.; Bogno, A.; Billia, B.; Houltz, Y.; Loth, K.; Voss, D.; Verga, A.; dePascale, F.; Mathiesen, R. H.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) - Microgravity Application Promotion (MAP) programme entitled XRMON (In situ X-Ray MONitoring of advanced metallurgical processes under microgravity and terrestrial conditions) aims to develop and perform in situ X-ray radiography observations of metallurgical processes in microgravity and terrestrial environments. The use of X-ray imaging methods makes it possible to study alloy solidification processes with spatio-temporal resolutions at the scales of relevance for microstructure formation. XRMON has been selected for MASER 12 sounding rocket experiment, scheduled in autumn 2011. Although the microgravity duration is typically six minutes, this short time is sufficient to investigate a solidification experiment with X-ray radiography. This communication will report on the preliminary results obtained with the experimental set-up developed by SSC (Swedish Space Corporation). Presented results dealing with directional solidification of Al-Cu confirm the great interest of performing in situ characterization to analyse dynamical phenomena during solidification processes.

  16. Motor area activity for action-related and nonaction-related sounds in a three-dimensional sound field reproduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Koichiro; Ueno, Kanako; Shimada, Sotaro

    2015-03-25

    The motor cortical area is often activated to auditory stimuli in the human brain. In this study, we examined whether the motor area shows differential activation for action-related and nonaction-related sounds and whether it is susceptible to the quality of the sounds. A three-dimensional sound field recording and reproduction system based on the boundary surface control principle (BoSC system) was used for this purpose. We measured brain activity during hearing action-related or nonaction-related sounds with electroencephalography using mu rhythm suppression (mu-suppression) as an index of motor cortical activation. The results showed that mu-suppression was observed when the participant heard action-related sounds, but it was not evident when hearing nonaction-related sounds. Moreover, this suppression was significantly larger in the 3D sound field (62-ch loudspeaker condition), which generates a more realistic sound field, than in the 1-ch loudspeaker condition. Our results indicate that the motor area was indeed activated for action-related sounds and that its activation was enhanced with a 3D realistic sound field. We discuss our findings in relation to the mirror neuron system and the possibility of using its activity as an objective measure that reflects the subjective sense of reality in various virtual reality settings when interacting with others. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatment Issues Related to Children with Developmental Speech Sound Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscello, Dennis M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) in the population of clients with developmental speech sound disorders. NSOMTs are a collection of nonspeech methods and procedures that claim to influence tongue, lip, and jaw resting postures; increase strength; improve muscle tone; facilitate range of motion; and develop…

  18. The Use of Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments for Developmental Speech Sound Production Disorders: Interventions and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) in the management of pediatric speech sound production disorders is controversial. This article serves as a prologue to a clinical forum that examines this topic in depth. Method: Theoretical, historical, and ethical issues are reviewed to create a series of clinical questions that…

  19. An Internal Thermal Environment Model of an Aluminized Solid Rocket Motor with Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the severity of the internal solid rocket motor (SRM) environment, very few direct measurements of that environment exist; therefore, the appearance of such data provides a unique opportunity to assess current thermal/fluid modeling capabilities. As part of a previous study of SRM internal insulation performance, the internal thermal environment of a laboratory-scale SRM featuring aluminized propellant was characterized with two types of custom heat-flux calorimeters: one that measured the total heat flux to a graphite slab within the SRM chamber and another that measured the thermal radiation flux. Therefore, in the current study, a thermal/fluid model of this lab-scale SRM was constructed using ANSYS Fluent to predict not only the flow field structure within the SRM and the convective heat transfer to the interior walls, but also the resulting dispersion of alumina droplets and the radiative heat transfer to the interior walls. The dispersion of alumina droplets within the SRM chamber was determined by employing the Lagrangian discrete phase model that was fully coupled to the Eulerian gas-phase flow. The P1-approximation was engaged to model the radiative heat transfer through the SRM chamber where the radiative contributions of the gas phase were ignored and the aggregate radiative properties of the alumina dispersion were computed from the radiative properties of its individual constituent droplets, which were sourced from literature. The convective and radiative heat fluxes computed from the thermal/fluid model were then compared with those measured in the lab-scale SRM test firings and the modeling approach evaluated.

  20. Combustion of single and agglomerated aluminum particles in solid rocket motor flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John Charles, IV

    2001-07-01

    Single and agglomerated aluminum droplets were studied in a solid rocket motor (SRM) test chamber with optical access to the internal flow at 6--22 atm and 2300 K. The chamber was pressurized by burning a main grain AP/HTPB propellant, and the burning aluminum droplets were generated by a smaller aluminized solid propellant sample, center-mounted in the flow. A 35 mm camera was used with a chopper wheel to give droplet flame diameter vs. time measurements of the burning droplets in flight, from which bum-rate laws were developed. A high-speed video CCD was used with high-magnification optics in order to image the flame/smoke cloud surrounding the burning liquid droplets. The intensity profiles of the droplet images were de-convoluted using an Abel inversion to give true intensity profiles. Both single and agglomerated droplets were studied, where agglomerates are comprised of hundreds of parent particles or more. The Abel inversion results show that the relative smoke cloud size is not constant with diameter, but instead grows as the droplet shrinks, by ˜D -0.5, for both the single and agglomerated droplets. Measured diameter trajectories show that for single droplets, the diameter law is D 0.75 = DO0.75 = 8·t [mu m, msec], and for agglomerated droplets, D 1.0 = Do1.0 - 20·t, such that the single droplets burn faster than the agglomerates. For both single and agglomerated droplets, the burning rate slope k did not change significantly over the chamber pressure studied. Lastly, a model was developed to describe the oxide cap accumulation on the droplet surface from the oxide smoke cloud surrounding the droplet. Results suggest that less oxide accumulates in high-pressure SRMs when considering mass burning rates for different relative cap sizes. The thermophoretic force, which can control oxide transport only over the cap, decreases with pressure.

  1. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Canfield, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme UV photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 A. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm per s. Based on a nominal probable error of 7 percent for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-A region (5 percent on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 A), and based on experimental errors associated with the present rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of about 14 percent is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  2. Undergraduate Student-built Experiments in Sounding-Rocket and Balloon Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Christian, J. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Lindon, M.; Lusk, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Space physics and aerospace engineering experiments are becoming readily accessible to STEM undergraduates. A number of ionospheric physics experiments and guidance and navigation components were designed, built, integrated, and tested by STEM students at West Virginia University in the 2013-2014 academic year. A main payload was flown on NASA's annual RockSat-C two-stage rocket launched from Wallops Flight Facility in Chincoteague, VA on the morning of June 26, 2014. A high-altitude balloon with a reduced payload was released from Bruceton Mills, WV, prior to the rocket and reached 30,054 m. The geographic distance between the two launch points is small compared to the footprint of geomagnetic and solar-terrestrial disturbances. Aerospace sensors provided flight profiles for each of the two platforms. Daytime E region electron density was measured via a Langmuir probe as a function of altitude from 90 km to the apogee of 117 km. Geomagnetic activity was low (Dst>-7 nT, AE<500 nT) so geomagnetic disturbances were probably due to solar quiet (Sq) currents. Earlier solar wind activity included two high-plasma-density regions measured by NASA's ACE which impacted the magnetosphere producing two sudden impulses at midlatitudes (Dst=+19 and +13 nT). In an airglow experiment, the altitude range of the sodium layer was estimated to be 75-110 km based on in situ measurements of the D2emission line intensity. Acceleration, rotation-rate, and magnetic-field data are useful in reconstructing the trajectory and flight dynamics of the two vehicles and comparing with video from onboard cameras. Participation in RockSat and similar programs is useful in ushering space science and spaceflight concepts in the classroom and lab experience of STEM undergraduates. Lectures, homework, and progress reports were used to connect advanced topics of Earth's space environment and spaceflight to the students' core courses. In several cases the STEM students were guided by graduate students

  3. Snapshot imaging spectroscopy of the solar transition region: The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) sounding rocket mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, James Lewis

    We have developed a revolutionary spectroscopic technique for solar research in the extreme ultraviolet. This slitless spectrographic technique allows snapshot imaging spectroscopy with data exactly cotemporal and cospectral. I have contributed to the successful realization of an application of this technique in the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph, MOSES . This instrument launched 2006 Feb 8 as a NASA sounding rocket payload and successfully returned remarkable data of the solar transition region in the He II 304Å spectral line. The unique design of this spectrometer allows the study of transient phenomena in the solar atmosphere, with spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution heretofore unachievable in concert, over a wide field of view. The fundamental concepts behind the MOSES spectrometer are broadly applicable to many solar spectral lines and phenomena and the instrument thus represents a new instrumentation technology. The early fruits of this labor are here reported: the first scientific discovery with the MOSES sounding rocket instrument, our observation of a transition region explosive event, phenomena observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548Å 1550Å) and Si IV (1393Å, 1402Å). This explosive event is the first seen in He II 304Å. With our novel slitless imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial structure of the event. We observe a bright core expelling two jets that are distinctly non-collinear, in directions that are not anti-parallel, in contradiction to standard models of explosive events, which give collinear jets. The jets have sky-plane velocities of order 75 km s -1 and line-of-sight velocities of +75 km s-1 (blue) and -30 km s-1 (red). The core is a region of high non-thermal doppler broadening, characteristic of explosive events, with maximal broadening 380 km s-1 FWHM. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components of maximum doppler

  4. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    Solid rocket motors (SRMs) typically use nozzle materials which are required to maintain their shape as well as insulate the underlying support structure during the motor operation. In addition, SRMs need internal insulation materials to protect the motor case from the harsh environment resulting from the combustion of solid propellant. In the nozzle, typical materials consist of high density graphite, carbon-carbon composites and carbon phenolic composites. Internal insulation of the motor cases is typically a composite material with carbon, asbestos, Kevlar, or silica fibers in an ablative matrix such as EPDM or NBR. For both nozzle and internal insulation materials, the charring process occurs when the hot combustion products heat the material intensely. The pyrolysis of the matrix material takes away a portion of the thermal energy near the wall surface and leaves behind a char layer. The fiber reinforcement retains the porous char layer which provides continued thermal protection from the hot combustion products. It is of great interest to characterize both the total erosion rates of the material and the char layer thickness. By better understanding of the erosion process for a particular ablative material in a specific flow environment, the required insulation material thickness can be properly selected. The recession rates of internal insulation and nozzle materials of SRMs are typically determined by testing in some sort of simulated environment; either arc-jet testing, flame torch testing, or subscale SRMs of different size. Material recession rates are deduced by comparison of pre- and post-test measurements and then averaging over the duration of the test. However, these averaging techniques cannot be used to determine the instantaneous recession rates of the material. Knowledge of the variation in recession rates in response to the instantaneous flow conditions during the motor operation is of great importance. For example, in many SRM configurations

  5. Active learning of novel sound-producing objects: motor reactivation and enhancement of visuo-motor connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew J; James, Karin Harman

    2013-02-01

    Our experience with the world commonly involves physical interaction with objects enabling us to learn associations between multisensory information perceived during an event and our actions that create an event. The interplay among active interactions during learning and multisensory integration of object properties is not well understood. To better understand how action might enhance multisensory associative recognition, we investigated the interplay among motor and perceptual systems after active learning. Fifteen participants were included in an fMRI study during which they learned visuo-auditory-motor associations between novel objects and the sounds they produce, either through self-generated actions on the objects (active learning) or by observing an experimenter produce the actions (passive learning). Immediately after learning, behavioral and BOLD fMRI measures were collected while perceiving the objects used during unisensory and multisensory training in associative perception and recognition tasks. Active learning was faster and led to more accurate recognition of audiovisual associations than passive learning. Functional ROI analyses showed that in motor, somatosensory, and cerebellar regions there was greater activation during both the perception and recognition of actively learned associations. Finally, functional connectivity between visual- and motor-related processing regions was enhanced during the presentation of actively learned audiovisual associations. Overall, the results of the current study clarify and extend our own previous work [Butler, A. J., James, T. W., & Harman James, K. Enhanced multisensory integration and motor reactivation after active motor learning of audiovisual associations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23, 3515-3528, 2011] by providing several novel findings and highlighting the task-based nature of motor reactivation and retrieval after active learning.

  6. Estimate of size distribution of charged MSPs measured in situ in winter during the WADIS-2 sounding rocket campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Asmus

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present results of in situ measurements of mesosphere–lower thermosphere dusty-plasma densities including electrons, positive ions and charged aerosols conducted during the WADIS-2 sounding rocket campaign. The neutral air density was also measured, allowing for robust derivation of turbulence energy dissipation rates. A unique feature of these measurements is that they were done in a true common volume and with high spatial resolution. This allows for a reliable derivation of mean sizes and a size distribution function for the charged meteor smoke particles (MSPs. The mean particle radius derived from Schmidt numbers obtained from electron density fluctuations was ∼ 0.56 nm. We assumed a lognormal size distribution of the charged meteor smoke particles and derived the distribution width of 1.66 based on in situ-measured densities of different plasma constituents. We found that layers of enhanced meteor smoke particles' density measured by the particle detector coincide with enhanced Schmidt numbers obtained from the electron and neutral density fluctuations. Thus, we found that large particles with sizes  > 1 nm were stratified in layers of  ∼ 1 km thickness and lying some kilometers apart from each other.

  7. Design and performance of an experiment for the investigation of open capillary channel flows. Sounding rocket experiment TEXUS-41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E. [University of Bremen, Sounding Rocket Experiment TEXUS-41 Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), Bremen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    In this paper we report on the set-up and the performance of an experiment for the investigation of flow-rate limitations in open capillary channels under low-gravity conditions (microgravity). The channels consist of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. In the case of steady flow the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the adjusted volumetric flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces. The flow is convective (inertia) dominated, since the viscous forces are negligibly small compared to the convective forces. In order to investigate this type of flow an experiment aboard the sounding rocket TEXUS-41 was performed. The aim of the investigation was to achieve the profiles of the free liquid surfaces and to determine the maximum flow rate of the steady flow. For this purpose a new approach to the critical flow condition by enlarging the channel length was applied. The paper is focussed on the technical details of the experiment and gives a review of the set-up, the preparation of the flight procedures and the performance. Additionally the typical appearance of the flow indicated by the surface profiles is presented as a basis for a separate continuative discussion of the experimental results. (orig.)

  8. Estimate of size distribution of charged MSPs measured in situ in winter during the WADIS-2 sounding rocket campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Heiner; Staszak, Tristan; Strelnikov, Boris; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Martin; Rapp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    We present results of in situ measurements of mesosphere-lower thermosphere dusty-plasma densities including electrons, positive ions and charged aerosols conducted during the WADIS-2 sounding rocket campaign. The neutral air density was also measured, allowing for robust derivation of turbulence energy dissipation rates. A unique feature of these measurements is that they were done in a true common volume and with high spatial resolution. This allows for a reliable derivation of mean sizes and a size distribution function for the charged meteor smoke particles (MSPs). The mean particle radius derived from Schmidt numbers obtained from electron density fluctuations was ˜ 0.56 nm. We assumed a lognormal size distribution of the charged meteor smoke particles and derived the distribution width of 1.66 based on in situ-measured densities of different plasma constituents. We found that layers of enhanced meteor smoke particles' density measured by the particle detector coincide with enhanced Schmidt numbers obtained from the electron and neutral density fluctuations. Thus, we found that large particles with sizes > 1 nm were stratified in layers of ˜ 1 km thickness and lying some kilometers apart from each other.

  9. Discrimination of speech and non-speech sounds following theta-burst stimulation of the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jack C; Möttönen, Riikka; Boyles, Rowan; Watkins, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    Perceiving speech engages parts of the motor system involved in speech production. The role of the motor cortex in speech perception has been demonstrated using low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to suppress motor excitability in the lip representation and disrupt discrimination of lip-articulated speech sounds (Möttönen and Watkins, 2009). Another form of rTMS, continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS), can produce longer-lasting disruptive effects following a brief train of stimulation. We investigated the effects of cTBS on motor excitability and discrimination of speech and non-speech sounds. cTBS was applied for 40 s over either the hand or the lip representation of motor cortex. Motor-evoked potentials recorded from the lip and hand muscles in response to single pulses of TMS revealed no measurable change in motor excitability due to cTBS. This failure to replicate previous findings may reflect the unreliability of measurements of motor excitability related to inter-individual variability. We also measured the effects of cTBS on a listener's ability to discriminate: (1) lip-articulated speech sounds from sounds not articulated by the lips ("ba" vs. "da"); (2) two speech sounds not articulated by the lips ("ga" vs. "da"); and (3) non-speech sounds produced by the hands ("claps" vs. "clicks"). Discrimination of lip-articulated speech sounds was impaired between 20 and 35 min after cTBS over the lip motor representation. Specifically, discrimination of across-category ba-da sounds presented with an 800-ms inter-stimulus interval was reduced to chance level performance. This effect was absent for speech sounds that do not require the lips for articulation and non-speech sounds. Stimulation over the hand motor representation did not affect discrimination of speech or non-speech sounds. These findings show that stimulation of the lip motor representation disrupts discrimination of speech sounds in an articulatory feature

  10. Expression of transcription factors after short-term exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures to hyper-g, and to simulated and sounding rocket micro-g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, R.; Babbick, M.

    Previous microarray studies with cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cv Columbia have shown responses in gene expression which were partly specific to exposure to microgravity sounding rocket experiment TEXUS In order to get access to early responses upon changes in gravitational fields we used exposure times as short as 2 min For this purpose we selected a range of genes which code for different groups of transcription factors WRKY ERF MYB MADS Samples were taken in 5-min clinorotation 2- and 3-dimensional hypergravity 8g and 2-min intervals sounding rocket experiment Amounts of transcripts were determined by quantitative RT PCR Most transcripts showed a significant transient change in content within a time frame of up to 30 min after changing the external gravitational field strength They could be grouped into 1 basic stress responses which occurred under all conditions 2 clinorotation-related effects which were either identical or opposite between 2D 60 rpm 4x10 -2 g and 3D clinorotation random positioning machine and 3 alterations specific to the microgravity exposure under sounding rocket conditions MAXUS The data are discussed in relation to gravitation-dependent signalling chains and with regard to the simulation of microgravity by means of clinorotation Supported by a grant from the Deutsches Zentrum f u r Luft- und Raumfahrt e V grant no 50 WB 0143

  11. Proizvodnja piropatrona i raketnih motora pilotskih sedišta / Production of cartridges and eject seat rocket motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad Savković

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovaj rad sadrži opis uspešnog razvoja i proizvodnje piropatrona, pogonskih punjenja i raketnih motora izbacivih pilotskih sedišta. Opisan je proces razvoja putem kopiranja stranog rešenja i njihovih modifikacija. Dati su primeri korišćenja te metodologije, razvoj i poređenje rezultata ispitivanja stranih i domaćih rešenja. Objašnjava se i važnost proizvodnje piropatrona, pogonskih punjenja i raketnih motora izbacivih pilotskih sedišta. / Scope of this work contains description of successful development and preparation for production of cartridges, propellants and rocket motors for pilot eject seat. Process of development through copying foreign solutions and their modifications is described. There are examples of used methodology for development and comparison of results of tests of foreign and domestic solutions. This work also explains importance of production of cartridges, propellants and rocket motors for pilots eject seat.

  12. Analysis and control of the compaction force in the composite prepreg tape winding process for rocket motor nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of composite prepreg tape winding, the compaction force could influence the quality of winding products. According to the analysis and experiments, during the winding process of a rocket motor nozzle aft exit cone with a winding angle, there would be an error between the deposition speed of tape layers and the feeding speed of the compaction roller, which could influence the compaction force. Both a lack of compaction and overcompaction related to the feeding of the compaction roller could result in defects of winding nozzles. Thus, a flexible winding system has been developed for rocket motor nozzle winding. In the system, feeding of the compaction roller could be adjusted in real time to achieve an invariable compaction force. According to experiments, the force deformation model of the winding tape is a time-varying system. Thus, a forgetting factor recursive least square based parameter estimation proportional-integral-differential (PID controller has been developed, which could estimate the time-varying parameter and control the compaction force by adjusting the feeding of the compaction roller during the winding process. According to the experimental results, a winding nozzle with fewer voids and a smooth surface could be wounded by the invariable compaction force in the flexible winding system.

  13. Methodology for fault detection in induction motors via sound and vibration signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Arredondo, Paulo Antonio; Morinigo-Sotelo, Daniel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, timely maintenance of electric motors is vital to keep up the complex processes of industrial production. There are currently a variety of methodologies for fault diagnosis. Usually, the diagnosis is performed by analyzing current signals at a steady-state motor operation or during a start-up transient. This method is known as motor current signature analysis, which identifies frequencies associated with faults in the frequency domain or by the time-frequency decomposition of the current signals. Fault identification may also be possible by analyzing acoustic sound and vibration signals, which is useful because sometimes this information is the only available. The contribution of this work is a methodology for detecting faults in induction motors in steady-state operation based on the analysis of acoustic sound and vibration signals. This proposed approach uses the Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition for decomposing the signal into several intrinsic mode functions. Subsequently, the frequency marginal of the Gabor representation is calculated to obtain the spectral content of the IMF in the frequency domain. This proposal provides good fault detectability results compared to other published works in addition to the identification of more frequencies associated with the faults. The faults diagnosed in this work are two broken rotor bars, mechanical unbalance and bearing defects.

  14. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  15. Influence of Structural Parameters on the Performance of Vortex Valve Variable-Thrust Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianggeng; Li, Jiang; He, Guoqiang

    2017-04-01

    The vortex valve solid variable thrust motor is a new solid motor which can achieve Vehicle system trajectory optimization and motor energy management. Numerical calculation was performed to investigate the influence of vortex chamber diameter, vortex chamber shape, and vortex chamber height of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor on modulation performance. The test results verified that the calculation results are consistent with laboratory results with a maximum error of 9.5%. The research drew the following major conclusions: the optimal modulation performance was achieved in a cylindrical vortex chamber, increasing the vortex chamber diameter improved the modulation performance of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor, optimal modulation performance could be achieved when the height of the vortex chamber is half of the vortex chamber outlet diameter, and the hot gas control flow could result in an enhancement of modulation performance. The results can provide the basis for establishing the design method of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor.

  16. Alterations in protein expression of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures during hyper- , simulated and sounding rocket micro-gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Barjaktarović, Žarko; Babbick, Maren; Magel, Elisabeth; Nordheim, Alfred; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Hampp, Ruediger

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to hypergravity (8g), 2D clinorotation and random positioning exhibit changes in gene expression (Martzivanou et al., Protoplasma 229:155-162, 2003). In a recent investigation we could show that after 2 hrs of exposure also the protein complement shows treatment-related changes. These are indicative for reactive oxygen species being involved in the perception of / response to changes in the gravitational field. In the present study we have extended these investigations for a period of up to 16 hrs of exposure. We report on changes in abundance of 28 proteins which have been identified by nano HPLC-ESI-MS/MS, and which were altered in amount after 2 hrs of treatment. According to changes between 2 and 16 hrs we could distinguish four groups of proteins which either declined, increased from down-regulated to control levels, showed a transient decline or a transient increase. With regard to function, our data indicate stress relief or adaption to a new gravitational steady state under prolonged exposure. The latter assumption is supported by the appearance of a new set of 19 proteins which is changed in abundance after 8 hrs of hypergravity. A comparative analysis of the different treatments showed some similarities in response between 8g centrifugation and 2D clinorotation, while random positioning showed the least responses. In addition, we report on the impact of reduced gravitation on the phospho proteom. Cell cultures exposed to 12 min of microgravity as obtained on board of sounding rockets do not respond with alterations in total protein but in the degree of phosphorylation as demonstrated after 2D SDS PAGE separation and sequencing. On this basis we give evidence for signaling cascades involved in the transduction of gravitational signals.

  17. Effect of ambient vibration on solid rocket motor grain and propellant/liner bonding interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yijun; Huang, Weidong; Li, Jinfei

    2017-05-01

    In order to study the condition of structural integrity in the process of the solid propellant motor launching and transporting, the stress and strain field analysis were studied on a certain type of solid propellant motor. the vibration acceleration on the solid propellant motors' transport process were monitored, then the original vibration data was eliminated the noise and the trend term efficiently, finally the characteristic frequency of vibration was got to the finite element analysis. Experiment and simulation results show that the monitored solid propellant motor mainly bear 0.2 HZ and 15 HZ low frequency vibration in the process of transportation; Under the low frequency vibration loading, solid propellant motor grain stress concentration position is respectively below the head and tail of the propellant/liner bonding surface and the grain roots.

  18. Vortex pairing and reverse cascade in a simulated two-dimensional rocket motor-like flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Kalyana; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional large eddy simulation of a flow experiment intended for studying and understanding transition and parietal vortex shedding has brought to light some interesting features that have never been seen in previous similar simulations and have implications for future computational work on combustion instabilities in rocket motors. The frequency spectrum of pressure at head end shows a peak at the expected value associated with parietal vortex shedding but an additional peak at half this frequency emerges at downstream location. Using vorticity spectra at various distances away from the wall, it is shown that the frequency halving is due to vortex pairing as hypothesized by Dunlap et al. ["Internal flow field studies in a simulated cylindrical port rocket chamber," J. Propul. Power 6(6), 690-704 (1990)] for a similar experiment. As the flow transitions to turbulence towards the nozzle end, inertial range with Kolmogorov scaling becomes evident in the velocity spectrum. Given that the simulation is two-dimensional, such a scaling could be associated with a reverse energy cascade as per Kraichnan-Leith-Bachelor theory. By filtering the simulated flow field and identifying where the energy backscatters into the filtered scales, the regions with a reverse cascade are identified. The implications of this finding on combustion modeling are discussed.

  19. Hybrid uncertainty-based design optimization and its application to hybrid rocket motors for manned lunar landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Design reliability and robustness are getting increasingly important for the general design of aerospace systems with many inherently uncertain design parameters. This paper presents a hybrid uncertainty-based design optimization (UDO method developed from probability theory and interval theory. Most of the uncertain design parameters which have sufficient information or experimental data are classified as random variables using probability theory, while the others are defined as interval variables with interval theory. Then a hybrid uncertainty analysis method based on Monte Carlo simulation and Taylor series interval analysis is developed to obtain the uncertainty propagation from the design parameters to system responses. Three design optimization strategies, including deterministic design optimization (DDO, probabilistic UDO and hybrid UDO, are applied to the conceptual design of a hybrid rocket motor (HRM used as the ascent propulsion system in Apollo lunar module. By comparison, the hybrid UDO is a feasible method and can be effectively applied to the general design of aerospace systems.

  20. An Automated Fluid-Structural Interaction Analysis of a Large Segmented Solid Rocket Motor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rex, Brian

    2003-01-01

    .... The fluid-structural interaction (FSI) analysis of the ETM-3 motor used PYTHON, a powerful programming language, and FEM BUILDER, a pre- and post processor developed by ATK Thiokol Propulsion under contract to the AFRL, to automatically...

  1. Off Like a Rocket: A Media Discourse Analysis of Tesla Motor Corporation

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Energy and transportation are topics of great importance to global sustainable development.  Tesla Motor Corporation is an electric vehicle company with the objective to “accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy” (Musk, 2016).  This thesis, a media discourse analysis, examines media texts concerning Tesla Motors to provide a better understanding of the company’s hitherto success in penetrating the automotive market.  Qualitative analyses of text were utilized to first define th...

  2. Relationship between speech motor control and speech intelligibility in children with speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aravind Kumar; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Yu, Vickie Y; Kadis, Darren S; Kroll, Robert; Pang, Elizabeth W; De Nil, Luc F

    2013-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to investigate the impact of speech motor issues on the speech intelligibility of children with moderate to severe speech sound disorders (SSD) within the context of the PROMPT intervention approach. The word-level Children's Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM), the sentence-level Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and tests of speech motor control and articulation proficiency were administered to 12 children (3:11 to 6:7 years) before and after PROMPT therapy. PROMPT treatment was provided for 45 min twice a week for 8 weeks. Twenty-four naïve adult listeners aged 22-46 years judged the intelligibility of the words and sentences. For CSIM, each time a recorded word was played to the listeners they were asked to look at a list of 12 words (multiple-choice format) and circle the word while for BIT sentences, the listeners were asked to write down everything they heard. Words correctly circled (CSIM) or transcribed (BIT) were averaged across three naïve judges to calculate percentage speech intelligibility. Speech intelligibility at both the word and sentence level was significantly correlated with speech motor control, but not articulatory proficiency. Further, the severity of speech motor planning and sequencing issues may potentially be a limiting factor in connected speech intelligibility and highlights the need to target these issues early and directly in treatment. The reader will be able to: (1) outline the advantages and disadvantages of using word- and sentence-level speech intelligibility tests; (2) describe the impact of speech motor control and articulatory proficiency on speech intelligibility; and (3) describe how speech motor control and speech intelligibility data may provide critical information to aid treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acoustic-mean flow interaction in solid rocket motors using Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillot, F.; Avalon, G.

    1988-07-01

    The presented numerical solution of laminar, two-dimensional, compressible and unsteady Navier-Stokes equations is aimed at a complete description of acoustic boundary layers that develop above a burning propellant. Such acoustic boundary layers are responsible for the so-called flow turning losses and also govern the local unsteady flow conditions that are seen by the burning propellant and to which it finally responds. In those respects, a complete understanding of such acoustic boundary layers is essential to improve existing solid rocket stability prediction codes. The full numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations permits to naturally incorporate into the analysis all the features of two-dimensional rocket chamber mean flow field. After a standing wave pattern is established through forcing at a given frequency, a special Fourier treatment is used to put the numerical results in a form directly comparable to available linear acoustic data. The presented results indicate that the acoustic boundary layer is substantially thinner than predicted by simplified models. Moreover, its acoustic admittance is found to significantly vary along the chamber, a result that is of major importance to stability predictions. Finally, the acoustic field is found to be rotational over a significant volume of the chamber, leading to a volume flow turning loss, rather than to a pure surface effect as usually assumed.

  4. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  5. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Pressure and Heat Rate Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonEckroth, Wulf; Struchen, Leah; Trovillion, Tom; Perez, Ravael; Nereolich, Shaun; Parlier, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Main Flame Deflector (MFD) at Launch Complex 39A was instrumented with sensors to measure heat rates, pressures, and temperatures on the last three Space Shuttle launches. Because the SRB plume is hot and erosive, a robust Tungsten Piston Calorimeter was developed to compliment the measurements made by off-the-shelf sensors. Witness materials were installed and their melting and erosion response to the Mach 2 / 4500 F / 4-second duration plume was observed. The data show that the specification document used for the design of the MFD thermal protection system over-predicted heat rates by a factor of 3 and under-predicted pressures by a factor of 2. These findings will be used to baseline NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics models and develop innovative MFD designs for the Space Launch System (SLS) before this vehicle becomes operational in 2017.

  6. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  7. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  8. Sounding Rocket Observations of Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra Between 0.5 and 2.5 nm Using a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Seth; Didkovsky, Leonid; Woods, Thomas; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Spectrally resolved measurements of individual solar active regions (ARs) in the soft X-ray (SXR) range are important for studying dynamic processes in the solar corona and their associated effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. They are also a means of evaluating atomic data and elemental abundances used in physics-based solar spectral models. However, very few such measurements are available. We present spectral measurements of two individual ARs in the 0.5 to 2.5 nm range obtained on the NASA 36.290 sounding rocket flight of 21 October 2013 (at about 18:30 UT) using the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a channel of the Extreme Ultaviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) payload designed for underflight calibrations of the orbital EVE on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The EVE rocket instrument is a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, except the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a freestanding transmission grating to provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST/SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. We discuss techniques (incorporating the NIST/SURF data) for determining SXR spectra from the dispersed AR images as well as the resulting spectra for NOAA ARs 11877 and 11875 observed on the 2013 rocket flight. In comparisons with physics-based spectral models using the CHIANTI v8 atomic database we find that both AR spectra are in good agreement with isothermal spectra (4 MK), as well as spectra based on an AR differential emission measure (DEM) included with the CHIANTI distribution, with the exception of the relative intensities of strong Fe xvii lines associated with 2p6-2p53{s} and 2p6-2p

  9. Observational signatures of low-altitude low-energy ion motions up and down auroral field lines: a survey of sounding rocket measurements (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. A.; Fernandes, P. A.; Gayetsky, L.; Mella, M. R.; Hampton, D. L.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    A number of auroral sounding rocket missions have sampled low-energy ion distribution functions near and in the ionospheric footpoint of auroral field lines, both on the dayside and the nightside, at altitudes ranging from a few hundred km to over 1000 km. The results, taken singly, can be confusing, given the variety of features. An overview of these observations, in the context of numerical modelling of the ionosphere, begins to reveal overall patterns of highly structured and temporally varying behaviors. In this talk we review observations from SCIFER (dayside, up to 1400 km), SCIFER2 (also dayside), SERSIO (dayside, lower altitude); and SIERRA, Cascades2, and MICA (all nightside, 300-500 km altitude.) A common feature in these auroral observations is that the ion distributions are seen to be moving either up (SIERRA low energies, MICA) or down (SCIFER, Cascades2, SIERRA medium eneriges) the field line with no obvious observational pattern. The downward moving distributions, particularly in the case of Cascades2, can be highly structured and varying in time, even showing dispersion signatures. Recent modelling efforts (Zettergren et al., this session) show structured patterns of upflow and downflow on auroral field lines consistent with these observations. Proper interpretation of sounding rocket case study ion flow observations must include the context given by 2-dimensional imagery and 2-dimensional (altitude and latitude) ionospheric modelling, as the net ion upflow from these low-altitude processes is a result of averaging over this variability.

  10. The Properties of the Diffuse X-ray Background from the DXL sounding rocket mission (plus ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Suzaku data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the properties of the different components of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) is made particularly difficult by their similar spectral signature.The University of Miami has been working on disentangling the different DXB components for many years, using a combination of proprietary and archival data from XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra, and a sounding rocket mission (DXL) specifically designed to study the properties of Local Hot Bubble (LHB) and Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) using their spatial signature. In this talk we will present:(a) Results from the DXL mission, specifically launch #2, to study the properties of the SWCX and LHB (and GH) and their contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Bands(b) Results from a Suzaku key project to characterize the SWCX and build a semi-empirical model to predict the SWCX line emission for any time, any direction. A publicly available web portal for the model will go online by the end of the year(c) Results from XMM-Newton deep surveys to study the angular correlation of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in the direction of the Chandra Deep Field South.DXL launch #3, schedule for January 2018 and the development of the DXG sounding rocket mission to characterize the GH-CGM emission using newly developed micropore optics will also be discussed.

  11. Spatial and temporal variability in MLT turbulence inferred from in situ and ground-based observations during the WADIS-1 sounding rocket campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Szewczyk, Artur; Strelnikova, Irina; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Rapp, Markus; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Löhle, Stefan; Eberhart, Martin; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Dunker, Tim; Friedrich, Martin; Hedin, Jonas; Khaplanov, Mikhail; Gumbel, Jörg; Barjatya, Aroh

    2017-04-01

    In summer 2013 the WADIS-1 sounding rocket campaign was conducted at the Andøya Space Center (ACS) in northern Norway (69° N, 16° E). Among other things, it addressed the question of the variability in mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) turbulence, both in time and space. A unique feature of the WADIS project was multi-point turbulence sounding applying different measurement techniques including rocket-borne ionization gauges, VHF MAARSY radar, and VHF EISCAT radar near Tromsø. This allowed for horizontal variability to be observed in the turbulence field in the MLT at scales from a few to 100 km. We found that the turbulence dissipation rate, ɛ varied in space in a wavelike manner both horizontally and in the vertical direction. This wavelike modulation reveals the same vertical wavelengths as those seen in gravity waves. We also found that the vertical mean value of radar observations of ɛ agrees reasonably with rocket-borne measurements. In this way defined value reveals clear tidal modulation and results in variation by up to 2 orders of magnitude with periods of 24 h. The value also shows 12 h and shorter (1 to a few hours) modulations resulting in one decade of variation in magnitude. The 24 h modulation appeared to be in phase with tidal change of horizontal wind observed by SAURA-MF radar. Such wavelike and, in particular, tidal modulation of the turbulence dissipation field in the MLT region inferred from our analysis is a new finding of this work.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability in MLT turbulence inferred from in situ and ground-based observations during the WADIS-1 sounding rocket campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Strelnikov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2013 the WADIS-1 sounding rocket campaign was conducted at the Andøya Space Center (ACS in northern Norway (69° N, 16° E. Among other things, it addressed the question of the variability in mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT turbulence, both in time and space. A unique feature of the WADIS project was multi-point turbulence sounding applying different measurement techniques including rocket-borne ionization gauges, VHF MAARSY radar, and VHF EISCAT radar near Tromsø. This allowed for horizontal variability to be observed in the turbulence field in the MLT at scales from a few to 100 km. We found that the turbulence dissipation rate, ε varied in space in a wavelike manner both horizontally and in the vertical direction. This wavelike modulation reveals the same vertical wavelengths as those seen in gravity waves. We also found that the vertical mean value of radar observations of ε agrees reasonably with rocket-borne measurements. In this way defined 〈εradar〉 value reveals clear tidal modulation and results in variation by up to 2 orders of magnitude with periods of 24 h. The 〈εradar〉 value also shows 12 h and shorter (1 to a few hours modulations resulting in one decade of variation in 〈εradar〉 magnitude. The 24 h modulation appeared to be in phase with tidal change of horizontal wind observed by SAURA-MF radar. Such wavelike and, in particular, tidal modulation of the turbulence dissipation field in the MLT region inferred from our analysis is a new finding of this work.

  13. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  14. Ubiquitous Motor Cognition in Musical Experience: Open Peer Review of Jacques Launay’s “Musical Sounds, Motor Resonance, and Detectable Agency”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Inge Godoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor cognition, defined as the capacity to conceive, plan, control, perceive, and imagine body motion, is here seen as a ubiquitous element in music: music is produced by body motion, people often move in various ways when listening to music, and images of body motion seem to be integral to mental images of musical sound. Given this ubiquity of motor cognition in musical experience, it could be argued that motor cognition is a fundamental element in music, and thus could be hypothesized to also have been an essential element in the evolution of music, regardless of whether music is seen as primarily a social or as a more solitary phenomenon. It could furthermore be argued that music in all cases has intersubjective significance because of shared motor cognition among people, and also that this motor cognition may be applied to most perceptually salient features of music.

  15. Non-speech oral motor treatment for children with developmental speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice S-Y; Gibbon, Fiona E

    2015-03-25

    Children with developmental speech sound disorders have difficulties in producing the speech sounds of their native language. These speech difficulties could be due to structural, sensory or neurophysiological causes (e.g. hearing impairment), but more often the cause of the problem is unknown. One treatment approach used by speech-language therapists/pathologists is non-speech oral motor treatment (NSOMT). NSOMTs are non-speech activities that aim to stimulate or improve speech production and treat specific speech errors. For example, using exercises such as smiling, pursing, blowing into horns, blowing bubbles, and lip massage to target lip mobility for the production of speech sounds involving the lips, such as /p/, /b/, and /m/. The efficacy of this treatment approach is controversial, and evidence regarding the efficacy of NSOMTs needs to be examined. To assess the efficacy of non-speech oral motor treatment (NSOMT) in treating children with developmental speech sound disorders who have speech errors. In April 2014 we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE (R) and Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), PsycINFO and 11 other databases. We also searched five trial and research registers, checked the reference lists of relevant titles identified by the search and contacted researchers to identify other possible published and unpublished studies. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared (1) NSOMT versus placebo or control; and (2) NSOMT as adjunctive treatment or speech intervention versus speech intervention alone, for children aged three to 16 years with developmental speech sound disorders, as judged by a speech and language therapist. Individuals with an intellectual disability (e.g. Down syndrome) or a physical disability were not excluded. The Trials Search Co-ordinator of the Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and

  16. Effect of propellant morphology on acoustics in a planar rocket motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daimon, Y.; Jackson, T.L. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets, Urbana, IL (United States); Topalian, V. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Mechanical Science and Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States); Freund, J.B. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Mechanical Science and Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States); Buckmaster, J. [Buckmaster Research, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2009-03-15

    This paper reports the results of numerical simulations of the acoustics in a two-dimensional (plane) motor using a high-order accurate, low-dissipation numerical solver. For verification we compare solutions to Culick's (AIAA J 4(8):1462-1464, 1966) asymptotic solution for constant injection, and to recent results of Hegab and Kassoy (AIAA J 44(4):812-826, 2006) for a space- and time-dependent mass injection. We present results when the injection boundary condition is described by propellant morphology and by white noise. Morphology strongly affects the amplitude of the longitudinal acoustic modes, and in this connection white noise is not a suitable surrogate. (orig.)

  17. On Improving the Quality of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded 18Ni 250 Maraging Steel Rocket Motor Casings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Renu N.; Raja, V. S.; Mukherjee, M. K.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.

    2017-10-01

    In view of their excellent combination of strength and toughness, maraging steels (18Ni 250 grade) are widely used for the fabrication of large sized solid rocket motor casings. Gas tungsten arc welding is commonly employed to fabricate these thin walled metallic casings, as the technique is not only simple but also provides the desired mechanical properties. However, sometimes, radiographic examination of welds reveals typical unacceptable indications requiring weld repair. As a consequence, there is a significant drop in weld efficiency and productivity. In this work, the nature and the cause of the occurrence of these defects have been investigated and an attempt is made to overcome the problem. It has been found that weld has a tendency to form typical Ca and Al oxide inclusions leading to the observed defects. The use of calcium fluoride flux has been found to produce a defect free weld with visible effect on weld bead finish. The flux promotes the separation of inclusions, refines the grain size and leads to significant improvement in mechanical properties of the weldment.

  18. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan; Kirchner, Robert; Engel, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) base heating test is broken down into two test programs: (1) Pathfinder and (2) Main Test. The Pathfinder Test Program focuses on the design, development, hot-fire test and performance analyses of the 2% sub-scale SLS core-stage and booster element propulsion systems. The core-stage propulsion system is composed of four gaseous oxygen/hydrogen RS-25D model engines and the booster element is composed of two aluminum-based model solid rocket motors (SRMs). The first section of the paper discusses the motivation and test facility specifications for the test program. The second section briefly investigates the internal flow path of the design. The third section briefly shows the performance of the model RS-25D engines and SRMs for the conducted short duration hot-fire tests. Good agreement is observed based on design prediction analysis and test data. This program is a challenging research and development effort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle.

  19. The production and perception of emotionally expressive walking sounds: similarities between musical performance and everyday motor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Giordano

    Full Text Available Several studies have investigated the encoding and perception of emotional expressivity in music performance. A relevant question concerns how the ability to communicate emotions in music performance is acquired. In accordance with recent theories on the embodiment of emotion, we suggest here that both the expression and recognition of emotion in music might at least in part rely on knowledge about the sounds of expressive body movements. We test this hypothesis by drawing parallels between musical expression of emotions and expression of emotions in sounds associated with a non-musical motor activity: walking. In a combined production-perception design, two experiments were conducted, and expressive acoustical features were compared across modalities. An initial performance experiment tested for similar feature use in walking sounds and music performance, and revealed that strong similarities exist. Features related to sound intensity, tempo and tempo regularity were identified as been used similarly in both domains. Participants in a subsequent perception experiment were able to recognize both non-emotional and emotional properties of the sound-generating walkers. An analysis of the acoustical correlates of behavioral data revealed that variations in sound intensity, tempo, and tempo regularity were likely used to recognize expressed emotions. Taken together, these results lend support the motor origin hypothesis for the musical expression of emotions.

  20. The production and perception of emotionally expressive walking sounds: similarities between musical performance and everyday motor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Bruno L; Egermann, Hauke; Bresin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the encoding and perception of emotional expressivity in music performance. A relevant question concerns how the ability to communicate emotions in music performance is acquired. In accordance with recent theories on the embodiment of emotion, we suggest here that both the expression and recognition of emotion in music might at least in part rely on knowledge about the sounds of expressive body movements. We test this hypothesis by drawing parallels between musical expression of emotions and expression of emotions in sounds associated with a non-musical motor activity: walking. In a combined production-perception design, two experiments were conducted, and expressive acoustical features were compared across modalities. An initial performance experiment tested for similar feature use in walking sounds and music performance, and revealed that strong similarities exist. Features related to sound intensity, tempo and tempo regularity were identified as been used similarly in both domains. Participants in a subsequent perception experiment were able to recognize both non-emotional and emotional properties of the sound-generating walkers. An analysis of the acoustical correlates of behavioral data revealed that variations in sound intensity, tempo, and tempo regularity were likely used to recognize expressed emotions. Taken together, these results lend support the motor origin hypothesis for the musical expression of emotions.

  1. The Production and Perception of Emotionally Expressive Walking Sounds: Similarities between Musical Performance and Everyday Motor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Bruno L.; Egermann, Hauke; Bresin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the encoding and perception of emotional expressivity in music performance. A relevant question concerns how the ability to communicate emotions in music performance is acquired. In accordance with recent theories on the embodiment of emotion, we suggest here that both the expression and recognition of emotion in music might at least in part rely on knowledge about the sounds of expressive body movements. We test this hypothesis by drawing parallels between musical expression of emotions and expression of emotions in sounds associated with a non-musical motor activity: walking. In a combined production-perception design, two experiments were conducted, and expressive acoustical features were compared across modalities. An initial performance experiment tested for similar feature use in walking sounds and music performance, and revealed that strong similarities exist. Features related to sound intensity, tempo and tempo regularity were identified as been used similarly in both domains. Participants in a subsequent perception experiment were able to recognize both non-emotional and emotional properties of the sound-generating walkers. An analysis of the acoustical correlates of behavioral data revealed that variations in sound intensity, tempo, and tempo regularity were likely used to recognize expressed emotions. Taken together, these results lend support the motor origin hypothesis for the musical expression of emotions. PMID:25551392

  2. Investigation of the effects of solid rocket motor propellant composition on plume signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaza, Clay J.

    1994-06-01

    Three propellants with aluminum/silicon weight percentages of 18/0%, 13.5/4.5%, and 12/6% were fired in a subscale motor to determine if the plume infrared signature could be reduced without a significant loss in specific impulse. Spectral measurements from 2.5 to 5.5 micrometers and thermal measurements from 3.5 to 5.0 micrometers were made. Plume particle size measurements showed that only particles with small diameters (less than 1.93 micrometers) were present with any significant volume. Replacing a portion of the aluminum in a highly metallized solid propellant with silicon was found to eliminate the Al2O3 in favor of SiO2 and Al6SiO13, without any change in particulate mass concentration or any large change in particle size distribution. These particulates were found to have significantly lower absorptivity than Al2O3. An additional investigation was conducted to determine the particle size distribution at the nozzle entrance. Malvern ensemble scattering, phase-Doppler single particle scattering, and laser transmittance measurements made through windows in the combustion chamber at the nozzle entrance indicated that large particles were present (to 250 micrometers). However, most of the mass of the particles was contained in particles with diameters smaller than 5 micrometers. Approximate calculations made with the measured data showed that if 100 micrometer particles are present with the smoke (particles with diameters less than 2 micrometers) they could account for only approximately 10% of the article volume.

  3. The sky is falling III: The effect of deposition from static solid rocket motor tests on juvenile crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, William J; Curry, Eric; McNeill, Laurie S; Heavilin, Justin

    2017-12-01

    A mixture of combustion products (mainly hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water) and entrained soil, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), can be deposited on crops during static solid rocket motor tests. The impact of a reported worst-case event was previously evaluated by exposing corn and alfalfa to 3200-gTFS/m(2) at 54days after emergence. Exposures via soil and leaves were evaluated separately. Reduced growth (soil exposure) and leaf "scorch" (leaf exposure) were attributed mainly to the high chloride concentrations in the TFS (56,000mg/kg). A follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a typical deposition event (70-gTFS/m(2), estimated by radar during several tests) and exposure (soil and leaves simultaneously) on juvenile corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat. Younger crops were used to examine potential age sensitivity differences. Impact was evaluated by comparing the growth, elemental composition, and leaf chlorophyll content of treated and untreated plants. The relationship between deposition exposure and response was also addressed. Growth of corn, alfalfa, and winter wheat exposed to a typical TFS loading was not impacted, although slightly elevated concentrations of aluminum and iron were found in the leaves. At the highest loadings used for the exposure-response experiment, concentrations of chloride and calcium were higher in TFS-exposed corn leaves than in the untreated leaves. Overall results indicate that exposure to a typical deposition event does not adversely impact juvenile crops and that younger plants may be less vulnerable to TFS. However, higher TFS loadings can cause leaf scorch and increase the leaf concentrations of some elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Motor sequencing deficit as an endophenotype of speech sound disorder: a genome-wide linkage analysis in a multigenerational family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate a measure of motor sequencing deficit as a potential endophenotype of speech sound disorder (SSD) in a multigenerational family with evidence of familial SSD. In a multigenerational family with evidence of a familial motor-based SSD, affectation status and a measure of motor sequencing during oral motor testing were obtained. To further investigate the role of motor sequencing as an endophenotype for genetic studies, parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses were carried out using a genome-wide panel of 404 microsatellites. In seven of the 10 family members with available data, SSD affectation status and motor sequencing status coincided. Linkage analysis revealed four regions of interest, 6p21, 7q32, 7q36, and 8q24, primarily identified with the measure of motor sequencing ability. The 6p21 region overlaps with a locus implicated in rapid alternating naming in a recent genome-wide dyslexia linkage study. The 7q32 locus contains a locus implicated in dyslexia. The 7q36 locus borders on a gene known to affect the component traits of language impairment. The results are consistent with a motor-based endophenotype of SSD that would be informative for genetic studies. The linkage results in this first genome-wide study in a multigenerational family with SSD warrant follow-up in additional families and with fine mapping or next-generation approaches to gene identification.

  5. The role of similarity, sound and awareness in the appreciation of visual artwork via motor simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Christine; Want, Stephen C; Dyson, Benjamin J

    2015-04-01

    One way to increase art appreciation is to create congruency between the actions performed by the artist and the actions performed by the viewer. Leder, Bar, and Topolinski (2012) successfully created such a link by asking participants to make either stroking or stippling motions while viewing stroke-style and pointillist-style paintings. We carried out a direct replication of Leder et al. (2012) in Experiment 1 but failed to reproduce their results. In Experiment 2, we achieved the desired cross-over interaction between image and action but only when the relationship was made more transparent. Experiment 3 demonstrated that this effect requires a motor component and cannot be reproduced by simply hearing the sounds associated with drawing production. Experiment 4 investigated whether either an external manipulation or a self-report measure of awareness of the image-action match modulated the liking ratings, in addition to artwork familiarity and participants' own hypotheses regarding the direction of the image-action effect. Participants who predicted that congruent relationships between what they saw and what they did would increase liking showed enhanced congruency effects. The links between historical production and contemporary exposure to art may then be an overt rather than covert process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ground and flight test program of a Stokes-flow parachute: Packaging, deployment, and sounding rocket integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, P. G.; Mihora, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The current design and hardware components of the patented 14 sqm Stokes flow parachute are described. The Stokes-flow parachute is a canopy of open mesh material, which is kept deployed by braces. Because of the light weight of its mesh material, and the high drag on its mesh elements when they operate in the Stokes-flow flight regime, this parachute has an extremely low ballistic coefficient. It provides a stable aerodynamic platform superior to conventional nonporous billowed parachutes, is exceptionally packable, and is easily contained within the canister of the Sidewinder Arcas or the RDT and E rockets. Thus, it offers the potential for gathering more meteorological data, especially at high altitudes, than conventional billowed parachutes. Methods for packaging the parachute are also recommended. These methods include schemes for folding the canopy and for automatically releasing the pressurizing fluid as the packaged parachute unfolds.

  7. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  8. The noctilucent cloud (NLC display during the ECOMA/MASS sounding rocket flights on 3 August 2007: morphology on global to local scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baumgarten

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the ECOMA/MASS rocket campaign large scale NLC/PMC was observed by satellite, lidar and camera from polar to mid latitudes. We examine the observations from different instruments to investigate the morphology of the cloud. Satellite observations show a planetary wave 2 structure. Lidar observations from Kühlungsborn (54° N, Esrange (68° N and ALOMAR (69° N show a highly dynamic NLC layer. Under favorable solar illumination the cloud is also observable by ground-based cameras. The cloud was detected by cameras from Trondheim (63° N, Juliusruh (55° N and Kühlungsborn. We investigate planetary scale morphology and local scale gravity wave structures, important for the interpretation of the small scale rocket soundings. We compare in detail the lidar observations with the NLC structure observed by the camera in Trondheim. The ALOMAR RMR-lidar observed only a faint NLC during the ECOMA launch window, while the camera in Trondheim showed a strong NLC display in the direction of ALOMAR. Using the high resolution camera observations (t~30 s, Δx<5 km and the wind information from the meteor radar at ALOMAR we investigate the formation and destruction of NLC structures. We observe that the NLC brightness is reduced by a factor of 20–40 within 100 s which can be caused by a temperature about 15 K above the frostpoint temperature. A horizontal temperature gradient of more than 3 K/km is estimated.

  9. Developing an eBook-Integrated High-Fidelity Mobile App Prototype for Promoting Child Motor Skills and Taxonomically Assessing Children's Emotional Responses Using Face and Sound Topology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, 3rd, William; Liu, Connie; John, Rita Marie; Ford, Phoebe

    2014-01-01

    .... We introduce "StorySense", an eBook-integrated mobile app prototype that can sense face and sound topologies and identify movement and expression to promote children's motor skills and emotional developmental...

  10. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  11. Development of a Low-cost, FPGA-based, Delay Line Particle Detector for Satellite and Sounding Rocket Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, M.; Kujawski, J. T.; Adrian, M. L.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Electrons are, by definition, a fundamental, chemical and electromagnetic constituent of any plasma. This is especially true within the partially ionized plasmas of Earth's ionosphere where electrons are a critical component of a vast array of plasma processes. Siena College is working on a novel method of processing information from electron spectrometer anodes using delay line techniques and inexpensive COTS electronics to track the movement of high-energy particles. Electron spectrometers use a variety of techniques to determine where an amplified electron cloud falls onto a collecting surface. One traditional method divides the collecting surface into sectors and uses a single detector for each sector. However, as the angular and spatial resolution increases, so does the number of detectors, increasing power consumption, cost, size, and weight of the system. An alternative approach is to connect each sector with a delay line built within the PCB material which is shielded from cross talk by a flooded ground plane. Only one pair of detectors (e.g., one at each end of the chain) are needed with the delay line technique which is different from traditional delay line detectors which use either Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) or very fast clocks. In this paper, we report on the implementation and testing of a delay line detector using a low-cost Xilinx FPGA and a thirty-two sector delay system. This Delay Line Detector has potential satellite and rocket flight applications due to its low cost, small size and power efficiency

  12. 17KS12000 Motor Grain Structural Integrity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    l7KS12000. Lars de !’analyse finale, trois conditions de chargement furent considerees: la contraction thermique , !’acceleration au lancement, et la mise...to be adapted as a third- stage motor to.the Terrier/Black Brant V sounding rocket vehicle. The projected missions required that the motor contain...because the 17KS12000 is a third- stage motor left unpressurized during acceleration; pressur- ization would of course induce a hydrostatic compression

  13. Transfer Effect of Speech-sound Learning on Auditory-motor Processing of Perceived Vocal Pitch Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaocong; Wong, Francis C K; Jones, Jeffery A; Li, Weifeng; Liu, Peng; Chen, Xi; Liu, Hanjun

    2015-08-17

    Speech perception and production are intimately linked. There is evidence that speech motor learning results in changes to auditory processing of speech. Whether speech motor control benefits from perceptual learning in speech, however, remains unclear. This event-related potential study investigated whether speech-sound learning can modulate the processing of feedback errors during vocal pitch regulation. Mandarin speakers were trained to perceive five Thai lexical tones while learning to associate pictures with spoken words over 5 days. Before and after training, participants produced sustained vowel sounds while they heard their vocal pitch feedback unexpectedly perturbed. As compared to the pre-training session, the magnitude of vocal compensation significantly decreased for the control group, but remained consistent for the trained group at the post-training session. However, the trained group had smaller and faster N1 responses to pitch perturbations and exhibited enhanced P2 responses that correlated significantly with their learning performance. These findings indicate that the cortical processing of vocal pitch regulation can be shaped by learning new speech-sound associations, suggesting that perceptual learning in speech can produce transfer effects to facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the online monitoring of auditory feedback regarding vocal production.

  14. A multigenerational family study of oral and hand motor sequencing ability provides evidence for a familial speech sound disorder subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate phenotypic expressions of speech sound disorder (SSD) in multigenerational families with evidence of familial forms of SSD. Method Members of five multigenerational families (N = 36) produced rapid sequences of monosyllables and disyllables and tapped computer keys with repetitive and alternating movements. Results Measures of repetitive and alternating motor speed were correlated within and between the two motor systems. Repetitive and alternating motor speeds increased in children and decreased in adults as a function of age. In two families with children who had severe speech deficits consistent with disrupted praxis, slowed alternating, but not repetitive, oral movements characterized most of the affected children and adults with a history of SSD, and slowed alternating hand movements were seen in some of the biologically related participants as well. Conclusion Results are consistent with a familial motor-based SSD subtype with incomplete penetrance, motivating new clinical questions about motor-based intervention not only in the oral but also the limb system. PMID:21909176

  15. Motor-Based Treatment with and without Ultrasound Feedback for Residual Speech-Sound Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Leece, Megan C.; Maas, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a need to develop effective interventions and to compare the efficacy of different interventions for children with residual speech-sound errors (RSSEs). Rhotics (the r-family of sounds) are frequently in error American English-speaking children with RSSEs and are commonly targeted in treatment. One treatment approach involves…

  16. Interactive footstep sounds modulate the perceptual-motor aftereffect of treadmill walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Camponogara, Ivan; Cesari, Paola

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of interactive auditory feedback in modulating the inadvertent forward drift experienced while attempting to walk in place with closed eyes following a few minutes of treadmill walking. Simulations of footstep sounds upon surface materials such as concrete...... and snow were provided by means of a system composed of headphones and shoes augmented with sensors. In a control condition, participants could hear their actual footstep sounds. Results showed an overall enhancement of the forward drift after treadmill walking independent of the sound perceived, while...... the strength of the aftereffect, measured as the proportional increase (posttest/pretest) in forward drift, was higher under the influence of snow compared to both concrete and actual sound. In addition, a higher knee angle flexion was found during the snow sound condition both before and after treadmill...

  17. The role of the motor system in discriminating normal and degraded speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Bufalari, Ilaria; Salmas, Paola; Fadiga, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    Listening to speech recruits a network of fronto-temporo-parietal cortical areas. Classical models consider anterior, motor, sites involved in speech production whereas posterior sites involved in comprehension. This functional segregation is more and more challenged by action-perception theories suggesting that brain circuits for speech articulation and speech perception are functionally interdependent. Recent studies report that speech listening elicits motor activities analogous to production. However, the motor system could be crucially recruited only under certain conditions that make speech discrimination hard. Here, by using event-related double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on lips and tongue motor areas, we show data suggesting that the motor system may play a role in noisy, but crucially not in noise-free environments, for the discrimination of speech signals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  18. Gross motor development and reach on sound as critical tools for the development of the blind child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisa, Fazzi; Josée, Lanners; Oreste, Ferrari-Ginevra; Claudia, Achille; Antonella, Luparia; Sabrina, Signorini; Giovanni, Lanzi

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess early neuromotor development in 20 congenitally blind or severely visually impaired children, nine without (B) and 11 with associated handicaps (B + H), in order to develop a strategy for early intervention in these subjects. The mean age at first observation was 11.4 months (range: 4-30 months). The mean follow-up duration was 16.9 months (range: 3-36 months). Assessment included developmental history, neurological examination, video-recording of spontaneous activity and administration of the Reynell-Zinkin Scales and neuroradiological and neurophysiological investigations. All B children walked independently (mean age 19.8 months) and 55.5% crawled (mean age 15 months); the B + H subjects displayed absence of almost all neuromotor functions, except one who walked at 20 months. All the B and just one (9%) of the B + H children developed satisfactory fine motor abilities. 'Reach on sound' at distance was achieved by all the B children by the age of 14.2 months while in the B + H group it was achieved by only two subjects at a median age of 19.5 months. We conclude that it is possible to describe the profile of neuromotor development in B and B + H children; strategies to help postural-motor development and 'reach on sound' appear to be fundamental in early intervention in these subjects. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Simulation of reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady flows in solid rocket motors: Efficient strategy using Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibra, A.; Dupays, J.; Murrone, A.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we tackle the issue of the accurate simulation of evaporating and reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady gaseous flows. In solid propulsion, aluminum particles are included in the propellant to improve the global performances but the distributed combustion of these droplets in the chamber is suspected to be a driving mechanism of hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. The faithful prediction of two-phase interactions is a determining step for future solid rocket motor optimization. When looking at saving computational ressources as required for industrial applications, performing reliable simulations of two-phase flow instabilities appears as a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. The size polydispersity, which conditions the droplet dynamics, is a key parameter that has to be accounted for. For moderately dense sprays, a kinetic approach based on a statistical point of view is particularly appropriate. The spray is described by a number density function and its evolution follows a Williams-Boltzmann transport equation. To solve it, we use Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods, based on a continuous discretization of the size phase space into sections, which offer an accurate treatment of the polydispersion. The objective of this paper is threefold: first to derive a new Two Size Moment Multi-Fluid model that is able to tackle evaporating polydisperse sprays at low cost while accurately describing the main driving mechanisms, second to develop a dedicated evaporation scheme to treat simultaneously mass, moment and energy exchanges with the gas and between the sections. Finally, to design a time splitting operator strategy respecting both reactive two-phase flow physics and cost/accuracy ratio required for industrial computations. Using a research code, we provide 0D validations of the new scheme before assessing the splitting technique's ability on a reference two-phase flow acoustic case. Implemented in the industrial

  20. 78 FR 2797 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... and Electric Vehicles; Draft Environmental Assessment for Rulemaking To Establish Minimum Sound Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles; Proposed Rules #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 9 / Monday... Requirements for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA...

  1. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development & Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    ATA-002 Technical Team has successfully designed, developed, tested and assessed the SLS Pathfinder propulsion systems for the Main Base Heating Test Program. Major Outcomes of the Pathfinder Test Program: Reach 90% of full-scale chamber pressure Achieved all engine/motor design parameter requirements Reach steady plume flow behavior in less than 35 msec Steady chamber pressure for 60 to 100 msec during engine/motor operation Similar model engine/motor performance to full-scale SLS system Mitigated nozzle throat and combustor thermal erosion Test data shows good agreement with numerical prediction codes Next phase of the ATA-002 Test Program Design & development of the SLS OML for the Main Base Heating Test Tweak BSRM design to optimize performance Tweak CS-REM design to increase robustness MSFC Aerosciences and CUBRC have the capability to develop sub-scale propulsion systems to meet desired performance requirements for short-duration testing.

  2. [Non-speech oral motor treatment efficacy for children with developmental speech sound disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ygual-Fernandez, A; Cervera-Merida, J F

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of speech disorders by means of speech therapy two antagonistic methodological approaches are applied: non-verbal ones, based on oral motor exercises (OME), and verbal ones, which are based on speech processing tasks with syllables, phonemes and words. In Spain, OME programmes are called 'programas de praxias', and are widely used and valued by speech therapists. To review the studies conducted on the effectiveness of OME-based treatments applied to children with speech disorders and the theoretical arguments that could justify, or not, their usefulness. Over the last few decades evidence has been gathered about the lack of efficacy of this approach to treat developmental speech disorders and pronunciation problems in populations without any neurological alteration of motor functioning. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has advised against its use taking into account the principles of evidence-based practice. The knowledge gathered to date on motor control shows that the pattern of mobility and its corresponding organisation in the brain are different in speech and other non-verbal functions linked to nutrition and breathing. Neither the studies on their effectiveness nor the arguments based on motor control studies recommend the use of OME-based programmes for the treatment of pronunciation problems in children with developmental language disorders.

  3. Torpedo Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    All through the 13th to the 15th Centuries there were reports of many rocket experiments. For example, Joanes de Fontana of Italy designed a surface-rurning, rocket-powered torpedo for setting enemy ships on fire

  4. Rocket Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  5. Developing an eBook-Integrated High-Fidelity Mobile App Prototype for Promoting Child Motor Skills and Taxonomically Assessing Children's Emotional Responses Using Face and Sound Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William; Liu, Connie; John, Rita Marie; Ford, Phoebe

    2014-01-01

    Developing gross and fine motor skills and expressing complex emotion is critical for child development. We introduce "StorySense", an eBook-integrated mobile app prototype that can sense face and sound topologies and identify movement and expression to promote children's motor skills and emotional developmental. Currently, most interactive eBooks on mobile devices only leverage "low-motor" interaction (i.e. tapping or swiping). Our app senses a greater breath of motion (e.g. clapping, snapping, and face tracking), and dynamically alters the storyline according to physical responses in ways that encourage the performance of predetermined motor skills ideal for a child's gross and fine motor development. In addition, our app can capture changes in facial topology, which can later be mapped using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) for later interpretation of emotion. StorySense expands the human computer interaction vocabulary for mobile devices. Potential clinical applications include child development, physical therapy, and autism.

  6. Ispitivanje piropatrona i raketnog motora pilotskog sedišta / Testing pyrocartridges and the rocket motor of the ejection seat

    OpenAIRE

    Milorad Savković

    2008-01-01

    Raketni motor pilotskog sedišta ima složen geometrijski oblik, tako da njegov potisak deluje pod određenim uglom u odnosu na ravan simetrije pilotskog sedišta. Radi određivanja intenziteta i napadne linije potiska izvršen je veći broj eksperimenata. Meren je potisak raketnog motora na višekomponentnom opitnom stolu. Letno ispitivanje pilotskog sedišta obavljeno je pomoću lutke koja simulira masu pilota. Takođe, analizirano je letno ispitivanje pilotskog sedišta u početnom periodu katapultiran...

  7. The STORM and CuPID soft X-ray cameras on the DXL sounding rocket mission: Employment of slumped micropore optics to image solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission in the magnetosheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.

    2016-12-01

    The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) and the Cusp Plasma Imaging Detector (CuPID) instruments are soft X-ray cameras the utilize slumped micropore ('lobster-eye') optics. These lobster-eye optics, developed by the University of Leicester and the Photonis Corporation, provide for wide field-of-view imaging of X-ray line emission produced via charge exchange between hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and heavy ions in the solar wind. Both instruments have position sensitize, chevron configuration, microchannel plate detectors in their respective focal planes. STORM possess two, 4 cm by 4 cm, lobster-eye optics, each with a focal length of 37.5 cm. It flew as a piggy back payload on the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket mission which was launched in December of 2012 from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. STORM operated successfully during this mission and represents the first use of lobster-eye optics in space. A future version of STORM, in high orbit, could image a significant portion of the magnetosheath to infer the locations of the magnetopause and the bow shock. CuPID is a 3U CubeSat variant of STORM that uses a single optic with a 27.5 cm focal length. A sounding rocket borne CuPID flew as a science payload with DXL from White Sands in December of 2015 with results forthcoming.

  8. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  9. Development of Flow and Heat Transfer Models for the Carbon Fiber Rope in Nozzle Joints of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Ewing, M. E.; Mathias, E. C.; Heman, J.; Smith, C.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for modeling both gas dynamics and heat transfer inside the carbon fiber rope (CFR) for applications in the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motor joints. Specifically, the CFR is modeled using an equivalent rectangular duct with a cross-section area, friction factor and heat transfer coefficient such that this duct has the same amount of mass flow rate, pressure drop, and heat transfer rate as the CFR. An equation for the friction factor is derived based on the Darcy-Forschheimer law and the heat transfer coefficient is obtained from pipe flow correlations. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the gas inside the CFR are calculated using the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Various subscale tests, both cold flow and hot flow, have been carried out to validate and refine this CFR model. In particular, the following three types of testing were used: (1) cold flow in a RSRM nozzle-to-case joint geometry, (2) cold flow in a RSRM nozzle joint No. 2 geometry, and (3) hot flow in a RSRM nozzle joint environment simulator. The predicted pressure and temperature history are compared with experimental measurements. The effects of various input parameters for the model are discussed in detail.

  10. The sky is falling II: Impact of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors on corn and alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, William J; Mendenhall, Scout; McNeill, Laurie S; Heavilin, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory, Utah, USA result in the deposition of an estimated 1.5million kg of entrained soil and combustion products (mainly aluminum oxide, gaseous hydrogen chloride and water) on the surrounding area. The deposition is referred to as test fire soil (TFS). Farmers observing TFS deposited on their crops expressed concerns regarding the impact of this material. To address these concerns, we exposed corn and alfalfa to TFS collected during a September 2009 test. The impact was evaluated by comparing the growth and tissue composition of controls relative to the treatments. Exposure to TFS, containing elevated levels of chloride (1000 times) and aluminum (2 times) relative to native soils, affected the germination, growth and tissue concentrations of various elements, depending on the type and level of exposure. Germination was inhibited by high concentrations of TFS in soil, but the impact was reduced if the TFS was pre-leached with water. Biomass production was reduced in the TFS amended soils and corn grown in TFS amended soils did not develop kernels. Chloride concentrations in corn and alfalfa grown in TFS amended soils were two orders of magnitude greater than controls. TFS exposed plants contained higher concentrations of several cations, although the concentrations were well below livestock feed recommendations. Foliar applications of TFS had no impact on biomass, but some differences in the elemental composition of leaves relative to controls were observed. Washing the TFS off the leaves lessened the impact. Results indicate that the TFS deposition could have an effect, depending on the amount and growth stage of the crops, but the impact could be mitigated with rainfall or the application of additional irrigation water. The high level of chloride associated with the TFS is the main cause of the observed impacts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran Venugopal; K K Rajesh; V. Ramanujachari

    2011-01-01

    With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems. Classical hybrids can be throttled for thrust tailoring, perform in-flight motor shutdown and restart. In classical hybrids, the fuel is stored in the form of a solid grain, requiring only half the feed system hardware of liquid bipropellant engines. The commonly used fuels are benign, nonto...

  12. 40 CFR 61.43 - Emission testing-rocket firing or propellant disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission testing-rocket firing or... Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.43 Emission testing—rocket firing or propellant disposal. (a) Ambient air concentrations shall be measured during and after firing of a rocket motor or...

  13. Solid Rocket Motor Insulation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-13

    ablation test, analysis): $2K • Rapid testing of 5-6 samples per day (or more) •Nozzle materials can also be tested Propellant Test Insulation...Igniter Backing Nozzle Distribution A: Public Release. Distribution Unlimited 4 Distribution A: Public Release. Distribution unlimited Nanofilled EPDM as...Improved Ablative Potential Pathway to Increase Performance M i c r o f i b e r s SOTA EPDM Rubber NANO EPDM Rubber ... . .. .burn carbon char

  14. Assessment of turbulence modeling for gas flow in two-dimensional convergent–divergent rocket nozzle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balabel, A; Hegab, A.M; Nasr, M; El-Behery, Samy M

    2011-01-01

    ... characteristics have a strong and direct impact on many physical processes occurring within the nozzle. The flow behavior inside the combustion chamber of a rocket plays a key role in both motor design and operation. The majority of the previous studies on the rocket motors have involved the investigations of a nozzleless rocket motor to study the applicabilit...

  15. Solid Rocket Testing at AFRL (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 10/21/2016 Briefing Charts 01 October 2016 - 31 October 2016 Solid Rocket Testing at AFRL Robert Antypas Air...Unclassified SAR 18 R. Antypas N/A Solid Rocket Testing at AFRL 21 Oct 2016 Robert Antypas AFRL/RQRO -Distribution A: Approved for Public Release...Distribution Unlimited. PA#16492 2 Agenda • Solid Rocket Motors • History of Sea Level Testing • Small Component Testing • Full-scale Testing • Altitude

  16. Thresholds of auditory-motor coupling measured with a simple task in musicians and non-musicians: was the sound simultaneous to the key press?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Floris T; Tillmann, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is able to predict the sensory effects of its actions. But how precise are these predictions? The present research proposes a tool to measure thresholds between a simple action (keystroke) and a resulting sound. On each trial, participants were required to press a key. Upon each keystroke, a woodblock sound was presented. In some trials, the sound came immediately with the downward keystroke; at other times, it was delayed by a varying amount of time. Participants were asked to verbally report whether the sound came immediately or was delayed. Participants' delay detection thresholds (in msec) were measured with a staircase-like procedure. We hypothesised that musicians would have a lower threshold than non-musicians. Comparing pianists and brass players, we furthermore hypothesised that, as a result of a sharper attack of the timbre of their instrument, pianists might have lower thresholds than brass players. Our results show that non-musicians exhibited higher thresholds for delay detection (180 ± 104 ms) than the two groups of musicians (102 ±65 ms), but there were no differences between pianists and brass players. The variance in delay detection thresholds could be explained by variance i n sensorimotor synchronisation capacities as well as variance in a purely auditory temporal irregularity detection measure. This suggests that the brain's capacity to generate temporal predictions of sensory consequences can be decomposed into general temporal prediction capacities together with auditory-motor coupling. These findings indicate that the brain has a relatively large window of integration within which an action and its resulting effect are judged as simultaneous. Furthermore, musical expertise may narrow this window down, potentially due to a more refined temporal prediction. This novel paradigm provides a simple test to estimate the temporal precision of auditory-motor action-effect coupling, and the paradigm can readily be incorporated in

  17. Thresholds of auditory-motor coupling measured with a simple task in musicians and non-musicians: was the sound simultaneous to the key press?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris T van Vugt

    Full Text Available The human brain is able to predict the sensory effects of its actions. But how precise are these predictions? The present research proposes a tool to measure thresholds between a simple action (keystroke and a resulting sound. On each trial, participants were required to press a key. Upon each keystroke, a woodblock sound was presented. In some trials, the sound came immediately with the downward keystroke; at other times, it was delayed by a varying amount of time. Participants were asked to verbally report whether the sound came immediately or was delayed. Participants' delay detection thresholds (in msec were measured with a staircase-like procedure. We hypothesised that musicians would have a lower threshold than non-musicians. Comparing pianists and brass players, we furthermore hypothesised that, as a result of a sharper attack of the timbre of their instrument, pianists might have lower thresholds than brass players. Our results show that non-musicians exhibited higher thresholds for delay detection (180 ± 104 ms than the two groups of musicians (102 ±65 ms, but there were no differences between pianists and brass players. The variance in delay detection thresholds could be explained by variance i n sensorimotor synchronisation capacities as well as variance in a purely auditory temporal irregularity detection measure. This suggests that the brain's capacity to generate temporal predictions of sensory consequences can be decomposed into general temporal prediction capacities together with auditory-motor coupling. These findings indicate that the brain has a relatively large window of integration within which an action and its resulting effect are judged as simultaneous. Furthermore, musical expertise may narrow this window down, potentially due to a more refined temporal prediction. This novel paradigm provides a simple test to estimate the temporal precision of auditory-motor action-effect coupling, and the paradigm can readily be

  18. Rocket Tablet,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-12

    the railway platform filled with sand, consumed by a great wave of emotion, looking at the soldiers and waving tearful farewells to them as well as...many matters awaiting me, how can I not be anxious?" Li Fuze rose and said farewell and Li Juemin insisted on -sending him off. These two comrades-in...front of the .? tombstone were the wife of the hero and several hundred solders; an entire rocket troop mourned the hero.... ...... from today on no

  19. Motor Music

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, John

    2014-01-01

    Motor Music II (2014) for small group and motors What happens when an AC or DC motor is plugged raw into a mixing desk or connected directly to a speaker? Motor Music II explores ‘low level’ instrument design and a reductionist approach. The piece also sets up a proposition concerning electronic music: ‘How can it be done simpler?’ The motor as ‘instrument’ encourages an objection-orientated approach to sound and music making: the motor itself has inherent musical qualities and po...

  20. Evidence for a Familial Speech Sound Disorder Subtype in a Multigenerational Study of Oral and Hand Motor Sequencing Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate phenotypic expressions of speech sound disorder (SSD) in multigenerational families with evidence of familial forms of SSD. Method: Members of five multigenerational families (N = 36) produced rapid sequences of monosyllables and disyllables and tapped computer keys with repetitive and alternating movements. Results: Measures…

  1. Analysis and modeling of infrasound from a four-stage rocket launch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Philip; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Infrasound from a four-stage sounding rocket was recorded by several arrays within 100 km of the launch pad. Propagation modeling methods have been applied to the known trajectory to predict infrasonic signals at the ground in order to identify what information might be obtained from such observations. There is good agreement between modeled and observed back azimuths, and predicted arrival times for motor ignition signals match those observed. The signal due to the high-altitude stage ignition is found to be low amplitude, despite predictions of weak attenuation. This lack of signal is possibly due to inefficient aeroacoustic coupling in the rarefied upper atmosphere.

  2. Rocket nozzle thermal shock tests in an arc heater facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, James H.; Williamson, Ronald A.

    1986-01-01

    A rocket motor nozzle thermal structural test technique that utilizes arc heated nitrogen to simulate a motor burn was developed. The technique was used to test four heavily instrumented full-scale Star 48 rocket motor 2D carbon/carbon segments at conditions simulating the predicted thermal-structural environment. All four nozzles survived the tests without catastrophic or other structural failures. The test technique demonstrated promise as a low cost, controllable alternative to rocket motor firing. The technique includes the capability of rapid termination in the event of failure, allowing post-test analysis.

  3. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...

  4. YMCA ROCKET RAMPAGE! SUMMER CAMP

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anonymous

    2014-01-01

    ... & Controls, sponsored the Rocket Rampagel summer camp at the YMCA in Eklton MD. On day 1, campers took Rockets 101, constructing balloon rockets and straw rockets, followed by racket manufacturing, where campers made rocket "propellant" on day 2...

  5. Aeroelastic Optimization of Sounding Rocket Fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    24 3.2.2 FEMAP v9.31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 vi Page 3.2.3 Mathcad v14...16. Mathcad Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 17. ModelCenter Main Window...center of gravity, and the moments of inertia. 26 3.2.3 Mathcad v14. MathcadTM is a symbolic math documentation and solv- ing application by

  6. Priming Gestures with Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge.

  7. Rocket Fuel R and D at AFRL: Recent Activities and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Charts 14 March 2017 - 12 April 2017 Rocket Fuel R&D at AFRL: Recent Activities & Future Direction Matt Billingsley Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC...Unclassified SAR 31 Matthew Billingsley N/A Q1W8 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited PA Clearance Number 17163 Rocket ... Rocket Kerosene Fuels Chemical Propulsion Liquid Rocket Engines (LRE) Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) Cryogenic (Liquid O2/fuel) Storable (IRFNA, MMH

  8. EUCC SRB Nozzle erosion motor test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The roman candle effect as seen in this picture represents the testing of a solid rocket booster (SRB) for unexplained corrosion conditions (EUCC) which have occurred on the nozzles of redesigned solid rocket motors (RSRM). The motor being tested in this photo is a 48 M-NASA motor.

  9. Searching Sound with Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Martin; Chapman, A.

    2010-01-01

    A sound installation developed to accompany Anna Chapman's sound installtion "Subjects for Melancholy Retrospection" that was presented t the Edinburgh Art Festrival in August 2010 at the National Trust for Scotland's Newhailes estate.

  10. Insights into the Behavior of Potential Structural Failures Originating from Localized High Stress Regions in Configurations Relevant to Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, David Matthew

    2017-01-01

    During the structural certification effort for the Space Launch System solid rocket booster nozzle, it was identified that no consistent method for addressing local negative margins of safety in non-metallic materials had been developed. Relevant areas included bond-line terminations and geometric features in the composite nozzle liners. In order to gain understanding, analog test specimens were designed that very closely mimic the conditions in the actual full scale hardware. Different locations in the nozzle were represented by different analog specimen designs. This paper describes those tests and corresponding results. Finite element analysis results for the tests are presented. Strain gage correlation of the analysis to the test results is addressed. Furthermore, finite fracture mechanics (a coupled stress and energy failure criterion) is utilized to predict the observed crack pop-in loads for the different configurations. The finite fracture mechanics predictions are found to be within a 10% error relative to the average measured pop-in load for each of four configurations. Initiation locations, arrest behaviors, and resistances to further post-arrest crack propagation are also discussed.

  11. Design criteria of launching rockets for burst aerial shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, T.; Takishita, Y.; Onda, T.; Shibamoto, H.; Hosaya, F. [Hosaya Kako Co. Ltd (Japan); Kubota, N. [Mitsubishi Electric Corporation (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Rocket motors attached to large-sized aerial shells are proposed to compensate for the increase in the lifting charge in the mortar and the thickness of the shell wall. The proposal is the result of an evaluation of the performance of solid propellants to provide information useful in designing launch rockets for large-size shells. The propellants composed of ammonium perchlorate and hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene were used to evaluate the ballistic characteristics such as the relationship between propellant mass and trajectories of shells and launch rockets. In order to obtain an optimum rocket design, the evaluation also included a study of the velocity and height of the rocket motor and shell separation. A launch rocket with a large-sized shell (84.5 cm in diameter) was designed to verify the effectiveness of this class of launch system. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  12. The ultimate limits of the relativistic rocket equation. The Planck photon rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Espen Gaarder

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we look at the ultimate limits of a photon propulsion rocket. The maximum velocity for a photon propulsion rocket is just below the speed of light and is a function of the reduced Compton wavelength of the heaviest subatomic particles in the rocket. We are basically combining the relativistic rocket equation with Haug's new insight on the maximum velocity for anything with rest mass. An interesting new finding is that in order to accelerate any subatomic ;fundamental; particle to its maximum velocity, the particle rocket basically needs two Planck masses of initial load. This might sound illogical until one understands that subatomic particles with different masses have different maximum velocities. This can be generalized to large rockets and gives us the maximum theoretical velocity of a fully-efficient and ideal rocket. Further, no additional fuel is needed to accelerate a Planck mass particle to its maximum velocity; this also might sound absurd, but it has a very simple and logical solution that is explained in this paper.

  13. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  14. Rocket propulsion elements

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, George P

    2011-01-01

    The definitive text on rocket propulsion-now revised to reflect advancements in the field For sixty years, Sutton's Rocket Propulsion Elements has been regarded as the single most authoritative sourcebook on rocket propulsion technology. As with the previous edition, coauthored with Oscar Biblarz, the Eighth Edition of Rocket Propulsion Elements offers a thorough introduction to basic principles of rocket propulsion for guided missiles, space flight, or satellite flight. It describes the physical mechanisms and designs for various types of rockets' and provides an unders

  15. Contact diagnostics of combustion products of rocket engines, their units, and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, N. N.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    This article is devoted to a new block-module device used in the diagnostics of condensed combustion products of rocket engines during research and development with liquid-propellant rocket engines (Glushko NPO Energomash; engines RD-171, RD-180, and RD-191) and solid-propellant rocket motors. Soot samplings from the supersonic high-temperature jet of a high-power liquid-propellant rocket engine were taken by the given device for the first time in practice for closed-exhaust lines. A large quantity of significant results was also obtained during a combustion investigation of solid propellants within solid-propellant rocket motors.

  16. High Regression Rate Hybrid Rocket Fuel Grains with Helical Port Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid Rockets are popular in the aerospace industry due to their storage safety, simplicity, and controllability during rocket motor burn. However, they produce fuel regression rates typically 25% lower than solid fuel motors of the same thrust level. These lowered regression rates produce unacceptably high oxidizer-to-fuel (O/F) ratios that produce a potential for motor instability, nozzle erosion, and reduced motor duty cycles. To achieve O/F ratios that produce acceptable combustion chara...

  17. Rockets two classic papers

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Rockets, in the primitive form of fireworks, have existed since the Chinese invented them around the thirteenth century. But it was the work of American Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945) and his development of liquid-fueled rockets that first produced a controlled rocket flight. Fascinated by rocketry since boyhood, Goddard designed, built, and launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926. Ridiculed by the press for suggesting that rockets could be flown to the moon, he continued his experiments, supported partly by the Smithsonian Institution and defended by Charles Lindbergh. T

  18. Solid rocket technology advancements for space tug and IUS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    In order for the shuttle tug or interim upper stage (IUS) to capture all the missions in the current mission model for the tug and the IUS, an auxiliary or kick stage, using a solid propellant rocket motor, is required. Two solid propellant rocket motor technology concepts are described. One concept, called the 'advanced propulsion module' motor, is an 1800-kg, high-mass-fraction motor, which is single-burn and contains Class 2 propellent. The other concept, called the high energy upper stage restartable solid, is a two-burn (stop-restartable on command) motor which at present contains 1400 kg of Class 7 propellant. The details and status of the motor design and component and motor test results to date are presented, along with the schedule for future work.

  19. Estimation of Pressure Index and Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient of Solid Rocket Propellants by Static Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2009-01-01

    Burning rate of a solid rocket propellant depends on pressure and temperature. Conventional strand burner and Crawford bomb test on propellant strands was conducted to assess these dependent parameters. However, behaviour of propellant in rocket motor is different from its behaviour in strand form. To overcome this anomaly, data from static evaluation of rocket motor was directly used for assessment of these burningrate controlling parameters. The conventional empirical power law (r=aoexp[p{T...

  20. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile...

  1. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 October 2016 – 26 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid Rocket Engine Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing SFTE Symposium 21 October 2016 Jake Robertson, Capt USAF AFRL... Rocket Lab Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 2Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

  2. Introduction to rocket science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Travis S

    2009-01-01

    What Are Rockets? The History of RocketsRockets of the Modern EraRocket Anatomy and NomenclatureWhy Are Rockets Needed? Missions and PayloadsTrajectoriesOrbitsOrbit Changes and ManeuversBallistic Missile TrajectoriesHow Do Rockets Work? ThrustSpecific ImpulseWeight Flow RateTsiolkovsky's Rocket EquationStagingRocket Dynamics, Guidance, and ControlHow Do Rocket Engines Work? The Basic Rocket EngineThermodynamic Expansion and the Rocket NozzleExit VelocityRocket Engine Area Ratio and LengthsRocket Engine Design ExampleAre All Rockets the Same? Solid Rocket EnginesLiquid Propellant Rocket Engines

  3. The flight of uncontrolled rockets

    CERN Document Server

    Gantmakher, F R; Dryden, H L

    1964-01-01

    International Series of Monographs on Aeronautics and Astronautics, Division VII, Volume 5: The Flight of Uncontrolled Rockets focuses on external ballistics of uncontrolled rockets. The book first discusses the equations of motion of rockets. The rocket as a system of changing composition; application of solidification principle to rockets; rotational motion of rockets; and equations of motion of the center of mass of rockets are described. The text looks at the calculation of trajectory of rockets and the fundamentals of rocket dispersion. The selection further focuses on the dispersion of f

  4. Experimental evaluation of anti-sound approach in damping self-sustained thermoacoustics oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyan; Zhao, Dan; Li, Junwei; Xu, Yousheng

    2013-11-01

    Self-sustained thermoacoustics oscillations most often arise due to the coupling between unsteady heat release and acoustic waves. The large-amplitude oscillations are wanted in thermoacoustic engine systems. However, they are undesirable in many other systems such as aero-engine afterburners, rocket motors, ramjets, and gas turbines, since the oscillations may become so intense that they cause structural damage and costly mission failure. In this work, we experimentally investigate the "anti-sound" approach in damping Rijke-type thermoacoustic oscillations by actuating a monopole-like sound source. For this, four different least-mean-square (LMS) algorithms are used to determine the "anti-sound" signal to drive the actuator. Comparison is then made. It is found that the LMS-based "anti-sound" approach is able to minimize the thermoacoustic oscillations, even when the operating conditions are slightly changed. Sound pressure level is reduced by 45 dB. Finally, a numerical model is developed to gain insights on the interaction between the monopole sound source and the system. Unsteady heat release from the flame is assumed to be caused by its surface variations resulting from the oncoming acoustic fluctuations. By linearizing the flame model and recasting it into the classical time-lag N -τ formulation, the thermoacoustic system transfer function is calculated. Compared with the experimental measurement by injecting a broad-band white noise, good agreement is obtained.

  5. Substituição de amianto por silicato de alumínio e grafite expansível em compósito de poliuretano utilizado em motor-foguete Substitution of asbestos for aluminosiliacate and expandable graphite in polyurethane composites used in rocket motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Crespim

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Compósitos de poliuretano e amianto (liner são utilizados como revestimento interno em paredes de motor-foguete, conferindo proteção térmica e garantindo a adesão entre o propelente e as paredes do motor. No entanto, o uso do amianto tem sido restringido devido à sua toxidade. No presente trabalho, o amianto foi substituído por um silicato de alumínio hidratado (SA e pelo grafite expansível (GE em diferentes teores no liner. Resultados de análise termogravimétrica (TG mostraram que a estabilidade térmica do liner praticamente não é afetada pela substituição das cargas, embora a energia de ativação (Ea obtida para a decomposição tenha mudado, mostrando maiores valores para as amostras contendo as cargas SA e GE. A análise termomecânica (TMA mostrou que o coeficiente de expansão térmica linear do liner contendo SA foi menor que aquele encontrado para o liner contendo amianto. O liner contendo a carga SA também apresentou os maiores valores de tensão nos testes mecânicos de tração.Composites of polyurethane (PU and asbestos (liner are used as internal coating of rocket motors, providing thermal protection and assuring the adhesion between propellant and the motor walls. However, the use of asbestos has been restricted due to its hazardous nature. In the present work, asbestos was replaced by hydrated alumina silicate (SA and expandable graphite (GE in different contents. Thermogravimetric analysis (TG showed that the thermal stability of liners was practically unaffected by the filler replacement although the activation energy obtained for the decomposition has changed. Thermomechanical analysis (TMA showed that coefficients of thermal expansion of SA/liners were lower than asbestos/liner. SA/liners also presented the highest tension values in mechanical tests.

  6. Heating and Cooling of Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-04-27

    25-27) 41 Nomenclature 45 Referencee ^ Figures: 1. Diagram of Thermocouple Locations 0 2. Time-Temperature Curve, Cooling of 2.75-in...is independent of the position ratio n. The experimental results of Fig. 3—5 and of Table 1 confirm this behavior. From the Heisler chart, an...n; however, the theoretical relation derived from Eq. 7, or Gurney- Lurie or Heisler charts, will give a rough approximation. iMPORTANCt OF FILM

  7. Ultraviolet Emission from Rocket Motor Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    blind ultraviolet, SBUV. Ultraviolet environmental effects on biological or physical systems are of:en considered for the ranges LVA, 400 to 315 nm, UVB...and surface destruction of ozore. Ir. remote unpolluted environments there is a lower surface level, about __ -2 aý Gx-op’ 13 ppb for the Amazonian...Climatic Bawline Observatories’ J. Geophys Res 91(D4). 522.-5236 (14󈨤) 14. Hough, A. M. and Denvent, R G. "Changes in the globil concentration of

  8. In-Flight Performance of the Polarization Modulator in the CLASP Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Ishikawa, R.; Giono, G.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Nakayama, S.; Tajima, T.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a polarization modulation unit (PMU), a motor system to rotate a waveplate continuously. We applied this PMU for the Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP), a sounding rocket experiment to observe the linear polarization of the Lyman-alpha emission (121.6 nm vacuum ultraviolet) from the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun with a high polarization sensitivity of 0.1% for the first time and investigate the vector magnetic field. Rotation non-uniformity of the waveplate causes error in the polarization degree (i.e. scale error) and crosstalk between Stokes components. In the ground tests, we confirmed that PMU has superior rotation uniformity. CLASP was successfully launched on September 3, 2015, and PMU functioned well as designed. PMU achieved a good rotation uniformity during the flight and the high precision polarization measurement of CLASP was successfully achieved.

  9. Three Dimensional Analysis of Elastic Rocket and Launcher at Launching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Shinsuke

    In this paper, a three-dimensional analysis of launching dynamics of a sounding rocket is investigated. In the analysis, the elastic vibration of the vehicle and launcher is considered. To estimate a trajectory dispersion including the effect of elasticity of the vehicle and launcher, a three-dimensional numerical simulation of a launch is performed. The accuracy of the numerical simulation is discussed and it is concluded that the simulation can estimate the maximum value of the trajectory dispersion properly. After that, the maximum value is estimated for the actual sounding rocket and the value is shown to be within the safty margin for this particular case.

  10. Solid rocket technology advancement for Space Tug and IUS applications. [Interim Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    Two-burn restartable solid propellant rocket motors for the kick stage (auxiliary stage) of the Shuttle Tug, or Interim Upper Stage, are described, with details on features and test results of the ignition and quench (thrust termination) systems and procedures, fabrication of propellant and insulation, explosion hazards of propellants, and comparative data on present and future motor design. These rocket motor systems are designed for upper stage augmentation of launch vehicles and possible service in Shuttle-launched outer planet spacecraft.

  11. The Undergraduate Satellite and Rocket Design, Fabrication and Launch Program at the US Air Force Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegenthaler, Kenneth E; Sellers, J. J; Miller, D. A; Lawrence, T. J; Richie, D. J

    2004-01-01

    ...." Its motto and aim is for cadets to "Learn Space by Doing Space." Cadets majoring in astronautical engineering and space operations study either the design, fabrication, testing, and launching of a sounding rocket...

  12. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects...

  13. US Rocket Propulsion Industrial Base Health Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    The number of active liquid rocket engine and solid rocket motor development programs has severely declined since the "space race" of the 1950s and 1960s center dot This downward trend has been exacerbated by the retirement of the Space Shuttle, transition from the Constellation Program to the Space launch System (SLS) and similar activity in DoD programs center dot In addition with consolidation in the industry, the rocket propulsion industrial base is under stress. To Improve the "health" of the RPIB, we need to understand - The current condition of the RPIB - How this compares to past history - The trend of RPIB health center dot This drives the need for a concise set of "metrics" - Analogous to the basic data a physician uses to determine the state of health of his patients - Easy to measure and collect - The trend is often more useful than the actual data point - Can be used to focus on problem areas and develop preventative measures The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs. center dot The RPIB encompasses US government, academic, and commercial (including industry primes and their supplier base) research, development, test, evaluation, and manufacturing capabilities and facilities. center dot The RPIB includes the skilled workforce, related intellectual property, engineering and support services, and supply chain operations and management. This definition touches the five main segments of the U.S. RPIB as categorized by the USG: defense, intelligence community, civil government, academia, and commercial sector. The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs

  14. Optimization of Construction of the rocket-assisted projectile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New scheme of the rocket motor of rocket-assisted projectile providing the increase in distance of flight due to controlled and optimal delay time of ignition of the solid-propellant charge of the SRM and increase in reliability of initiation of the SRM by means of the autonomous system of ignition excluding the influence of high pressure gases of the propellant charge in the gun barrel has been considered. Results of the analysis of effectiveness of using of the ignition delay device on motion characteristics of the rocket-assisted projectile has been presented.

  15. Research activities on vibro-acoustics of satellites during rocket launch

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Keiichi; Inada, Yoshinobu; Aoyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Takashi; Aiso, Hideaki; 村上 桂一; 稲田 喜信; 青山 剛史; 高橋 孝; 相曽 秀昭

    2006-01-01

    A study to establish a prediction method for vibro-acoustics of satellites during rocket launch has been conducted using a multidisciplinary analysis method of fluid, acoustic, and vibration. This coupling method consists of following four elements: numerical analyses of (1) sound generation, (2) sound propagation, (3) sound permeation, and (4) vibro-acoustics of payload. In the sound generation analysis, it can be seen from FEM analysis of a simply modeled deflector that a strong resonance o...

  16. Research on the sound absorption characteristics of porous metal materials at high sound pressure levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous metal materials are widely used in noise control with high sound pressure applications such as aircraft engine liners and combustion chambers for rocket engines due to their excellent performance of sound absorption characteristics and distinguished advantages in heat resistance, lightness, and stiffness. Understanding the effect of sound pressure on the acoustic properties of these materials is crucial when attempting to predict silencer performance. In this article, we experimentally investigate the sound absorption characteristics of porous metal materials at high sound pressure level. The effects of material parameters on the sound absorption characteristics of porous metal materials under high sound pressure level are further explored experimentally. Measurements are carried out by using a standard impedance tube that has been modified to accommodate sound pressure level of up to 150 dB. The experimental results show that with the increase in sound pressure level, the effect of sound pressure level on the sound absorption characteristics yields different variation regularities in different frequencies. The sound absorption performance of porous metal materials increases with the increase in sound pressure level in low frequency, which is reasonably consistent with the theoretical results. Under high sound pressure level, the sound absorption characteristics are significantly dependent upon the material parameters such as the metal fiber diameter, the material porosity, and the material thickness. It could provide a reliable experimental validation for the applications of porous metal materials in the area of vibration and noise control at high sound pressure levels.

  17. Transient combustion in hybrid rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Mustafa Arif

    1998-09-01

    Hybrid rockets regained interest recently as an alternative chemical propulsion system due to their advantages over the solid and liquid systems that are currently in use. Development efforts on hybrids revealed two important problem areas: (1) low frequency instabilities and (2) slow transient response. Both of these are closely related to the transient behavior which is a poorly understood aspect of hybrid operation. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical study of transient combustion in hybrid rockets. We follow the methodology of identifying and modeling the subsystems of the motor such as the thermal lags in the solid, boundary layer combustion and chamber gasdynamics from a dynamic point of view. We begin with the thermal lag in the solid which yield the regression rate for any given wall heat flux variation. Interesting phenomena such as overshooting during throttling and the amplification and phase lead regions in the frequency domain are discovered. Later we develop a quasi-steady transient hybrid combustion model supported with time delays for the boundary layer processes. This is integrated with the thermal lag system to obtain the thermal combustion (TC) coupled response. The TC coupled system with positive delays generated low frequency instabilities. The scaling of the instabilities are in good agreement with actual motor test data. Finally, we formulate a gasdynamic model for the hybrid chamber which successfully resolves the filling/emptying and longitudinal acoustic behavior of the motor. The TC coupled system is later integrated to the gasdynamic model to obtain the overall response (TCG coupled system) of gaseous oxidizer motors with stiff feed systems. Low frequency instabilities were also encountered for the TCG coupled system. Apart from the transient investigations, the regression rate behavior of liquefying hybrid propellants such as solid cryogenic materials are also studied. The theory is based on the possibility of enhancement

  18. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  19. The gravitational wave rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnor, W. B.; Piper, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    Einstein's equations admit solutions corresponding to photon rockets. In these a massive particle recoils because of the anisotropic emission of photons. In this paper we ask whether rocket motion can be powered only by the emission of gravitational waves. We use the double series approximation method and show that this is possible. A loss of mass and gain in momentum arise in the second approximation because of the emission of quadrupole and octupole waves.

  20. Large Payload Nuclear Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-06-01

    CORE TIMP . 5013R SOLIDO FRACrON ,0.7 REFL MAT: No 25O00 EFL TEMP. • 4000R Tg a 3.0 CM sot a 1.0 w• 20000 -.. 0U.. 1,iI.000. 0 •0 4~100 \\ 080I0...Boiling and Super - critical Pressure States," ARS 1710-61, presented at American Rocket Society Propellants, Combustion, and Liquid Rockets Conference

  1. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Auroral Turbulance II sounding rocket was launched on February 11, 1997 into moderately active nightside aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, US. The experiment consisted of three independent, completely instrumented payloads launched by a single vehicle. The aim of the experiment...

  2. Ultrasonic investigation of mechanical properties of double base rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeff, J.A. van der; Boer, R.S. de

    1976-01-01

    For a series of double base rocket propellants and for poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) the longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities are measured at a frequency of 0.351 MHz in t h e temperature range of −40°C to +60°C. The relations between these acoustic properties and mechanical properties

  3. Sound objects in time, space and action

    OpenAIRE

    Bourquin, N.

    2011-01-01

    SOUND OBJECTS IN TIME, SPACE AND ACTIONThe term "sound object" describes an auditory experience that is associated with an acoustic event produced by a sound source. At cortical level, sound objects are represented by temporo-spatial activity patterns within distributed neural networks. This investigation concerns temporal, spatial and action aspects as assessed in normal subjects using electrical imaging or measurement of motor activity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).Hear...

  4. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  5. Nitrous oxide cooling in hybrid rocket nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, has developed an innovative program of experimental research and development on hybrid rocket motors (where the fuel and the oxidizer are in different phases prior to combustion). One project currently underway involves the development of aerospike nozzles for such motors. These nozzles, however, are even more susceptible to throat ablation than regular converging-diverging nozzles, due the nature of their flow expansion mechanism. This paper presents the result of a recent development project focused on reducing throat ablation in hybrid rocket motor nozzles. Although the method is specifically targeted at increasing the life and operating range of aerospike nozzles, this paper describes its proof-of-concept implementation on conventional nozzles. The method is based on a regenerative cooling mechanism that differs in practice from that used in liquid propellant motors. A series of experimental tests demonstrate that this new method is not only effective at reducing damage in the most ablative region of the nozzle, but that the nozzle can survive multiple test runs.

  6. Rocket plume temperature measurement by wire welded thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang

    2006-05-01

    The plume of solid rocket motor is a high velocity flow with high temperature. Temperature distribution in the plume is of great interest for analyzing the compatibility of rocket weapon system. The high temperature exhausted flow field would cause damage on certain equipment and loading vehicles. An instantaneous temperature field with sharp step is established by the exhausted flow field of rocket motor. The increasing rate of the step depends on the flow velocity at cross section of nozzle exit. To perform an accurate measurement of temperature inside the flow field, a thermocouple must be sturdy enough to endure the flow impingement. In the meantime, the thermocouple must have a short time constant to trace the temperature fluctuation in flow field and a small size to avoid disturbing the flow field severely. The dynamic performance of the thermocouples used in exhausted flow temperature measurement must be evaluated before the experiment. The thermocouple which can be used in measuring the temperature distribution in rocket plume was presented in this paper. A NAMNAC (R) self-renew-erode thermocouples with a nominal time constant of 10 microseconds was used as a reference in a dynamic calibration test for this kind of thermocouple. The thermocouple could trace the temperature increase in the exhausted flow perfectly. This kind of thermocouples was used in several real tests of rocket motors, such as the temperature in free exhausted flow field of a stationary rocket motor test, the stagnate temperature in a shock flow field during the launching of a rocket, and the temperature in a launch tube.

  7. ROCKET PORT CLOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1963-02-12

    This invention provides a simple pressure-actuated closure whereby windowless observation ports are opened to the atmosphere at preselected altitudes. The closure comprises a disk which seals a windowless observation port in rocket hull. An evacuated instrument compartment is affixed to the rocket hull adjacent the inner surface of the disk, while the outer disk surface is exposed to the atmosphere through which the rocket is traveling. The pressure differential between the evacuated instrument compartment and the relatively high pressure external atmosphere forces the disk against the edge of the observation port, thereby effecting a tight seai. The instrument compartment is evacuated to a pressure equal to the atmospheric pressure existing at the altitude at which it is desiretl that the closure should open. When the rocket reaches this preselected altitude, the inwardly directed atmospheric force on the disk is just equaled by the residual air pressure force within the instrument compartment. Consequently, the closure disk falls away and uncovers the open observation port. The separation of the disk from the rocket hull actuates a switch which energizes the mechanism of a detecting instrument disposed within the instrument compartment. (AE C)

  8. Rocket Flight Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Waters

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Florida.

  9. Fin whale sound reception mechanisms: skull vibration enables low-frequency hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted W Cranford

    Full Text Available Hearing mechanisms in baleen whales (Mysticeti are essentially unknown but their vocalization frequencies overlap with anthropogenic sound sources. Synthetic audiograms were generated for a fin whale by applying finite element modeling tools to X-ray computed tomography (CT scans. We CT scanned the head of a small fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus in a scanner designed for solid-fuel rocket motors. Our computer (finite element modeling toolkit allowed us to visualize what occurs when sounds interact with the anatomic geometry of the whale's head. Simulations reveal two mechanisms that excite both bony ear complexes, (1 the skull-vibration enabled bone conduction mechanism and (2 a pressure mechanism transmitted through soft tissues. Bone conduction is the predominant mechanism. The mass density of the bony ear complexes and their firmly embedded attachments to the skull are universal across the Mysticeti, suggesting that sound reception mechanisms are similar in all baleen whales. Interactions between incident sound waves and the skull cause deformations that induce motion in each bony ear complex, resulting in best hearing sensitivity for low-frequency sounds. This predominant low-frequency sensitivity has significant implications for assessing mysticete exposure levels to anthropogenic sounds. The din of man-made ocean noise has increased steadily over the past half century. Our results provide valuable data for U.S. regulatory agencies and concerned large-scale industrial users of the ocean environment. This study transforms our understanding of baleen whale hearing and provides a means to predict auditory sensitivity across a broad spectrum of sound frequencies.

  10. Fin whale sound reception mechanisms: skull vibration enables low-frequency hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Ted W; Krysl, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Hearing mechanisms in baleen whales (Mysticeti) are essentially unknown but their vocalization frequencies overlap with anthropogenic sound sources. Synthetic audiograms were generated for a fin whale by applying finite element modeling tools to X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. We CT scanned the head of a small fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) in a scanner designed for solid-fuel rocket motors. Our computer (finite element) modeling toolkit allowed us to visualize what occurs when sounds interact with the anatomic geometry of the whale's head. Simulations reveal two mechanisms that excite both bony ear complexes, (1) the skull-vibration enabled bone conduction mechanism and (2) a pressure mechanism transmitted through soft tissues. Bone conduction is the predominant mechanism. The mass density of the bony ear complexes and their firmly embedded attachments to the skull are universal across the Mysticeti, suggesting that sound reception mechanisms are similar in all baleen whales. Interactions between incident sound waves and the skull cause deformations that induce motion in each bony ear complex, resulting in best hearing sensitivity for low-frequency sounds. This predominant low-frequency sensitivity has significant implications for assessing mysticete exposure levels to anthropogenic sounds. The din of man-made ocean noise has increased steadily over the past half century. Our results provide valuable data for U.S. regulatory agencies and concerned large-scale industrial users of the ocean environment. This study transforms our understanding of baleen whale hearing and provides a means to predict auditory sensitivity across a broad spectrum of sound frequencies.

  11. Fin Whale Sound Reception Mechanisms: Skull Vibration Enables Low-Frequency Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Ted W.; Krysl, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Hearing mechanisms in baleen whales (Mysticeti) are essentially unknown but their vocalization frequencies overlap with anthropogenic sound sources. Synthetic audiograms were generated for a fin whale by applying finite element modeling tools to X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. We CT scanned the head of a small fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) in a scanner designed for solid-fuel rocket motors. Our computer (finite element) modeling toolkit allowed us to visualize what occurs when sounds interact with the anatomic geometry of the whale’s head. Simulations reveal two mechanisms that excite both bony ear complexes, (1) the skull-vibration enabled bone conduction mechanism and (2) a pressure mechanism transmitted through soft tissues. Bone conduction is the predominant mechanism. The mass density of the bony ear complexes and their firmly embedded attachments to the skull are universal across the Mysticeti, suggesting that sound reception mechanisms are similar in all baleen whales. Interactions between incident sound waves and the skull cause deformations that induce motion in each bony ear complex, resulting in best hearing sensitivity for low-frequency sounds. This predominant low-frequency sensitivity has significant implications for assessing mysticete exposure levels to anthropogenic sounds. The din of man-made ocean noise has increased steadily over the past half century. Our results provide valuable data for U.S. regulatory agencies and concerned large-scale industrial users of the ocean environment. This study transforms our understanding of baleen whale hearing and provides a means to predict auditory sensitivity across a broad spectrum of sound frequencies. PMID:25633412

  12. Launching rockets and small satellites from the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.; Dougherty, W. M.; Pankow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Scientific payloads and their propulsion systems optimized for launch from the lunar surface differ considerably from their counterparts for use on earth. For spin-stabilized payloads, the preferred shape is a large diameter-to-length ratio to provide stability during the thrust phase. The rocket motor required for a 50-kg payload to reach an altitude of one lunar radius would have a mass of about 41 kg. To place spin-stabilized vehicles into low altitude circular orbits, they are first launched into an elliptical orbit with altitude about 840 km at aposelene. When the spacecraft crosses the desired circular orbit, small retro-rockets are fired to attain the appropriate direction and speed. Values of the launch angle, velocity increments, and other parameters for circular orbits of several altitudes are tabulated. To boost a 50-kg payload into a 100-km altitude circular orbit requires a total rocket motor mass of about 90 kg.

  13. Development status of M-V rocket structures and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Junjiro; Minesugi, Kenji; Watanabe, Naoyuki

    M-V is the next generation satellite launcher of the Mu rocket series of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). This paper describes the plan and the status of the development of its structure and mechanisms. The performance of the motor casings for the solid propellant rockets, which are the largest structural members in each stage, will be much improved by the introduction of new materials and new fabrication methods. For the nose-faring made of honeycomb sandwich shells with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) face sheet, a new separation joint is being developed, which is composed of an expanding shielded mild detonating cord. A unique inter-stage joint between the 1st and 2nd stages is being developed in order to accommodate to the fire-in-the-hole (FITH) ignition of the 2nd stage rocket motor.

  14. Cryogenic rocket engine development at Delft aerospace rocket engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J; Hermsen, R.; Huijsman, R; Akkermans, C.; Denies, L.; Barreiro, F.; Schutte, A.; Cervone, A.; Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current developments regarding cryogenic rocket engine technology at Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering (DARE). DARE is a student society based at Delft University of Technology with the goal of being the first student group in the world to launch a rocket into space. After

  15. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  16. Rockets in World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  17. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  18. Looming sounds are perceived as faster than receding sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G

    2016-01-01

    Each year thousands of people are killed by looming motor vehicles. Throughout our evolutionary history looming objects have posed a threat to survival and perceptual systems have evolved unique solutions to confront these environmental challenges. Vision provides an accurate representation of time-to-contact with a looming object and usually allows us to interact successfully with the object if required. However, audition functions as a warning system and yields an anticipatory representation of arrival time, indicating that the object has arrived when it is still some distance away. The bias provides a temporal margin of safety that allows more time to initiate defensive actions. In two studies this bias was shown to influence the perception of the speed of looming and receding sound sources. Listeners heard looming and receding sound sources and judged how fast they were moving. Listeners perceived the speed of looming sounds as faster than that of equivalent receding sounds. Listeners also showed better discrimination of the speed of looming sounds than receding sounds. Finally, close sounds were perceived as faster than distant sounds. The results suggest a prioritization of the perception of the speed of looming and receding sounds that mirrors the level of threat posed by moving objects in the environment.

  19. ROCKETS: Soar to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Christine E. W.; O'Merle, Mary Jane; White, Gene

    2017-01-01

    This article describes ROCKETS, an after-school program for at-risk youth, and how the university students became involved in this service-learning project. The article discusses the steps that were taken to start the program, what is being done to continue the program, and the challenges that faculty have faced. This program is an authentic…

  20. The Relativistic Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  1. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  2. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  3. Rocket Combustion Chamber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coating with the ability to protect (1) the inside wall (i.e., lining) of a rocket engine combustion chamber and (2) parts of other apparatuses that utilize or are exposed to combustive or high temperature environments. The novelty of this invention lies in the manner a protective coating is embedded into the lining.

  4. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  5. Rocket-Powered Parachutes Rescue Entire Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Langley Research Center helped BRS Aerospace, of Saint Paul, Minnesota, to develop technology that has saved 246 lives to date. The company s whole aircraft parachute systems deploy in less than 1 second thanks to solid rocket motors and are capable of arresting the descent of a small aircraft, lowering it safely to the ground. BRS has sold more than 30,000 systems worldwide, and the technology is now standard equipment on many of the world s top-selling aircraft. Parachutes for larger airplanes are in the works.

  6. Technical Advisory Team (TAT) report on the rocket sled test accident of October 9, 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stofleth, Jerome H.; Dinallo, Michael Anthony; Medina, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes probable causes and contributing factors that led to a rocket motor initiating prematurely while employees were preparing instrumentation for an AIII rocket sled test at SNL/NM, resulting in a Type-B Accident. Originally prepared by the Technical Advisory Team that provided technical assistance to the NNSA's Accident Investigation Board, the report includes analyses of several proposed causes and concludes that the most probable source of power for premature initiation of the rocket motor was the independent battery contained in the HiCap recorder package. The report includes data, evidence, and proposed scenarios to substantiate the analyses.

  7. Laser rocket system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  8. The relativistic rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antippa, Adel F [Departement de Physique, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful method that can be applied to a wide range of special relativistic problems of linear acceleration.

  9. Determinação da distribuição de funcionalidade de HTPB e verificação de sua influência no comportamento mecânico de poliuretano utilizado em motor-foguete Determination of functionality distribution of HTPB and evaluation of its influence in the mechanical behaviour of polyurethane used in rocket cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Lourenço

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Um método SEC com dupla detecção para determinação de distribuição de funcionalidade de resina polibutadiênica hidroxilada HTPB foi desenvolvido, verificando-se a influência desse parâmetro no comportamento mecânico de poliuretano utilizado em motor-foguete fabricado no Centro Técnico Aeroespacial (CTA. O método mostrou-se sensível a pequenas diferenças de funcionalidade e sua distribuição podendo ser utilizado para a caracterização mais completa da resina. Ensaios de tração realizados em amostras de PU sem carga refletiram pequenas diferenças de distribuição de funcionalidade existentes entre os lotes de polibutadieno hidroxilado.A size exclusion chromatography (SEC method, with double detection, was developed to determine the functionality distribution of hydroxyl polybutadiene (HTPB resin, evaluating the influence of that parameter on the mechanical behavior of HTPB polyurethane used as binder in the rocket motors manufactured at Centro Técnico Aeroespacial (CTA. The method showed to be sensitive to small differences in the functionality distribution of the HTPB resin and, thus, can be used for a more complete characterization of the resin. Tensile tests performed on HTPB polyurethane reflected the small differences observed in the functionality distribution of three batches of HTPB.

  10. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  11. Probe experiment with RIKI device on a meteorological rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapknov, S.K.; Ivanova, T.N.; Gusheva, M.N.; Knchev, A.G.; Tsvetkov, Z.I.

    1979-01-01

    The RIKI device carried on board the Centaure-II ionospheric sounding rocket launched on October 31, 1978 from the equatorial rocket base at Tumba, India in order to measure local plasma ion concentrations and temperatures is described. The device consists of a four-spherical-electrode and a three-spherical-electrode spherical ion trap and a block of measuring electronics mounted in the air-tight rocket container. The volt-ampere characteristics of protons traversing a system of concentric grids are determined in fine or coarse resolution as sweeping voltages are supplied to the grids from a sawtooth wave generator. Positive ions which penetrate the grids are collected by the ion trap collectors, and the current generated is used to determine operational modes. Measurements of ion concentration obtained with the RIKI device have been found to be in good agreement with electron concentration measurements obtained concurrently.

  12. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  13. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  14. Design Study: Rocket Based MHD Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the technical feasibility and design of a rocket based MHD generator using a sub-scale LOx/RP rocket motor. The design study was constrained by assuming the generator must function within the performance and structural limits of an existing magnet and by assuming realistic limits on (1) the axial electric field, (2) the Hall parameter, (3) current density, and (4) heat flux (given the criteria of heat sink operation). The major results of the work are summarized as follows: (1) A Faraday type of generator with rectangular cross section is designed to operate with a combustor pressure of 300 psi. Based on a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla, the electrical power output from this generator is estimated to be 54.2 KW with potassium seed (weight fraction 3.74%) and 92 KW with cesium seed (weight fraction 9.66%). The former corresponds to a enthalpy extraction ratio of 2.36% while that for the latter is 4.16%; (2) A conceptual design of the Faraday MHD channel is proposed, based on a maximum operating time of 10 to 15 seconds. This concept utilizes a phenolic back wall for inserting the electrodes and inter-electrode insulators. Copper electrode and aluminum oxide insulator are suggested for this channel; and (3) A testing configuration for the sub-scale rocket based MHD system is proposed. An estimate of performance of an ideal rocket based MHD accelerator is performed. With a current density constraint of 5 Amps/cm(exp 2) and a conductivity of 30 Siemens/m, the push power density can be 250, 431, and 750 MW/m(sup 3) when the induced voltage uB have values of 5, 10, and 15 KV/m, respectively.

  15. Neuroplasticity beyond sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reybrouck, Mark; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    adaptations in musicians, following long-term exposure to music, are then reviewed by keeping in mind the distinct subprocesses of a musical aesthetic experience. We conclude that these neural adaptations can be conceived of as the immediate and lifelong interactions with multisensorial stimuli (having...... to the immediate demands of the sounding environment. The resulting neural adaptations in musicians closely depend on the duration of the interactions, the starting age, the involvement of attention, the amount of motor practice and the musical genre played....

  16. Rocket + Science = Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris,Bruce; Sullivan, Greg; Burkey, Martin

    2010-01-01

    It's a cliche that rocket engineers and space scientists don t see eye-to-eye. That goes double for rocket engineers working on human spaceflight and scientists working on space telescopes and planetary probes. They work fundamentally different problems but often feel that they are competing for the same pot of money. Put the two groups together for a weekend, and the results could be unscientific or perhaps combustible. Fortunately, that wasn't the case when NASA put heavy lift launch vehicle designers together with astronomers and planetary scientists for two weekend workshops in 2008. The goal was to bring the top people from both groups together to see how the mass and volume capabilities of NASA's Ares V heavy lift launch vehicle could benefit the science community. Ares V is part of NASA's Constellation Program for resuming human exploration beyond low Earth orbit, starting with missions to the Moon. In the current mission scenario, Ares V launches a lunar lander into Earth orbit. A smaller Ares I rocket launches the Orion crew vehicle with up to four astronauts. Orion docks with the lander, attached to the Ares V Earth departure stage. The stage fires its engine to send the mated spacecraft to the Moon. Standing 360 feet high and weighing 7.4 million pounds, NASA's new heavy lifter will be bigger than the 1960s-era Saturn V. It can launch almost 60 percent more payload to translunar insertion together with the Ares I and 35 percent more mass to low Earth orbit than the Saturn V. This super-sized capability is, in short, designed to send more people to more places to do more things than the six Apollo missions.

  17. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch......Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects...... and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...

  18. ADEPT Sounding Rocket One (SR-1)Flight Experiment Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wercinski, Paul; Smith, B.; Yount, B.; Cassell, A.; Kruger, C.; Brivkalns, C.; Makino, A.; Duttta, S.; Ghassemieh, S.; Wu, S.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The SR-1 flight experiment will demonstrate most of the primary end-to-end mission stages including: launch in a stowed configuration, separation and deployment in exo-atmospheric conditions, and passive ballistic re-entry of a 70-degree half-angle faceted cone geometry.

  19. Rhenium Rocket Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion Branch has a research and technology program to develop high-temperature (2200 C), iridium-coated rhenium rocket chamber materials for radiation-cooled rockets in satellite propulsion systems. Although successful material demonstrations have gained much industry interest, acceptance of the technology has been hindered by a lack of demonstrated joining technologies and a sparse materials property data base. To alleviate these concerns, we fabricated rhenium to C-103 alloy joints by three methods: explosive bonding, diffusion bonding, and brazing. The joints were tested by simulating their incorporation into a structure by welding and by simulating high-temperature operation. Test results show that the shear strength of the joints degrades with welding and elevated temperature operation but that it is adequate for the application. Rhenium is known to form brittle intermetallics with a number of elements, and this phenomena is suspected to cause the strength degradation. Further bonding tests with a tantalum diffusion barrier between the rhenium and C-103 is planned to prevent the formation of brittle intermetallics.

  20. Sound settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund Mortensen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  1. A summary of laboratory testing performed to characterize and select an elastomeric O-ring material to be used in the redesigned solid rocket motors of the space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elastomeric O-ring material is used in the joints of the redesigned solid motors (RSRM's) of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS). The selection of the O-ring material used in the RSRM's was a very thorough process that included efforts by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Langley Research Center, and the Thiokol Corporation. One of the efforts performed at MSFC was an extensive in-house laboratory test regime to screen potential O-ring materials and ultimately to characterize the elastomeric material that was chosen to be used in the RSRM's. The laboratory tests performed at MSFC are summarized.

  2. What fuel for a rocket?

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, E N

    2012-01-01

    Elementary concepts from general physics and thermodynamics have been used to analyze rocket propulsion. Making some reasonable assumptions, an expression for the exit velocity of the gases is found. From that expression one can conclude what are the desired properties for a rocket fuel.

  3. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Second Sound - The Role of Elastic Waves. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/06/0015-0019 ...

  4. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. Second Sound - Waves of Entropy and Temperature. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/03/0016-0024 ...

  5. Sex difference in subjective duration of looming and receding sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Looming sounds (sounds increasing in intensity over time) are more salient than receding sounds (a looming sound reversed in time). For example, they are estimated as being longer, louder, and more changing in loudness than receding sounds. Some authors interpret the looming salience as evolutionarily adaptive, because it increases the margins of safety of the perceiver in the case of preparatory behaviours (e.g., a motor reaction to an approaching sound source). Recently, Neuhoff et al (2009, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 35 225-234) found that females more than males show overestimation of the spatiotemporal properties of virtually simulated looming sound sources. Here, I investigated whether the sex difference could be observed for the subjective duration of looming and receding sounds, and found that females more than males overestimate the duration of looming sounds in comparison to receding sounds.

  6. Experimental Study of Ballistic-Missile Base Heating with Operating Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, J. Cary

    1958-01-01

    A rocket of the 1000-pound-thrust class using liquid oxygen and JP-4 fuel as propellant was installed in the Lewis 8- by 6-foot tunnel to permit a controlled study of some of the factors affecting the heating of a rocket-missile base. Temperatures measured in the base region are presented from findings of three motor extension lengths relative to the base. Data are also presented for two combustion efficiency levels in the rocket motor. Temperature as high as 1200 F was measured in the base region because of the ignition of burnable rocket gases. combustibles that are dumped into the base by accessories seriously aggravate the base-burning temperature rise.

  7. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  8. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  9. Scale effects on solid rocket combustion instability behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greatrix, D. R. [Ryerson University, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The ability to understand and predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. A numerical model incorporating pertinent elements, such as a representative transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of scale effects (motor size, i.e., grain length and internal port diameter) on influencing instability-related behaviour in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the motor's size has a significant influence on transient pressure wave magnitude and structure, and on the appearance and magnitude of an associated base pressure rise. (author)

  10. Unidentified Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    , contextualised and conceptualised in an era of transmission. Observing that urban sounds until late 1930es are rarely heard in Danish radio compared to German and English broadcasting, I argue that an urban and auditory aesthetics incorporating noise, heterogeneity and unpredictability did not really develop......This article investigates how urban spaces and its noises are approached by radio reporters in the first decades of public radio production in Denmark. Focussing on the period before reel tape was incorporated in production by late 1940es, I ask how urban space and urban sounds are heard...... in Danish radio until early post-war years. Yet I trace early attempts at managing noisy urban conditions and demonstrate how reporters experimented with available technological repositories and developed techniques in order to make sense in and through urban environments. Inspired by Michel Serres idea...

  11. Exergy Analysis of Rocket Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew; Mesmer, Bryan; Watson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Exergy is defined as the useful work available from a system in a specified environment. Exergy analysis allows for comparison between different system designs, and allows for comparison of subsystem efficiencies within system designs. The proposed paper explores the relationship between the fundamental rocket equation and an exergy balance equation. A previously derived exergy equation related to rocket systems is investigated, and a higher fidelity analysis will be derived. The exergy assessments will enable informed, value-based decision making when comparing alternative rocket system designs, and will allow the most efficient configuration among candidate configurations to be determined.

  12. EEG sensorimotor correlates of translating sounds into actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Pineda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the actions of others is a necessary foundational cornerstone for effective and affective social interactions. Such understanding may result from a mapping of observed actions as well as heard sounds onto one’s own motor representations of those events. To examine the electrophysiological basis of action-related sounds, EEG data were collected in two studies from adults who were exposed to auditory events in one of three categories: action (either hand- or mouth-based sounds, non-action (environmental sounds, and control sounds (scrambled versions of action sounds. In both studies, triplets of sounds of the same category were typically presented, although occasionally, to insure an attentive state, trials containing a sound from a different category were presented within the triplet and participants were asked to respond to this oddball event either covertly in one study or overtly in another. Additionally, participants in both studies were asked to mimic hand- and mouth-based motor actions associated with the sounds (motor task. Action sounds elicited larger EEG mu rhythm (8-13 Hz suppression, relative to control sounds, primarily over left hemisphere, while non-action sounds showed larger mu suppression primarily over right hemisphere. Furthermore, hand-based sounds elicited greater mu suppression over the hand area in sensorimotor cortex compared to mouth-based sounds. These patterns of mu suppression across cortical regions to different categories of sounds and to effector-specific sounds suggest differential engagement of a mirroring system in the human brain when processing sounds.

  13. When Distance Matters: Perceptual Bias and Behavioral Response for Approaching Sounds in Peripersonal and Extrapersonal Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camponogara, I.; Komeilipoor, N.; Cesari, P.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on sound perception show a tendency to overestimate the distance of an approaching sound source, leading to a faster reaction time compared to a receding sound source. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether motor preparation and execution change according to the perceived sound direction and

  14. Product Sound: Acoustically pleasant motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, Laszlo

    is also presented here. The second chapter starts with an overview of the most widely used two level inverters and presentation of the basic modulation principles. A theoretical elaboration of the line-to-line voltage and vibration spectrum is presented in the next chapter, where a new unified analytical...

  15. An introduction to the water recovery x-ray rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Drew M.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Schultz, Ted B.; Donovan, Benjamin D.; Tutt, James H.; Yastishock, Daniel; Steiner, Tyler; Hillman, Christopher R.; McCoy, Jake A.; Wages, Mitchell; Hull, Sam; Falcone, Abe; Burrows, David N.; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Anderson, Tyler; McQuaide, Maria

    2017-08-01

    The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRXR) is a sounding rocket payload that will launch from the Kwajalein Atoll in April 2018 and seeks to be the first astrophysics sounding rocket payload to be water recovered by NASA. WRXR's primary instrument is a grating spectrometer that consists of a mechanical collimator, X-ray reflection gratings, grazing-incidence mirrors, and a hybrid CMOS detector. The instrument will obtain a spectrum of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the northern part of the Vela supernova remnant and is optimized for 3rd and 4th order OVII emission. Utilizing a field of view of 3.25° × 3.25° and resolving power of λ/δλ ≍40-50 in the lines of interest, the WRXR spectrometer aims to achieve the most highly-resolved spectrum of Vela's diffuse soft X-ray emission. This paper presents introductions to the payload and the science target.

  16. The Rocket Balloon (Rocketball): Applications to Science, Technology, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Originally envisioned to study upper atmospheric phenomena, the Rocket Balloon system (or Rocketball for short) has utility in a range of applications, including sprite detection and in-situ measurements, near-space measurements and calibration correlation with orbital assets, hurricane observation and characterization, technology testing and validation, ground observation, and education. A salient feature includes the need to reach space and near-space within a critical time-frame and in adverse local meteorological conditions. It can also provide for the execution of technology validation and operational demonstrations at a fraction of the cost of a space flight. In particular, planetary entry probe proof-of-concepts can be examined. A typical Rocketball operational scenario consists of a sounding rocket launch and subsequent deployment of a balloon above a desired location. An obvious advantage of this combination is the additional mission 'hang-time' rendered by the balloon once the sounding rocket flight is completed. The system leverages current and emergent technologies at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and other organizations.

  17. British used Congreve Rockets to Attack Napoleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Sir William Congreve developed a rocket with a range of about 9,000 feet. The incendiary rocket used black powder, an iron case, and a 16-foot guide stick. In 1806, British used Congreve rockets to attack Napoleon's headquarters in France. In 1807, Congreve directed a rocket attack against Copenhagen.

  18. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  19. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  20. Not just rocket science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAdam, S.; Anderson, R. [Celan Energy Systems, Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The paper explains a different take on oxyfuel combustion. Clean Energy Systems (CES) has integrated aerospace technology into conventional power systems, creating a zero-emission power generation technology that has some advantages over other similar approaches. When using coal as a feedstock, the CES process burns syngas rather than raw coal. The process uses recycled water and steam to moderate the temperature, instead of recycled CO{sub 2}. With no air ingress, the CES process produces very pure CO{sub 2}. This makes it possible to capture over 99% of the CO{sub 2} resulting from combustion. CES uses the combustion products to drive the turbines, rather than indirectly raising steam for steam turbines, as in the oxyfuel process used by companies such as Vattenfall. The core of the process is a high-pressure oxy-combustor adapted from rocket engine technology. This combustor burns gaseous or liquid fuels with gaseous oxygen in the presence of water. Fuels include natural gas, coal or coke-derived synthesis gas, landfill and biodigester gases, glycerine solutions and oil/water emulsion. 2 figs.

  1. Easier Analysis With Rocket Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing rocket engines is one of Marshall Space Flight Center's specialties. When Marshall engineers lacked a software program flexible enough to meet their needs for analyzing rocket engine fluid flow, they overcame the challenge by inventing the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which was named the co-winner of the NASA Software of the Year award in 2001. This paper describes the GFSSP in a wide variety of applications

  2. Scale effects on quasi-steady solid rocket internal ballistic behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greatrix, D. R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5B2K3 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor's performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size). The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor's internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor's internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale. (author)

  3. SAFE Testing Nuclear Rockets Economically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Steven D.; Travis, Bryan; Zerkle, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  4. An investigation of the side force that is sometimes observed in rocket start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, J. M., Jr.; Kreiter, G. W.; Petersen, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The occurrence of a large but momentary side force during the start-up of rocket motors employing convergent-divergent nozzles has been noted occasionally. Asymmetric flow separation within the divergent section of the nozzle is proposed as the principal source of this lateral force. A method for estimating this force and its concomitant lateral impulse is outlined, and results obtained by applying the method to Scout vehicle first-, second-, and third-stage rocket motor start-ups are presented and compared with similar estimates that other researchers obtained by a different method.

  5. The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Drew

    2017-08-01

    The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R) is a diffuse soft X-ray spectrometer that will launch on a sounding rocket from the Kwajalein Atoll. WRX-R has a field of view of >10 deg2 and will observe the Vela supernova remnant. A mechanical collimator, state-of-the-art off-plane reflection grating array and hybrid CMOS detector will allow WRX to achieve the most highly-resolved spectrum of the Vela SNR ever recorded. In addition, this payload will fly a hard X-ray telescope that is offset from the soft X-ray spectrometer in order to observe the pulsar at the center of the remnant. We present here an introduction to the instrument, the expected science return, and an update on the state of the payload as we work towards launch.

  6. Scanning Rocket Impact Area with an UAV: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C. C. C.; Costa, D. A. L. M.; Junior, V. L. S.; Silva, B. R. F.; Leite, D. L.; Junor, C. E. B. S.; Liberator, B. A.; Nogueira, M. B.; Senna, M. D.; Santiago, G. S.; Dantas, J. B. D.; Alsina, P. J.; Albuquerque, G. L. A.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the first subsystems developed for an UAV used in safety procedures of sounding rockets campaigns. The aim of this UAV is to scan the rocket impact area in order to search for unexpected boats. To achieve this mission, designers developed an image recognition algorithm, two human-machine interfaces and two communication links, one to control the drone and the other for receiving telemetry data. In this paper, developers take all major engineering decisions in order to overcome the project constraints. A secondary goal of the project is to encourage young people to take part in Brazilian space program. For this reason, most of designers are undergraduate students under supervision of experts.

  7. Study of Rapid-Regression Liquefying Hybrid Rocket Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilliac, Greg; DeZilwa, Shane; Karabeyoglu, M. Arif; Cantwell, Brian J.; Castellucci, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A report describes experiments directed toward the development of paraffin-based hybrid rocket fuels that burn at regression rates greater than those of conventional hybrid rocket fuels like hydroxyl-terminated butadiene. The basic approach followed in this development is to use materials such that a hydrodynamically unstable liquid layer forms on the melting surface of a burning fuel body. Entrainment of droplets from the liquid/gas interface can substantially increase the rate of fuel mass transfer, leading to surface regression faster than can be achieved using conventional fuels. The higher regression rate eliminates the need for the complex multi-port grain structures of conventional solid rocket fuels, making it possible to obtain acceptable performance from single-port structures. The high-regression-rate fuels contain no toxic or otherwise hazardous components and can be shipped commercially as non-hazardous commodities. Among the experiments performed on these fuels were scale-up tests using gaseous oxygen. The data from these tests were found to agree with data from small-scale, low-pressure and low-mass-flux laboratory tests and to confirm the expectation that these fuels would burn at high regression rates, chamber pressures, and mass fluxes representative of full-scale rocket motors.

  8. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  9. Scale Effects on Solid Rocket Combustion Instability Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Greatrix

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to understand and predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. A numerical model incorporating pertinent elements, such as a representative transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of scale effects (motor size, i.e., grain length and internal port diameter on influencing instability-related behaviour in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the motor’s size has a significant influence on transient pressure wave magnitude and structure, and on the appearance and magnitude of an associated base pressure rise.

  10. Yes--This is Rocket Science: MMCs for Liquid Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelley, J

    2001-01-01

    The Air Force's Integrated High-Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies (IHPRPT) Program has established aggressive goals for both improved performance and reduced cost of rocket engines and components...

  11. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  12. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...

  13. A weak equivalence principle test on a suborbital rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reasenberg, Robert D; Phillips, James D, E-mail: reasenberg@cfa.harvard.ed [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    We describe a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle, to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. The test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of sigma(eta) < 10{sup -16} after averaging the results of eight separate drops. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm Hz{sup -1/2}. The discovery of a violation (eta not = 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

  14. A weak equivalence principle test on a suborbital rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Reasenberg, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    We describe a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle, to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. The test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of sigma(eta) < 10^-16 after averaging the results of eight separate drops. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm Hz^-1/2. The discovery of a violation (eta not equal to 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  15. Rocket Science 101 Interactive Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Dennis; Funkhouse, Deborah; DiMarzio, Donald

    2007-01-01

    To better educate the public on the basic design of NASA s current mission rockets, Rocket Science 101 software has been developed as an interactive program designed to retain a user s attention and to teach about basic rocket parts. This program also has helped to expand NASA's presence on the Web regarding educating the public about the Agency s goals and accomplishments. The software was designed using Macromedia s Flash 8. It allows the user to select which type of rocket they want to learn about, interact with the basic parts, assemble the parts to create the whole rocket, and then review the basic flight profile of the rocket they have built.

  16. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  17. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  18. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  19. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  20. Attitude Dynamics of a Spinning Rocket with Internal Fluid Whirling Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Ionut MARMUREANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact that helical motion of fluid products of combustion within the combustion chamber of a rocket can have on the attitude dynamics of rocket systems. By developing the study presented by Sookgaew (2004, we determined the configuration of the Coriolis moment components, which catch the impact of the combustion product’s whirling motion, for the radial and centripetal propellant burn pattern specific to S-5M and S-5K solid rocket motors. We continue the investigation of the effects of internal whirling motion of fluid products of combustion on the attitude behavior of variable mass systems of the rocket type by examining the spin motion and transverse attitude motion of such systems. The results obtained show that internal fluid whirling motion can cause appreciable deviations in spin rate predictions, and also affects the frequencies of the transverse angular velocity components.

  1. Sound knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    The thesis is about the conceptualisation of knowledge associated with ‘evidence’. In the Danish society, there is a proliferating demand for ‘evidence’, which started as the basis of practices in medicine and has spread into social work, education and most policymaking arenas. The aim of the res......The thesis is about the conceptualisation of knowledge associated with ‘evidence’. In the Danish society, there is a proliferating demand for ‘evidence’, which started as the basis of practices in medicine and has spread into social work, education and most policymaking arenas. The aim...... of the research is to investigate what is considered to ‘work as evidence’ in health promotion and how the ‘evidence discourse’ influences social practices in policymaking and in research. From investigating knowledge practices in the field of health promotion, I develop the concept of sound knowledge...... as knowledge based on reflexive practices. I chose ‘health promotion’ as the field for my research as it utilises knowledge produced in several research disciplines, among these both quantitative and qualitative. I mapped out the institutions, actors, events, and documents that constituted the field of health...

  2. Sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  3. Subtyping Children with Speech Sound Disorders by Endophenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara A.; Avrich, Allison A.; Freebairn, Lisa A.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Stein, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examined associations of 5 endophenotypes (i.e., measurable skills that are closely associated with speech sound disorders and are useful in detecting genetic influences on speech sound production), oral motor skills, phonological memory, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and speeded naming, with 3 clinical criteria…

  4. Interventions for Speech Sound Disorders in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. Lynn, Ed.; McLeod, Sharynne, Ed.; McCauley, Rebecca J., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    With detailed discussion and invaluable video footage of 23 treatment interventions for speech sound disorders (SSDs) in children, this textbook and DVD set should be part of every speech-language pathologist's professional preparation. Focusing on children with functional or motor-based speech disorders from early childhood through the early…

  5. Metal Matrix Composites for Liquid Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelley, J

    2001-01-01

    ...) technologies being developed for application to Liquid Rocket Engines (LIRE). Developments in LRE technology for the US Air Force are being tracked and planned through the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies Program (IHPRPT...

  6. Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate an Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension (ICRNE) for use in rocket thrust chambers. The ICRNE will utilize an...

  7. Laser diagnostics for small rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Frank J.; Degroot, Wilhelmus A.

    1993-11-01

    Two nonintrusive flowfield diagnostics based on spectrally-resolved elastic (Rayleigh) and inelastic (Raman) laser light scattering were developed for obtaining local flowfield measurements in low-thrust gaseous H2/O2 rocket engines. The objective is to provide an improved understanding of phenomena occurring in small chemical rockets in order to facilitate the development and validation of advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for analyzing engine performance. The laser Raman scattering diagnostic was developed to measure major polyatomic species number densities and rotational temperatures in the high-density flowfield region extending from the injector through the chamber throat. Initial application of the Raman scattering diagnostic provided O2 number density and rotational temperature measurements in the exit plane of a low area-ratio nozzle and in the combustion chamber of a two-dimensional, optically-accessible rocket engine. In the low-density nozzle exit plane region where the Raman signal is too weak, a Doppler-resolved laser Rayleigh scattering diagnostic was developed to obtain axial and radial mean gas velocities, and in certain cases, H2O translational temperature and number density. The results from these measurements were compared with theoretical predictions from the RPLUS CFD code for analyzing rocket engine performance. Initial conclusions indicate that a detailed and rigorous modeling of the injector is required in order to make direct comparisons between laser diagnostic measurements and CFD predictions at the local level.

  8. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  9. Calculating Speed of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  10. F. Gomez Arias' rocket vehicle project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, R.

    1977-01-01

    Research done by Spanish pioneer rocket scientists in the 19th century was investigated with major emphasis placed on F. Gomez Arias' rocket vehicle project. Arias, considered the world's first designer of rocket propelled, manned aircraft, was interested in solving the problem of space navigation. Major concerns included ascent and direction of heavier-than-airmachines, as well as ascent and direction of balloons.

  11. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  12. Intercepting a sound without vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Vercillo

    Full Text Available Visual information is extremely important to generate internal spatial representations. In the auditory modality, the absence of visual cues during early infancy does not preclude the development of some spatial strategies. However, specific spatial abilities might result impaired. In the current study, we investigated the effect of early visual deprivation on the ability to localize static and moving auditory stimuli by comparing sighted and early blind individuals' performance in different spatial tasks. We also examined perceptual stability in the two groups of participants by matching localization accuracy in a static and a dynamic head condition that involved rotational head movements. Sighted participants accurately localized static and moving sounds. Their localization ability remained unchanged after rotational movements of the head. Conversely, blind participants showed a leftward bias during the localization of static sounds and a little bias for moving sounds. Moreover, head movements induced a significant bias in the direction of head motion during the localization of moving sounds. These results suggest that internal spatial representations might be body-centered in blind individuals and that in sighted people the availability of visual cues during early infancy may affect sensory-motor interactions.

  13. Hard X-ray Vela supernova observation on rocket experiment WRX-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlikova, V.; Urban, M.; Nentvich, O.; Daniel, V.; Sieger, L.; Tutt, J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a hard X-ray telescope for the Vela nebula observation during a sounding rocket flight. The Water Recovery X-ray Rocket (WRX-R) experiment is organised by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA with a primary payload of a soft X-ray spectroscope. The Czech team developed a hard X-ray Lobster-eye telescope as a secondary payload. The Czech experiment’s astrophysical object of study is the Vela pulsar in the centre of the Vela nebula.

  14. Large Solid Rocket Motor Safety Analyses: Thermal Effects Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    source (industrial site…), hazard flux (propagation, toxic species dispersion, fire and explosion) and targets submitted to damage (personnel, material...and two propellant compositions (20% and 4% of Aluminium in mass) are tested within this first setup. The solid propellants are produced by the SME...and it is 1.10 mm/s ±0.04 mm/s with the 4% Aluminium one. In other words, higher aluminium rate in mass is, faster the solid propellant burns

  15. Investigations of Novel Energetic Materials to Stabilize Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-30

    The main conclusions are: (i.) small changes in the composition and thermodynamic properties of a propellant have significant consequences for...while for both O2 and water the temperature is ~4000 K. These correspond to the thermodynamic equilibrium for the three oxidizers. There is much...Specifically, it is believed that the TiO2 accelerates HClO4 decomposition ( HClO4 is a product of AP decomposition) to cause an exotherm within the matrix

  16. Aluminum Agglomeration and Trajectory in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-30

    agglomerates coming off the surface of a burning propellant. These methods include film studies 6, quench particles combustion bomb (QPCB) devices similar...34the stepwise oxidation of aluminum (that) is caused by the sequence of polymorphic phase transitions occurring in the growing oxide film ",2 5 . 25... cinematography data from China Lake. Task 2.2, Aluminum Agglomeration Model Selection (SEA/BYU/ATK Task) Part of the model selection task has already been

  17. An Investigation of Particulate Behavior in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    together with corresponding pictures taken with the high- speed cinematography method. The latter were obtained from the films taken by Diloreto [Ref...High-Speed Cinematography Metallized Propellants Holography Light Scattering 20. AT~tFT (C.U50us on Fever aide if ft oGo. IF d Ids t I- I IO 1101...Page I. INTRODUCTION ---------------------------------- 10 II. -METHOD OF INVESTIGATION ----------------------- 19 III. HIGH-SPEED CINEMATOGRAPHY

  18. Design Methods in Solid Rocket Motors. Revised Version 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    souleves par l’evaluation des caracteristiques en vieillissement , l’assurance de la qualite et la verification des marges de securite. 3.4. Conception et...2.2.2 VIEILLISSEMENT Chaque sp~cimen fabriqu~ doit ~tre capable d’assurer ses fonctions avec une probabilit~ sup~rieure A une valeur minimale lors de

  19. The problem of space travel: The rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordung, Hermann; Stuhlinger, Ernst (Editor); Hunley, J. D. (Editor); Garland, Jennifer (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This is an English translation of Noordung's 'Das Problem der Befahrung des Weltraums'. It is a part of the NASA History Series. The book provides Noordung's insight as to how a space station might be constructed. Keep in mind that the author passed away in 1929. It contains ideas that were criticized for faults and those that were acclaimed for their potentially successful ingenuity.

  20. Modeling of Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Solid Propellant Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    techniques required to deal with such discontinuities are discussed in Sections 2.5 and 6.4. Ihe inclusion of end burning effects does not require any...provide a vent time of approximately 20% of the period of the fundamento acoustic mode of the chamber. By varying the design of the pulser, it is possible

  1. Some Considerations Relating to Combustion in Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-03-01

    by Nicholson22 for studying the mechanism of flame stabilization in the wakes of bluff bodies. Briefly the method consists in suspending fine...6) ADGW (R&D) -16-S IV.P. 334 TECH. NOTE: R.P.D. 30 iU N IS SI EF E DFIG . I WCffPffN mppm FIG.I. QUASI THREE DIMENSIONAL MODELS FOR STUDY OF FLOW IN COMBUSTION CHAMBERS ’t",CLASSIFIED ~4A

  2. Development of moldable carbonaceous materials for ablative rocket nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, R. J.; Bortz, S. A.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a materials system developed for use as low-cost ablative nozzles for NASA's 260-in. solid rocket motor. Petroleum coke and carbon black fillers were employed; high density was achieved by controlling particle size distribution. An alumina catalyzed furfuryl ester resin which produced high carbon residues after pyrolysis was employed as the binder. Staple carbon fibers improved the strength and crack resistance of molded bodies. In static firing tests of two subscale nozzles, this material compared favorably in erosion rate with several other ablative systems.

  3. Making Sound Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  4. Multichannel Sound Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkki, Ville

    Spatial reproduction of sound is a field in which the spatial attributes of a real recording room or a virtual space are reproduced to the listener. Spatial attributes include for example directions of sound sources, directions of reflections and envelopment by reverberation. Many such systems employ more than two loudspeakers to create virtual sources. This is called multichannel sound or spatial sound reproduction.

  5. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  6. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  7. Little Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M. Bani-Khair

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Spider and the Fly   You little spider, To death you aspire... Or seeking a web wider, To death all walking, No escape you all fighters… Weak and fragile in shape and might, Whatever you see in the horizon, That is destiny whatever sight. And tomorrow the spring comes, And the flowers bloom, And the grasshopper leaps high, And the frogs happily cry, And the flies smile nearby, To that end, The spider has a plot, To catch the flies by his net, A mosquito has fallen down in his net, Begging him to set her free, Out of that prison, To her freedom she aspires, Begging...Imploring...crying,  That is all what she requires, But the spider vows never let her free, His power he admires, Turning blind to light, And with his teeth he shall bite, Leaving her in desperate might, Unable to move from site to site, Tied up with strings in white, Wrapped up like a dead man, Waiting for his grave at night,   The mosquito says, Oh little spider, A stronger you are than me in power, But listen to my words before death hour, Today is mine and tomorrow is yours, No escape from death... Whatever the color of your flower…     Little sounds The Ant The ant is a little creature with a ferocious soul, Looking and looking for more and more, You can simply crush it like dead mold, Or you can simply leave it alone, I wonder how strong and strong they are! Working day and night in a small hole, Their motto is work or whatever you call… A big boon they have and joy in fall, Because they found what they store, A lesson to learn and memorize all in all, Work is something that you should not ignore!   The butterfly: I’m the butterfly Beautiful like a blue clear sky, Or sometimes look like snow, Different in colors, shapes and might, But something to know that we always die, So fragile, weak and thin, Lighter than a glimpse and delicate as light, Something to know for sure… Whatever you have in life and all these fields, You are not happier than a butterfly

  8. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    . In order to examine paraffin/additive combustion in a motor environment, I conducted experiments on well characterized aluminum based additives. In particular, I investigate the influence of aluminum, unpassivated aluminum, milled aluminum/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and aluminum hydride on the performance of paraffin fuels for hybrid rocket propulsion. I use an optically accessible combustor to examine the performance of the fuel mixtures in terms of characteristic velocity efficiency and regression rate. Each combustor test consumes a 12.7 cm long, 1.9 cm diameter fuel strand under 160 kg/m 2s of oxygen at up to 1.4 MPa. The experimental results indicate that the addition of 5 wt.% 30 mum or 80 nm aluminum to paraffin increases the regression rate by approximately 15% compared to neat paraffin grains. At higher aluminum concentrations and nano-scale particles sizes, the increased melt layer viscosity causes slower regression. Alane and Al/PTFE at 12.5 wt.% increase the regression of paraffin by 21% and 32% respectively. Finally, an aging study indicates that paraffin can protect air and moisture sensitive particles from oxidation. The opposed burner and aluminum/paraffin hybrid rocket experiments show that additives can alter bulk fuel properties, such as viscosity, that regulate entrainment. The general effect of melt layer properties on the entrainment and regression rate of paraffin is not well understood. Improved understanding of how solid additives affect the properties and regression of paraffin is essential to maximize performance. In this document I investigate the effect of melt layer properties on paraffin regression using inert additives. Tests are performed in the optical cylindrical combustor at ˜1 MPa under a gaseous oxygen mass flux of ˜160 kg/m2s. The experiments indicate that the regression rate is proportional to mu0.08rho 0.38kappa0.82. In addition, I explore how to predict fuel viscosity, thermal conductivity, and density prior to testing

  9. Nanoparticles for solid rocket propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galfetti, L [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); De Luca, L T [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); Severini, F [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); Meda, L [Polimeri Europa, Istituto G Donegani, Novara (Italy); Marra, G [Polimeri Europa, Istituto G Donegani, Novara (Italy); Marchetti, M [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale ed Astronautica, Rome (Italy); Regi, M [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale ed Astronautica, Rome (Italy); Bellucci, S [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    The characterization of several differently sized aluminium powders, by BET (specific surface), EM (electron microscopy), XRD (x-ray diffraction), and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), was performed in order to evaluate their application in solid rocket propellant compositions. These aluminium powders were used in manufacturing several laboratory composite solid rocket propellants, based on ammonium perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and hydroxil-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was an AP/HTPB/Al composition with 68/17/15% mass fractions respectively. The ballistic characterization of the propellants, in terms of steady burning rates, shows better performance for propellant compositions employing nano-aluminium when compared to micro-aluminium. Results obtained in the pressure range 1-70 bar show that by increasing the nano-Al mass fraction or decreasing the nano-Al size, larger steady burning rates are measured with essentially the same pressure sensitivity.

  10. Device for installing rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A device for installing rocket engines is reported that is supported at a cant relative to vertical by an axially extensible, tiltable pedestal. A lifting platform supports the rocket engine at its thrust chamber exit, including a mount having a concentric base characterized by a concave bearing surface, a plurality of uniformly spaced legs extended radially from the base, and an annular receiver coaxially aligned with the base and affixed to the distal ends of said legs for receiving the thrust chamber exit. The lifting platform rests on a seat concentrically related to the pedestal and affixed to an extended end portion thereof having a convex bearing surface mated in sliding engagement with the concave bearing surface of the annular base for accommodating a rocking motion of the platform.

  11. Rocket Engine Altitude Simulation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jody L.; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center is embarking on a very ambitious era in its rocket engine propulsion test history. The first new large rocket engine test stand to be built at Stennis Space Center in over 40 years is under construction. The new A3 Test Stand is designed to test very large (294,000 Ibf thrust) cryogenic propellant rocket engines at a simulated altitude of 100,000 feet. A3 Test Stand will have an engine testing chamber where the engine will be fired after the air in the chamber has been evacuated to a pressure at the simulated altitude of less than 0.16 PSIA. This will result in a very unique environment with extremely low pressures inside a very large chamber and ambient pressures outside this chamber. The test chamber is evacuated of air using a 2-stage diffuser / ejector system powered by 5000 lb/sec of steam produced by 27 chemical steam generators. This large amount of power and flow during an engine test will result in a significant acoustic and vibrational environment in and around A3 Test Stand.

  12. In-flight performance of the polarization modulator in the CLASP rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Giono, Gabriel; Beabout, Dyana L.; Beabout, Brent L.; Nakayama, Satoshi; Tajima, Takao

    2016-07-01

    We developed a polarization modulation unit (PMU), a motor system to rotate a waveplate continuously. In polarization measurements, the continuous rotating waveplate is an important element as well as a polarization analyzer to record the incident polarization in a time series of camera exposures. The control logic of PMU was originally developed for the next Japanese solar observation satellite SOLAR-C by the SOLAR-C working group. We applied this PMU for the Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP). CLASP is a sounding rocket experiment to observe the linear polarization of the Lyman-alpha emission (121.6 nm vacuum ultraviolet) from the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun with a high polarization sensitivity of 0.1 % for the first time and investigate their vector magnetic field by the Hanle effect. The driver circuit was developed to optimize the rotation for the CLASP waveplate (12.5 rotations per minute). Rotation non- uniformity of the waveplate causes error in the polarization degree (i.e. scale error) and crosstalk between Stokes components. We confirmed that PMU has superior rotation uniformity in the ground test and the scale error and crosstalk of Stokes Q and U are less than 0.01 %. After PMU was attached to the CLASP instrument, we performed vibration tests and confirmed all PMU functions performance including rotation uniformity did not change. CLASP was successfully launched on September 3, 2015, and PMU functioned well as designed. PMU achieved a good rotation uniformity, and the high precision polarization measurement of CLASP was successfully achieved.

  13. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the Stratospheric Plumes of Three Rockets During the ACCENT Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Brock, C. A.; Reeves, J. M.; Ross, M. N.; Schmid, O.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The global impact of particles emitted by rocket engines on stratospheric ozone is not well understood, mainly due to the lack of comprehensive in situ measurements of the size distributions of these emitted particles. During the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) missions in 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft carried the University of Denver N-MASS and FCAS instruments into the stratospheric plumes from three rockets. Size distributions of particles with diameters from 4 to approximately 2000 nm were calculated from the instrument measurements using numerical inversion techniques. The data have been averaged over 30-second intervals. The particle size distributions observed in all of the rocket plumes included a dominant mode near 60 nm diameter, probably composed of alumina particles. A smaller mode at approximately 25 nm, possibly composed of soot particles, was seen in only the plumes of rockets that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as a propellant. Aircraft exhaust emitted by the WB-57F was also sampled; the size distributions within these plumes are consistent with prior measurements in aircraft plumes. The size distributions for all rocket intercepts have been fitted to bimodal, lognormal distributions to provide input for global models of the stratosphere. Our data suggest that previous estimates of the solid rocket motor alumina size distributions may underestimate the alumina surface area emission index, and so underestimate the particle surface area available for heterogeneous chlorine activation reactions in the global stratosphere.

  14. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  15. Transient desorption of water vapor - A potential source of error in upper atmosphere rocket experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, B. R. F.; Weeks, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Results of measurements of the outgassing rates of samples of materials and surface finishes used on the outer skins of rocket-borne experiment packages in simulated rocket ascents. The results showed outgassing rates for anodized aluminum in the second minute of flight which are two to three orders of magnitude higher than those given in typical tables of outgassing rates. The measured rates for aluminum with chromate conversion surface coatings were also abnormally high. These abnormally high initial rates fell quickly after about five to ten minutes to values comparable with those in the published literature. It is concluded that anodized and chromate conversion coatings on the aluminum outer surfaces of a sounding rocket experiment package will cause gross distortion of the true water vapor environment.

  16. A Green, Safe, Dual-pulse Solid Motor for CubeSat Orbit Changing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Small satellites such as CubeSats are in need of responsive propulsion, but are limited due to their size. Though single pulse, AP/HTPB fueled solid rocket motors...

  17. Synthesized size-sound sound symbolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockwood, G.F.; Hagoort, P.; Dingemanse, M.; Papafragou, A.; Grodner, D.; Mirman, D.; Trueswell, J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of sound symbolism have shown that people can associate sound and meaning in consistent ways when presented with maximally contrastive stimulus pairs of nonwords such as bouba/kiki (rounded/sharp) or mil/mal (small/big). Recent work has shown the effect extends to antonymic words from

  18. Romanian MRE Rocket Engines Program - An Early Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugescu, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    (MRE) was initiated in the years '60 of the past century at the Chair of Aerospace Sciences "Elie Carafoli" from the "Politehnica" University in Bucharest (PUB). Consisting of theoretical and experimental investigations in the form of computational methods and technological solutions for small size MRE-s and the concept of the test stand for these engines, the program ended in the construction of the first Romanian liquid rocket motors. Hermann Oberth and Dorin Pavel, were known from 1923, no experimental practice was yet tempted, at the time level of 1960. It was the intention of the developers at PUB to cover this gap and initiate a feasible, low-cost, demonstrative program of designing and testing experimental models of MRE. The research program was oriented towards future development of small size space carrier vehicles for scientific applications only, as an independent program with no connection to other defense programs imagined by the authorities in Bucharest, at that time. Consequently the entire financial support was assured by "Politehnica" university. computerized methods in the thermochemistry of heterogeneous combustion, for both steady and unsteady flows with chemical reactions and two phase flows. The research was gradually extended to the production of a professional CAD program for steady-state heat transfer simulations and the loading capacity analyses of the double wall, cooled thrust chamber. The resulting computer codes were run on a 360-30 IMB machine, beginning in 1968. Some of the computational methods were first exposed at the 9th International Conference on Applied Mechanics, held in Bucharest between June 23-27, 1969. hot testing of a series of storable propellant, variable thrust, variable geometry, liquid rocket motors, with a maximal thrust of 200N. A remotely controlled, portable test bad, actuated either automatically or manually and consisting of a 6-modules construction was built for this motor series, with a simple 8 analog

  19. Two-dimensional motions of rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoonhwan [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS), Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Saebyok [Institute for Gifted Students, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the descending parts of the trajectories tend to be gentler and straighter slopes than the ascending parts for relatively large launching angles due to the non-vanishing thrusts. We discuss the ranges, the maximum altitudes and the engine performances of the rockets. It seems that the exponential fuel exhaustion can be the most potent engine for the longest and highest flights.0.

  20. Aqueous foam experiments in the MAXUS 6 rocket: towards the development of an ISS module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marze, S.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Langevin, D.; Cox, S. J.; Weaire, D.

    2005-08-01

    We report results of aqueous foam experiments performed in the MAXUS 6 sounding rocket, dealing both with technological and scientific issues. On the technological side, the performed tests concern the methods for controlled foam generation and destruction. On the scientific side, we present the results of an imbibition experiment, in which some liquid is injected into the foam and its propagation followed by electrical conductimetry. Comparisons with numerical simulations are made, evidencing a good agreement.

  1. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  2. Principles of underwater sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urick, Robert J

    1983-01-01

    ... the immediately useful help they need for sonar problem solving. Its coverage is broad-ranging from the basic concepts of sound in the sea to making performance predictions in such applications as depth sounding, fish finding, and submarine detection...

  3. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  4. Catalytic Decomposition of Nitrous Monopropellant for Hybrid Motor Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an inexpensive and readily available non-toxic rocket motor oxidizer. It is the most commonly used oxidizer for hybrid bipropellant rocket systems, and several bipropellant liquid rocket designs have also used nitrous oxide. In liquid form, N2O is highly stable, but in vapor form it has the potential to decompose exothermically, releasing up to 1865 Joules per gram of vapor as it dissociates into nitrogen and oxygen. Consequently, it has long been considered as a potent...

  5. Scale Effects on Quasi-Steady Solid Rocket Internal Ballistic Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Greatrix

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor’s performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size. The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor’s internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor’s internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale.

  6. Scale Effects on Quasi-Steady Solid Rocket Internal Ballistic Behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greatrix, David R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor’s performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size). The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor’s internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor’s internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale.

  7. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  8. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  9. Form Follows Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Caramiaux, Baptiste; Altavilla, Alessandro; Pobiner, Scott G.; Tanaka, Atau

    2015-01-01

    Sonic interaction is the continuous relationship between user actions and sound, mediated by some technology. Because interaction with sound may be task oriented or experience-based it is important to understand the nature of action-sound relationships in order to design rich sonic interactions. We propose a participatory approach to sonic interaction design that first considers the affordances of sounds in order to imagine embodied interaction, and based on this, generates interaction models...

  10. Focused Rocket-Ejector RBCC Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2003-01-01

    This document reports the results of additional efforts for the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) rocket-ejector mode research work carried out at the Perm State Propulsion Engineering Research Center in support of NASA s technology development efforts for enabling 3rd generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The two tasks conducted under this program build on earlier NASA MSFC funded research program on rocket ejector investigations. The first task continued a systematic investigation of the improvements provided by a gaseous hydrogen (GHz)/oxygen (GO2) twin thruster RBCC rocket ejector system over a single rocket system. In a similar vein, the second task continued investigations into the performance of a hydrocarbon (liquid JP-7)/gaseous oxygen single thruster rocket-ejector system. To gain a systematic understanding of the rocket-ejector s internal fluid mechanic/combustion phenomena, experiments were conducted with both direct-connect and sea-level static diffusion and afterburning (DAB) configurations for a range of rocket operating conditions. For all experimental conditions, overall system performance was obtained through global measurements of wall static pressure profiles, heat flux profiles and engine thrust. For the GH2/GO2 propellant rocket ejector experiments, high frequency measurements of the pressure field within the system were also made to understand the unsteady behavior of the flowfield.

  11. High regression rate hybrid rocket fuel grains with helical port structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sean D.

    Hybrid rockets are popular in the aerospace industry due to their storage safety, simplicity, and controllability during rocket motor burn. However, they produce fuel regression rates typically 25% lower than solid fuel motors of the same thrust level. These lowered regression rates produce unacceptably high oxidizer-to-fuel (O/F) ratios that produce a potential for motor instability, nozzle erosion, and reduced motor duty cycles. To achieve O/F ratios that produce acceptable combustion characteristics, traditional cylindrical fuel ports are fabricated with very long length-to-diameter ratios to increase the total burning area. These high aspect ratios produce further reduced fuel regression rate and thrust levels, poor volumetric efficiency, and a potential for lateral structural loading issues during high thrust burns. In place of traditional cylindrical fuel ports, it is proposed that by researching the effects of centrifugal flow patterns introduced by embedded helical fuel port structures, a significant increase in fuel regression rates can be observed. The benefits of increasing volumetric efficiencies by lengthening the internal flow path will also be observed. The mechanisms of this increased fuel regression rate are driven by enhancing surface skin friction and reducing the effect of boundary layer "blowing" to enhance convective heat transfer to the fuel surface. Preliminary results using additive manufacturing to fabricate hybrid rocket fuel grains from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) with embedded helical fuel port structures have been obtained, with burn-rate amplifications up to 3.0x than that of cylindrical fuel ports.

  12. Underwater Sound Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutger van Aalst; Ines Simic

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a possible solution to the underwater sound filtering problem, using Blind Source Separation. The problem regards splitting sound from a boat engine and the water waves to prove the possibility to extract one sound fragment from the other on the open sea. The illustrations shown

  13. Sound art and the annihilation of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Shaun

    This thesis describes the way in which sound is taken up and subsequently suppressed within the visual arts. The idealisation and development of sound as a plastic material is able to be traced within the modernist trajectory, which, reflecting a set of cultural practices and having developed its own specific terminologies, comes to regard any material, or anything conceived of as material, as appropriate and adequate to the expression of its distinctive and guiding concepts and metaphors. These concepts and metaphors are discussed as already having at their bases strongly visualist biases, the genealogies of which are traced within traditional or formal philosophies. Here, the marginalising tendency of ocularcentrism is exposed, but the very nature and contingency of marginalisation is found to work for the sound artist (where the perpetuation of the mythologised 'outsider' figure is desired) but against sound which is positioned in a purely differential and negative relation. In this epistemological and ontological reduction, sound becomes simply a visual metaphor or metonymic contraction which forecloses the possibility of producing other ways of articulating its experience or of producing any markedly alternative 'readings'. Rather than simply attempting to reverse the hierarchisation of the visual over the aural, or of prefacing sound within a range of artistic practices (each which would keep the negative tradition going) sound's ambiguous relation to the binarism of presence/absence, system and margin, is, however oddly, elaborated. The strategy which attempts to suspend sound primarily within and under the mark of the concept is interrogated and its limits exposed. The sound artist, the 'margin surfer' is revealed as a perhaps deeply conservative figure who may in the end desire the suppression of sound, and who, actually rejecting any destabilising and threatening notion of 'radical alterity' anxiously clings to the 'marginalised' modernist pretence. It is

  14. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering.......The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  15. The Development of Rocketry Capability in New Zealand—World Record Rocket and First of Its Kind Rocketry Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Buchanan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The University of Canterbury has developed a rocket research group, UC Rocketry, which recently broke the world altitude record for an I-class motor (impulse of 320–640 Ns and has run a rocketry course for the first time in New Zealand. This paper discusses the development and results of the world record rocket “Milly” and details all the fundamental elements of the rocketry final year engineering course, including the manufacturing processes, wind tunnel testing, avionics, control and the final rocket launch of “Smokey”. The rockets Milly and Smokey are an example of the design, implementation and testing methodologies that have significantly contributed to research and graduates for New Zealand’s space program.

  16. Pressure And Thermal Modeling Of Rocket Launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.; Farmer, Richard C.; Freeman, Jon A.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents mathematical model for use in designing rocket-launching stand. Predicts pressure and thermal environment, as well as thermal responses of structures to impinging rocket-exhaust plumes. Enables relatively inexperienced analyst to determine time-varying distributions and absolute levels of pressure and heat loads on structures.

  17. Aerodynamics and flow characterisation of multistage rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G.; Prakash, M. V. S.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to conduct a systematic flow analysis on single, double and multistage rockets using ANSYS software. Today non-air breathing propulsion is increasing dramatically for the enhancement of space exploration. The rocket propulsion is playing vital role in carrying the payload to the destination. Day to day rocket aerodynamic performance and flow characterization analysis has becoming challenging task to the researchers. Taking this task as motivation a systematic literature is conducted to achieve better aerodynamic and flow characterization on various rocket models. The analyses on rocket models are very little especially in numerical side and experimental area. Each rocket stage analysis conducted for different Mach numbers and having different flow varying angle of attacks for finding the critical efficiency performance parameters like pressure, density and velocity. After successful completion of the analysis the research reveals that flow around the rocket body for Mach number 4 and 5 best suitable for designed payload. Another major objective of this paper is to bring best aerodynamics flow characterizations in both aero and mechanical features. This paper also brings feature prospectus of rocket stage technology in the field of aerodynamic design.

  18. Ionospheric shock waves triggered by rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Lin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional structure of the shock wave signatures in ionospheric electron density resulting from a rocket transit using the rate of change of the total electron content (TEC derived from ground-based GPS receivers around Japan and Taiwan for the first time. From the TEC maps constructed for the 2009 North Korea (NK Taepodong-2 and 2013 South Korea (SK Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-II rocket launches, features of the V-shaped shock wave fronts in TEC perturbations are prominently seen. These fronts, with periods of 100–600 s, produced by the propulsive blasts of the rockets appear immediately and then propagate perpendicularly outward from the rocket trajectory with supersonic velocities between 800–1200 m s−1 for both events. Additionally, clear rocket exhaust depletions of TECs are seen along the trajectory and are deflected by the background thermospheric neutral wind. Twenty minutes after the rocket transits, delayed electron density perturbation waves propagating along the bow wave direction appear with phase velocities of 800–1200 m s−1. According to their propagation character, these delayed waves may be generated by rocket exhaust plumes at earlier rocket locations at lower altitudes.

  19. V-2 Rocket at White Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    A V-2 rocket takes flight at White Sands, New Mexico, in 1946. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  20. The early scientific history of the rocket-grenade experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    In the decade, 1950 to 1960, some thirty sounding rockets carrying the grenade experiment were fired in the Arctic, at middle latitudes and in the equatorial western Pacific. The vertical distributions of temperatures and winds at different seasons and at different times of the day were measured. Although there were significant variations in the results from each of the sites, an outstanding feature was the uniformity with latitude of the seasonal variation of the wind field. Over the latitude-altitude ranges sampled, the winds were strong and from the west during the winter months; and weak and from the east during the summer months. The nature of the general circulation pattern in the mesosphere of the northern hemisphere was revealed by the measurements. Of particular interest were those measurements made at the seasonal turnovers because of the insight into the dynamics of this region they provided.

  1. Singular Optimal Controls of Rocket Motion (Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiforenko, B. N.

    2017-05-01

    Survey of modern state and discussion of problems of the perfection of methods of investigation of variational problems with a focus on mechanics of space flight are presented. The main attention is paid to the enhancement of the methods of solving of variational problems of rocket motion in the gravitational fields, including rocket motion in the atmosphere. These problems are directly connected with the permanently actual problem of the practical astronautics to increase the payload that is orbited by the carrier rockets in the circumplanetary orbits. An analysis of modern approaches to solving the problems of control of rockets and spacecraft motion on the trajectories with singular arcs that are optimal for the motion of the variable mass body in the medium with resistance is given. The presented results for some maneuvers can serve as an information source for decision making on designing promising rocket and space technology

  2. Rocket and radar investigation of background electrodynamics and bottom-type scattering layers at the onset of equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Sounding rocket experiments were conducted during the NASA EQUIS II campaign on Kwajalein Atoll designed to elucidate the electrodynamics and layer structure of the postsunset equatorial F region ionosphere prior to the onset of equatorial spread F (ESF. Experiments took place on 7 and 15 August 2004, each comprised of the launch of an instrumented and two chemical release sounding rockets. The instrumented rockets measured plasma number density, vector electric fields, and other parameters to an apogee of about 450 km. The chemical release rockets deployed trails of trimethyl aluminum (TMA which yielded wind profile measurements. The Altair radar was used to monitor coherent and incoherent scatter in UHF and VHF bands. Electron density profiles were also measured with rocket beacons and an ionosonde. Strong plasma shear flow was evident in both experiments. Bottom-type scattering layers were observed mainly in the valley region, below the shear nodes, in westward-drifting plasma strata. The layers were likely produced by wind-driven interchange instabilities as proposed by Kudeki and Bhattacharyya (1999. In both experiments, the layers were patchy and distributed periodically in space. Their horizontal structure was similar to that of the large-scale plasma depletions that formed later at higher altitude during ESF conditions. We argue that the bottom-type layers were modulated by the same large-scale waves that seeded the ESF. A scenario where the large-scale waves were themselves produced by collisional shear instabilities is described.

  3. Coupled simulation of CFD-flight-mechanics with a two-species-gas-model for the hot rocket staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Reimann, Bodo; Eggers, Thino

    2016-11-01

    The hot rocket staging is to separate the lowest stage by directly ignite the continuing-stage-motor. During the hot staging, the rocket stages move in a harsh dynamic environment. In this work, the hot staging dynamics of a multistage rocket is studied using the coupled simulation of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Flight Mechanics. Plume modeling is crucial for a coupled simulation with high fidelity. A 2-species-gas model is proposed to simulate the flow system of the rocket during the staging: the free-stream is modeled as "cold air" and the exhausted plume from the continuing-stage-motor is modeled with an equivalent calorically-perfect-gas that approximates the properties of the plume at the nozzle exit. This gas model can well comprise between the computation accuracy and efficiency. In the coupled simulations, the Navier-Stokes equations are time-accurately solved in moving system, with which the Flight Mechanics equations can be fully coupled. The Chimera mesh technique is utilized to deal with the relative motions of the separated stages. A few representative staging cases with different initial flight conditions of the rocket are studied with the coupled simulation. The torque led by the plume-induced-flow-separation at the aft-wall of the continuing-stage is captured during the staging, which can assist the design of the controller of the rocket. With the increasing of the initial angle-of-attack of the rocket, the staging quality becomes evidently poorer, but the separated stages are generally stable when the initial angle-of-attack of the rocket is small.

  4. Sound a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Sound is integral to how we experience the world, in the form of noise as well as music. But what is sound? What is the physical basis of pitch and harmony? And how are sound waves exploited in musical instruments? Sound: A Very Short Introduction looks at the science of sound and the behaviour of sound waves with their different frequencies. It also explores sound in different contexts, covering the audible and inaudible, sound underground and underwater, acoustic and electronic sound, and hearing in humans and animals. It concludes with the problem of sound out of place—noise and its reduction.

  5. Studies on Pre-Ignition Chamber Dynamics of Solid Rockets with Different Port Geometries

    OpenAIRE

    S. Vivek; Sharad Sharan; R. Arvind; D. V. Praveen; J. Vigneshwar; S. Ajith; V. R. Sanal Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper numerical studies have been carried out to examine the pre-ignition flow features of high-performance solid propellant rocket motors with two different port geometries but with same propellant loading density. Numerical computations have been carried out using a validated 3D, unsteady, 2nd-order implicit, SST k- ω turbulence model. In the numerical study, a fully implicit finite volume scheme of the compressible, Reynolds-Averaged, Navier- Stokes equations i...

  6. Identification of Noise Sources During Rocket Engine Test Firings and a Rocket Launch Using a Microphone Phased-Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; Mosher, Robert N.; Porter, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    A 70 microphone, 10-foot by 10-foot, microphone phased array was built for use in the harsh environment of rocket launches. The array was setup at NASA Wallops launch pad 0A during a static test firing of Orbital Sciences' Antares engines, and again during the first launch of the Antares vehicle. It was placed 400 feet away from the pad, and was hoisted on a scissor lift 40 feet above ground. The data sets provided unprecedented insight into rocket noise sources. The duct exit was found to be the primary source during the static test firing; the large amount of water injected beneath the nozzle exit and inside the plume duct quenched all other sources. The maps of the noise sources during launch were found to be time-dependent. As the engines came to full power and became louder, the primary source switched from the duct inlet to the duct exit. Further elevation of the vehicle caused spilling of the hot plume, resulting in a distributed noise map covering most of the pad. As the entire plume emerged from the duct, and the ondeck water system came to full power, the plume itself became the loudest noise source. These maps of the noise sources provide vital insight for optimization of sound suppression systems for future Antares launches.

  7. The sound of distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglia, Cristina D; Maglio, Sam J; Krehm, Madelaine; Seok, Jin H; Trope, Yaacov

    2016-07-01

    Human languages may be more than completely arbitrary symbolic systems. A growing literature supports sound symbolism, or the existence of consistent, intuitive relationships between speech sounds and specific concepts. Prior work establishes that these sound-to-meaning mappings can shape language-related judgments and decisions, but do their effects generalize beyond merely the linguistic and truly color how we navigate our environment? We examine this possibility, relating a predominant sound symbolic distinction (vowel frontness) to a novel associate (spatial proximity) in five studies. We show that changing one vowel in a label can influence estimations of distance, impacting judgment, perception, and action. The results (1) provide the first experimental support for a relationship between vowels and spatial distance and (2) demonstrate that sound-to-meaning mappings have outcomes that extend beyond just language and can - through a single sound - influence how we perceive and behave toward objects in the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sound insulation between dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  9. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  10. The electric motor handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, R.W.; Feltham, P. (eds.)

    2004-05-01

    This handbook outlines the important role that electric motors play in modern society. It covers the field of motor applications from various motor types to their use and repair. It also presents practical applications of electric motors and methods on motor efficiency. More than half of all electricity generated, and 75 per cent of all industrial electricity consumption is consumed by electric motors. Electrical personnel must be aware of all factors involved in electric motors in order to choose and apply the appropriate size of electric motor. These factors include efficiency, sizing and proper application. The efficient use and maximum life expectancy of electric motors depends on proper motor protection, control and maintenance. This handbook includes articles from leading experts on electric motors in modern electrical systems. The content includes: design considerations; proper electric motor sizing techniques; optimal electric motor application; electric motor protection technology; electric motor control principles; electric motor maintenance and troubleshooting; induction electric motors; electric motor bearing currents; electric motor bearing lubrication; electromagnetism; electric motor enclosures; electric motor testing; electric motor repair; DC electric motor; electric motor starters; electric motor brushes; industrial electric motors; electric motor diagrams; AC electric motors; electric motor wiring; electric motor service; electric motor rewinding; electric motor winding; diagram of electric motor wiring; electric motor kit; and, troubleshooting electric motors. A directory of motor manufacturers and suppliers was also included. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Orcas in Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Washington. Mumford, T.F. 2007. Kelp and Eelgrass in Puget Sound. Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Report No. 2007-05. Published by Seattle District, U.S...2006). Wild Chinook populations continue to decline due to dam con- struction, overall habitat loss , loss of prey and historical over-fishing...Sanford (2006) pointed out that current mean weight of adult Chinook salmon returning to their spawn- ing grounds in Puget Sound is only 56 percent of

  12. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  13. Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber/Phenolic Matrix Composites for Rocket Nozzles and Heat Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, R. D.; Pittman, C. U., Jr.; Wang, L.; Day, A.; Hill, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    The ablation and mechanical and thermal properties of vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF)/phenolic resin composites were evaluated to determine the potential of using this material in solid rocket motor nozzles. Composite specimens with varying VGCF loading (30%-50% wt) including one sample with ex-rayon carbon fiber plies were prepared and exposed to a plasma torch for 20 s with a heat flux of 16.5 MW/sq m at approximately 1650 C. Low erosion rates and little char formation were observed, confirming that these materials were promising for rocket motor nozzle materials. When fiber loadings increased, mechanical properties and ablative properties improved. The VGCF composites had low thermal conductivities (approximately 0.56 W/m-C) indicating they were good insulating materials. If a 65% fiber loading in VGCF composite can be achieved, then ablative properties are projected to be comparable to or better than the composite material currently used on the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM).

  14. Motor teams :

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Switch. Welte et al, 1998, Gross et al, 2002. Motion of Lipid droplets in Drosophila embryos. Page 7. • Stochastic transitions between two species of motor yields Bidirectional motion. • Tuning of single-motor parameters. • No need to invoke a ...

  15. Rocket-borne Lithium ejection system for neutral wind measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habu, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Watanabe, S.; Larsen, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    Chemical tracer releases represent the most widely used technique for in situ neutral wind measurements in the thermosphere/ionosphere region. Different chemicals have been used for this purpose, but lithium releases in particular provide some unique capabilities due to the strong resonant emissions that are produced when lithium is illuminated by sunlight. The majority of the lithium releases from sounding rockets were carried out in the 1960's and 1970's, but there has been recent renewed interest in the use of lithium vapor releases to extend neutral wind measurements into the F region and for daytime wind profile measurements in the E region. The rocketborne Lithium Ejection System (LES) is a chemical release device that has been developed for the Japanese space research program. Since lithium vapor acts as a neutral tracer, the winds are obtained by tracking the motion of the clouds or trails optically from the ground using the bright red emission that is characteristic of the chemical. Lithium is a solid at room temperature, so that a gas release requires rapid vaporization of the metal to make the cloud at the intended altitude. The release canister is designed to produce a high-heat chemical reaction without gaseous products. Appropriate mixtures of thermite are employed as the heat source. In early experiments, lithium pellets were mixed directly into the thermite. However, since lithium is an active chemical, the use of lithium-thermite mixtures creates potential hazards when used in a rocket-borne device. Moreover, the pyrotechnic devices used to ignite the thermite also have to be considered in the payload canister design to assure that the safety standards for sounding rockets are satisfied. The design of the LES, described in this paper, was based on the safety requirements and the reliability in storing and handling of the materials. The LES design is also flexible in that the lithium tracer material can be replaced with other chemicals without

  16. Molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  17. Electro magnetic compatibility of rockets; Rocket ni okeru denji tekigosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Y. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Outlined herein is electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC), which is of crucial importance for rockets and satellites. It is concerned with interference between electronic devices, resulting from increased quantities of electromagnetic waves. This problem can be solved by keeping conducted emission (CE: emission of noise) or radiated emission (RE: radiated noise) of one component lower than conducted susceptibility (CS: resistance to noise) or radiated susceptibility (RS: ability of preventing malfunction by noise) of another component. The EMC-related standards have been established, base on the above concepts. They fall into two general categories; CISPR- and MIL-centered ones. MIL-STD-461 is one of the basic EMC standards for space craft. The aerospace industry should solve the various EMC-related problems specific to flying bodies, such as limited spaces for on-board devices, diversified types of components, common power sources, combinations of components supplied by different makers and ungrounded devices. The EMC testing unit installed can measure 20 Hz to 18 GHz of radiated noise and 20 Hz to 1 GHz of conducted noise, and works in an electrical field of up to 60 V/m at 14 KHz to 18 GHz. (NEDO)

  18. Regenerative cooling for liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer in the thrust chamber is of great importance in the design of liquid propellant rocket engines. Regenerative cooling is an advanced method which can ensure not only the proper running but also higher performance of a rocket engine. The theoretical model is complicated, it relates to fluid dynamics, heat transfer, combustion, etc... In this paper, a regenerative cooling model is presented. Effects such as radiation, heat transfer to environment, variable thermal properties and coking are included in the model. This model can be applied to all kinds of liquid propellant rocket engines as well as similar constructions. The modularized computer code is completed in the work.

  19. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Forecasting method is a normative forecasting technique that allows the designer to quantify the effects of adding new technologies on a given design. This method can be used to assess and identify the necessary technological improvements needed to close the gap that exists between the current design and one that satisfies all constraints imposed on the design. The TIF methodology allows for more design knowledge to be brought to the earlier phases of the design process, making use of tools such as Quality Function Deployments, Morphological Matrices, Response Surface Methodology, and Monte Carlo Simulations.2 This increased knowledge allows for more informed decisions to be made earlier in the design process, resulting in shortened design cycle time. This paper will investigate applying the TIF method, which has been widely used in aircraft applications, to the conceptual design of a hydrocarbon rocket engine. In order to reinstate a manned presence in space, the U.S. must develop an affordable and sustainable launch capability. Hydrocarbon-fueled rockets have drawn interest from numerous major government and commercial entities because they offer a low-cost heavy-lift option that would allow for frequent launches1. However, the development of effective new hydrocarbon rockets would likely require new technologies in order to overcome certain design constraints. The use of advanced design methods, such as the TIF method, enables the designer to identify key areas in need of improvement, allowing one to dial in a proposed technology and assess its impact on the system. Through analyses such as this one, a conceptual design for a hydrocarbon-fueled vehicle that meets all imposed requirements can be achieved.

  20. Early Spin-Stabilised Rockets - the Rockets of Bergrat Heinrich Gottlob Kuhn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, H.-D.

    19th century's war rockets were at first stabilised by sticks, but these sticks produced a very uncertain flight path and it often happened that rockets changed their direction and even flew back to their firing position. So very many early inventors in Europe, America, and British-India tried to stabilise the rocket's flight in a better way. They tried fins and even rotation but they did not succeed. It is said in history that William Hale was the first who succeeded in constructing a spin stabilised (i.e. rotating) rocket which worked. But before him, in the thirties of that century, a German amateur rocket inventor succeeded as well and secretly proved his stickless rotating rockets in trials for Prussian officers and some years later officially for Saxon artillery officers. His invention was then bought by the kingdom of Saxony, but these were never use in the field because of lack of money.

  1. The Trail Inventory of Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  2. Notes on Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bonnie Jones creates improvised and composed text-sound performances that explore the fluidity and function of electronic noise (field recordings, circuit bending and text (poetry, found, spoken. She is interested in how people perceive, “read” and interact with these sounds and texts given our current technological moment.

  3. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  4. Shadow of sound

    OpenAIRE

    Prvacki, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: "Shadow of sound is a musical flip book, an attempt to move sound through pages and to measure music visually. Prvacki demonstrates that 40 seconds of Bach's Minuet in G Major fit on 150 pages.".

  5. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects with...

  6. The sounds of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norah; Deane, Cormac; Murphy, Padraig

    2017-07-01

    Public perceptions of nanotechnology are shaped by sound in surprising ways. Our analysis of the audiovisual techniques employed by nanotechnology stakeholders shows that well-chosen sounds can help to win public trust, create value and convey the weird reality of objects on the nanoscale.

  7. OMNIDIRECTIONAL SOUND SOURCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    A sound source comprising a loudspeaker (6) and a hollow coupler (4) with an open inlet which communicates with and is closed by the loudspeaker (6) and an open outlet, said coupler (4) comprising rigid walls which cannot respond to the sound pressures produced by the loudspeaker (6). According...

  8. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  9. Peripheral motor dynamics of song production in the zebra finch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Franz; Cooper, Brenton G

    2004-06-01

    Singing behavior in songbirds is a model system for motor control of learned behavior. The target organs of its central motor programs are the various muscle systems involved in sound generation. Investigation of these peripheral motor mechanisms of song production is the first step toward an understanding of how different motor systems are coordinated. Here we review physiological studies of all major motor systems that are involved in song production and modification in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). Acoustic syllables of zebra finch song are produced by a characteristic air sac pressure pattern. Electromyographic (EMG) and sonomicrometric recording of expiratory muscle activity reveals that respiratory motor control is tightly coordinated with syringeal gating of airflow. Recordings of bronchial airflow demonstrate that most of the song syllables are composed of simultaneous independent contributions from the two sides of the syrinx. Sounds generated in the syrinx can be modified by the resonance properties of the upper vocal tract. Tracheal length affects resonance, but dynamic changes of tracheal length are unlikely to make a substantial contribution to sound modification. However, beak movements during song contribute to sound modification and, possibly, affect the vibratory behavior of the labia. Rapid beak aperture changes were associated with nonlinear transitions in the acoustic structure of individual syllables. The synergy between respiratory and syringeal motor systems, and the unique bilateral, simultaneous, and independent sound production, combined with dynamic modification of the acoustic structure of song, make the zebra finch an excellent model system for exploring mechanisms of sensorimotor integration underlying a complex learned behavior.

  10. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    OpenAIRE

    Mboyi, Kalomba; Ren, Junxue; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the e...

  11. Stepper motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  12. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  13. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    National schemes for sound classification of dwellings exist in more than ten countries in Europe, typically published as national standards. The schemes define quality classes reflecting different levels of acoustical comfort. Main criteria concern airborne and impact sound insulation between...... dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity...... is needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality...

  14. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories...... of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel....... The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  15. 21 CFR 866.4830 - Rocket immunoelectro-phoresis equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rocket immunoelectro-phoresis equipment. 866.4830... § 866.4830 Rocket immunoelectro-phoresis equipment. (a) Identification. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis... called rocket immunoelectrophoresis. In this procedure, an electric current causes the protein in...

  16. Fundamentals of aircraft and rocket propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, Ahmed F

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive basics-to-advanced course in an aero-thermal science vital to the design of engines for either type of craft. The text classifies engines powering aircraft and single/multi-stage rockets, and derives performance parameters for both from basic aerodynamics and thermodynamics laws. Each type of engine is analyzed for optimum performance goals, and mission-appropriate engines selection is explained. Fundamentals of Aircraft and Rocket Propulsion provides information about and analyses of: thermodynamic cycles of shaft engines (piston, turboprop, turboshaft and propfan); jet engines (pulsejet, pulse detonation engine, ramjet, scramjet, turbojet and turbofan); chemical and non-chemical rocket engines; conceptual design of modular rocket engines (combustor, nozzle and turbopumps); and conceptual design of different modules of aero-engines in their design and off-design state. Aimed at graduate and final-year undergraduate students, this textbook provides a thorough grounding in th...

  17. Magnesium Based Rockets for Martian Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed Phase II program, we will continue the development of Mg bipropellant rockets for Martian PAV applications. In Phase I, we proved the feasibility of...

  18. Photon rockets moving arbitrarily in any dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Podolsky, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    A family of explicit exact solutions of Einstein's equations in four and higher dimensions is studied which describes photon rockets accelerating due to an anisotropic emission of photons. It is possible to prescribe an arbitrary motion, so that the acceleration of the rocket need not be uniform - both its magnitude and direction may vary with time. Except at location of the point-like rocket the spacetimes have no curvature singularities, and topological defects like cosmic strings are also absent. Any value of a cosmological constant is allowed. We investigate some particular examples of motion, namely a straight flight and a circular trajectory, and we derive the corresponding radiation patterns and the mass loss of the rockets. We also demonstrate the absence of "gravitational aberration" in such spacetimes. This interesting member of the higher-dimensional Robinson-Trautman class of pure radiation spacetimes of algebraic type D generalises the class of Kinnersley's solutions that has long been known in f...

  19. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A non-intrusive method for measuring velocities in a rocket exhaust is proposed in a joint effort by MetroLaser and Vanderbilt University. Hydroxyl Tagging...

  20. Ionospheric modification by rocket effluents. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhardt, P.A.; Price, K.M.; da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes experimental and theoretical studies related to ionospheric disturbances produced by rocket exhaust vapors. The purpose of our research was to estimate the ionospheric effects of the rocket launches which will be required to place the Satellite Power System (SPS) in operation. During the past year, we have developed computational tools for numerical simulation of ionospheric changes produced by the injection of rocket exhaust vapors. The theoretical work has dealt with (1) the limitations imposed by condensation phenomena in rocket exhaust; (2) complete modeling of the ionospheric depletion process including neutral gas dynamics, plasma physics, chemistry and thermal processes; and (3) the influence of the modified ionosphere on radio wave propagation. We are also reporting on electron content measurements made during the launch of HEAO-C on Sept. 20, 1979. We conclude by suggesting future experiments and areas for future research.

  1. Manufacturing Advanced Channel Wall Rocket Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will adapt and demonstrate a low cost flexible method of manufacturing channel wall liquid rocket nozzles and combustors, while providing developers a...

  2. Magnesium Based Rockets for Martian Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop Mg rockets for Martian ascent vehicle applications. The propellant can be acquired in-situ from MgO in the Martian regolith (5.1% Mg by mass)...

  3. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a safe, highly-reliable, low-cost and uniquely versatile propulsion...

  4. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  5. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a highly-reliable, low-cost and...

  6. NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Bramon, Christopher J.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. The goal of the first mission, which will be uncrewed, is to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft before a crewed flight in 2021. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. Common logistics concerns for SLS include integration of discreet programs geographically separated, multiple prime contractors with distinct and different goals, schedule pressures and funding constraints. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. The new program is a confluence of new hardware and heritage, with heritage hardware constituting seventy-five percent of the program. This unique approach to design makes logistics concerns such as commonality especially problematic. Additionally, a very low manifest rate of one flight every four years makes logistics comparatively expensive. That, along with the SLS architecture being developed using a block upgrade evolutionary approach, exacerbates long-range planning for supportability considerations. These common and unique logistics challenges must be clearly identified and tackled to allow SLS to have a successful program. This paper will address the common and unique challenges facing the SLS programs, along with the analysis and decisions the NASA Logistics engineers are making to mitigate the threats posed by each.

  7. Focused RBCC Experiments: Two-Rocket Configuration Experiments and Hydrocarbon/Oxygen Rocket Ejector Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2003-01-01

    This addendum report documents the results of two additional efforts for the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) rocket-ejector mode research work carried out at the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center in support of NASA s technology development efforts for enabling 3 d generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The tasks reported here build on an earlier NASA MSFC funded research program on rocket ejector investigations. The first task investigated the improvements of a gaseous hydrogen/oxygen twin thruster RBCC rocket ejector system over a single rocket system. The second task investigated the performance of a hydrocarbon (liquid JP-7)/gaseous oxygen single thruster rocket-ejector system. To gain a systematic understanding of the rocket-ejector s internal fluid mechanic/combustion phenomena, experiments were conducted with both direct-connect and sea-level static diffusion and afterburning (DAB) configurations for a range of rocket operating conditions. For all experimental conditions, overall system performance was obtained through global measurements of wall static pressure profiles, heat flux profiles and engine thrust. Detailed mixing and combustion information was obtained through Raman spectroscopy measurements of major species (gaseous oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and water vapor) for the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen rocket ejector experiments.

  8. Iranian rocket launch alarms the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandron, Michelle

    2008-03-01

    Iran came a step closer to becoming a space-faring nation last month, with the successful test of a rocket capable of carrying a satellite into orbit and the opening of a new space centre. Western commentators, however, have expressed scepticism about whether Iran really does have the technology to successfully launch a satellite, suggesting instead that the country is more interested in developing intercontinental ballistic missiles, which require similarly powerful rockets.

  9. Bondi-Sachs metrics and Photon Rockets

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Huabin; Su, Qiping; Wang, Ding; Zhang, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    We study the Bondi-Sachs rockets with nonzero cosmological constant. We observe that the acceleration of the systems arises naturally in the asymptotic symmetries of (anti-) de Sitter spacetimes. Assuming the validity of the concepts of energy and mass previously introduced in asymptotically flat spacetimes, we find that the emission of pure radiation energy balances the loss of the Bondi mass in certain special families of the Bondi-Sachs rockets, so in these there is no gravitational radiation.

  10. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  11. 2.75-Inch Motor Manufacturing Waste Minimization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-19

    Institute of Technology vii LIST OF ACRONYMS—Continued SMAW Shoulder-Launched Multipurpose Assault Weapon SRM Shear roll mill TACOM Tank-Automotive...caliber ammunition, tank rounds (tactical and training), rocket motors (TOW Launch, Hydra 70, and SMAW ), and specialty applications. New River

  12. Two-phase flow characteristics of liquid oxygen flow in low pressure liquid rocket engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkyung Cho; Youngmog Kim [Korea Aerospace Research Inst., Control Systems Dept., Daejeon (Korea); Seunghan Kim [Korea Aerospace Research Inst., Engine Dept., Daejeon (Korea); Sangkwon Jeong; Jeheon Jung [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Daejeon (Korea)

    2004-08-01

    In most cryogenic liquid rocket engines, liquid oxygen manifold and injector are not thermally insulated from room temperature environment for the purpose of reducing system complexity and weight. This feature of cryogenic liquid supply system results in the situation that liquid oxygen flow is vaporized especially in the vicinity of the manifold and the injector wall. The transient two-phase flow tendency is severe for low combustion pressure rocket engine without using turbo-pump. This paper focuses on the two-phase flow phenomena of liquid oxygen in low combustion pressure rocket engine. The KSR-III (Korea Sounding Rocket) engine test data is thoroughly analyzed to estimate the vapor fraction of liquid oxygen flow near the engine manifold and the injector. During the cold flow and the combustion tests of the KSR-III Engine, the static and dynamic pressures are measured at the engine inlet, the liquid oxygen manifold and the combustion chamber. The manifold outer wall and the inner wall temperatures are also measured. In this paper, we present the experimental investigation on the vapor generation, the vapor mass fraction, and the boiling characteristics of the liquid oxygen flow in the engine manifold and injector. (Author)

  13. Ramjet Application Possibilities for Increasing Fire Range of the Multiple Launch Rocket Systems Ammunition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zubov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a possibility to increase a flying range of the perspective rockets equipped with the control unit with aerodynamic controllers for the multiple launch rocket systems “Smerch”.To increase a flying range and reduce a starting mass of the rocket, the paper studies a possibility to replace the single-mode rocket engine used in the solid-fuel rocket motor for the direct-flow propulsion jet engine (DFPJE with not head sector air intakes. The DFPJE is implemented according to the classical scheme with a fuel charged in the combustion chamber. A separated solid propellant starting accelerator provides the rocket acceleration to reach a speed necessary for the DFPJE to run.When designing the DFPJE a proper choice of not head air intake parameters is one of the most difficult points. For this purpose a COSMOS Flow Simulation software package and analytical dependences were used to define the following: a boundary layer thickness where an air intake is set, maximum permissible and appropriate angles of attack and deviation angles of controllers at the section where the DFPJE works, and some other parameters as well.Calculation of DFPJE characteristics consisted in determining parameters of an air-gas path of the propulsion system, geometrical sizes of the pipeline flow area, sizes of a fuel charge, and dependence of the propulsion system impulse on the flight height and speed. Calculations were performed both in thermodynamic statement of problem and in using software package of COSMOS Flow Simulation.As a result of calculations and design engineering activities the air intake profile is created and mass-dimensional characteristics of DFPJE are defined. Besides, calculations of the starting solid fuel accelerator were carried out. Further design allowed us to create the rocket shape, estimate its mass-dimensional characteristics, and perform ballistic calculations, which proved that achieving a range of 120 km for the rocket is

  14. Nitrous Oxide/Paraffin Hybrid Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Snyder, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide/paraffin (N2OP) hybrid rocket engines have been invented as alternatives to other rocket engines especially those that burn granular, rubbery solid fuels consisting largely of hydroxyl- terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Originally intended for use in launching spacecraft, these engines would also be suitable for terrestrial use in rocket-assisted takeoff of small airplanes. The main novel features of these engines are (1) the use of reinforced paraffin as the fuel and (2) the use of nitrous oxide as the oxidizer. Hybrid (solid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket engines offer advantages of safety and simplicity over fluid-bipropellant (fluid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket en - gines, but the thrusts of HTPB-based hybrid rocket engines are limited by the low regression rates of the fuel grains. Paraffin used as a solid fuel has a regression rate about 4 times that of HTPB, but pure paraffin fuel grains soften when heated; hence, paraffin fuel grains can, potentially, slump during firing. In a hybrid engine of the present type, the paraffin is molded into a 3-volume-percent graphite sponge or similar carbon matrix, which supports the paraffin against slumping during firing. In addition, because the carbon matrix material burns along with the paraffin, engine performance is not appreciably degraded by use of the matrix.

  15. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form.......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...

  16. The Effects of Motor Neurone Disease on Language: Further Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Thomas H.; Hodges, John R.

    2004-01-01

    It might sound surprising that Motor Neurone Disease (MND), regarded still by many as the very example of a neurodegenerative disease affecting selectively the motor system and sparing the sensory functions as well as cognition, can have a significant influence on language. In this article we hope to demonstrate that language dysfunction is not…

  17. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  18. Internal Flow Simulation of Enhanced Performance Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced performance solid rocket booster concept for the space shuttle system has been proposed. The concept booster will have strong commonality with the existing, proven, reliable four-segment Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) with individual component design (nozzle, insulator, etc.) optimized for a five-segment configuration. Increased performance is desirable to further enhance safety/reliability and/or increase payload capability. Performance increase will be achieved by adding a fifth propellant segment to the current four-segment booster and opening the throat to accommodate the increased mass flow while maintaining current pressure levels. One development concept under consideration is the static test of a "standard" RSRM with a fifth propellant segment inserted and appropriate minimum motor modifications. Feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the potential for any significant departure in component performance/loading from the well-characterized RSRM. An area of concern is the aft motor (submerged nozzle inlet, aft dome, etc.) where the altered internal flow resulting from the performance enhancing features (25% increase in mass flow rate, higher Mach numbers, modified subsonic nozzle contour) may result in increased component erosion and char. To assess this issue and to define the minimum design changes required to successfully static test a fifth segment RSRM engineering test motor, internal flow studies have been initiated. Internal aero-thermal environments were quantified in terms of conventional convective heating and discrete phase alumina particle impact/concentration and accretion calculations via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two sets of comparative CFD simulations of the RSRM and the five-segment (IBM) concept motor were conducted with CFD commercial code FLUENT. The first simulation involved a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of the full motor, initial grain RSRM. The second set of analyses

  19. Categorization of environmental sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, Catherine

    2007-03-01

    This paper investigates the way in which people categorize environmental sounds in their everyday lives. Previous research has shown that isolated environmental sounds are categorized on the basis of high-level semantic features when the sounds can be attributed to specific sound sources. However, in the presence of numerous sound sources, as occur in most real-world situations, the process of source identification is often hindered. In the present study, a free categorization task with open-ended verbal descriptions was used to investigate auditory categories for environmental sounds in complex real-world sonic environments. Two main categories emerged from the free-sort, reflecting the absence or presence of human activity in relation to hedonic judgments. At a subordinate level, subcategories were mediated by the participant's reported interactions with the environment through socialized activities. The spontaneous verbal descriptors collected were successful in discriminating categories. These findings indicate that complex environmental sounds are processed and categorized as meaningful events providing relevant information about the environment. The relevance of situational factors in categorization and the notion of auditory category in its relation to linguistic labeling are then discussed.

  20. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with -11 to -13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that -12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.