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Sample records for sorption experiments showed

  1. U(VI) sorption on granite: prediction and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, C.; Brendler, V.

    2010-01-01

    One widely accepted approach - component additivity (CA) - to describe the sorption of contaminants onto complex materials such as rocks or soils is based on the assumption that the surface of a complex mineral assemblage is composed of a mixture of mineral constituents whose surface properties are known from independent studies. An internally consistent SCM (surface complexation model) database can be developed that describes the adsorption reactions of solutes to each phase. Here, the capability of such a methodology was tested, using the code MINTEQA2 including thermodynamic data of the NEA-TDB, and literature data for SCM, namely the DDL model. The sorption characteristics of U(VI) on granite (from Eibenstock, Saxony, Germany, with the main components quartz, albite, orthoclase, and muscovite) was predicted and then compared to batch experiments. Granite plays an important role in the remediation of former uranium ore mining and milling sites, but is also one of the host rocks considered for final disposal of nuclear materials. Safety assessment requires a detailed understanding of this system and its retention potential with regard to hazardous components. Namely the sorption of uranium in this complex rock is not fully understood yet. The experiments thus also provided a better understanding of the far-field behaviour in granitic geological nuclear repositories. The robustness of the prediction was tested by variation of the granite composition and the variation of the specific surface area (SSA) - first all components were predicted with a uniform granite SSA, second with a distinct SSA for each granite component (determined on pure minerals for the same grain size fractions). Changes in compositions yielded only marginal differences in the prediction. Different approaches to SSA showed somewhat larger deviations. In conclusion, the CA methodology is a valid and robust approach to U(VI) sorption onto complex substrates such as granite, provided sufficient

  2. Modelling of a diffusion-sorption experiment on sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.A.

    1989-11-01

    The results of a diffusion-sorption experiment on a sample of Darley Dale sandstone, using simulated groundwater spiked with a mixture of 125 I, 85 Sr and 137 Cs, are modelled by a one-dimensional porous medium approach in which sorption is described by Freundlich isotherms. The governing equations are solved analytically for the special case of a linear isotherm, and numerically using the computer code RANCHDIFF for non-linear isotherms. A set of time-dependent, ordinary differential equations is obtained using the Lagrange interpolation technique and integrated by Gear's variable order predictor-corrector method. It is shown that the sorption behaviour of 85 Sr can be modelled successfully by a linear isotherm, using a sorption parameter consistent with batch-sorption tests. The behaviour of 137 Cs may be modelled by a non-linear isotherm, but the amount of 137 Cs sorbed is less than that anticipated from batch-sorption tests. 125 I is assumed to be non-sorbing and is used to determine the porosity of the sandstone. (author) 10 figs., 4 tabs., 6 refs

  3. Plutonium-239 sorption and transport on/in unsaturated sediments. Comparison of batch and column experiments for determining sorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinchuan Xie; Jiachun Lu; Xiaohua Zhou; Xuhui Wang; Mei Li; Lili Du; Yueheng Liu; Guoqing Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Sorption (distribution) coefficients of plutonium were most often derived by static batch experiments. However, it is not clear how unsaturated flow conditions including moisture content and pore water velocity change the sorption coefficients. Transport experiments of plutonium through the unsaturated sediments packed into the columns were then performed in order to determine the sorption coefficients (column-K ds ). Static batch experiments were also conducted to obtain batch-K ds and then compare the differences between batch-K ds and column-K ds . The results show that unsaturated flow conditions had no significant effect on column-K ds , and the average column-K d value was 1.74 ± 0.02 m 3 /kg. By comparison, batch-K d values spanned several orders of magnitude, regardless of the specified liquid-solid conditions. Moreover, the batch-K d (22.7 m 3 /kg) at the standard L/S (4 mL/g) recommended by ASTM D 4319 was over an order of magnitude larger than the average column-K d . (author)

  4. Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment (LTDE-SD). Performance of main in situ experiment and results from water phase measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Nilsson, Kersti; Hoeglund, Susanne; Gustafsson, Erik; Kronberg, Magnus

    2010-12-01

    sorption to colloids in the aqueous phase was of minor importance. Furthermore, the measurements performed after a general colloid filtration showed no significant concentrations of inorganic colloids. The natural redox conditions were difficult to maintain during the experiment. Therefore the experiment was performed under the oxidizing conditions (E h ∼470 mV) that was obtained during the circulation of the groundwater. Sorption occurred on equipment during the experiment, in particular for some surface complexation sorbing tracers, possibly due to iron-oxy-hydroxides formed on equipment surfaces. Quantification was made of the amount of sorption on the equipment in order to enable corrections in the evaluation procedures. The sorption occurring for ion-exchange sorbing tracers was concluded to predominately be an effect of interaction with the geologic material since the sorbed amount on the equipment was found to be insignificant. Natural pressure conditions were maintained throughout the experiment time and consequently penetration into the rock matrix must be considered as a result only of diffusion since no advection could have been involved. Modelling in order to determine sorption coefficients (K a , K d ) was performed using a homogeneous porosity sorption-diffusion model using fixed data for porosity and matrix diffusivity from laboratory investigations on LTDE-SD core materials. For the ion-exchange sorbing tracers, the in situ evaluated K d was in the range of the batch sorption results or near the highest values (fracture material) from the batch sorption results. This indicates that a sorption-diffusion model can describe the concentration losses reasonably well for the ion-exchange sorbing tracers. However, due to the sorption on equipment, one should treat these results with care and consider the analysis of the sampled rock material before any definitive conclusions can be made based on the actual penetration profiles of the rock

  5. Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment (LTDE-SD). Performance of main in situ experiment and results from water phase measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Nilsson, Kersti; Hoeglund, Susanne; Gustafsson, Erik (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Kronberg, Magnus (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    radionuclide sorption to colloids in the aqueous phase was of minor importance. Furthermore, the measurements performed after a general colloid filtration showed no significant concentrations of inorganic colloids. The natural redox conditions were difficult to maintain during the experiment. Therefore the experiment was performed under the oxidizing conditions (E{sub h} approx470 mV) that was obtained during the circulation of the groundwater. Sorption occurred on equipment during the experiment, in particular for some surface complexation sorbing tracers, possibly due to iron-oxy-hydroxides formed on equipment surfaces. Quantification was made of the amount of sorption on the equipment in order to enable corrections in the evaluation procedures. The sorption occurring for ion-exchange sorbing tracers was concluded to predominately be an effect of interaction with the geologic material since the sorbed amount on the equipment was found to be insignificant. Natural pressure conditions were maintained throughout the experiment time and consequently penetration into the rock matrix must be considered as a result only of diffusion since no advection could have been involved. Modelling in order to determine sorption coefficients (K{sub a}, K{sub d}) was performed using a homogeneous porosity sorption-diffusion model using fixed data for porosity and matrix diffusivity from laboratory investigations on LTDE-SD core materials. For the ion-exchange sorbing tracers, the in situ evaluated K{sub d} was in the range of the batch sorption results or near the highest values (fracture material) from the batch sorption results. This indicates that a sorption-diffusion model can describe the concentration losses reasonably well for the ion-exchange sorbing tracers. However, due to the sorption on equipment, one should treat these results with care and consider the analysis of the sampled rock material before any definitive conclusions can be made based on the actual penetration profiles of

  6. Surface complexation modelling: Experiments on the sorption of nickel on quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.; Hakanen, M.

    1995-10-01

    Assessing the safety of a final repository for nuclear wastes requires knowledge concerning the way in which the radionuclides released are retarded in the geosphere. The aim of the work is to aquire knowledge of empirical methods repeating the experiments on the sorption of nickel on quartz described in the reports published by the British Geological Survey (BGS). The experimental results were modelled with computer models at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT Chemical Technology). The results showed that the experimental knowledge of the sorption of Ni on quartz have been acheved by repeating the experiments of BGS. Experiments made with the two quartz types, Min-U-Sil 5 (MUS) and Nilsiae, showed the difference in sorption of Ni in the low ionic strength solution (0.001 M NaNO 3 ). The sorption of Ni on MUS was higher than predicted by the Surface Complexation Model (SCM). The phenomenon was also observed by the BGS, and may be due to the different amounts of inpurities in the MUS and in the NLS. In other respects, the results of the sorption experiments fitted quite well with those predicted by the SCM model. (8 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.)

  7. Uranium sorption from aqueous solutions by activated biochar fibres investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukia Hadjittofi; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of activated biochar fibres obtained from Opuntia ficus indica regarding the sorption of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions has been investigated by batch experiments, as a function of various physicochemical parameters, and FTIR spectroscopy prior and after U(VI) sorption. The experimental results show that the activated biochar fibres possess extraordinary sorption capacity for U(VI) even in acidic solutions (q max = 210 g kg -1 ), which is attributed to the formation of inner-sphere complexes with the surface carboxylic moieties, available in high density on the lamellar structures of the bio-sorbent. The adsorption process is described by a two-step exothermic reaction. (author)

  8. Experiences of fitting isotherms to data from batch sorption experiments for radionuclides on tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.

    1989-11-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the sorption of radionuclides on tuff as site characterization information for the Yucca Mountain Project. This paper presents general observations on the results of curve-fitting of sorption data by isotherm equations and the effects of experimental variables on their regressional analysis. Observations are specific to the effectiveness and problems associated with fitting isotherms, the calculation and value of isotherm parameters, and the significance of experimental variables such as replication, particle size, mode of sorption, and mineralogy. These observations are important in the design of laboratory experiments to ensure that collected data are adequate for effectively characterizing sorption of radionuclides on tuffs or other materials. 13 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Cs sorption to potential host rock of low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan: experiments and numerical fitting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Chen, Chin-Lung; Ou, Lu-Yen; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Chang, Fu-Lin; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2011-09-15

    A reliable performance assessment of radioactive waste repository depends on better knowledge of interactions between nuclides and geological substances. Numerical fitting of acquired experimental results by the surface complexation model enables us to interpret sorption behavior at molecular scale and thus to build a solid basis for simulation study. A lack of consensus on a standard set of assessment criteria (such as determination of sorption site concentration, reaction formula) during numerical fitting, on the other hand, makes lower case comparison between various studies difficult. In this study we explored the sorption of cesium to argillite by conducting experiments under different pH and solid/liquid ratio (s/l) with two specific initial Cs concentrations (100mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-4)mol/L and 0.01 mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-8)mol/L). After this, numerical fitting was performed, focusing on assessment criteria and their consequences. It was found that both ion exchange and electrostatic interactions governed Cs sorption on argillite. At higher initial Cs concentration the Cs sorption showed an increasing dependence on pH as the solid/liquid ratio was lowered. In contrast at trace Cs levels, the Cs sorption was neither s/l dependent nor pH sensitive. It is therefore proposed that ion exchange mechanism dominates Cs sorption when the concentration of surface sorption site exceeds that of Cs, whereas surface complexation is attributed to Cs uptake under alkaline environments. Numerical fitting was conducted using two different strategies to determine concentration of surface sorption sites: the clay model (based on the cation exchange capacity plus surface titration results) and the iron oxide model (where the concentration of sorption sites is proportional to the surface area of argillite). It was found that the clay model led to better fitting than the iron oxide model, which is attributed to more amenable sorption sites (two specific sorption sites along with larger site

  10. Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment (LTDE-SD). Supporting laboratory program - Sorption diffusion experiments and rock material characterisation. With supplement of adsorption studies on intact rock samples from the Forsmark and Laxemar site investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Selnert, Eva; Skaalberg, Mats; Hoeglund, Susanne; Gustafsson, Erik (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The LTDE-SD experiment, (Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment) aims at increasing the scientific knowledge of sorption and diffusion under in situ conditions and to provide data for performance and safety assessment calculations. In this report, performance and results of laboratory sorption and diffusion experiments and porosity investigations using site-specific crushed and intact rock materials are presented, including a geological and mineralogical characterization of the samples. A synthetic groundwater and a part of the radionuclide tracer cocktail that was used for the in situ experiment were used also in the laboratory experiments. 13 radionuclide tracers were analysed in the laboratory experiments. The method descriptions from SKB Site Investigations were applied in order to enable comparisons with Site Investigations data. The water saturation porosity of 10 unaltered matrix rock samples from KA3065A02 and A03 is 0.26 +- 0.08% and two fracture material samples show porosities of 2.4% and 5.2% respectively. 14C-methylmethacrylate impregnation (the PMMA-method) show that the unaltered rock matrix porosity is relatively homogeneous with grain boundary porosity, while the porosity of fracture samples is heterogeneous and have increased porosity up to more than 10% in some parts. Through-diffusion experiments using tritiated water (H3HO) give a matrix diffusivity in the range from 2.7centre dot10-14 to 6.5centre dot10-14 m2/s in four samples from KA3065A02 and A03. The results of the porosity and diffusion measurements are coherent in ranges with earlier LTDE-SD measurements and are also in line with the SKB Site Investigations results. In the batch sorption experiments using crushed rock material, two matrix rock samples of Aevroe granodiorite, one red-stained altered Aevroe granodiorite sample and two chlorite-calcite dominated fracture samples were analysed for three different size fractions as a function of time up to 186 days contact time. The

  11. Experience of Implementing Moisture Sorption Control in Historical Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zítek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a novel approach to inhibiting the harmful impact of moisture sorption in old art works and historical exhibits preserved in remote historic buildings that are in use as depositories or exhibition rooms for cultural heritage collections. It is a sequel to the previous work presented in [2], where the principle of moisture sorption stabilization was explained. Sorption isotherm investigations and EMC control implementation in historical buildings not provided with heating are the main concern in this paper. The proposed microclimate adjustment consists in leaving the interior temperature to run almost its spontaneous yearly cycle, while the air humidity is maintained in a specific relationship to the current interior temperature. The interior air humidity is modestly adjusted to protect historical exhibits and art works from harmful variations in the content of absorbed moisture, which would otherwise arise owing to the interior temperature drifts. Since direct measurements of moisture content are not feasible, the air humidity is controlled via a model-based principle. Two long-term implementations of the proposed microclimate control have already proved that it can permanently maintain a constant moisture content in the preserved exhibits. 

  12. Oskarshamn site investigation. Batch experiments of I, Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, U and Np sorption onto soil from the Laxemar area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holgersson, Stellan (Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-04-15

    Soil and groundwater samples from the Laxemar area have been collected and characterised, as have previously been reported. Batch experiments with sorption of radiotracers of I, Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, U and Np have been made with eight selected soil samples and one natural groundwater. The solid/liquid ratio in the experiments was 1/48 and sampling were made at 3 hours, 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 40 days and finally 130 days. Phase separation was made by centrifugation field > 20 kG. Experiments were made in an inert-gas glove-box (O{sub 2} < 1 ppm). The same type of batch sorption experiments was also made with a synthetic groundwater. The recipe for the synthetic groundwater was based on the analyses of the natural groundwater, except for dissolved organic matter, which were omitted. A separate series of supporting experiments, without radionuclide tracers, were made for the measurement of the evolution of pH and Eh. Another series of supporting experiments were made for a number of chemical analyses, where samples were taken at 14 and 130 days only: anion and cation chromatography, alkalinity titrations, total organic carbon (TOC), inorganic carbon, pH and Eh measurements, ICP-MS and -OES analyses of background radiotracer elements and a number of other elements. The general trend of the batch sorption results show specific surface corrected distribution coefficients, R{sub a} (m) that increase with time, but the trend is a levelling out to limiting values. Iodine sorption is generally below the lower detection limit and very few data could be collected for this tracer. Eu generally shows the strongest sorption and some measurements at the later samplings are above the upper detection limit. Results from the batch experiments with peat and natural groundwater at 130 days give R{sub a} values that ranges from 5x10-5 (Sr) to 3x10-4 m (Cs). The order of increasing sorption is: Sr, Ni, Np, Eu, U and Cs. For synthetic groundwater Eu and U sorption is stronger, at least

  13. Applicability of sorption data determined by laboratory experiments for evaluation of strontium-85 mobility in subsurface field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    Applicability of laboratory measurements to radionuclide transport in a natural environment was studied using the data from the field tests. The K d values obtained in the laboratory experiments were input into the instantaneous equilibrium sorption model, which simulates the migration of 85 Sr in the unsaturated loess. This simulation managed to reproduce results of the aforementioned field tests. To evaluate more accurately migration behavior of 85 Sr, based on the sorption data obtained by the laboratory experiments, the hybrid sorption model consisting of the equilibrium sorption process and the kinetic sorption process was proposed. When compared with predictions using the K d -based equilibrium sorption model, the results of the field migration tests of 85 Sr were more successfully reproduced by introducing the hybrid sorption model. (author)

  14. Surface complexation modelling: Experiments on sorption of nickel on quartz, goethite and kaolinite and preliminary tests on sorption of thorium on quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puukko, E.; Hakanen, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry. Lab. of Radiochemistry

    1997-09-01

    The aim of the work was to study the sorption behaviour of Ni on quartz, goethite and kaolinite at different pH levels and in different electrolyte solutions of different strength. In addition preliminary experiments were made to study the sorption of thorium on quartz. The MUS quartz and Nilsiae quartz were analysed for MnO{sub 2} by neutron activation analysis (NAA) and the experimental results were modelled with the HYDRAQL computer model. 9 refs.

  15. Oskarshamn site investigation. Batch experiments of I, Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, U and Np sorption onto soil from the Laxemar area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holgersson, Stellan

    2009-04-01

    Soil and groundwater samples from the Laxemar area have been collected and characterised, as have previously been reported. Batch experiments with sorption of radiotracers of I, Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, U and Np have been made with eight selected soil samples and one natural groundwater. The solid/liquid ratio in the experiments was 1/48 and sampling were made at 3 hours, 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 40 days and finally 130 days. Phase separation was made by centrifugation field > 20 kG. Experiments were made in an inert-gas glove-box (O 2 a (m) that increase with time, but the trend is a levelling out to limiting values. Iodine sorption is generally below the lower detection limit and very few data could be collected for this tracer. Eu generally shows the strongest sorption and some measurements at the later samplings are above the upper detection limit. Results from the batch experiments with peat and natural groundwater at 130 days give R a values that ranges from 5x10 -5 (Sr) to 3x10 -4 m (Cs). The order of increasing sorption is: Sr, Ni, Np, Eu, U and Cs. For synthetic groundwater Eu and U sorption is stronger, at least initially, compared with the natural groundwater, but for Cs the sorption is weaker over the whole sampling period. Results from the batch experiments with gyttja and natural groundwater at 130 days give R a values that ranges from 3x10 -5 (Sr) to 1x10 -2 m (Eu). The order of increasing sorption is: Sr, Cs, U, Ni, Np and Eu. For synthetic groundwater the sorption of U is stronger and comparable with Eu. Results from the batch experiments with clay gyttja, type I and natural groundwater at 130 days give R a values that ranges from 1x10 -5 (Sr) to > 1x10 -3 m (Eu). The order of increasing sorption is: Sr, Cs, Ni, U, Np and Eu. For synthetic groundwater the sorption of U is stronger, at least initially, comparable with Eu. For Np, on the other hand, the sorption is weaker and comparable with Sr over the whole sampling period. Results from the batch experiments

  16. Batch experiments of Cs, Co and Eu sorption onto cement with dissolved fibre mass UP2 in the liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holgersson, Stellan; Dubois, Isabelle; Boerstell, Lisa

    2011-05-01

    The potential effects of alkaline degradation products of the fibre mass UP2 on metal sorption onto fresh and degraded cement have been investigated. For this purpose, crushed cement have been leached to support material for the subsequent batch sorption experiments. Alkaline leaching of UP2 were also made, which gave leaching solutions of 30 ppm DOC after 300 days. These solutions were used in the batch experiments. Continued leaching shows that even higher concentrations can be expected: 45 ppm DOC in the leaching with a low-alkaline (pH 12.5) artificial cement pore-water and 150 ppm DOC with a high alkaline (pH 13.3) artificial pore-water. Batch sorption experiments with 134 Cs and 60 Co show no effects on metal sorption onto leached or fresh cement when the 30 ppm DOC leaching solutions of UP2 were used as liquid phase. The measured R d values were 10 -3 m 3 /kg for Cs and in the range of 0.03-0.1 m 3 /kg for Co. Separate experiments with other organics ligands were also made: EDTA, ISA and citric acid with maximum concentrations of 500, 300 and 300 ppm DOC, respectively. Also here no effects on Cs and Co sorption onto leached and fresh cement were established. Batch experiments of 152 Eu were not successful since results were above detection level of about 2-3 m 3 /kg. The addition of the aforementioned 30 ppm UP2 leaching solution or the other organic ligands did not affect the detection level. Measurements of background concentrations of total Eu show a peculiar result of Eu apparently increasing in batch experiments with cement to final values of about 5-10 nM. The underlying reason for this effect, whether real or artificial, could not be established. Background concentrations of Th were about 1 nM in both cement and blank samples. Background concentrations of Zr were about 100-700 nM in both cement and blank samples, the high values were measured acidic blanks, which suggests either acidic leaching from tube walls or contamination from the acid itself. No

  17. Batch experiments of Cs, Co and Eu sorption onto cement with dissolved fibre mass UP2 in the liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holgersson, Stellan; Dubois, Isabelle; Boerstell, Lisa (Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden))

    2011-05-15

    The potential effects of alkaline degradation products of the fibre mass UP2 on metal sorption onto fresh and degraded cement have been investigated. For this purpose, crushed cement have been leached to support material for the subsequent batch sorption experiments. Alkaline leaching of UP2 were also made, which gave leaching solutions of 30 ppm DOC after 300 days. These solutions were used in the batch experiments. Continued leaching shows that even higher concentrations can be expected: 45 ppm DOC in the leaching with a low-alkaline (pH 12.5) artificial cement pore-water and 150 ppm DOC with a high alkaline (pH 13.3) artificial pore-water. Batch sorption experiments with 134Cs and 60Co show no effects on metal sorption onto leached or fresh cement when the 30 ppm DOC leaching solutions of UP2 were used as liquid phase. The measured R{sub d} values were 10-3 m3/kg for Cs and in the range of 0.03-0.1 m3/kg for Co. Separate experiments with other organics ligands were also made: EDTA, ISA and citric acid with maximum concentrations of 500, 300 and 300 ppm DOC, respectively. Also here no effects on Cs and Co sorption onto leached and fresh cement were established. Batch experiments of 152Eu were not successful since results were above detection level of about 2-3 m3/kg. The addition of the aforementioned 30 ppm UP2 leaching solution or the other organic ligands did not affect the detection level. Measurements of background concentrations of total Eu show a peculiar result of Eu apparently increasing in batch experiments with cement to final values of about 5-10 nM. The underlying reason for this effect, whether real or artificial, could not be established. Background concentrations of Th were about 1 nM in both cement and blank samples. Background concentrations of Zr were about 100-700 nM in both cement and blank samples, the high values were measured acidic blanks, which suggests either acidic leaching from tube walls or contamination from the acid itself. No

  18. The effect of organics on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand in laboratory batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haigh, D.G.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.; Ross, C.A.M.; Allen, M.R.; Warwick, P.

    1989-01-01

    Acetate, EDTA and organic compounds naturally present in groundwater at the Drigg in situ radionuclide migration experimental site, have been studied to assess their effect on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand in a series of batch experiments. Removing 56% of the natural organic material from the grounwater with DEAE cellulose increased the distribution ratio (R d ) of cobalt by a factor of about two. EDTA had a dramatic effect on the sorption of Co even at low concentrations, reducing the R d by up to two orders of magnitude. At EDTA concentrations greater than 5 mg/l, there was no further reduction in sorption. EDTA was not itself sorbed, but formed a mobile complex with Co. Differences in distribution ratios were observed depending on whether the cobalt was added before or after EDTA. Within the same period of equilibrium, the R d values were higher when cobalt was allowed to equilibrate with the sand before adding EDTA. The desorption of cobalt from the mineral surface may be a rate-limiting step such that equilibrium was not achieved within the 14-day period of these experiments. Acetate had no effect on cobalt sorption in any of the experiments undertaken. This work is part of the Commission Mirage project, Phase 2, research area Geochemistry of actinides and fission products in natural aquifer systems

  19. The mobility of indium and gallium in groundwater systems: constraining the role of sorption in sand column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, I.; Ringering, K.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2017-12-01

    The mobility of indium and gallium in groundwater environments was studied via laboratory experiments using quartz sand as a porous medium. Indium and gallium are metals of very low abundance in the Earth's crust and, correspondingly, the biosphere is only adapted to very small concentrations of these elements. However, in modern semiconductor industries, both elements play a central role and are incorporated in devices of mass production such as smartphones and digital cameras. The resulting considerable increase in production, use and discharge of indium and gallium throughout the last two decades, with a continuous and fast increase in the near future, raises questions regarding the fate of both elements in the environment. However, the transport behavior of these two metals in soils and groundwater systems remains poorly understood to date. Because of the low solubility of both elements in aqueous solutions, trisodium citrate was used as a complexation agent to stabilize the solutions, enabling investigation of the transport of these metals at neutral pH. Column experiments showed different binding capacities for indium and gallium, where gallium is much more mobile compared to indium and both metals are substantially retarded in the column. Different affinities were also confirmed by examining sorption isotherms of indium and gallium in equilibrium batch systems. The effect of natural organic matter on the mobility of indium and gallium was also studied, by addition of humic acid. For both metals, the presence of humic acid affects the sorption dynamics: for indium, sorption is strongly inhibited leading to much higher mobility, whereas gallium showed a slightly higher sorption affinity and very similar mobility compared to the same setup without humic acid addition. However, in all cases, the binding capacity of gallium to quartz is much weaker than that of indium. These results are consistent with the assumption that indium and gallium form different types

  20. Sorption of phosphate onto calcite; results from batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite was stud......The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite...... of a high degree of super-saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (SIHAP⩽7.83). The amount of phosphate adsorbed varied with the solution composition, in particular, adsorption increases as the CO32- activity decreases (at constant pH) and as pH increases (at constant CO32- activity). The primary effect...... of ionic strength on phosphate sorption onto calcite is its influence on the activity of the different aqueous phosphate species. The experimental results were modeled satisfactorily using the constant capacitance model with >CaPO4Ca0 and either >CaHPO4Ca+ or >CaHPO4- as the adsorbed surface species...

  1. Suitability of Moshi Pumice for Phosphorus Sorption in Constructed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of Moshi Pumice's phosphorus sorption behaviours and properties was carried out in laboratory scale where by 1-2 mm, 2-4 mm and 4-8 mm grains were tested using batch experiments. The results show that Moshi Pumice has high phosphorus sorption capacity. The sorption capacity for the Moshi Pumice was ...

  2. Sorption of Sr, Co and Zn on illite: Batch experiments and modelling including Co in-diffusion measurements on compacted samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, V.; Baeyens, B.; Glaus, M. A.; Kupcik, T.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Van Laer, L.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Schäfer, T.

    2018-02-01

    occupancies. The pH dependent sorption determined for trace Zn concentrations showed large Rd values across the entire pH range with almost no dependence on the background electrolyte concentration. Additional sorption experiments carried out at substantial fractional Zn loadings demonstrated that the selectivity for the exchange of Na+ for Zn2+ at the planar sites could not explain the large Rd values measured at low pH and trace Zn concentrations. This suggests that another mechanism is ruling Zn uptake under these conditions.

  3. The effect of organics on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand in laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haigh, G.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.; Ross, C.A.M.; Allen, M.R.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of acetate, EDTA and natural organic compounds in groundwater at Drigg test site, on the sorption of cobalt by glacial sand has been studied in a series of batch experiments. Removing 50% of the organic material from the groundwater with DEAE cellulose increased the distribution ratio (R d ) of cobalt by a factor of about two. The addition of both EDTA and acetate to the sand/water system led to the removal of Ca, Mg, Sr and Ba from solution. Both organic compounds had the effect of reducing the pH and bicarbonated concentrations. EDTA also removed iron from the solution. EDTA reduced the R d for Co by up to 2 orders of magnitude. At EDTA concentrations greater than 5mg/1, there was no further reduction in sorption. EDTA was not itself sorbed, but formed a mobile complex with Co. Within the same period of equilibrium, the R d values were lower when EDTA was allowed to equilibrate with the sand before adding cobalt. The desorption of cobalt from the minerals surface may be a rate limiting step such that equilibrium was not achieved within the 14 day period of these experiments. Acetate had no effect of cobalt sorption. (author)

  4. The interaction of sorbing and non-sorbing tracers with different Aespoe rock types. Sorption and diffusion experiments in the laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byegaard, J.; Johansson, Henrik; Skaalberg, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Tullborg, E.L. [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    1998-11-01

    Laboratory experiments studying the sorption and diffusivity of different tracers in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL) site specific conditions have been performed. The experiments were conducted by applying both the batch sorption and the through diffusion technique. The investigation was focused on slightly sorbing tracers, i e, alkaline metals (Na{sup +}, Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}) and alkaline earth metals (Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+}), but some presumed non-sorbing species have also been included. The dominating generic rock material from Aespoe HRL, Aespoe-diorite and fine-grained granite, were used as well as some altered wall rock and mylonite from the Feature A fracture, the fracture where in situ migration studies have been performed. Synthetic groundwater was used; similar to the high saline groundwater found at the 350m level at Aespoe HRL and at the Feature A site. The results of batch experiments show that the sorption of the tracers increase in the order Nasorption coefficient of Na{sup +} in the order of (4-30)x10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/kg and for Cs{sup +} in the range of (I-400)x10{sup -3} m{sup 3}/kg. The variations in sorption coefficients are due to differences in the composition of the geological material, contact time and particle size. Sorption is generally stronger for the Aespoe-diorite than for the fine-grained granite which is explained by the much higher concentration of biotite in Aespoe diorite than in fine-grained granite. In the altered material the biotite has been transformed to chlorite and a lower sorptivity is shown for those material compared to the fresh diorite and granite, respectively. Attempts to explain the sorption and desorption results to a surface sorption - diffusion model are presented. The diffusion results show that the tracers were retarded in the same order as was expected from the measured batch sorption coefficients. Furthermore, the largest size fraction was the most

  5. Diffusion and sorption on hardened cement pastes - experiments and modelling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, A.; Sarott, F.-A.; Spieler, P.

    1999-08-01

    Large parts of repositories for low and intermediate level radioactive waste consist of cementitious materials. Radionuclides are transported by diffusion in the cement matrix or, in case of fractured or highly permeable cement, by advection and dispersion. In this work we aim at a mechanistic understanding of diffusion processes of some reactive tracers. On the laboratory scale, ten through-diffusion experiments were performed to study these processes for Cl{sup -}, I{sup -}, Cs{sup +} and Ni{sup 2+} ions in a Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC) equilibrated with an artificial pore water. Some of the experiments continued up to nearly three years with daily measurements. In all the experiments, a cement disk initially saturated with an artificial pore water was exposed on one side to a highly diluted solution containing the species of interest. On the second side, a near-zero concentration boundary was maintained to drive through-diffusion of the tracer. The changes of concentrations on both sides of the samples were monitored, allowing careful mass balances. From these data, values of the diffusive flux and the mass of tracer taken up by the cementitious material were determined as a function of time. In the subsequent modelling, the time histories of these tracer breakthroughs were fitted using five different models. The simplest model neglects all retarding mechanisms except pure diffusion. More complex models either account for instantaneous equilibrium sorption in form of linear or non-linear (Freundlich) sorption or for first-order sorption kinetics where the forward reaction may be linear or non-linear according to the Freundlich isotherm, while the back-reaction is linear. Hence, the analysis allows the extraction of the diffusion coefficient and parameter values for the sorption isotherm or rate-constants for sorption and desorption. The fits to the experimental data were carried out by an automated Marquardt-Levenberg procedure yielding error

  6. The interaction of sorbing and non-sorbing tracers with different Aespoe rock types. Sorption and diffusion experiments in the laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byegaard, J.; Johansson, Henrik; Skaalberg, M.

    1998-11-01

    Laboratory experiments studying the sorption and diffusivity of different tracers in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL) site specific conditions have been performed. The experiments were conducted by applying both the batch sorption and the through diffusion technique. The investigation was focused on slightly sorbing tracers, i e, alkaline metals (Na + , Rb + and Cs + ) and alkaline earth metals (Ca 2+ , Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ ), but some presumed non-sorbing species have also been included. The dominating generic rock material from Aespoe HRL, Aespoe-diorite and fine-grained granite, were used as well as some altered wall rock and mylonite from the Feature A fracture, the fracture where in situ migration studies have been performed. Synthetic groundwater was used; similar to the high saline groundwater found at the 350m level at Aespoe HRL and at the Feature A site. The results of batch experiments show that the sorption of the tracers increase in the order Na + in the order of (4-30)x10 -6 m 3 /kg and for Cs + in the range of (I-400)x10 -3 m 3 /kg. The variations in sorption coefficients are due to differences in the composition of the geological material, contact time and particle size. Sorption is generally stronger for the Aespoe-diorite than for the fine-grained granite which is explained by the much higher concentration of biotite in Aespoe diorite than in fine-grained granite. In the altered material the biotite has been transformed to chlorite and a lower sorptivity is shown for those material compared to the fresh diorite and granite, respectively. Attempts to explain the sorption and desorption results to a surface sorption - diffusion model are presented. The diffusion results show that the tracers were retarded in the same order as was expected from the measured batch sorption coefficients. Furthermore, the largest size fraction was the most representative when comparing batch sorption coefficients with sorption coefficients evaluated from the

  7. Sorption of Heterocyclic Organic Compounds to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelder, Florian; Funck, Matin; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2018-01-16

    Sorption is an important natural and technical process. Sorption coefficients are typically determined in batch experiments, but this may be challenging for weakly sorbing compounds. An alternative method enabling analysis of those compounds is column chromatography. A column packed with the sorbent is used and sorption data are determined by relating sorbate retention to that of a nonretarded tracer. In this study, column chromatography was applied for the first time to study sorption of previously hardly investigated heterocyclic organic compounds to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Sorption data for these compounds are very limited in literature, and weak sorption is expected from predictions. Deuterium oxide was used as nonretarded tracer. Sorption isotherms were well described by the Freundlich model and data showed reasonable agreement with predicted values. Sorption was exothermic and physisorption was observed. H-bonding may contribute to overall sorption, which is supported by reduced sorption with increasing ionic strength due to blocking of functional groups. Lowering pH reduced sorption of ionizable compounds, due to electrostatic repulsion at pH 3 where sorbent as well as sorbates were positively charged. Overall, column chromatography was successfully used to study sorption of heterocyclic compounds to MWCNTs and could be applied for other carbon-based sorbents.

  8. Characterization of reactive tracers for C-wells field experiments 1: Electrostatic sorption mechanism, lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.; Newman, B.D.

    1989-11-01

    Lithium (Li + ) was introduced as lithium bromide (LiBr), as a retarded tracer for experiments in the C-wells complex at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The objective was to evaluate the potential of lithium to sorb predominately by physical forces. lithium was selected as a candidate tracer on the basis of high solubility, good chemical and biological stability, and relatively low sorptivity; lack of bioaccumulation and exclusion as a priority pollutant in pertinent federal environmental regulations; good analytical detectability and low natural background concentrations; and a low cost Laboratory experiments were performed with suspensions of Prow Pass cuttings from drill hole UE-25p number-sign 1 at depths between 549 and 594 m in J-13 water at a pH of approximately 8 and in the temperature range of 25 degree C to 45 degree C. Batch equilibrium and kinetics experiments were performed; estimated thermodynamic constants, relative behavior between adsorption and desorption, and potentiometric studies provided information to infer the physical nature of lithium sorption

  9. Characterizing pesticide sorption and degradation in microscale biopurification systems using column displacement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, Tineke de; Mertens, Jan; Simunek, Jirka; Sniegowksi, Kristel; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Jaeken, Peter; Springael, Dirk; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    Biopurification systems treating pesticide contaminated water are very efficient, however they operate as a black box. Processes inside the system are not yet characterized. To optimize the performance, knowledge of degradation and retention processes needs to be generated. Therefore, displacement experiments were carried out for four pesticides (isoproturon, bentazone, metalaxyl, linuron) in columns containing different organic mixtures. Bromide, isoproturon and bentazone breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and a first-order degradation kinetic approach. Metalaxyl and linuron BTCs were well described using the CDE model expanded with Monod-type kinetics. Freundlich sorption, first-order degradation and Monod kinetics coefficients were fitted to the BTCs. Fitted values of the distribution coefficient K f,column were much lower than those determined from batch experiments. Based on mobility, pesticides were ranked as: bentazone > metalaxyl - isoproturon > linuron. Based on degradability, pesticides were ranked as: linuron > metalaxyl - isoproturon > bentazone. - Transport of pesticides in column experiments containing organic substrates

  10. Characterizing pesticide sorption and degradation in microscale biopurification systems using column displacement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, Tineke de [Laboratory of Crop Protection Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: tineke.dewilde@UGent.be; Mertens, Jan [Division Soil and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, K.U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Simunek, Jirka [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Sniegowksi, Kristel; Ryckeboer, Jaak [Division Soil and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, K.U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Jaeken, Peter [PCF-Royal Research Station of Gorsem, De Brede Akker 13, 3800 Sint-Truiden (Belgium); Springael, Dirk [Division Soil and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, K.U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Spanoghe, Pieter [Laboratory of Crop Protection Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2009-02-15

    Biopurification systems treating pesticide contaminated water are very efficient, however they operate as a black box. Processes inside the system are not yet characterized. To optimize the performance, knowledge of degradation and retention processes needs to be generated. Therefore, displacement experiments were carried out for four pesticides (isoproturon, bentazone, metalaxyl, linuron) in columns containing different organic mixtures. Bromide, isoproturon and bentazone breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and a first-order degradation kinetic approach. Metalaxyl and linuron BTCs were well described using the CDE model expanded with Monod-type kinetics. Freundlich sorption, first-order degradation and Monod kinetics coefficients were fitted to the BTCs. Fitted values of the distribution coefficient K{sub f,column} were much lower than those determined from batch experiments. Based on mobility, pesticides were ranked as: bentazone > metalaxyl - isoproturon > linuron. Based on degradability, pesticides were ranked as: linuron > metalaxyl - isoproturon > bentazone. - Transport of pesticides in column experiments containing organic substrates.

  11. An axisymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M; Hiratsuka, T; Ito, K; Finsterle, S

    2011-04-25

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an

  12. An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an

  13. Structural comparison of hazardous and non-hazardous coals based on gas sorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Toth, J. [Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Radnai-Gyoengyoes, Z. [Geopard Ltd., Pecs (Hungary); Bokanyi, L. [Miskolc Univ., Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Comparison of carbon-dioxide and propane sorption at ambient temperature was used for characterising the difference of the structure of hazardous and non hazardous coals. However, hazardous coals were found more microporous or contain more closed pores than non hazardous ones, this difference couldn`t have been enlarged and attributed to one petrographic component by producing the density fractions. Gas sorption isobars (nitrogen, methane, ethane) are proposed to make a distinction between fine pore structure of coals. (orig.)

  14. Mineralogy and petrography of Caithness Flagstones used in sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloodworth, A.J.; Kemp, S.J.; Inglethorpe, S.D.J.; Morgan, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    The mineralogy and petrography of a suite of samples taken from the Caithness Flagstones are described. Samples were collected from core material obtained from a borehole beneath DNE Dounreay, Highland Region, and are duplicates of those used in sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratories. The geological background of the samples is described, with particular emphasis on the development of lithologically distinct facies within the laminated lacustrine sediments examined in this study. Optical examination reveals distinctive sedimentary structures and petrofabrics associated with different lithofacies. Lithofacies type is also reflected in mineralogical variation within the sequence. Highly-laminated, deeper-water facies rocks are typified by the presence of ferroan-dolomite cement, with relatively high clay and organic matter contents. Detrital quartz and feldspar are more abundant in the shallow water facies and the carbonate assemblage in these rocks is dominated by calcite. Though total clay content varies with facies, the distribution of clay mineral species remains largely identical. There is a complex pattern of carbonate and pyrite diagenesis within these sediments. (author)

  15. Comparison of neptunium sorption results using batch and column techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Furlano, A.C.; Weaver, S.C.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    We used crushed-rock columns to study the sorption retardation of neptunium by zeolitic, devitrified, and vitric tuffs typical of those at the site of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We used two sodium bicarbonate waters (groundwater from Well J-13 at the site and water prepared to simulate groundwater from Well UE-25p No. 1) under oxidizing conditions. It was found that values of the sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, obtained from these column experiments under flowing conditions, regardless of the water or the water velocity used, agreed well with those obtained earlier from batch sorption experiments under static conditions. The batch sorption distribution coefficient can be used to predict the arrival time for neptunium eluted through the columns. On the other hand, the elution curves showed dispersivity, which implies that neptunium sorption in these tuffs may be nonlinear, irreversible, or noninstantaneous. As a result, use of a batch sorption distribution coefficient to calculate neptunium transport through Yucca Mountain tuffs would yield conservative values for neptunium release from the site. We also noted that neptunium (present as the anionic neptunyl carbonate complex) never eluted prior to tritiated water, which implies that charge exclusion does not appear to exclude neptunium from the tuff pores. The column experiments corroborated the trends observed in batch sorption experiments: neptunium sorption onto devitrified and vitric tuffs is minimal and sorption onto zeolitic tuffs decreases as the amount of sodium and bicarbonate/carbonate in the water increases

  16. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  17. Study of sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Dong; Fan Xianhua; Su Xiguang; Zeng Jishu

    2001-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of technetium on pyrrhotine are studied with batch experiment and dilute sulfuric acid is used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. Sorption and desorption experiment are performed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions (inert gas box). The results show that a significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine is found under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral is supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Desorption process of the sorbed technetium into dilute sulfuric acid is found to be different under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. On addition of H 2 O 2 to the leach solution a sudden increase of the technetium concentration is observed

  18. Patient experience shows little relationship with hospital quality management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; Klazinga, N.S.; Wagner, C.; Bartels, P.D.; Kristensen, S.; Saillour, F.; Thompson, C.A.; Pfaff, H.; DerSarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes

  19. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; Dersarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for

  20. Sorption on inactive repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-11-01

    The near-field of an intermediate level/low level radioactive waste repository will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. The sorption of americium and plutonium onto magnesium hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, colloidal magnetite and colloidal haematite has been studied under conditions typical of the porewater of a cementitious near-field. R D values ≥ 10 5 m g -1 were measured for both actinides on the oxides and hydroxides. These values are at least as great as those measured on crushed 3:1 Blast Furnace Slag/Ordinary Portland cement. Competitive sorption experiments have shown that sorption onto the corrosion products does not take place in preference to that on the cement or the converse. Magnetite and haematite colloids are positively charged in cement-equilibrated water whilst zirconium hydroxide is negatively charged. Crushed cement was found to be positively charged. Simple experiments show that only a small proportion of haematite colloids is potentially mobile through a column of crushed cement. (author)

  1. Sorption on inactive repository components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-07-01

    The near-field of an intermediate level/low level radioactive waste repository will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. The sorption of americium and plutonium onto magnesium hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, colloidal magnetite and colloidal haematite has been studied under conditions typical of the porewater of a cementitious near-field. R D values ≥ 10 5 ml g -1 were measured for both actinides on the oxides and hydroxides. These values are at least as great at those measured on crushed 3:1 Blast Furnace Slag/Ordinary Portland Cement. Competitive sorption experiments have shown that sorption onto the corrosion products does not take place in preference to that on the cement or the converse. Magnetite and haematite colloids are positively charged in cement-equilibrated water whilst zirconium hydroxide is negatively charged. Crushed cement was found to be positively charged. Simple experiments show that only a small proportion of haematite colloids is potentially mobile through a column of crushed cement. (author)

  2. Effect of glutamic acid on copper sorption onto kaolinite. Batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimzadeh, Lotfallah; Barthen, Robert; Gruendig, Marion; Franke, Karsten; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactive Transport; Stockmann, Madlen [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the mobility behavior of Cu(II) under conditions related to an alternative, neutrophile biohydrometallurgical Cu(II) leaching approach. Sorption of copper onto kaolinite influenced by glutamic acid (Glu) was investigated in the presence of 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4} by means of binary and ternary batch adsorption measurements over a pH range of 4 to 9 and surface complexation modeling.

  3. Effect of glutamic acid on copper sorption onto kaolinite. Batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimzadeh, Lotfallah; Barthen, Robert; Gruendig, Marion; Franke, Karsten; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Stockmann, Madlen

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the mobility behavior of Cu(II) under conditions related to an alternative, neutrophile biohydrometallurgical Cu(II) leaching approach. Sorption of copper onto kaolinite influenced by glutamic acid (Glu) was investigated in the presence of 0.01 M NaClO_4 by means of binary and ternary batch adsorption measurements over a pH range of 4 to 9 and surface complexation modeling.

  4. Column Chromatography To Obtain Organic Cation Sorption Isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Sullivan, James; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2016-08-02

    Column chromatography was evaluated as a method to obtain organic cation sorption isotherms for environmental solids while using the peak skewness to identify the linear range of the sorption isotherm. Custom packed HPLC columns and standard batch sorption techniques were used to intercompare sorption isotherms and solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) for four organic cations (benzylamine, 2,4-dichlorobenzylamine, phenyltrimethylammonium, oxytetracycline) with two aluminosilicate clay minerals and one soil. A comparison of Freundlich isotherm parameters revealed isotherm linearity or nonlinearity was not significantly different between column chromatography and traditional batch experiments. Importantly, skewness (a metric of eluting peak symmetry) analysis of eluting peaks can establish isotherm linearity, thereby enabling a less labor intensive means to generate the extensive data sets of linear Kd values required for the development of predictive sorption models. Our findings clearly show that column chromatography can reproduce sorption measures from conventional batch experiments with the benefit of lower labor-intensity, faster analysis times, and allow for consistent sorption measures across laboratories with distinct chromatography instrumentation.

  5. Volatile Organic Molecules Sorption onto Carbon Nanotubes: Experiment and Molecular Modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simha Martynková, G.; Plachá, D.; Plevová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 142-146 ISSN 2211-8128 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0070 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * sorption * naphthalene * formaldehyde Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://ac.els-cdn.com/S2211812816000341/1-s2.0-S2211812816000341-main.pdf?_tid=a9631cda-969b-11e6-9761-00000aab0f01&acdnat=1476950778_b6de7ebc7654df3afb52d7e7fb4c0986

  6. Sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tao; Wang Bo; Bao Liangjin; Zhou Duo; Long Haoqi; Song Zhixin; Chen Xi

    2012-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of Np (Ⅴ) on the granite fracture filling materials were studied by batch experiments under anaerobic in Beishan groundwater. The impact of pH of groundwater, CO 3 2- , humic acid and different components of granite fracture filling materials on sorption of Np (Ⅴ) was investigated. The results show that the granite fracture filling materials have strong capacity of Np (Ⅴ) adsorption. The value of K d , for Np (Ⅴ) sorption on the granite fracture filling materials is 843 mL/g. With the increase of pH, the value of K d increases at first and then decreases. K d of Np sorption on granite fracture filling materials in the presence of CO 3 2- and humic acid decreases. The chlorite and feldspar are major contributors to the sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials. (authors)

  7. Neptunium(V) sorption on kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amayri, S.; Jermolajev, A.; Reich, T. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium(V) onto the clay mineral kaolinite was studied in batch experiments under different experimental conditions: [Np(V)] = 7 x 10{sup -12}-8 x 10{sup -6} M, solid-to-liquid ratio 2-20 g L{sup -1}, I = 0.1 and 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4}, pH = 6-10, ambient air and Ar atmosphere. The short-lived isotope {sup 239}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.36 d) was used instead of {sup 237}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.14 x 10{sup 6} a) to study the sorption behavior of Np(V) at environmentally-relevant concentrations, i.e., 7 x 10{sup -12} M Np. In addition, {sup 239}Np(V) served as tracer to measure sorption isotherms over six orders of magnitude in Np concentration (4.8 x 10{sup -12}-1.0 x 10{sup -4} M). The results show that Np(V) sorption on kaolinite is strongly influenced by pH, CO{sub 2}, and ionic strength. The sorption of 8 x 10{sup -6} M Np(V) at pH 9.0, and ionic strength of 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} was proportional to the solid-to-liquid ratio of kaolinite in the range of 2-10 g L{sup -1}. In the absence of CO{sub 2}, the Np(V) uptake increased continuously with increasing pH value up to 97% at pH 10. Under ambient CO{sub 2}, the sorption of Np decreased above pH 8 up to zero at pH 10. An increase of Np(V) concentration from 7 x 10{sup -12} to 8 x 10{sup -6} M resulted in a shift of the sorption pH edge by up to one pH unit to higher pH values. The ionic strength influenced the Np(V) sorption onto kaolinite only in the presence of ambient CO{sub 2}. Under Ar atmosphere the sorption of Np(V) was independent from ionic strength, indicating the formation of inner-sphere complexes of Np(V) with kaolinite. Time-dependent batch experiments at pH 9.0 under ambient CO{sub 2} showed that the sorption of Np(V) on kaolinite is fast and fully reversible over six orders in Np(V) concentration. (orig.)

  8. Sorption of a nonionic surfactant Tween 80 by minerals and soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soyoung, E-mail: soyoung@pusan.ac.kr; Jeong, Hoon Young, E-mail: hjeong@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • Tween 80 sorption varies significantly among soil minerals. • Sorption mechanisms and atomic compositions explain to mineral-specific sorption. • Clay minerals and SOM in soils are the key contributors to Tween 80 sorption. • Hysteresis suggests the potential difficulty in removing residual surfactants. - Abstract: Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate Tween 80 sorption by oxides, aluminosilicates, and soils. For oxides, the sorption by silica and alumina follow linear isotherms, and that by hematite follows a Langmuir isotherm. Considering isotherm type and surface coverage, Tween 80 may partition into the silica/alumina–water interface, whereas it may bind to hematite surface sites. Among aluminosilicates, montmorillonite shows the greatest sorption due to the absorption of Tween 80 into interlayers. For other aluminosilicates, it sorbs to surfaces, with the sorption increasing as plagioclase < vermiculite < kaolinite. This results from the relative reactivity among surface sites: ≡NaOH, ≡CaOH << ≡SiOH < ≡AlOH. Experiments using dry- and wet-sieved soils reveal that fine-grained clay minerals, difficult to separate by dry-sieving, contribute significantly to Tween 80 sorption. The greater sorption by untreated soils than H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated soils indicates that soil organic matter is a vital sorbent. The sorption hysteresis, contributed to by clay minerals and soil organic matter, is characterized by the greater sorption during the desorption than the sorption stages. This suggests the potential difficulty in removing surfactants from soils. Also, sorption of surfactants can adversely affect surfactant-enhanced remediation by decreasing the aquifer permeability and the availability of surfactants for micellar solubilization.

  9. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1. In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron, total organic carbon, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin, pH and partition coefficient to organic carbon were evaluated. The Freundlich isotherm was adjusted appropriately to describe diuron sorption kinetics in all the studied treatments. The application of biochar provided increment in the sorption (Kf and reduction in the desorption of diuron in 64 and 44%, respectively. This effect is attributed to the biochar contribution to the total organic carbon and C-humin and of these to diuron through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The positive correlation between the partition coefficient to organic carbon and Kf confirms the importance of soil organic compartment in the sorption of diuron. There was no competition of NPK fertilizer for the same sorption site of diuron. The increase and reduction in sorption and desorption, respectively, show that the application of biochar is an important alternative for the remediation of soil leaching of diuron, especially in sandy soils.

  10. Sorption properties of wool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radetić Maja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Strict ecological legislation, especially in highly developed countries, imposed requirements for the purification of industrial effluents and the need for efficient oil clean up after sea and inland water spills. Although numerous processes have been developed, the application of sorbents is still one of the most efficient methods to remove heavy metal ions, dyes and crude oil from water. Recently, special attention was paid to sorbents based on natural fibres. A review of studies concerning the sorption properties of wool is presented in this paper. The presence of various functional groups on the wool fibre surface contributes to the efficient sorption of heavy metal ions and dyes. A hydrophobic, scaly surface and fibre crimp strongly influence the high sorption capacity of wool for oil. Wool has great sorption potential even as a recycled material. Accordingly, it can be used as a viable substitute to commercially available synthetic sorbents that show poor biodegradab ility.

  11. Sorption mechanisms and sorption models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.; Duc, M.; Neskovic, C.; Milonjic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Sorption at the solid-liquid interfaces play a major role in many phenomena and technologies: chemical separations, catalysis, biological processes, transport of toxic and radioactive species in surface and underground waters. The long term safety of radioactive waste repositories is based on artificial and natural barriers, intended to sorb radionuclides after the moment when the storage matrixes and containers will be corroded. Predictions on the efficiency of sorption for more than 10 6 years have to be done in order to demonstrate the safety of such depositories, what is a goal never encountered in the history of sciences and technology. For all these purposes, and, especially for the long term prediction, acquiring of sorption data constitutes only a first step of studies. Modeling based on a very good knowledge of sorption mechanisms is needed. In this review, we shall examine the main approaches and models used to quantify sorption processes, including results taken from the literature and from our own studies. We shall compare sorption models and examine their adequacy with sorption mechanisms. The cited references are only a few examples of the numerous articles published in that field. (orig.)

  12. Preliminary test Results for a 25K Sorption Cryocooler Designed for the UCSB Long Duration Balloon Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, L. A.; Levy, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous operation, vibration-free, long-life 25K sorption cryocooler has been built and is now in final integration and performance testing. This cooler wil be flown on the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) Long Duration Balloon (LDB) Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment.

  13. Batch experiments for assessing the sorption/desorption characteristics of 152Eu in systems of loose sediments and water containing humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    2001-01-01

    The 152 Eu distribution coefficients of the sorption and desorption of non-binding loose sediments of different grain sizes are investigated using a groundwater of tertiary lignite from Northern Germany which contains high concentrations of humic acids. The batch experiments were carried out with a ratio of 2.5cm 3 /g of solution volume to sediment mass, without mixing [de

  14. Sorption of natural uranium by algerian bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megouda, N.; Kadi, H.; Hamla, M.S.; Brahimi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Batch sorption experiments have been used to assess the sorption behaviour of uranium onto natural and drilling bentonites. The operating parameters (pH, aolis-liquid ratio, particle size, time and initial uranium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption. The distribution coefficient (Kd) range values at equilibrium time are 45.95-1079.26 ml/g and 32.81-463053 ml/g for the drilling and natural bentonites respectively. The equilibrium isotherms show that the data correlate with both Freundlich and Langmuir models

  15. Technetium sorption by stibnite from natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretroukhine, V.; Sergeant, C.; Deves, G.; Poulain, S.; Vesvres, M.H.; Thomas, B.; Simonoff, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of technetium by powdered and polished mineral stibnite Sb 2 S 3 has been investigated in simulated and natural underground waters from the Meuse/Haute-Marne region (France). The sorption by powdered stibnite has been found to be complete under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions in batch experiments. The sorption rate is higher in the absence of oxygen than under aerobic condition. Increasing the temperature from 30 C to 60 C results in a rise of the sorption rate by 9.1 and 27 times under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The observed differences in sorption kinetics in the presence and in absence of oxygen are explained by the interaction of oxygen with sulfide ion in aerobic conditions and by the reduction of technetium(VII) by iron(II) and by other impurities present in natural water and in the mineral, and by the subsequent sorption of Tc(IV) on stibnite under anaerobic conditions. The sorption on a polished mineral surface resulted in the formation of a technetium film, probably Tc 2 S 7 , with a thickness of 1-3 μg Tc/cm 2 pH 3-6 and 4-12 μg Tc/cm 2 at 9-12. The simultaneous formation of stibnite colloids with adsorbed technetium occurs at pH 9-12. The study of the technetium film on the mineral by proton induced X-ray emission analysis showed it to be at least one order of magnitude thinner on the SiO 2 impurities than on the main Sb 2 S 3 component and the iron impurities. (orig.)

  16. Sorption behaviour of radioactive technetium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying

    1996-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of technetium in different soils has been studied by batch experiments under aerobic conditions. The soil samples have been taken to study the characteristics and to derive the pH-Eh values. In addition, the activated carbon and reduced iron powder have been selected as additives to the JAERI sand according to the former research work, so that the technetium sorption behaviour in the artificial soils can be studied under similar conditions. The experimental results show that all these soil samples except for the gluey soil have a very small distribution coefficient for Tc, while the artificial soils have a very large distribution coefficient for Tc. Besides, for artificial soils, the distribution coefficient (R d ) values will become larger and larger when more additive is added and more contact time is allowed. The physico-chemical fixation processes and possible sorption modes have been discussed as well

  17. Sorption-desorption of antimony species onto calcined hydrotalcite: Surface structure and control of competitive anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2018-02-15

    Calcined hydrotalcite can be applied to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems such as antimony species due to its great anion exchange capacity and high surface area. Hence, this study evaluated antimonite and antimonate sorption-desorption processes onto calcined hydrotalcite in the presence of nitrate, sulfate and phosphate. Sorption and desorption experiments of antimonite and antimonate were carried out in batch equilibrium and the post-sorption solids were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). Sorption data were better fitted by dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model (R 2 >0.99) and desorption data by Langmuir model. High maximum sorption capacities were found for the calcined hydrotalcite, ranging from 617 to 790meqkg -1 . The competing anions strongly affected the antimony sorption. EDXRF analysis and mathematical modelling showed that sulfate and phosphate presented higher effect on antimonite and antimonate sorption, respectively. High values for sorption efficiency (SE=99%) and sorption capacity were attributed to the sorbent small particles and the large surface area. Positive hysteresis indexes and low mobilization factors (MF>3%) suggest very low desorption capacity to antimony species from LDH. These calcined hydrotalcite characteristics are desirable for sorption of antimony species from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effects of cadmium stress and sorption kinetics on tropical freshwater periphytic communities in indoor mesocosm experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bere, Taurai; Tundisi, José Galizia

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cause and effect relationship between stressors and biota is crucial for the effective management, restoration and preservation of aquatic systems. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of five Cd concentrations on tropical periphyton community growth, Cd accumulation kinetics, as well as the effects of Cd on diatom community structure and composition. Natural periphyton communities were transferred to artificial stream chambers and exposed to Cd concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 mg.L −1 . Metal accumulation (total and intracellular) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, growth rate, algal cell density and diatom community composition were analysed on samples collected after 1, 2 and 4 weeks of colonization. Periphyton growth and development were significantly lowered by Cd concentrations > 0.03 mg.L −1 . High Cd accumulation capacity by periphyton was demonstrated with total and intracellular Cd content in biofilms reflecting the effects of concentrations of Cd in the culture media and exposure duration. Total and intracellular Cd content generally increased in treatments in the order 0.005 −1 at any sampling time with increasing level of accumulated Cd with duration of exposure in all the systems. Shifts in species composition (development of more resistant species like Achnanthidium minutissimum and reduction of sensitive ones like Diatoma vulgare, Navicula viridula and Navicula cryptocephala), decreases in species richness and diversity and morphological alterations (deformities) of diatom cells with increasing Cd concentration and exposure duration were observed. The results give valuable information on Cd impact of freshwater biofilms. -- Highlights: ► We investigated toxicity and sorption kinetics of Cd on periphyton communities. ► [Cd] > 0.03 mg.L −1 lowers growth. ► Absorbed Cd was a function of duration of exposure and [Cd]. ► Changes in community composition were recorded

  19. Effects of cadmium stress and sorption kinetics on tropical freshwater periphytic communities in indoor mesocosm experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bere, Taurai, E-mail: taubere@yahoo.com [Instituto Internacional de Ecologia, Rua Bento Carlos, 750, Centro, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Federal De Sao Carlosm, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia e Recursos Naturais, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235, SP-310, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tundisi, Jose Galizia [Instituto Internacional de Ecologia, Rua Bento Carlos, 750, Centro, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    Understanding the cause and effect relationship between stressors and biota is crucial for the effective management, restoration and preservation of aquatic systems. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of five Cd concentrations on tropical periphyton community growth, Cd accumulation kinetics, as well as the effects of Cd on diatom community structure and composition. Natural periphyton communities were transferred to artificial stream chambers and exposed to Cd concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 mg.L{sup -1}. Metal accumulation (total and intracellular) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, growth rate, algal cell density and diatom community composition were analysed on samples collected after 1, 2 and 4 weeks of colonization. Periphyton growth and development were significantly lowered by Cd concentrations > 0.03 mg.L{sup -1}. High Cd accumulation capacity by periphyton was demonstrated with total and intracellular Cd content in biofilms reflecting the effects of concentrations of Cd in the culture media and exposure duration. Total and intracellular Cd content generally increased in treatments in the order 0.005 < 0.01 < 0.03 < 0.05 < 0.1 mg.L{sup -1} at any sampling time with increasing level of accumulated Cd with duration of exposure in all the systems. Shifts in species composition (development of more resistant species like Achnanthidium minutissimum and reduction of sensitive ones like Diatoma vulgare, Navicula viridula and Navicula cryptocephala), decreases in species richness and diversity and morphological alterations (deformities) of diatom cells with increasing Cd concentration and exposure duration were observed. The results give valuable information on Cd impact of freshwater biofilms. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated toxicity and sorption kinetics of Cd on periphyton communities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Cd] > 0.03 mg.L{sup -1} lowers growth. Black

  20. Sorption and diffusion of FE(II) in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Tournassat, C.; Hadi, J.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2014-02-01

    . Qualitatively, the sorption of the radioactive 55 Fe on all the clays shows the same type of behaviour, i.e. sorption increases with increasing pH. In the measurements with the bentonite purified at VTT, the sorption occurs at a higher pH than in the measurements carried out with bentonite purified at BRGM. The sorption experiments in the acetate buffer of pH 5 show decreasing sorption of 55 Fe as a function of the increasing concentration of the added Fe(II). A general model for the investigated clays is proposed where Fe sorption is due to adsorption on exchange sites, strong and weak complexation sites and electron transfer with the structural Fe. All mechanisms identified apply to all clay samples but with variations in CEC values, structural Fe redox potential and strong and weak sites' surface density. The measured diffusivities show rather low values (10 -15 - 10 -16 m 2 /s) at pH 8 and 5. At pH 8, the diffusion curve calculated with a reactive transport model on the basis of the sorption matches fairly well the experimental results. At pH 5, the model predicts a much longer diffusion distance than found in the experiment. The reason for this discrepancy is not yet understood. A possible explanation could be a slow redox/sorption process which does not appear in the short batch sorption measurements. (orig.)

  1. Sorption and diffusion of FE(II) in bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Tournassat, C.; Hadi, J. [BRGM, Orleans (France); Greneche, J.-M. [LPCE, Le Mans (France)

    2014-02-15

    . Qualitatively, the sorption of the radioactive {sup 55}Fe on all the clays shows the same type of behaviour, i.e. sorption increases with increasing pH. In the measurements with the bentonite purified at VTT, the sorption occurs at a higher pH than in the measurements carried out with bentonite purified at BRGM. The sorption experiments in the acetate buffer of pH 5 show decreasing sorption of {sup 55}Fe as a function of the increasing concentration of the added Fe(II). A general model for the investigated clays is proposed where Fe sorption is due to adsorption on exchange sites, strong and weak complexation sites and electron transfer with the structural Fe. All mechanisms identified apply to all clay samples but with variations in CEC values, structural Fe redox potential and strong and weak sites' surface density. The measured diffusivities show rather low values (10{sup -15} - 10{sup -16} m{sup 2}/s) at pH 8 and 5. At pH 8, the diffusion curve calculated with a reactive transport model on the basis of the sorption matches fairly well the experimental results. At pH 5, the model predicts a much longer diffusion distance than found in the experiment. The reason for this discrepancy is not yet understood. A possible explanation could be a slow redox/sorption process which does not appear in the short batch sorption measurements. (orig.)

  2. Sorption of benzothiazoles onto sandy aquifer material under equilibrium and nonequlibrium conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kragulj Marijana M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorption behaviour of 1,3-benzothiazole (BT and 2-(methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT was investigated on Danube geosorbent under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. All sorption isotherms fitted well with the Freundlich model (R2=0.932-0.993. The results showed that organic matter of the Danube geosorbent has a higher sorption affinity for the more hydrophobic MTBT compared to BT. However, sorption-desorption experiments showed that MTBT was more easily desorbed than BT molecules, which indicates the importance of absorption relative to adsorption in the overall sorption mechanism of MTBT. In general, molecules of BT and MTBT were more easily desorbed in the lower concentration range, which resulted in an increase in the hysteresis indices with increasing concentrations. Column experiments revealed that retention of the investigated compounds on the aquifer material followed the compound’s hydrophobicity. BT showed a lower retention, in accordance with its lower sorption affinity obtained in the static experiments, while MTBT showed a greater sorption affinity, and thus had a longer retention time on the column. Thus during transport BT represent greater risk for groundwaters than MTBT. These results have increased our understanding of benzothiazoles sorption and desorption process which represent one of the most important factors which influence the behaviour of organic compounds in the environment.

  3. Reversibility of sorption of plutonium-239 onto hematite and goethite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Cotter, C.R.; Kitten, H.D.; Bentley, J.; Triay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate: (1) sorption of plutonium-239 ( 239 Pu) on different iron oxide colloids (hematite and geothite), (2) sorption kinetics of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) onto these two colloids, and (3) desorption of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) from 239 Pu-loaded colloids as a function of time. Natural groundwater and carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater were used in this study. To examine the possible influence of bicarbonate on 239 Pu sorption, an additional set of experiments was conducted in sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) solutions under carbon dioxide free environments. Our results show that colloidal Pu(IV) as well as soluble Pu(V) was rapidly adsorbed by hematite and goethite colloids in both natural and synthetic groundwater. The amount of 239 Pu adsorbed by both iron oxide colloids in synthetic groundwater was higher than in natural groundwater. The presence of carbonate did not influence the sorption of 239 Pu. While sorption of soluble Pu(V) is a slow process, sorption of colloidal Pu(IV) occurs rapidly. Desorption of Pu from iron oxide colloids is much slower than the sorption processes. Our findings suggest that different sorption and desorption behaviors of 239 Pu by iron oxide colloids in groundwater may facilitate the transport of 239 Pu along potential flowpaths from the areas contaminated by radionuclide and release to the accessible environment. (orig.)

  4. Water sorption and transport in dry crispy bread crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B.J.; Nieuwenhuijzen, van N.H.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2010-01-01

    Water sorption and dynamical properties of bread crust have been studied using gravimetric sorption experiments. Water uptake and loss were followed while relative humidity (RH) was stepwise in- or decreased (isotherm experiment) or varied between two adjusted values (oscillatory experiment).

  5. Batch-Versuche zur Bestimmung der Sorption und Reaktionskinetik von fluoreszierenden Tracern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitl, Tobias; Wohnlich, Stefan

    2018-06-01

    For many tracer experiments, prior determination of interaction between solid medium and used tracers is of major interest in order to achieve efficient, economic and successful field experiments. In the present study, three different types of batch experiments were performed with three fluorescent dyes (Na-Fluorescein, Amidorhodamin G and Tinopal CBS-X) and three different rock types (sandstone, claystone and limestone), to determine distribution coefficients and reaction kinetics. All three rock types were analysed for organic carbon content, specific surface area and mineralogical composition to identify the main sorption mechanisms. For all tracers, different sorption properties were found depending on the type of rock. The strongest sorption was observed for Tinopal CBS-X in contact with claystone. Only Na-Fluorescein showed sorption (albeit limited) in contact with the sandstones. The investigated limestones indicated a high sorption for the tracer Tinopal CBS-X. Regarding reaction kinetics, in most cases, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions were reached after two weeks.

  6. Toxicity and sorption kinetics of dissolved cadmium and chromium III on tropical freshwater phytoperiphyton in laboratory mesocosm experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bere, Taurai; Tundisi, Jose Galizia

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the interactive effects of Cd and Cr III on tropical phytoperiphyton community growth, metal sorption kinetics, as well as Cd and Cr mixtures toxicity to diatom assemblages in laboratory mesocosm experiments. A natural phytoperiphyton community sampled from the Monjolinho River (South of Brazil) was inoculated into seven experimental systems containing clean glass substrates for phytoperiphyton colonization. The communities were exposed to mixtures of dissolved Cd and Cr concentrations of 0.01 and 0.1 mg.L -1 Cd and 0.05 and 0.2 mg.L -1 Cr. Phytoperiphyton chlorophyll a, ash-free dry mass, growth rate, diatom cell density and diatom community composition were analyzed on samples collected after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of colonization. High Cd concentration (0.1 mg.L -1 ) affects phytoperiphyton growth while high concentration of Cr (0.2 mg.L -1 ) decreased the toxic effects of Cd on phytoperiphyton growth demonstrating the importance of studying metal mixtures in field studies. Shifts in species composition (development of more resistant species like Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kuetzing) Czarnecki, and Nitzschia palea (Kuetzing) Smith and reduction of sensitive ones like Fragilaria capucina Desmazieres, Navicula cryptocephala (Grunow) Cleve, Encyonema silesiacum (Bleisch) Mann, Eunotia bilunaris (Ehrenberg) Mills and Gomphonema parvulum (Kuetzing) Kuetzing), of phytoperiphyton communities with increasing Cd and Cr concentrations and exposure duration have been demonstrated in this study making phytoperiphyton communities appropriate monitors of metal mixtures in aquatic systems. Good Cd and Cr accumulation capacity by phytoperiphyton was demonstrated with total and intracellular metal content in phytoperiphyton reflecting the effects of dissolved concentrations of metal in the culture media and exposure duration. Increase in both Cd and Cr reduced sequestration of each other, with generally more Cd being sequestered compared to Cr

  7. Toxicity and sorption kinetics of dissolved cadmium and chromium III on tropical freshwater phytoperiphyton in laboratory mesocosm experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bere, Taurai, E-mail: taubere@yahoo.com [Instituto Internacional de Ecologia, Rua Bento Carlos, 750, Centro, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Univeridade Federal De Sao Carlos, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia e Recursos Naturais, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235, SP-310, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tundisi, Jose Galizia [Instituto Internacional de Ecologia, Rua Bento Carlos, 750, Centro, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the interactive effects of Cd and Cr III on tropical phytoperiphyton community growth, metal sorption kinetics, as well as Cd and Cr mixtures toxicity to diatom assemblages in laboratory mesocosm experiments. A natural phytoperiphyton community sampled from the Monjolinho River (South of Brazil) was inoculated into seven experimental systems containing clean glass substrates for phytoperiphyton colonization. The communities were exposed to mixtures of dissolved Cd and Cr concentrations of 0.01 and 0.1 mg.L{sup -1} Cd and 0.05 and 0.2 mg.L{sup -1} Cr. Phytoperiphyton chlorophyll a, ash-free dry mass, growth rate, diatom cell density and diatom community composition were analyzed on samples collected after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of colonization. High Cd concentration (0.1 mg.L{sup -1}) affects phytoperiphyton growth while high concentration of Cr (0.2 mg.L{sup -1}) decreased the toxic effects of Cd on phytoperiphyton growth demonstrating the importance of studying metal mixtures in field studies. Shifts in species composition (development of more resistant species like Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kuetzing) Czarnecki, and Nitzschia palea (Kuetzing) Smith and reduction of sensitive ones like Fragilaria capucina Desmazieres, Navicula cryptocephala (Grunow) Cleve, Encyonema silesiacum (Bleisch) Mann, Eunotia bilunaris (Ehrenberg) Mills and Gomphonema parvulum (Kuetzing) Kuetzing), of phytoperiphyton communities with increasing Cd and Cr concentrations and exposure duration have been demonstrated in this study making phytoperiphyton communities appropriate monitors of metal mixtures in aquatic systems. Good Cd and Cr accumulation capacity by phytoperiphyton was demonstrated with total and intracellular metal content in phytoperiphyton reflecting the effects of dissolved concentrations of metal in the culture media and exposure duration. Increase in both Cd and Cr reduced sequestration of each other, with generally more Cd being

  8. The sorption behavior of DDT onto sediment in the presence of surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xiaoyan; Han Huayu; Yang Guipeng; Gong Xiaofei; Jing Jianning

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The sorption behavior of a complex system consists of DDT and CTAB onto marine sediment was studied. → Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics. → The presence of CTAB could remarkably accelerate and enhance the sorption of DDT. → The sorption of DDT had relatively more negative ΔG 0 and ΔH 0 in the presence of CTAB. - Abstract: The sorption behavior of p,p'- and o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the presence of a cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on sediment was studied. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics of the process. The kinetic behavior of these three chemicals on sediment was described by pseudo-second-order kinetic equations, and the isotherms followed the Freundlich model well. The presence of CTAB was able to remarkably accelerate and enhance the sorption of DDT, whereas DDT showed no effect on the sorption of CTAB in our considered concentration ranges. The thermodynamic parameters, such as standard enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ), standard entropy change (ΔS 0 ) and standard Gibbs free energy change (ΔG 0 ) showed that the sorption process of p,p'- and o,p'-DDT was physical, spontaneous and exothermic, and the randomness at the solid-liquid interface increased during the process. In the presence of CTAB, the sorption of DDT showed significantly negative ΔG 0 and ΔH 0 values.

  9. Equilibrium sorption of cobalt, cesium, and strontium on Bandelier Tuff: analysis of alternative mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Essington, E.H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms are derived from batch equilibrium data for cobalt, cesium and strontium on Bandelier Tuff. Experiments were conducted at an average temperature of 23 0 C and equilibrium was defined at 48 hours. The solute concentrations ranged from 0 to 500 mg/L. The radioactive isotopes 60 Co, 137 Cs, and 85 Sr were used to trace the sorption of the stable solutes. The Linear, Langmuir, Freundlich and a Modified Freundlich isotherm equations are evaluated. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of the three solutes. The empirical constants derived from the Modified Freundlich isotherm equation indicate that under dynamic flow conditions strontium will move most rapidly and cobalt least rapidly. On the other hand, chemical dispersion will be greatest for cesium and least for strontium. Hill Plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation sorption of all three solutes is impeded by interactions among sorption sites; cobalt exhibits the greatest effect of interactions and strontium shows only a minimal effect. In the saturation region of 50% or more, sorption of cobalt is enhanced slightly by interactions among sorption sites whereas sorption of cesium and strontium appears to be independent of site interactions. 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  10. Determination of Sorption Coefficient of Phosphorus Applied for Sugarcane Production in Southwestern Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwamba, A; Nkedi-Kizza, P; Morgan, K T

    2016-09-01

    Phosphorus is among the essential nutrients applied to sugarcane ( L.) fields in the form of a fertilizer mixture (N, P, and K) in southwestern Florida. Sorption coefficient is used for modeling P movement, and in this study, we hypothesized that the sorption coefficient determined using fertilizer mixture (N, P, and K) will be significantly different from values determined using KCl and CaCl, the electrolytes most commonly used for conducting sorption experiments. Supporting electrolytes, 0.01 mol L KCl, 0.005 mol L CaCl, deionized (DI) water, simulated Florida rain, and fertilizer mixture prepared in Florida rain were used to characterize P sorption. Immokalee (Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) and Margate (Sandy, siliceous hyperthermic Mollic Psammaquents) are the dominant mineral soils used for sugarcane production in southwestern Florida; we used the A and B horizons of Margate soil and the A and B horizons of the Immokalee soil for sorption experiments in this study. Freundlich sorption isotherms described P sorption data. The Freundlich sorption isotherm coefficients followed the trend 0.005 mol L CaCl > 0.01 mol L KCl ≈ fertilizer mixture > simulated Florida rain ≈ DI water. Sorption coefficients were used for modeling P movement with HYDRUS 1D; similar P results were obtained with the 0.01 mol L KCl and fertilizer mixture electrolyte treatments. The sorption coefficient for DI water and simulated Florida rain overpredicted P movement. The P sorption data showed the importance of choosing the appropriate electrolyte for conducting experiments based on the composition of fertilizer. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Permeable barrier materials for strontium immobilization: Unsaturated flow apparatus determination of hydraulic conductivity -- Column sorption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, T.E.; Conca, J.

    1996-09-01

    Selected materials were tested to emulate a permeable barrier and to examine the (1) capture efficiency of these materials relating to the immobilization of strontium-90 and hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) in Hanford Site groundwater; and (2) hydraulic conductivity of the barrier material relative to the surrounding area. The emplacement method investigated was a permeable reactive barrier to treat contaminated groundwater as it passes through the barrier. The hydraulic conductivity function was measured for each material, and retardation column experiments were performed for each material. Measurements determining the hydraulic conductivity at unsaturated through saturated water content were executed using the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus

  12. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows

  13. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows the

  14. Simulation of radio nuclide migration in crystalline rock under influence of matrix diffusion and sorption kinetics: Code development and pre-assessment of migration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerman, A.; Xu Shulan

    1996-04-01

    The overall objective of the present study is to illuminate how spatial variability in rock chemistry in combination with spatial variability in matrix diffusion affects the radio nuclide migration along single fractures in crystalline rock. Models for ground water flow and transport of radio nuclides in a single fracture with micro-fissures have been formulated on the basis of generally accepted physical and chemical principles. Limits for the validity of the models are stated. The model equations are solved by combining finite differences and finite element methods in a computer code package. The computational package consists of three parts, namely, a stochastic field generator, a sub-program that solves the flow problem and a sub-program that solves the transport problem in a single fracture with connecting micro-fissures. Migration experiments have been pre-assessed by simulations of breakthrough curves for a constant concentration change at the upstream boundary. Breakthrough curves are sensitive to variations of parameters, such as, fracture aperture, porosity, distribution coefficient and advection velocity. The impact of matrix diffusion and sorption is manifested in terms of a retention of radionuclides causing a prolonged breakthrough. Heterogeneous sorption was characterized with a variable distribution coefficient for which the coefficient of variation CV(K d )=1 and the integral scale of an exponential covariance function is one tenth of the drill core's length. Simulated breakthrough curves for the heterogeneous sorption case have a relative variance of 3% in comparison to that of homogeneous case. An appropriate experimental set up for investigation of the effect of matrix diffusion and sorption on radio nuclide migration experiments would be an aperture less than 1 mm and porosity larger than 0.5%. 36 refs, 19 figs

  15. Use of thermodynamic sorption models to derive radionuclide Kd values for performance assessment: Selected results and recommendations of the NEA sorption project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, M.; Davis, J.A.; Olin, M.; Payne, T.E.; Tweed, C.J.; Askarieh, M.M.; Altmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    For the safe final disposal and/or long-term storage of radioactive wastes, deep or near-surface underground repositories are being considered world-wide. A central safety feature is the prevention, or sufficient retardation, of radionuclide (RN) migration to the biosphere. To this end, radionuclide sorption is one of the most important processes. Decreasing the uncertainty in radionuclide sorption may contribute significantly to reducing the overall uncertainty of a performance assessment (PA). For PA, sorption is typically characterised by distribution coefficients (Kd values). The conditional nature of Kd requires different estimates of this parameter for each set of geochemical conditions of potential relevance in a RN's migration pathway. As it is not feasible to measure sorption for every set of conditions, the derivation of Kd for PA must rely on data derived from representative model systems. As a result, uncertainty in Kd is largely caused by the need to derive values for conditions not explicitly addressed in experiments. The recently concluded NEA Sorption Project [1] showed that thermodynamic sorption models (TSMs) are uniquely suited to derive K d as a function of conditions, because they allow a direct coupling of sorption with variable solution chemistry and mineralogy in a thermodynamic framework. The results of the project enable assessment of the suitability of various TSM approaches for PA-relevant applications as well as of the potential and limitations of TSMs to model RN sorption in complex systems. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag.

  16. Sorption of neptunium(V) on opalinus clay under aerobic/anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, D.R.; Amayri, S.; Drebert, J.; Reich, T.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between neptunium(V) and a natural argillaceous rock (Opalinus Clay (OPA), Mont Terri, Switzerland) has been investigated in batch sorption experiments by varying pH (6-10), Np(V) concentration (10 -12 -10 -4 M), solid-to-liquid ratio (2-20 g/L), and partial pressure of CO 2 (10 -3.5 and 10 -2.3 atm) under aerobic/anaerobic conditions in saturated calcite solution. All batch experiments were carried out using well characterized aerobic and anaerobic dry powders of OPA. The results show a great influence of pH on Np(V) sorption. Under aerobic conditions sorption increases with increasing pH until maximum sorption is reached between pH 8-9. At pH > 9 sorption decreases due to the formation of negatively charged Np(V)-carbonate complexes. By increasing p CO 2 from 10 -3.5 to 10 -2.3 atm, the sorption edge is shifted ∼ 0.5 units to lower pH values. Under anaerobic conditions stronger sorption of 8 x 10 -6 M Np(V) was found, possibly due to partial reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV). The sorption of 8 x 10 -6 M Np(V) under aerobic conditions at pH 8.2 in saturated calcite solution increases continuously with increasing solid-to-liquid ratio of OPA in the range of 2-20 g/L with a constant K d value of 126 ± 13 L/kg. The sorption isotherm was measured over seven orders of magnitude in Np(V) concentration using 239 Np as tracer. The sorption isotherm could be divided in a part of linear sorption behaviour between 10 -13 -10 -9 M Np(V) and non-linear behaviour in the range of 10 -9 -10 -4 M Np(V). (orig.)

  17. Oxygen isotope evidence for sorption of molecular oxygen to pyrite surface sites and incorporation into sulfate in oxidation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichomirowa, Marion; Junghans, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate (i) the rate of O-isotope exchange between SO 4 and water molecules at low pH and surface temperatures typical for conditions of acid mine drainage (AMD) and (ii) the O- and S-isotope composition of sulfates produced by pyrite oxidation under closed and open conditions (limited and free access of atmospheric O 2 ) to identify the O source/s in sulfide oxidation (water or atmospheric molecular O 2 ) and to better understand the pyrite oxidation pathway. An O-isotope exchange between SO 4 and water was observed over a pH range of 0-2 only at 50 deg. C, whereas no exchange occurred at lower temperatures over a period of 8 a. The calculated half-time of the exchange rate for 50 deg. C (pH = 0 and 1) is in good agreement with former experimental data for higher and lower temperatures and excludes the possibility of isotope exchange for typical AMD conditions (T ≤ 25 deg. C, pH ≥ 3) for decades. Pyrite oxidation experiments revealed two dependencies of the O-isotope composition of dissolved sulfates: O-isotope values decreased with longer duration of experiments and increasing grain size of pyrite. Both changes are interpreted as evidence for chemisorption of molecular O 2 to pyrite surface sites. The sorption of molecular O 2 is important at initial oxidation stages and more abundant in finer grained pyrite fractions and leads to its incorporation in the produced SO 4 . The calculated bulk contribution of atmospheric O 2 in the dissolved SO 4 reached up to 50% during initial oxidation stages (first 5 days, pH 2, fine-grained pyrite fraction) and decreased to less than 20% after about 100 days. Based on the direct incorporation of molecular O 2 in the early-formed sulfates, chemisorption and electron transfer of molecular O 2 on S sites of the pyrite surface are proposed, in addition to chemisorption on Fe sites. After about 10 days, the O of all newly-formed sulfates originates only from water, indicating direct interaction

  18. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  19. Sorption characteristics of radioactive cesium and strontium on smectite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi

    1994-01-01

    Sorption of 137 Cs and 85 Sr on smectite has been studied by combining sorption and desorption experiments. In the desorption experiments, the 137 Cs and 85 Sr were desorbed from the smectite by 0.1 N different desorption reagents solution of Li + , Na + , K + , Rb + , Cs + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Ba 2+ . The effects of Cs and Sr concentrations on sorption were examined by desorption experiments using 1 N KCl as a desorption reagent over a Cs and Sr concentrations range from 10 -8 to 1 N (saturated). All of Sr sorbed was desorbed with a 1 N KCl solution over Sr concentrations range of 10 -8 and 1 M. Approximately 50% of the 137 Cs sorbed at a concentration of 10 -8 M was desorbed with a 1 N KCl solution, and the fraction desorbed increased with increasing a Cs concentration. These results show that all Sr was reversibly sorbed on smectite, and a fraction of Cs was irreversibly sorbed on smectite. Thus, smectite has reversible sorption sites for Sr and both reversible and irreversible sorption sites for Cs. The fractions of Sr desorbed were related to the products of an ionic radius and charge of a desorption reagent, and those of Cs were related to the hydration energy. These results suggest that sorbed Sr and Cs reversibly on smectite form hydrated and dehydrated ions, respectively. (orig.)

  20. Phosphorus sorption-desorption and effects of temperature, pH and salinity on phosphorus sorption in marsh soils from coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Ye, Xiaofei; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-12-01

    Wetland soils act as a sink or source of phosphorus (P) to the overlaying water due to phosphorus sorption-desorption processes. Litter information is available on sorption and desorption behaviors of phosphorus in coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate phosphorus sorption-desorption processes, fractions of adsorbed phosphorus, and the effects of salinity, pH and temperature on phosphorus sorption on soils in tidal-flooding wetlands (TW), freshwater-flooding wetlands (FW) and seasonal-flooding wetlands (SW) in the Yellow River Delta. Our results showed that the freshly adsorbed phosphorus dominantly exists in Occluded-P and Fe/AlP and their percentages increased with increasing phosphorus adsorbed. Phosphorus sorption isotherms could be better described by the modified Langmuir model than by the modified Freundlich model. A binomial equation could be properly used to describe the effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on phosphorus sorption. Phosphorus sorption generally increased with increasing salinity, pH, and temperature at lower ranges, while decreased in excess of some threshold values. The maximum phosphorus sorption capacity (Q max ) was larger for FW soils (256 mg/kg) compared with TW (218 mg/kg) and SW soils (235 mg/kg) (p < 0.05). The percentage of phosphorus desorption (P des ) in the FW soils (7.5-63.5%) was much lower than those in TW (27.7-124.9%) and SW soils (19.2-108.5%). The initial soil organic matter, pH and the exchangeable Al, Fe and Cd contents were important factors influencing P sorption and desorption. The findings of this study indicate that freshwater restoration can contribute to controlling the eutrophication status of water bodies through increasing P sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorption behavior of thorium onto montmorillonite and illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yoshihisa; Barr, Logan; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Hemmi, Ko

    2016-01-01

    Thorium (Th)-229 is one of the important radionuclides for the performance assessment calculations for high-level radioactive waste repositories. The sorption behavior of Th onto montmorillonite and illite were investigated by batch sorption experiments. Experiments were carried out under variable pH and carbonate concentrations. The sorbability of montmorillonite was higher than that of illite. Distribution coefficients, K d (m 3 kg -1 ), decreased with increased carbonate concentrations and showed the minimal value at around pH 10. The sorption behaviors of Th were analyzed by the non-electrostatic surface complex model with PHREEQC computer program. The model calculations were able to explain the experimental results reasonably well. The decreases of K d was likely due to the stabilization of aqueous species by hydroxo-carbonate complexations in the solutions. (author) [ja

  2. Determination of Chlorinated Solvent Sorption by Porous Material-Application to Trichloroethene Vapor on Cement Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Marion; Brusseau, Mark L; Marcoux, Manuel; Morrison, Candice; Quintard, Michel

    2014-08-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the sorption of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor by concrete material or, more specifically, the cement mortar component. Gas-flow experiments were conducted using columns packed with small pieces of cement mortar obtained from the grinding of typical concrete material. Transport and retardation of TCE at high vapor concentrations (500 mg L -1 ) was compared to that of a non-reactive gas tracer (Sulfur Hexafluoride, SF6). The results show a large magnitude of retardation (retardation factor = 23) and sorption (sorption coefficient = 10.6 cm 3 g -1 ) for TCE, compared to negligible sorption for SF6. This magnitude of sorption obtained with pollutant vapor is much bigger than the one obtained for aqueous-flow experiments conducted for water-saturated systems. The considerable sorption exhibited for TCE under vapor-flow conditions is attributed to some combination of accumulation at the air-water interface and vapor-phase adsorption, both of which are anticipated to be significant for this system given the large surface area associated with the cement mortar. Transport of both SF6 and TCE was simulated successfully with a two-region physical non-equilibrium model, consistent with the dual-medium structure of the crushed cement mortar. This work emphasizes the importance of taking into account sorption phenomena when modeling transport of volatile organic compounds through concrete material, especially in regard to assessing vapor intrusion.

  3. Sorption of lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and fenvalerate to quartz, corundum, kaolinite and montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudou, H Chaaieri; Hansen, H C Bruun

    2002-12-01

    Sorption to mineral surfaces may be important for retention and degradation of hydrophobic pesticides in subsoils and aquifers poor in organic matter. In this work the title pyrethroids have been used to investigate selective interactions with the surfaces of four minerals. Sorption of the four pyrethroids was quantified in batch experiments with initial pyrethroid concentrations of 1-100 microg/l. Sorption to centrifuge tubes used in the batch experiments accounted for 25-60% of total sorption. Net sorption was obtained from total sorption after subtracting the amounts of pyrethroids sorbed to centrifuge tubes used. All isotherms could be fitted by the Freundlich equation with n ranging between 0.9 and 1.1. Bonding affinities per unit surface area decreased in the order: corundum > quartz > montmorillonite approximately equal kaolinite. A similar sequence as found for the total surface tension of the minerals. All minerals showed the same selectivity order with respect to sorption affinity of the four pyrethroids: lambda-cyhalothrin > deltamethrin > cypermethrin > fenvalerate, which shows that the most hydrophobic compound is sorbed most strongly. Stereochemical properties of the four pyrethroid formulations may also contribute to the selectivity pattern.

  4. Sorption of radionuclides on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajec, P.; Matel, L.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption of cesium, strontium, plutonium and americium from water solution on natural zeolite, clay minerals, synthetic zeolites and ferrocyanides in silica gel matrix was studied. The same experiments but with synthetic zeolites irradiated by the dose 100 kGy proved no change in sorption properties. 1 tab., 4 refs

  5. Binary Component Sorption of Cadmium, and Copper Ions onto Yangtze River Sediments with Different Particle Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sorption is a crucial process that influences immobilization and migration of heavy metals in an aqueous environment. Sediments represent one of the ultimate sinks for heavy metals discharged into water body. Moreover, the particle size of sediments plays an extremely important role in the immobilization of heavy metals. In this study, the sorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd and copper (Cu onto sediments with different particle sizes were investigated to predict the rate and capacity of sorption, to understand their environmental behaviors in an aqueous environment. Batch sorption and kinetic experiments were conducted to obtain the retained amount and rate of Cd and Cu in a binary system. Experimental data were simulated using sorption models to ascertain the sorption capacity and the kinetic rate. Results of European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR sequential extraction showed the highest concentration of Cd (0.344 mg kg−1, and its distribution varied with sediment particle size and site. Furthermore, most of Cu (approximately 57% to 84% existed as a residual fraction. The sorption of Cu onto six sediments followed a pseudo-first order reaction, whereas that of Cd followed a pseudo-second order reaction. Additionally, the competitive Langmuir model fitted the batch sorption experimental data extremely well. The highest sorption capacities of Cd and Cu reach 0.641 mmol kg−1 and 62.3 mmol kg−1, respectively, on the smallest submerged sediment particles. The amounts of Cu and Cd desorbed (mmol kg−1 increased linearly with the initial concentration increasing. Thus, sediment texture is an important factor that influences the sorption of heavy metal onto sediments.

  6. Mathematical modelling of the sorption isotherms of quince

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrevski Vangelce

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The moisture adsorption isotherms of quince were determined at four temperatures 15, 30, 45, and 60°C over a range of water activity from 0.110 to 0.920 using the standard static gravimetric method. The experimental data were fitted with generated three parameter sorption isotherm models on Mitrevski et al., and the referent Anderson model known in the scientific and engineering literature as Guggenheim- Anderson-de Boer model. In order to find which models give the best results, large number of numerical experiments was performed. After that, several statistical criteria for estimation and selection of the best sorption isotherm model was used. The performed statistical analysis shows that the generated three parameter model M11 gave the best fit to the sorption data of quince than the referent three parameter Anderson model.

  7. The sorption behaviour of 99Tc on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying; Zeng Jishu

    2004-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of 99 Tc on apricot-pit activated carbon with batch experiment is studied. The influence of such factors as sorbent particle size, temperature, pH value on sorption ratio, and the Freundlich sorption isotherms are reported in this paper. (author)

  8. Nitrate sorption on activated carbon modified with CaCl2: Equilibrium, isotherms and kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanella Odivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nitrate (NO3- removal from aqueous solutions was investigated using granular activated carbon (GAC modified with CaCl2. Batch sorption studies were performed as a function of sorbent dose, initial nitrate concentration and pH. Sorption was maximized between pH 3 and 9. Studies on the effect of pH showed that the ion exchange mechanism might be involved in the sorption process. The percentage of nitrate removed increased with increasing sorbent concentration, and the ideal sorbent dose was found to be 20 g•L-1. Four isotherm models-Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Sips-were used to fit the experimental data. The Redlich-Peterson isotherm model explained the sorption process well and showed the best coefficient of determination (0.9979 and Chi-square test statistic (0.0079. Using the Sips isotherm model, the sorption capacity (qe was found to be 1.93 mg nitrate per g of sorbent. Kinetic experiments indicated that sorption was a fast process, reaching equilibrium within 120 min. The nitrate sorption kinetic data were successfully fitted to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The overall results demonstrated potential applications of modified GAC for nitrate removal from aqueous solutions.

  9. Effects of organic degradation products on the sorption of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.; Brownsword, M.; Linklater, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that products from the chemical degradation of cellulosic matter can significantly reduce sorption of uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) on geological materials. Uranium(IV) batch sorption experiments have now been performed to study the effect of organic degradation products in a reducing environment. Thorium(IV) sorption has also been studied since thorium is an important radioelement in its own right and has potential use as a simulant for other tetravalent actinides. Sorption onto London clay, Caithness flagstones and St. Bees sandstone was investigated. Experimental conditions were chosen to simulate both those expected close to cementitious repository (pH ∝ 11) and at the edge of the zone of migration of the alkaline plume (pH ∝ 8). Work was carried out with both authentic degradation products and with gluconate, acting as a well-characterized simulant for cellulosic degradation products. The results show that the presence of organic species can cause a reduction in sorption. This is especially so in the presence of a high concentration of gluconate ions, but the reduction is significantly less with authentic degradation products. (orig.)

  10. Effects of organic degradation products on the sorption of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.; Brownsword, M.; Linklater, C.M. (AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that products from the chemical degradation of cellulosic matter can significantly reduce sorption of uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) on geological materials. Uranium(IV) batch sorption experiments have now been performed to study the effect of organic degradation products in a reducing environment. Thorium(IV) sorption has also been studied since thorium is an important radioelement in its own right and has potential use as a simulant for other tetravalent actinides. Sorption onto London clay, Caithness flagstones and St. Bees sandstone was investigated. Experimental conditions were chosen to simulate both those expected close to cementitious repository (pH [proportional to] 11) and at the edge of the zone of migration of the alkaline plume (pH [proportional to] 8). Work was carried out with both authentic degradation products and with gluconate, acting as a well-characterized simulant for cellulosic degradation products. The results show that the presence of organic species can cause a reduction in sorption. This is especially so in the presence of a high concentration of gluconate ions, but the reduction is significantly less with authentic degradation products. (orig.).

  11. Sorption behaviour of W, Hf, Lu, U, and Th on ion exchangers from HCl/H2O2 solutions. Model experiments for chemical studies of seaborgium (Sg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, D.; Andrassy, M.; Nitsche, H.; Misiak, R.; Schaedel, M.; Bruechle, W.; Schausten, B.; Kratz, J.V.

    1997-08-01

    In model experiments with W, Hf, Th, and U radionuclides, a chemical system was developed for the separation of seaborgium from element 104 and heavy actinides, i.e., cation exchange on DOWEX 50 x 8 from solutions containing 0.1-1.0 M HCl and 0.5-2.0 vol.% H 2 O 2 . The system should be suitable for fast on-line experiments if seaborgium exibits a non-uranium-like behaviour. Adding hydrogen peroxide to mixed HCl/HF solutions suppresses the partial sorption of W and, presumably seaborgium, on the cation exchanger. This way, the elution volume can be minimized. Prospects for anion exchange separations of group 6 from 4 elements are also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  12. Sorption of radon-222 to natural sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.S.; Chin, Y.P.; Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    The sorption of radon to sediments was investigated, since this may affect the use of porewater radon profiles for estimating bed irrigation rates. Batch experiments showed that radon has an organic-carbon-normalized sediment-water partition coefficient (K oc , L kg oc -1 ) of 21.1 ± 2.9 for a Boston Harbor sediment, 25.3 ± 2.1 for a Charles River sediment, and 22.4 ± 2.6 for a Buzzards Bay sediment. These values are in close agreement with predictions using radon's octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow ), which was measured to be 32.4 ± 1.5. Temperature and ionic strength effects on K oc were estimated to be small. Given rapid sorption kinetics, the authors suggest that slurry stripping techniques used by many investigators to measure 222 Rn in sediment samples collect both sorbed and dissolved radon. Sorption effects were included in a transport model to obtain revised estimates of irrigation rates from existing literature profiles. Irrigation rates had to be increased over previously reported values in proportion to the sediment organic matter content

  13. A study of sorption mechanism onto cement hydrates by isotherm measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari

    2003-01-01

    In the concept for TRU waste disposal in Japan, cement is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material and is expected to provide chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cement material, which controls the aqueous concentrations of elements in the porewater, is a very important parameter when considering the release of radionuclides from the near field of a repository. Many safety assessment calculations currently assume radionuclide retardation as linear sorption equilibrium and describe it with a distribution ratio (R d value). In this study, the sorption mechanism is discussed by measuring the sorption isotherm of caesium, strontium and thorium onto Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H gel), to justify and support this assumption. In addition, the effect of competitive sorption between thorium and uranium and other groundwater ions is studied by examining sorption using a range of sodium chloride concentrations to simulate different groundwater ionic strengths. Based on the experimental results, we have showed that: Caesium and strontium sorb by substitution for Ca in C-S-H phases and the presence of some calcium sites with different ion-exchange log K values is suggested; Thorium would be fixed in a surface co-precipitation to form a solubility-limiting phase. The results of sorption experiments are reasonably well modelled by the ion-exchange model for caesium and strontium and the surface co-precipitation model for thorium, respectively. (author)

  14. Ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates sorption from simulated reclaimed waters by modified clinoptilolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Hanxin; Lin, Hai; Dong, Yingbo; Cheng, Huang; Wang, Han; Cao, Lixia

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The salt and thermally modified clinoptilolite can effectively sorb NH 3 -N and phosphates. ► The phosphorus and nitrogen removal was consistent with Langmuir isotherm model. ► The modified clinoptilolite possesses rapid adsorption and slow balance characteristics. ► The adsorption is more in line with the Elovich adsorption dynamics equation. ► The entropy effect plays the role of the main driving force in the adsorption. - Abstract: This paper presents the investigation of the ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates sorption from simulated reclaimed wastewater by modified clinoptilolite. The results showed that the modified clinoptilolite has a high sorption efficiency and removal performance. The ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates removal rate of the modified clinoptilolite reached to 98.46% and 99.80%, respectively. The surface of modified clinoptilolite became loose and some pores appeared, which enlarged the specific surface area; the contents of Na and Fe increased, and the contents of Ca and Mg decreased. The modified clinoptilolite possesses rapid sorption and slow balance characteristics and ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates sorption is more consistent with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics of ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates follows the Elovich adsorption dynamics equation, which describes the sorption of ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates in aqueous solution as mainly a chemical sorption. Results from the thermodynamics experiment involving ammonia-nitrogen and phosphates sorption reveal that the process is a spontaneous and endothermic process, and is mainly driven by entropy effect.

  15. Effect of biosurfactant[0] on the sorption of phenanthrene onto original and H2O2-treated soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Xiaohong; ZHAN Xinhua; ZHOU Lixiang

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of biosurfactant on sorption of phenanthrene (PHE) onto the original or H2O2-treated black loamy soil (typic isohumisols) and red sandy soil (typic ferralisols). The sorption isotherms were performed with the original and "soft" carbon-removed soils in the presence and absence of biosurfactant (200 mg/L). The sorption and degradation of biosurfactant were investigated. The result showed that organic matter played an important role in PHE sorption onto the black loamy and red sandy soils, and the PHE sorption isotherms on the "soft" carbon-removed soils exhibited more nonlinearity than those on the original soils. The values of partition coefficient (Kd) on the original black loamy soil with or without 200 mg/L biosurfactant were 181.6 and 494.5 mL/g, respectively. Correspondingly, in the red sandy soil, Kd was 246.4 and 212.8 mL/g in the presence or absence of biosurfactant, respectively. The changes of Kd suggested that biosurfactant inhibited PHE sorption onto the black loamy soil, but facilitated PHE sorption onto the red sandy soil. The nonlinearity of PHE sorption isotherm was decreased in the presence of biosurfactant. Site specific sorption might occur during PHE sorption onto both the original and the "soft" carbon-removed soils in the presence of biosurfactant. It was noted that biosurfactant could also be sorbed onto soils. The maximal sorption capacity of the red sandy soil for biosurfactant was (76.9 ± 0.007) μg/g, which was 1.31 times that of black loamy soil. Biosurfactant was degraded quickly in the two selected soils, and 92% of biosurfactant were mineralized throughout the incubation experiment for 7 d. It implied that biosurfactant should be added frequently when the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils was conducted through PAH desorption approach facilitated by biosurfactant.

  16. Effect of the cationic composition of sorption solution on the quantification of sorption-desorption parameters of heavy metals in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre, J.; Rauret, G.; Vidal, M.

    2006-01-01

    We obtained the sorption isotherms of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in clay, clay saline and organic soils. The distribution coefficients (K d ) were determined in 0.02 eq l -1 CaCl 2 and in a solution that simulated the soil solution cationic composition. The K d values greatly varied with the composition of the sorption solution and the initial metal concentration. The sorption experiments were complemented with the quantification of the extractable metal, to estimate the reversibility of metal sorption. The extraction yields depended on the metal-soil combination, and the initial metal concentration, showing no correlation with previous K d values. The effect of the solution composition in mobility predictions was estimated through a Retention Factor, defined as the ratio of the K d versus the extraction yield. Results showed that risk was over- or underestimated using the CaCl 2 medium in soils with a markedly different soil solution composition. - Sorption solution composition modifies metal sorption-desorption pattern in soils

  17. Genome-wide analysis of adolescent psychotic-like experiences shows genetic overlap with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Oliver; Dudbridge, Frank; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Lu, Yi; Lundstrom, Sebastian; Lichtenstein, Paul; Ronald, Angelica

    2018-03-31

    This study aimed to test for overlap in genetic influences between psychotic-like experience traits shown by adolescents in the community, and clinically-recognized psychiatric disorders in adulthood, specifically schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. The full spectra of psychotic-like experience domains, both in terms of their severity and type (positive, cognitive, and negative), were assessed using self- and parent-ratings in three European community samples aged 15-19 years (Final N incl. siblings = 6,297-10,098). A mega-genome-wide association study (mega-GWAS) for each psychotic-like experience domain was performed. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-heritability of each psychotic-like experience domain was estimated using genomic-relatedness-based restricted maximum-likelihood (GREML) and linkage disequilibrium- (LD-) score regression. Genetic overlap between specific psychotic-like experience domains and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression was assessed using polygenic risk score (PRS) and LD-score regression. GREML returned SNP-heritability estimates of 3-9% for psychotic-like experience trait domains, with higher estimates for less skewed traits (Anhedonia, Cognitive Disorganization) than for more skewed traits (Paranoia and Hallucinations, Parent-rated Negative Symptoms). Mega-GWAS analysis identified one genome-wide significant association for Anhedonia within IDO2 but which did not replicate in an independent sample. PRS analysis revealed that the schizophrenia PRS significantly predicted all adolescent psychotic-like experience trait domains (Paranoia and Hallucinations only in non-zero scorers). The major depression PRS significantly predicted Anhedonia and Parent-rated Negative Symptoms in adolescence. Psychotic-like experiences during adolescence in the community show additive genetic effects and partly share genetic influences with clinically-recognized psychiatric disorders, specifically schizophrenia and

  18. Differences in sorption behavior of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on artificial soils as a function of soil pre-aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Georg; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H

    The sorption behavior of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) to three different artificial soil mixtures was investigated. Artificial soils serve as model systems for improving understanding of sorption phenomena. The soils consisted of quartz, ferrihydrite, illite, montmorillonite, and charcoal. In a previous study, several selected mixtures had been inoculated with organic matter, and microbial aging (incubation) had been performed for different periods of time (3, 12, and 18 months) before conducting the sorption experiments. The effect of this pre-incubation time on the sorption behavior was determined. Interaction of MCPA with soil surfaces was monitored by aqueous phase sorption experiments, using high-performance liquid chromatography/ultraviolet and in selected cases Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. The sorption behavior showed large differences between differently aged soils; Freundlich and linear sorption model fits (with sorption constants K f , 1/ n exponents, and K d values, respectively) were given for pH = 3 and the unbuffered pH of ∼7. The largest extent of sorption from diluted solutions was found on the surfaces with a pre-incubation time of 3 months. Sorption increased at acidic pH values. Regarding the influence of aging of artificial soils, the following conclusions were drawn: young artificial soils exhibit stronger sorption at lower concentrations, with a larger K f value than aged soils. A correlation with organic carbon content was not confirmed. Thus, the sorption characteristics of the soils are more influenced by the aging of the organic carbon than by the organic carbon content itself.

  19. Nitrate Sorption in an Agricultural Soil Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissem Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concentrations of in surface water and groundwater can cause ecological and public health effects and has come under increased scrutiny by both environmental scientists and regulatory agencies. For many regions though, including the Sahel of Tunisia, little is known about the sorption capacity of soils. In this project we measured sorption by a profile of an iso-humic soil from Chott Meriem, Tunisia. Soil samples were collected from four soil depths (0–25, 25–60, 60–90, and 90–120 cm on 1 June 2011, and their sorption capacity was determined using batch experiments under laboratory conditions. The effects of contact time, the initial concentration, and the soil-solution ratio on sorption were investigated. In general, the results suggested that was weakly retained by the Chott Meriem soil profile. The quantity of sorption increased with depth, contact time, initial concentration, and soil-solution ratios. To evaluate the sorption capacities of the soil samples at concentrations ranging between 25 and 150 mg L−1 experimental data were fitted to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm sorption models. The results indicated that Freundlich model was better for describing sorption in this soil profile.

  20. Effect made by the colloids to the sorption behavior of strontium on granite fracture-fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Zuo, R.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects made by the colloid to the sorption capacity of colloids in granite fracture-fillings in aqueous solutions. The granite fracture-fillings were collected from three different depth of the research mine in Gansu province. According to the composition of the local soil and groundwater, two colloids were chosen to investigate this sorption process. Batch tests had been investigated at 27° under the air atmosphere as a function of pH(3 11), initial uranium concentration(5 400 mg/L) and water-rock ratio on the sorption of Sr on granite fracture-fillings. The batch experimental results showed that the sorption capacity presented a positive relationship with pH value, which may be caused by the hydrolytic adsorption raised by the reaction between Sr(OH)+ and OH- groups on the surface on the adsorbent. Initial strontium concentration also showed a positive relationship with sorption capacity when the concentration was lower than 200mg/mL, when the concentration was higher than 200mg/ml sorption reached the equilibrium. Sorption percentage showed a positive relationship with water/solid ratios, when the ratio was lower than 1:100 the system got equilibrium. When other experiment parameters were fixed and only the solid-liquid ratio changed, the adsorption capacity increased with the increasing solid-water ratio. The reason was that the total amount of Sr in the adsorption system remained unchanged, the adsorption sites increased with the solid-liquid ratio, and the adsorption capacity increased gradually with the increasing adsorption sites. The experiments data were interpreted in terms of Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms and the data fitted the former better. Equilibrium isotherm studies were used to evaluate the maximum sorption capacity of colloid.

  1. Sorption studies of radioiodine on soils with special references to soil microbial biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bors, J. (Niedersaechsisches Inst. fuer Radiooekologie, Hannover (Germany, F.R.)); Erten, H. (Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry); Martens, R. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Bodenbiologie)

    1991-01-01

    In batch experiments with two types of soils, chernozem and podzol, radioiodine ({sup 125}I) showed an initial rapid sorption, followed by a long and slow further increase. Very little sorption (R{sub d} < 1) was detected in clay minerals. Generally, higher R{sub d}-values were observed for the chernozem soil, characterized by a higher amount of organic substance and of soil biomass. The sorption process was predominantly irreversible, the isotherms were linear at low ion concentrations and deviated from linearity starting at 10{sup -5} mmol.ml{sup -1}. Sorption ratio was found to increase with increasing volume to mass ratio. The composition of liquid phases (bidistilled water, synthetic soil water, rain water) highly affected iodine sorption. In experiments with KBr solution, the sorption of I{sup -} was found to be strongly preferred to Br{sup -}. Incubation of soil samples under varied conditions (decreased or increased soil biomass, O{sub 2}-concentration, incubation temperature, soil water content and storage conditions) delivered indications for the participation of soil microflora in iodine immobilization. Test with isolated soil bacteria and fungi showed that radioiodine can be incorporated by soil microorganisms under certain conditions only: Considerable uptake of radioiodine was found in washed (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}) cells with both bacteria and fungi, but no incorporation was detected into cells incubated with radioiodine in the culture medium. (orig.).

  2. Sorption studies of radioiodine on soils with special references to soil microbial biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, J.; Erten, H.; Martens, R.

    1991-01-01

    In batch experiments with two types of soils, chernozem and podzol, radioiodine ( 125 I) showed an initial rapid sorption, followed by a long and slow further increase. Very little sorption (R d d -values were observed for the chernozem soil, characterized by a higher amount of organic substance and of soil biomass. The sorption process was predominantly irreversible, the isotherms were linear at low ion concentrations and deviated from linearity starting at 10 -5 mmol.ml -1 . Sorption ratio was found to increase with increasing volume to mass ratio. The composition of liquid phases (bidistilled water, synthetic soil water, rain water) highly affected iodine sorption. In experiments with KBr solution, the sorption of I - was found to be strongly preferred to Br - . Incubation of soil samples under varied conditions (decreased or increased soil biomass, O 2 -concentration, incubation temperature, soil water content and storage conditions) delivered indications for the participation of soil microflora in iodine immobilization. Test with isolated soil bacteria and fungi showed that radioiodine can be incorporated by soil microorganisms under certain conditions only: Considerable uptake of radioiodine was found in washed (NaCl, CaCl 2 ) cells with both bacteria and fungi, but no incorporation was detected into cells incubated with radioiodine in the culture medium. (orig.)

  3. Preliminary report on the statistical evaluation of sorption data: Sorption as a function of mineralogy, temperature, time, and particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, R.; Thomas, K.; Crowe, B.

    1988-05-01

    This report studies the transport of radionuclides from a repository to the environment by dissolution of the stored solid-waste form and subsequent transport in water. The sorption process may retard this movement of radionuclides from the repository to the accessible environment. A measure of this retardation process is the sorption ratio, R/sub D/, where R/sub D/ = (activity in solid phase per unit mass of solid)(activity in solution per unit volume of solution). In this study, predictions of the R/sub D/ values for the elements barium, cerium, cesium, europium, and strontium are developed from linear regression techniques. An R/sub D/ value was obtained for numerous drill core samples. Additional data include the particle size of the rock, temperature condition during the experiment, concentration of the sorbing element, and length of the sorption experiment. Preliminary regression results based on these data show that the temperature and length of the experiment are the most significant factors influencing the R/sub D/ values. Particle size has a slight effect, and based on a small amount of data, it appears that concentration had no effect. The x-ray diffraction data are used to classify the samples by mineralogy, and regression techniques are used to develop estimates of the R/sub D/ values. Zeolite abundance of 10% or more with some addition of clay increases the sorption values significantly. 12 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions

  5. Sorption of Cs, Eu and U(VI) onto rock samples from Nizhnekansky massive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, V.; Vlasova, I.; Kalmykov, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kuzmenkova, N. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation); Petrov, V.; Poluektov, V. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences - IGEM RAS (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The accepted in Russia concept for high level wastes (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal is based on their isolation into the deep underground crystalline rock formations. The 'Eniseysky' area (Nizhnekansky massive) is supposed as the most perspective location for the future HLW and SNF repository. Core materials from different areas of Nizhnekasnsky massive have been studied in terms of petrographic and mineralogical characterization; definition of filtration, elastic, petro-physical and strength properties; estimation of hydrothermal-metasomatic transformation of rocks. We used both undisturbed sliced cores and crushed material for the sorption experiments. Preliminary results of uranium sorption show some significant differences between used rock samples from different depth in sorption rate and pH-dependence. In all cases maximum sorption (more than 90%) is reached in 2-3 weeks. The pH-dependence of sorbed uranium fraction has typical hump-shape: increase of sorption percentage with increasing pH values to 6, plateau (90-98 % of uranium sorbed), decrease of sorption percentage with increasing pH values from 8 due to U(VI) hydrolysis. In the case of cesium the sorption maximum is reached within 10-12 days and in the case of europium - about 5 days. All radionuclides sorbed preferentially onto dark minerals. Local distribution and preferential sorption of cesium, europium and uranium (VI) onto different minerals within the sample were studied by radiography, SEM-EDX, etc. These data accompanying with rock sample composition will allow the development of quantitative model for Cs, Eu and U(VI) sorption onto investigated rocks. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  6. Carbon Dioxide Transport and Sorption Behavior in Confined Coal Cores for Enhanced Coalbed Methane and CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jikich, S.A.; McLendon, T.R.; Seshadri, K.S.; Irdi, G.A.; Smith, D.H.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements of sorption isotherms and transport properties of CO2 in coal cores are important for designing enhanced coalbed methane/CO2 sequestration field projects. Sorption isotherms measured in the lab can provide the upper limit on the amount of CO2 that might be sorbed in these projects. Because sequestration sites will most likely be in unmineable coals, many of the coals will be deep and under considerable lithostatic and hydrostatic pressures. These lithostatic pressures may significantly reduce the sorption capacities and/or transport rates. Consequently, we have studied apparent sorption and diffusion in a coal core under confining pressure. A core from the important bituminous coal Pittsburgh #8 was kept under a constant, three-dimensional external stress; the sample was scanned by X-ray computer tomography (CT) before, then while it sorbed, CO2. Increases in sample density due to sorption were calculated from the CT images. Moreover, density distributions for small volume elements inside the core were calculated and analyzed. Qualitatively, the computerized tomography showed that gas sorption advanced at different rates in different regions of the core, and that diffusion and sorption progressed slowly. The amounts of CO2 sorbed were plotted vs. position (at fixed times) and vs. time (for various locations in the sample). The resulting sorption isotherms were compared to isotherms obtained from powdered coal from the same Pittsburgh #8 extended sample. The results showed that for this single coal at specified times, the apparent sorption isotherms were dependent on position of the volume element in the core and the distance from the CO2 source. Also, the calculated isotherms showed that less CO2 was sorbed than by a powdered (and unconfined) sample of the coal. Changes in density distributions during the experiment were also observed. After desorption, the density distribution of calculated volume elements differed from the initial distribution

  7. Sorption and migration of neptunium in porous sedimentary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Column migration experiments of neptunium were conducted for porous sedimentary materials: coastal sand, tuffaceous sand, ando soil, reddish soil, yellowish soil and loess, and migration behavior, sorption mechanisms and chemical formation of Np were investigated. The migration behavior of Np in each material was much different each other, due to chemical formation in solution and/or sorption mechanism of Np. Mathematical models of different concepts were applied to the experimental results to interpret the sorption mechanism and the migration behavior. It can be concluded that both of instantaneous equilibrium sorption and sorption-desorption kinetics have to be considered to model the Np migration in sedimentary materials. (author)

  8. Sorption of mercury on chemically synthesized polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remya Devi, P.S.; Verma, R.; Sudersanan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and methyl mercury, on chemically synthesized polyaniline, in 0.1-10N HCl solutions has been studied. Hg 2+ is strongly sorbed at low acidities and the extent of sorption decreases with increase in acidity. The sorption of methyl mercury is very low in the HCl concentration range studied. Sorption of Hg 2+ on polyaniline in 0.1-10N LiCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions has also been studied. The analysis of the data indicates that the sorption of Hg 2+ depends on the degree of protonation of polyaniline and the nature of mercury(II) chloride complexes in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) of polyaniline sorbed with mercury show that mercury is bound as Hg 2+ . Sorbed mercury is quantitatively eluted from polyaniline with 0.5N HNO 3 . Polyaniline can be used for separation and pre-concentration of inorganic mercury from aqueous samples. (author)

  9. Phenanthrene sorption on biochar-amended soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    on their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark, we investigated the effect of birch wood-derived biochar (Skogans kol) on the sorption of phenanthrene in soils with different properties. The soil sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg-1......), of phenanthrene was measured on sandy loam and loamy sand soils which have received from zero up to 100 t ha-1 of biochar. Results show that birch wood biochar had a higher Kd compared to soils. Furthermore, the application of birch wood biochar enhanced the sorption of phenanthrene in agricultural soils...... carbon, while it negatively correlated with clay content. The results also revealed that biochar-mineral interactions play an important role in the sorption of phenanthrene in biochar-amended soil....

  10. Sorption and biodegradation characteristics of the selected pharmaceuticals and personal care products onto tropical soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolad, Mahsa; Hu, Jiangyong; Tran, Ngoc Han; Ong, Say Leong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the sorption and biodegradation characteristics of five pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), including acetaminophen (ACT), carbamazepine (CBZ), crotamiton (CTMT), diethyltoluamide (DEET) and salicylic acid (SA), were studied in laboratory-batch experiments. Sorption kinetics experimental data showed that sorption systems under this study were more appropriately described by the pseudo second-order kinetics with a correlation coefficient (R2)>0.98. Sorption equilibrium data of almost all target compounds onto soil could be better described by the Freundlich sorption isotherm model. The adsorption results showed higher soil affinity for SA, following by ACT. Results also indicated a slight effect of pH on PPCP adsorption with lower pH causing lower adsorption of compounds onto the soil except for SA at pH 12. Moreover, adsorption of PPCPs onto the soil was influenced by natural organic matter (NOM) since the higher amount of NOM caused lower adsorption to the soil. Biodegradation studies of selected PPCPs by indigenous microbial community present in soil appeared that the removal rates of ACT, SA and DEET increased with time while no effect had been observed for the rest. This study suggests that the CBZ and CTMT can be considered as suitable chemical sewage indicators based on their low sorption affinity and high resistance to biodegradation.

  11. Sorption-desorption of imidacloprid onto a lacustrine Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mahrous M; El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Koskinen, William C

    2015-01-01

    Sorption-desorption of the insecticide imidacloprid 1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)-methyl]-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine onto a lacustrine sandy clay loam Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid (HA) fractions was investigated in 24-h batch equilibrium experiments. Imidacloprid (IMDA) sorption-desorption isotherms onto the three sorbents were found to belong to a non-linear L-type and were best described by the Freundlich model. The value of the IMDA adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd(ads), varied according to its initial concentration and was ranged 40-84 for HA, 14-58 for clay and 1.85-4.15 for bulk soil. Freundlich sorption coefficient, Kf(ads), values were 63.0, 39.7 and 4.0 for HA, clay and bulk soil, respectively. The normalized soil Koc value for imidacloprid sorption was ∼800 indicating its slight mobility in soils. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were indicated by 1/n(ads) values imidacloprid sorption process with all tested sorbents. Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values indicated a spontaneous and physicosorption process for IMDA and a more favorable sorption to HA than clay and soil. In conclusion, although the humic acid fraction showed the highest capacity and affinity for imidacloprid sorption, the clay fraction contributed to approximately 95% of soil-sorbed insecticide. Clay and humic acid fractions were found to be the major two factors controlling IMDA sorption in soils. The slight mobility of IMDA in soils and the hysteresis phenomenon associated with the irreversibility of its sorption onto, mainly, clay and organic matter of soils make its leachability unlikely to occur.

  12. Phenolic Acids from Wheat Show Different Absorption Profiles in Plasma: A Model Experiment with Catheterized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    The concentration and absorption of the nine phenolic acids of wheat were measured in a model experiment with catheterized pigs fed whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone diets. Six pigs in a repeated crossover design were fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery to study...... the absorption of phenolic acids. The difference between the artery and the vein for all phenolic acids was small, indicating that the release of phenolic acids in the large intestine was not sufficient to create a porto-arterial concentration difference. Although, the porto-arterial difference was small...... consumed. Benzoic acid derivatives showed low concentration in the plasma (phenolic acids, likely because it is an intermediate in the phenolic acid metabolism...

  13. Environmental Conditions Influencing Sorption of Inorganic Anions to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Studied by Column Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelder, Florian; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2017-05-02

    Sorption to carbon-based nanomaterials is typically studied in batch experiments. An alternative method offering advantages to study sorption is column chromatography. Sorbent packed columns are used and sorption data are determined by relating sorbate retention to that of a nonretarded tracer. We have now for the first time applied this technique to study the influence of environmental conditions on sorption of inorganic anions (bromide, nitrite, nitrate, and iodide) to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Deuterium oxide was used as nonretarded tracer. Sorption isotherms were best described by the Freundlich model. Sorption increased in the order bromide 4.5 the surface charge was negative, but sorption was still detectable at pH 6 and 9. Consequently, other forces than electrostatic attraction contributed to sorption. These forces may include H-bonding as indicated by sorption enthalpy determined by variation of column temperature. Overall, column chromatography represents a promising alternative in sorption studies to reveal sorbent properties.

  14. Influence of mineral characteristics on the retention of low molecular weight organic compounds: a batch sorption-desorption and ATR-FTIR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Singh, Balwant; Kookana, Rai S; Farrell, Mark; Sparks, Donald L; Johnston, Cliff T

    2014-10-15

    Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption-desorption behaviour of (14)C-labelled carboxylic acids (citric and oxalic) and amino acids (glutamic, alanine, phenylalanine and lysine) on pure minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, ferrihydrite and goethite). The sorption experiments were complemented by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to gain possible mechanistic insight into the organic acids-mineral interactions. In terms of charge, the organic solutes ranged from strongly negative (i.e., citric) to positively charged solutes (i.e., lysine); similarly the mineral phases also ranged from positively to negatively charged surfaces. In general, sorption of anionic carboxylic and glutamic acids was higher compared to the other compounds (except lysine). Cationic lysine showed a stronger affinity to permanently charged phyllosilicates than Fe oxides. The sorption of alanine and phenylalanine was consistently low for all minerals, with relatively higher sorption and lower desorption of phenylalanine than alanine. Overall, the role of carboxylic functional groups for the sorption and retention of these carboxylic and amino acids on Fe oxides (and kaolinite) and of amino group on 2:1 phyllosilicates was noticeable. Mineral properties (surface chemistry, specific surface area), chemistry of the organic compounds (pKa value, functional groups) and the equilibrium pH of the system together controlled the differences in sorption-desorption patterns. The results of this study aid to understand the effects of mineralogical and chemical factors that affect naturally occurring low molecular weight organic compounds sorption under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Behavior of Cs in Grimsel granodiorite. Sorption on main minerals and crushed rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muuri, Eveliina; Ikonen, Jussi; Matara-aho, Minja; Voutilainen, Mikko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry; Lindberg, Antero [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Holgersson, Stellan [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry; Martin, Andrew [Nagra (National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste), Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    In this study the sorption of cesium was investigated on four different minerals; quartz, plagioclase, potassium feldspar and biotite as well as granodiorite obtained from the Grimsel test site in Switzerland. The experiments were conducted in the presence of the weakly saline Grimsel groundwater simulant by determining the distribution coefficients using batch sorption experiments and PHREEQC-modelling across a large concentration range. In addition, the purity of the minerals was measured by XRD and the specific surface areas by BET method using krypton. The distribution coefficients of cesium were largest on biotite (0.304±0.005 m{sup 3}/kg in 10{sup -8} M). Furthermore, the sorption of cesium on quartz was found to be negligibly small in all investigated concentrations and the sorption of cesium on potassium feldspar and plagioclase showed similar behavior against a concentration isotherm with distribution coefficients of 0.0368±0.0004 m{sup 3}/kg and 0.18±0.04 m{sup 3}/kg in 10{sup -8} M. Finally, cesium sorption behavior on crushed granodiorite followed the trend of one of its most abundant mineral, plagioclase with distribution coefficient values of 0.107±0.003 m{sup 3}/kg in 10{sup -8} M. At low concentrations (<1.0.10{sup -6} M) cesium was sorbed on the frayed edge sites of biotite and once these sites are fully occupied cesium sorbs additionally to the Type II and Planar sites. As a consequence, the sorption of cesium on biotite is decreased at concentrations >1.0.10{sup -6} M. Secondly cesium sorption on potassium feldspar and plagioclase showed similar non-linear behavior with varying concentration. The results were used to assist the interpretation of cesium diffusion process in the 2.5 year in-situ experiment carried out in the underground laboratory at Grimsel test site in Switzerland (2007-2009).

  16. A study on the uranium sorption properties of a domestic granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Kang, Mun Ja; Keum, Dong Kwon; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we selected a domestic granite rock as a studying medium. Granite rock is considered as candidate rock for a high-level radioactive waste repository site and as a representative system of the composite mineral systems. We performed sorption experiments for crushed particles, intact rock surfaces, and natural fracture surfaces of the domestic granite rock and investigated the effects of important geochemical parameters such as pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration. Fracture surfaces showed higher sorption capacities than intact rock surfaces due to the higher content of secondary minerals and the amount of sorbed uranium was greatly dependent on pH, surface types, and carbonate concentration but little on ionic strength. Besides, we tried to investigate the nuclide sorption behaviors of composite mineral systems in terms of mineralogy in order to evaluate the contribution of constituent minerals and to analyze the sorption properties using sequential chemical extraction and XRD, and EPMA methods. It was found that one dominant mineral(mica in case of intact rock surfaces and chlorite in case of fracture surfaces) controls the uranium sorption and nuclide sorption behavior of composite mineral systems are quite different with that of single mineral systems.

  17. Effect of pH on the sorption properties of bentonite Kopernica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.; Paucova, V.

    2009-01-01

    In this work sorption of strontium-85 on Slovak bentonites was studied. Sorption experiments that were conducted at four different values of pH = 2, 4, 6 and 8 showed that by increasing of pH in the solution an increasing of values of percentage of sorption and of distribution relationships occur. Value approaching 99% was achieved during the sorption of strontium cations from the bentonite deposits Kopernica only at pH = 8. It can be concluded that in addition to the basic mechanism of sorption, which is ion exchange, complex-forming reactions with surface groups of bentonite take place there at higher values. The increase in value attributable to R 'hydrolytic' adsorption, because there is a reaction between Sr(OH) + and OH-groups and H + ion competition is stifled. At pH = 2 in the whole studied range of concentrations low values of sorption percent, distribution ratio and adsorbed amount of strontium were observed. It can be attributed to a significant competitive impact of hydrogen ions and disruption of the structure of bentonite.

  18. Sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite -- Effect of calcium ion on the sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muraoka, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite was studied with batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 8. A series of parallel studies using Na-smectite, Ca-smectite and admixtures of Na-smectite and calcite quantified the capacity of Ca 2+ (which occurs in bentonite as an exchangeable cation of smectite and as a component of calcite) to inhibit the sorption of neptunium. The distribution coefficient (K d ) of neptunium for bentonite was constant from pH 2 to 7, while for pure Na-smectite K d increased below pH 5 due to specific sorption of neptunium on Na-smectite. Specific sorption was defined as occurring when neptunium could be desorbed by a strong acid (1 M HCl) but was stable in the presence of 1 M KCl. It was found that the quantity of neptunium sorbed on Na-smectite was inversely proportional to the concentration of Ca 2+ in solution, an effect most pronounced at pH 2+ limits the specific sorption capacity of Na-smectite for neptunium. Similarly, in the mixture of Na-smectite and calcite, sufficient Ca 2+ was solubilized to depress neptunium sorption. This investigation demonstrates that Ca 2+ contained in bentonite as exchangeable cation and released from calcite reduces the specific sorption of neptunium

  19. Prediction of metal sorption in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, Henry R.; Anderson, Harold L. Jr.; Arthur, Sara E.; Brady, Patrick V.; Cygan, Randall T.; Liang, Jianjie; Zhang, Pengchu; Yee, N.

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide transport in soils and groundwaters is routinely calculated in performance assessment (PA) codes using simplified conceptual models for radionuclide sorption, such as the K D approach for linear and reversible sorption. Model inaccuracies are typically addressed by adding layers of conservativeness (e.g., very low K D 's), and often result in failed transport predictions or substantial increases in site cleanup costs. Realistic assessments of radionuclide transport over a wide range of environmental conditions can proceed only from accurate, mechanistic models of the sorption process. They have focused on the sorption mechanisms and partition coefficients for Cs + , Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ (analogue for Ra 2+ ) onto iron oxides and clay minerals using an integrated approach that includes computer simulations, sorption/desorption measurements, and synchrotron analyses of metal sorbed substrates under geochemically realistic conditions. Sorption of Ba 2+ and Sr 2+ onto smectite is strong, pH-independent, and fully reversible, suggesting that cation exchange at the interlayer basal sites controls the sorption process. Sr 2+ sorbs weakly onto geothite and quartz, and is pH-dependent. Sr 2+ sorption onto a mixture of smectite and goethite, however, is pH- and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacity of montmorillonite is higher than that of goethite, which may be attributed to the high specific surface area and reaction site density of clays. The presence of goethite also appears to control the extent of metal desorption. In-situ, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic measurements for montmorillonite and goethite show that the first shell of adsorbed Ba 2+ is coordinated by 6 oxygens. The second adsorption shell, however, varies with the mineral surface coverage of adsorbed Ba 2+ and the mineral substrate. This suggests that Ba 2+ adsorption on mineral surfaces involves more than one mechanism and that the stability of sorbed

  20. Sorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) to synthetic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Erping; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2005-10-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used gasoline oxygenate. Contamination of MTBE and its major degradation product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in groundwater and surface water has received great attention. However, sorption affinity and sorption mechanisms of MTBE and TBA to synthetic resins, which can be potentially used in removal of these contaminants from water, in passive sampling, or in enrichment of bacteria, have not been studied systemically. In this study, kinetic and equilibrium sorption experiments (single solute and binary mixtures) on four synthetic resins were conducted. The sorption affinity of the investigated sorbents for MTBE and TBA decreases in the order Ambersorb 563>Optipore L493>Amberlite XAD4>Amberlite XAD7, and all show higher sorption affinity for MTBE than for TBA. Binary experiments with o-xylene, a major compound of gasoline as co-contaminant, imply that all resins preferentially sorb o-xylene over MTBE or TBA, i.e., there is sorption competition. In the equilibrium aqueous concentration (Ceq) range (0.1-139.0 mg/L for MTBE, and 0.01-48.4 mg/L for TBA), experimental and modeling results as well as sorbent characteristics indicate that micropore filling and/or some other type of adsorption process (e.g., adsorption to specific sites of high sorption potential at low concentrations) rather than partitioning were the dominant sorption mechanisms. Optipore L493 has favourable sorption and desorption characteristics, and is a suitable sorbent, e.g., in bacteria enrichment or passive sampling for moderately polar compounds. However, for highly polar compounds such as TBA, Ambersorb 563 might be a better choice, especially in water treatment.

  1. Geochemical behavior of Cs, Sr, Tc, Np, and U in saline groundwaters: Sorption experiments on shales and their clay mineral components: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Ho, P.C.; Case, F.I.; O'Kelley, G.D.

    1987-11-01

    The Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating shale to determine its potential suitability as a host rock for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). In support of this program, preliminary studies were carried out on sorption of cesium, strontium, technetium, neptunium, and uranium onto Chattanooga (Upper Dowelltown), Pierre, Green River Formation, Nolichucky, and Pumpkin Valley Shales under oxic conditions (air present). Three simulated groundwaters were used. One of the groundwaters was a synthetic brine made up to simulate highly saline groundwaters in the Pumpkin Valley Shale. The second was a 100/1 dilution of this groundwater and the third was 0.03 M NaHCO 3 . Moderate to significant sorption was observed under most conditions for all of the tested radionuclides except technetium. Moderate technetium sorption occurred on Upper Dowelltown Shale, and although technetium sorption was low on the other shales, it was higher than expected for Tc(VII), present as the anion TcO 4 - . Little sorption of strontium onto the shales was observed from the concentrated saline groundwater. These data can be used in a generic fashion to help assess the sorption characteristics of shales in support of a national survey. 10 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs

  2. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  3. Sorption of triclosan onto activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite: effects of pH, ionic strength, and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Shishir Kumar; Oh, Seok-Young; Park, Hung-Suck

    2010-07-15

    Sorption of triclosan on three sorbents, viz., activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and humic acid (HA) concentration through controlled batch experiments. Triclosan sorption was found to be higher in the acidic pH range, as varying pH showed significant influence on the surface charge of the sorbents and degree of ionization of the sorbate. Sorption capacity of the sorbents increased with an increase in the ionic strength of solution. At low pH (pH 3), the overall increase in triclosan sorption was 1.2, approximately 4 and 3.5 times, respectively for activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite when ionic strength was increased from 1x10(-3) to 5x10(-1) M. Triclosan sorption onto activated carbon decreased from 31.4 to 10.6 mg g(-1) by increasing the HA concentration to 200 mg C L(-1). However, during sorption onto kaolinite and montmorillonite, the effect of HA was very complex probably due to (i) hydrophobicity (log K(ow)=4.76) of triclosan; and (ii) complexation of HA with triclosan. Though triclosan sorption onto activated carbon is higher, the potential of kaolinite and montmorillonite in controlling the transport of triclosan in subsurface environment can still be appreciable. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sorption of malachite green from aqueous solution by potato peel: Kinetics and equilibrium modeling using non-linear analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khamsa Guechi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato peel (PP was used as a biosorbent to remove malachite green (MG from aqueous solution under various operating conditions. The effect of the experimental parameters such as initial dye concentration, biosorbent dose, initial pH, stirring speed, temperature, ionic strength and biosorbent particle size was investigated through a number of batch sorption experiments. The sorption kinetic uptake for MG by PP at various initial dye concentrations was analyzed by non-linear method using pseudo-first, pseudo-second and pseudo-nth order models. It was found that the pseudo-nth order kinetic model was the best applicable model to describe the sorption kinetic data and the order n of sorption reaction was calculated in the range from 0.71 to 2.71. Three sorption isotherms namely the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherms in their non-linear forms were applied to the biosorption equilibrium data. Both the Langmuir and Redlich–Peterson models were found to fit the sorption isotherm data well, but the Redlich–Peterson model was better. Thermodynamic parameters show that the sorption process of MG is endothermic and more effective process at high temperatures. The results revealed that PP is very effective for the biosorption of MG from aqueous solutions.

  5. Influence of sorption competition on sorption data for MX-80 bentonite used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.; Marques Fernandes, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In order to obtain a (quasi) mechanistic understanding of radionuclide uptake on clay minerals and argillaceous rocks, the majority of sorption experiments have been carried out on purified clay minerals such as montmorillonite and illite at trace concentrations (sorption edges), or as a function of concentration (sorption isotherms), with a single radionuclide under well-defined conditions in simple background electrolytes. As a result of such studies the 2 site proto-lysis non electrostatic surface complexation cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model, was developed and has been successfully applied to quantitatively describe the uptake of numerous radionuclides of differing valences as a function of pH and concentration on montmorillonite. In a deep geological repository for high level waste, stable impurities arise from many sources: they are present in the pore waters, in the tunnel back fill materials and host rock formations, they arise from the corrosion of the carbon steel canister and finally they are dissolved from the spent fuel and vitrified high level waste simultaneously with the radionuclides. These impurities, which are an integral part of a realistic repository system, can potentially compete with radionuclides for the sorption sites on the backfill materials and host rock and thus reduce their uptake on them. The influence of competitive sorption is not intrinsically included (or only partly so) in the sorption model. It is clearly an inherently important issue to quantify the influence of sorption competition on the transport of released radionuclides through the multi-barrier system in a deep repository. In this study an extreme case of a competitive sorption scenario in the near field of a HLW repository is presented. Two factors are considered: one associated with the high concentrations and the other with competitive sorption effects. The tendency in both cases is to cause a reduction in

  6. SORPTION OF Au(III BY Saccharomyces cerevisiae BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaria Amaria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Au(III sorption by S. cerevisiae biomass extracted from beer waste industry was investigated. Experimentally, the sorption was conducted in batch method. This research involved five steps: 1 identification the functional groups present in the S. cerevisiae biomass by infrared spectroscopic technique, 2 determination of optimum pH, 3 determination of the sorption capacity and energy, 4 determination of the sorption type by conducting desorption of sorbed Au(III using specific eluents having different desorption capacity such as H2O (van der Waals, KNO3 (ion exchange, HNO3 (hydrogen bond, and tiourea (coordination bond, 5 determination of effective eluents in Au(III desorption by partial desorption of sorbed Au(III using thiourea, NaCN and KI. The remaining Au(III concentrations in filtrate were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results showed that: 1 Functional groups of S. cerevisiae biomass that involved in the sorption processes were hydroxyl (-OH, carboxylate (-COO- and amine (-NH2, 2 maximum sorption was occurred at pH 4, equal to 98.19% of total sorption, 3 The sorption capacity of biomass was 133.33 mg/g (6.7682E-04 mol/g and was involved sorption energy 23.03 kJ mol-1, 4 Sorption type was dominated by coordination bond, 5 NaCN was effective eluent to strip Au(III close to 100%.   Keywords: sorption, desorption, S. cerevisiae biomass, Au(III

  7. Sorption of cesium and uranium to Feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijland, G.C.; Pennders, R.M.J.

    1990-07-01

    Within safety assessment studies, for nuclear waste disposal in deep geologic formations, calculation for the migration of radionuclides through the geosphere are often carried out with models taking sorption into account. In the past 8 years the insight grew that other physico-chemical processes, besides sorption, could affect migration behaviour. While the currently used transport models were being improved taking either linear or non-linear sorption into account, the coupling of geochemical and transport models came into scope. In spite of these developments models which are still based on the sorption theory are frequently applied in studying migration behaviour of radionuclides. This is caused by the necessity of making preliminary pronouncements, while coupled models are still in stage of development and thermodynamic data are very limited available. Therefore one has to obtain insight in the reliability of the models based on the sorption theory. within the sorption database there is a lack of knowledge about mineralogy, composition of the fluid and the experimental conditions underlying the data. Therefore the Expert Group on geochemical Modelling supported by the Finnish proposal in order to obtain insight in the possible deviation of the sorption coefficients that can be estimated from experiments performed with standard samples, fluid composition and experimental conditions. Nine laboratories from OECD membership countries took part in this intercalibration study. In the framework of the Dutch safety assessment studies the Dutch National Institute of Public health and Environmental protection (RIVM) has decided to participate in this exercise. In this report the results are presented of sorption experiments for cesium and natural Uranium to Feldspar. (H.W.). 4 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  8. Sorption of biodegradation end products of nonylphenol polyethoxylates onto activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Viet; Tateda, Masafumi; Ike, Michihiko; Fujita, Masanori; Tsunoi, Shinji; Tanaka, Minoru

    2004-01-01

    Nonylphenol(NP), nonylphenoxy acetic acid (NP1EC), nonylphenol monoethoxy acetic acid (NP2EC), nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NP1EO) and nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO) are biodegradation end products (BEPs) of nonionic surfactant nonylphenolpolyethoxylates (NPnEO). In this research, sorption of these compounds onto model activated sludge was characterized. Sorption equilibrium experiments showed that NP, NP1EO and NP2EO reached equilibrium in about 12 h, while equilibrium of NP1EC and NP2EC were reached earlier, in about 4 h. In sorption isotherm experiments, obtained equilibrium data at 28 degrees C fitted well to Freundlich sorption model for all investigated compounds. For NP1EC, in addition to Freundlich, equilibrium data also fitted well to Langmuir model. Linear sorption model was also tried, and equilibrium data of all NP, NP1EO, NP2EO and NP2EC except NP1EC fitted well to this model. Calculated Freundlich coefficient (K(F)) and linear sorption coefficient (K(D)) showed that sorption capacity of the investigated compounds were in order NP > NP2EO > NP1EO > NP1EC approximately NP2EC. For NP, NP1EO and NP2EO, high values of calculated K(F) and K(D) indicated an easy uptake of these compounds from aqueous phase onto activated sludge. Whereas, NP1EC and NP2EC with low values of K(F) and K(D) absorbed weakly to activated sludge and tended to preferably remain in aqueous phase.

  9. Sorption behaviour of radiocaesium in soils from various regions of Libya and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenber, Mohamed Ahmed.

    1992-01-01

    In the last years the interest of zeolite minerals has increased. Some of them have been tested as caesium binding agents in both animals and in soil-plant systems. The sorption capacity of zeolites was high, and the experimental results showed that the zeolite materials have a considerable potential as a caesium binding agent. A significant reduction reduction in the plant uptake of 134 Cs, maximally by a factor of 8, was obtained in the experiments. The sorption characteristics of 134 Cs on soils from various regions of Libya and Sweden were studied, using batch techniques. The influence of soil parameters, contact time, and various concentrations of Cs + , K + and NH 4 + in the solution on the sorption ratio (R s -value) for 134 Cs were determined by using 134 Cs as a tracer. Important parameters influencing the sorption were clay content, pH, and the concentration of cations, in particular that of K + and NH 4 + , which compete with Cs + for the sorption sites. The conditions influencing the exchangeability of 134 Cs sorbed in different soil types were studied in desorption experiments. The exchangeability of caesium was determined by extraction with 1 N Ba Cl 2 and 1 N NH 4 Cl. The results showed that divalent Ba 2+ was much less effective than the monovalent NH 4 + in exchanging 134 Cs from the sorption sites in the soils. Increasing the equilibration time and drying the soils reduced the exchangeability of 134 Cs in most of the soils, especially the fraction exchangeable with NH 4 + . Correlations were found between the radiocaesium transfer factor for plant uptake, clay content, and sorption ratio. Simple mathematical models were used to estimate the transfer factors for radiocaesium to wheat on soils of interest, for which no uptake data are available. 31 refs, 1 fig, 2 tabs

  10. PAL application to the study of sorption mechanism in polymers - capillary effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Shimadzu, A.; Ikeda, K.

    1999-01-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime technique can be applied to the study of the sorption mechanism in polymers in a quite unique way. In our previous experiments it had been shown that τ 3 and I 3 of polymers show a V-shaped dependence as a function of the contact with vapours. The decreasing part of the V-shaped dependence had been attributed to the Langmuir-type sorption, and the increasing part of delayed occurrence of the Henry-type sorption. But since there was some doubt that the capillary effect, i.e. the vapour to be sorbed is deposited in between the polymer membranes, might be involved in the increasing part, we performed a careful experiment to avoid the capillary effect. We have performed further experiments in a careful conditions to avoid the capillary effect, and have observed the same V-shape as before. Thus our interpretation of the V-shaped dependence has been established. Furthermore, in another example it is shown a case where the capillary effect is observed. This latter case is an example how positron annihilation lifetime can distinguish the real sorption and false sorption (capillary effect). (author)

  11. Retention of Nickel in Soils: Sorption-Desorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption and desorption of heavy metals in soils are primary factors that influence their bioavailability and mobility in the soil profile. To examine the characteristics of nickel (Ni) adsorption-desorption in soils, kinetic batch experiments were carried out followed by Ni re...

  12. Uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate chemically modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.; Ordonez R, E.

    2010-10-01

    This work deals with the uranium (Vi) speciation after sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (ZrP 2 O 7 ) surface, hydrated and in a surface modified with organic acids. Oxalic and citric acids were chosen to modify the ZrP 2 O 7 surface because they have poly carboxylic groups and they mimic the organic matter in nature. Thus the interest of this work is to evaluate the uranium (Vi) sorption edge at different s ph values in natural and modified surfaces. The luminescence technique (fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively) was used for the quantification and speciation of uranyl sorbed at the zirconium diphosphate interface. The fluorescence experiment, showed that adsorption of uranyl on surface of zirconium diphosphate tends to 100%. The speciation shows that there are different complexes in surface which were formed between zirconium diphosphate and uranyl, since it is produced a displacement of wavelength in fluorescence spectra of each system. (Author)

  13. Sorption data bases and mechanistic sorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    In common with many other countries with a nuclear programme, the Swiss concept for the disposal of radioactive waste is focused on deep burial in specially constructed repositories in geologically stable host rocks. Under such conditions, the most likely means whereby radionuclides might return to the biosphere involves their transport in slowly moving groundwater. The sorption of radionuclides by solid phases in the engineered barriers within the repository, and in the surrounding geological media, limits their release and retards their movement. Performance assessment studies for disposal concepts are carried out by Nagra, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, in which various release scenarios are examined, and 'doses to man' calculated. The uptake of radionuclides by immobile phases is one of the pillars upon which the safety case rests. Hence, sorption databases are very important data sets for performance assessments. The methodology lying behind the construction of sorption databases, and some aspects of the supporting experimental work, are briefly described in this report. Flexible, long-term, focused research programmes are required to properly understand the radionuclide/rock/groundwater system, and this is an essential pre-requisite for producing robust state-of-the-art sorption databases. (author)

  14. Sorption data bases and mechanistic sorption studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H

    2000-07-01

    In common with many other countries with a nuclear programme, the Swiss concept for the disposal of radioactive waste is focused on deep burial in specially constructed repositories in geologically stable host rocks. Under such conditions, the most likely means whereby radionuclides might return to the biosphere involves their transport in slowly moving groundwater. The sorption of radionuclides by solid phases in the engineered barriers within the repository, and in the surrounding geological media, limits their release and retards their movement. Performance assessment studies for disposal concepts are carried out by Nagra, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, in which various release scenarios are examined, and 'doses to man' calculated. The uptake of radionuclides by immobile phases is one of the pillars upon which the safety case rests. Hence, sorption databases are very important data sets for performance assessments. The methodology lying behind the construction of sorption databases, and some aspects of the supporting experimental work, are briefly described in this report. Flexible, long-term, focused research programmes are required to properly understand the radionuclide/rock/groundwater system, and this is an essential pre-requisite for producing robust state-of-the-art sorption databases. (author)

  15. Diffusion and sorption properties of radionuclides in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Ji-Wei; Neretnieks, I. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1997-07-01

    In this report, recent studies on sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in compacted bentonite have been reviewed. The sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient data obtained from experiments in the literature have been compiled. Based on these experimental data and the report SKB-TR--91-16 (Brandberg and Skagius, 1991), this report proposes a set of sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient values for modelling purpose for safety analysis of nuclear waste repositories. The variability and uncertainty of the diffusivity data span somewhat more than an order or magnitude up and down. Most of the nuclides have an effective diffusivity in around 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s. Ion exclusion effects are observed for C, Cl and for Tc in oxidizing waters. Effective diffusivities are nearly tow orders of magnitude lower for these elements and of the order of 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s. Surface diffusion effects are found for Cs, Ni, Pa, Pb, Ra, Sn, Sr and Zr. Effective diffusivities for these elements are of the order of 10{sup -8} m{sup 2}/s. The surface diffusion effect should decrease in saline waters which is seen for Cs and Sr where there are data available. It is also deemed that Ra will have this effect because of its similarity with Sr. The other nuclides should also show this decrease but no data is available. Sorption and diffusion mechanisms in compacted bentonite are discussed in the report. In highly compacted bentonite, sorption and hence its distribution coefficient is not well defined, and a pore diffusion coefficient or a surface diffusion coefficient is not well defined either. Therefore, an apparent diffusion coefficient and a total concentration gradient should be more relevant in describing the diffusion process in compacted bentonite. 99 refs.

  16. Variation in free jumping technique within and among horses with little experience in show jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria, S.; Bobbert, M.F.; Back, W.; Barneveld, A.; van Weeren, P.R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective - To quantify variation in the jumping technique within and among young horses with little jumping experience, establish relationships between kinetic and kinematic variables, and identify a limited set of variables characteristic for detecting differences in jumping performance among

  17. The sorption characteristics of mercury as affected by organic matter content and/or soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šípková, Adéla; Šillerová, Hana; Száková, Jiřina

    2014-05-01

    The determination and description of the mercury sorption extend on soil is significant for potential environmental toxic effects. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of mercury sorption at different soil samples and vermicomposts. Mercury interactions with soil organic matter were studied using three soils with different physical-chemical properties - fluvisol, cambisol, and chernozem. Moreover, three different vermicomposts based on various bio-waste materials with high organic matter content were prepared in special fermentors. First was a digestate, second was represented by a mixture of bio-waste from housing estate and woodchips, and third was a garden bio-waste. In the case of vermicompost, the fractionation of organic matter was executed primarily using the resin SuperliteTM DAX-8. Therefore, the representation of individual fractions (humic acid, fulvic acid, hydrophilic compounds, and hydrophobic neutral organic matter) was known. The kinetics of mercury sorption onto materials of interest was studied by static sorption experiments. Samples were exposed to the solution with known Hg concentration of 12 mg kg-1 for the time from 10 minutes to 24 hours. Mercury content in the solutions was measured by the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Based on this data, the optimum conditions for following sorption experiments were chosen. Subsequently, the batch sorption tests for all soil types and vermicomposts were performed in solution containing variable mercury concentrations between 1 and 12 mg kg-1. Equilibrium concentration values measured in the solution after sorption and calculated mercury content per kilogram of the soil or the vermi-compost were plotted. Two basic models of sorption isotherm - Langmuir and Freundlich, were used for the evaluation of the mercury sorption properties. The results showed that the best sorption properties from studied soil were identified in chernozem with highest cation exchange

  18. Carbon dioxide sorption on EDTA modified halloysite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waszczuk Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the sorption study of CO2 on EDTA surface modified halloysite was conducted. In the paper chemical modification of halloysite from the Dunino deposit (Poland and its influence on sorption of CO2 are presented. A halloysite samples were washed with water-EDTA 1% solution, centrifuged to separate liquid and impurities and dried. The samples were tested for the sorption capacity using a manometric method with pressure up to 3 MPa. A Langmuir adsorption model was fitted to the data. The results showed that EDTA had a limited effect on the increase of sorption potential at low pressure and the samples exhibited similar results to that ones treated solely with the water solution.

  19. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  20. Sorption of fluoride using chemically modified Moringa oleifera leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Shabnam; Chattree, Amit

    2018-05-01

    Contamination of drinking water due to fluoride is a severe health hazard problem. Excess of fluoride (> 1.5 mg/L) in drinking water is harmful to human health. Various treatment technologies for removing fluoride from groundwater have been investigated. The present study showed that the leaves of Moringa oleifera, a herbal plant is an effective adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Acid treated Moringa oleifera leaves powder showed good adsorption capacity than alkali treated Moringa oleifera leaves powder. Batch sorptive defluoridation was conducted under the variable experimental condition such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and initial fluoride ion concentration. Maximum defluoridation was achieved at pH 1. The percentage of fluoride removal increases with adsorbent dose. The equilibrium sorption data were fitted into Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. Of the three adsorption isotherms, the R 2 value of Langmuir isotherm model was the highest. The maximum monolayer coverage ( Q max) from Langmuir isotherm model was determined to be 1.1441 mg/g, the separation factor indicating a favorable sorption experiment is 0.035. It was also discovered that the adsorption did not conform to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The heat of sorption process was estimated from Temkin Isotherm model to be - 0.042 J/mol which vividly proved that the adsorption experiment followed a physical process.

  1. Sorption behavior of nonylphenol (NP) on sewage-irrigated soil: Kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Caixiang; Yao, Linlin; Li, Jiale; Liu, Min; Xu, Liang; Evalde, Mulindankaka

    2014-01-01

    The reuse of wastewater for irrigation of agricultural land is a well established resources management practice but has the disadvantage of inputting various forms of contaminants into the terrestrial environment including nonylphenol (NP), a well known endocrine disrupting substance. To elucidate the environmental fate and transport of NP, the sorption behavior on sewage-irrigated soil was studied by batch experiment. It was found that sorption processes of NP on different sorbents (soil, humic acid (HA) and silica) could be expressed well using two compartment pseudo first-order model, where both surface and intra-particle diffusion were probable rate-controlling processes. Linear model could better express the sorption of NP on soil, black carbon (BC) and mineral (e.g., SiO 2 ) except HA than Freundlich model. The large value of distribution coefficients of normalized organic carbon (K oc ) on soils indicated that NP was limited to migrate to deep soil. The higher desorption partition coefficient of NP on soil showed enhanced hysteresis. According to the experimental data, the calculated thermodynamic parameters implied that the sorption reaction on sewage-irrigation was spontaneous, exothermic and entropy decreasing process. The amount of soil organic matter (SOM) dominated the sorption capacity, whereas the sorption behavior of NP on soil showed no significant correlation with ionic strength. - Highlights: • Both surface and intra-particle diffusion were rate-controlling processes. • Soil composition influences the partition activity of NP. • Soil organic matter has dominated the sorption capacity of NP on soil. • NP molecule was limited to migrate to deep soil in sewage-irrigated area

  2. Study of sorption and diffusion of 137Cs in compacted bentonite saturated with saline water at 60degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Haginuma, Masashi; Suzuki, Kazunori

    2007-01-01

    The effect of compaction of bentonite on the sorption behavior of 137 Cs was studied for the safety assessment of the high level radioactive waste. The diffusion coefficients (effective D e and apparent D a ) and the distribution coefficient for sorption K d for 137 Cs in compacted and dispersed bentonite saturated with saline water were investigated at 60degC by four different sorption and diffusion experiments: the in-diffusion, through-diffusion, reservoir-depletion and batch sorption experiments. The system of the through-diffusion experiment was carefully designed to maintain the boundary conditions of constant concentration at each end of the specimen. D e and D a were found to be reproducible and showed good consistency among three of the diffusion experiments (through-diffusion, in-diffusion and reservoir depletion). K d of 137 Cs in compacted bentonite determined from the three types of diffusion experiments was in good accordance with that determined by the batch sorption experiment for dispersed bentonite. (author)

  3. Gas sorption properties of microporous metal organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, JeongYong; Li Jing; Jagiello, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    A low-temperature gas sorption study has been carried out on four three-dimensional microporous metal organic framework (MMOF) structures and two two-dimensional layered structures. The pore characteristics are analyzed based on the argon adsorption-desorption isotherms at 87 K. The results from hydrogen sorption experiments conducted at 77 and 87 K show that all MMOFs have a relatively high hydrogen uptake, with adsorbed hydrogen densities falling in the range of liquid hydrogen. Isosteric heats of hydrogen adsorption data calculated based on the Clausius-Clapeyron equation are consistent with these observations, indicating strong sorbent-sorbate interactions. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 and 87 K

  4. Real Science: MIT Reality Show Tracks Experiences, Frustrations of Chemistry Lab Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    A reality show about a college course--a chemistry class no less? That's what "ChemLab Boot Camp" is. The 14-part series of short videos is being released one episode at a time on the online learning site of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The novel show follows a diverse group of 14 freshmen as they struggle to master the…

  5. Showing the Unsayable: Participatory Visual Approaches and the Constitution of 'Patient Experience' in Healthcare Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulias, Constantina

    2018-06-01

    This article considers the strengths and potential contributions of participatory visual methods for healthcare quality improvement research. It argues that such approaches may enable us to expand our understanding of 'patient experience' and of its potential for generating new knowledge for health systems. In particular, they may open up dimensions of people's engagement with services and treatments which exceed both the declarative nature of responses to questionnaires and the narrative sequencing of self reports gathered through qualitative interviewing. I will suggest that working with such methods may necessitate a more reflexive approach to the constitution of evidence in quality improvement work. To this end, the article will first consider the emerging rationale for the use of visual participatory methods in improvement before outlining the implications of two related approaches-photo-elicitation and PhotoVoice-for the constitution of 'experience'. It will then move to a participatory model for healthcare improvement work, Experience Based Co-Design (EBCD). It will argue that EBCD exemplifies both the strengths and the limitations of adequating visual participatory approaches to quality improvement ends. The article will conclude with a critical reflection on a small photographic study, in which the author participated, and which sought to harness service user perspectives for the design of psychiatric facilities, as a way of considering the potential contribution of visual participatory methods for quality improvement.

  6. Effect of natural organic materials on cadmium and neptunium sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, K.S.; Triay, I.R.

    1994-01-01

    In a batch sorption study of the effect of naturally occurring organic materials on the sorption of cadmium and neptunium on oxides and tuff surfaces, the model sorbents were synthetic goethite, boehmite, amorphous silicon oxides, and a crushed tuff material from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. An amino acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxypheny)-DL-alanine (DOPA), and an aquatic-originated fulvic material, Nordic aquatic fulvic acid (NAFA), were used as model organic chemicals. Sorption isotherm results showed that DOPA sorption followed the order aluminum oxide > iron oxide > silicon oxide and that the amount of DOAP sorption for a given sorbent increased as the solution pH was raised. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on the iron oxide was about ten times higher than that on the aluminum oxide. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on natural tuff material was much lower than that on aluminum and iron oxides. The sorption of cadmium on iron and aluminum oxides was found to be influenced by the presence of DOPA, and increasing the amount of DOPA coating resulted in higher cadmium sorption on aluminum oxide. However, for iron oxide, cadmium sorption decreased with increasing DOPA concentration. The presence of the model organic materials DOPA and NAFA did not affect the sorption of neptunium on tuff material or on the iron and aluminum oxides. Spectroscopic results indicate that cadmium complexes strongly with DOPA. Therefore, the effect of the organic material, DOPA, on the cadmium sorption is readily observed. However, neptunium is possibly complexed weakly with organic material. Thus, DOPA and NAFA have little effect on neptunium sorption on all sorbents selected for study

  7. Sorption of chlorophenols from aqueous solution by granular activated carbon, filter coal, pine and hardwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, G S M; McLaughlan, R G

    2012-09-01

    Wood and coal, as low-cost sorbents, have been evaluated as an alternative to commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) for chlorophenol removal. Kinetic experiments indicated that filter coal had a significantly lower rate of uptake (approximately 10% of final uptake was achieved after three hours) than the other sorbents, owing to intra-particle diffusion limitations. The data fitted a pseudo-second-order model. Sorption capacity data showed that GAC had a high sorption capacity (294-467 mg g(-1)) compared with other sorbents (3.2-7.5 mg(g-1)). However, wood and coal had a greater sorption capacity per unit surface area than GAC. Sorption equilibrium data was best predicted using a Freundlich adsorption model. The sorption capacity for all sorbents was 2-chlorophenol coal than the other sorbents. The results showed that pine, hardwood and filter coal can be used as sorbent materials for the removal of chlorophenol from water; however, kinetic considerations may limit the application of filter coal.

  8. Sorption and Transport of Sildenafil in Natural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinot, F. G.; Vulava, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical Chemicals (PCs) mainly enter our ecosystems from discharges of treated wastewater and have direct effects on the ecological health of that area. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) is one such PC, whose presence has been reported in stream waters. Although one study has shown that sildenafil is not harmful in bacterial and fungal environments, there remains much unknown about its fate elsewhere in ecosystems. Sildenafil is a complex organic molecule with two amino functional groups that result in pKa's of 7.27 and 5.97. It also has a high solubility of 3.5 g/L. Given that sildenafil consumption (and concurrently disposal) is on the rise, it is essential that its behavior in the natural environment be better understood. The goal of this study was to quantify the sorption and transport behavior of sildenafil in differing natural soils with varying compositions. Pristine A- and B- horizon soil samples from several soil series were collected in a managed forest near Charleston, SC and used for these studies. The soils were characterized for physical and chemical properties: soil organic matter content ranged between 0.6-7.6%, clay content between 6-20%, and soil pH between 4-5. These soils were then used to perform kinetic reaction, sorption, and column transport experiments. Batch kinetic experiments showed a fast reaction rate in both clay-rich and organic-rich soils and an equilibration time of less than 24 hours. Batch reactor sorption experiments provided data for sorption isotherms (plot of sildenafil in solution, C vs. sildenafil sorbed in soil, q) which were nonlinear. The isotherms were fit using Freundlich model (q=KfCn, where Kf and n are fitting parameters). Sildenafil sorbed more strongly to clay-rich soils compared with organic-rich soils with less clay. It is hypothesized that permanent negative charge on clay mineral surfaces form ionic bonds with positively charged amines in sildenafil in acidic pHs. Transport experiments were conducted using

  9. Mechanism of cesium sorption on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yongxia; Xu Shiping; Song Chongli

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of cesium sorption on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate is described. The dependence of the sorption speed on temperature, particle granule size, and the stirring speed is studied. The results show that the sorption process is controlled by liquid film diffusion and particle diffusion. An exchange reaction occurs mainly between K + in the exchanger and Cs + in the solution, i.e. potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate, and Cs + of simulated high-level liquid waste

  10. Meta-analysis of field experiments shows no change in racial discrimination in hiring over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillian, Lincoln; Pager, Devah; Hexel, Ole; Midtbøen, Arnfinn H

    2017-10-10

    This study investigates change over time in the level of hiring discrimination in US labor markets. We perform a meta-analysis of every available field experiment of hiring discrimination against African Americans or Latinos ( n = 28). Together, these studies represent 55,842 applications submitted for 26,326 positions. We focus on trends since 1989 ( n = 24 studies), when field experiments became more common and improved methodologically. Since 1989, whites receive on average 36% more callbacks than African Americans, and 24% more callbacks than Latinos. We observe no change in the level of hiring discrimination against African Americans over the past 25 years, although we find modest evidence of a decline in discrimination against Latinos. Accounting for applicant education, applicant gender, study method, occupational groups, and local labor market conditions does little to alter this result. Contrary to claims of declining discrimination in American society, our estimates suggest that levels of discrimination remain largely unchanged, at least at the point of hire.

  11. A didactic experiment showing the Compton scattering by means of a clinical gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Ernesto; Auditore, Lucrezia; Campennì, Alfredo; Minutoli, Fabio; Cucinotta, Mariapaola; Sindoni, Alessandro; Baldari, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    We describe a didactic approach aimed to explain the effect of Compton scattering in nuclear medicine imaging, exploiting the comparison of a didactic experiment with a gamma camera with the outcomes from a Monte Carlo simulation of the same experimental apparatus. We employed a 99m Tc source emitting 140.5keV photons, collimated in the upper direction through two pinholes, shielded by 6mm of lead. An aluminium cylinder was placed on the source at 50mm of distance. The energy of the scattered photons was measured on the spectra acquired by the gamma camera. We observed that the gamma ray energy measured at each step of rotation gradually decreased from the characteristic energy of 140.5keV at 0° to 102.5keV at 120°. A comparison between the obtained data and the expected results from the Compton formula and from the Monte Carlo simulation revealed a full agreement within the experimental error (relative errors between -0.56% and 1.19%), given by the energy resolution of the gamma camera. Also the electron rest mass has been evaluated satisfactorily. The experiment was found useful in explaining nuclear medicine residents the phenomenology of the Compton scattering and its importance in the nuclear medicine imaging, and it can be profitably proposed during the training of medical physics residents as well. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting sorption of organic acids to a wide range of carbonized sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Many contaminants and infochemicals are organic acids that undergo dissociation under environmental conditions. The sorption of dissociated anions to biochar and other carbonized sorbents is typically lower than that of neutral species. It is driven by complex processes that are not yet fully understood. It is known that predictive approaches developed for neutral compounds are unlikely to be suitable for organic acids, due to the effects of dissociation on sorption. Previous studies on the sorption of organic acids to soils have demonstrated that log Dow, which describes the decrease in hydrophobicity of acids upon dissociation, is a useful alternative to log Kow. The aim of the present study was to adapt a log Dow based approach to describe the sorption of organic acids to carbonized sorbents. Batch experiments were performed with a series of 9 sorbents (i.e., carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, and sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes and activated carbon), and four acids commonly used for pesticidal and biocidal purposes (i.e., 2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB, and triclosan). Sorbents were comprehensively characterized, including by N2 and CO2 physisorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The wide range of sorbents considered allows (i) discussing the mechanisms driving the sorption of neutral and anionic species to biochar, and (ii) their dependency on sorbate and sorbent properties. Results showed that the sorption of the four acids was influenced by factors that are usually not considered for neutral compounds (i.e., pH, ionic strength). Dissociation affected the sorption of the four compounds, and sorption of the anions ranged over five orders of magnitude, thus substantially contributing to sorption in some cases. For prediction purposes, most of the variation in sorption to carbonized sorbents (89%) could be well described with a two-parameter regression equation including log Dow and sorbent specific surface area. The proposed model

  13. Sorption of malachite green (MG) by cassava stem biochar (CSB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava stem biochar (CSB) was produced by pyrolyzing CS at 500°C for 2 hours at nitrogen environment. Proximate and ultimate analyses were conducted on CS and CSB. Batch sorption experiment on synthetic MG wastewater was optimized for the sorbent dosage, MG solution pH and contact time. Sorption data was ...

  14. Functional coupling networks inferred from prefrontal cortex activity show experience-related effective plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Tavoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional coupling networks are widely used to characterize collective patterns of activity in neural populations. Here, we ask whether functional couplings reflect the subtle changes, such as in physiological interactions, believed to take place during learning. We infer functional network models reproducing the spiking activity of simultaneously recorded neurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC of rats, during the performance of a cross-modal rule shift task (task epoch, and during preceding and following sleep epochs. A large-scale study of the 96 recorded sessions allows us to detect, in about 20% of sessions, effective plasticity between the sleep epochs. These coupling modifications are correlated with the coupling values in the task epoch, and are supported by a small subset of the recorded neurons, which we identify by means of an automatized procedure. These potentiated groups increase their coativation frequency in the spiking data between the two sleep epochs, and, hence, participate to putative experience-related cell assemblies. Study of the reactivation dynamics of the potentiated groups suggests a possible connection with behavioral learning. Reactivation is largely driven by hippocampal ripple events when the rule is not yet learned, and may be much more autonomous, and presumably sustained by the potentiated PFC network, when learning is consolidated. Cell assemblies coding for memories are widely believed to emerge through synaptic modification resulting from learning, yet their identification from activity is very arduous. We propose a functional-connectivity-based approach to identify experience-related cell assemblies from multielectrode recordings in vivo, and apply it to the prefrontal cortex activity of rats recorded during a task epoch and the preceding and following sleep epochs. We infer functional couplings between the recorded cells in each epoch. Comparisons of the functional coupling networks across the epochs allow us

  15. Neptunium(V) sorption onto kaolinite in the absence and presence of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amayri, S.; Reich, Ta.; Reich, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The adsorption of heavy metals on clay minerals such as kaolinite is an important process that affects the migration and retardation of neptunium and other actinides in the geosphere. The sorption of Np(V) onto the reference clay mineral kaolinite KGa-1b was investigated both by batch experiments and EXAFS measurements. The aim of our study was to combine macroscopic studies (batch experiments) with microscopic techniques (EXAFS) to study the Np(V) speciation at the kaolinite surface. The batch experiments were done under relevant environmental conditions with Np(V) concentrations of 10 -11 and 10 -12 mol/L. Sorption samples were prepared in 0.1 mol/L NaClO 4 , 4 g/L kaolinite, pH 6.0 to 10.5, presence and absence of ambient CO 2 , and 60-h equilibration. The sorption curves for 10 -11 and 10 -12 mol/L Np(V) obtained in the presence and absence of CO 2 , respectively, show that the adsorption edge occurs at pH 8.5. The uptake of Np(V) by kaolinite strongly increased above pH 7.0 and reached its sorption maximum (70 %) at pH 9.0. Above pH 9.0, the amount of Np(V) sorbed onto kaolinite decreased and reached ca. 30 % at pH 10.5 due to the formation of Np(V) carbonato species in the aqueous solution. In the CO 2 -free system, the sorption of Np(V) increased continuously with pH until the sorption maximum of 100 % was reached at pH 10.5. The same sorption behavior was found in batch experiments in the CO 2 equilibrated system with Np concentrations ranging from 1 μmol/L to 10 μmol/L. EXAFS experiments on some of these batch samples indicated the formation of Np(V) carbonato species at the kaolinite surface at pH 9.0 where the uptake of Np(V) by kaolinite reaches its maximum [1]. [1] T. Reich, S. Amayri, Ta. Reich, J. Drebert, A. Jermolajev, P. Thoerle, N. Trautmann, C. Hennig, S. Sachs, Feasibility of EXAFS experiments at the Np L-edge to investigate neptunium sorption on kaolinite, Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Annual

  16. Sorption of radioactive technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, D.; Fan, X.H.; Su, X.G.; Zeng, J.S.; Dong, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of technetium on pyrrhotine was studied with batch experiments and diluted sulfuric acid (less than 2.88 mol/l) was used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. A significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine was observed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral was supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 x nH 2 O. Sorbed technetium on the mineral could be desorbed by diluted sulfuric acid. The maximum desorption ratio under aerobic conditions was much higher than that of under anaerobic conditions, meanwhile, the desorption rates under anaerobic conditions were higher than that of under aerobic conditions in the initial stage of the experiments. (author)

  17. Investigation of metal ions sorption of brown peat moss powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelus, Nadezhda; Blokhina, Elena; Novikov, Dmitry; Novikova, Yaroslavna; Chuchalin, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    For regularities research of sorptive extraction of heavy metal ions by cellulose and its derivates from aquatic solution of electrolytes it is necessary to find possible mechanism of sorption process and to choice a model describing this process. The present article investigates the regularities of aliovalent metals sorption on brown peat moss powder. The results show that sorption isotherm of Al3+ ions is described by Freundlich isotherm and sorption isotherms of Na+ i Ni2+ are described by Langmuir isotherm. To identify the mechanisms of brown peat moss powder sorption the IR-spectra of the initial brown peat moss powder samples and brown peat moss powder samples after Ni (II) sorption were studied. Metal ion binding mechanisms by brown peat moss powder points to ion exchange, physical adsorption, and complex formation with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups.

  18. Integrative Analysis of Disease Signatures Shows Inflammation Disrupts Juvenile Experience-Dependent Cortical Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Milo R.; Burman, Poromendro

    2016-01-01

    Throughout childhood and adolescence, periods of heightened neuroplasticity are critical for the development of healthy brain function and behavior. Given the high prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, identifying disruptors of developmental plasticity represents an essential step for developing strategies for prevention and intervention. Applying a novel computational approach that systematically assessed connections between 436 transcriptional signatures of disease and multiple signatures of neuroplasticity, we identified inflammation as a common pathological process central to a diverse set of diseases predicted to dysregulate plasticity signatures. We tested the hypothesis that inflammation disrupts developmental cortical plasticity in vivo using the mouse ocular dominance model of experience-dependent plasticity in primary visual cortex. We found that the administration of systemic lipopolysaccharide suppressed plasticity during juvenile critical period with accompanying transcriptional changes in a particular set of molecular regulators within primary visual cortex. These findings suggest that inflammation may have unrecognized adverse consequences on the postnatal developmental trajectory and indicate that treating inflammation may reduce the burden of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28101530

  19. Neural stem cells show bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the perinatal mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippin, Tod E; Cain, Sean W; Masum, Zahra; Ralph, Martin R

    2004-03-17

    Many of the effects of prenatal stress on the endocrine function, brain morphology, and behavior in mammals can be reversed by brief sessions of postnatal separation and handling. We have tested the hypothesis that the effects of both the prenatal and postnatal experiences are mediated by negative and positive regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) number during critical stages in neurodevelopment. We used the in vitro clonal neurosphere assay to quantify NSCs in hamsters that had experienced prenatal stress (maternal restraint stress for 2 hr per day, for the last 7 d of gestation), postnatal handling (maternal-offspring separation for 15 min per day during postnatal days 1-21), orboth. Prenatal stress reduced the number of NSCs derived from the subependyma of the lateral ventricle. The effect was already present at postnatal day 1 and persisted into adulthood (at least 14 months of age). Similarly, prenatal stress reduced in vivo proliferation in the adult subependyma of the lateral ventricle. Conversely, postnatal handling increased NSC number and reversed the effect of prenatal stress. The effects of prenatal stress on NSCs and proliferation and the effect of postnatal handling on NSCs did not differ between male and females. The findings demonstrate that environmental factors can produce changes in NSC number that are present at birth and endure into late adulthood. These changes may underlie some of the behavioral effects produced by prenatal stress and postnatal handling.

  20. Why do people show minimal knowledge updating with task experience: inferential deficit or experimental artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Christopher; Price, Jodi; Burpee, Ailis; Frentzel, William J; Feldstein, Simeon; Dunlosky, John

    2009-01-01

    Students generally do not have highly accurate knowledge about strategy effectiveness for learning, such as that imagery is superior to rote repetition. During multiple study-test trials using both strategies, participants' predictions about performance on List 2 do not markedly differ for the two strategies, even though List 1 recall is substantially greater for imagery. Two experiments evaluated whether such deficits in knowledge updating about the strategy effects were due to an experimental artifact or to inaccurate inferences about the effects the strategies had on recall. Participants studied paired associates on two study-test trials--they were instructed to study half using imagery and half using rote repetition. Metacognitive judgements tapped the quality of inferential processes about the strategy effects during the List 1 test and tapped gains in knowledge about the strategies across lists. One artifactual explanation--noncompliance with strategy instructions--was ruled out, whereas manipulations aimed at supporting the data available to inferential processes improved but did not fully repair knowledge updating.

  1. Computer simulation of molecular sorption in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmiano, Mark Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis encompasses the computer simulation of molecular sorption. In Chapter 1 we outline the aims and objectives of this work. Chapter 2 follows in which an introduction to sorption in zeolites is presented, with discussion of structure and properties of the main zeolites studied. Chapter 2 concludes with a description of the principles and theories of adsorption. In Chapter 3 we describe the methodology behind the work carried out in this thesis. In Chapter 4 we present our first computational study, that of the sorption of krypton in silicalite. We describe work carried out to investigate low energy sorption sites of krypton in silicalite where we observe krypton to preferentially sorb into straight and sinusoidal channels over channel intersections. We simulate single step type I adsorption isotherms and use molecular dynamics to study the diffusion of krypton and obtain division coefficients and the activation energy. We compare our results to previous experimental and computational studies where we show our work to be in good agreement. In Chapter 5 we present a systematic study of the sorption of oxygen and nitrogen in five lithium substituted zeolites using a transferable interatomic potential that we have developed from ab initio calculations. We show increased loading of nitrogen compared to oxygen in all five zeolites studied as expected and simulate adsorption isotherms, which we compare to experimental and simulated data in the literature. In Chapter 6 we present work on the sorption of ferrocene in the zeolite NaY. We show that a simulated, low energy sorption site for ferrocene is correctly located by comparing to X-ray powder diffraction results for this same system. The thesis concludes with some overall conclusions and discussion of opportunities for future work. (author)

  2. Effects of sorption behaviour on contaminant migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of sorption behaviour on contaminant migration in groundwater systems are varied. Retardation of migration and dispersive effects can vary widely and contaminant concentration profiles can take a number of different shapes. This report examines the nature of some of these effects, especially those due to sorption behaviours that are dependent on the concentration of the contaminant in the groundwater. The effects are calculated using, in most cases, analytical solutions to the chemical equations imbedded in a simple reaction-cell or box-model transport algorithm. The hydrogeological parameters are held constant, and radioactive decay and hydrodynamic dispersion are excluded. A general discussion of the role of sorption equations in transport modelling is followed by presentation of migration results for a number of models of sorption behaviour varying from linear isotherms, Langmuir, Freundlich and ion-exchange isotherms, to precipitation reactions and multiple-site sorption reactions. The results are compared and general conclusions are drawn about the various migration behaviours calculated. The conclusions are that equilibrium sorption of trace contaminants can be modelled with linear isotherms (constant distribution coefficients or constant retardation factors) but the evaluation and extrapolation of the distribution coefficient are not easy. Nonlinear isotherms lead to unsymmetrical migration fronts. A comparison of Freundlich and linear isotherms is made. Sorption/desorption kinetic factors can be significant on the time scale of laboratory experiments and can cause large dispersive effects. Slow but important reactions can be missed altogether. Precipitation or mineralization behaviour cannot be modelled with constant distribution coefficients. Also, mineralization reactions can be kinetically slow even on the geological time scale. 89 refs

  3. Sorption of uranyl species on zircon and zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenech, C.; Drot, R.; Simoni, E.; Ehrhardt, J.J.; Mielczarski, J.

    2002-01-01

    few samples, because of the weak signals obtained), X-ray electron spectroscopy enabled us to show differences in the bonding energies between uranyl species sorbed either on zircon or on zirconia, or for the same sorbent for different pH or in different media (nitrate or perchlorate), this last point being confirmed by diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy. EXAFS measurements were then performed on well-characterised samples, on zircon and zirconia at different pH and in different media, for either dry or in situ samples. The results clearly show that the sorbed species are inner sphere complexes, and they seem to indicate strong similarities between our dry samples and the in situ experiments, which confirms the validity of other spectroscopic measurements. Moreover, differences between samples prepared at different pH were observed, which could possibly be explained by the formation of a surface precipitate. (authors)

  4. Enhanced PCBs sorption on biochars as affected by environmental factors: Humic acid and metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Wang Lei; Fang Guodong; Herath, H.M.S.K.; Wang Yujun; Cang Long; Xie Zubin; Zhou Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Biochar plays an important role in the behaviors of organic pollutants in the soil environment. The role of humic acid (HA) and metal cations on the adsorption affinity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the biochars in an aqueous medium and an extracted solution from a PCBs-contaminated soil was studied using batch experiments. Biochars were produced with pine needles and wheat straw at 350 °C and 550 °C under anaerobic condition. The results showed that the biochars had high adsorption affinity for PCBs. Pine needle chars adsorbed less nonplanar PCBs than planar ones due to dispersive interactions and separation. Coexistence of HA and metal cations increased PCBs sorption on the biochars accounted for HA adsorption and cation complexation. The results will aid in a better understanding of biochar sorption mechanism of contaminants in the environment. - Highlights: ► Application of the biochars for PCBs sorption was a new and effective way. ► The biochars had higher adsorption affinity for PCBs in the soil extracted solution. ► Pine needle chars adsorbed less nonplanar PCBs than planar ones. ► Coexisting humic acid or metal cations increased PCBs sorption on the biochars. - The biochars had higher adsorption affinity for PCBs in the extracted soil solution because coexisting humic acid and metal cations increased their sorption.

  5. Metal sorption on kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, H.R.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Anderson, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    A key issue in performance assessment of low-level radioactive waste sites is predicting the transport and retardation of radionuclides through local soils under a variety of hydrologic and geochemical conditions. Improved transport codes should include a mechanistic model of radionuclide retardation. The authors have been investigating metal sorption (Cs + , Sr 2+ , and Ba 2+ ) on a simple clay mineral (kaolinite) to better understand the geochemical interactions of common soil minerals with contaminated groundwaters. These studies include detailed characterizations of kaolinite surfaces, experimental adsorption measurements, surface complexation modeling, and theoretical simulations of cation sorption. The aluminol edge (010) site has been identified as the most likely site for metal sorption on kaolinite in natural solutions. Relative metal binding strengths decrease from Ba 2+ to Sr 2+ to Cs + , with some portion sorbed on both kaolinite edges and basal surfaces. Some Cs + also appears to be irreversibly sorbed on both sites. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Cs + is sorbed at aluminol (010) edge sites as an inner-sphere complex and weakly sorbed as an outer-sphere complex on (001) basal surfaces. These results provide the basis to understand and predict metal sorption onto kaolinite, and a framework to characterize sorption processes on more complex clay minerals

  6. Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

    2009-02-01

    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession.

  7. Sorption-desorption of samarium in Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Guinart, O.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Fernandez-Poyatos, P.; Alba, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    with a Be window. Determination of Sm in the solutions derived from sorption-desorption experiments. Samarium concentrations were determined with ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The wavelength used in the ICP-OES was 359.3 nm, whereas the isotope 147 Sm was used in the ICP-MS. The quantification limits for the ICP-OES and ICP-MS were 30 μg L -1 and 10 ng L -1 , respectively. The initial sample shows an asymmetric 001 reflexion whose maximum corresponds to a basal spacing of 14.6 A and a shoulder to a higher 2θ. This is compatible with a heterogeneity composition of the interlayer space where divalent cations predominate. After sorption in water and at increasing Sm concentrations, the peaks became symmetric and the 001 reflexion shifted progressively to lower 2θ up to a basal spacing of 15.3 A compatible with a more homogeneous composition of the interlayer space and the exchange of the original interlayer divalent cations with Sm. These results indicated that whereas at lower concentration sorption was controlled by inner-sphere mechanisms, at higher initial Sm concentrations the predominant sorption mechanism was cationic exchange. The scenario differed when the sorption took place in the interstitial water medium, as the 001 reflexion did not shift to lower 2θ, but it widened and slightly shifted to higher 2θ. Both facts indicate competitiveness between Sm and the cations in the solution. Although the affinity for the interlayer space, in general, increases with the cation charge and then favors Sm, this was only observed for the highest initial Sm concentrations. Samarium sorption-desorption Samarium sorption was higher in water than in the interstitial, basically due to the cationic competition effect both for specific and for ionic-exchange, regular sites. This was consistent with results from the XRD analyses, and it was corroborated by the increase in the divalent cation concentrations in the final solutions after sorption when increasing samarium initial

  8. The NEA sorption data base (SDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruegger, B.; Ticknor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The current NEA Sorption Data Base is developed to replace the former International Sorption Information Retrieval System (ISIRS) initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and contains about 11,000 distribution coefficients with corresponding experimental condition parameters describing sorption of key nuclides for a large variety of solid and liquid phases. The SDB is designed to run on a micro-computer using the commercially available database software dBASE III Plus. For each recorded sorption experiment, the SDB provides a bibliographical reference, the most complete characterization of the solid and liquid phases available, a description of the experimental conditions and the distribution coefficient or retardation factor for each element studied. When available, parameters such as temperature, initial radionuclide concentration, pH, Eh, contact time, solid to solution ratio, sample origin, oxidation state and type of solution are included. The SDB provides information for a wide variety of rocks or geological materials, buffer backfill candidates, concretes/cements, elements (Am, Cs, Co, I, Np, Pu, Ra, Sr, Se, Tc, U and, to a lesser extent, Ag, Ba, C, Ce, Eu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, Pd, Pm, Ru, Sb, Sn, Y, Zn, and Zr), or radioisotopes. A compilation of sorption data like SDB provide a readily available source of data for radioactive waste repository performance assessments when site specific data are not available or essential, for example, during a site selection phase. 2 appendices

  9. Sorption of uranium and cesium by Hanford basalts and associated secondary smectite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, L.L.; McGarrah, J.E.; Walker, B.A.; Salter, P.F.

    1982-01-01

    Three characterized basalts and an associated secondary smectite were used in comparative uranium and cesium sorption studies. Experiments utilizing two synthetic characteristic basalt groundwaters at 23 and 60 0 C allowed comparison of increased temperature and carbonate concentration effects on Cs and U sorption. The sorption data were fitted to the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm, and loading maxima and energetics derived. An increase in temperature caused a decrease in Cs sorption maxima on all solids from all groundwaters studied and an increase in U sorption maxima, especially from the higher-carbonate-content groundwater. Sorption energies were characteristic of ion exchange for both Cs and U sorption processes. Basalt U sorption maxima were relatively insignificant, but smectite U sorption maxima surpassed Cs sorption maxima in both groundwaters at 60 0 C. The uranyl carbonate complexes thus may be relatively temperature-sensitive. Upon removal of excess Fe-oxides from the secondary smectite, U sorption decreased and the D-R isotherm reverted to a normal Freundlich sorption isotherm. Removal of excess Fe-oxides from the basalts and secondary smectite would probably result in Freundlich sorption isotherms for both Cs and U. (Auth.)

  10. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  11. Radionuclide sorption kinetics and column sorption studies with Columbia River basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and desorption reactions in basalt-groundwater systems were evaluated at 60 degrees C using a batch equilibration method. It was found that many sorption reactions on surfaces of fresh (unaltered) basalt from the Umtanum and Cohassett flows are slow. Some reactions require more than 50 days to reach a steady state. Sorption of neptunium and uranium in oxidizing (air saturated) groundwater appears to be controlled by slow reduction of these elements by the basalt surfaces. The resulting lower oxidation states are more strongly sorbed. Technetium and selenium, which are anionic under oxidizing conditions, are not measurably sorbed on fresh basalt surfaces, but are slightly sorbed on the altered surfaces of flow top basalt. Under reducing conditions, where the groundwater contains dilute hydrazine, sorption is faster for neptunium, uranium, technetium, selenium, and lead. Plutonium sorption rates were not affected by the groundwater Eh. It was shown that radium was precipitated rather than sorbed under the conditions of these experiments. Umtanum flow top material sorbed radionuclides much faster than fresh basalt surfaces due to its greater surface area and cation exchange capacity. Desorption rates for plutonium, uranium, neptunium, technetium, and selenium were generally much less than sorption rates (especially for reducing conditions). These radionuclides are irreversibly sorbed on the basalts. 25 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs

  12. Sepiolite functionalized with N-[3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl]-ethylenediamine triacetic acid trisodium salt. Part II: Sorption of Ni2+ from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Slavica S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available sorption of Ni2+ on the sepiolite functionalized by covalent grafting of N-[3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl]ethylenediamine triacetic acid trisodium salt, MSEAS, was studied in batch experiments as a function of the initial metal concentration, the equilibration time, pH value, and temperature. The modification of sepiolite resulted in an enhanced Ni2+ retention with a capacity of 0.261 mmol/g at 298 K. The retention of Ni2+ ions occurred dominantly by specific sorption and exchange of Mg2+ ions from the sepiolite structure. The sorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The sorption equilibrium results were best described by the non-linear form of the Langmuir Sorption Equation. The values of the thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy, free energy and entropy were calculated from temperature dependent sorption isotherms and these values showed that the sorption of Ni2+ onto modified sepiolite was endothermic. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019 i FP7 NANOTECH FTM No. 245916

  13. Sorption of cesium in intact rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.

    2014-04-01

    The mass distribution coefficient K d is used in performance assessment (PA) to describe sorption of a radionuclide on rock. The R d is determined using crushed rock which causes uncertainty in converting the R d values to K d values for intact rock. This work describes a method to determine the equilibrium of sorption on intact rock. The rock types of the planned Olkiluoto waste disposal site were T-series mica gneiss (T-MGN), T-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (T-TGG), P-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (P-TGG) and pegmatitic granite (PGR). These rocks contain different amount of biotite which is the main sorbing mineral. The sorption of cesium on intact rock slices was studied by applying an electrical field to speed up migration of cesium into the rock. Cesium is in the solution as a noncomplex cation Cs + and it is sorbed by ion exchange. The tracer used in the experiments was 134 Cs. The experimental sorption on the intact rock is compared with values calculated using the in house cation exchange sorption model (HYRL model) in PHREEQC program. The observed sorption on T-MGN and T-TGG rocks was close to the calculated values. Two PGR samples were from a depth of 70 m and three samples were from a depth of 150 m. Cesium sorbed more than predicted on the two 70 m PGR samples. The sorption of Cs on the three 150 m PGR samples was small which was consistent with the calculations. The pegmatitic granite PGR has the smallest content of biotite of the four rock types. In the case of P-TGG rock the observed values of sorption were only half of the calculated values. Two kind of slices were cut from P-TGG drill core. The slices were against and to the direction of the foliation of the biotite rims. The sorption of cesium on P-TGG rock was same in both cases. The results indicated that there was no effect of the directions of the electric field and the foliation of biotite in the P-TGG rock. (orig.)

  14. Europium sorption on zirconia at elevated temperatures: experimental study and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglizaud, N.; Catalette, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep underground repository is being considered by several countries. The waste package maintains an elevated temperature for thousands of years. As sorption is one of the main phenomenon limiting the dispersion of radionuclides in the environment, it has to be studied at elevated temperatures. Zirconia is an oxide produced by cladding oxidation which is suspected in the near field of a nuclear repository. It then could possibly be in contact with waste elements as Europium (III), the sorption of which is therefore studied on zirconia. Experiments were performed by the batch method at a solid/liquid ratio of 10 g.L-1. The sorption edges were recorded in the pH-range from 2 to 10 at 2.10 -5 mol.L -1 Eu(NO 3 ) 3 (I = 0.1 mol.L -1 KNO 3 ). An over-pressure device in an autoclave with an incorporated filtering system allowed the experiments, carbonate free, at 25 deg. C, 50 deg. C, 80 deg. C, 120 deg. C and 150 deg. C and in situ pH measurements. Filtrates were analyzed by the ICP-AES method. Sorption isotherms show an increase in the sorption phenomenon when the temperature raises. The half sorption pH decreases from 7 at 25 deg. C to 3,6 at 150 deg. C. The distribution coefficients that were obtained at elevated temperatures enriched the databases of integrated performance assessment codes. Raw data were modeled with the surface complexation theory using the double layer model (DLM). Several possible surface complexes were examined and discussed, taking into account aqueous hydrolyzed and precipitated species of Europium. A good agreement between experimental values and modeled isotherms was found at all studied temperatures. Results were consistent with a bidentate complex formed by Europium (III) on the zirconia surface. Associated formation constants were then determined with the geochemical computer code CHESS. (authors)

  15. Effect of competing cations on strontium sorption to surficial sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The following study was conducted to determine strontium distribution coefficients (K d 'S) of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine K d 's which describe the partitioning of a solute between the solution and solid phase. A surficial sediment was mixed with synthesized aqueous solutions designed to chemically simulate wastewater disposed to infiltrations ponds near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the INEL with respect to major ionic character and pH. The effects of variable concentrations of competing cations (sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) on strontium sorption were investigated at a fixed pH of 8.00. The pH of the natural system shows no appreciable variation, whereas a marked variability in cation concentration has been noted. Strontium sorption was impacted to a greater degree by the concentration of calcium and magnesium in solution than by the presence of sodium or potassium. However, extreme sodium solution concentrations of 1.0 to 5.0 g/L dramatically reduced strontium sorption. In all cases, strontium K d 's decreased as the concentration of calcium and magnesium in solution increased. Linear isotherm model K d 's ranged from 12.0 to 84.7 mL/g. Analysis of data from these experiments indicated that moderate concentrations of calcium and magnesium (less than 40 mg/L) and high concentrations of sodium (1.0 to 5.0 g/L) in wastewater increase strontium mobility by decreasing the sorption of strontium on surficial sediments beneath infiltration ponds at the INEL

  16. Fluoride ions sorption of the water using natural and modified hematite with aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teutli S, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine is a mineral known for its dental benefits, but fluoride ions can cause fluoro sis in excessive quantities. There are many epidemiological studies on possible adverse effects resulting from prolonged ingestion of fluoride through drinking water. These studies demonstrate that fluoride mainly affects the bone tissue (bones and teeth), may produce an adverse effect on tooth enamel and can cause mild dental fluoro sis at concentrations from 0.9 to 1.2 mg/L in drinking water. In several states of Mexico, water contaminated with fluoride ions can be found, such as Aguascalientes, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Guanajuato, Sonora, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, where the fluoride ions levels are higher than 1.5 mg/L, established by the Mexican Official Standard (NOM-127-Ssa-2000) which sets the permissible limits of water for human use and consumption. Currently, several technologies have been proposed to remove fluoride ions from water such as precipitation methods which are based on the addition of chemicals to water and sorption methods to removed fluoride ions by sorption or ion exchange reactions by some suitable substrate capable of regenerate and reuse. In this work, the sorption of fluoride ions using unmodified and modified hematite with aluminum hydroxide to remove fluoride ions from water by bath experiments was studied. The hematite was modified by treating it with aluminum hydroxide, NaOH and Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 solutions. The characterization of hematite before and after modification with aluminum hydroxide was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, EDS and Bet. The effect of ph, contact time, concentration of fluoride ions, and the dose of sorbent on the sorption of fluoride ions by the modified hematite were studied. Equilibrium was reached within 48 hours of contact time and the maximum sorption of fluoride ions were in the range pH eq between 2.3 and 6.2. Sorption capacities of fluoride ions as a function of dose of

  17. Effect of the modification of a natural mexican zeolite in the sorption of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes M, R.

    2007-01-01

    Clinoptilolite type zeolite is a material of relative abundance in Mexico, which possess ion exchange properties and it can be used in the removal of metal ions from polluted waters. The external surface of zeolites can be modified with cationic surfactants. This modification could have a negative effect on the removal of metal ions and provides to the material the capacity to adsorb phenolic compounds. For this reason, it is important to know the capability of the modified material on the sorption of metal ions and phenolic compounds, simultaneously. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the external surface modification with surfactant of a Mexican zeolite over its sorption capacity of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol, in batch and column systems. To accomplish that, a clinoptilolite type zeolitic rock from a deposit located in the state of Sonora, Mexico, was used. It was ground, sieved and characterized with different techniques; and its external surface area was modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br). A grain size fraction was selected to carry out sorption kinetics and equilibrium experiments, as well as packed column tests with zeolitic material and solutions of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol. There are different models proposed in literature that are used to describe sorption kinetics and equilibrium. In this work, the sorption experimental results were adjusted to some of these models to identify controlling mechanisms on the kinetics and equilibrium of the studied systems. The results showed that the cadmium adsorption on natural and modified zeolite was similar in batch systems. For the case of 4-chloro phenol sorption, it was observed that natural zeolite does not retain this compound, while in modified zeolite the sorption is better than other comparable materials. The results also showed that for the case of cadmium sorption, the mechanism involved was ion exchange; while for sorption of 4-chloro phenol, a partition mechanism

  18. Sorption of graphites at high temperatures. Progress report, February 1, 1976--January 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyecha, T.D.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary to mixed isotherm studies, one additional cesium isotherm was obtained with a finned-rod H-451 graphite sample at 1100 0 C. The results indicated that not only are long times required to reach saturation, but also there is a hysteresis effect at low vapor pressures and concentrations and that under these conditions sorption of cesium in graphite is not readily reversible. Several cesium isotherms (at 1000 0 C) were obtained of H-451 graphite which had been pre-impregnated with selected concentrations of Sr-85-tagged strontium. The runs were of long duration to attain equilibrium. The data obtained showed a substantial effect of the presence (concentration) of strontium on cesium sorption. End-of-run cesium and strontium concentration profiles were obtained. As yet the data on the mixed-sorption behavior, relative to possible models, has not been analyzed in depth. As a preliminary to the mixed-sorption studies, strontium impregnation in the absence of cesium was studied and a few experiments on the effect of concentration on strontium diffusion were carried out with interesting results. Finally a few experiments on sample characterization and on the microdistribution of cesium and strontium were conducted. It was found difficult to obtain distributions at the concentration levels characteristic of our experiments

  19. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  20. Study on sorption capacity of synthetic zeolite for simulated nuclide Cs+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinming; Yi Facheng

    2006-01-01

    For the sake of understanding the functionary order of simulated nuclide Cs + and Synthetic Zeolite (ZF), the sorption equilibrium time and sorption capacity of simulated nuclide Cs + on ZF are studied with the intermittence method. The difference of temperature, pH value, Cs + concentration and medium on sorption capacity and sorption ratio are investigated. The results show that the sorption complexion of simulated nuclide Cs + on ZF in the same concentration solution are sorption equilibrium quantity in range of 155-190 mg/g in different temperatures and that in range of 165-190 mg/g in different pH values and that in range of 120-210 mg/g in different media; and changing order of equilibrium adsorption ratio is the same to that of sorption equilibrium quantity, but their changing range are wider than that of sorption equilibrium quantity; equilibrium adsorption quantity in range of 180-380 mg/g in different concentration solutions, and changing order of equilibrium adsorption ratio is opposite to that of sorption equilibrium quantity, and more-over, their changing range are wider than that of the sorption equilibrium quantity. Sorption equilibrium time of simulated nuclide Cs + on ZF is about ten to fifteen days. So the changing range of sorption capacity of simulated nuclide Cs + on ZF with conditions effects is smaller and the sorption equilibrium time is also less and ZF preferably absorbs Cs in radiation wastes and thus consumedly reduces the effect of radwaste on the environment. (authors)

  1. Arsenic sorption to nanoparticulate mackinawite (FeS): An examination of phosphate competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Burton, Edward D

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticulate mackinawite (FeS) can be an important host-phase for arsenic (As) in sulfidic, subsurface environments. Although not previously investigated, phosphate (PO 4 3- ) may compete with As for available sorption sites on FeS, thereby enhancing As mobility in FeS-bearing soils, sediments and groundwater systems. In this study, we examine the effect of PO 4 3- on sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) to nanoparticulate FeS at pH 6, 7 and 9. Results show that PO 4 3- (at 0.01-1.0 mM P) did not significantly affect sorption of either As(V) or As(III) to nanoparticulate FeS at initial aqueous As concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 mM. At pH 9 and 7, sorption of both As(III) and As(V) to nanoparticulate FeS was similar, with distribution coefficient (K d ) values spanning 0.76-15 L g -1 (which corresponds to removal of 87-98% of initial aqueous As(III) and As(V) concentrations). Conversely, at pH 6, the sorption of As(III) was characterized by substantially higher K d values (6.3-93.4 L g -1 ) than those for As(V) (K d  = 0.21-0.96 L g -1 ). Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicated that up to 52% of the added As(V) was reduced to As(III) in As(V) sorption experiments, as well as the formation of minor amounts of an As 2 S 3 -like species. In As(III) sorption experiments, XANES spectroscopy also demonstrated the formation of an As 2 S 3 -like species and the partial oxidation of As(III) to As(V) (despite the strictly O 2 -free experimental conditions). Overall, the XANES data indicate that As sorption to nanoparticulate FeS involves several redox transformations and various sorbed species, which display a complex dependency on pH and As loading but that are not influenced by the co-occurrence of PO 4 3- . This study shows that nanoparticulate FeS can help to immobilize As(III) and As(V) in sulfidic subsurface environments where As co-exists with PO 4 3- . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. 137Cs sorption onto Fullers' Earth (calcium montmorillonite) -the influence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.M.; Haigh, D.G.; Hooker, P.J.; Rowe, E.J.

    1987-12-01

    The influences of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on the sorption of 137 Cs onto Fullers' Earth (Calcium montmorillonite) has been studied using batch sorption methods. Results were expressed as distributions ratios (Rd) and as Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. They show that microbes present naturally in the Fullers' Earth did not influence sorption data, however the addition of microbes in the aqueous phase alters the sorption properties in a complex manner. (author)

  3. Recent progress in sorption mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Sorption-desorption phenomena play an important role in the migration of radioactive species in surface and underground waters. In order to predict the transport of these species, we need a good knowledge of sorption processes and data, together with reliable models able to be included in transport calculation. Traditional approaches based on experimentally determined distribution coefficients (Kd) and sorption isotherms have a limited predictive capability, since they are very sensitive to the numerous parameters characterizing the solution and the solid. Models based on thermodynamic equilibria were developed to account for the influence these parameters: the ion exchange model and the surface complexation models (2-pK mono-site, 1-pK multi-site, with several different electrostatic models: CCM, DLM, BSM, TLM,...). Although these models are very useful, studies performed in recent years showed that they have important theoretical and experimental limitations, which result in the fact that we must be very careful when we use them for extrapolating sorption data to long term and to large natural systems. Among all problems which can be found are: the possibility to fit a set of experimental data with different models, sometimes bad adequacy with the real sorption processes, some theoretical limitations such as a rigorous definition of reference and standard states in surface equilibria, slow kinetics which prevent from equilibrium achievement, irreversibility, solubility and evolution of solid phases... Through the increase of the number of sensitive spectroscopic methods, we are now able to know more about sorption processes at the atomic scale. Models such as the 1-pK CD-MUSIC model can account for the influence of orientation of the faces of the solid. More and more examples of the influence of this orientation on the sorption properties are known. Calculations performed by 'ab initio' modeling is also useful to predict the

  4. Transformation and sorption of illicit drug biomarkers in sewer biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Pedram; Brock, Andreas Libonati; Causanilles Llanes, Ana

    2017-01-01

    , 16 drug biomarkers were selected, including the major human metabolites of mephedrone, methadone, cocaine, heroin, codeine and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Transformation and sorption of these substances were assessed in targeted batch experiments using laboratory-scale biofilm reactors operated under...

  5. Ion-sorption pumps with an electrostatic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larionov, L.S.; Leksakov, O.P.; Serbinov, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Parameters are investigated and the choise of optimal operation regimes is made to develop the construction and production of an ion-sorption pump with an electrostatic field (orbitron). Described is the construction of ''Orbitron'' type and the results of bench marks, given are optimal operation regimes, dependence of pumping-out rate on pressure and other parameters. Operarion experience of these pumps on EG-8, EG-5 electrostatic accelerators, as well as on the KGE-300 accelerator in JINR showed their reliable operation during a long period of time and service simplicity. The parameters of the operation regime little differed from those, obtained earlier during bench marks

  6. On the derivation of a sorption database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Haworth, A.; Wisbey, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The safety arguments in support of many radioactive waste repository concepts are heavily dependent on the existence of a sorption reaction. Such a reaction will, in the near field, reduce the magnitude of the release of a number of hazardous radionuclides so that their release to the geosphere is dispersed in time. In the geosphere, the sorption reactions provide a mechanism whereby the migration of the elements released from the repository is retarded and the radioisotopes then subsequently decay. The processes involved in sorption cannot in many cases be satisfactorily represented in thermodynamic terms such as are employed in the description of dissolution and precipitation. Experiments that investigate these reactions are not easy to perform. The sorption parameters that are obtained experimentally for the near field relate, in the UK case, to sorption on to a cementitious surface. These surfaces, since they consist substantially of calcium hydroxide or calcium silicate hydrates, control the aqueous chemistry, do not permit pH changes to be made and limit the range of concentrations of sorbate that may be used. In the far field, on the other hand, the surfaces are not in general so active with respect to the solution chemistry and data can be obtained across a wide spectrum of aqueous chemistries. These data, although they may be useful in testing and parameterizing models, may not have validity under field conditions since the minerals will, inevitably, react to the changes in water chemistry, over geological timescales. The uncertainties in the experimental data are, for many elements and solids, balanced by a reasonable agreement between workers in the values of the parameters used to describe sorption. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Impact of long-term wastewater irrigation on sorption and transport of atrazine in Mexican agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K; Duwig, C; Prado, B; Siebe, C; Hidalgo, C; Etchevers, J

    2012-01-01

    In the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, crops have been irrigated with untreated municipal wastewater for more than a century. Atrazine has been applied to maize and alfalfa grown in the area for weed control for 15 years. Our objectives were to analyse (i) how wastewater irrigation affects the filtering of atrazine, and (ii) if the length of irrigation has a significant impact. We compared atrazine sorption to Phaeozems that have been irrigated with raw wastewater for 35 (P35) and 85 (P85) years with sorption to a non-irrigated (P0) Phaeozem soil under rainfed agriculture. The use of bromide as an inert water tracer in column experiments and the subsequent analysis of the tracers' breakthrough curves allowed the calibration of the hydrodynamic parameters of a two-site non equilibrium convection-dispersion model. The quality of the irrigation water significantly altered the soils' hydrodynamic properties (hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and the size of pores that are hydraulically active). The impacts on soil chemical properties (total organic carbon content and pH) were not significant, while the sodium adsorption ratio was significantly increased. Sorption and desorption isotherms, determined in batch and column experiments, showed enhanced atrazine sorption and reduced and slower desorption in wastewater-irrigated soils. These effects increased with the length of irrigation. The intensified sorption-desorption hysteresis in wastewater-irrigated soils indicated that the soil organic matter developed in these soils had fewer high-energy, easily accessible sorption sites available, leading to lower and slower atrazine desorption rates. This study leads to the conclusion that wastewater irrigation decreases atrazine mobility in the Mezquital valley Phaeozems by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity and increasing the soil's sorption capacity.

  8. Sorption of V and VI group metalloids (As, Sb, Te on modified peat sorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansone-Bertina Linda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates arsenic, antimony and tellurium sorption using iron modified peat. The results were obtained using batch tests and the sorption was studied as a function of initial metalloid concentration, pH and sorption time, as well as the presence of competing substances. The obtained results indicate that modification of peat with Fe compounds significantly enhances the sorption capacity of the sorbents used for sorption of arsenic, antimony and tellurium. The optimal pH interval for the sorption of Sb(III is 6.5–9 and for As(V and Sb(V – 3–6, while As(III and tellurium sorption using Fe-modified peat is favourable in a wider interval of 3–9. The presence of competing ions as well as HA affect sorption of metalloids on Fe-modified peat. A minor impact on the reduction of metalloid sorption was detected in the presence of nitrate, sulphate, carbonate and tartrate ions, while in the presence of phosphate and HA the sorption ability of metalloids can be considerably reduced. The obtained results of kinetic experiments indicate that sorption of metalloids on Fe-modified peat mainly occurs relying on mechanisms of physical sorption processes.

  9. Sorption of technetium and its analogue rhenium on bentonite material under aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Konirova, R.; Vecernik, P.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of technetium on bentonite materials has been studied from the point of view of characterization of long-term radioactive elements behavior in nuclear waste repository. Bentonite R (locality Rokle, Czech Republic) and two types of model groundwater (granitic and bentonite) were selected for the sorption experiments. It is generally known that bentonite materials show an excellent cation-exchange capacity and, on the other hand, a poor uptake of anions. Technetium occurs under aerobic conditions in its most stable oxidation state (+VII) as pertechnetate, which makes a question of its sorption on bentonite more complex when compared with e.g. Cs + or Sr 2+ . To increase the K d values for technetium sorption on bentonite, it is necessary to carry out the experiments under anaerobic conditions in the presence of reducing agent, which is capable to lower the oxidation state of technetium which enables its successful immobilization. The aim of our research has been to find out the conditions suitable for the technetium sorption on selected bentonite under oxidizing conditions. The sorption experiments with Tc-99 on bentonite have been carried out by batch method. The influence of the addition of different materials (e.g. activated carbon, graphite, Fe 2+ , Fe) with bentonite, the effect of solid:aqueous phase ratio and a pH value on the percentage of technetium uptake and on the K d values were tested. Perrhenate was selected as an analogue of pertechnetate in non-active experiments of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and isotachophoresis (ITP). The percentage of rhenium sorbed on bentonite material was determined from the decrease of perrhenate peak area (CE) and from the shortening of the ITP zone corresponding to perrhenate. Both electromigration methods provided comparable results. The results obtained in this study with non-active material were compared to those of technetium acquired by radiometry and polarography. (authors)

  10. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO 4 − adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 . • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O 4 − , in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O 4 − , as an analogue for Tc(VII)O 4 − . Batch Re(VII)O 4 − sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O 2 (s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH 4 + (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO 4 − under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  11. Plutonium sorption to nanocast mesoporous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Wang, Deborah; Jones, Stephen; Olive, Daniel; Nitsche, Heino [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Tueysuez, Harun [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    Nanocast ordered mesoporous carbons are attractive as sorbents because of their extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes. This paper compares Pu uptake, added as Pu(VI), to both untreated and chemically oxidized CMK-(carbon molecular sieves from KAIST) type mesoporous carbon with that to a commercial amorphous activated carbon. The CMK was synthesized via nanocasting by using cubic ordered mesoporous silica KIT-6 as a hard template, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nitrogen adsorption. A portion of the CMK was oxidized by treatment with nitric acid, and will be called OX CMK. The three carbon powders have similar particle morphology, and high BET surface areas. The activated carbon is disordered, while the CMK materials show large domains of ordered cubic mesostructure. The CMK material seems to have more oxygen-containing functional groups than the activated carbon, and the oxidation of the CMK increased the density of these groups, especially - COOH, thus lowering the point of zero charge (PZC) of the material. Batch studies of all 3 materials with plutonium solutions, in a 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} matrix were performed to investigate pH dependence, sorption kinetics, Pu uptake capacities, competition with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in solution, and Pu desorption. Both CMK materials demonstrated high Pu sorption from solutions of pH 3 or greater, and the oxidized CMK also showed high sorption from pH 2 solutions. The activated carbon bound less Pu, and at a much slower rate than CMK. All other batch experiments were carried out in pH 4 solutions. The Pu uptake from low-concentration solutions was faster for the oxidized CMK than for untreated CMK, but in more concentrated samples (∝ 250 μM Pu), the Pu uptake kinetics and apparent capacity were the same for oxidized and untreated CMK. The 23-h Pu uptake capacity of the CMK

  12. Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on particulate organic matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xueyan; Luo Lei; Ma Yibing; Zhang Shuzhen

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) is a key organic matter fraction which can influence soil fertility. Its interactions with hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOCs) have not been characterized and the mechanisms of retention of HOCs by POM remain unclear. In the present study, sorption behaviors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE), and pyrene (PYR) by POMs separated from different soils were examined and the POMs were characterized by elemental analysis, solid state 13 C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicated that POMs were mainly composed of aliphatic components with high polarity. The different original POMs showed similar chemical composition and configuration. Sorption behaviors of PAHs indicated that there was no significant difference in sorption capacity among the POMs. Sorption of NAP and PHE by POMs displayed a nonlinear isotherm, while sorption of PYR yielded a linear isotherm. No significant hysteresis and ionic strength effect were observed for PAH desorption from the POMs.

  13. Sorption of perfluoroalkyl substances to two types of minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsing, Maja S; Josefsson, Sarah; Hughes, Arwel V; Ahrens, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    The sorption of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) was investigated for two model soil mineral surfaces, alumina (Al2O3) and silica (SiO2), on molecular level using neutron scattering. The PFASs were selected (i.e. perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS)) to examine the role of hydrophobic chain length and hydrophilic functional group on their sorption behaviour. All four PFASs were found to sorb to alumina surface (positively charged) forming a hydrated layer consisting of 50% PFASs. The PFAS solubility limit, which decrease with chain length, was found to strongly influence the sorption behaviour. The sorbed PFAS layer could easily be removed by gentle rinsing with water, indicating release upon rainfall in the environment. No sorption was observed for PFOA and PFOS at silica surface (negatively charged), showing electrostatic interaction being the driving force in the sorption process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sorption behaviour of cobalt-60 on Suez Canal bottom sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Gawad, S.A.; El-Shinawy, R.M.K.; Abdel Malik, W.E.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Mineralogical, elemental analysis and sorption behaviour of the Suez Canal bottom sediments in the Port Said area were investigated. It was found that the bottom sediment consist mainly of quartz, feldspars and traces of calcite mineral. The cation-exchange capacity was found to increase as the particle size of the sediment decreased. Sorption of 60 Co by the bottom sediment increased with contact time up to 6 h. Variation of the solution pH from 4 to 9 showed limited increase in the sorption of 60 Co. As carrier concentrations increase from 10 -7 N to 10 -3 N, sorption of Co was found to increase linearly following Freundlich isotherm. The presence of Mg 2+ and Fe 3+ in solution depressed the sorption of 60 Co by the sediments. The desorption of 60 Co from bottom sediment with distilled and Suez Canal water was found to increase with contact time. (author)

  15. Sorption of methanol in alkali exchange zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M.; Rep, M.; Corma, Avelino; Palomares, A.E.; Palomares gimeno, A.E.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Lercher, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Metal cation methanol sorption complexes in MFI (ZSM5), MOR and X have been studied by in situ i.r. spectroscopy in order to understand the nature of interactions of methanol in the molecular sieve pores. The results show that (a) a freely vibrating hydroxy and methyl group of methanol exist on

  16. Technetium Sorption Media Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.; Kelly, S.E.; Robbins, R.A.; Adams, R.D.; Thorson, M.A.; Haass, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  17. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  18. Tritium sorption on protective coatings for concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Senohrabek, J.A.; Allsop, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Because of the high sorption level of tritium on unprotected concrete, a program to examine the effectiveness of various concrete coatings and sealants in reducing tritium sorption was undertaken, and various exposure conditions were examined. Coatings of epoxy, polyurethane, bituminous sealant, bituminous sealant covered with polyvinylidene chloride wrap, alkyd paint, and sodium silicate were investigated with tritium (HTO) vapor concentration, humidity and contact time being varied. An exposure to HT was also carried out, and the effect of humidity on the tritium desorption rate was investigated. The relative effectiveness of the coatings was in the order of bituminous sealant + wrap > bituminous sealant > solvent-based epoxy > 100%-solids epoxy > alkyd paint > sodium silicate. The commercially available coatings for concrete resulted in tritium sorption being reduced to less than 7% of unprotected concrete. This was improved to ∼0.1% with the use of the Saran wrap (polyvinylidene chloride). The amount of tritium sorbed was proportional to tritium concentration. The total tritium sorbed decreased with an increase in humidity. A saturation effect was observed with increasing exposure time for both the coated and unprotected samples. Under the test conditions, complete saturation was not achieved within the maximum 8-hour contact time, except for the solvent-based epoxy. The desorption rate increased with a higher-humidity air purge stream. HT desorbed more rapidly than HTO, but the amount sorbed was smaller. The experimental program showed that HTO sorption by concrete can be significantly reduced with the proper choice of coating. However, tritium sorption on concrete and proposed coatings will continue to be a concern until the effects of the various conditions that affect the adsorption and desorption of tritium are firmly established for both chronic and acute tritium release conditions. Material sorption characteristics must also be considered in

  19. Artificial Weathering of Biotite and Uranium Sorption Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Jae Kwang

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for uranium sorption onto fresh and weathered biotites was performed. After centrifugation, concentrations of uranium in the supernatants were analyzed using ICP-MS, and biotite samples were investigated using XRD and SEM. With powdered biotites (<3 mm in size), we have conducted uranium sorption experiments about fresh and weathered biotites to obtain uranium sorption amounts in various pH conditions. The uranium sorption was not high at a low pH (e.g., pH 3), but increased with increasing pH. There were lower uranium sorption by the weathered biotites than by the fresh ones, and the difference was much larger at higher pH (e.g., pH 11). The lower sorption values of uranium by the weathered biotites may be caused by a change of mineral surfaces and a chemical behavior of surrounding dissolved elements. It seems that the uranium-mineral interaction has been diminished, especially, in the weathered biotite by a destruction and dissolution of preferential sorption sites on the mineral surfaces and by the colloidal formation from dissolved elements.

  20. Re-evaluation of the sorption behaviour of Bromide and Sulfamethazine under field conditions using leaching data and modelling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Matthias; Olsson, Oliver; Höper, Heinrich; Hamscher, Gerd; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of reactive transport in the aquatic environment is hampered by the ambiguity of environmental fate process conceptualizations for a specific substance in the literature. Concepts are usually identified by experimental studies and inverse modelling under controlled lab conditions in order to reduce environmental uncertainties such as uncertain boundary conditions and input data. However, since environmental conditions affect substance behaviour, a re-evaluation might be necessary under environmental conditions which might, in turn, be affected by uncertainties. Using a combination of experimental data and simulations of the leaching behaviour of the veterinary antibiotic Sulfamethazine (SMZ; synonym: sulfadimidine) and the hydrological tracer Bromide (Br) in a field lysimeter, we re-evaluated the sorption concepts of both substances under uncertain field conditions. Sampling data of a field lysimeter experiment in which both substances were applied twice a year with manure and sampled at the bottom of two lysimeters during three subsequent years was used for model set-up and evaluation. The total amount of leached SMZ and Br were 22 μg and 129 mg, respectively. A reactive transport model was parameterized to the conditions of the two lysimeters filled with monoliths (depth 2 m, area 1 m²) of a sandy soil showing a low pH value under which Bromide is sorptive. We used different sorption concepts such as constant and organic-carbon dependent sorption coefficients and instantaneous and kinetic sorption equilibrium. Combining the sorption concepts resulted in four scenarios per substance with different equations for sorption equilibrium and sorption kinetics. The GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation) method was applied to each scenario using parameter ranges found in experimental and modelling studies. The parameter spaces for each scenario were sampled using a Latin Hypercube method which was refined around local model efficiency maxima

  1. Influence of light-weight organic matters on strontium sorption to bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Wu, Ding-Chiang; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Light-weight organic matters were frequently observed in groundwater. Their existence had significant influence on the transport of radionuclides. In this study, light-weight organic acid species including oxalic (MW 90), succinic (MW 118), adipic (MW 146), azelaic (MW 188), eicosanedioic (MW 306), benzoic (MW 122), salicylic (MW 138), and gallic (MW 170) were selected as the surrogate of natural organic matters. Their effects on strontium sorption to bentonite were evaluated by using a surface complexation model MINEQL+. Under this framework, three sorption mechanisms were considered: 1. structure sorption sites, 2. edge sorption sites, 3. further hydration of adsorbed Sr 2+ . The presence of organic species had no influence on Sr cation sorption to structure sorption sites. However, Sr cation sorption to edge sorption was affected by the organics to certain extent. For example, sorption capability of edge sites toward Sr was increased by the gallic species. Furthermore, hydration of adsorbed Sr was significantly affected by the presence of organic species. This might relate to that adsorbed Sr would become the bridge associating organic species on bentonite surfaces, but this argument required more solid spectral evidences to support. Some preliminary observations on Sr sorption to bentonite were obtained in this work; however, further experiments are still required by conducting experiments with more variety of organic species. By doing a comprehensive study, it would be much beneficial to make a more accurate evaluation of the influence of organic matters on Sr sorption

  2. The influence of organic matter on sorption and fate of glyphosate in soil - Comparing different soils and humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, Christian N., E-mail: calbers@ruc.d [Dept. of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Banta, Gary T. [Dept. of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Hansen, Poul Erik [Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jacobsen, Ole S. [Dept. of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-10-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is generally believed not to influence the sorption of glyphosate in soil. To get a closer look on the dynamics between glyphosate and SOM, we used three approaches: I. Sorption studies with seven purified soil humic fractions showed that these could sorb glyphosate and that the aromatic content, possibly phenolic groups, seems to aid the sorption. II. Sorption studies with six whole soils and with SOM removed showed that several soil parameters including SOM are responsible for the strong sorption of glyphosate in soils. III. After an 80 day fate experiment, approx40% of the added glyphosate was associated with the humic and fulvic acid fractions in the sandy soils, while this was the case for only approx10% of the added glyphosate in the clayey soils. Glyphosate sorbed to humic substances in the natural soils seemed to be easier desorbed than glyphosate sorbed to amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. - Glyphosate was sorbed by purified humic substances and a significant amount of glyphosate was found to be associated with soil organic matter in whole soils.

  3. The influence of organic matter on sorption and fate of glyphosate in soil - Comparing different soils and humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, Christian N.; Banta, Gary T.; Hansen, Poul Erik; Jacobsen, Ole S.

    2009-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is generally believed not to influence the sorption of glyphosate in soil. To get a closer look on the dynamics between glyphosate and SOM, we used three approaches: I. Sorption studies with seven purified soil humic fractions showed that these could sorb glyphosate and that the aromatic content, possibly phenolic groups, seems to aid the sorption. II. Sorption studies with six whole soils and with SOM removed showed that several soil parameters including SOM are responsible for the strong sorption of glyphosate in soils. III. After an 80 day fate experiment, ∼40% of the added glyphosate was associated with the humic and fulvic acid fractions in the sandy soils, while this was the case for only ∼10% of the added glyphosate in the clayey soils. Glyphosate sorbed to humic substances in the natural soils seemed to be easier desorbed than glyphosate sorbed to amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. - Glyphosate was sorbed by purified humic substances and a significant amount of glyphosate was found to be associated with soil organic matter in whole soils.

  4. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter, Fabiano André; Ferreira, Tamara Santos; Sinhorin, Adilson Paulo; Lima, Larissa Borges de; Morais, Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco, Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diu...

  5. Arsenic Sorption on Mechanically Activated Magnetite and Olivine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Bujňáková

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic sorption on mechanically activated minerals such as magnetite Fe3O4 (Kiruna, Sweden and olivine (Mg,Fe2SiO4 (Ǻheim,Norway has been studied and compared in this work. Experiments were carried out with non-activated and mechanically activatedsamples. The activation of both minerals was performed in a planetary mill at different milling conditions. The specific surface areaand consequent sorption activity were enhanced by mechanical activation. The using of olivine seems to be better than magnetite fromthe point of view of milling time, which is necessary for achievement of the same sorption effect.

  6. Co-contaminants and factors affecting the sorption behaviour of two sulfonamides in pasture soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K.; Manley-Harris, Merilyn

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of soil pH, organic carbon, ionic strength and steroid hormones on the sorption of sulfamethoxazole (SMO) and sulfachloropyridazine (SCP) in three pastoral soils of New Zealand. A model linking sorbate speciation with species-specific sorption coefficients describing the pH dependence of the apparent sorption coefficients was used to derive the fraction of each species of SMO. All soils displayed a decrease in sorption when pH was increased, with SMO exhibiting the highest sorption at pH 2. The cationic form of SMO appeared to sorb more close to pH ≥ pK a1 and, when pH ≥ pK a2 (6.5, 7.5 and 8.5) the anionic species seems to dominate, however, its sorption affinity to all soils was low. SMO sorption was affected by ionic strengths and organic carbon content, while the presence of hormones showed only a subtle decrease in SCP sorption in a selected model pasture soil. -- Highlights: •The effect of OC content on sulfamethoxazole sorption is nullified by the pH effect. •Steroid hormone has a subtle influence on the sulfachloropyridazine sorption in pastoral soil. •Increased hormone concentrations decrease sulfachloropyridazine sorption in soils. -- Sorption affinity of SMO and SCP are strongly governed by multitude of factors, and variations in these factors can be significant when manure and fertilisers are added to soil

  7. Sorption of actinides onto nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchatskaya, Yulia; Romanchuk, Anna; Yakovlev, Ruslan; Kulakova, Inna [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Shiryaev, Andrei [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry; Kalmykov, Stepan [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry

    2015-06-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (ND) present a significant part of nanocarbons group, which could be produced on commercial scale by detonation of explosives in a closed chamber. Their unique properties of high surface area, low weight and radiation resistance make ND a prospective candidate for applications in sorption processes in radiochemistry. To study the influence of surface chemistry on sorption properties, apristine sample of ND was treated with acids and hydrogen. The surface chemistry of the samples was characterised by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The sorption properties of ND were tested fordifferent radionuclides. The sorption capacity of ND was shown to be higher than those of commonly used radionuclide sorbents like activated carbon and compariable to other members of nanocarbon group like graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. The sorption properties were shown to be influenced by the presence of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of ND. This represents an opportunity to increase the sorption capacity of ND.

  8. Sorption of actinides onto nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchatskaya, Yulia; Romanchuk, Anna; Yakovlev, Ruslan; Kulakova, Inna; Shiryaev, Andrei; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Kalmykov, Stepan; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow

    2015-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (ND) present a significant part of nanocarbons group, which could be produced on commercial scale by detonation of explosives in a closed chamber. Their unique properties of high surface area, low weight and radiation resistance make ND a prospective candidate for applications in sorption processes in radiochemistry. To study the influence of surface chemistry on sorption properties, apristine sample of ND was treated with acids and hydrogen. The surface chemistry of the samples was characterised by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The sorption properties of ND were tested fordifferent radionuclides. The sorption capacity of ND was shown to be higher than those of commonly used radionuclide sorbents like activated carbon and compariable to other members of nanocarbon group like graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes. The sorption properties were shown to be influenced by the presence of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of ND. This represents an opportunity to increase the sorption capacity of ND.

  9. Radionuclide sorption database for Swiss safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.G.; Hadermann, J.

    1984-10-01

    Recommended sorption data for use in transport models for a Swiss High-Level Waste repository are presented. The models used in 'Project Gewaehr 1985' assume linear sorption isotherms and require elemental partition coefficient (Kd) data. On the basis of a literature search 'realistic' Kd data for 22 elements have been selected for weathered crystalline rock and sediments in contact with a reducing groundwater and also sediments with a less reducing groundwater. In an appendix sorption data for 28 elements on bentonite backfill are given. These data are supplemented with 'conservative' estimates taken to represent minimum reasonable values. Available data are discussed for each element clearly exhibiting (i) the large gaps in knowledge, (ii) their unbalanced distribution between different elements and, hence, (iii) the need for further experiments in the laboratory, the field and analogue studies. An overview of the theoretical concepts of sorption, experimental methodology and data interpretation is given in order to put the values into context. General problem areas are identified. (Auth.)

  10. Speciation of plutonium during sorption and diffusion in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Ugras

    2013-01-01

    The presented work was carried out in the framework of the BMWi-project ''Interaction and migration of actinides in natural clay rocks taking into account humic substances and clay organic matter - Interactions of neptunium and plutonium with natural clay rocks''. For the long-term safety assessments of nuclear repositories, the possible migration of the radiotoxic wastes into the environment must be considered. Due to its long half-life (T 1/2 = 24000 y) 239 Pu has a significant contribution to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel in a repository after long periods of storage. The redox-sensitive plutonium has a very complicated chemical behavior. In aqueous solution under environmental relevant conditions Pu can exist in oxidation states +III to +VI and it can exist in up to four oxidation states simultaneously in a solution. Clays are considered as a possible host rock formation for of high-level radioactive waste disposal. Therefore, detailed information on the mobilization and immobilization of plutonium through / into the groundwater from a repository are of special interest. In this work new insights into the interaction between Pu and natural Opalinus clay (OPA, Mont Terri, Switzerland) are obtained with regard to the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in a deep geological repository.rnThe focus of this work was on the determination of the speciation of Pu on the mineral surface after sorption and diffusion process by different synchrotron based techniques (μ-XRF, μ-XANES/-EXAFS, μ-XRD, and EXAFS/XANES). The interaction between Pu and OPA was studied in batch sorption and diffusion experiments in dependence of various experimental parameters (e.g. pH, Pu oxidation state). Sorption experiments showed that some experimental parameters (e.g. temperature, humic acid) have a significant impact on the sorption of Pu on OPA. Speciation studies were performed as a function of various chemical parameters on powder samples form batch experiments as

  11. Organomineral Interactions and Herbicide Sorption in Brazilian Tropical and Subtropical Oxisols under No-Tillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfleur, Eloana J; Kookana, Rai S; Tornisielo, Valdemar L; Regitano, Jussara B

    2016-05-25

    We evaluated the effects of the soil organic matter (SOM) composition, distribution between soil aggregates size, and their interactions with the mineral phase on herbicide sorption (alachlor, bentazon, and imazethapyr) in tropical and subtropical Oxisols under no-till systems (NT). Using soil physical fractionation approach, sorption experiments were performed on whole soils and their aggregates. SOM chemistry was assessed by CP/MAS (13)C NMR. The lower sorption observed in tropical soils was attributed to the greater blockage of SOM sorption sites than in subtropical soils. When these sites were exposed upon physical fractionation, sorption of the three herbicides in tropical soils increased, especially for imazethapyr. High amounts of poorly crystallized sesquioxides in these soils may have contributed to masking of sorption sites, indicating that organomineral interactions may lead to blockage of sorption sites on SOM in tropical soils.

  12. Modeling and Prediction of Soil Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil water vapor sorption isotherms describe the relationship between water activity (aw) and moisture content along adsorption and desorption paths. The isotherms are important for modeling numerous soil processes and are also used to estimate several soil (specific surface area, clay content.......93) for a wide range of soils; and (ii) develop and test regression models for estimating the isotherms from clay content. Preliminary results show reasonable fits of the majority of the investigated empirical and theoretical models to the measured data although some models were not capable to fit both sorption...... directions accurately. Evaluation of the developed prediction equations showed good estimation of the sorption/desorption isotherms for tested soils....

  13. Combined performance of biochar sorption and magnetic separation processes for treatment of chromium-contained electroplating wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-ye; Tang, Yan-kui; Li, Kun; Mo, Ya-yuan; Li, Hao-feng; Gu, Zhan-qi

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic biochar was prepared with eucalyptus leaf residue remained after essential oil being extracted. Batch experiments were conducted to examine the capacity of the magnetic biochar to remove Cr (VI) from electroplating wastewater and to be separated by an external magnetic field. The results show that the initial solution pH plays an important role on both sorption and separation. The removal rates of Cr (VI), total Cr, Cu (II), and Ni (II) were 97.11%, 97.63%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The turbidity of the sorption-treated solution was reduced to 21.8NTU from 4075NTU after 10min magnetic separation. The study also confirms that the magnetic biochar still retains the original magnetic separation performance after the sorption process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A mechanistic approach to the generation of sorption databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1992-01-01

    Sorption of radionuclides in the near and far fields of an underground nuclear waste repository is one of the most important processes retarding their release to the environment. In the vast majority of cases sorption data have been presented in terms of empirical parameters such as distribution coefficients and isotherm equations. A consequence of this empirical methodology is that the sorption data are only strictly valid under the experimental conditions at which they were measured. Implicit in this approach is the need to generate large amounts of data and fitting parameters necessary for an empirical description of sorption under all realistically conceivable conditions which may arise in space and time along the migration pathway to Man. An alternative approach to the problem is to try to understand, and develop model descriptions of, underlying retention mechanisms and to identify those systems parameters which essentially determine the extent of sorption. The aim of this work is to see to what extent currently existing mechanistic models, together with their associated data, can be applied to predict sorption data from laboratory experiments on natural systems. This paper describes the current status of this work which is very much in an early stage of development. An example is given whereby model predictions are compared with laboratory results for the sorption of Np at trace concentrations under oxidizing conditions on a series of minerals relevant to granite formations. 31 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Separation of radio cesium from PUREX feed solution by sorption on composite ammonium molybdo phosphate (AMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, I.J.; Achuthan, P.V.; Jain, S.; Janardanan, C.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Wattal, P.K.; Ramanujam, A.

    2001-01-01

    Composite AMP exchanger was developed and evaluated for separation of radio cesium from dissolver solutions of PUREX process using a column experiment. The composite shows excellent sorption of radio cesium from dissolver solutions without any loss of plutonium and uranium. The removal of radio cesium from dissolver solutions will help in lowering the degradation of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in the solvent extraction process and will also help in reducing the radiation related problems. (author)

  16. Sorption of the organic cation metoprolol on silica gel from its aqueous solution considering the competition of inorganic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Susann; Schaffer, Mario; Börnick, Hilmar; Licha, Tobias; Worch, Eckhard

    2014-05-01

    Systematic batch experiments with the organic monovalent cation metoprolol as sorbate and the synthetic material silica gel as sorbent were conducted with the aim of characterizing the sorption of organic cations onto charged surfaces. Sorption isotherms for metoprolol (>99% protonated in the tested pH of around 6) in competition with mono- and divalent inorganic cations (Na(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were determined in order to assess their influence on cation exchange processes and to identify the role of further sorptive interactions. The obtained sorption isotherms could be described well by an exponential function (Freundlich isotherm model) with consistent exponents (about 0.8). In general, a decreasing sorption of metoprolol with increasing concentrations in inorganic cations was observed. Competing ions of the same valence showed similar effects. A significant sorption affinity of metoprolol with ion type dependent Freundlich coefficients KF,0.77 between 234.42 and 426.58 (L/kg)(0.77) could still be observed even at very high concentrations of competing inorganic cations. Additional column experiments confirm this behavior, which suggests the existence of further relevant interactions beside cation exchange. In subsequent batch experiments, the influence of mixtures with more than one competing ion and the effect of a reduced negative surface charge at a pH below the point of zero charge (pHPZC ≈ 2.5) were also investigated. Finally, the study demonstrates that cation exchange is the most relevant but not the sole mechanism for the sorption of metoprolol on silica gel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Cosolutes on the Sorption of Phenanthrene onto Mineral Surface of River Sediments and Kaolinite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorption of phenanthrene onto the natural sediment with low organic carbon content (OC%, organic-free sediment, and kaolinite was investigated through isotherm experiments. Effects of cosolutes (pyrene, 4-n-nonyphenol (NP, and humic acid (HA on phenanthrene sorption were also studied by comparing apparent solid-water distribution coefficients (Kdapp of phenanthrene. Two addition sequences, including “cosolute added prior to phenanthrene” and “cosolute and phenanthrene added simultaneously,” were adopted. The Freundlich model fits phenanthrene sorption on all 3 sorbents well. The sorption coefficients on these sorbents were similar, suggesting that mineral surface plays an important role in the sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants on low OC% sediments. Cosolutes could affect phenanthrene sorption on the sorbents, which depended on their properties, concentrations, and addition sequences. Pyrene inhibited phenanthrene sorption. Sorbed NP inhibited phenanthrene sorption at low levels and promoted sorption at high levels. Similar to NP, effect of HA on phenanthrene sorption onto the natural sediment depended on its concentrations, whereas, for the organic-free sediment and kaolinite, preloading of HA at high levels led to an enhancement in phenanthrene Kdapp while no obvious effect was observed at low HA levels; dissolved HA could inhibit phenanthrene sorption on the two sorbents.

  18. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero, Carlos; Fiol, Nuria; Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3 ± 0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  19. Sorption of alkylphenols on Ebro River sediments: Comparing isotherms with field observations in river water and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Alicia [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: anoqam@iiqab.csic.es; Endo, Satoshi; Gocht, Tilman [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Barth, Johannes A.C. [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Geologie, GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Schlossgarten 5, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lacorte, Silvia [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo, Damia [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Institut Catala de Recerca de l' Aigua (ICRA), Parc Cientific i Tecnologic de la Universitat de Girona, Pic de Peguera, 15, 17003 Girona (Spain); Grathwohl, Peter [Center of Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    This study reports sorption isotherms of the endocrine disruptors nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) in three sediment samples from the Ebro River basin (NE Spain), with organic carbon fractions (f{sub OC}) ranging from 0.0035 to 0.082 g{sub OC} g{sup -1}. All isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich model with slightly nonlinear exponents ranging from 0.80 to 0.94. The solubility of the compounds as well as the organic carbon (OC) content had the strongest influences on the sorption behavior of these compounds. Comparison of the laboratory-spiked samples with the native contamination of NP of 45 water and concurrent sediment samples resulted in reasonable matches between both data sets, even though the lowest concentrations in the field were not completely reached in laboratory tests. This good agreement indicates that sorption laboratory data can be extrapolated to environmental levels and therefore the distribution of nonylphenol between sediments and water can be predicted with a precision of one order of magnitude. Furthermore, laboratory experiments with simultaneous loading of NP and OP revealed negligible competition for sorption sites at low concentrations. - Laboratory sorption of nonylphenol compared to field concentrations showed good agreements.

  20. Sorption of alkylphenols on Ebro River sediments: Comparing isotherms with field observations in river water and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Alicia; Endo, Satoshi; Gocht, Tilman; Barth, Johannes A.C.; Lacorte, Silvia; Barcelo, Damia; Grathwohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This study reports sorption isotherms of the endocrine disruptors nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) in three sediment samples from the Ebro River basin (NE Spain), with organic carbon fractions (f OC ) ranging from 0.0035 to 0.082 g OC g -1 . All isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich model with slightly nonlinear exponents ranging from 0.80 to 0.94. The solubility of the compounds as well as the organic carbon (OC) content had the strongest influences on the sorption behavior of these compounds. Comparison of the laboratory-spiked samples with the native contamination of NP of 45 water and concurrent sediment samples resulted in reasonable matches between both data sets, even though the lowest concentrations in the field were not completely reached in laboratory tests. This good agreement indicates that sorption laboratory data can be extrapolated to environmental levels and therefore the distribution of nonylphenol between sediments and water can be predicted with a precision of one order of magnitude. Furthermore, laboratory experiments with simultaneous loading of NP and OP revealed negligible competition for sorption sites at low concentrations. - Laboratory sorption of nonylphenol compared to field concentrations showed good agreements

  1. Thermodynamic parameters of U (VI) sorption onto soils in aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Rout, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Malay; Singhal, Rakesh Kumar; Ravi, Pazhayath Mana

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters viz. the standard free energy (∆Gº), Standard enthalpy change (∆Hº) and standard entropy change (∆Sº) were determined using the obtained values of distribution coefficient (kd) of U (VI) in two different types of soils (agricultural and undisturbed) by conducting a batch equilibrium experiment with aqueous media (groundwater and deionised water) at two different temperatures 25°C and 50°C. The obtained distribution coefficients (kd) values of U for undisturbed soil in groundwater showed about 75% higher than in agricultural soil at 25°C while in deionised water, these values were highly insignificant for both soils indicating that groundwater was observed to be more favorable for high surface sorption. At 50°C, the increased kd values in both soils revealed that solubility of U decreased with increasing temperature. Batch adsorption results indicated that U sorption onto soils was promoted at higher temperature and an endothermic and spontaneous interfacial process. The high positive values of ∆Sº for agricultural soil suggested a decrease in sorption capacity of U in that soil due to increased randomness at solid-solution interface. The low sorption onto agricultural soil may be due to presence of high amount of coarse particles in the form of sand (56%). Geochemical modeling predicted that mixed hydroxo-carbonato complexes of uranium were the most stable and abundant complexes in equilibrium solution during experimental.

  2. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz F, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  3. Sorption of nonpolar aromatic contaminants by chlorosilane surface modified natural minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttenloch, P; Roehl, K E; Czurda, K

    2001-11-01

    The efficacy of the surface modification of natural diatomite and zeolite material by chlorosilanes is demonstrated. Chlorosilanes used were trimethylchlorosilane (TMSCI), tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane (TBDMSCI), dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DMODSCI), and diphenyldichlorosilane (DPDSCI) possessing different headgroups and chemical properties. Silanol groups of the diatomite and zeolite were modified by chemical reaction with the chlorosilanes resulting in a stable covalent attachment of the organosilanes to the mineral surface. The alteration of surface properties of the modified material was proved by measurements of water adsorption capacity, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and thermoanalytical data. The surface modified material showed great stability even when exposed to extremes in ionic strength, pH, and to pure organic solvents. Sorption of toluene, o-xylene, and naphthalene from water was greatly enhanced by the surface modification compared to the untreated materials which showed no measurable sorption of these compounds. The enhanced sorption was dependent on the organic carbon content as well as on chemical characteristics of the chlorosilanes used. Batch sorption experiments showed that the phenyl headgroups of DPDSCI have the best affinity for aromatic compounds. Removal from an aqueous solution of 10 mg/L of naphthalene, o-xylene, and toluene was 71%, 60%, and 30% for surface modified diatomite and 51%, 30%, and 16% for modified clinoptilolite, respectively. Sorption data were well described by the Freundlich isotherm equation, which indicated physical adsorption onto the lipophilic surface rather than partitioning into the surface organic phase. The chlorosilane modified materials have an apparent potential for application in environmental technologies such as permeable reactive barriers (PRB) or wastewater treatment.

  4. Characterization of Al-coated and Uncoated Steel Slags in Flow-through Experiments: An Approach to Evaluate the Potential Efficiency of P Sorption Materials in P Removal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, I. S. P.; Penn, C. J.; Huang, C. H.

    2017-12-01

    Excessive phosphorus (P) in surface waters is one of the key drivers of eutrophication. P removal structures are an emerging technology developed to reduce excessive dissolved P in runoff and drainage water, preventing or mitigating P delivery to water systems. One of the determining factors for the success of these structures is the type of P sorption material (PSM) being used. Steel slag, a residue of the steel industry, is an example of PSM proven to be efficient in sequestering dissolved P from water. However, its P sorption capacity can significantly vary, mostly because different steel-making processes generate this PSM. Aluminum-coating is a technology aiming to improve the P sorptive qualities of steel slag. In this study, we characterized eighteen different slag samples from different plants and steel-making processes. Safety, i.e., presence of trace metals, as well as chemical and physical properties were evaluated through digestions, metal-extractions and general chemical and physical characterization (e.g.: pH, buffer index, bulk density). We conducted flow-through experiments, a dynamic sorption approach, on coated and uncoated slag samples in order to evaluate differences in P removal efficiency and the effects of Al-coating. For the Al-coating, a solution of Al2(SO4)3 at two concentrations (94.5 or 66.2 g L-1) was used to coat the slag samples. After 48 hours in contact with the solution, flow-through experiments were performed. All samples were tested with an incoming P concentration of 0.5 mg L-1. Hydraulic residence time was regulated for each steel slag sample, alternating between 9.85 minutes or 0.28 minutes. This study will provide essential information about intrinsic differences in steel slag composition and its efficiency in sequestering P from flowing waters. Moreover, we explore the effects of the Al-coating technique, which can in turn enhance P removal structures efficacy and broaden its adoption.

  5. Sorption and Transport of Pharmaceutical chemicals in Organic- and Mineral-rich Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulava, V. M.; Schwindaman, J.; Murphey, V.; Kuzma, S.; Cory, W.

    2011-12-01

    OC, again indicating that these PhACs preferentially partition into the soil OM. Such a correlation was absent for cetirizine. Breakthrough curves of PhACs measured in homogeneous packed soil columns indicated that PhAC transport was affected by chemical nonequilibrium processes depending on the soil and PhAC chemistry. The shape of the breakthrough curves indicated that there were two distinct sorption sites - OM and clay minerals - which influence nonequilibrium transport of these compounds. The retardation factor estimated using the distribution coefficient, Kd, measured from the sorption experiments was very similar to the measured value. While the sorption and transport data do not provide mechanistic information regarding the nature of PhAC interaction with chemical reactive components within geological materials, they do provide important information regarding potential fate of such compounds in the environment. The results also show the role that soil OM and mineral surfaces play in sequestering or transporting these chemicals. These insights have implications to the quality of the water resources in our communities.

  6. Radionuclide sorption studies on abyssal red clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radionuclide sorption properties of a widely distributed abyssal red clay are being experimentally investigated using batch equilibration techniques. This paper summarizes sorption equilibrium data obtained when 0.68 N NaCl solutions containing either Tc, U, Pu, Am or Cm were contacted with samples of the red clay and also summarizes some initial results from experiments designed to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for various nuclides. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, the sorption equilibrium distribution coefficients for technetium were essentially zero. At solution-phase nuclide concentrations on the order of 10 -6 M and less and at solution pH values of about 6.9, the distribution coefficients for plutonium were about 3 x 10 3 m1/gm and for uranium, americium, and curium were about 10 5 ml/gm or greater. However, at solution pH values of about 2.7, the distribution coefficients for each of the nuclides were greatly diminished. Initial experiments conducted in order to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for cesium, barium, and cerium, indicated that the silicate phases in the clay were selective for cesium over barium and cerium. These experiments also indicated that the hydrous oxide phases were selective for cerium over barium and for barium over cesium

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Moisture Sorption Isotherms and Determination of Isosteric Heats of Sorption of Ziziphus Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Saad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption and adsorption equilibrium moisture isotherms of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were determined using the gravimetric-static method at 30, 40, and 50°C for water activity (aw ranging from 0.057 to 0.898. At a given aw, the results show that the moisture content decreases with increasing temperature. A hysteresis effect was observed. The experimental data of sorption were fitted by eight models (GAB, BET, Henderson-Thompson, modified-Chung Pfost, Halsey, Oswin, Peleg, and Adam and Shove. After evaluating the models according to several criteria, the Peleg and Oswin models were found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The net isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of Ziziphus spina-christi leaves were calculated by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the sorption isotherms and an expression for predicting these thermodynamic properties was given.

  8. Water vapor sorption thermodynamics of the Nafion ionomer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsö, Lars; Jannasch, Patric

    2013-07-18

    The water interactions of polymer electrolyte membranes are of significant interest when these materials are used in, for example, fuel cells. We have therefore studied the sorption thermodynamics of Nafion with a sorption calorimeter that simultaneously measures the sorption isotherm and the mixing (sorption) enthalpy. This unique method is suitable for investigating the sorption thermodynamics of ionic polymers. The measurements were made at 25 °C on a series of samples dried at different temperatures from 25 to 120 °C. The sorption isotherms indicate that the samples dried at 120 °C lost about 0.8 more water molecules per sulfonic group during the drying than did the samples dried at 25 °C, and this result was verified gravimetrically. The mixing enthalpies showed several peaks or plateaus for the samples dried at 60-120 °C. This behavior was seen up to about 2 water molecules per sulfonic group. As these peaks were not directly related to any feature in the sorption isotherm, they probably have their origin in a secondary process, such as a reorganization of the polymer.

  9. Sorption of selenium on Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Eu layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, H.; Paparigas, Z.; Kaiser, G.

    2008-01-01

    Salt domes represent deep geological formations which are under consideration as final repositories for irradiated research reactor fuel elements. For long-term safety aspects the mobilisation of the radionuclides due to a water ingress is intensively investigated. At the Institute of Energy Research (IEF-6), leaching experiments were performed in a hot cell facility with UAl x -Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersed research reactor fuel elements in repository-relevant MgCl 2 -rich salt brines under anaerobic conditions. The fuel plates corroded completely within one year and a Mg-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH) with chloride as interlayer anion was identified as one crystalline phase component of the corrosion products (secondary phases). This Mg-Al-LDH was synthesized, characterized, and the ability to retard europium by an incorporation process was investigated. Europium, as a representative for lanthanides, was identified to be one of the radionuclides which were found in the corrosion products. We could show that europium was incorporated in the lattice structure. LDHs have high anion exchange capacities that enhance their potential to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems. In this work the sorption behaviour of selenium in the chemical form as selenite (SeO 3 2- ) on Mg-Al-LDH and on Mg-Al-Eu-LDH was investigated. Especially the influence of the larger europium-III ion was of interest. It represents in the Mg-Al-Eu-LDH about 10% of the molar aluminium amount. The sorption has been experimentally studied in a wide range of pH, ionic strength, radionuclide and sorbent concentration. Both LDHs with chloride as interlayer anion were synthesized by a coprecipitation method under controlled conditions, and their main physico-chemical properties were analyzed prior to the sorption experiments. The sorption kinetics of selenite on the LDHs in water and in MgCl 2 -rich brine were rapid using a LDH concentration of 10 g/L. Equilibrium, indicated by stable p

  10. Sorption of radioiodine in organo-clays and -soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of investigations on the sorption of radioiodine to natural and artificially altered soil components, a number of clay minerals and natural soils were treated with quaternary alkylammonium ions to replace the exchangeable metal cations. With help of batch experiments the resulting organo-clays were tested with respect to their sorption capability of radioiodine quantified by the distribution ratio (R D -value). Treatment of bentonite, vermiculite and cretaceous clay as well as of samples from natural horizons of chernozem soil with hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY + ) and benzethonium (BE + ) exhibited sorptions rates and amounts, which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of the respective untreated samples. Moderate increases of the R D -values were found after cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA + ), while the applications of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA + ) and tetramethylammonium (TMA + ) were ineffective. Considerable sorption of radioiodine was observed with the commercially available Bentone. (orig.)

  11. Sorption of radioiodine in organo-clays and -soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bors, J. (Niedersaechsisches Inst. fuer Radiooekologie, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of investigations on the sorption of radioiodine to natural and artificially altered soil components, a number of clay minerals and natural soils were treated with quaternary alkylammonium ions to replace the exchangeable metal cations. With help of batch experiments the resulting organo-clays were tested with respect to their sorption capability of radioiodine quantified by the distribution ratio (R{sub D}-value). Treatment of bentonite, vermiculite and cretaceous clay as well as of samples from natural horizons of chernozem soil with hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY{sup +}) and benzethonium (BE{sup +}) exhibited sorptions rates and amounts, which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of the respective untreated samples. Moderate increases of the R{sub D}-values were found after cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA{sup +}), while the applications of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA{sup +}) and tetramethylammonium (TMA{sup +}) were ineffective. Considerable sorption of radioiodine was observed with the commercially available Bentone. (orig.).

  12. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  13. Sorption behaviour of perfluoroalkyl substances in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinovic, Jelena; Lacorte, Silvia; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The sorption behaviour of three perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), was studied in six soils with contrasting characteristics, especially in the organic carbon content. Sorption isotherms were obtained by equilibrating the soil samples with 0.01 mol L(-1) CaCl2 solutions spiked with increasing concentrations of the target PFAS. The sorption reversibility of PFASs was also tested for some of the samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify the target PFASs in the solutions. Both the Freundlich and linear models were appropriate to describe the sorption behaviour of PFASs in soils, and enabled us to derive solid-liquid distribution coefficients (Kd) for each compound in each soil. Kd values increased from 19 to 295 mL g(-1) for PFOS, from 2.2 to 38 mL g(-1) for PFOA and from 0.4 to 6.8 mL g(-1) for PFBS, and were positively correlated with the organic carbon content of the soil. KOC values obtained from the correlations were 710, 96 and 17 mL g(-1) for PFOS, PFOA and PFBS, respectively. Whereas Kd values decreased in the sequence PFOS>PFOA>PFBS, desorption yields were lower than 13% for PFOS, from 24 to 58% for PFOA, and from 32 to 60% for PFBS. This shows that the physicochemical characteristics of PFASs, basically their hydrophobicity, controlled their sorption behaviour in soils, with PFOS being the most irreversibly sorbed PFAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sorption analyses in materials science: selected oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.; Jones, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    Physical adsorption studies have been shown to be extremely valuable in studying the chemistry and structure of dispersed materials. Many processes rely on the access to the large amount of surface made available by the high degree of dispersion. Conversely, there are many applications where consolidation of the dispersed solids is required. Several systems (silica gel, alumina catalysts, mineralogic alumino-silicates, and yttrium oxide plasters) have been studied to show the type and amount of chemical and structural information that can be obtained. Some review of current theories is given and additional concepts are developed based on statistical and thermodynamic arguments. The results are applied to sorption data to show that detailed sorption analyses are extremely useful and can provide valuable information that is difficult to obtain by any other means. Considerable emphasis has been placed on data analyses and interpretation of a nonclassical nature to show the potential of such studies that is often not recognized nor utilized

  15. Study of the radium sorption/desorption on goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassot, S.; Stammose, D.; Mallet, C.; Lefebvre, C.; Ferreux, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    The oxi-hydroxides, present at trace level in uranium mill tailings, are responsible of about 70% of the 226 radium sorption, half being fixed on crystallized forms. This radionuclide (half time=1622y), present at high level (50 to 100kBq.kg -1 ), can be released in groundwater, involving a possible contamination of the food chain (actual concentration limit=0.37Bq.1 -1 ). So, it is very important to point out the mechanisms of the radium sorption/desorption on crystallized oxi-hydroxides as a function of chemical conditions of the system. The radium sorption on synthetic goethite α-FeOOH has been studied as a function of contact time, initial radium activity, pH, sodium and calcium concentrations. The results show that, after one hour of contact time (necessary to reach equilibrium), the radium sorption increases widely in a pH range 6-7. The increase of Na + concentration is without influence on the radium sorption, indicating the low interactions between sodium and surface sites. At the opposite, the presence of calcium in solution decreases widely the radium sorption, that indicates a competition between calcium and radium for the same kind of sorption sites of the oxi-hydroxide surface. The percentage of radium desorbed increases widely with time, from 1 to 120h and becomes constant at a time higher than 120h. This long equilibrium time for desorption in comparison with sorption one can be explain by a local evolution of the sorption sites of the solid, which become less accessible for the solution in contact. (author)

  16. Effects of cell condition, pH, and temperature on lead, zinc, and copper sorption to Acidithiobacillus caldus strain BC13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, John E.; Apel, William A.; Lee, Brady D.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: →At. caldus sorbs lead, zinc, and copper across a range of pH and temperature. →At. caldus shows a relatively high sorption capacity for zinc and copper at low pH. → Lead, zinc, and copper sorption decreases in tertiary mixtures. → Copper appears to sorb via a different mechanism(s) than lead or zinc. - Abstract: This study describes the effects of cell condition, pH, and temperature on lead, zinc, and copper sorption to Acidithiobacillus caldus strain BC13 with a Langmuir model. Copper exhibited the highest loading capacity, 4.76 ± 0.28 mmol g -1 , to viable cells at pH 5.5. The highest k L (binding-site affinity) observed was 61.2 ± 3.0 L mmol -1 to dehydrated cells at pH 4.0. The pHs that maximized loading capacities and binding-site affinities were generally between 4.0 and 5.5, where the sum of free-proton and complexed-metal concentrations was near a minimum. Of additional importance, lead, zinc, and copper sorbed to viable cells at pH values as low as 1.5. Previous studies with other acidithiobacilli did not measure viable-cell sorption below pH 4.0. In separate experiments, desorption studies showed that far less copper was recovered from viable cells than any other metal or cell condition, suggesting that uptake may play an important role in copper sorption by At. caldus strain BC13. To reflect an applied system, the sorption of metal mixtures was also studied. In these experiments, lead, zinc, and copper sorption from a tertiary mixture were 40.2 ± 4.3%, 28.7 ± 3.8%, and 91.3 ± 3.0%, respectively, of that sorbed in single-metal systems.

  17. Sorption studies of radioelements on geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, John A.; Yui, Mikazu; Kitamura, Akira

    2007-11-01

    Batch sorption experiments have been carried out to study the sorption of uranium, technetium, curium, neptunium, actinium, protactinium, polonium, americium and plutonium onto bentonite, granodiorite and tuff. Mathematical modelling using the HARPHRQ program and the HATCHES database was carried out to predict the speciation of uranium and technetium in the equilibrated seawater, and neptunium, americium and plutonium in the rock equilibrated water. Review of the literature for thermodynamic data for curium, actinium, protactinium and polonium was carried out. Where sufficient data were available, predictions of the speciation and solubility were made. This report is a summary report of the experimental work conducted by AEA Technology during April 1991-March 1998, and the main results have been presented at Material Research Society Symposium Proceedings and published as proceedings of them. (author)

  18. Sorption and Transport of Diphenhydramine in Natural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, C. J.; Vulava, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical and related chemicals have been detected in streams and ground water sources throughout the world, as a result of sewage overflows, runoff, or sewage treatment facilities unequipped to remove trace levels of pharmaceuticals. Diphenhydramine- an antihistamine that is used to treat allergy and common cold symptoms, induce sleep, suppress cough, and treat motion sickness- is prominent among them. Diphenhydramine has a complex, highly polar organic structure including two benzene rings and an amine functional group. It has a solubility of 3.06 g/L and a pKa of 8.98. Recent studies have shown that diphenhydramine in streams disrupts the ecology by affecting the algal and bacterial biofilms present on the streambed. In streams, photosynthesis has been found to decrease by up to 99% and plant respiration has been inhibited. Diphenhydramine has also altered the types and numbers of bacteria found in streams. Its presence in contaminated stream bodies can result in contact with soils and sediment in the stream floodplain. The objective of this study is to measure sorption and transport behavior of diphenhydramine in natural soils and determine reactivity of soil components. These studies were conducted in the laboratory using natural soil collected from the Francis Marion National Forrest. Soil samples from A and B horizons of several soil series were characterized for physical and chemical properties: organic matter content ranged between 0.6-7.6%, clay content between 6-20%, and soil pH between 3.7-4.9. The B-horizon soils contain a higher amount of clay than the organic-rich A-horizon soils. Equilibrium sorption isotherms and reaction kinetic rates were measured using batch reactor experiments and chromatographic column experiments were conducted to measure transport behavior. Kinetic experiments showed that diphenhydramine sorbed more strongly to the clay-rich soils and reached equilibrium after seven days, compared to ten days in organic-rich soils. The

  19. Sorption and Transport of Ranitidine in Natural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, A. J.; Vulava, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    -horizon than to A-horizon soils, implying a strong preference for soils higher in clay content. Freundlich model (q = Kf Cn, where Kf and n are fitting parameters) fit the sorption isotherms. Glass chromatography columns packed with soil were used for column experiments. Ranitidine tracer was injected into saturated soil columns and the breakthrough tracer concentrations were plotted as a function of time. The shape of these breakthrough curves indicated that there were two distinct sorption sites on soils - organic matter and clay minerals - which influenced tracer transport. A two-region, nonequilibrium transport code was used to model the breakthrough curves. These experiments indicate that ranitidine sorbs more strongly to clay-rich soils than to organic-rich soils. The presence of amine functional groups in ranitidine's chemical structure results in its acidic behavior in the soil solution. In acidic solutions, the cationic form of ranitidine likely forms ionic bonds with negatively charged clay surfaces. Other components of ranitidine are likely to form covalent bonds with organic matter. The data shows the complex nature of ranitidine in interactions with environmental surfaces.

  20. The fate of silver nanoparticles in soil solution--Sorption of solutes and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Sondra; Metreveli, George; Peters, Andre; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Lang, Friederike

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles enter soils through various pathways. In the soil, they undergo various interactions with the solution and the solid phase. We tested the following hypotheses using batch experiments: i) the colloidal stability of Ag NP increases through sorption of soil-borne dissolved organic matter (DOM) and thus inhibits aggregation; ii) the presence of DOM suppresses Ag oxidation; iii) the surface charge of Ag NP governs sorption onto soil particles. Citrate-stabilized and bare Ag NPs were equilibrated with (colloid-free) soil solution extracted from a floodplain soil for 24h. Nanoparticles were removed through centrifugation. Concentrations of free Ag ions and DOC, the specific UV absorbance at a wavelength of 254 nm, and the absorption ratio α254/α410 were determined in the supernatant. Nanoparticle aggregation was studied using time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement following the addition of soil solution and 1.5mM Ca(2+) solution. To study the effect of surface charge on the adsorption of Ag NP onto soil particles, bare and citrate-stabilized Ag NP, differing in the zeta potential, were equilibrated with silt at a solid-to-solution ratio of 1:10 and an initial Ag concentration range of 30 to 320 μg/L. Results showed that bare Ag NPs sorb organic matter, with short-chained organic matter being preferentially adsorbed over long-chained, aromatic organic matter. Stabilizing effects of organic matter only come into play at higher Ag NP concentrations. Soil solution inhibits the release of Ag(+) ions, presumably due to organic matter coatings. Sorption to silt particles was very similar for the two particle types, suggesting that the surface charge does not control Ag NP sorption. Besides, sorption was much lower than in comparable studies with sand and glass surfaces. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Sorption mechanism of solvent vapors to coals; Sekitan eno yobai joki no shuchaku kiko no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, K.; Takanohashi, T.; Iino, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science

    1996-10-28

    With an objective to clarify the interactions between micropore structure of coal and solvent reagents, a sorption experiment was carried out under solvent saturated vapor pressure. Low-volatile bituminous coal, Pocahontas No. 3 coal, has the aromatic ring structure developed, and makes solvent more difficult to diffuse into coal, hence sorption amount is small. Methanol has permeated since its polarity is high. High-volatile bituminous coal, Illinois No. 6 coal, makes solvent penetrate easily, and the sorption amount was large with both of aromatic and polar solvents. Since brown coal, Beulah Zap coal, contains a large amount of oxygen, and hydrogen bonding is predominant, sorption amount of cyclohexane and benzene having no polarity is small. Methanol diffuses while releasing hydrogen bond due to its polarity, and its sorption amount is large. A double sorption model is available, which expresses the whole sorption amount as a sum of physical sorption amount and amount of permeation into coal. This model was applied when it explained successfully the sorption behavior of the solvents relative to coals, excepting some of the systems. However, also observed were such abnormal behavior as sorption impediment due to interactions between coal surface and solvents, and permeation impediment due to hydroxyl groups inside the coals. 1 ref., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Yucca Mountain Project far-field sorption studies and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, A.

    1990-09-01

    Batch sorption experiments in which radionuclides dissolved in groundwaters from Yucca Mountain were sorbed onto samples of crushed tuff have resulted in a substantial database of sorption coefficients for radionuclides of interest to the repository program. Although this database has been useful in preliminary evaluations of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for a nuclear waste repository, the database has limitations that must be addressed before it can be used for performance assessment calculations in support of a license application for a waste repository. The purpose of this paper is to: review the applicability of simple (constant) sorption coefficients in transport calculations; review and evaluate alternative methods for the derivation of sorption coefficients; summarize and evaluate the present YMP sorption database to identify areas of data sufficiency and significant data gaps; summarize our current understanding of pertinent sorption mechanisms and associated kinetic parameters; evaluate the significance to the YMP of potential problems in the experimental determination and field application of sorption coefficients as enumerated by the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1987) in its technical position paper on sorption; formulate and evaluate strategies for the resolution of NRC concerns regarding experimental problems; and formulate a position on the sorption coefficient database and the level of understanding of sorption mechanisms likely to be required in the licensing application. 75 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Chao, T.T.

    1973-01-01

    The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides was studied using synthesized samples of three members of the manganous manganite (birnessite) group, of different chemical composition and crystallinity, and a poorly organized ??-MnO2. All four oxides sorbed significant quantities of silver. The manganous manganites showed the greatest sorption (up to 0.5 moles silver/mole MnOx at pH 7) while the ??-MnO2 showed the least (0.3 moles silver/ mole MnOx at pH 7). Sorption of silver was adequately described by the Langmuir equation over a considerable concentration range. The relationship failed at low pH values and high equilibrium silver concentrations. The sorption capacity showed a direct relationship with pH. However, the rate of increase of sorption capacity decreased at the higher pH values. Silver sorption maxima. were not directly related to surface area but appeared to vary with the amount of occluded sodium and potassium present in the manganese oxide. The important processes involved in the uptake of silver by the four poorly crystallized manganese oxides ara considered to be surface exchange for manganese, potassium and sodium as well as exchange for structural manganese, potassium and sodium. ?? 1973.

  4. [Impact of biochar amendment on the sorption and dissipation of chlorantraniliprole in soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Yu, Xiang-Yang; Shen, Yaen; Zhang, Chao-Lan; Liu, Xian-Jin

    2012-04-01

    The effects of biochar amendment on sorption and dissipation of chlorantraniliprole (CAP) in 5 different agricultural soils were studied. Red gum wood (Eucalyptus spp.) derived biochar was amended into a black soil, a yellow soil, a red soil, a purplish soil, and a fluvo-aquic soil at the rate of 0.5% (by weight). The sorption and dissipation behaviors of CAP in soils with and without biochar amendment were measured by batch equilibration technique and dissipation kinetic experiment, respectively. The objective was to investigate the impact of biochar application on the environmental fate of pesticides in agricultural soils with different physical-chemical properties, and evaluate the potential ecological impacts of field application of biochar materials. The results showed that biochar application in soils could enhance the sorption of CAP, but the magnitudes were varied among soils with different properties. Amendment of 0.5% (by weight) biochar in the black soil, which have high content of organic matter (4.59%), resulted in an increase of sorption coefficient (K(d)) by 2.17%; while for the fluvo-aquic soil with organic matter content of 1.16%, amendment of biochar at the same level led to an increase of 139.13%. The sorption capacity of biochar was partially suppressed when biochar was mixed with soils. The calculated K(Fbiochar) of biochar after mixed in the black soil, yellow soil, red soil, purplish soil, and fluvo-aquic soil were decreased by 96.94%, 90.6%, 91.31%, 68.26%, and 34.59%, respectively, compared to that of the original biochar. The half-lives of CAP in black soil, yellow soil, red soil, purplish soil, and fluvo-aquic soil were 115.52, 133.30, 154.03, 144.41 and 169.06 d, respectively. In soils amended with biochar, the corresponding half-lives of CAP were extended by 20.39, 35.76, 38.51, 79.19, and 119.75 d, respectively. Similar to the effects of biochar on CAP sorption, in soil with higher content of organic matter, the retardation of CAP

  5. Study of sorption mechanisms of europium(3) and uranium(6) ions on clays : impact of silicates; Etude des mecanismes de retention des ions U(6) et Eu(3) sur les argiles: influence des silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal-Fouchard, A

    2002-11-01

    Bentonite clay has been selected as a potential buffer or backfill material in a number of disposal programmes for high level waste. In order to enhance the thermodynamic database of sorption phenomena at the solid-water interface, we have investigated sorption mechanisms of europium(III) and uranium(VI) ions onto montmorillonite and bentonite. Thermodynamic data were obtained for different ions concentrations, different background electrolytes and different ionic strengths. The structural identification of the surface complexes and sorption sites was carried out using two spectroscopies, XPS and TRLIFS, while sorption edges were performed using batch experiments. However, clays are complex minerals and in order to understand these sorption mechanisms we have studied europium(III) and uranium(VI) retention on a silica and an alumina because these solids are often considered as basic components of clays. The comparison of structural results shows that europium ions are significantly sorbed on permanently charged sites of clay until pH 7. But this ion is also sorbed on {identical_to}SiOH and {identical_to}AlOH sites of montmorillonite at pH higher than 6. Uranyl ions sorption on montmorillonite is mainly explained by retention of three complexes on {identical_to}SiOH sites. Moreover, we have shown that nitrate ions and dissolved silicates affect on uranium(VI) sorption mechanisms onto alumina. Nevertheless, uranyl ions sorption on montmorillonite and bentonite only decreases with increasing carbonate concentration. Finally, all the sorption edges were then modeled using these results and a surface complexation model (2 pK and constant capacitance models). (author)

  6. Sorption and desorption of insecticides in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Lord, K.A.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The sorption from aqueous solution of ten Brazilian soil types of four organochlorine, two organophosphorus and one carbamate insecticide was determined in the laboratory using gas chromatographic and radiometric techniques. Measurements showed that soils richest in organic matter, sorbed all substances except aldrin more strongly than the other soils. DDT was the most and aldrin the least sorbed organochlorine pesticide, being dieldrin sorbed two to four times more strongly than aldrin. Sorption of lindane varied in different soils. The organophosphate insecticides malathion and parathion were strongly sorbed in the soils richest in organic matter and weakly sorbed in the poorest soils heing moderately sorbed by the other soils. Sorption of carbaryl by all soils is small. Lindane was desorbed from the soil richest in organic matter and the extent of desorption was dependent on the sorption time. (Author) [pt

  7. Copper foliar sorption: study of cuticular uptake and penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamel, Andre; Bougie, Bernadette

    1977-01-01

    Results show that copper is easily retained by enzymatically isolated cuticles from pear leaves discs. The sorption is very rapid during the first hour, then progressively slower with increasing time. Upper and lower cuticles exhibit the same sorption when immersed, but the sorption by the upper internal surface is greater than that by the external surface. Sorption depends on the dates of sampling of the leaves and vegetal species. The variation of the process with concentrations is hyperbolic. The retained copper may be partially exchanged: from 16 to 95% after 24 hours of exchange in a cupric solution, as the Cu concentration increases from 10 -6 to 10 -2 M. The penetration of copper through astomatous cuticular discs is extremely reduced if there is pure water in the receiver unit [fr

  8. Sorption of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by konjac glucomannan beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Konjac glucomannan beads have been investigated as metal biosorbent for Pb(II) from aqueous solu-tions. The effect of contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration, and desorption were studied in batch experiments at 20℃±2℃. Maximum mental sorption was found to occur at initial pH 4.0―5.5. Kinetic studies revealed that the initial uptake was rapid and equilibrium was established in 3 h and that the data followed the prseudo-second order reaction. The equilibrium sorption data at initial pH 4.0 were described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models; however, Langmuir isotherm model has been found to provide the best correlation. The highest value of Langmuir maximum uptake (qmax) was found to be 105.71 mg·g-1. Similar Freundlich empirical constant (KF) was obtained to be 1.98 for lead. Adsorption-complexation may be involved in the sorption process of lead. Desorption experi- ments showed evidence that after two contacts neither HCl nor EDTA solutions were able to desorb lead from the konjac glucomannan beads, but the desorbtion efficacy of HCl solution was higher than EDTA solution. The results obtained show that konjac glucomannan beads may be used for the treat-ment of wastewater contaminated with lead.

  9. Lead sorption by waste biomass of hazelnut and almond shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Erol; Altun, Türkan; Cetin, Serpil; Iqbal Bhanger, M

    2009-08-15

    The potential to remove Pb(2+) ion from aqueous solutions using the shells of hazelnut (HNS) (Corylus avellana) and almond (AS) (Prunus dulcis) through biosorption was investigated in batch experiments. The main parameters influencing Pb(2+) ion sorption on HNS and AS were: initial metal ion concentration, amount of adsorbent, contact time and pH value of solution. The influences of initial Pb(2+) ion concentration (0.1-1.0mM), pH (2-9), contact time (10-240 min) and adsorbent amount (0.1-1.0 g) have been investigated. Equilibrium isotherms have been measured and modelled. Adsorption of Pb(2+) ions was in all cases pH-dependent showing a maximum at equilibrium pH values between 6.0 and 7.0, depending on the biomaterial, that corresponded to equilibrium pH values of 6.0 for HNS and 7.0 for AS. The equilibrium sorption capacities of HNS and AS were 28.18 and 8.08 mg/g for lead, respectively after equilibrium time of 2h. The adsorption data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the experimental result inferred that adsorption, chelation and ion exchange are major adsorption mechanisms for binding Pb(2+) ion to the sorbents.

  10. Influence of iron redox transformations on plutonium sorption to sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hixon, A.E.; Powell, B.A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States); Hu, Y.J.; Nitsche, H. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States); Kaplan, D.I. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Kukkadapu, R.K.; Qafoku, O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and reduction. A pH 6.3 vadose zone sediment containing iron oxides and iron-containing phyllosilicates was treated with various complexants (ammonium oxalate) and reductants (hydroxylamine hydrochloride and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)) to selectively leach and/or reduce iron oxide and phyllosilicate/clay Fe(III). {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to identify initial iron mineral composition of the sediment and monitor dissolution and reduction of iron oxides and reduction of phyllosilicate Fe(III). {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that the Fe-mineral composition of the untreated sediment is: 25-30% hematite, 60-65% small-particle/Al-goethite, and < 10% Fe(III) in phyllosilicate; there was no detectable Fe(II). Upon reduction with a strong chemical reductant (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate buffer), much of the hematite and goethite was removed. Partial reduction of phyllosilicate Fe(III) was evident in the sediments subjected to DCB treatment. Sorption of Pu(V) was monitored over one week for the untreated and each of five treated sediment fractions. Plutonium oxidation state speciation in the aqueous and solid phases was monitored using solvent extraction, coprecipitation, and XANES. The rate of sorption appears to correlate with the fraction of Fe(II) in the sediment (untreated or treated). Pu(V) was the only oxidation state measured in the aqueous phase, irrespective of treatment, whereas Pu(IV) and much smaller amounts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were measured in the solid phase. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) occurred in treated and untreated sediment samples; Pu(V) remained on untreated sediment surface for two days before reducing to Pu

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II sorption by Lagenaria vulgaris shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić-Stojanović Dragana-Linda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of lead, cadmium and zinc ions from aqueous solution by Lagenaria vulgaris shell biosorbent (LVB in batch system was investigated. The effect of relevant parameters such as contact time, biosorbent dosage and initial metal ions concentration was evaluated. The Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II sorption equilibrium (when 98% of initial metal ions were sorbed was attained within 15, 20 and 25 min, respectively. The pseudo first, pseudo-second order, Chrastil’s and intra-particle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second order kinetic model and intra-particle diffusion model. Removal efficiency of lead(II, cadmium(II and zinc(II ions rapidly increased with increasing biosorbent dose from 0.5 to 8.0 g dm-3. Optimal biosorbent dose was set to 4.0 g dm-3. An increase in the initial metal concentration increases the sorption capacity. The sorption data of investigated metal ions are fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. Langmuir model best fitted the equilibrium data (r2 > 0.99. Maximal sorption capacities of LVB for Pb(II, Cd(II and Zn(II at 25.0±0.5°C were 0.130, 0.103 and 0.098 mM g-1, respectively. The desorption experiments showed that the LVB could be reused for six cycles with a minimum loss of the initial sorption capacity.

  12. Sorption separation of Eu and As from single-component systems by Fe-modified biochar. Kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Soja, Gerhard; Michalekova-Richveisova, Barbora; Pipiska, Martin; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal; Duriska, Libor; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of carbonaceous materials in separation processes of radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids represents a burning issue in environmental and waste management. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effect of chemical modification of corncob-derived biochar by Fe-impregnations on sorption efficiency of Eu and As as a model compounds of cationic lanthanides and anionic metalloids. The biochar sample produced in slow pyrolysis process at 500 C before (BC) and after (IBC) impregnation process was characterized by elemental, FTIR, SEM-EDX analysis to confirm the effectiveness of Fe-impregnation process. The basic physico-chemical properties showed differences in surface area and pH values of BC- and IBC-derived sorbents. Sorption processes of Eu and As by BC and IBC were characterized as a time- and initial concentration of sorbate-dependent processes. The sorption equilibrium was reached for both sorbates in 24 h of contact time. Batch equilibrium experiments revealed the increased maximum sorption capacities (Q max ) of IBC for As about more than 20 times (Q max BC 0.11 and Q max IBC 2.26 mg g -1 ). Our study confirmed negligible effect of Fe-impregnation on sorption capacity of biochar for Eu (Q max BC 0.89 and Q max IBC 0.98 mg g -1 ). The iron-impregnation of biochar-derived sorbents can be utilized as a valuable treatment method to produce stable and more effective sorption materials for various xenobiotics separation from liquid wastes and aqueous solutions.

  13. Sorption separation of Eu and As from single-component systems by Fe-modified biochar. Kinetic and equilibrium study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fristak, Vladimir; Soja, Gerhard [Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Tulln (Austria). Energy Dept. Environmental Resources and Technologies; Michalekova-Richveisova, Barbora; Pipiska, Martin [Trnava Univ. (Slovakia). Dept. of Chemistry; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Duriska, Libor [Slovak Univ. of Technology in Bratislava, Trnava (Slovakia). Faculty of Materials Science and Technology; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Agricola y Bromatologia

    2017-03-15

    The utilization of carbonaceous materials in separation processes of radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids represents a burning issue in environmental and waste management. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effect of chemical modification of corncob-derived biochar by Fe-impregnations on sorption efficiency of Eu and As as a model compounds of cationic lanthanides and anionic metalloids. The biochar sample produced in slow pyrolysis process at 500 C before (BC) and after (IBC) impregnation process was characterized by elemental, FTIR, SEM-EDX analysis to confirm the effectiveness of Fe-impregnation process. The basic physico-chemical properties showed differences in surface area and pH values of BC- and IBC-derived sorbents. Sorption processes of Eu and As by BC and IBC were characterized as a time- and initial concentration of sorbate-dependent processes. The sorption equilibrium was reached for both sorbates in 24 h of contact time. Batch equilibrium experiments revealed the increased maximum sorption capacities (Q{sub max}) of IBC for As about more than 20 times (Q{sub max} BC 0.11 and Q{sub max} IBC 2.26 mg g{sup -1}). Our study confirmed negligible effect of Fe-impregnation on sorption capacity of biochar for Eu (Q{sub max} BC 0.89 and Q{sub max} IBC 0.98 mg g{sup -1}). The iron-impregnation of biochar-derived sorbents can be utilized as a valuable treatment method to produce stable and more effective sorption materials for various xenobiotics separation from liquid wastes and aqueous solutions.

  14. Pervaporation and sorption behavior of zeolite-filled polyethylene glycol hybrid membranes for the removal of thiophene species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ligang; Zhang, Yuzhong; Li, Hong

    2010-10-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-CuY zeolite hybrid membranes were prepared for sulfur removal from gasoline feed. The sorption and diffusion behavior of typical gasoline components through the hybrid membranes has been investigated by systematic studies of dynamic sorption curves. Influencing factors including feed temperature, permeate pressure, and zeolite content in the membranes on membrane performance have been evaluated. Immersion experiments results showed the preferential sorption of thiophene, which is key in fulfilling the separation of thiophene/hydrocarbon mixtures. The sorption, diffusion, and permeation coefficients of gasoline components in filled membranes are higher than those in unfilled membranes. Pervaporation (PV) and gas chromatography (GC) experiments results corresponded to the discussions on dynamic sorption curves. PV experiments showed that lower permeate pressure meant higher separation performance. The optimum temperature occurred at 383K, and an Arrhenius relationship existed between permeation flux and operating temperature. The CuY zeolite filling led to a significant increase of flux since the porous zeolite provides for more diffusion for small molecules in mixed matrix membranes. The sulfur enrichment factor increased first and then decreased with the increasing zeolite content, which was attributed to the combined influence of complexation force between CuY and thiophenes as well as the trade-off phenomenon between flux and selectivity. At 9 wt% CuY content, a higher permeation flux (3.19 kg/(m(2) h)) and sulfur enrichment factor (2.95) were obtained with 1190 microg/g sulfur content level in gasoline feed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of simplified desorption method to sorption study. (2) Sorption of neptunium (V) on montmorillonite-based mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the sorption behaviors of radionuclides in multi-mineral systems and the mutual effects of minerals on the sorption, this paper carried out the sorption and desorption experiments of neptunium(V) on montmorillonite-based two-mineral mixtures. The Np sorbed on montmorillonite at pH from 4 to 8 was desorbed with 1M KCl solutions, indicating that the sorption was cation exchange. The Np sorbed on apatite and calcite was nondesorbable with 1M KCl solutions, which is in harmony with the knowledge that Np forms strong complexes with the phosphate groups of apatite and the carbonate groups of calcite. This study utilized these clear distinguishes of the desorption behaviors for examining the two-mineral systems. In montmorillonite-apatite mixtures, the sorption on the montmorillonite was decreased and Np was accumulated on the apatite. In montmorillonite-calcite mixtures, the sorption on the montmorillonite was decreased due to the interference by the calcium and carbonate ions dissolved from calcite while no accumulation of Np to calcite was observed. (author)

  16. Investigation of strontium sorption on Kula volcanites treated with HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuetahyali, C.; Cetinkaya, B.; Acar, M. B.; Isik, N. O.; Cireli, I.

    2009-01-01

    In planning the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep geologic repository, consideration must be given to the ways in which radionuclides might leave the repository and migrate through the geosphere. In performance assessment studies the uptake of the radioactive elements by rock formations play an important role in retarding their aqueous phase migration. Sorption studies of radionuclides have been conducted to obtain data on the distribution coefficient (K d ) that is as an input parameter in the performance assessment of the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. In many studies, the sorption experiments employed natural soils and rocks as sorbents. Adsorption experiments were studied in a batch adsorption system using Sr(NO 3 ) 2 (Merck) solution. Strontium sorption on Kula Volcanites treated with HCl was investigated. Central Composite Design Method was used in the experiments. Sr adsorption was studied as a function of pH, contact time, concentration of adsorbate, and temperature.

  17. Sorption properties of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletskii, Aleksandr V

    2004-01-01

    The current status of research in sorption properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reviewed. The structural peculiarities of CNTs, determining their sorption characteristics, are considered. The mechanisms of sorption of gaseous and condensed substances by such structures are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the problem of using CNTs for storing hydrogen and other gaseous substances. Methods for filling CNTs with liquid materials, based on capillary phenomena and wetting the graphite surface of the CNT with liquids of various nature, are considered. Properties of 'peapods' formed as a result of filling single-walled CNTs with fullerene molecules are reviewed. Also considered are perspectives on the applied usage of the sorption properties of CNTs in electrochemical and fuel cells, and material storage devices, as well as for producing superminiature metallic conductors. (reviews of topical problems)

  18. Defluoridation by Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides: Sorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K.; Ferris, F.

    2009-05-01

    prediction of fluoride removal in a wide variety of groundwater systems. Sorption isotherms and affinity constants show the use of BIOS to be a promising technique for the remediation of fluoride in groundwater.

  19. The Crucial Role of the K+-Aluminium Oxide Interaction in K+-Promoted Alumina- and Hydrotalcite-Based Materials for CO2 Sorption at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walspurger, S.; Boels, L.; Cobden, P.D.; Elzinga, G.D.; Haije, W.G.; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Westerduinweg 3, 1755LE, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    CO2-free hydrogen can be produced from coal gasification power plants by pre-combustion decarbonisation and carbon dioxide capture. Potassium carbonate promoted hydrotalcite-based and alumina-based materials are cheap and excellent materials for high-temperature (300-500C) adsorption of CO2, and particularly promising in the sorption-enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) reaction. Alkaline promotion significantly improves CO2 reversible sorption capacity at 300-500C for both materials. Hydrotalcites and promoted hydrotalcites, promoted magnesium oxide and promoted -alumina were investigated by in situ analytical methods (IR spectroscopy, sorption experiments, X-ray diffraction) to identify structural and surface rearrangements. All experimental results show that potassium ions actually strongly interact with aluminium oxide centres in the aluminium-containing materials. This study unambiguously shows that potassium promotion of aluminium oxide centres in hydrotalcite generates basic sites which reversibly adsorb CO2 at 400C.

  20. Cs-137 sorption and desorption in relation to properties of 17 soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerpen, W.

    1988-01-01

    For Cs-137 sorption and desorption studies material of Ap and Ah horizons from 17 soils with wide varying soil properties was selected. The soils were: Podsol, Luvisol, Chernozem, Cambisol, Phaeozem, Arenosol, Gleysol and other soils. The Cs-137 sorption and desorption experiments were carried out in aqueous solution (20 g of soil) under standardized conditions for two reasons: (1) to determine the amounts of Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains as a function of different soils and (2) to evaluate the soil parameters which govern the sorption, desorption processes. Concerning the second point the sorption values, the amount of 137 Cs desorbed within four desorption cycles and the 137 Cs remains after four desorption cycles were correlated with pH, grain size, sorption capacity (CEC), and other soil properties. It will be shown that generally Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains depend primarily on the pH of the soil. The middle sand proved to be an indicator for the strenght of sorption, and desorption processes. Sorption and desorption studies lead to the same results as found in biotest experiments

  1. Soil Properties Control Glyphosate Sorption in Soils Amended with Birch Wood Biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite a contemporary interest in biochar application to agricultural fields to improve soil quality and long-term carbon sequestration, a number of potential side effects of biochar incorporation in field soils remain poorly understood, e.g., in relation to interactions...... with agrochemicals such as pesticides. In a fieldbased study at two experimental sites in Denmark (sandy loam soils at Risoe and Kalundborg), we investigated the influence of birch wood biochar with respect to application rate, aging (7–19 months), and physico- chemical soil properties on the sorption coefficient......, Kd (L kg−1), of the herbicide glyphosate. We measured Kd in equilibrium batch sorption experiments with triplicate soil samples from 20 field plots that received biochar at different application rates (0 to 100 Mg ha−1). The results showed that pure biochar had a lower glyphosate Kd value as compared...

  2. Spectroscopic investigations on sorption of uranium onto suspended bentonite. Effects of pH, ionic strength and complexing anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Parveen Kumar; Pathak, Priyanath; Mohapatra, Manoj; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Sambhunath; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Atomic and Molecular Physics Div.

    2015-06-01

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out under aerobic conditions to understand the sorption behavior of U(VI) onto bentonite clay under varying pH (2-8) and ionic strength (I = 0.01 - 1 M (NaClO{sub 4})) conditions. The influences of different complexing anions (1 x 10{sup -4} M) such as oxalic acid (ox), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), citric acid (cit), and humic acid (HA, 10 mg/L) on the sorption behavior were also investigated. The sorption of U(VI) increased with increasing pH up to pH 6 beyond which a decrease was attributed to the formation of anionic carbonate species. Marginal influence of the change in the ionic strength of the medium on the sorption profile of uranium suggested inner-sphere complexation onto the bentonite surface. The presence of humic acid showed interesting sorption profile with varying pH. Initially, there was an enhancement in the sorption with increased pH followed by a plateau and finally a decrease thereafter due to the formation of aqueous U(VI)-humate complexes. Spectroscopic studies such as UV spectrophotometry, luminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements were also performed to understand the changes in aqueous speciation of U(VI) ion. The luminescence yields of different aqueous U(VI) species followed the order: U(VI){sub Hydroxy} > U(VI){sub HumicAcid} > U(VI){sub carbonate} > U(VI){sub citrate}. The lower luminescence yield of U(VI)carbonate complex can be attributed to the strong dynamic quenching by carbonate at room temperature. The U(VI) samples shows two distinct life-time suggesting the presence of the different luminescent U(VI) species. Similar trend was observed for U(VI)-bentonite suspension in presence/absence of the complexing ligands. There was luminescence quenching for the sorbed U(VI) due to surface complexation. These observations were further supported by spectrophotometric measurements. EXAFS spectra of U(VI) samples were recorded in luminescence mode at the U L{sub 3

  3. Extended sorption partitioning models for pesticide leaching risk assessments: Can we improve upon the k{sub oc} concept?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.jarvis@slu.se

    2016-01-01

    Models used to assess leaching of pesticides to groundwater still rely on the sorption k{sub oc} value, even though its limitations have been known for several decades, especially for soils of low organic carbon content (i.e. subsoils). This is mainly because the general applicability of any improved model approach that is also simple enough to use for regulatory purposes has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to test and compare alternative models of sorption that could be useful in pesticide risk assessment and management. To this end, a database containing the results of batch sorption experiments for pesticides was compiled from published studies in the literature, which placed at least as much emphasis on measurements in subsoil horizons as in topsoil. The database includes 785 data entries from 34 different published studies and for 21 different active substances. Overall, the apparent k{sub oc} value, k{sub oc(app)}, roughly doubled as the soil organic carbon content decreased by a factor of ten. Nevertheless, in nearly half of the individual datasets, a constant k{sub oc} value proved to be an adequate model. Further analysis showed that significant increases in k{sub oc(app)} in subsoil were found primarily for the more weakly adsorbing compounds (k{sub oc} values < ca. 100–200 L kg{sup −1}) and that sorption to clay in loamy and clayey-textured subsoil horizons was the main cause. Tests with the MACRO model demonstrated that sorption to clay minerals may significantly affect the outcome of regulatory exposure and risk assessments for leaching to groundwater. The k{sub oc} concept currently used in leaching models should therefore be replaced by an alternative approach that gives a more realistic representation of pesticide sorption in subsoil. The two alternative models tested in this study appear to have widespread applicability and are also simple enough to parameterize for this purpose. - Highlights: • A database was collated

  4. A suggested approach toward measuring sorption and applying sorption data to repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundberg, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of radionuclide migration for the purpose of assessing the safety of a nuclear waste repository will be based on a collective knowledge of hydrologic and geochemical properties of the surrounding rock and groundwater. This knowledge along with assumption about the interactions of radionuclides with groundwater and minerals form the scientific basis for a model capable of accurately predicting the repository's performance. Because the interaction of radionuclides in geochemical systems is known to be complicated, several fundamental and empirical approaches to measuring the interaction between radionuclides and the geologic barrier have been developed. The approaches applied to the measurement of sorption involve the use of pure minerals, intact, or crushed rock in dynamic and static experiments. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. There is no single best method for providing sorption data for performance assessment models which can be applied without invoking information derived from multiple experiments. 53 refs., 12 figs

  5. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of bovine leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhfakh, Rihab; Mihoubi, Daoued; Kechaou, Nabil

    2018-04-01

    This study was aimed at the determination of bovine leather moisture sorption characteristics using a static gravimetric method at 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C. The curves exhibit type II behaviour according to the BET classification. The sorption isotherms fitting by seven equations shows that GAB model is able to reproduce the equilibrium moisture content evolution with water activity for moisture range varying from 0.02 to 0.83 kg/kg d.b (0.9898 thermodynamic properties such as isosteric heat of sorption, sorption entropy, spreading pressure, net integral enthalpy and entropy. Net isosteric heat of sorption and differential entropy were evaluated through direct use of moisture isotherms by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and used to investigate the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. Both sorption enthalpy and entropy for desorption increase to a maximum with increasing moisture content, and then decrease sharply with rising moisture content. Adsorption enthalpy decreases with increasing moisture content. Whereas, adsorption entropy increases smoothly with increasing moisture content to a maximum of 6.29 J/K.mol. Spreading pressure increases with rising water activity. The net integral enthalpy seemed to decrease and then increase to become asymptotic. The net integral entropy decreased with moisture content increase.

  6. Thermodynamic parameters and sorption of U(VI) on ACSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donat, R.; Cilgi, G.K.; Cetisli, H.; Aytas, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the sorption properties for U(VI) by alginate coated CaSO 4 x 2H 2 O sepiolite and calcined diatomite earth (Kieselguhr) (ACSD). The removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution by sorption onto ACSF in a single component system with various contact times, pH, temperatures, and initial concentrations of U(VI) was investigated. The sorption patterns of uranium on the composite adsorbent followed the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkhevic (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich, Langmuir, and D-R models have been applied and the data correlated well with Freundlich model and that the sorption was physical in nature (sorption energy, E a = 17.05 kJ/mol). The thermodynamic parameters such as variation of enthalpy ΔH, variation of entropy ΔS and variation of Gibbs free energy ΔG were calculated from the slope and intercept of lnK 0 vs. 1/T plots. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH ads = 31.83 kJ/mol, ΔS ads = 167 J/mol x K, ΔGdeg ads (293.15 K) = -17.94 kJ/mol) showed the endothermic heat of sorption and the feasibility of the process. The thermodynamics of U(VI) ion/ACSD system indicates the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. It was noted that an increase in temperature resulted in a higher uranium loading per unit weight of the adsorbent. (author)

  7. Sericitization of illite decreases sorption capabilities for cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Hwang, J.; Han, W.; Shin, W.

    2017-12-01

    Release of radioactive cesium (137Cs) to environment occurs through nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The concern is that 137Cs has long half-life (t1/2 = 30.2 years) with chemical toxicity and γ-radiation. Sorption techniques are mainly applied to remove 137Cs from aquatic environment. In particular, it has been known well that clay minerals (e.g, illite) are effective and economical sorbents for 137Cs. Illite that was formed by hydrothermal alteration exist with sericite through "sericitization" processes. Although sericite has analogous composition and lattice structure with illite, the sorptive characteristics of illite and sericite for radiocesium could be different. This study evaluated the effects of hydrothermal alteration and weathering process on illite cesium sorption properties. Natural illite samples were collected at Yeongdong area in Korea as the world-largest hydrothermal deposits for illite. The samples were analyzed by XRF, XRD and SEM-EDX to determine mineralogy, chemical compositions and morphological characteristics, and used for batch sorption experiments. The Yeongdong illites predominantly consist of illite, sericite, quartz, and albite. The measured cesium sorption distribution coefficients (Kd,Cs) of reference illite and sericite were approximately 6000 and 400 L kg-1 at low aqueous concentration (Cw 10-7 M), respectively. In contrast, Kd,Cs values for the Yeongdong illite samples ranged from 500 to 4000 L kg-1 at identical concentration. The observed narrow and sharp XRD peak of sericite indicated that the sericite has better crystallinity compared to illite. These experimental results suggested that sericitization processes of illite can decline the sorption capabilities of illite for cesium under various hydrothermal conditions. In particular, weathering experiments raised the cesium sorption to illite, which seems to be related to the increase of preferential sorption sites for cesium through crystallinity destruction

  8. The ternary sorption system U(VI)-phosphate-silica explained by spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Stockmann, Madlen; Heim, Karsten; Mueller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Comarmond, M.J.; Payne, T.E. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights (Australia); Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    Spectroscopic data of sorption processes potentially provide direct impact on Surface Complexation Modelling (SCM) approaches. Based on spectroscopic data of the ternary sorption system U(VI)/phosphate/silica strongly suggesting the formation of a precipitate as the predominant surface process, SCM calculations accurately reproduced results from classical batch experiments.

  9. Sorption of radionuclides on geological samples from the Bradwell, Elstow, Fulbeck and Killingholme site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Coates, H.A.; Green, A.; Littleboy, A.K.

    1988-06-01

    The sorption of chloride, caesium, calcium, nickel and americium on geological samples collected during the site investigations at Bradwell, Elstow, Fulbeck and Killingholme has been studied. Through-diffusion and batch sorption techniques were used and experiments were designed to give a direct comparison between the sorptive behaviour of material from each site. (author)

  10. The ternary sorption system U(VI)-phosphate-silica explained by spectroscopy and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Stockmann, Madlen; Heim, Karsten; Mueller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz; Steudtner, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic data of sorption processes potentially provide direct impact on Surface Complexation Modelling (SCM) approaches. Based on spectroscopic data of the ternary sorption system U(VI)/phosphate/silica strongly suggesting the formation of a precipitate as the predominant surface process, SCM calculations accurately reproduced results from classical batch experiments.

  11. Sorption and release of organics by primary, anaerobic, and aerobic activated sludge mixed with raw municipal wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Modin

    Full Text Available New activated sludge processes that utilize sorption as a major mechanism for organics removal are being developed to maximize energy recovery from wastewater organics, or as enhanced primary treatment technologies. To model and optimize sorption-based activated sludge processes, further knowledge about sorption of organics onto sludge is needed. This study compared primary-, anaerobic-, and aerobic activated sludge as sorbents, determined sorption capacity and kinetics, and investigated some characteristics of the organics being sorbed. Batch sorption assays were carried out without aeration at a mixing velocity of 200 rpm. Only aerobic activated sludge showed net sorption of organics. Sorption of dissolved organics occurred by a near-instantaneous sorption event followed by a slower process that obeyed 1st order kinetics. Sorption of particulates also followed 1st order kinetics but there was no instantaneous sorption event; instead there was a release of particles upon mixing. The 5-min sorption capacity of activated sludge was 6.5±10.8 mg total organic carbon (TOC per g volatile suspend solids (VSS for particulate organics and 5.0±4.7 mgTOC/gVSS for dissolved organics. The observed instantaneous sorption appeared to be mainly due to organics larger than 20 kDa in size being sorbed, although molecules with a size of about 200 Da with strong UV absorbance at 215-230 nm were also rapidly removed.

  12. Effect of organic fertilizers derived dissolved organic matter on pesticide sorption and leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Kun [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States) and Northeast Institute of Geography and Agro-ecology, CAS, Harbin 150040 (China)]. E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.edu; Torello, William A. [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Incorporation of organic fertilizers/amendments has been, and continues to be, a popular strategy for golf course turfgrass management. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from these organic materials may, however, facilitate organic chemical movement through soils. A batch equilibrium technique was used to evaluate the effects of organic fertilizer-derived DOM on sorption of three organic chemicals (2,4-D, naphthalene and chlorpyrifos) in USGA (United States Golf Association) sand, a mixed soil (70% USGA sand and 30% native soil) and a silt loam soil (Typic Fragiochrept). DOM was extracted from two commercial organic fertilizers. Column leaching experiments were also performed using USGA sand. Sorption experiments showed that sorption capacity was significantly reduced with increasing DOM concentration in solution for all three chemicals. Column experimental results were consistent with batch equilibrium data. These results suggest that organic fertilizer-derived DOM might lead to enhanced transport of applied chemicals in turf soils. - Dissolved organic matter could result in enhanced transport of chemicals applied to turf.

  13. Effect of organic fertilizers derived dissolved organic matter on pesticide sorption and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Kun; Xing Baoshan; Torello, William A.

    2005-01-01

    Incorporation of organic fertilizers/amendments has been, and continues to be, a popular strategy for golf course turfgrass management. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from these organic materials may, however, facilitate organic chemical movement through soils. A batch equilibrium technique was used to evaluate the effects of organic fertilizer-derived DOM on sorption of three organic chemicals (2,4-D, naphthalene and chlorpyrifos) in USGA (United States Golf Association) sand, a mixed soil (70% USGA sand and 30% native soil) and a silt loam soil (Typic Fragiochrept). DOM was extracted from two commercial organic fertilizers. Column leaching experiments were also performed using USGA sand. Sorption experiments showed that sorption capacity was significantly reduced with increasing DOM concentration in solution for all three chemicals. Column experimental results were consistent with batch equilibrium data. These results suggest that organic fertilizer-derived DOM might lead to enhanced transport of applied chemicals in turf soils. - Dissolved organic matter could result in enhanced transport of chemicals applied to turf

  14. Benzene and MTBE Sorption in Fine Grain Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Bautista, R. M.; Lenczewski, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    The practice of adding methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to gasoline started in the late 1970s and increased dramatically in the 1990s. MTBE first was added as a substitute for tetra-ethyl lead then later as a fuel oxygenate. Although the use of MTBE has resulted in significant reduction in air pollution, it has become a significant groundwater contaminant due to its high solubility in water, high environmental mobility, and low potential for biodegradation. A recent report (1999-2001) by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in collaboration with United State Geological Survey and the Oregon Health and Science University found that MTBE was the second most frequent detected volatile organic compound in groundwater. In Illinois, MTBE has been found in 26 of the 1,800 public water supplies. MTBE has also been blended in Mexico into two types of gasoline sold in the country by the state oil company (PEMEX) but is not monitored in groundwater at this time. Early research on MTBE considered it unable to adsorb to soils and sediments, however, by increasing the organic matter and decreasing the size of the grains (silts or clays) this may increase sorption. The objective of this study is to determine if fine grained materials have the potential for sorption of MTBE due to its high specific surface area (10-700 m 2/g) and potentially high organic matter (0.5-3.8%). The experiment consisted of sorption isotherms to glacial tills from DeKalb, Illinois and lacustrine clays from Chalco, Mexico. Experiments were performed with various concentrations of MTBE and benzene (10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 ug/L) at 10° C and 25° C. Results showed a range of values for the distribution coefficient (Kd, linear model). At 10° C the Kd value for MTBE was 0.187 mL/g for lacustrine clay while the glacial loess had a value of 0.009 mL/g. The highest Kd values with MTBE were 0.2859 mL/g for organic rich lacustrine clays and 0.014 mL/g for glacial loess at 25° C. The highest

  15. Landfill leachate effects on sorption of organic micropollutants onto aquifer materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Pfeffer, Fred M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of dissolved organic carbon as present in landfill leachate, on the sorption of organic micropollutants in aquifer materials was studied by laboratory batch and column experiments involving 15 non-polar organic chemicals, 5 landfill leachates and 4 aquifer materials of low organic carbon......, the effect of landfill leachate on retardation of organic micropollutants in aquifer material seems limited....... content. The experiments showed that hydrophobic organic micropollutants do partition into dissolved organic carbon found in landfill leachate potentially increasing their mobility. However, landfill leachate interacted with aquifer materials apparently increases the sorbent affinity for the hydrophobic...

  16. Chromium(VI) sorption efficiency of acid-activated banana peel over organo-montmorillonite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Anam; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Ok, Yong Sik; Murtaza, Ghulam; Shahid, Muhammad; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Li, Dongwei; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-07-03

    In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont) as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration at a sorbent dose of 4 g L -1 and at 20 ± 1°C in aqueous solutions. In sorption edge experiments, maximum Cr(VI) removal was obtained at pH 3 after 2 hours by AABP and O-mont (88% and 69%). Sorption isotherm data showed that the sorption capacity of AABP was higher than O-mont (15.1 vs. 6.67 mg g -1 , respectively, at pH 4). Freundlich and Langmuir models provided the best fits to describe Cr(VI) sorption onto AABP (R 2 = 0.97) and O-mont (R 2 = 0.96). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy elucidated that for AABP mainly the -OH, -COOH, -NH 2 , and for O-mont intercalated amines and -OH surface functional groups were involved in Cr(VI) sorption. The scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses, although partly, indicate that the (wt. %) proportion of cations (e.g., Ca, Mg) in AABP decreased after Cr(VI) sorption. This may be due to ion exchange of chromite (Cr(III)) (produced from Cr(VI) reduction) with cationic elements in AABP. Also, Cr(VI) desorption (using phosphate solution) from AABP was lower (29%) than that from O-mont (51%) up to the third regeneration cycle. This bench scale comparative study highlights that the utilization of widely available and low-cost acid-activated biomaterials has a greater potential than organo-clays for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous media. However, future studies are warranted to precisely delineate different mechanisms of Cr(VI) sorption/reduction by acid-activated biomaterials and organo-clays.

  17. Sorption of Arsenic from Desalination Concentrate onto Drinking Water Treatment Solids: Operating Conditions and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions with high salinity is required for safe disposal of the concentrate and protection of the environment. The use of drinking water treatment solids (DWTS to remove arsenic from reverse osmosis (RO concentrate was studied by batch sorption experiments. The impacts of solution chemistry, contact time, sorbent dosage, and arsenic concentration on sorption were investigated, and arsenic sorption kinetics and isotherms were modeled. The results indicated that DWTS were effective in removing arsenic from RO concentrate. The arsenic sorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Multilayer adsorption was simulated by Freundlich equation. The maximum sorption capacities were calculated to be 170 mg arsenic per gram of DWTS. Arsenic sorption was enhanced by surface precipitation onto the DWTS due to the high amount of calcium in the RO concentrate and the formation of ternary complexes between arsenic and natural organic matter (NOM bound by the polyvalent cations in DWTS. The interactions between arsenic and NOM in the solid phase and aqueous phase exhibited two-sided effects on arsenic sorption onto DWTS. NOM in aqueous solution hindered the arsenic sorption onto DWTS, while the high organic matter content in solid DWTS phase enhanced arsenic sorption.

  18. Investigation of solution chemistry effects on sorption behavior of radionuclide 64Cu(II) on illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitong Yang; Guodong Sheng; Zhiqiang Guo; Yubing Sun; Donglin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of various environmental factors such as contact time, pH, ionic strength, coexisting electrolyte ions, humic substances and temperature on the sorption behavior of illite towards 64 Cu(II). The results indicated that 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite achieved equilibrium quickly. The pH- and ionic strength-dependent sorption suggested that 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite was dominated by ion exchange or outer-sphere surface complexation at pH 7. A positive effect of humic substances on 64 Cu(II) sorption was found at pH 6.5. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of 64 Cu(II) at three different temperatures of 293, 313, and 333 K. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , and ΔG 0 ) of 64 Cu(II) sorption on illite were calculated from the temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results indicated that the sorption of 64 Cu(II) on illite was endothermic and spontaneous. From the experimental results, it is possible to conclude that illite has good potentialities for cost-effective treatments of 64 Cu(II)-contaminated wastewaters. (author)

  19. Sorption of activation products on London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Littleboy, A.K.; Pilkington, N.J. (AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    The sortpion of a series of activation-product radionuclides onto London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel from the nuclear reactor sites at Bradwell and Dungeness, has been examined. Batch sorption and through-diffusion experiments with clay determined chlorine as the chloride ion to be effectively non-sorbing; calcium to be weakly sorbing, whereas cobalt, nickel, niobium and samarium were moderately to strongly sorbing and silver was strongly sorbing. Distribution ratios (R[sub D] values) for Nb, Sm and Ag were found to have a strong dependence on the liquid-solid separation technique employed. The presence of high concentrations of calcium hydroxide led to lower values of R[sub D] for radioactive Ca but higher R[sub D] values for Sm and Ag. The sorption of Ni showed no apparent dependence on groundwater composition at low levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The values of R[sub D] for Co decreased as the DOC content was increased by addition of humic materials. Batch sorption studies with aquifer gravel demonstrated that Ca is weakly sorbing whereas Nb, Ag and Eu are moderately to strongly sorbing. R[sub D] values for Ca and for Ag under neutral pH conditions show little sensitivity to the liquid/solid separation technique used. However, R[sub D] values for Nb and Eu under neutral pH conditions and for Ag in alkaline solution (pH = 11 - 12) show a marked effect. The aquifer gravel was found to be highly inhomogeneous unlike the clay and sorption was greatest on samples with a high proportion of sand, reflecting the clay mineral content. (orig.).

  20. Sorption of activation products on London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Littleboy, A.K.; Pilkington, N.J.

    1992-01-01

    The sortpion of a series of activation-product radionuclides onto London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel from the nuclear reactor sites at Bradwell and Dungeness, has been examined. Batch sorption and through-diffusion experiments with clay determined chlorine as the chloride ion to be effectively non-sorbing; calcium to be weakly sorbing, whereas cobalt, nickel, niobium and samarium were moderately to strongly sorbing and silver was strongly sorbing. Distribution ratios (R D values) for Nb, Sm and Ag were found to have a strong dependence on the liquid-solid separation technique employed. The presence of high concentrations of calcium hydroxide led to lower values of R D for radioactive Ca but higher R D values for Sm and Ag. The sorption of Ni showed no apparent dependence on groundwater composition at low levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The values of R D for Co decreased as the DOC content was increased by addition of humic materials. Batch sorption studies with aquifer gravel demonstrated that Ca is weakly sorbing whereas Nb, Ag and Eu are moderately to strongly sorbing. R D values for Ca and for Ag under neutral pH conditions show little sensitivity to the liquid/solid separation technique used. However, R D values for Nb and Eu under neutral pH conditions and for Ag in alkaline solution (pH = 11 - 12) show a marked effect. The aquifer gravel was found to be highly inhomogeneous unlike the clay and sorption was greatest on samples with a high proportion of sand, reflecting the clay mineral content. (orig.)

  1. Removal of Copper (II Ions in Aqueous Solutions by Sorption onto Alkali Activated Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmayanti Lita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is a particulate material produced from coal combustion power plants with major components are silica, alumina, iron oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, and carbon which are ideal for metal adsorbents. The potential use of fly ash in the wastewater treatment process is obvious because it can be obtained cheaply in large quatities and it can be used as an adsorbent. However, fly ash still shows lower adsorption capacity unless it is activated. In this study, fly ash activated by NaOH 14 M and KOH 14 M solutions. The batch experiments were carried out to study the sorption of copper ions from aqueous on alkali activated fly ash. The influence of initial concentration and contact time were examined at constant pH and dose of adsorbent. The sorption capacity of copper ions increased with the initial concentration and contact time. The sorption capacities followed the order Na1>Ka1>FA. The adsorption isotherm model exhibited that the Langmuir model is very suitable with copper ions adsorption onto fly ash and alkali activated fly ash. Kinetic study shows that adsorption of copper ions onto FA, Na1, and Ka1 follows the pseudo second-order kinetics.

  2. Sensitivity of Deep Soil Organic Carbon Age to Sorption, Transport and Microbial Interactions - Insights from a Calibrated Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, B.; Schrumpf, M.; Reichstein, M.

    2013-12-01

    . First results of a calibration against SOC, SO14C, MOC and MO14C profiles (mineral associated organic carbon, density fraction >1.6 g cm-3) of a Haplic Podzol of the Waldstein site (Germany) show that we can use the maximum sorption capacity (qmax) estimated from batch sorption experiments to parameterize the dynamic Langmuir sorption equation. qmax could potentially be extrapolated to other soil profiles based on relations to iron and aluminum oxide contents. Although we are able to capture the secondary maximum of SOC contents in the Bh horizon with qmax from batch sorption experiments, our results indicate that the adsorption and desorption rates retrieved from batch sorption experiments are too fast to explain the low Δ14C values of the MOC. This could point to other processes apart from DOC sorption that trigger stabilization by organo-mineral associations with a stronger apparent irreversibility (e.g. inclusion in small pores). Alternatively, the conditions of batch sorption experiments (constant shaking in centrifuge tubes) might not be representative for in situ sorption conditions. Overall, we show how effective decomposition rates and 14C ages readily emerge from a combination of known stabilizing and destabilizing mechanisms and we discuss how to identify these processes with a model-data fusion framework.

  3. Sorption behavior of cobalt on manganese dioxide, smectite and their mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption behavior of cobalt on manganese dioxide, the clay mineral smectite and mixtures of the two was studied by batch type sorption/desorption experiments at neutral pH. Sorption behavior was examined by sequential extraction, in which the sorbents were contacted first with a 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 solution and then with a hydroxylamine solution (NH 2 OH of 1 M with 25 weight % CH 3 COOH). More than 70% of the sorbed cobalt was desorbed from smectite with a 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 solution: about 15% of the cobalt remained on the smectite after treatment with the hydroxylamine solution. Less than 1% of the remaining cobalt was desorbed from manganese dioxide with a 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 solution; with the hydroxylamine solution, all was desorbed. In mixtures of MnO 2 and smectite that were formulated to sorb equal amounts of cobalt regardless of the MnO 2 /smectite ratio in the mixture, less than 5% of the sorbed cobalt was desorbed by treatment with 1 M CH 3 COONH 4 . The fraction of the cobalt desorbed by treatment with the hydroxylamine solution increased with increased MnO 2 in the mixtures. The fraction of the cobalt sorbed on MnO 2 in the mixture was estimated from the desorption experiments. The results showed that higher fractions were sorbed onto MnO 2 than were estimated by the weighted averages of distribution coefficients for MnO 2 and smectite. Therefore, in minerals of the mixture, manganese dioxide is a more important component than smectite for the sorption of cobalt. (orig.)

  4. Validation of RNAi Silencing Efficiency Using Gene Array Data shows 18.5% Failure Rate across 429 Independent Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyi Munkácsy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No independent cross-validation of success rate for studies utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA for gene silencing has been completed before. To assess the influence of experimental parameters like cell line, transfection technique, validation method, and type of control, we have to validate these in a large set of studies. We utilized gene chip data published for siRNA experiments to assess success rate and to compare methods used in these experiments. We searched NCBI GEO for samples with whole transcriptome analysis before and after gene silencing and evaluated the efficiency for the target and off-target genes using the array-based expression data. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess silencing efficacy and Kruskal–Wallis tests and Spearman rank correlation were used to evaluate study parameters. All together 1,643 samples representing 429 experiments published in 207 studies were evaluated. The fold change (FC of down-regulation of the target gene was above 0.7 in 18.5% and was above 0.5 in 38.7% of experiments. Silencing efficiency was lowest in MCF7 and highest in SW480 cells (FC = 0.59 and FC = 0.30, respectively, P = 9.3E−06. Studies utilizing Western blot for validation performed better than those with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR or microarray (FC = 0.43, FC = 0.47, and FC = 0.55, respectively, P = 2.8E−04. There was no correlation between type of control, transfection method, publication year, and silencing efficiency. Although gene silencing is a robust feature successfully cross-validated in the majority of experiments, efficiency remained insufficient in a significant proportion of studies. Selection of cell line model and validation method had the highest influence on silencing proficiency.

  5. Sorption of environmentally relevant radionuclides (U(VI), Np(V)) and lanthanides (Nd(III)) on feldspar and mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Constanze

    2015-11-05

    obtained sorption curves exhibit a similar characteristic for orthoclase and muscovite. As expected Nd(III) shows the highest amount of sorption followed by U(VI) and finally Np(V). With spectroscopic investigations of the aquatic U(VI) solution in presence of Ca{sup 2+}, the Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex could be identified. Furthermore, with spectroscopic methods the U(VI) surface species onto orthoclase could be characterized, of which a novel uranium-carbonate surface species was observed. Based on the results of batch experiments and spectroscopic methods new SCM parameters for the sorption of U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III) onto orthoclase and for Np(V) and Nd(III) onto muscovite could be derived. SCM parameters for U(VI) sorption onto muscovite confirmed earlier investigations. The obtained SCM parameters increase the amount of data available for sorption processes onto feldspar and mica. With this the relevance of feldspars for the sorption of actinides and lanthanides could be shown. Thus, this work contributes to a better understanding of interactions of actinides and lanthanides, in particular U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III), with mineral phases ubiquitous in the environment. This in turn adds confidence to long-term safety assessments essential for the protection of humans and the environment from the hazards of radioactive waste.

  6. Sorption of environmentally relevant radionuclides (U(VI), Np(V)) and lanthanides (Nd(III)) on feldspar and mica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    obtained sorption curves exhibit a similar characteristic for orthoclase and muscovite. As expected Nd(III) shows the highest amount of sorption followed by U(VI) and finally Np(V). With spectroscopic investigations of the aquatic U(VI) solution in presence of Ca 2+ , the Ca 2 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 complex could be identified. Furthermore, with spectroscopic methods the U(VI) surface species onto orthoclase could be characterized, of which a novel uranium-carbonate surface species was observed. Based on the results of batch experiments and spectroscopic methods new SCM parameters for the sorption of U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III) onto orthoclase and for Np(V) and Nd(III) onto muscovite could be derived. SCM parameters for U(VI) sorption onto muscovite confirmed earlier investigations. The obtained SCM parameters increase the amount of data available for sorption processes onto feldspar and mica. With this the relevance of feldspars for the sorption of actinides and lanthanides could be shown. Thus, this work contributes to a better understanding of interactions of actinides and lanthanides, in particular U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III), with mineral phases ubiquitous in the environment. This in turn adds confidence to long-term safety assessments essential for the protection of humans and the environment from the hazards of radioactive waste.

  7. The sorption of uranium and technetium on bentonite, tuff and granodiorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Cowper, M.M.; Heath, T.G.; Tweed, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    A combined experimental and modeling study of the sorption of uranium and technetium on geological materials has been carried out as part of the PNC program to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository in Japan. Batch sorption experiments have been performed in order to study the sorption of uranium and technetium onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from both equilibrated seawater and de-ionized water under strongly-reducing and non-reducing conditions. A preliminary study of the sorption of uranium on mineral surfaces in granodiorite has also been undertaken using a nuclear microprobe. Mathematical modeling using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database has been carried out in order to interpret the results of the sorption experiments

  8. Sorption mechanisms of chromate with coprecipitated ferrihydrite in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamun, Abdullah Al, E-mail: mamun@toki.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Morita, Masao, E-mail: masao.swimer@akane.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Matsuoka, Mitsuaki, E-mail: m-matsuoka@aoni.waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Tokoro, Chiharu, E-mail: tokoro@waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Coprecipitation showed twice the sorption density of simple adsorption at pH 5. • Mechanism shift from outer- to inner-sphere surface complexation at high Cr/Fe. • In coprecipitation the mechanism shift occurs at lower Cr/Fe ratios than adsorption. • Higher-molar-ratio bidentate binuclear Cr−Fe bonds; yielded ferrihydrite expansion. - Abstract: Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) attracted researchers’ interest for its toxicity, natural availability and removal difficulty. Nevertheless, its sorption mechanism is not clearly understood yet. In this work, we elucidated the sorption mechanism of the co-precipitation of chromates with ferrihydrite through quantitative analysis. The influence of Cr/Fe molar ratio on sorption was investigated by zeta potential measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray adsorption fine-structure analysis (XAFS). Coprecipitation at pH 5 showed almost twice the sorption density of adsorption at pH 5. In co-precipitation, a shift of the XRD peak due to inner-sphere sorption of chromate was observed at Cr/Fe molar ratio 0.5. For adsorption, the same peak shift was confirmed at Cr/Fe molar ratio of 1. Zeta potential at pH 5 suggested that the sorption mechanism changed at Cr/Fe molar ratio 0.25 for coprecipitation and at Cr/Fe molar ratio of 1 for adsorption. Fitting of Cr and Fe K-edge extended X-ray adsorption fine-structure suggested that ferrihydrite immobilized Cr(VI) via outer sphere surface complexation for lower Cr/Fe ratios and via inner-sphere surface complexation for higher molar ratios. At higher molar ratios, bidentate binuclear Cr−Fe bonds were well established, thus resulting in the expansion of the ferrihydrite structure.

  9. Study of sorption of platinum metals, gold and silver by phosphonium hydroxide antonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaybergenov, U.; Tajibaev, D.; Yuldasheva, K.T.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study and to use a phosphonium hydroxide anionite for concentrating of trace amounts of platinum metals, gold and silver from the mixed solutions composed of copper, nickel, cobalt, iron and zinc. The experiments were done using radionuclides of determined and interfered elements. Conditions for sorption concentrating of the noble metals by phosphonium hydroxide were determined by the selectivity of the phosphonium hydroxide to the noble metals from acid solutions. A noble metal sorption degree was observed from the experiments to be rather high at the acid concentration level of 0.1-0.5 M. At higher than 0.5 M acid concentration sorption activity decreased. With increase of chlorine acid-concentration sorption of palladium was observed to considerably decrease, while iridium sorption was increased. The latter fact can be caused by lowering of hydration of iridium ions. A considerable decrease of capability of the noble metal sorption from nitric acid solutions was observed. It is possible that HNO 3 anions are strongly bound with the anionite functional group. Thus, nitric acid reduces sorption of the noble metals in the following order: Ir>Ru>Pd>Pt>Os, and it does not have effect on the sorption activity of Au and Ag. Increase of H 2 SO 4 concentration in the solution has slightly reduced noble metal sorption activity. Copper, nickel, iron and other metals accompanying the noble metals, at concentration ratio of 1:1000 have resulted in decrease of sorption activity of the noble metals, although sorption of iridium was increased in the presence of copper, silver and nickel. We suggest that copper, silver and nickel have formed the complex functional compounds, which can probably undergo an anion exchange

  10. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Yamawaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium-handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reator or experimental room is a matter of problem for safe control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate this tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were experimentally studied.(1)Sorption experiments were conducted using columns packed with cement particles of different sizes. From the analysis of the breakthrough curve, tritium diffusivity in macropores and microparticles were evaluated.(2)From the short-term tritium release experiments, effective desorption rate constants were evaluated and the effects of temperature and moisture were studied.(3)In the long-term tritium release experiments to 6000h, the tritium release mechanism was found to be composed of three kinds of water: initially from capillary water, and in the second stage from gel water and from the water in the cement crystal.(4)Tritium release behavior by heat treatment to 800 C was studied. A high temperature above 600 C was required for the tritium trapped in the crystal water to be released. (orig.)

  11. Sorption data bases for generic Swiss argillaceous rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.; Thoenen, T.

    2010-09-01

    implies, these factors were used to convert the (predominantly) illite sorption values into sorption values valid for the defined generic conditions with regard to mineralogy and porewater composition. Conversion factors were used to adapt sorption values to mineralogy (CF min ), to pH value (CF pH ) and to radionuclide speciation (CF spec ). Finally, a Lab→Field conversion factor (CF Lab→Field ) was applied to adapt sorption data measured in dispersed systems (batch experiments) to intact rock under in-situ conditions. Calcareous rock is used in safety analyses as being representative of a clay rock which has lost most of its favorable sorption properties due to near-field effects such as alteration by an alkaline plume and subsequent processes. It is assumed that calcareous rocks do not contain any significant quantities of phyllosilicates and that only uptake data on calcite are relevant. Sorption data on calcite are extremely sparse and the uptake mechanisms are not fully understood. However, when the existing sorption data (log R d values) are plotted against the ionic radii of the respective metals, an acceptable linear correlation between these two quantities is found. This so-called linear free energy relationship is used to complement the sparse experimental data in the SDB for calcareous systems. (authors)

  12. Sorption of Eu(III) to Kaolinite in the Presence of Humic Acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Sang; Harn, Yoon I; Oh, Se Jin

    2010-05-01

    The sorption of europium(Eu(III)) onto kaolinite and the influence of humic acids over a range of pH 3 ∼ 11 has been studied by batch adsorption experiment (V/m = 250:1 mL/g, CEu(III) = 1x10 -5 mol/L, C HA = 5 ∼ 50 mg/L, PCO 2 = 10 -3.5 atm). The concentrations of HA and Eu(III) in aqueous phase were measured by UV absorbance at 254 nm(e.g., UV 254 ) and ICP-MS after microwave digestion for HA removals, respectively. Results showed that the HA sorption onto kaolinite was decreased with increasing pH and their sorption isotherms fit well with the Langmuir adsorption model (except pH 3). Maximum amount(q max ) for the HA sorption at pH 4 to 11 was ranged from 4.73 to 0.47 mg/g. Europium adsorption onto the kaolinite in the absence of HA was typical, showing an increases with pH and a distinct adsorption edge at pH 3 to 5. However in the presence of HA, Eu adsorption to kaolinite was significantly affected. HA was shown to enhance Eu adsorption in the acidic pH range (pH 3 ∼ 4) due to the formation of additional binding sites for Eu coming from HA adsorbed onto kaolinite surface, but reduce Eu adsorption in the intermediate and high pH above 6 due to the formation of aqueous Eu-HA complexes. The results on the ternary interaction of kaolinite-Eu-HA are compared with those on the binary system of kaolinite-HA and kaolinite-Eu and adsorption mechanism with pH was discussed

  13. Geochemistry of REE in Acid Mine Drainage: Sorption onto Basaluminite and Schwertmannite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Letellier, A.; Ayora, C.; Fernandez-Martinez, A.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemistry of Rare Earth Elements (REE) has been investigated in natural streams and in mine areas during the last decades. Most of these studies agree that REE are mobile in acidic waters and they transferred to a solid phase when pH increases. However, there is no agreement on the pH range, on which precipitates can retain REE and the mechanisms responsible for the retention. Thus, whereas some authors determined that hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) scavenge REE from pH 3, other authors observed REE retention by hydrous aluminum oxides (HAOs) from pH 4 to 6.1. A field survey conducted in the Odiel River in the SW Spain showed that pH values higher than 5, REE, Cu, Al and Fe concentrations in the river were lower than expected from a theoretical mixture because they were trapped in the precipitates. For pH below 4, however, only schwertmannite (Fe8O8OH6SO4) and no basaluminite (Al4SO4OH10·5H2O) precipitated. Then, REE, Cu and Al behaved conservatively and Fe does not, indicating that REE are trapped in the Al but not in the Fe solid phase. These observations are perfectly consistent with the REE accumulation in the Al-rich precipitates in the AMD treatment systems. Taking into account these observations, sorption experiments with synthetic basaluminite and schwertmannite at different pH were performed in the laboratory. For Lanthanides and Yttrium, sorption edge took place at pH higher than 5, whereas Sc sorption started at pH 4. A surface complexation model is proposed to explain the retention mechanism onto these two precipitates. Both minerals, schwertmannite and basaluminite showed similar sorption behavior. However, as schwertmannite formation occurs at pH lower than 4, no REE elements are sorbed on it.

  14. Reversible Second Order Kinetics of Sorption-Desorption of Cr(VI Ion on Activated Carbon from Palm Empty Fruit Bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iip Izul Falah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC from palm empty fruit bunches has been prepared, and this material was then used to adsorb Cr(VI from a solution. Characterization of the AC was conducted by detection of its functional groups, determination of total volatile compounds (VC content and its iodine number. Study on sorption-desorption kinetics was conducted by comparing results of evaluations of several models with proposed reversible second order model using the data produced in this work. Results of the works showed that the AC had similar characters compared with the AC produced by previous researchers. Application of the kinetics models on sorption Cr(VI onto the AC showed that nearly all of the models gave a good linearity. However, only the proposed model had a good relation with Langmuir isotherm, with respectively sorption (ks and desorption (kd constants were 5.75 x 10-4 L.mg‑1.min-1 and 2.20 x 10-3 min-1; maximum sorption capacity, qm = 20.00 mg.g-1; and equilibrium constant, K from kinetics experiment (0.261 L.mg-1 was comparable with the result from the isotherm experiment (0.269 L.mg-1. Hence, using this model, kinetics and Langmuir parameters can probably be determined from a single kinetics data experiment.

  15. Evaluation of sorption distribution coefficient of Cs onto granite using sorption data collected in sorption database and sorption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the sorption distribution coefficients (K d ) of Cs onto granite collected from the JAERI Sorption Database (SDB), the parameters for a two-site model without the triple-layer structure were optimized. Comparing the experimentally measured K d values of Cs onto Mizunami granite carried out by JAEA with the K d values predicted by the model, the effect of the ionic strength on the K d values of Cs onto granite was evaluated. It was found that K d values could be determined using the content of biotite in granite at a sodium concentration ([Na]) of 1 x 10 -2 to 5 x 10 -1 mol/dm 3 . It was suggested that in high ionic strength solutions, the sorption of Cs onto other minerals such as microcline should also be taken into account. (author)

  16. Evaluation of sorption distribution coefficient of Cs onto granite using sorption data collected in sorption database and sorption model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, S., E-mail: nagasas@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Based on the sorption distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) of Cs onto granite collected from the JAERI Sorption Database (SDB), the parameters for a two-site model without the triple-layer structure were optimized. Comparing the experimentally measured K{sub d} values of Cs onto Mizunami granite carried out by JAEA with the K{sub d} values predicted by the model, the effect of the ionic strength on the K{sub d} values of Cs onto granite was evaluated. It was found that K{sub d} values could be determined using the content of biotite in granite at a sodium concentration ([Na]) of 1 x 10{sup -2} to 5 x 10{sup -1} mol/dm{sup 3} . It was suggested that in high ionic strength solutions, the sorption of Cs onto other minerals such as microcline should also be taken into account. (author)

  17. Perrhenate sorption kinetics in zerovalent iron in high pH and nitrate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenell, Brian A.; Arai, Yuji, E-mail: yarai@illinois.edu

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Ammonium adsorption enhanced ReO{sub 4}{sup −} adsorption in ZVI under alkaline conditions (modified from Cho et al., 2015) [39]. - Highlights: • ZVI effectively sorbs Re(VII) at near neutral pH. • Sorption of Re(VII) in ZVI is attributed to the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}. • The extent of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI decreases with increasing pH from 8 to 10. • The rate of Re(VII) sorption in ZVI increases with increasing nitrate concentration. - Abstract: Technetium(Tc)-99 is one of major risk drivers in low level radioactive liquid waste at the U.S. Department of Energy sites. Cementitious waste technology (CWT) has been considered immobilizing pertechnetate, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, in brine and alkaline waste solutions, as Tc(IV) oxides and/or sulfides with the use of reducing agents like slag. In this study, zero valent iron (ZVI) was evaluated as a potential reducing agent in CWT as a function of pH and [nitrate] (0–0.1 M) using perrhenate, Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}, as an analogue for Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −}. Batch Re(VII)O{sub 4}{sup −} sorption experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis showed that the Re(VII) sorption occurred via the reductive precipitation of Re(IV)O{sub 2}(s) and the extent of sorption decreased with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Interestingly, pseudo 2nd order kinetic rates increased with increasing [nitrate] which was attributed to co-adsorption of NH{sub 4}{sup +} (i.e., a reaction product of reduced nitrate by ZVI), facilitating electrostatic attraction towards ReO{sub 4}{sup −} under alkaline conditions. Considering the thermodynamically favorable reduction of Tc(VII) over Re(VII), ZVI might have potential for improving the reduction capacity of the current CWT.

  18. Study of the temperature influence during the uranium (Vi) sorption on surface of ZrP2O7 in presence of oxalic and salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the effect of temperature on the uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate in the presence of organic acids (oxalic and salicylic acids). Zirconium diphosphate was synthesized by a chemical condensation reaction and characterized using several analytical techniques, in order to check its purity. This point is very important because the presence of any impurities or secondary phases may interfere with the hydration and sorption process. Prior to the sorption experiments, three batches of zirconium diphosphate were pre-equilibrated with NaClO 4 , oxalic acid or salicylic acid solutions. The hydrated solids were washed and dried and then again characterized in order to study the interactions between organic acids and zirconium diphosphate surface. Uranium sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (pre-equilibrated with NaClO 4 , oxalic acid and salicylic acid solutions) was investigated as a function of ph, organic acid and temperature (20, 40 y 60 grades C). Thermodynamic parameters for the sorption reactions (enthalpy change, entropy change and Gibbs free energy change) were determined from temperature dependence of distribution coefficient by using the Vant Hoff equation. Solids characterization after hydration shows that exist an interaction between organic acids and ZrP 2 O 7 . This fact was confirmed with the microcalorimetry study, the reaction heat for hydration of zirconium diphosphate in NaClO 4 solution was exothermic (-269.59 mJ) and for hydration of zirconium diphosphate in oxalic acid solution was endothermic (53.64 mJ). The experimental results showed important differences in the sorption mechanisms for the reaction of Uranium with ZrP 2 O 7 in the presence and absence of organic acids. For the zirconium diphosphate hydrated with oxalic acid, the sorption percentage was 50% from lowest ph values. For the zirconium diphosphate hydrated with salicylic acid, the initial concentration of uranium was 6 x 10 -4 M and a percentage of 10% was

  19. Results of a European interlaboratory comparison on CO2 sorption on activated carbon and coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Busch, Andreas; Krooss, Bernhard; de Weireld, Guy; Billemont, Pierre; van Hemert, Patrick; Wolf, Karl-Heinz

    2013-04-01

    For the assessment of CO2 storage in coal seams or enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM), the sorption properties of natural coals are important parameters. Since more and more laboratories worldwide are concerned with measurements of gas sorption on coal it is indispensable to establish quality standards for such experiments. The first two interlaboratory studies on CO2 sorption on coal (Goodman et al. 2004, 2007) revealed a poor agreement of sorption isotherms among the participating laboratories, particularly in the high-pressure range. During the MOVECBM (http://www.movecbm.eu/) project funded by the European Commission (6th framework), an interlaboratory comparison of CO2 sorption on selected coals and activated carbon was initiated. Measurements were performed on dry samples at 45° C using the manometric and the gravimetric method. up to a final pressure of 15 MPa. The first set of high-pressure sorption measurements was performed on a Filtrasorb 400 activated carbon sample in order to minimise heterogeneity effects and to optimize the experimental procedures for the individual (manometric or gravimetric) methods (Gensterblum et al. 2009). Since comparability for the activated carbon was excellent, the measurements were continued using natural coals of various rank (anthracite, bituminous coal and lignite) to study the influence of heterogeneities and varying starting conditions on the CO2 sorption properties (Gensterblum et al. 2010). Compared to the poor reproducibility observed in previous interlaboratory studies (Goodman et al., 2004, 2007) this European study showed excellent agreement (van Hemert, P. Billemont, A. Busch, B.M. Krooss, G. de Weireld, D. Prinz , K.-H.A.A. Wolf, "European inter-laboratory comparison of high pressure CO2 sorption isotherms. II: natural coals" IJCG, 2010, 84, 115-124 Gensterblum Y., P. van Hemert, P. Billemont, A. Busch, D. Charriére, D. Li, B.M. Krooss, G. de Weireld, D. Prinz , K.-H.A.A. Wolf, "European inter

  20. Comparative evaluation for the sorption capacity of four carbonaceous sorbents to phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Feng Jin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sorption kinetics and isotherms of phenol by four carbonaceous sorbents (activated carbon (AC, mesoporous carbon (MPC, bamboo biochar (BBC and oak wood biochar (OBC were compared in this study. MPC has the fastest sorption rate and initial sorption potential, which were indicated by sorption rate constants and initial sorption rate “h” in a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The ordered and straight pore structure of MPC facilitated the accessibility of phenol. The AC showed the greatest sorption capacity towards phenol with maximum sorption of 123 mg/g as calculated by the Langmuir model. High surface area, complexity of pore structure, and the strong binding force of the π–π electron-donor-acceptor interaction between phenol molecules and AC were the main mechanisms. The BBC and OBC had much slower sorption and lower sorption capacity (33.04 and 29.86 mg/g, respectively, compared to MPC (73.00 mg/g and AC, indicating an ineffective potential for phenol removal from water.

  1. Comparative sorption and desorption behaviors of PFHxS and PFOS on sequentially extracted humic substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia Zhao; Yifeng Zhang; Shuhong Fang; Lingyan Zhu; Zhengtao Liu

    2014-01-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviors of two perfluoroalkane sulfonates (PFSAs),including perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on two humic acids (HAs) and humin (HM),which were extracted from a peat soil,were investigated.The sorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the sorption of PFOS on the humic substances (HSs) was much higher than PFHxS.For the same PFSA compound,the sorption on HSs followed the order of HM > HA2 > HA1.These suggest that hydrophobic interaction plays a key role in the sorption of PFSAs on HSs.The sorption capacities of PFSAs on HSs were significantly related to their aliphaticity,but negatively correlated to aromatic carbons,indicating the importance of aliphatic groups in the sorption of PFSAs.Compared to PFOS,PFHxS displayed distinct desorption hysteresis,probably due to irreversible pore deformation after sorption of PFHxS.The sorption of the two PFSAs on HSs decreased with an increase in pH in the solution.This is ascribed to the electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding at lower pH.Hydrophobic interaction might also be stronger at lower pH due to the aggregation of HSs.

  2. Performance of Cationic Surfactant Modified Sepiolite and Bentonite in Lead Sorption from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Rafiei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The remediation of soils and water contaminated with heavy metals generate a great need to develop efficient adsorbents for these pollutants. This study reports the sorption of lead (Pb by bentonite (Bent, and sepiolite (Sep, that were modified with cetyltrimethyl ammonium (CTMA+ organic cations. The natural and surfactant modified clays (organo-clays were characterized with some instrumental techniques including XRF, XRD, FTIR and SEM. Sorption studies were performed in a batch system, and the effects of various experimental parameters including contact time and initial Pb concentration were evaluated upon the Pb sorption onto sorbents. Maximum sorption of Pb was found to be, 83.26, 71.36, 56.25 and 37 mg g-1 for Sep, CTMA-Sep, Bent and CTMA-Bent adsorbents, respectively. The Pb sorption data were fitted to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The Freundlich model represented the sorption process better than the Langmuir model. Lead sorption rate was found to be considerably slower for organo-clays than that for unmodified clays. Sorption kinetics was evaluated by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models. The sorption processes of organo-clays followed intraparticle diffusion kinetics. The results showed that the cationic surfactant modified bentonite and sepiolite sorbed less Pb than the unmodified clays.

  3. Competitive sorption of persistent organic pollutants onto microplastics in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Organic pollutants are present as complex mixtures in the marine environment. ► The competitive sorption of phenanthrene and DDT in a bi-solute system was investigated onto PVC and PE. ► DDT outcompeted phenanthrene for sorption onto plastic. ► DDT also appeared to have a negative effect on the sorption of phenanthrene onto plastic when added at high concentration. - Abstract: Plastics are known to sorb persistent organic pollutants from seawater. However, studies to quantify sorption rates have only considered the affinity of chemicals in isolation, unlike the conditions in the environment where contaminants are present as complex mixtures. Here we examine whether phenanthrene and 4,4′-DDT, in a mixture, compete for sorption sites onto PVC with no added additives (unplasticised PVC or uPVC) and Ultra-High Molecular Weight polyethylene. Interactions were investigated by exposing particles of uPVC and UHMW PE to mixtures of 3H and 14C radiolabelled Phe and DDT. Changes in sorption capacity were modelled by applying a Freundlich binding sorption isotherms. An Extended Langmuir Model and an Interaction Factor Model were also applied to predict equilibrium concentrations of pollutants onto plastic. This study showed that in a bi-solute system, DDT exhibited no significantly different sorption behaviour than in single solute systems. However, DDT did appear to interfere with the sorption of Phe onto plastic, indicating an antagonistic effect.

  4. Evaluation of sorption affinity of cadmium(II) on Haro river sand from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Chaudhary, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The sorption of Cd(II) on Haro river sand from deionized water is reported. The sorption system obeyed according to the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich parameters 1/n = 0.67±0.05 and of A = 1.38±1.14 mmole x g -1 have been ascertained. D-R isotherm yields the values of β = -0.003741±0.000321 kJ 2 x mole -2 , X m = 0.23±0.21 μmole x g -1 and of E = 11.6±0.5 kJ x mole -1 . The influence of common anions and cations on the sorption was examined. Trivalent Bi enhances the sorption whereas Fe, Cr, Al and chromate ions reduce the sorption significantly. Hf(IV) and Ag(I) indicate substantial sorption (61-98%) whereas Gd(III), Re(VII) and Sc(III) show low sorption (<5%). The elements having low sorption can be separated from elements indicating higher sorption using Haro river sand column. (author)

  5. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter,Fabiano André; Ferreira,Tamara Santos; Sinhorin,Adilson Paulo; Lima,Larissa Borges de; Morais,Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco,Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorpti...

  6. Sorption of 60 Co in natural zeolite (clinoptilolite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez B, E.

    1996-01-01

    A Mexican zeolite (clinoptilolite) from Taxco, Guerrero, was partially stabilized with sodium cations. Radioactive Cobalt ( 60 Co) was used to study the Co 2+ sorption in the stabilized zeolite (Na + ). It was found that sorption in general does not favour the diffusion of cobalt between framework, it explains because of it is a natural zeolite and its composition heterogeneous decrease its exchange capacity by the generated competence to the existence other type of exchange ions. The cobalt retention reached the highest level, around 0.408 m eq Co 2+ /g in the Na-Clinoptilolite. The crystallinity of the aluminosilicates was maintained during experiments, it was verified by XRD patterns. (Author)

  7. Autoradiographic studies of actinide sorption in groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kelley, G.D.; Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.

    1980-01-01

    Autoradiography is a convenient and sensitive technique for the study of spacial distributions of alpha radioactive nuclides on slabs of rock or on other planar surfaces. The autoradiographic camera contains an arrangement for placing in firm contact Polaroid sheet film, a plastic scintillator screen, and the radioactive face of the specimen. As an example of the use of the autoradiographic method, a series of sorption experiments were carried out in which synthetic groundwater solutions of americium, neptunium, uranium, and plutonium were contacted with Climax Stock granite under aerated and anoxic conditions at pH 8 to 9. The sorption observed at specific mineral sites was correlated with data on sorption of these actinides on pure minerals

  8. Sorption of americium and neptunium by deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgo, J.J.W.; Rees, L.V.C.; Cronan, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The sorption and desorption of americium and neptunium by a wide range of deep-sea sediments from natural sea water at 4 0 C has been studied using a carefully controlled batch technique. All the sediments studied should form an excellent barrier to the migration of americium since distribution coefficients were uniformly greater than 10 5 and the sorption-desorption reaction may not be reversible. The sorption of neptunium was reversible and, except for one red clay, the distribution coefficients were greater than 10 3 for all the sediments investigated. Nevertheless the migration of neptunium should also be effectively retarded by most deep-sea sediments even under relatively oxidizing conditions. The neptunium in solution remained in the V oxidation state throughout the experiments. Under the experimental conditions used colloidal americium was trapped by the sediment and solubility did not seem to be the controlling factor in the desorption of americium. (Auth.)

  9. Natural minerals and synthetic materials for sorption of radioactive anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Mun Ja; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kim, Seung Soo

    1998-07-01

    Technetium-99 and iodine-129 are fission products with long half-lives, and exist as highly soluble anionic species. Studies on natural and synthetic materials sorbing TcO{sub 4} and/or I have been performed by several researchers. The application of these materials as an additive in the high-level waste disposal has been considered. The iron- or sulfide-containing minerals such as metal iron, iron powder, stibnite and pyrrhotite show a high capacity for TcO{sub 4} sorption. And the small amounts of activated carbon are reported to have high distribution coefficients recently. In the iodine sorption studies, sulfide-, copper-, lead- or mercury-containing minerals can be a candidate. Pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, Cu{sub 2}S and CuS reveal a high capacity for I sorption. The synthetic materials were found to have high sorption capacity and compensate the defects of natural minerals, which contain hydrous oxides such as zirconium oxide, aluminium oxide and mercarbide. The mercarbide has the high distribution coefficients for the sorption of TcO{sub 4} and I. Recently it was proposed that the synthetic clay, hydrotalcite, could be useful for the fixation of anion. However, to determine the applicability of those natural and synthetic materials as an additive to a buffer or backfill material for sorption of TcO{sub 4} and/or I, the sorption behavior of the anions on those materials under the repository conditions should be identified. (author). 32 refs., 21 tabs., 10 figs

  10. Synthesis and sorption properties of new synthesized rare-earth-doped sodium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of rare-earth-doped sodium titanates with the chemical formula R x H y Na 4-(x+y) TiO 4 ·nH 2 O (where R = Ce 3+ , Nd 3+ and Sm 3+ ) were grown employing solid-state fusion reaction technique. The physico-chemical investigations indicated that the new materials were self engineered into large particles enough to be used in sorption process and having crystalline structures containing localized Na + ions. Equilibrium studies revealed that an enhancement in sorption efficiency of sodium titanate after rare-earth doping. The neodymium-rich sodium titanate exhibited a better exchange affinity for Cs + compared to the other studied series. Data on the kinetics of cesium exchange fit well to pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion models. In a separate experiment, it was reported that the R-HNaTi series showed responsible sorption affinity toward Ce, Nd and Sm ions in their solution mixture with insignificant selectivity trend which reflects the high stability of titanate matrices. (author)

  11. Associating Physical and Chemical Properties to Evaluate Buffer Materials by Th and U Sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Yi-Lin; Chen, Tzu-Yun; Cheng, Hwai-Ping; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Tseng, Chia-Liang; Wei,Yuan-Yaw; Yang, Jen-Yan; Ke, Cheng-Hsiung; Chuang, Jui-Tang; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2003-02-27

    The physical and chemical properties of buffer materials to be used for a radwaste disposal repository should be evaluated prior to use. In a conventional approach, independent studies of physical and/or chemical characteristics are conducted. This study investigated the relationship between the plastic index (PI) and distribution ratio (Rd) of buffer materials composed of varying ratios of quartz sand and bentonite. Thorium (Th) and Uranium (U) were the nuclides of interest, and both synthetic groundwater and seawater were used as the liquid phases to simulate conditions representative of deep geological disposal within an island. Atterberg tests were used to determine PI values, and batch sorption experiments were employed to measure Rd values. The results show that Th reached maximum sorption behavior when the bentonite content exceeded 30 % of the mixture. Contrariwise, the sorption of U increased linearly with bentonite content, up to bentonite contents of 100%, and this correlation was present regardless of the liquid phase used. A further result is that U has a better additivity with respect to Rd than Th in both synthetic groundwater and synthetic seawater. These results will allow a determination of more effective buffer material composition, and improved estimates of the overall Rd of the buffer material mixture from the Rd of each mineral component.

  12. Sorption Behavior of Strontium-85 Onto Colloids of Silica and Smectite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Triay, I.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Longmire, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Strontium-90 is one of the sizable radioactive contaminants found in DP Canyon at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Radioactive surveys found the 90 Sr is present in surface and groundwater in DP Canyon and Los Alamos Canyon. Colloids may influence the transport of this radionuclide in surface water and groundwater environments in both canyons. In this study, we investigated the sorption/desorption behavior of Sr on colloids of smectite and silica. Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted using 85 Sr as a surrogate to 90 Sr. Groundwater, collected from DP Canyon and from Well J-13 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and deionized water were used in this study. Our results show that 92% to 100% of 85 Sr was rapidly adsorbed onto smectite colloids in all three waters. The concentrations of Ca 2+ significantly influence the adsorption of 85 Sr onto silica colloids. Desorption of 85 Sr from smectite colloids is much slower than the sorption process. Desorption of 85 Sr from silica colloids was rapid in DP groundwater and slow using J-13 groundwater and deionized water

  13. Sorption isotherms, GAB parameters and isosteric heat of sorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirijns, E.J.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Straten, van G.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion-sorption drying model has been developed as a physics-based way to model the decreasing drying rate at low moisture contents. This new model is founded on the existence of different classes of water: free and bound water. The transition between these classes and the corresponding

  14. Deal or No Deal? Decision Making under Risk in a Large-Stake TV Game Show and Related Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van den Assem (Martijn)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe central theme of this dissertation is the analysis of risky choice. The first two chapters analyze the choice behavior of contestants in a TV game show named “Deal or No Deal” (DOND). DOND provides a unique opportunity to study risk behavior, because it is characterized by very large

  15. Sorption mechanisms of phenanthrene, lindane, and atrazine with various humic acid fractions from a single soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xilong; Guo, Xiaoying; Yang, Yu; Tao, Shu; Xing, Baoshan

    2011-03-15

    The sorption behavior of organic compounds (phenanthrene, lindane, and atrazine) to sequentially extracted humic acids and humin from a peat soil was examined. The elemental composition, XPS and (13)C NMR data of sorbents combined with sorption isotherm data of the tested compounds show that nonspecific interactions govern sorption of phenanthrene and lindane by humic substances. Their sorption is dependent on surface and bulk alkyl carbon contents of the sorbents, rather than aromatic carbon. Sorption of atrazine by these sorbents, however, is regulated by polar interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding). Carboxylic and phenolic moieties are key components for H-bonding formation. Thermal analysis reveals that sorption of apolar (i.e., phenanthrene and lindane) and polar (i.e., atrazine) compounds by humic substances exhibit dissimilar relationships with condensation and thermal stability of sorption domains, emphasizing the major influence of domain spatial arrangement on sorption of organic compounds with distinct polarity. Results of pH-dependent sorption indicate that reduction in sorption of atrazine by the tested sorbents is more evident than phenanthrene with increasing pH, supporting the dependence of organic compound sorption on its polarity and structure. This study highlights the different interaction mechanisms of apolar and polar organic compounds with humic substances.

  16. Status of sorption information retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, D.D.; Serne, R.J.; Brandstetter, A.

    1979-09-01

    A Sorption Information Retrieval System (SIRS) is being designed to provide an efficient, computerized, data base for information on radionuclide sorption in geologic media. The data bank will include Kd values for a large number of radionuclides occurring in radioactive wastes originating from the commercial nuclear power industry. Kd values determined to date span several groundwater compositions and a wide variety of rock types and minerals. The data system will not only include Kd values, but also background information on the experiments themselves. This will allow the potential user to retrieve not only the Kd values of interest but also sufficient information to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of the data. During FY-1979, the logic structure of the system was designed, the software programmed, the data categories selected, and the data format specified. About 40% of the approximately 5000 Kd experiments performed by the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and its subcontractors during FY-1977 and FY-1978 have been evaluated, coded and keypunched. Additional software improvements and system testing are needed before the system will be fully operational. A workshop requested by the NEA was held to discuss potential internatioal participation in the data system

  17. Microplastics play a minor role in tetracycline sorption in the presence of dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baile; Liu, Fei; Brookes, Philip C; Xu, Jianming

    2018-05-02

    Microplastics have a great potential to sorb organic pollutants from the adjacent environment. In this study, the sorption of tetracycline, a polar and ionizable antibiotic, on three types of microplastics (polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS)) were investigated in batch sorption experiments. The sorption isotherms were well fitted by the Langmuir model, indicating that not only hydrophobic interactions but also other interactions (e.g. electrostatic interactions) played important roles in the sorption process. PS had the maximum sorption capacity, following the order PS > PP > PE, which can be attributed to polar interactions and π-π interactions. The sorption of tetracycline on microplastics was significantly influenced by pH, with sorption capacity increasing gradually, peaking at pH 6.0 and then decreasing, likely due to the influence of tetracycline speciation with the change of pH. Fulvic acid was selected as representative dissolved organic matter (DOM) to examine the effect on sorption. The increasing concentration of fulvic acid inhibited the sorption of tetracycline on three microplastics, decreasing them by more than 90% at the fulvic acid concentration of 20 mg/L, which implied a greater affinity of tetracycline to fulvic acid than to microplastics. Increasing salinity from 0.05 to 3.5% had negligible effects on the sorption of tetracycline on the three microplastics. Our results highlight the importance of pH and DOM on the sorption of tetracycline on microplastics, and suggest the relatively minor role of microplastics in the fate and transport of tetracycline in the aquatic environment in the presence of DOM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sorption Regularities in Behaviour of Fission-Product Elements during Filtration of their Solutions through Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, V. I.; Balukova, V. D.; Gromov, V. V.; Zakharov, S. I.; Zhagin, B. P.; Spiridonov, F. M.

    1960-07-01

    Research on the sorption of radioisotopes under natural conditions employing the controlled filtration process was performed. Radioisotopes were introduced into the solution as soon as filtration had become steady and the process continued for four months. Soil samples were then taken by drilling at different depths and analysed to determine their radioisotope content. Diffusion of radioisotopes was observed at depths of up to 10 m; two distinct boundaries of soil-activity decrease were ascertained: at the surface of the site and at the depth of the solution filtration front. In addition, the radiostrontium absorption by natural sorbents, principally pure minerals widely distributed in soils and subsoils, was investigated separately. The presence of calcium ions, even in small quantities, sharply reduces the degree of radiostrontium sorption. However, other conditions being equal, strontium may be absorbed to a greater extent than calcium, according to the composition of the sorbent. The field investigations of radiostrontium sorption and migration showed that when filtering radioactive solutions two possible variants have to be taken into account. In the first case the solutions are discharged into soil unaffected by any flow of ground water. In this situation the radiostrontium is retained by the soil. In the second case, the radioisotopes proceed directly into the water-bearing horizon. The radiostrontium will then migrate with the ground water flow and through the soil and this migration will be further affected by the sorption and desorption processes occurring. The experiments performed demonstrate the ease with which long-lived radioisotopes migrate under natural conditions and call attention to the need for thorough study of ground water problems in connexion with various methods of disposing of radioactive waste into ground. (author)

  19. p-Nitrophenol, phenol and aniline sorption by organo-clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, C.H.; Fan Chihhao; Chiang, P.N.; Wang, M.K.; Lin, K.C.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to make use of organo-clays (i.e., Cloisite-10A, Cloisite-15A, Cloisite-30B and Cloisite-93A), to remove p-nitrophenol, phenol and aniline of organic pollutants. The organo-clays were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Sorption isotherm, kinetic and pH effect of p-nitrophenol, phenol and aniline sorbed by four organo-clays were evaluated. The d-spacings (0 0 1) of the XRD peak of Cloisite-10A, Cloisite-15A, Cloisite-30B and Cloisite-93A are 1.98, 2.76, 1.93 and 2.64 nm, respectively. The d(0 0 1)-spacings of XRD indicated that these p-nitropheno, phenol and aniline could penetrate into the interlayer of clays and expand the d(0 0 1)-spacings. The linear sorption isotherm of constant partition was employed to describe the sorption isotherms of phenols sorbed by organo-clays through hydrophobic-hydrophobic chemical reactions. The parabolic diffusion and power-function of kinetic models were employed to describe properly the kinetic experiments. The rate limiting step of the p-nitrophenol sorption reactions on organo-clays were diffusion-controlled processes (i.e., 15A, 30B, 93A) and chemical-controlled process for 10A organo-clays. The pre-exponential factor of the p-nitrophenol sorbed by four organo-clays showed the trend as follows: 10A > 30B > 93A > 15A. The efficiency of these organo-clays in removing phenol compounds in water treatments merit further study

  20. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    In this work, wet ball milling method is used in order to improve hydrogen sorption behaviour due to its improved microstructure of solid hydrogen materials. Compared to traditional ball milling method, wet ball milling has benefits on improvement of MgH{sub 2} microstructure and further influences on its hydrogen sorption behavior. With the help of solvent tetrahydrofuran (THF), wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder has much smaller particle size and its specific surface area is 7 times as large as that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder. Although after ball milling the grain size is decreased a lot compared to as-received MgH{sub 2} powder, the grain size of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is larger than that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder due to the lubricant effect of solvent THF during wet ball milling. The improved particle size and specific surface area of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is found to be determining its hydrogen sorption kinetics especially at relatively low temperatures. And it also shows good cycling sorption behavior, which decides on its industrial applicability. With three different catalysts MgH{sub 2} powder shows improved hydrogen sorption behavior as well as the cyclic sorption behavior. Among them, the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst is found to be the most effective one in this work. Compared to the wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder, the particle size and specific surface area of the MgH{sub 2} powder with catalysts are similar to the previous ones, while the grain size of the MgH{sub 2} with catalysts is much finer. In this case, two reasons for hydrogen sorption improvement are suggested: one is the reduction of the grain size. The other may be as pointed out in some literatures that formation of new oxidation could enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics, which is also the reason why its hydrogen capacity is decreased compared to without catalysts. After further ball milling, the specific surface area of wet ball milled Mg

  1. Effect of the modification of a natural mexican zeolite in the sorption of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol; Efecto de la modificacion de una zeolita natural mexicana en la sorcion de cadmio y 4-clorofenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes M, R [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Clinoptilolite type zeolite is a material of relative abundance in Mexico, which possess ion exchange properties and it can be used in the removal of metal ions from polluted waters. The external surface of zeolites can be modified with cationic surfactants. This modification could have a negative effect on the removal of metal ions and provides to the material the capacity to adsorb phenolic compounds. For this reason, it is important to know the capability of the modified material on the sorption of metal ions and phenolic compounds, simultaneously. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the external surface modification with surfactant of a Mexican zeolite over its sorption capacity of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol, in batch and column systems. To accomplish that, a clinoptilolite type zeolitic rock from a deposit located in the state of Sonora, Mexico, was used. It was ground, sieved and characterized with different techniques; and its external surface area was modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br). A grain size fraction was selected to carry out sorption kinetics and equilibrium experiments, as well as packed column tests with zeolitic material and solutions of cadmium and 4-chloro phenol. There are different models proposed in literature that are used to describe sorption kinetics and equilibrium. In this work, the sorption experimental results were adjusted to some of these models to identify controlling mechanisms on the kinetics and equilibrium of the studied systems. The results showed that the cadmium adsorption on natural and modified zeolite was similar in batch systems. For the case of 4-chloro phenol sorption, it was observed that natural zeolite does not retain this compound, while in modified zeolite the sorption is better than other comparable materials. The results also showed that for the case of cadmium sorption, the mechanism involved was ion exchange; while for sorption of 4-chloro phenol, a partition mechanism

  2. Sorption of trivalent lanthanides and actinides onto montmorillonite: Macroscopic, thermodynamic and structural evidence for ternary hydroxo and carbonato surface complexes on multiple sorption sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M Marques; Scheinost, A C; Baeyens, B

    2016-08-01

    The credibility of long-term safety assessments of radioactive waste repositories may be greatly enhanced by a molecular level understanding of the sorption processes onto individual minerals present in the near- and far-fields. In this study we couple macroscopic sorption experiments to surface complexation modelling and spectroscopic investigations, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopies (TRLFS), to elucidate the uptake mechanism of trivalent lanthanides and actinides (Ln/An(III)) by montmorillonite in the absence and presence of dissolved carbonate. Based on the experimental sorption isotherms for the carbonate-free system, the previously developed 2 site protolysis non electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) model needed to be complemented with an additional surface complexation reaction onto weak sites. The fitting of sorption isotherms in the presence of carbonate required refinement of the previously published model by reducing the strong site capacity and by adding the formation of Ln/An(III)-carbonato complexes both on strong and weak sites. EXAFS spectra of selected Am samples and TRLFS spectra of selected Cm samples corroborate the model assumptions by showing the existence of different surface complexation sites and evidencing the formation of Ln/An(III) carbonate surface complexes. In the absence of carbonate and at low loadings, Ln/An(III) form strong inner-sphere complexes through binding to three Al(O,OH)6 octahedra, most likely by occupying vacant sites in the octahedral layers of montmorillonite, which are exposed on {010} and {110} edge faces. At higher loadings, Ln/An(III) binds to only one Al octahedron, forming a weaker, edge-sharing surface complex. In the presence of carbonate, we identified a ternary mono- or dicarbonato Ln/An(III) complex binding directly to one Al(O,OH)6 octahedron, revealing that type-A ternary complexes form with the one

  3. Quantifying the effect of sorption and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Bouwer, E.; Cunningham, A.

    1994-01-01

    In-situ bioremediation has been applied successfully at a few sites. Several restrictions presently exist which could greatly limit the effectiveness of this promising technology. Hydrophobic organic contaminants tend to sorb onto soil. However, microorganisms are most effective in utilizing substrates from the aqueous phase. Sorption tends to separate the direct contact between microorganisms and contaminants necessary for biodegradation to occur. A series of experiments, which represented scenarios with fast sorption/desorption, slow sorption/desorption, mass transfer across boundary layer and mass transfer within attached microorganisms (biofilm), was conducted to demonstrate the concentration effect and the mass transfer effect. A method has been developed to quantify bioavailability of organic contaminants in aquatic environments. Bioavailability Factor (B f ), a dimensionless parameter derived from mathematical models and verified by experimental results, has been formulated to describe the impact of equilibrium sorption, nonequilibrium sorption, and mass transfer processes on the rate and extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons

  4. Kinetics and equilibrium studies for sorption of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions onto polymeric composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The sorption behavior of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions from aqueous solutions was studied using polymeric composite resins. Batch sorption experiments were performed as a function of hydrogen ion concentration, complexing agent concentration, resin weight and ionic strength. Kinetic parameters as a function of initial ion concentration were determined to predict the sorption behavior of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) onto polymeric composite resins. The equilibrium data could be fitted by the frendlich adsorption isotherm equation

  5. Enhancing the antimony sorption properties of nano titania-chitosan beads using epichlorohydrin as the crosslinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishad, Padala Abdul; Bhaskarapillai, Anupkumar; Velmurugan, Sankaralingam

    2017-07-15

    Antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority importance by USEPA. We have earlier reported the synthesis of nano-titania impregnated epichlorohydrin crosslinked chitosan (TA-Cts-Epi) beads, in a format suitable for large scale applications with high sorption capacity for antimony. To understand the sorption mechanism, and to fine tune the bead composition, the effect of crosslinking density on the swelling and sorption properties of the beads was investigated in detail. Epichlorohydrin effected significant changes in physical and sorption properties of the beads. The antimony sorption capacity of the TA-Cts-Epi beads prepared by crosslinking 0.3g non-crosslinked titania-chitosan beads (TA-Cts-NCL) with 6.4mmol epichlorohydrin was 493μmol/g, while those crosslinked with 0.64mmol showed a capacity of 133μmol/g. Whereas, TA-Cts-NCL beads showed a capacity of 75μmol/g. The increase in uptake capacity with increase in crosslinking demonstrated the active involvement of the epichlorohydrin moieties in antimony binding leading to enhanced sorption. Apart from altering the stability, swelling behaviour and sorption kinetics of the beads, crosslinking significantly increased the uptake of the anionic species via electrostatic interactions. Epichlorohydrin crosslinked chitosan beads prepared without TiO 2 also showed similar behaviour. The results demonstrated the involvement of chitosan, TiO 2 and epichlorohydrin in sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. INFLUENCES OF SOIL PROPERTIES ON CHROMIUM (III SORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Salmasi, F. Salmasi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil adsorbing properties reduce sorption ability of the metal, which in turn may influence decision for remediation at contaminated sites. The objective of this study is presentation of a model based on soil properties to estimate the sorption of Cr(III in chromium contaminated soils. Twenty uncontaminated soil samples, with properties similar to the contaminated soils were selected from around of city of Tabriz and treated with Cr as CrCl3. A multiple regression analysis with statgraph software was used to drive an expression that related Cr sorption to common soil properties. The results showed that four soil properties were important in determining the amount of Cr adsorbed by the soils including pH, cation exchange capacity, total inorganic carbon and clay content with nearly 80% variability in Cr sorption and a reasonable level of confidence by this model. The obtained model suggested that Cr(III sorption was enhanced by higher soil pH, more total inorganic carbon, more clay, and higher cation exchange capacity.

  7. Ammonium, Nitrate, and Phosphate Sorption to and Solute Leaching from Biochars Prepared from Corn Stover ( L.) and Oak Wood ( spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, C Colin; Bisogni, James J; Lehmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Biochar (BC) was evaluated for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal from aqueous solution to quantify its nutrient pollution mitigation potential in agroecosystems. Sorption isotherms were prepared for solutions of ammonium (NH), nitrate (NO), and phosphate (PO-P) using BC of corn ( L.) and oak ( spp.) feedstock, each pyrolyzed at 350 and 550°C highest treatment temperature (HTT). Sorption experiments were performed on original BC as well as on BC that went through a water extraction pretreatment (denoted WX-BC). Ammonium sorption was observed for WX-Oak-BC and WX-Corn-BC, and Freundlich model linearization showed that a 200°C increase in HTT resulted in a 55% decrease in * values for WX-Oak-BC and a 69% decrease in * for WX-Corn-BC. Nitrate sorption was not observed for any BC. Removing metals by water extraction from WX-Oak-350 and WX-Oak-550 resulted in a 25 to 100% decrease in phosphate removal efficiency relative to original Oak-350 and Oak-550, respectively. No PO-P sorption was observed using any Corn-BC. Calcium (Ca) leached from BC produced at 550°C was 63 and 104% higher than from BC produced at 350°C for corn and oak, respectively. Leaching of P was two orders of magnitude lower in WX-Oak-BC than in WX-Corn-BC, concurrent with similar difference in magnesium (Mg). Nitrate and NH leaching from consecutive water extractions of all tested BCs was mostly below detection limits. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Inhibitory effects of extracellular polymeric substances on ofloxacin sorption by natural biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwen; Dong, Deming; Hua, Xiuyi; Guo, Zhiyong

    2018-06-01

    Natural biofilms have strong affinities for organic contaminants, and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have been thought to control the sorption process. However, the role of EPS in the sorption of antibiotics, an emerging concern, is poorly understood. Here, soluble (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) were extracted from intact biofilms incubated at different lengths of time to obtain SEPS- and BEPS-free biofilms. Batch sorption experiments and infrared spectroscopy were used to investigate the role of EPS in the sorption of ofloxacin (OFL) by natural biofilms. The sorption capacities of OFL onto intact biofilms were lower than that those onto SEPS-free and BEPS-free biofilms. Partition and Langmuir adsorption contributed to the sorption of OFL onto these biofilms. SEPS and BEPS suppressed partitioning of OFL into biofilm organic matter. Meanwhile, the formation of hydrogen bonds could affect the Langmuir adsorption of OFL onto BEPS-free biofilms. These sorption mechanisms occurred simultaneously and enhanced the sorption capacities of biofilms after EPS removal. The information obtained in this study is beneficial for understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotics and natural biofilms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diffusion and sorption of organic micropollutants in biofilms with varying thicknesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena; Polesel, Fabio; Bester, Kai

    2017-01-01

    , propranolol, citalopram, venlafaxine, erythromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin), revealing the importance of electrostatic interactions with solids. Sorption equilibria were likely not reached within the duration of batch experiments (4 h), particularly for the thickest biofilm, requiring...

  10. Sorption of tritium and tritiated water on construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.S.; Miller, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    Sorption and desorption of tritium (HT) and tritiated water (HTO) on materials to be used in the construction of fusion facilities were studied. In ∼ 24-hour exposures in argon or room air, metal samples sorbed 8-200 μCi/m 2 of tritium from atmospheres of 5-9 Ci/m 3 HT, and non-metallic samples sorbed 60-800 μCi/m 2 from atmospheres of 14 Ci/m 3 HT. Sorption of HTO varied much more widely than HT sorption for different samples, ranging from 4 μCi/m 2 for glass to 1,300,000 μCi/m 2 for concrete samples, in 24-hour exposures to 1 Ci/m 3 HTO in room air. Time dependence of desorption in dry air showed a rapid initial process and a slower secondary process. (Author) (10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  11. Sorption of thiabendazole in sub-tropical Brazilian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Neto, Odilon França; Arenas, Alejandro Yopasa; Fostier, Anne Hélène

    2017-07-01

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is an ionizable anthelmintic agent that belongs to the class of benzimidazoles. It is widely used in veterinary medicine and as a fungicide in agriculture. Sorption and desorption are important processes influencing transport, transformation, and bioavailability of xenobiotic compounds in soils; data related to sorption capacity are therefore needed for environmental risk assessments. The aim of this work was to assess the sorption potential of TBZ in four Brazilians soils (sandy, sandy-clay, and clay soils), using batch equilibrium experiments at three pH ranges (2.3-3.0, 3.8-4.2, and 5.5-5.7). The Freundlich sorption coefficient (K F ) ranged from 9.0 to 58 μg 1-1/n  (mL) 1/n  g -1 , with higher values generally observed at the lower pH ranges (2.3-3.0 and 3.8-4.2) and for clay soils. The highest organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K OC ) obtained at pH 3.8-5.7 (around the natural pH range of 4.1-5.0) for both clay soils and sandy-clay soil were 3255 and 2015 mL g -1 , respectively. The highest correlations K F vs SOM (r = 0.70) and K F vs clay content (r = 0.91) were observed at pH 3.8-4.2. Our results suggest that TBZ sorption/desorption is strongly pH dependent and that its mobility could be higher in the studied soils than previously reported in soils from temperate regions.

  12. The measurement and estimation method of the sorption of lead onto cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Kiyoshi; Tsukamoto, Masaki; Fujita, Tomonari; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2002-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging material for radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material is a very important parameter when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive waste. In this study, sorption of lead, onto hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), OPC/Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (BFS), Highly containing Flyash and Silica Fume Cement (HFSC) and cement constituent minerals (portlandite, ettringite, hydrotalcite and C-S-H gels (Ca/Si = 0.9 and 1.65)) was measured using the batch sorption technique. Lead is one of the important nuclides for safety assessment. The obtained distribution ratios, Rd values, for sorption of lead onto hydrated (freshly cured) OPC and HFSC are very high:>1000 cm3g-1. The distribution ratio for sorption of lead onto OPC/BFS could not be determined quantitatively due to the precipitation of PbS. Comparing the Rd values onto cements and minerals, it was suggested the sorption onto C-S-H gel phases dominate the sorption for lead onto hydrated cements. Once a cementitious material is altered in the disposal environment, its sorption ability may be affected. The sorption of lead onto degraded OPC and degraded HFSC, which were altered in the presence of distilled water, was also measured. It was observed that the alteration did not cause changes that decreased the sorption of lead onto OPC and HFSC. An approach, in which it is assumed that each of the component phases contributes to the composite material, is proposed and discussed to describe the sorption of lead onto cement using a knowledge of the phase components in a linear additive manner. The results showed reasonably good agreement between the predicted and measured Rd values for lead onto freshly cured and altered cements. (author)

  13. Sorption of phosphates and thiocyanates on isomorphic substituted Mg/Zn–Al-type hydrotalcites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA PODE

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The sorption equilibriums of phosphate and thiocyanate anions on isomorphic substituted Mg/Zn–Al-type hydrotalcites were investigated in this study. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to interpret the equilibrium data for phosphate. The sorption equilibriums of phosphate on Mg3Al, Mg2ZnAl and Mg1.5Zn1.5Al hydrotalcites were well described by the Langmuir isotherm. The highest maximum sorption capacities for these adsorbents were as follows: 111, 101 and 95 mg g-1. The equilibrium constant and standard Gibbs energy changes were also calculated from the sorption data. Standard Gibbs energy changes of about –20 kJ mol-1 indicated that the process might be considered as physical adsorption. The sorption equilibriums of phosphate on isomorphic substituted samples of MgZn2Al and Zn3Al were well described by the Freundlich isotherm. Thiocyanate showed a relative low affinity for the studied materials, as indicated by both the “S”-shaped isotherms and low sorption capacities. The sorption of phosphate and thiocyanate on the investigated hydrotalcites showed a continuous decrease of the sorption capacity in the following order: Mg3Al > Mg2ZnAl > Mg1.5Zn1.5Al > MgZn2Al > Zn3Al.

  14. EXAFS study of plutonium sorption onto kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, T.Y.; Banik, L.; Buda, R.A.; Amayri, S.; Drebert, J.; Kratz, J.V.; Trautmann, N.; Reich, T.; Ageev, A.L.; Korshunov, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The uptake mechanism of plutonium by kaolinite was investigated by applying X-ray absorption spectroscopy to batch sorption samples (total Pu concentrations 1 and 10 μM; 4 g kaolinite/L in 0.1 M NaClO 4 ; 1 ≤ pH ≤ 9; presence and absence of ambient CO 2 ). For XAFS measurements, one sample was prepared from a Pu(III) solution at pH 6 under argon atmosphere. Three samples were obtained by sorption of Pu(IV) at pH I, 4, and 9 in an air-equilibrated system. The Pu L III -edge XANES spectra indicated that in all samples, including the Pu(III) sample, plutonium is sorbed at the kaolinite surface as Pu(IV). The Pu L III -edge k 3 -weighted EXAFS spectra showed eight oxygen atoms at an average Pu-O distance of 2.3 angstrom. Two Pu atoms were detected at ∼ 3.7 angstrom in all spectra, indicating the formation of polynuclear Pu(IV) species at the kaolinite surface. For the sample prepared from Pu(III) solution, an additional Pu-O shell at 3.2 angstrom was observed. The spectra of samples prepared from Pu(IV) included a Pu-Al/Si co-ordination shell at approximately 3.6 angstrom, indicating formation of inner-sphere sorption complexes. The structural models used in the least-squares fits were confirmed by an alternative EXAFS data analysis approach based on a modified Tikhonov regularization method. (authors)

  15. Investigation of the charge boost technology for the efficiency increase of closed sorption thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohringer, C.; Engel, G.; Köll, R.; Wagner, W.; van Helden, W.

    2017-10-01

    The inclusion of solar thermal energy into energy systems requires storage possibilities to overcome the gap between supply and demand. Storage of thermal energy with closed sorption thermal energy systems has the advantage of low thermal losses and high energy density. However, the efficiency of these systems needs yet to be increased to become competitive on the market. In this paper, the so-called “charge boost technology” is developed and tested via experiments as a new concept for the efficiency increase of compact thermal energy storages. The main benefit of the charge boost technology is that it can reach a defined state of charge for sorption thermal energy storages at lower temperature levels than classic pure desorption processes. Experiments are conducted to provide a proof of principle for this concept. The results show that the charge boost technology does function as predicted and is a viable option for further improvement of sorption thermal energy storages. Subsequently, a new process application is developed by the author with strong focus on the utilization of the advantages of the charge boost technology over conventional desorption processes. After completion of the conceptual design, the theoretical calculations are validated via experiments.

  16. Mercury Sorption onto Malt Spent Rootlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manariotis, I. D.; Anagnostopoulos, V.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Chrysikopoulos, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is a metal of particular concern due to its toxicity even at relatively low concentrations. The maximum permissible level for mercury in drinking water set by the European Union is 0.001 mg/L. Mercury is released into the environment via four principal pathways: (1) natural processes; i.e. a volcanic eruption, (2) incidental to some other activity; i.e. coal burning power plants, (3) accidentally during the manufacture, breakage or disposal of products that have mercury put into them deliberately, and (4) direct use in industrial settings. The present study focuses on the removal of mercury (II) from aqueous solutions via sorption onto Malt Spent Rootlets (MSR). Batch experiments were conducted employing MSR with size ranging from 0.18 to 1 mm. The effects of pH, mercury concentration, contact time, and solid to liquid ratio on mercury sorption onto MSR were investigated. The highest mercury removal from the aqueous phase, of 41%, was observed at pH of 5.

  17. Data for the sorption of actinides on candidate materials for use in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.D.; Pryke, D.C.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-02-01

    The sorptive behaviour of the actinides uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium has been investigated under air-saturated conditions on a number of candidate near-field materials by batch sorption experiments. Distribution ratios were measured with respect to initial actinide concentration, the solid:liquid ratio and contact time. Desorption experiments were carried out to help elucidate the mechanism of sorption. The fit of the data to the Freundlich isotherm was assessed. This work contains the data obtained in the investigation. (author)

  18. Thermodynamics of imidacloprid sorption in Croatian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milin, Čedomila; Broznic, Dalibor

    2015-04-01

    Neonicotinoids are increasingly replacing the organophosphate and methylcarbamate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors which are losing their effectiveness because of selection for resistant pest populations. Imidacloprid is the most important neonicotinoid with low soil persistence, high insecticidal potency and relatively low mammalian toxicity. In Croatia, imidacloprid is most commonly used in olive growing areas, including Istria and Kvarner islands, as an effective means of olive fruit fly infestation control. Sorption-desorption behavior of imidacloprid in six soils collected from five coastal regions in Croatia at 20, 30 and 40°C was investigated using batch equilibrium technique. Isothermal data were applied to Freundlich, Langmuir and Temkin equation, and the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔG°, ΔS° were calculated. The sorption isotherm curves were of non-linear and may be classified as L-type suggesting a relatively high sorption capacity for imidacloprid. Our results showed that the KFsor values decreased for all the tested soils as the temperature increases, indicating that the temperature strongly influence the sorption. Values of ΔG° were negative (-4.65 to -2.00 kJ/mol) indicating that at all experimental temperatures the interactions of imidacloprid with soils were spontaneous process. The negative and small ΔH° values (-19.79 to -8.89 kJ/mol) were in the range of weak forces, such as H-bonds, consistent with interactions and par¬titioning of the imidacloprid molecules into soil organic matter. The ΔS° values followed the range of -57.12 to -14.51 J/molK, suggesting that imidacloprid molecules lose entropy during transition from the solution phase to soil surface. It was found that imidacloprid desorption from soil was concentration and temperature dependent, i.e. at lower imidacloprid concentrations and temperature, lower desorption percentage occurred. Desorption studies revealed that hysteretic behavior under different temperature

  19. Sorption and direct speciation of neptunium(V) on aluminium oxide and montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    This study comprised batch experiments, direct speciation studies via EXAFS, and modelling with the 2SPNE SC/CE model to elucidate the mechanisms of Np(V) sorption on montmorillonite and, for reference, on γ-Al 2 O 3 . The sorption of pM 239 Np(V) and μM 237 Np(V) on montmorillonite (STx-1, 4 g/L) and γ-Al 2 O 3 (0.5 g/L) was studied at room temperature in the presence and absence of ambient CO 2 covering a pH-range from 2.5 (STx-1) or 5 (γ-Al 2 O 3 ) to 10.5 with 0.01 or 0.1M NaClO 4 as background electrolyte. The Np(V) uptake was determined by γ spectroscopy of the supernatants and calculated as percentage as well as distribution coefficient K d . Sorption starts from pH ∼6 and, under exclusion of CO 2 , increases continuously, while, in the presence of ambient air, it reaches a maximum at pH ∝8.5 (γ-Al 2 O 3 : logK d max ∼ 4 mL/g; STx-1: logK d max ∼ 2.7 mL/g). Beyond that it decreases again due to the formation of aqueous neptunium carbonate complexes. Furthermore, neptunium sorption on montmorillonite is influenced by ionic strength at pH <6 through ion exchange processes pointing towards the formation of outer-sphere surface complexes there. Isotherms measured at the sorption maximum showed the precipitation of presumably neptunium carbonate complexes above 3.10 -5 M under ambient air conditions. Additionally, they indicated progressive saturation of the sorption sites of γ-Al 2 O 3 . At selected pH (STx-1: 5.0, 7.0, 8.0, 8.5, 9.0, 9.5; γ-Al 2 O 3 : 8.5, 9.5) EXAFS samples were prepared as wet pastes with μM 237 Np and measured at room temperature in fluorescence mode at ANKA and ESRF. Several spectra were averaged and analysed with EXAFSPAK and FEFF 8.20 employing models of NaNpO 2 (CO 3 ) or soddyite, (UO 2 ) 2 SiO 4 .2(H 2 O). The shorter atomic distances of the neptunyl ion at pH 5 compared to the others hinted at the retention of the hydration shell and, thus, at outer-sphere sorption. On average the bond lengths for Np(V) sorbed on STx

  20. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 22 0 C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 90 0 C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 22 0 C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables

  1. β-Zeolite modified by ethylenediamine for sorption of Th(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng; Wu, Hanyu; Yuan, Ni; Yin, Zhuoxin; Pan, Duoqiang; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Lab.; Ministry of Education, Lanzhou (China). Key Lab. of Special Function Materials and Structure Design

    2017-08-01

    β-Zeolite-EDA was modified with ethylenediamine (EDA) after synthesized. The synthesized material was characterized and used for removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The influences of pH, ionic strength, contact time, temperature and humic acid (HA) on Th(IV) sorption onto synthesized β-zeolite-EDA was studied by batch technique. The dynamic process showed that the sorption of Th(IV) onto β-zeolite-EDA matched the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The sorption of Th(IV) on β-zeolite-EDA was significantly dependent on pH values, the sorption percentage increased markedly at pH 3.5-4.5, and then maintained a steady state as pH values increased. Through simulating the sorption isotherms by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubini-Radushkevich (D-R) models, it could be seen respectively that the sorption pattern of Th(IV) on β-zeolite-EDA was mainly controlled by surface complexation, and that the sorption processes was endothermic and spontaneous. The presence of HA increased Th(IV) sorption on β-zeolite-EDA.

  2. Experimental studies of Cs, Sr, Ni, and Eu sorption on Na-illite and the modelling of Cs sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, C.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.

    1999-08-01

    A natural illite (illite du Puy) was purified and converted to the homo-ionic Na-form. The conditioned Na-illite was characterised in terms of its mineralogy, chemical inventory and physico-chemical properties. The structural formula was determined from energy dispersive spectroscopic analyses (SEM/TEM-EDS) and bulk chemistry measurements. A cation exchange capacity of 127 meq kg -1 was determined by the 22 Na isotope dilution method at neutral pH. The Na-CEC was also measured as a function of pH. The stability of Na-illite as a function of pH in the range between 3 and 6 was investigated. At low pH values partial dissolution of the illite occurs releasing the structural elements Al, Si, Mg, and K into solution. The presence of Ca and Sr in solution was interpreted as being due to desorption from cation exchange sites. All of these elements are also present at neutral pH but at considerably lower levels. Such effects cannot be avoided and must be considered in the interpretation of the sorption measurements. The main focus of the experimental work presented here is on the sorption behaviour of Cs, Sr, Ni and Eu on conditioned Na-illite as a function of NaClO 4 background electrolyte concentration (0.1 and 0.01 M), nuclide concentration and pH in the range between 3 and 11. Sorption edge data (R d versus pH) and sorption isotherms (quantity of nuclide sorbed versus equilibrium nuclide concentration) are presented for these four elements. Prior to beginning these experiments, sorption kinetics were measured. The broad based pool of sorption measurements generated from this work will provide the source data sets for subsequent modelling. So far only the Cs sorption measurements have been modelled. A two site cation exchange model was developed to describe the sorption of Cs over the whole range of experimental conditions. The two site types were termed 'frayed edge sites' (FES, high affinity/low capacity) and 'type II sites' (low affinity/high capacity). Selectivity

  3. SORPTION AND SOLUBILITY OF LOW-SHRINKAGE RESIN-BASED DENTAL COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Yantcheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-based composites are well-established restorative materials. However, these materials may absorb significant amounts of water when exposed to aqueous environments. Sorption and solubility are affecting composite restorations by two different mechanisms; the first is the up taking of water producing an increased weight and the second is the dissolution of materials in water, leading to a weight reduction of the final conditioned samples. Objective: To measure the water sorption and solubility of different low-shrinkage resin-based composites. Six materials were selected: Filtek P60, Filtek Ultimate, SonicFill, Filtek Silorane, Kalore and Venus Diamond. Materials and methods: Five disc specimens were prepared of each material and polymerized with diode light-curing unit. Water sorption and solubility of the different materials were were calculated by means of weighting the samples before and after water immersion and desiccation. Data were statistically analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk One Way Analysis of Variance followed by the Holm-Sidak comparison test . Results: There were significant differences (p<=0.001 between materials regarding sorption and solubility. Regarding sorption F. Silorane showed lowest values, followed by SonicFill, without significant difference between them. Statistical significant differences exist between F. Silorane and F.P60, F. Ultimate, Kalore. Significant differences exist between SonicFill and F. Ultimate. F.Silorane (-0.018 and Kalore (-0.010 showed lowest values of solubility but there were marginal difference among all composites investigated. Conclusions: 1.The material with lowest values of sorption and solubility was F.Silorane. 2. The attained sorption and solubility values for composites are influenced by the differences in resin matrix composition and filler contend. 3. Modifications of dimethacrylate matrix did not minimize significantly sorption and solubility of composites. 4. Besides water

  4. Kinetics and equilibrium modeling of uranium(VI) sorption by bituminous shale from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortaboy, Sinem; Atun, Gülten

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oil shales are sedimentary rocks containing a polymeric matter in a mineral matrix. • Sorption potential of bituminous shale (BS) for uranium recovery was investigated. • U(VI) sorption increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. • Kinetic data were analyzed based on single and two resistance diffusion models. • The results fit well to the McKay equation assuming film and intraparticle diffusion. - Abstract: Sorption of U(VI) onto a bituminous shale (BS) from a nuclear power plant project site in Black Sea region was investigated for potential risk assessment when it releases into the environment with contaminated ground and surface water. The sorption characteristics of the BS for U(VI) recovery were evaluated as a function of contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Kinetic results fit better with pseudo-second-order model rather than pseudo-first-order. The possibility of diffusion process was analyzed based on Weber–Morris intra-particle diffusion model. The McKay equation assuming film- and intraparticle diffusion better predicted the data than the Vermeulen approximation presuming surface diffusion. Equilibrium sorption data were modeled according to the Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) and Freundlich isotherm equations. Sorption capacity increased from 0.10 to 0.15 mmol g −1 in 298–318 K temperature range. FT-IR analysis and pH dependent sorption studies conducted in hydroxide and carbonate media revealed that U(VI) species were sorbed in uranyl and its hydroxo forms on the BS. Desorption studies showed that U(VI) leaching with Black Sea water was negligible from the loaded BS. The activation parameters (E a , ΔH ∗ and ΔG ∗ ) estimated from diffusion coefficients indicated the presence of an energy barrier in the sorption system. However, thermodynamic functions derived from sorption equilibrium constants showed that overall sorption process was spontaneous in nature

  5. Sorption of uranium by cellulose derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroi, M.; Imai, S.; Hamaguchi, A.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of uranium was investigated by batch and column methods using four cellulose derivatives, two having an amino group and two having an amino group plus a dithiocarboxylate group. All four derivatives showed maximum uranium sorption from pure water in the neutral region or from artificial sea water in the acidic region. In the batch method, quantitative removal of 100 μg of uranium from 50 ml of water at pH 5.0 was achieved by equilibration with 50 mg of any of the four sorbents. The percentage removal under these conditions decreased gradually with increasing concentration of uranium above 100 μg per 50 ml. A similar high percentage removal of uranium was achieved using artificial sea water. In the column method, quantitative removal of 5 μg of uranium from 1l of water at pH 6.7 was achieved with 200 mg of either of the two sorbents. Similar quantitative removal of uranium was achieved from 1l of artificial sea water at pH 5.4 with 500 mg of either of the two sorbents. (author)

  6. Gas Sorption, Diffusion, and Permeation in Nafion

    KAUST Repository

    Mukaddam, Mohsin Ahmed

    2015-12-22

    The gas permeability of dry Nafion films was determined at 2 atm and 35 °C for He, H2, N2, O2, CO2, CH4, C2H6, and C3H8. In addition, gas sorption isotherms were determined by gravimetric and barometric techniques as a function of pressure up to 20 atm. Nafion exhibited linear sorption uptake for low-solubility gases, following Henry’s law, and convex behavior for highly sorbing condensable gases, indicating rubber-like behavior at 35 °C. XRD results demonstrated that Nafion contains bimodal amorphous chain domains with average d-spacing values of 2.3 and 5.3 Å. Only helium and hydrogen showed relatively high gas permeability of 37 and 7 barrers, respectively; all other gases exhibited low permeability that decreased significantly as penetrant size increased. Dry Nafion was characterized by extraordinarily high selectivities: He/H2 = 5.2, He/CH4 = 445, He/C2H6 = 1275, He/C3H8 = 7400, CO2/CH4 = 28, CO2/C2H6 = 79, CO2/C3H8 = 460, H2/CH4 = 84, H2/C2H6 = 241, and H2/C3H8 = 1400. These high selectivities could make Nafion a potential candidate membrane material for dry feeds for helium recovery and carbon dioxide separation from natural gas and removal of higher hydrocarbons from hydrogen-containing refinery gases.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool investigating arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) sorption by an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-11-15

    Historic applications of arsenical pesticides to agricultural land have resulted in accumulation of residual arsenic (As) in such soils. In situ immobilization represents a cost-effective and least ecological disrupting treatment technology for soil As. Earlier work in our laboratory showed that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs), a low-cost, waste by-product of the drinking-water treatment process exhibit a high affinity for As. Wet chemical experiments (sorption kinetics and desorption) were coupled with X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the bonding strength and type of As(V) and As(III) sorption by an aluminum-based WTR. A fast (1h), followed by a slower sorption stage resulted in As(V) and As(III) sorption capacities of 96% and 77%, respectively. Arsenic desorption with a 5mM oxalate from the WTR was minimal, being always absorption spectroscopy data showed inner-sphere complexation between As and surface hydroxyls. Reaction time (up to 48h) had no effect on the initial As oxidation state for sorbed As(V) and As(III). A combination of inner-sphere bonding types occurred between As and Al on the WTR surface because mixed surface geometries and interatomic distances were observed.

  8. Effect of sediment properties on the sorption of C12-2-LAS in marine and estuarine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico Rico, A.; Temara, A.; Behrends, T.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) are anionic high production volume surfactants used in the manufacture of cleaning products. Here, we have studied the effect of the characteristics of marine and estuarine sediments on the sorption of LAS. Sorption experiments were performed with single sediment

  9. Effect of Suez Canal Marine Sediment on Sorption of Cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.B.

    2016-01-01

    Suez Canal is surrounded by navigation, industrial, agricultural activities and suffers from high rate of population growth that discharging waste into Suez Canal. The Suez Canal coastal waters are influenced by a complex variety of physical, geochemical and biological processes, which influence the behavior, transport and fate of containments released into the marine environment. Sorption of releasing containment such as cesium in Suez Canal water is investigated because of its toxic effect on the marine environment. The object of present study is to determine the effects some of physical and chemical characteristics of collected sediment samples from the three important locations on Suez Canal (Suez Bay, Bitter Lakes and El- Temsah Lake beaches) on sorption behavior of cesium by using batch experiment. Batch experiment was used to study the sorption of the cesium ion. The sorption process is dependent on mineral constituents of Suez Canal sediment and their characteristics. Analytical methods which included particle size and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses found that particle size of Suez Canal sediment samples is characterized by sand to fine sand and quartz is the main mineralogical species. Distribution coefficient (K d ) which represent geochemical processes and particle size of these sediment samples effect on the degree of cesium sorption to the sediment. Also (K d ) increase with increase cation exchangeable capacity (CEC). The Suez Canal sediment samples have low (K d ) values which effected by their physical and chemical properties. Sample (2) has highest distribution coefficient (K d ) between measured samples due to containing ratio 30% of fine sand and high ratio of organic matter.

  10. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  11. Sorption properties of algae Spirogyra sp. and their use for determination of heavy metal ions concentrations in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajfur, Małgorzata; Kłos, Andrzej; Wacławek, Maria

    2010-11-01

    Kinetics of heavy-metal ions sorption by alga Spirogyra sp. was evaluated experimentally in the laboratory, using both the static and the dynamic approach. The metal ions--Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)--were sorbed from aqueous solutions of their salts. The static experiments showed that the sorption equilibria were attained in 30 min, with 90-95% of metal ions sorbed in first 10 min of each process. The sorption equilibria were approximated with the Langmuir isotherm model. The algae sorbed each heavy metal ions proportionally to the amount of this metal ions in solution. The experiments confirmed that after 30 min of exposition to contaminated water, the concentration of heavy metal ions in the algae, which initially contained small amounts of these metal ions, increased proportionally to the concentration of metal ions in solution. The presented results can be used for elaboration of a method for classification of surface waters that complies with the legal regulations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Uranyl sorption onto alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, A.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism for the adsorption of uranyl onto alumina from aqueous solution was studied experimentally and the data were modeled using a triple layer surface complexation model. The experiments were carried out at low uranium concentrations (9 x 10 -11 --5 x 10 -8 M) in a CO 2 free environment at varying electrolyte concentrations (0.01--1 M) and pH (4.5--12). The first and second acid dissociation constants, pK a1 and pK a2 , of the alumina surface were determined from potentiometric titrations to be 7.2 ± 0.6 and 11.2 ± 0.4, respectively. The adsorption of uranium was found to be independent of the electrolyte concentration. The authors therefore conclude that the uranium binds as an inner sphere complex. The results were modeled using the code FITEQL. Two reactions of uranium with the surface were needed to fit the data, one forming a uranyl complex with a single surface hydroxyl and the other forming a bridged or bidentate complex reacting with two surface hydroxyls of the alumina. There was no evidence from these experiments of site heterogeneity. The constants used for the reactions were based in part on predictions made utilizing the Hard Soft Acid Base, HSAB, theory, relating the surface complexation constants to the hydrolysis of the sorbing metal ion and the acid dissociation constants of the mineral oxide surface

  13. Sorption of 241Am onto montmorillonite, illite and hematite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Ulrich, H.J.; Silby, H.

    1994-01-01

    Actinide sorption on colloids may be described as a competition between the formation of complexes in solution and the build up of surface complexes. The role of particle and of carbonate concentrations on the sorption/desorption of 241 Am on montmorillonite, illite and hematite colloids is investigated. Since the partition coefficient (K p ) values are virtually independent of the colloid concentrations, within the range 1 to 300 ppm, no significant aggregation takes place in the sorption/desorption experiment. At pH 8, a slight decrease of K p is observed if the concentration of total carbonate exceeds 10 -2 M. The formation of the carbonato- (and hydroxo-carbonato-) complexes in the solution competes with the formation of surface complexes on the colloids. A relationship between the sorption coefficient and the complexation of 241 Am in the solution has been found. This leads to the conclusion that, besides free americium cation, the hydroxo-, and carbonato- as well as the mixed hydroxo-carbonato-complexes are sorbed. Only when the tricarbonatocomplex [Am(CO 3 ) 3 ] 3- prevails (total carbonate concentration > 10 -2 M), a significant decrease of the distribution coefficient is observed. At pH 10 this decrease disappears because under these conditions the strong hydroxo-complexes dominate. A pragmatic and relatively simple application of surface complexation model describes the observed features. (orig.)

  14. Sorption characteristics of technetium on crosslinked chitosan from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Rajec, P.

    2014-01-01

    Sorption of technetium on crosslinked chitosan was studied using batch techniques in static arrangement of experiment under aerobic conditions at laboratory temperature. The adsorption of technetium was rapid and the percentage of the technetium sorption was > 98 %. In the pH range of 3-11 adsorption of technetium on crosslinked chitosan was > 98 %. The competition effect of Fe 3+ towards TcO 4 - sorption on crosslinked chitosan was stronger than the competition effect of other observed cations. The selectivity of crosslinked chitosan for these cations in solution with the concentration above 1·10 -3 mol·dm -3 was in the order Fe 3+ > Ca 2+ > Na + > Fe 2+ . The competition effect of (ClO 4 ) - towards TcO 4 - sorption was stronger than the competition effect of (SO 4 ) 2 - ions. From these results it can be expected that crosslinked chitosan could be a suitable sorbent for the immobilization of technetium in the liquid radioactive waste. (authors)

  15. Sorption compressor/mechanical expander hybrid refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. A.; Britcliffe, M.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with Deep Space Network (DSN) ground-based cryogenic refrigerators has proved the reliability of the basic two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium refrigerator. A very long life cryogenic refrigeration system appears possible by combining this expansion system or a turbo expansion system with a hydride sorption compressor in place of the usual motor driven piston compressor. To test the feasibility of this system, a commercial Gifford-McMahon refrigerator was tested using hydrogen gas as the working fluid. Although no attempt was made to optimize the system for hydrogen operation, the refrigerator developed 1.3 W at 30 K and 6.6 W at 60 K. The results of the test and of theoretical performances of the hybrid compressor coupled to these expansion systems are presented.

  16. Sorption of radionuclides on a soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami

    1979-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes into the ground has been discussed, and this paper emphasized significance of the investigation for underground water flow and for the prediction of radionuclides through a stratified aquifer using column experiments to evaluate the internal radiation dose. Distributions and redistributions of radionuclides in a sandy layer were observed to identify the sorption model which predicts the behavior, and the underground water flow in the Plio-Pleistocene Osaka Group was investigated as an example, by mean of the measurement of 222 Rn concentration, the pumping technique and the tracer technique using the activation analysis. Then, the estimation of radioactive concentration in the underground water was worked out for the boundary condition of steady state inflow of liquid wastes and of which the 90 Sr are leached from the solidified body, moreover, the equation which easily evaluates the suitability of the disposal site was proposed. These approach may be useful for the actual site selection of radioactive wastes disposal. (author)

  17. Applicability of microautoradiography to sorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of microautoradiography was applied to the study of the sorption of uranium and americium on five rock types which exist at the Nevada Test Site. It was found that autoradiograms could be prepared in a few days which would allow the specific minerals responsible for sorption to be identified. Furthermore, the state of aggregation of the sorbed species was clearly indicated. It was concluded that microautoradiography was a useful adjunct to currently used methods for studying sorption of certain radionuclides

  18. Effects of nitrate, fulvate, phosphate, phthalate, salicylate and catechol on the sorption of uranyl onto SiO2. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongxia; Wen Chuanxi; Tao Zuyi; Wu Wangsuo

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a large number of batch sorption experiments of uranyl onto SiO 2 and examined the effects of nitrate or ionic strength, phosphate, fulvic acid(FA), phthalic acid (PH), salicylic acid (SA), and catechol (CA) on the uranyl sorption onto SiO 2 . Three sorption edges and three sorption isotherms at ionic strengths 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 mol/L KNO 3 were used to investigate the effect of ionic strength or nitrate on the sorption and the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich models are used to simulate the sorption isotherms, respectively. Five sorption edges in the presence of phosphate, FA, PH, SA, and CA were compared with that in the absence of complexing ligand. The results suggest that the effect of complexation of uranyl with nitrate on the uranyl sorption can be negligible and the sorption can be described Freundlich and D-R model very well. The positive effect of phosphate on the uranyl sorption was found, though the extent of effect was decreased with increasing pH. The positive effect and the negative effect of FA on the uranyl sorption were found at low pH and high pH ranges, respectively. The sorption edge of uranyl sorption remained unaffected in the presence of PH in the pH 2-10. In the presence of SA, the no effect and the negative effect on the uranyl sorption were, respectively, found at low pH and high pH ranges. The negative effect of CA on the uranyl sorption was found in the pH 2-10. (author)

  19. Measurement of NO2 pollutant sorption of various trees, shrubs and ground cover plants using gas NO2 labelled 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrullah, Nizar; Wungkar, Marietje; Gunawan, Andi; Gandanegara, Soertini; Suharsono, Heny

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to measure the NO 2 pollutant sorption of various trees, shrubs and ground cover plants. 32 species of trees, 64 speceis of shrubs and 13 species of ground cover plants were exposed to 3 ppm (v / v) N- 15 O 2 in a gas chamber for 60 minutes. Experiment consisted of 2 replicates. The environment conditions in the chamber were set at 30 o C, 1000 lux, and initial relative humidity 60 %. After gas treatment, plants parts were separated into leaves, stems and roots, than dried in 70 o C for 48 hours and then weighed. After weighing, those plants parts were ground to a pine powder. After kjendhal digestion, N total content of plants were analyzed by distillation method. 15 N content of plant samples were analyzed by emission spectrometer ( Yasco, N-151). The amount of N-15 absorbed by plant was the total content of 15 N in the whole plants ( leaves, stem and root ) per gram dry weight of leaves. The amount of 15 N absorbed by plants varied among investigated plants. 15 N sorption of trees are in the range 0.28 - 68.31μg/g. The sorption of shrubs and ground cover plants varied in 1.97 - 100.02 μg/g and 2.38 - 24.06μg/g, respectively. According to the amount of 15 N sorption , the plants were divided into 3 groups of sorption level, high ( > 30.0μg/g), moderate ( 15 - 30 μg/g ), and low sorption level ( 15 μg/g). Results showed that among of 32 investigated trees, 64 shrubs and 13 ground cover plant, 4 species of trees and 13 species of shrubs performed a high sorption level and no one of ground cover plants performed a high sorption level. The species of trees and 15 species of shrubs that mention above are recommended to use as an element of landscape which to be functioned to reduce NO 2 atmospheric pollutant

  20. A comparative study of phosphate sorption in lowland soils under oxic and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Lisa; Pedersen, Thomas Vils; Jensen, Henning S.

    2010-01-01

    of 36 to 93% of the dithionite-extractable FeIII (FeBD). Langmuir fitted Pi sorption isotherms showed a Pi release of up to 1.1 mmol kg-1 in six soils when Pi concentrations in the matrix (Psol) were lower than 10 µM. Phosphate desorption was attributed to dissolution of amorphous iron oxides......, and higher pH under anoxic conditions. The point of zero net sorption (EPC0) increased 2- to 10-fold on reduction. Five soils showed higher Pi sorption capacities in the anoxic than in the oxic state at higher Psol concentrations. Solubility calculations indicated that precipitation of vivianite or similar...

  1. Strontium sorption on Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1984-12-01

    A laboratory study of strontium-85 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that strontium sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence strontium sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the conditions of water at the bottom of waste trenches, did not account for low strontium sorption observed with some trench waters

  2. Sorption of radioiodide in an acidic, nutrient-poor boreal bog: insights into the microbial impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusa, M.; Bomberg, M.; Aromaa, H.; Knuutinen, J.; Lehto, J.

    2015-01-01

    Batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption behaviour of iodide and the microbial impact on iodide sorption in the surface moss, subsurface peat, gyttja, and clay layers of a nutrient-poor boreal bog. The batch distribution coefficient (K d ) values of iodide decreased as a function of sampling depth. The highest K d values, 4800 L/Kg dry weight (DW) (geometric mean), were observed in the fresh surface moss and the lowest in the bottom clay (geometric mean 90 mL/g DW). In the surface moss, peat and gyttja layers, which have a high organic matter content (on average 97%), maximum sorption was observed at a pH between ∼4 and 5 and in the clay layer at pH 2. The K d values were significantly lower in sterilized samples, being 20-fold lower than the values found for the unsterilized samples. In addition, the recolonization of sterilized samples with a microbial population from the fresh samples restored the sorption capacity of surface moss, peat and gyttja samples, indicating that the decrease in the sorption was due to the destruction of microbes and supporting the hypothesis that microbes are necessary for the incorporation of iodide into the organic matter. Anoxic conditions reduced the sorption of iodide in fresh, untreated samples, similarly to the effect of sterilization, which supports the hypothesis that iodide is oxidized into I 2 /HIO before incorporation into the organic matter. Furthermore, the K d values positively correlated with peroxidase activity in surface moss, subsurface peat and gyttja layers at +20 °C, and with the bacterial cell counts obtained from plate count agar at +4 °C. Our results demonstrate the importance of viable microbes for the sorption of iodide in the bog environment, having a high organic matter content and a low pH. - Highlights: • Sorption of iodide is highest on the surface Sphagnum layer of the bog. • Sterilization of peat decreases the sorption of iodide. • Anoxic conditions decrease

  3. Sorption behavior of cesium on various soils under different pH levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannakopoulou, F.; Haidouti, C.; Chronopoulou, A.; Gasparatos, D.

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the sorption behavior of Cs in four different soils (sandyloam, loam, clayloam and clay) by using batch experiment. Cs sorption characteristics of the studied soils were examined at 4 mg L -1 Cs concentration, at various pH levels, at room temperature and with 0.01 M CaCl 2 as a background electrolyte. Among different soils the decrease of k d (distribution coefficient) of cesium, at all pH levels, followed the sequence sandyloam > loam > clayloam > clay, indicating that the particle size fractions and especially the clay content plays predominant role on sorption of Cs. The effect of pH on cesium sorption displays a similar pattern for all soils, depending on soil type. At acid pH levels less cesium was sorbed, due to a greater competition with other cations for available sorption sites. The maximum sorption of Cs was observed at pH 8, where the negative charge density on the surface of the absorbents was the highest. For all soils was observed significantly lower Cs sorption at pH 10

  4. Enrofloxacin sorption on smectite clays: effects of pH, cations, and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Hu, Shan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2012-04-15

    Enrofloxacin (ENR) occurs widely in natural waters because of its extensive use as a veterinary chemotherapeutic agent. To improve our understanding of the interaction of this emerging contaminant with soils and sediments, sorption of ENR on homoionic smectites and kaolinite was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength, exchangeable cations, and humic acid concentration. Batch experiments and in situ ATR-FTIR analysis suggested multiple sorption mechanisms. Cation exchange was a major contributor to the sorption of cationic ENR species on smectite. The decreased ENR sorption with increasing ionic strength indicated the formation of outer-sphere complexes. Exchangeable cations significantly influenced the sorption capacity, and the observed order was Cssorption, while humic acid had a negligible contribution to the interlayer intercalation. The results of this study provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of ENR sorption on clay minerals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Humidity scanning quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring setup for determination of sorption-desorption isotherms and rheological changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Björklund, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastianbjorklund@gmail.com; Kocherbitov, Vitaly [Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden); Biofilms—Research Center for Biointerfaces, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden)

    2015-05-15

    A new method to determine water sorption-desorption isotherms with high resolution in the complete range of water activities (relative humidities) is presented. The method is based on quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The QCM-D is equipped with a humidity module in which the sample film is kept in air with controlled humidity. The experimental setup allows for continuous scanning of the relative humidity from either dry to humid conditions or vice versa. The amount of water sorbed or desorbed from the sample is determined from the resonance frequencies of the coated quartz sensor, via analysis of the overtone dependence. In addition, the method allows for characterization of hydration induced changes of the rheological properties from the dissipation data, which is closely connected to the viscoelasticity of the film. The accuracy of the humidity scanning setup is confirmed in control experiments. Sorption-desorption isotherms of pig gastric mucin and lysozyme, obtained by the new method, show good agreement with previous results. Finally, we show that the deposition technique used to coat the quartz sensor influences the QCM-D data and how this issue can be used to obtain further information on the effect of hydration. In particular, we demonstrate that spin-coating represents an attractive alternative to obtain sorption-desorption isotherms, while drop-coating provides additional information on changes of the rheological properties during hydration.

  6. Effects of humic acid and heavy metals on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fei; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Liu, Yarui; Zhu, Hongkai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) and heavy metals (Cu 2+ and Ag + ) on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars that were produced at temperatures of 200 °C (BC200) and 700 °C (BC700) were studied. Due to the plentiful polar functional groups on BC200, cationic propranolol exhibited higher levels of sorption than naphthalene on BC200 while naphthalene and propranolol showed similar sorption capacities on BC700. HA changed the characteristics of biochars and generally inhibited the sorption of target organic pollutants on biochars; however, enhancement occurred in some cases depending on the pollutants involved and their concentrations, biochars used and the addition sequences and concentrations of HA. On BC200, HA modifications mainly influenced sorption by decreasing its polarity and increasing its aromaticity, while on BC700, the surface area and pore volume greatly decreased due to the pore-blocking effects of HA. Residue dissolved HA in solution may also contribute to sorption inhibition. Complexation between polar functional groups on BC200 and heavy metals slightly enhanced the sorption of neutral naphthalene and significantly enhanced that of anionic 4-nitro-1-naphtol, while limited the sorption of cationic propranolol. Heavy metals together with their associated water molecules decreased the sorption of target chemicals on BC700 via pore-filling or pore-mouth-covering. Inhibition of heavy metals for 4-nitro-1-naphthol was found to be the weakest due to the bridge effects of heavy metals between 4-nitro-1-naphtol and BC700. The higher polarizability of Ag + led to the increase of its sorption on biochars in the presence of organic aromatic pollutants. The results of the present study shed light on the sorption mechanisms of bi-solute systems and enable us to select suitable biochar sorbents when chemicals co-exist. - Highlights: • Polar functional groups on low-temperature biochar enhanced propranolol sorption. • Humic acid

  7. Soil microorganisms determine the sorption of radionuclides within organic soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Potter, E.D.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of soil microorganisms to enhance the retention of 137 Cs and 85 Sr in organic systems was assessed in a series of experiments. A biologically active, 'mineral-free', organic material, produced under laboratory conditions from leaves, was used as the uptake matrix in all experiments to minimise potential interference from competing clay minerals. Biological uptake and release were differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing the sorption of radionuclides in sterilised organic material with sterile material inoculated with soil extracts or single fungal strains. Our results show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material. The presence of soil microorganisms significantly enhanced the retention of Cs in organic systems and ∼70% of the Cs spike was strongly (irreversibly) bound (remained non-extractable) in the presence of microorganisms compared to only ∼10% in abiotic systems. Sorption of 85 Sr was not significantly influenced by the presence of soil microorganisms. A non-linear temperature response was observed for the retention in biotic systems with increased uptake at between 10 and 30 deg. C and lower retention at temperatures above or below the optimum range. The optimum temperatures for biological uptake were between 15 and 20 deg. C for Cs, and 25 and 30 deg. C for Sr. Our results indicate that single strains of soil and saprotrophic fungi make an important contribution to the sorption of Cs and Sr in organic systems, but can only account for part of the strong, irreversible binding observed in biotic systems. Single strains of soil fungi increased the amount of non-extractable 137 Cs (by ∼30%) and 85 Sr (by ∼20%) in the organic systems as compared to abiotic systems, but the major fraction of 137 Cs and 85 Sr sorbed in systems inoculated with saprotrophic fungi remained extractable

  8. Sorption of organic water pollutants on dead vegetable biomass; Sorption organischer Wasserschadstoffe an abgestorbene pflanzliche Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraeuter, A.

    2001-03-01

    Hemp-derived biological sorption agents were produced, and their physical, chemical and sorptive characteristics were tested in batch and filter tests. The experiments were accompanied by model calculations. In the natural state, the sorption agents had a kation exchange capacity of 0.1-0.3 mmol/g, modified sorption agents had about 2 mmol/g. Kationized hemp had values of 0.34 mmol/g and thermally modified hemp absorption agents absorbed more than 1.2 mmol/g of dichlorophenol. In the case of a liquid effluent from a textile dyeing plant, only a discoloration effect was achieved. The absorption agents can be regenerated, combusted or composted after use. [German] Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurden naturbelassene und modifizierte Billig-Biosorbentien aus Hanfschaeben zur Entfernung organischer Schadstoffe aus Waessern hergestellt und ihre physikalischen, chemischen und sorptiven Eigenschaften in Batch- und Filterversuchen untersucht. Wegen der Komplexheit des Systems ''Biosorption organischer Wasserschadstoffe'' wurden die ermittelten Sorptionsisothermen mit den Ansaetzen nach Langmuir und Freundlich beschrieben. Die Sorptionskinetik und das Durchbruchsverhalten wurde ebenfalls mit einfachen Ansaetzen modelliert. Naturbelassene Hanfschaeben erreichten Kationenaustauschkapazitaeten von 0,1-0,3 mmol/g, entsprechend modifizierte Hanfschaeben ca. 2 mmol/g. Kationisierte Hanfschaeben dagegen erreichten Anionenaustauschkapazitaeten von 0,34 mmol/g und thermisch modifizierte Hanfschaeben sorbierten bis ueber 1,2 mmol/g Dichlorphenol. Bei der Behandlung eines Abwassers aus einer Textilfaerberei beschraenkte sich die Reinigungsleistung der hergestellten Biosorbentien auf eine Entfaerbung. Nach Schadstoffbeladung koennen die Hanfschaeben regeneriert, thermisch verwertet oder kompostiert werden. (orig.)

  9. Sorption of cesium in young till soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusa, Merja; Lempinen, Janne; Ahola, Hanna; Soederlund, Mervi; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Laboratory of Radiochemistry; Lahdenperae, Anne-Maj [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Ikonen, Ari T.K. [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    Soil samples from three forest soil pits were examined down to a depth of approximately three metres using 1 M ammonium acetate extraction and microwave-assisted extraction with concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), to study the binding of cesium (Cs) at Olkiluoto Island, southern Finland. Ammonium acetate was used to extract the readily exchangeable Cs fractions roughly representing the Cs fraction in soil which is available for plants. Microwave-assisted HNO{sub 3} extraction dissolves various minerals, e.g. carbonates, most sulphides, arsenides, selenides, phosphates, molybdates, sulphates, iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides and some silicates (olivine, biotite, zeolite), and reflects the total Cs concentrations. Cs was mostly found in the strongly bound fraction obtained through HNO{sub 3} extraction. The average Cs concentrations found in this fraction were 3.53 ± 0.30 mg/kg (d.w.), 3.06 ± 1.86 mg/kg (d.w.) and 1.83 ± 0.42 mg/kg (d.w.) in the three soil pits, respectively. The average exchangeable Cs found in the ammonium acetate extraction in all three sampling pits was 0.015 ± 0.008 mg/kg (d.w.). In addition, Cs concentrations in the soil solution were determined and in situ distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Cs were calculated. Furthermore, the in situ K{sub d} data was compared with the Cs K{sub d} data obtained using the model batch experiments. The in situ K{sub d} values were observed to fairly well follow the trend of batch sorption data with respect to soil depth, but on average the batch distribution coefficients were almost an order of magnitude higher than the in situ K{sub d} data. In situ Cs sorption data could be satisfactory fitted with the Langmuir sorption isotherm, but the Freundlich isotherm failed to fit the data. Finally, distribution coefficients were calculated by an ion exchange approach using soil solution data, the cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as Cs to sodium (Na) and Cs to potassium (K) ion exchange selectivity

  10. Sorption and Migration Mechanisms of 237 Np through Sandy Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraprachoom, Nanthavan; Tanaka, Tadao

    2003-06-01

    In order to evaluate migration behavior of radioactive nuclides in the disposal of low-level radioactive waste into a shallow land burial, the sorption characteristic and migration behavior of 237 Np through sandy soil was studied. Two experimental methods were performed by using batch and column systems. The distribution coefficients (K d ) obtained from the adsorption and desorption process are rather small about 16 and 21 cm 3 /g respectively. Size distribution of 237 Np species in the influent solution was measured by ultra-filtration technique. Migration mechanism of 237 Np was studied by column experiments. The experimental condition was the influence of volume of eluting solution; 100, 300, 500, 1000 and 2000 ml respectively. The result from five column experiments confirm that the sorption characteristics of 237 Np are mainly controlled by a reversible ion-exchange reaction and the migration of 237 Np in the sandy soil can be estimated by using the K d concept

  11. Impact of bleaching agents on water sorption and solubility of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi Ardakani, Mahshid; Atashkar, Berivan; Bagheri, Rafat; Burrow, Michael F

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of distilled water and home and office bleaching agents on the sorption and solubility of resin luting cements. A total of 18 disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of four resin cements: G-CEM LinkAce, Panavia F, Rely X Unicem, and seT. Specimens were cured according to the manufacturers' instructions and randomly divided into three groups of six, where they were treated with either an office or home bleaching agent or immersed in distilled water (control). Water sorption and solubility were measured by weighing the specimens before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. There was a significant, positive correlation between sorption and solubility. Two-way anova showed significant differences among all resin cements tested for either sorption or solubility. Water sorption and solubility of all cements were affected significantly by office bleaching, and even more by home bleaching agents. Sorption and solubility behavior of the studied cements were highly correlated and significantly affected by applying either office or home bleaching agents; seT showed the highest sorption and solubility, whereas Rely X Unicem revealed the lowest. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  13. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Fabio; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges; Lavorenti, Arquimedes

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh 2 PO 4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha -1 of P 2 O 5 , which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L -1 ), with a 14 C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL -1 . Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl 2 0.01 mol L -1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L -1 ). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm -3 . Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  14. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  15. Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Brett C.; Revzan, Kenneth L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-11-30

    We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m{sup 3} room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C{sub 8}-C{sub 10} aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h{sup -1} and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium.

  16. Effects of human management on black carbon sorption/desorption during a water transfer project: Recognizing impacts and identifying mitigation possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong; Zhang, Jinliang; Wang, Peichao; Hu, Ronggui; Song, Yantun; Wu, Yupeng; Qiu, Guohong

    2018-05-15

    Water resources management is an important public concern. In this study, we examined the extent of sorption/desorption of trace pollutants to soil black carbon (BC) in the water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of the middle route of the South to North Water Transfer Project in China. In addition, we investigated the main management measures affecting these processes during the project. The results showed that the pseudo second-order model adequately describes the sorption/desorption of phenanthrene on the soil BC in the WLFZ. Water level fluctuation may indirectly influenced BC sorption/desorption by altering water chemistry. Water level residence time had negative effects on BC sorption in short-term experiments (days to months), but the impact gradually diminished with increased residence time. The results suggested that long-term field monitoring of water chemistry is urgent. During the initial period of water transfer, delaying the water supplies as drinking water source or directly irrigating crops could mitigate the adverse impacts. Future research should focus on the water-soluble products of BC degradation. The findings of this study should be useful in improving sustainable management of water resources for water transfer projects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydro-mechanical coupling and permeability of an unsaturated swelling clay under hydrous and thermal stress: sorption curve and water permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olchitzky, E.

    2002-02-01

    The use of swelling clay for engineered safety barriers of radioactive waste disposal require the understanding of its thermal-hydro-mechanical behaviour. This work concerns particularly the characterization and the modelling of the behaviour of one of these clays: the FoCa7 clay. The characteristics of the studied material are: the sorption (desorption) curve and the water permeability. For each of them, new experiments have allowed to acquire data in fields still few explored: in temperature (between 20 and 80 C) for the sorption curve and in the unsaturated field for the water permeability. The analysis of these results and of bibliographic data has allowed in one hand to estimate the importance of the hysteresis phenomenon and the temperature influence on the sorption curve and in another hand, to establish the requirement to introduce in the modelling of the sorption curve, a plastic parameter due to the irreversible deformations occurring during the compaction. Moreover, the tests carried out for data acquirement have been used too to give validation elements to the non linear behaviour laws proposed by O. Coussy and P. Dangla for the non saturated porous media. The particularity of these laws is to suppose the existence of an effective constraint in the non saturated field, this shows the importance of the validation elements presented here. (O.M.)

  18. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems; Sorcion de samario en fosfatos de hierro (II) y (III) en sistemas acuosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J C

    2006-07-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  19. The effect of preparation of biogenic sorbent on zinc sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jenčárová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prepare biogenic sulphides by using bacteria for the removal of zinc cations from their solutions. Theproduction was realized in a bioreactor under anaerobic conditions at 30 °C. Sorbents were prepared by sulphate-reducing bacteria indifferent nutrient medium modifications, under two modes of bacteria cultivation. Created precipitates of iron sulphides were removedfrom the liquid phase of the cultivation medium by filtration, dried and used for the sorption experiments.

  20. Sorption study of U+6 in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junior, Antonio P.; Wasserman, Maria A.V.; Mantovano, Jose L.; Carvalho, Leonel M.; Perez, Daniel V.

    2015-01-01

    The uranium mining is one of the main activities of the nuclear fuel cycle that can contribute to the increased exposure to radioactive materials and is one of the main routes of contamination of soil by natural radionuclides. This study investigated the sorption of uranium in brazilian soils, through sorption isotherms performed in batch. In this study, two types of soils were selected: Ferralsols Red and Nitosol. The adjustment of the experimental data to the kinetic models were evaluated by two approaches: the traditional, based on the coefficient of determination (R 2 ); and the theoretical and informative, based on Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AIC C ). The coefficient of determination (R 2 ), revealed that, although empirical, both the kinetic model, Freundlich and Langmuir, describes satisfactorily the experimental data, showing R 2 values higher than 0.9, while the partition constant model was not suitable for describe these sorption data. The AICC model analysis showed that the Langmuir model fit the U sorption curve well for Ferralsols Red, while the Freundlich model fits better to Nitosol. This study has highlighted the role of organic matter on the sorption of uranium in highly weathered soils, rich in oxyhydroxides and low activity clays. The Kd values reported in this study differ from those recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, therefore must be considered as reference values for highly weathered soils, since it refers to Brazilian pedoenvironmental conditions. The low Kd values obtained in this study allowed to evaluate the high vulnerability of highly weathered soils to uranium contamination. (author)

  1. Sorption study of U{sup +6} in Brazilian soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junior, Antonio P.; Wasserman, Maria A.V.; Mantovano, Jose L.; Carvalho, Leonel M., E-mail: apjunior@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mwasserman@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mantovan@ien.gov.br, E-mail: leonel@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Perez, Daniel V., E-mail: daniel@cnps.embrapa.br [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisas Agropecuarias (Embrapa Solos-CNPS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The uranium mining is one of the main activities of the nuclear fuel cycle that can contribute to the increased exposure to radioactive materials and is one of the main routes of contamination of soil by natural radionuclides. This study investigated the sorption of uranium in brazilian soils, through sorption isotherms performed in batch. In this study, two types of soils were selected: Ferralsols Red and Nitosol. The adjustment of the experimental data to the kinetic models were evaluated by two approaches: the traditional, based on the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}); and the theoretical and informative, based on Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AIC{sub C}). The coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), revealed that, although empirical, both the kinetic model, Freundlich and Langmuir, describes satisfactorily the experimental data, showing R{sup 2} values higher than 0.9, while the partition constant model was not suitable for describe these sorption data. The AICC model analysis showed that the Langmuir model fit the U sorption curve well for Ferralsols Red, while the Freundlich model fits better to Nitosol. This study has highlighted the role of organic matter on the sorption of uranium in highly weathered soils, rich in oxyhydroxides and low activity clays. The Kd values reported in this study differ from those recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, therefore must be considered as reference values for highly weathered soils, since it refers to Brazilian pedoenvironmental conditions. The low Kd values obtained in this study allowed to evaluate the high vulnerability of highly weathered soils to uranium contamination. (author)

  2. Structural analysis of ternary actinyl(V/VI) sorption complexes on gibbsite. A combined quantum chemical and spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueckel, Katharina

    2013-10-08

    For the safety assessment of high-level nuclear waste repositories, it is mandatory to know the transportation paths of contaminants, e.g. actinyl ions, in the geological barrier. The most attention needs to be focused on the transport in aquifers, because water contamination, depending on retention and migration processes of radionuclides in the geosphere, is of primary environmental concern. The migration behavior of actinides in ground water is mainly controlled by aquatic speciations and sorption processes at water-mineral interfaces. Hence, the investigation of complexspecies in aqueous solutions and at mineral surfaces becomes essential for the safety assessment in the near and far field of nuclear repositories. For deep ground repositories, clay and clay minerals are considered as possible host rocks, because they show a low permeability and are expected to have a high retention capacity towards actinyl ions. But the complexity of naturally occurring minerals in particular their surface often hampers the unequivocal interpretation of results obtained from sorption experiments. The use of model phases only showing one particular functional group at the surfaces with a well defined surface topology is an appropriate approach for the understanding of the basic sorption processes. Aluminum oxide and hydroxides are of special interest because they represent main components in clays and clay minerals. In particular, gibbsite is widely used as a model system because it represents not only the most common crystalline aluminum hydroxide but also a ubiquitous weathering product of alumosilicates. Furthermore, the elemental structural unit of gibbsite, that is the Al(OH)6 octahedron, occurs ubiquitously as part of the structure of common clay minerals like kaolinite. In the present study, the sorption processes of U(VI) and Np(V) on gibbsite were studied under consideration of the aqueous speciation.

  3. Uranium(VI) sorption on iron oxides in Hanford Site sediment: Application of a surface complexation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Rod, Kenton A.

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of U(VI) on Hanford fine sand (HFS) with varying Fe-oxide (especially ferrihydrite) contents showed that U(VI) sorption increased with the incremental addition of synthetic ferrihydrite into HFS, consistent with ferrihydrite being one of the most reactive U(VI) sorbents present in natural sediments. Surface complexation model (SCM) calculations for U(VI) sorption, using only U(VI) surface-reaction constants obtained from U(VI) sorption data on freshly synthesized ferrihydrite at different pHs, were similar to the measured U(VI) sorption results on pure synthetic ferrihydrite and on HFS with high contents of ferrihydrite (5 wt%) added. However, the SCM prediction using only U(VI) sorption reactions and constants for synthetic ferrihydrite overestimated U(VI) sorption on the natural HFS or HFS with addition of low amounts of added ferrihydrite (1 wt% added). Over-predicted U(VI) sorption was attributed to reduced reactivity of natural ferrihydrite present in Hanford Site sediments, compared to freshly prepared synthetic ferrihydrite. Even though the SCM general composite (GC) approach is considered to be a semi-quantitative estimation technique for contaminant sorption, which requires systematic experimental data on the sorbent-sorbate system being studied to obtain credible SCM parameters, the general composite SCM model was still found to be a useful technique for describing U(VI) sorption on natural sediments. Based on U(VI) batch sorption results, two simple U(VI) monodentate surface species, SO U O 2 HCO 3 and SO U O 2 OH on ferrihydrite and phyllosillicate in HFS, respectively, can be successfully used to describe U(VI) sorption onto Hanford Site sediment contacting varying geochemical solutions

  4. Effects of biochar and clay amendment on nutrient sorption of an Arenosol in semi-arid NE-Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beusch, Christine; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil nutrient-poor Arenosol with a low capacity to retain water and nutrients is the predominant soil type. Our aim is to provide a long-term melioration of the soils with locally available and inexpensive materials. We hypothesize an increase in nutrient sorption by the addition of biochar and clay. We conducted adsorption experiments according to OECD 106 batch equilibrium method in order to test this hypothesis. Sandy Arenosol, locally produced pyrolized biochar made of Prosopis juliflora, and a clayey Vertisol with a clay content of 69.8 %, all from our project area in Pernambuco, NE-Brazil, were used. The percentage of biochar and Vertisol added were 0 % (pure Arenosol), 1 %, 2.5 %, 5 %, 10 %, 100 % (pure biochar respectively Vertisol). Samples were shaken for 24 hours in a 1:5 solid-solution ratio in six different concentrations of Ammonium-N, Nitrate-N (0 - 25 mg L-1 each), Phosphorus (0 - 19.8 mg L-1) and Potassium (0 - 50 mg L-1). These concentrations were chosen to represent a common range of nutrients in a prevalent quaternary fertilization scheme of N:P:K of 1:0.4:1, with half NH4-N and NO3-N each. Then, where possible, sorption isotherms according to Langmuir were derived. Addition of biochar and Vertisol only showed marginal effects on Ammonium sorption. We detected a high loss of Ammonium with pure biochar, we assume loss of gaseous NH3. High rates of biochar addition caused Nitrate retention. Biochar increased P sorption with a maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) of 27.35 mg kg-1 for the 5 % amendment, although some P was leached out (up to 1.58 mg kg-1 for the 10 % addition). Phosphate sorption on Vertisol was even higher with a qmax for the 5 % addition of 60.77 mg kg-1. Potassium did not sorb to biochar, but was strongly leached out (84.19 mg kg-1 out of the 5 % addition). For Vertisol we observed a strong Potassium sorption that is linear within the concentration range we tested. A possible enhancement of nutrient

  5. Sorption behavior of europium(III) and curium(III) on the cell surfaces of microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Yoshida, Z.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the association of europium(III) and curium(III) with the microorganisms Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, and Halobacterium halobium. We determined the kinetics and distribution coefficients (K d ) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) sorption at pH 3-5 by batch experiments, and evaluated the number of water molecules in the inner-sphere (N H 2 O ) and the degree of strength of ligand field (R E/M ) for Eu(III) by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Exudates from C. vulgaris, Halomonas sp., and H. halobium had an affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). The log K d of Eu(III) and Cm(III) showed that their sorption was not fully due to the exchange with three protons on the functional groups on cell surfaces. The halophilic microorganisms (Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, H. halobium) showed almost no pH dependence in log K d , indicating that an exchange with Na + on the functional groups was involved in their sorption. The ΔN H 2 O (= 9 - N H 2 O ) for Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was 1-3, while that for the other microorganisms was over 3, demonstrating that the coordination of Eu(III) with C. vulgaris was predominantly an outer-spherical process. The R E/M for Eu(III) on halophilic microorganisms was 2.5-5, while that for non-halophilic ones was 1-2.5. This finding suggests that the coordination environment of Eu(III) on the halophilic microorganisms is more complicated than that on the other three non-halophilic ones. (orig.)

  6. Sorption behavior of europium(III) and curium(III) on the cell surfaces of microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Yoshida, Z. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan); Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J. [Environmental Sciences Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the association of europium(III) and curium(III) with the microorganisms Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, and Halobacterium halobium. We determined the kinetics and distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) sorption at pH 3-5 by batch experiments, and evaluated the number of water molecules in the inner-sphere (N{sub H{sub 2}O}) and the degree of strength of ligand field (R{sub E/M}) for Eu(III) by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Exudates from C. vulgaris, Halomonas sp., and H. halobium had an affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). The log K{sub d} of Eu(III) and Cm(III) showed that their sorption was not fully due to the exchange with three protons on the functional groups on cell surfaces. The halophilic microorganisms (Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, H. halobium) showed almost no pH dependence in log K{sub d}, indicating that an exchange with Na{sup +} on the functional groups was involved in their sorption. The {delta}N{sub H{sub 2}O} (= 9 - N{sub H{sub 2}O}) for Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was 1-3, while that for the other microorganisms was over 3, demonstrating that the coordination of Eu(III) with C. vulgaris was predominantly an outer-spherical process. The R{sub E/M} for Eu(III) on halophilic microorganisms was 2.5-5, while that for non-halophilic ones was 1-2.5. This finding suggests that the coordination environment of Eu(III) on the halophilic microorganisms is more complicated than that on the other three non-halophilic ones. (orig.)

  7. Sorption of Np(V) by synthetic hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.C.; Holt, K.; Zhao, H.; Hasan, A.; Awwad, N.; Gasser, M.; Sanchez, C.

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of Np(V) to synthetic hydroxyapatite was determined in batch experiments in a 0.1 M NaClO 4 solution. The hydroxyapatite used was of high purity as determined by SEM, EDS, XRD, FT-IR and ICP-MS analysis. Results from kinetic experiments with an initial Np(V) concentration of 1 x 10 -7 to 1 x 10 -6 M indicate the sorption process is relatively fast with more than 90% of the Np(V) being sorbed in approximately 3 hours. Equilibrium experiments performed over the pH range of 6 to 11 indicated sorption is strongly pH dependent with distribution coefficients, K d values (mL/g), increasing from 123 L/mole at pH 6 to 69 200 L/mole at pH 8.5. K d values are observed to decrease as pH further increases. Data points over a range of Np(V) concentrations were collected at pH 8 and fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model for simple adsorption. The Langmuir equation gave an excellent representation of the data. Langmuir parameters were determined to be C a = 0.032 mole/mole and K = 1.22 x 10 6 L/mole, indicating the high affinity of hydroxyapatite for Np(V) adsorption. (orig.)

  8. Ionic strength-induced formation of smectite quasicrystals enhances nitroaromatic compound sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Pereira, Tanya R; Teppen, Brian J; Laird, David A; Johnston, Cliff T; Boyd, Stephen A

    2007-02-15

    Sorption of organic contaminants by soils is a determinant controlling their transport and fate in the environment. The influence of ionic strength on nitroaromatic compound sorption by K+- and Ca2+ -saturated smectite was examined. Sorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene by K-smectite increased as KCl ionic strength increased from 0.01 to 0.30 M. In contrast, sorption by Ca-smectite at CaCl2 ionic strengths of 0.015 and 0.15 M remained essentially the same. The "salting-out" effect on the decrease of 1,3-dinitrobenzene aqueous solubility within this ionic strength range was smectite with increasing KCl ionic strength. X-ray diffraction patterns and light absorbance of K-clay suspensions indicated the aggregation of clay particles and the formation of quasicrystal structures as KCI ionic strength increased. Sorption enhancement is attributed to the formation of better-ordered K-clay quasicrystals with reduced interlayer distances rather than to the salting-out effect. Dehydration of 1,3-dinitrobenzene is apparently a significant driving force for sorption, and we show for the first time that sorption of small, planar, neutral organic molecules, namely, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, causes previously expanded clay interlayers to dehydrate and collapse in aqueous suspension.

  9. [Surface Property and Sorption Characteristics of Phosphorus onto Surface Sediments in Sanggou Bay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-mei; Cao, Xiao-yan; Liu, Su-mei; Wang, Li-sha; Yang, Gui-peng; Ge, Cheng-feng; Lu, Min

    2016-02-15

    Kinetic curves and isotherms were investigated to study the sorption mechanism of phosphorus onto the sediments of Sanggou Bay, together with the surface charge properties of sediments and the forms of phosphorus studied. The results showed that the sorption including a fast process and a slow one, and could be described by a two-compartment first order equation. The thermodynamic isotherms were well fitted with a modified Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity was larger in summer than in spring, and the smaller particle size was favorable to the sorption. The maximum adsorption capacities (Qm) were 0.0471-0.1230 mg x g(-1), and the zero equilibrium phosphorus concentration (EPC0) of the sediments ranged from 0.0596 mg x L(-1) to 0.1927 mg x L(-1), which indicated that the sediments from Sanggou Bay were sources of phosphorus. Inorganic phosphorus (IP) was the main form of total phosphorus (TP). The contents of exchangeable or loosely absorbed P and Fe-bound P increased significantly in the samples after sorption. The sorption process involved physical sorption and chemical sorption, with the former being the predominant.

  10. Enhanced chlorophenol sorption of soils by rice-straw-ash amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jen-Chyi; Tzou, Yu-Min; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Wu, Jeng-Tzung; Cheng, Mei-Ping; Wang, Shan-Li

    2010-01-01

    Rice-straw burning is a common post-harvest practice on rice paddy land, which results in the accumulation of rice-straw ash (RSA) in paddy soil. Because the occurrence of RSA in soil may affect the fate and transport of contaminants, this study investigated the sorption of 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) on RSA and RSA amended soils to evaluate the sorptive properties of RSA in soils. The results showed that the sorption of 3-CP to RSA proceeds through a surface reaction rather than through partitioning and that the neutral form of 3-CP is preferentially sorbed to the surface when compared to the deprotonated anionic form of 3-CP. The addition of RSA to the soils enhanced the overall 3-CP sorption, indicating that RSA amendment may be applied to retard the movement of 3-CP in contaminated soils. As the RSA content in the soils was increased from 0% to 2%, the Langmuir sorption maximum of the soils increased from 18-80 to 256-274 mg kg -1 . Thus, RSA contributed more to the total sorption of the soils than other major components in the soils. Nonetheless, the 3-CP sorption of the soils containing RSA was less than the combination of pure RSA and the soils, thereby indicating that the 3-CP sorption of RSA was suppressed. This may be attributed to the competition of organic matter or other soil components for the surface binding sites of RSA.

  11. Properties of diclofenac sodium sorption onto natural zeolite modified with cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajišnik, Danina; Daković, Aleksandra; Milojević, Maja; Malenović, Anđelija; Kragović, Milan; Bogdanović, Danica Bajuk; Dondur, Vera; Milić, Jela

    2011-03-01

    In this study an investigation of a model drug sorption onto cationic surfactant-modified natural zeolites as a drug formulation excipient was performed. Natural zeolite was modified with cetylpyridinium chloride in amounts equivalent to 100, 200 and 300% of its external cation-exchange capacity. The starting material and obtained organozeolites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements and thermal analysis. In vitro sorption of diclofenac sodium as a model drug was studied for all surfactant/zeolite composites by means of sorption isotherm measurements in aqueous solutions (pH 7.4). The modified zeolites with three levels of surfactant coverage within the short activation time were prepared. Zeta potential measurements and thermal analysis showed that when the surfactant loading level was equal to external cation-exchange value, almost monolayer of organic phase were present at the zeolitic surface while higher amounts of surfactant produced less extended bilayers, ordered bilayers or admicelles at the zeolitic surface. Modified zeolites, obtained in this manner, were effective in diclofenac sodium sorption and the organic phase derived from adsorbed cetylpyridinium chloride was the primary sorption phase for the model drug. The Langmuir isotherm was found to describe the equilibrium sorption data well over the entire concentration range. The separate contributions of the adsorption and partition to the total sorption of DS were analyzed mathematically. Results revealed that that adsorption and partitioning of the model drug take place simultaneously. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cobalt sorption onto Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1985-06-01

    A laboratory study of cobalt-60 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that cobalt sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Over a pH range of 2 to 9, the distribution coefficient ranged from 2 to more than 10,000 mL/g. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence cobalt sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect on cobalt sorption. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the condition of water at the bottom of the waste trenches, accounts for part of the decrease in cobalt sorption observed with trench waters. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Assessment of sorption properties and kinetic reaction of phosphorus reactive material to limit diffuse pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bus Agnieszka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of sorption properties and kinetic reaction of phosphorus reactive material to limit diffuse pollution. Polonite® is an effective reactive material (manufactured from opoka rock for removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions. In conducted experiments, Polonite® of grain size of 2–5 mm was used as a potential reactive material which can be used as a filter fulfillment to reduce phosphorus diffuse pollution from agriculture areas. Kinetic and equilibrium studies (performed as a batch experiment were carried out as a function of time to evaluate the sorption properties of the material. The obtained results show that Polonite® effectively removes such contamination. All tested concentrations (0.998, 5.213, 10.965 mg P-PO4·L−1 are characterized by a better fit to pseudo-second kinetic order. The Langmuir isotherm the best reflects the mechanism of adsorption process in case of Polonite® and based on the isotherm, calculated maximum adsorption capacity equals 96.58 mg P-PO4·g−1.

  14. A new safety assessment model for shallow land burial of LLW based on multicomponent sorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, N.; Asano, T.; Tasaka, H.

    1984-01-01

    A new model on the radionuclide migration in underground environment is developed based on ''multicomponent sorption theory''. The model is capable of predicting the behaviors of the coexisting materials in soil-ground water system as ''multicomponent sorption phenomena'' and also predicting the radinuclide migration affected by the changes of concentrations of coexisting materials. The model is not a ''statistical model'' but a ''chemical model'' based on the ''ion exchange theory'' and ''adsorption theory''. Additionally, the model is a ''kinetic model'' capable of estimating the effect of ''rate of sorption'' on the radionuclide migration. The validity of the model was checked by the results of column experiments for sorption. Finally, sample calculations on the radionuclide migration in reference shallow land burial site were carried out for demonstration

  15. Sorption properties of new composite materials suitable for radioanalytical determination of 59-Ni and 63-Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisera, O.; Sebesta, F.

    2006-01-01

    New composite materials for separation and radioanalytical determination of radionickel ( 59, 63 Ni) were prepared and their sorption properties were examined. Chelating agents dimethylglyoxime (DMG) and diphenylglyoxime (DFG) as active components were immobilized in porous matrix of binding polymer polyacrylonitrile (PAN). Sorption properties of these materials were compared with commercial Ni Resin (Eichrom Technologies, USA). Weight distribution ratios, sorption kinetics and operating capacities were investigated during experiments performed. The highest weight distribution ratios were found for the material DFG-PAN. The sorbent DMG-PAN has the highest operating capacity. The fastest kinetics of nickel sorption was determined for the commercial Ni Resin. Elution of nickel with nitric acid solution allows subsequent and direct determination of radionickel by liquid scintillation counting. (author)

  16. General review of solar-powered closed sorption refrigeration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarbu, Ioan; Sebarchievici, Calin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Provide review of development in solar sorption refrigeration technologies. • Theoretical basis and applications of absorption and adsorption cycles are discussed. • Thermodynamic properties of most common working pairs have been reviewed. • Development of hybrid or thermal energy storage adsorption systems was explored. • A comparison between solar-powered absorption and adsorption systems was performed. - Abstract: The negative environmental impacts of burning fossil fuels have forced the energy research community seriously to consider renewable sources, such as naturally available solar energy. Thermally powered refrigeration technologies are classified into two categories: thermo-mechanical technology and sorption technology (open systems or closed systems). This paper provides a detailed review of the solar closed sorption (absorption and adsorption) refrigeration systems, which utilise working pairs (fluids). After an introduction of the basic principles of these systems, the history of development and recent advances in solar sorption refrigeration technologies are reported. The adsorption cooling typically has a lower heat source temperature requirement than the absorption cooling. Based on the coefficient of performance (COP), the absorption systems are preferred over the adsorption systems, and the higher temperature issues can be easily handled with solar adsorption systems. The thermodynamic properties of most common working fluids, as well as the use of ternary mixtures in solar-powered absorption systems, have been reviewed in this study. The paper also refers to new approaches to increase the efficiency and sustainability of the basic adsorption cycles, such as the development of hybrid or thermal energy storage adsorption systems. This research shows that solar-powered closed sorption refrigeration technologies can be attractive alternatives not only to serve the needs for air-conditioning, refrigeration, ice making, thermal

  17. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luscino Alves de Castro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8×2 mm were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI. Three temperatures (10°C, 25°C and 60°C and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1; B: 7 days after storage (M2; C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3. The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%. Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p0.05. The 60°C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10°C temperature (p0.05. Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05, but was higher at 10°C than at 60°C for all curing times (p0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and curing times.

  18. Sorption of selected organic compounds from water to a peat soil and its humic-acid and humin fractions: Potential sources of the sorption nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Rutherford, D.W.; Sheng, G.; Boyd, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The sorption isotherms of ethylene dibromide (EDB), diuron (DUN), and 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) from water on the humic acid and humin fractions of a peat soil and on the humic-acid of a muck soil have been measured. The data were compared with those of the solutes with the whole peat from which the humic-acid (HA) and humin (HM) fractions were derived and on which the sorption of the solutes exhibited varying extents of nonlinear capacities at low relative concentrations (C(e)/S(w)). The HA fraction as prepared by the density-fractionated method is relatively pure and presumably free of high- surface-area carbonaceous material (HSACM) that is considered to be responsible for the observed nonlinear sorption for nonpolar solutes (e.g., EDB) on the peat; conversely, the base-insoluble HM fraction as prepared is presumed to be enriched with HSACM, as manifested by the greatly higher BET- (N2) surface area than that of the whole peat. The sorption of EDB on HA exhibits no visible nonlinear effect, whereas the sorption on HM shows an enhanced nonlinearity over that on the whole peat. The sorption of polar DUN and DCP on HA and HM display nonlinear effects comparable with those on the whole peat; the effects are much more significant than those with nonpolar EDB. These results conform to the hypothesis that adsorption onto a small amount of strongly adsorbing HSACM is largely responsible for the nonlinear sorption of nonpolar solutes on soils and that additional specific interactions with the active groups of soil organic matter are responsible for the generally higher nonlinear sorption of the polar solutes.

  19. Comparison of sorption measurements on argillaceous rocks and bentonite with predictions using the SGT-E2 approach to derive sorption data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B; Marques Fernandes, M.

    2014-11-15

    In Stage 1 of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories, four rock types have been identified as being suitable host rocks for a radioactive waste repository, namely, Opalinus Clay for a high-level (HLW) and a low- and intermediate-level (L/ILW) repository, and 'Brauner Dogger', Effingen Member and Helvetic Marls for a L/ILW repository. Sorption data bases (SDBs) for all of these host rocks are required for the provisional safety analyses, including all of the bounding porewater and mineralogical composition combinations. In addition, SDBs are needed for the rock formations lying below Opalinus Clay (lower confining units) and for the bentonite backfill in the HLW repository. A detailed procedure was developed for deriving SDBs for argillaceous rocks (and bentonite) based on sorption edge measurements on illite (and montmorillonite), the hypothesis that 2:1 clay minerals are the dominant sorbents and a series of so called conversion factors which take into account the different radionuclide speciations in the different porewaters. Since this methodology for generating SDBs is relatively new, a validation and demonstration of the robustness and reliability of the sorption values derived was required. This report describes an extensive piece of work in which blind predictions of sorption values were compared with measured ones. Sorption isotherms were measured for the following metal ions Cs(I), Co(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) in a range of realistic porewater chemistries for a range of host rock mineralogies. In the end 53 isotherm data sets were measured. For each of these isotherms a prediction was made of the sorption at trace concentrations using the SDB derivation methodology. A comparison between measured and predicted values for each case was then made. This validation study shows that the methodology used for the derivation of the sorption data bases for argillaceous rocks and bentonite produces reliable sorption values. (authors)

  20. Impact of exotic earthworms on organic carbon sorption on mineral surfaces and soil carbon inventories in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy Lyttle; Kyungsoo Yoo; Cindy Hale; Anthony Aufdenkampe; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Kathryn Resner; Alex. Blum

    2015-01-01

    Exotic earthworms are invading forests in North America where native earthworms have been absent since the last glaciation. These earthworms bioturbate soils and may enhance physical interactions between minerals and organic matter (OM), thus affecting mineral sorption of carbon (C) which may affect C cycling. We quantitatively show how OM-mineral sorption and soil C...

  1. Sorption of polar and nonpolar organic contaminants by oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2008-12-01

    Sorption of nonpolar (phenanthrene and butylate) and polar (atrazine and diuron) organic chemicals to oil-contaminated soil was examined to investigate oil effects on sorption of organic chemicals and to derive oil-water distribution coefficients (K(oil)). The resulting oil-contaminated soil-water distribution coefficients (K(d)) for phenanthrene demonstrated sorption-enhancing effects at both lower and higher oil concentrations (C(oil)) but sorption-reducing (competitive) effects at intermediate C(oil) (approximately 1 g kg(-1)). Rationalization of the different dominant effects was attempted in terms of the relative aliphatic carbon content which determines the accessibility of the aromatic cores to phenanthrene. Little or no competitive effect occurred for butylate because its sorption was dominated by partitioning. For atrazine and diuron, the changes in K(d) at C(oil) above approximately 1 g kg(-1) were negligible, indicating that the presently investigated oil has little or no effect on the two tested compounds even though the polarity of the oil is much less than soil organic matter (SOM). Therefore, specific interactions with the active groups (aromatic and polar domains) are dominantly responsible for the sorption of polar sorbates, and thus their sorption is controlled by available sorption sites. This study showed that the oil has the potential to be a dominant sorptive phase for nonpolar pollutants when compared to SOM, but hardly so for polar compounds. The results may aid in a better understanding of the role of the aliphatic and aromatic domains in sorption of nonpolar and polar organic pollutants.

  2. Radiotracer study of sorption of europium on Gorleben sand from aqueous solutions containing humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, P.; Stamberg, K.; Siroky, L.; Mizera, J.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of trace europium, as a trivalent actinide homologue, was studied in the system Gorleben sand - aqueous solution with the aim to elucidate its mechanism. Radiotracer method ( 152/154 Eu) and batch experiments were used. Simultaneously, the distribution of humic substances present in, or added to the system was measured. The evaluation of the sorption was complicated by the adsorption of Eu on the walls of polyethylene vials used for the experiments, which was rather high and had to be taken into consideration. It has been found that Eu sorption on Gorleben sand increases from pH 2 to pH 5-7 and then it decreases. The decrease is due to the complexation of Eu with humic substances leached from Gorleben sand at pH>7. The position of the sorption maximum depends on the composition of the solution and on the liquid-to-solid ratio. It is shifted to lower pH values in the presence of added humic acid (HA), which enhances Eu sorption at low PH values and suppresses it at pH values higher than 5. The regions of the enhancing/suppressing effects coincidence with the high/low adsorption of HA on Gorleben sand, respectively. The increasing ionic strength (from 0.01 to 0.1) and europium concentration (3.4 x 10 -8 to 9.3 x 10 -7 mol/l) suppress the relative sorption (expressed in %) at low pH values and enhance it at pH>6-8. Addition of carbonates (5 x 10 -3 mol/l) supports Eu sorption at pH>7.5 so that no decrease with pH is observed till pH 9. Alkaline leaching of the sand significantly changes most of the effects found. These results were qualitatively interpreted and conclusions were drawn on the mechanism of the sorption. (author)

  3. Modification of zirconium diphosphate with salicylic acid and its effect on the uranium (Vi) sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almazan T, M. G.; Garcia G, N.; Simoni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The surface of zirconium diphosphate (ZrP 2 O 7 ) was modified with salicylic acid and its effect was evaluated on the uranium (Vi) sorption. The modified surface of the material was analyzed with different analytical techniques among which are included the atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This analysis allowed showing that the salicylic acid is being held on the surface of the zirconium diphosphate. The reactivity of modified zirconium diphosphate compared with uranium (Vi) was investigated using the classical method of batch sorption. The analysis of sorption isotherms shows that the salicylic acid has an important effect in the uranium (Vi) sorption. According to the study conducted, the interaction among the uranium (Vi) and the surface of zirconium diphosphate modified with the salicylic acid most likely leads to the complexes formation of binary (U(Vi)/ZrP 2 O 7 ) and ternary (U(Vi)/salicylate/ZrP 2 O 7 ) surface. (Author)

  4. Study of thermodynamic water properties and moisture sorption hysteresis of mango skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio José Ferreira de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium moisture content for adsorption and desorption isotherms of mango skin was determined using the static gravimetric method at temperatures of 20, 26, 33, 38 and 44 oC in the 0.056 to 0.873 water activity range. Both sorption curves show a decrease in equilibrium moisture content as the temperature increasing. The hysteresis effect was observed at constant water activity. The Guggenheim, Anderson, and de Boer (GAB model presented the best fitting accuracy among a group of models and was used to determine the thermodynamic properties of water sorption. Integral enthalpy and integral entropy areas showed inverted values for the adsorption and desorption isotherms over the wide range of water activity studied. These values confirm, in energetic terms, the difference between adsorption and desorption isotherms observed in the hysteresis phenomenon. Finally, the Gibbs free energy revealed that the sorption process was spontaneous for both sorption isotherms.

  5. Fluoride ions sorption of the water using natural and modified hematite with aluminium hydroxide; Sorcion de iones fluoruro del agua utilizando hematita natural y hematita acondicionada con hidroxido de aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teutli S, E. A.

    2011-07-01

    Fluorine is a mineral known for its dental benefits, but fluoride ions can cause fluoro sis in excessive quantities. There are many epidemiological studies on possible adverse effects resulting from prolonged ingestion of fluoride through drinking water. These studies demonstrate that fluoride mainly affects the bone tissue (bones and teeth), may produce an adverse effect on tooth enamel and can cause mild dental fluoro sis at concentrations from 0.9 to 1.2 mg/L in drinking water. In several states of Mexico, water contaminated with fluoride ions can be found, such as Aguascalientes, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Guanajuato, Sonora, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, where the fluoride ions levels are higher than 1.5 mg/L, established by the Mexican Official Standard (NOM-127-Ssa-2000) which sets the permissible limits of water for human use and consumption. Currently, several technologies have been proposed to remove fluoride ions from water such as precipitation methods which are based on the addition of chemicals to water and sorption methods to removed fluoride ions by sorption or ion exchange reactions by some suitable substrate capable of regenerate and reuse. In this work, the sorption of fluoride ions using unmodified and modified hematite with aluminum hydroxide to remove fluoride ions from water by bath experiments was studied. The hematite was modified by treating it with aluminum hydroxide, NaOH and Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} solutions. The characterization of hematite before and after modification with aluminum hydroxide was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, EDS and Bet. The effect of ph, contact time, concentration of fluoride ions, and the dose of sorbent on the sorption of fluoride ions by the modified hematite were studied. Equilibrium was reached within 48 hours of contact time and the maximum sorption of fluoride ions were in the range pH{sub eq} between 2.3 and 6.2. Sorption capacities of fluoride ions as a

  6. Effect of humic acid & bacterial exudates on sorption-desorption interactions of 90Sr with brucite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Hollie; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Bryan, Nick; Foster, Lynn; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Kellet, Simon; Heath, Sarah

    2018-05-18

    One of the nuclear fuel storage ponds at Sellafield (United Kingdom) is open to the air, and has contained a significant inventory of corroded magnox fuel and sludge for several decades. As a result, some fission products have also been released into solution. 90Sr is known to constitute a small mass of the radionuclides present in the pond, but due to its solubility and activity, it is at risk of challenging effluent discharge limits. The sludge is predominantly composed of brucite (Mg(OH)2), and organic molecules are known to be present in the pond liquor with occasional algal blooms restricting visibility. Understanding the chemical interactions of these components is important to inform ongoing sludge retrievals and effluent management. Additionally, interactions of radionuclides with organics at high pH will be an important consideration for the evolution of cementitious backfilled disposal sites in the UK. Batch sorption-desorption experiments were performed with brucite, 90Sr and natural organic matter (NOM) (humic acid (HA) and Pseudanabaena catenata cyanobacterial growth supernatant) in both binary and ternary systems at high pH. Ionic strength, pH and order of addition of components were varied. 90Sr was shown not to interact strongly with the bulk brucite surface in binary systems under pH conditions relevant to the pond. HA in both binary and ternary systems demonstrated a strong affinity for the brucite surface. Ternary systems containing HA demonstrated enhanced sorption of 90Sr at pH 11.5 and vice versa, likely via formation of strontium-humate complexes regardless of the order of addition of components. The distribution coefficients show HA sorption to be reversible at all pH values studied, and it appeared to control 90Sr behaviour at pH 11.5. Ternary systems containing cyanobacterial supernatant demonstrated a difference in 90Sr behaviour when the culture had been subjected to irradiation in the first stages of its growth.

  7. Dynamic Simulation of a Periodic 10 K Sorption Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, P.; Rodriguez, J.; Bard, S.; Wade, L.

    1994-01-01

    A transient thermal simulation model has been developed to simulate the dynamic performance of a multiple-stage 10 K sorption cryocooler for spacecraft sensor cooling applications that require periodic quick-cooldown (under 2 minutes) , negligible vibration, low power consumption, and long life (5 to 10 years). The model was specifically designed to represent the Brilliant Eyes Ten-Kelvin Sorption Cryocooler Experiment (BETSCE), but it can be adapted to represent other sorption cryocooler systems as well. The model simulates the heat transfer, mass transfer, and thermodynamic processes in the cryostat and the sorbent beds for the entire refrigeration cycle, and includes the transient effects of variable hydrogen supply pressures due to expansion and overflow of hydrogen during the cooldown operation. The paper describes model limitations and simplifying assumptions, with estimates of errors induced by them, and presents comparisons of performance predictions with ground experiments. An important benefit of the model is its ability to predict performance sensitivities to variations of key design and operational parameters. The insights thus obtained are expected to lead to higher efficiencies and lower weights for future designs.

  8. Bio sorption of copper ions with biomass of algae and dehydrated waste of olives; Biosorcion de iones cobre con biomasa de algas y orujos deshidratados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia, P.; Santander, M.; Pavez, O.; Valderrama, L.; Guzman, D.; Romero, L.

    2011-07-01

    They were carried out experiments of biosorption batch and in continuous to remove copper from aqueous solutions using as adsorbents green algae and olive residues under virgins conditions and chemically activated. The results of batch bio sorption indicate that the algae present mayor elimination capacities than the waste of olives, with uptakes of copper of the order of 96 % using activated algae with dissolution of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} under the optimum conditions. The results of the columns tests show that the virgin algae permits the removal of more copper ions than the activate algae, with removal efficiency of 98 % during the firth 20 min, a breakthrough time of 240 min and a saturation at time of 600 min. In the second cycle the regenerated biomass showed a best performance indicating that they can be used for another bio sorption cycle. (Author) 42 refs.

  9. Hydro-mechanical coupling and permeability of an unsaturated swelling clay under hydrous and thermal stress: sorption curve and water permeability; Couplage hydromecanique et permeabilite d'une argile gonflante non saturee sous sollicitations hydriques et thermiques: courbe de sorption et permeabilite a l'eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olchitzky, E

    2002-02-15

    The use of swelling clay for engineered safety barriers of radioactive waste disposal require the understanding of its thermal-hydro-mechanical behaviour. This work concerns particularly the characterization and the modelling of the behaviour of one of these clays: the FoCa7 clay. The characteristics of the studied material are: the sorption (desorption) curve and the water permeability. For each of them, new experiments have allowed to acquire data in fields still few explored: in temperature (between 20 and 80 C) for the sorption curve and in the unsaturated field for the water permeability. The analysis of these results and of bibliographic data has allowed in one hand to estimate the importance of the hysteresis phenomenon and the temperature influence on the sorption curve and in another hand, to establish the requirement to introduce in the modelling of the sorption curve, a plastic parameter due to the irreversible deformations occurring during the compaction. Moreover, the tests carried out for data acquirement have been used too to give validation elements to the non linear behaviour laws proposed by O. Coussy and P. Dangla for the non saturated porous media. The particularity of these laws is to suppose the existence of an effective constraint in the non saturated field, this shows the importance of the validation elements presented here. (O.M.)

  10. Changes in redox properties of humic acids upon sorption to alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdiaga, Edisson; Orsetti, Silvia; Jindal, Sharmishta; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction A prominent role of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in biogeochemical processes is its ability to act as an electron shuttle, accelerating rates between a bulk electron donor and an acceptor. The underlying processes are reversible redox reactions of quinone moieties.1 This shuttling effect has been studied in two major areas: transformation of redox active pollutants and microbial respiration.2-3 Previous studies primarily compared effects in the presence or absence of NOM without addressing the redox properties of NOM nor its speciation. The interaction between humic acids (HA) and minerals might change properties and reactivity of organic matter. Specifically, we investigate whether changes in the redox properties of a HA occur upon sorption to redox inactive minerals. Since fractionation and conformational rearrangements of NOM moieties upon sorption are likely to happen, the redox properties of the NOM fractions upon sorption might differ as well. 2. Materials and methods Elliot Soil Humic Acid (ESHA), Pahokee Peat Humic Acid (PPHA) and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) were used as received from IHSS. Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was suspended in 0.1M KCl. Sorption was studied at pH 7.0 in duplicate batch experiments for several HA/Al2O3 ratios. For the suspension (mineral + sorbed HA, plus dissolved HA), the filtrate (0.45μm) and the HA stock solution, the electron donating and accepting capacities (EDC and EAC) were determined following established procedures.4 3. Results All studied HA-Al2O3 systems showed similar behavior with regard to changes in redox properties. There was a significant increase in the EDC of the whole suspension compared to the stock solutions and the non-sorbed HA in the filtrate (up to 300% for PPHA). This effect was more pronounced with increasing amounts of sorbed HA in the suspension. Although ESHA had the highest sorption capacity on Al2O3 (~ 6 times higher than PPHA & SRHA), it showed the smallest changes in redox

  11. Sorption of U(VI) in surfaces of SrTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz O, H.B.; Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work is presented the physico chemical characterization and evaluation of those surface properties and of sorption of U on the SrTiO 3 like possible candidate for contention barrier in the deep geological confinement. The made studies showed that the SrTiO 3 presents maximum levels of sorption of positive nature species (mainly UO 2 2+ and UO 2 NO 3 + ). (Author)

  12. Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.R.; Venkataramani, B.

    1988-01-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), magnetite (MAG), and hydrous thorium oxide (HThO) has been studied as a function of pH. Hydrous oxides have been characterized by their pH-titration curves, intrinsic dissociation constants (pK ai * ) and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). The fraction of protonated surface hydroxyl groups as well as the surface pH (pH surf ) as a function of solution pH have been computed. The distribution of various hydrolyzed species of uranyl ions with solution pH have been compared with uranyl sorption isotherm on these oxides. Sorption edge in all the cases occurs when free hydroxyl groups are available on the surface and pH surf is sufficiently high to favor the formation of dimer-like species on the surface. A new model for the sorption process, called surface hydrolysis model, which explains these and other features of uranyl sorption on hydrous oxides has been proposed. The model visualizes the sorption process as linking of uranyl ions with two adjacent free surface hydroxyl groups without deprotonation (provided the surface pH is high for the hydrolysis of uranyl ions) and formation of dimer-like structures on the surface. The new model has been successfully applied to the present and other available data on uranyl ion sorption on hydrous oxides. (author)

  13. Sorption equilibria of ethanol on cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequin, Sonia; Chassagne, David; Karbowiak, Thomas; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-05

    We report here for the first time a thermodynamic study of gaseous ethanol sorption on raw cork powder and plate. Our study aims at a better understanding of the reactivity of this material when used as a stopper under enological conditions, thus in close contact with a hydroethanolic solution, wine. Sorption−desorption isotherms were accurately measured by thermogravimetry at 298 K in a large range of relative pressures. Sorption enthalpies were determined by calorimetry as a function of loading. Sorption−desorption isotherms exhibit a hysteresis loop probably due to the swelling of the material and the absorption of ethanol. Surprisingly, the sorption enthalpy of ethanol becomes lower than the liquefaction enthalpy as the filling increases. This result could be attributed to the swelling of the material, which would generate endothermic effects. Sorption of SO₂ on cork containing ethanol was also studied. When the ethanol content in cork is 2 wt %, the amount of SO₂ sorbed is divided by 2. Thus, ethanol does not enhance the sorption rate for SO₂ but, on the contrary, decreases the SO₂ sorption activity onto cork, probably because of competitive sorption mechanisms.

  14. Sorption of streptococcus faecium to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerstavik, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed by which to study the sorption of Streptococcus faecium to soda-lime cover glasses. Conditions were chosen to minimize the influence on sorption of bacterial polymer production, passive sorption being studied rather than attachment mediated by metabolic activities. Sorption of S. faecium increased with increasing temperature (to 50degC), time, and cell concentration, but equilibrium apparently was not reached even after incubation for 8 hours or at a cell concentration of 3 x 10 10 per ml. Sorption increased with solute molarity up to 0.1 M concentration of NaCl and KCl, indicating an effect of the electrical double layers on the apposition of cells to the glass surface. Desorption of bacteria could be obtained after multiple washings of the glasses in buffer or by the action of Tween 80, but not if sorbed bacteria were left in distilled water, various salt solutions, urea, or in suspensions of unlabelled bacteria. It was concluded that sorption occurred as a result of chemical interactions between the glass and the cell surface. Tween 80 at a concentration of 1 per cent inhibited sorption to 26 per cent of buffer controls, 2 M urea was less effective, and 1 M NaCl was without effect. It is suggested that hydrophobic interactions may be of importance in the binding of S. faecium to glass. (author)

  15. Enhanced sorption of radiocobalt from water by Bi(III) modified montmorillonite: A novel adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiqiang; Li Yuan; Zhang Shouwei; Niu Haihong; Chen Zhesheng; Xu Jinzhang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Bi-Mt has higher surface area than Ca-Mt. → The sorption of Co(II) on Bi-Mt is dependent on ionic strength and pH. → The sorption of Co(II) on Bi-Mt is an spontaneous and endothermic process. → Bi-Mt has good practical application potential in wastewater disposal. - Abstract: In this study, Ca-montmorillonite (Ca-Mt) modified with Bi 3+ was used as a novel adsorbent for the sorption of Co(II) from aqueous solutions. The sorption of Co(II) on Bi-montmorillonite (Bi-Mt) was investigated as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, adsorbent content, Co(II) concentrations, fulvic acid (FA) and temperature. Compared to Ca-Mt, Bi-Mt showed a higher affinity to bind Co(II) ions. The sorption percentage of Co(II) on Bi-Mt increased with increasing pH at pH 3.0-8.5, and then maintained the high level at pH 8.5-12. The sorption of Co(II) on Bi-Mt was dependent on ionic strength at low pH, and independent of ionic strength at high pH. The presence of FA enhanced Co(II) sorption at low pH, but suppressed Co(II) sorption at high pH. The thermodynamic data derived from temperature dependent sorption isotherms suggested that the sorption of Co(II) on Bi-Mt was spontaneous and endothermic process. Outer-sphere surface complexation and/or ion exchange were the main mechanisms of Co(II) sorption on Bi-Mt at low pH, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH. From the experimental results, it is possible to conclude that Bi-Mt is suitable for application of Co(II) removal from aqueous solutions.

  16. Performance of LiCl Impregnated Mesoporous Material Coating over Corrugated Heat Exchangers in a Solid Sorption Chiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The composite material made by impregnating 40 wt. % lithium chloride (LiCl into the mesopores of a kind of natural porous rock (Wakkanai Siliceous Shale: WSS micropowders (short for “WSS + 40 wt. % LiCl” had been developed previously, and can be regenerated below 100 °C with a cooling coefficient of performance (COP of approximately 0.3 when adopted as a sorbent in a sorption cooler. In this study, experiments have been carried out on an intermittent solid sorption chiller with the WSS + 40 wt. % LiCl coating over two aluminum corrugated heat exchangers. Based on the experimental condition (regeneration temperature of 80 °C, condensation temperature of 30 °C in the desorption process; sorption temperature of 30 °C and evaporation temperature of 12 °C in the sorption process, the water sorption amount changes from 20 wt. % to 70 wt. % in one sorption cooling cycle. Moreover, a specific cooling power (SCP of 86 W/kg, a volumetric specific cooling power (VSCP of 42 W/dm3, and a specific sorption power of 170 W/kg can be achieved with a total sorption and desorption time of 20 min. The obtained cooling COP is approximately 0.16.

  17. Occurrence and sorption properties of arsenicals in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Sanderson, Hans; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg

    2013-01-01

    in marine sediments when conditions are similar to the Baltic Sea. At locations with significant anthropogenic point sources or where the local geology contains volcanic rock and sulphide mineral deposits, there may be significantly elevated arsenic concentrations, and it is recommended to determine on......The content of total arsenic, the inorganic forms: arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)), the methylated forms: monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), trimethylarsenic oxide, tetramethylarsenonium ion and arsenobetaine was measured in 95 sediment samples and 11 pore water samples...... in the Baltic Sea and other parts of the world. Existing data for on-site measurements of sorption coefficients (Kd) of arsenicals in marine and freshwater sediments show large variability from 1,000 L/kg. In this work, calculated sorption coefficients (Kd and Koc) for As(III+V) showed significant correlation...

  18. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandau, E.; Sandau, P.; Pulz, O.

    1996-01-01

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  19. Simulations of hydrogen sorption in rht-MOF-1: identifying the binding sites through explicit polarization and quantum rotation calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Hogan, Adam; McLaughlin, Keith; Belof, Jonathan L.; Eckert, Juergen; Space, Brian

    2014-01-01

    . This is a charged rht-MOF that contains extra-framework nitrate counterions within the material. For the simulations performed herein, excellent agreement with experiment was achieved for the simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric

  20. Metal Sorption to Dolomite Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.; Kelly, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Potential human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) might release actinides into the Culebra Dolomite where sorption reactions will affect of radiotoxicity from the repository. Using a limited residence time reactor the authors have measured Ca, Mg, Nd adsorption/exchange as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. By the same approach, but using as input radioactive tracers, adsorption/exchange of Am, Pu, U, and Np on dolomite were measured as a function of ionic strength, P CO2 , and pH at 25 C. Metal adsorption is typically favored at high pH. Calcium and Mg adsorb in near-stoichiometric proportions except at high pH. Adsorption of Ca and Mg is diminished at high ionic strengths (e.g., 0.5M NaCl) pointing to association of Na + with the dolomite surface, and the possibility that Ca and Mg sorb as hydrated, outer-sphere complexes. Sulfate amplifies sorption of Ca and Mg, and possibly Nd as well. Exchange of Nd for surface Ca is favored at high pH, and when Ca levels are low. Exchange for Ca appears to control attachment of actinides to dolomite as well, and high levels of Ca 2+ in solution will decrease Kds. At the same time, to the extent that high P CO2 increase Ca 2+ levels, JK d s will decrease with CO 2 levels as well, but only if sorbing actinide-carbonate complexes are not observed to form (Am-carbonate complexes appear to sorb; Pu-complexes might sorb as well; U-carbonate complexation leads to desorption). This indirect CO 2 effect is observed primarily at, and above, neutral pH. High NaCl levels do not appear to affect to actinide K d s

  1. Sorption of methylxanthines by different sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, S. G.; Andreeva, E. Yu.; Tolmacheva, V. V.; Terent'eva, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Sorption of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine, diprophylline, and pentoxyphylline on different sorbents (supercross-linked polystyrene, surface-modified copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene Strata-X, and carbon nanomaterials Taunit and Diasorb-100-C16T) was studied in a static mode in an effort to find new sorbents suitable for sorption isolation and concentration of methylxanthines. The peculiarities of sorption of methylxanthines were explained in relation to the solution acidity, the nature of the sorbates and their concentration, the nature of the solvent, and the structural characteristics of the sorbents.

  2. Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Sokol'nitskaya, T.A.; Yukhkam, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater is considered and prospects of use of selective adsorbents for purification of seawater or liquid radioactive wastes mixed with seawater from 90 Sr are discussed. Comparative analysis of sorptive properties of adsorbents of different nature is done. It is shown that sorption-reagent materials developed by authors can to afford effective separation of 90 Sr from seawater. Possible mechanism of strontium sorption by these adsorbents is considered. The prospect of their use for purification of liquid radioactive wastes from strontium is shown [ru

  3. Investigation of sorption of Hg(II) ions onto coconut husk from aqueous solution using radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasany, S.M.; Ahmad, R.; Chaudhary, M.H. [Nuclear Chemistry Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2003-07-01

    The sorption of Hg(II) ions onto coconut (Cocos nucifera) husk has been studied using radiotracer technique. Maximum sorption (96%) of Hg(II) ions (7.39 x 10{sup -6} M) onto sorbent surface is achieved from 10{sup -3} M HNO{sub 3} solution in 30 min agitation time using 100 mg of coconut husk. The sorption data follow the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. Sorption capacity (6.84{+-}0.45 mmol g{sup -1}) and sorption energy (10.6{+-}0.13 kJ mol{sup -1}) have been evaluated using these isotherms. Among the ions tested to monitor their influence on the sorption, Ba(II), fluoride and tartarate increased the sorption, while thiosulfate, bromide and thiocyanate reduced (< 63 > 26%) the sorption. The cations K(I), Ce(III), Cr(III), Fe(III) and Zr(IV) partially suppressed the sorption. The variation of sorption with temperature yields thermodynamic parameters {delta}H = -37.4{+-}2 kJ mol{sup -1} {delta}S = -105{+-}7 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1} and {delta}G = -2.58{+-}0.05 kJ mol{sup -1} at 298 K. The negative values of enthalpy and free energy reflect the spontaneous and exothermic nature of sorption, respectively. The selectivity studies of sorbent show that the coconut husk column can be used to separate Hg(II) ions from Se(IV), Zn(II), I(I) and Tc (VII). The sorbent has a potential in radiochemistry to separate gamma energies of {sup 203}Hg (279 keV) from {sup 75}Se (265 and 280 keV). (orig.)

  4. Effects of humic acid and heavy metals on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Liu, Yarui; Zhu, Hongkai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Chao

    2017-12-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) and heavy metals (Cu 2+ and Ag + ) on the sorption of polar and apolar organic pollutants onto biochars that were produced at temperatures of 200 °C (BC200) and 700 °C (BC700) were studied. Due to the plentiful polar functional groups on BC200, cationic propranolol exhibited higher levels of sorption than naphthalene on BC200 while naphthalene and propranolol showed similar sorption capacities on BC700. HA changed the characteristics of biochars and generally inhibited the sorption of target organic pollutants on biochars; however, enhancement occurred in some cases depending on the pollutants involved and their concentrations, biochars used and the addition sequences and concentrations of HA. On BC200, HA modifications mainly influenced sorption by decreasing its polarity and increasing its aromaticity, while on BC700, the surface area and pore volume greatly decreased due to the pore-blocking effects of HA. Residue dissolved HA in solution may also contribute to sorption inhibition. Complexation between polar functional groups on BC200 and heavy metals slightly enhanced the sorption of neutral naphthalene and significantly enhanced that of anionic 4-nitro-1-naphtol, while limited the sorption of cationic propranolol. Heavy metals together with their associated water molecules decreased the sorption of target chemicals on BC700 via pore-filling or pore-mouth-covering. Inhibition of heavy metals for 4-nitro-1-naphthol was found to be the weakest due to the bridge effects of heavy metals between 4-nitro-1-naphtol and BC700. The higher polarizability of Ag + led to the increase of its sorption on biochars in the presence of organic aromatic pollutants. The results of the present study shed light on the sorption mechanisms of bi-solute systems and enable us to select suitable biochar sorbents when chemicals co-exist. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Investigation of sorption of Hg(II) ions onto coconut husk from aqueous solution using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Ahmad, R.; Chaudhary, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of Hg(II) ions onto coconut (Cocos nucifera) husk has been studied using radiotracer technique. Maximum sorption (96%) of Hg(II) ions (7.39 x 10 -6 M) onto sorbent surface is achieved from 10 -3 M HNO 3 solution in 30 min agitation time using 100 mg of coconut husk. The sorption data follow the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. Sorption capacity (6.84±0.45 mmol g -1 ) and sorption energy (10.6±0.13 kJ mol -1 ) have been evaluated using these isotherms. Among the ions tested to monitor their influence on the sorption, Ba(II), fluoride and tartarate increased the sorption, while thiosulfate, bromide and thiocyanate reduced ( 26%) the sorption. The cations K(I), Ce(III), Cr(III), Fe(III) and Zr(IV) partially suppressed the sorption. The variation of sorption with temperature yields thermodynamic parameters ΔH = -37.4±2 kJ mol -1 ΔS = -105±7 J mol -1 K -1 and ΔG = -2.58±0.05 kJ mol -1 at 298 K. The negative values of enthalpy and free energy reflect the spontaneous and exothermic nature of sorption, respectively. The selectivity studies of sorbent show that the coconut husk column can be used to separate Hg(II) ions from Se(IV), Zn(II), I(I) and Tc (VII). The sorbent has a potential in radiochemistry to separate gamma energies of 203 Hg (279 keV) from 75 Se (265 and 280 keV). (orig.)

  6. Clinoptilolite and palygorskite as sorbents of neutral emerging organic contaminants in treated wastewater: Sorption-desorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Meffe, Raffaella; Lillo, Javier; de Bustamante, Irene

    2017-05-01

    Water reuse for aquifer recharge could be an important route for the introduction of emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) into the environment. The installation of a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (H-PRB) could constitute a tertiary treatment process to remove EOCs from treated domestic wastewater prior to recharge activities. The sorption-desorption behaviour of six neutral EOCs present in treated domestic wastewater (acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, cotinine, 4-acetamidoantipyrine (4-AAA) and 4-formylaminoantipyrine (4-FAA)) has been evaluated. Clinoptilolite and palygorskite have been studied as sorbents to be installed in the H-PRB. Batch tests were carried out using an EOC initial concentration ranging from 5 to 100 μg L -1 . Apart from acetaminophen and caffeine, both materials showed a limited sorption capacity of neutral EOCs (K d  = 0.63-5.42 L kg -1 ). In general, the experimental results show that EOCs exhibit a higher sorption affinity for clinoptilolite than for palygorskite. With the exception of carbamazepine, the sorption of the compounds occurs mainly by interactions with mineral surfaces as indicated by the comparison of the partition coefficients into organic matter and into mineral surfaces. According to the molecular geometry of the compounds and the sorption sequences observed, it appears that the dimensions of the organic molecules play a key role in the sorption process. All the studied EOCs exhibit irreversible sorption and sorption-desorption hysteresis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Technetium-99 toxicity to plants and sorption by soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gast, R.G.; Thorvig, L.H.; Landa, E.R.; Gallagher, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The potential toxic effects of 99 Tc on germinating seeds and young seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena sativa L.), radishes (Raphanus sativus L.), soybeans (Glycine max L.), and corn (Zea mays L.) were studied by germinating and growing seedlings in 50 ml of one-third to one-half strength Hoagland solution containing increasing 99 Tc concentrations. All species showed shoot and root tissue yield reductions at low 99 Tc concentrations, with greatest yield reductions for the three small grains and radishes occurring below 2.5 μCi 99 Tc/50 ml solution or 3.0 μg Tc/ml. The greatest yield reductions for soybeans and corn occurred at higher 99 Tc concentrations in solution but at comparable concentrations in tissue. Significant yield reductions in wheat seedlings occurred after post-germination additions of 99 Tc. This indicates that seedlings are sensitive to 99 Tc toxicity at later stages of growth. Wheat plants grown to maturity in soils to which 99 Tc was added 7, 17, and 33 days after planting showed much greater 99 Tc concentrations in older than in newer leaves; concentrations in seeds were 40 to 80 times less than those in vegetative tissue. Results for 99 Tc sorption on four different samples of Nicollet (Aquic Hapludoll) and Bergland (Aeric Haplaquept) soils showed little sorption by the Nicollet soils. In contrast, all Bergland samples showed significant but variable sorption rates. Although there were some differences in the chemical and physical properties of the Bergland samples, it is difficult to correlate these differences with differences in their 99 Tc sorption properties

  8. Technetium Sorption By Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Estes, Shanna L.; Arai, Yuji; Powell, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure Tc sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. Earlier studies were conducted and the experimental conditions were found not to simulate those of the facility. Through a five month subcontract with Clemson University, sorption of 99 Tc to four cementitious materials was examined within an anaerobic glovebag targeting a 0.1% H 2 (g)/ 99.9% N 2 (g) atmosphere. Early experiments based on Tc sorption and Eh indicated that 0.1% H 2 (g) (a reductant) was necessary to preclude experimental impacts from O 2 (g) diffusion into the glovebag. Preliminary data to date (up to 56 days) indicates that sorption of 99 Tc to cementitious materials increased with increasing slag content for simulated saltstone samples. This is consistent with the conceptual model that redox active sulfide groups within the reducing slag facilitate reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). These experiments differ from previous experiments where a 2% H 2 (g) atmosphere was maintained (Kaplan et al., 2011 (SRNL-STI-2010-00668)). The impact of the 2% H 2 (g) reducing atmosphere on this data was examined and determined to cause the reduction of Tc in experimental samples without slag. In the present ongoing study, after 56 days, Tc sorption by the 50-year old cement samples (no slag) was undetectable, whereas Tc sorption in the cementitious materials containing slag continues to increase with contact time (measured after 1, 4, 8, 19 and 56 days). Sorption was not consistent with spike concentrations and steady state has not been demonstrated after 56 days. The average conditional K d value for the Vault 2 cementitious material was 873 mL/g (17% slag), for the TR547 Saltstone (45% slag) the conditional K d was 168 mL/g, and for TR545 (90% slag) the conditional K d was 1,619 mL/g. It is anticipated that additional samples will be collected until steady state conditions are established to permit measuring

  9. Validation of water sorption-based clay prediction models for calcareous soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    on prediction accuracy. The soils had clay content ranging from 9 to 61% and CaCO3 from 24 to 97%. The three water sorption models considered showed a reasonably fair prediction of the clay content from water sorption at 28% relative humidity (RMSE and ME values ranging from 10.6 to 12.1 and −8.1 to −4......Soil particle size distribution (PSD), particularly the active clay fraction, mediates soil engineering, agronomic and environmental functions. The tedious and costly nature of traditional methods of determining PSD prompted the development of water sorption-based models for determining the clay...... fraction. The applicability of such models to semi-arid soils with significant amounts of calcium carbonate and/or gypsum is unknown. The objective of this study was to validate three water sorption-based clay prediction models for 30 calcareous soils from Iran and identify the effect of CaCO3...

  10. Sorption/desorption of Cs on clay and soil fractions from various regions of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erten, H.N.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption/desorption behaviour of Cs ion in the concentration region of 10 -8 to 10 -4 meqml -1 have been studied using clay and soil fractions from various regions of Turkey. The sorption curves for all the material studied show similar behaviour indicating at least two different sorption processes. One with high and the other with low distribution coefficients. The results of desorption studies indicate that Cs cation is to a large extent attached to the solid material in a reversible manner. The adsorption isotherms were found to be nonlinear in all cases. The increase of R D values with decreasing particle size in most cases, suggests that sorption and/or exchange is primarily a surface phenomenon in the clay and soil fractions studied. 14 figs.; 4 tabs

  11. Cadmium Sorption Characteristics of Soil Amendments and its Relationship with the Cadmium Uptake by Hyperaccumulator and Normal Plants in Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Wu, Qi-Tang; Lee, Charles C.C.; Li, Baoqin; Long, Xinxian

    2013-01-01

    In order to select appropriate amendments for cropping hyperaccumulator or normal plants on contaminated soils and establish the relationship between Cd sorption characteristics of soil amendments and their capacity to reduce Cd uptake by plants, batch sorption experiments with 11 different clay minerals and organic materials and a pot experiment with the same amendments were carried out. The pot experiment was conducted with Sedum alfredii and maize (Zea mays) in a co-cropping system. The results showed that the highest sorption amount was by montmorillonite at 40.82 mg/g, while mica was the lowest at only 1.83 mg/g. There was a significant negative correlation between the n value of Freundlich equation and Cd uptake by plants, and between the logarithm of the stability constant K of the Langmuir equation and plant uptake. Humic acids (HAs) and mushroom manure increased Cd uptake by S. alfredii, but not maize, thus they are suitable as soil amendments for the co-cropping S. alfredii and maize. The stability constant K in these cases was 0.14–0.16 L/mg and n values were 1.51–2.19. The alkaline zeolite and mica had the best fixation abilities and significantly decreased Cd uptake by the both plants, with K ≥ 1.49 L/mg and n ≥ 3.59. PMID:24912231

  12. Characterization of the sorption of uranium(VI) on different complexing resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesavento, Maria; Biesuz, Raffaela; Alberti, Giancarla; Sturini, Michela

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of uranium(VI) on two cationic resins containing different complexing groups, the iminodiacetic resin Chelex 100 and the weak carboxylic resin Amberlite CG-50, was investigated. The Gibbs-Donnan model was used to describe and to predict the sorption through the determination of the intrinsic complexation constants. These quantities, even though non-thermodynamic, characterize the sorption as being independent of experimental conditions. The sorption mechanism of the metal on the complexing resins was also studied by adding a competitive soluble ligand that shifts the sorption curves to higher pH values. The ligand competes with the resin for the complexation with the metal ion. Uranium is also strongly sorbed on Chelex 100 at very acid pH, through formation of two complexes in the resin phase: ML with logβ 110i =-1.16, in more acidic solution, and ML 2 with log β 120i =-5.72. Only the presence of the competitive ligand in solution makes the determination of the second complex possible. Also on Amberlite CG-50 the sorption is strong and involves the formation of the complex ML 2 , in more acidic solution, with log β 120i =-3.16. In the presence of the ligand EDTA, the complex ML 2 (OH) 2 was characterized with log β 12-2i =-5.15. In all the experiments the hydrolysis reaction in the aqueous phase was quantitatively considered. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of ''local equilibrium'' assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of

  14. Kinetic Study of Zn2+ and Cd2+ Ions Sorption by Ceric Oxide Powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.S.; Abd El-Rahman, K.M.; El Sayed, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Ceric Oxide powder was chemically synthesized and characterized using infrared spectra and x-ray diffraction. The sorptive removal of Zinc and Cadmium ions from aqueous waste solution using synthetic ceric oxide powder was investigated using batch technique. Experiments were carried out as a function of ph, particle size, solute concentration and temperature. The uptake of zinc was found to be greater than that of cadmium. A comparison of kinetic models applied to the sorption process of each ion was evaluated for the pseudo first order, the pseudo second order, and homogeneous particle diffusion kinetic models, respectively. The results showed that both the pseudo second order and the homogeneous particle diffusion model (HPDM) were found to best correlate the experimental rate data. The numerical values of the rate constants and particle diffusion coefficients were determined from the graphical representation of the proposed models. Activation energy (Ε a ) and entropy (δ S * ) of activation for each sorption process were also calculated from the linearized form of Arrhenius equation

  15. Sorption of {sup 99}MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions on commercial hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, J.; Gonzalez, H.; Lopez, H.; Aranda, N.; Granados, F.; Bulbulian, S. [Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico (Mexico). Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares

    2005-07-01

    {sup 99}MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-} sorption behavior on 3 commercial hydrotalcites, produced by Sasol Chemie, was studied through batch experiments. Only one of them showed high sorption capacity. This product, the MG70 was identified by XRD diffraction analysis as hydrotalcite (Mg{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 16}CO{sub 3} x 4H{sub 2}O), while the other two, MG50 and MG30, were identified mainly as magnesium aluminum hydroxide hydrate, MgAl{sub 2}(OH){sub 14} x 3H{sub 2}O. Calcined MG70 (CMG70) was used to retain about 298.17{+-}8.3 mg of {sup 99}Mo-MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (MG70-{sup 99}MoO{sub 4}). When this material was packed in a glass column, the generated {sup 99m}Tc was eluted by using NaCl or HNO{sub 3} aqueous solutions. Saline solutions eluted {sup 99m}Tc with considerable amounts of {sup 99}Mo while 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} eluted {sup 99m}Tc together with a such small amount of {sup 99}Mo that the {sup 99}Mo {mu}Ci/{sup 99m}Tc mCi ratios are close to the value recommended by the American Pharmacopeia. (orig.)

  16. Water Sorption and Hindered Diffusion with Different Chain Stiffness of Superabsorbent Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Myung-Suk; Lee, Dae-Young [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Water sorption and diffusion are essential physicochemical properties of a high-performance superabsorbent polymer (SAP). We combine the Park model with the obstruction-scaling model and the water clustering in confined spaces of the polymer hydrogel. Special attention is focused on elucidating the effect of chain stiffness by considering the conformation of the polymer chain. Theoretical model parameters are determined from the best fits by simultaneous nonlinear regressions for both sorption and corrected diffusion data based on previous experiments with poly(acrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) hydrogel. Predictions show that the hindered water diffusivity leads to a sigmoid curve with relative humidity a{sub w}, where it increases monotonically up to aw{sub ≅} 0.6 due to the swelling but decreases at higher a{sub w} caused by water clustering. Water diffusion decreases with increasing chain stiffness, and the larger persistence length provides a smaller opening radius in void spaces regarding the weak elastic deformation of hydrogel under the applied stress.

  17. Using of peat sorbents in bivalent metals sorption from municipal solid waste landfills leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teirumnieka, E.; Teirumnieks, E. [Rezeknes Augskola, Rezekne (Latvia). Faculty of Engineering; Klavins, M. [Latvia Univ., Riga (Latvia). Faculty of Geography and Earth Sciences

    2009-07-01

    Landfill leachate in acidic regions can pollute surface and ground waters with heavy metals and other pollutants. This study investigated the use of peat as an effective media for removing dissolved metal pollutants. As an adsorbent, peat can effectively remove metals from aqueous solutions. The experiment used 10 grams of peat mixed with heat metal solutions in a reaction vessel at temperatures of 20 degrees C. The solution was analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer. A pH meter was used to measure pH values. The study showed that the maximum adsorption capacity for cobalt (Co) was approximately 75 mg per gram. Adsorption quantity was estimated at 68 per cent, with an initial pH of 5.6. The maximum adsorption capacity for nickel (Ni) was approximately 77 mg per gram, and copper (Cu) was 58 mg per gram with initial pH values of 6.8. Results varied with variations in peat composition and structure. Adsorption affinities correlated with electronegativity and softness. Adsorption capacity of peat for each metal decreased due to the competitive effect of binary and ternary solute systems. Approximately 85 per cent of Ni ions were adsorbed in 30 minutes. It was concluded that the sorption efficiency of the peat decreased with increasing initial concentrations of the metals. The pH levels were influenced by the ion exchange effect in the sorption mechanism. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  18. Kinetic study of Cs+ and Eu3+ ions sorption by zirconium oxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafi, H.A.; Hassan, H.S.; Hamed, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium oxide powder was chemically synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized using infrared spectra and x-ray diffraction. The sorptive removal of cesium and europium ions from aqueous waste solution using synthetic zirconium oxide powder was investigated using batch technique. Experiments were carried out as a function of pH, time and temperature. The uptake of europium was found to be greater than that of cesium. A comparison of kinetic models applied to the sorption process of each ion was evaluated for the pseudo first order, the pseudo second order, and homogeneous particle diffusion kinetic models, respectively. The results showed that both the pseudo second order and the homogeneous particle diffusion models (HPDM) were found to best correlate the experimental rate data. The numerical values of the rate constants and particle diffusion coefficients were determined from the graphical representation of the proposed models. Activation energy (Ea) and entropy (Δ S*) of activation for each sorption process were also calculated from the linearized form of Arrhenius equation. (author)

  19. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeok; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, K F (L kg -1 ) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log K F of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  20. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, K{sub F} (L kg{sup -1}) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log K{sub F} of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  1. Cd2+ and Zn2+ sorption on apatite in the presence of EDTA and humic substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viipsi K.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of Cd2+ and Zn2+ on hydroxyapatite [HAP- Ca10(PO46(OH2] and fluorapatite [FAP- Ca10( PO46(F2] with different specific surface area and stoichiometry was investigated in batch experiments in the pH range 4 to 11 (25 ◦C; 0.1 M KNO3. The impact of different conditions was concerned: solution pH, the presence of complexing ligands (EDTA and humic substance and competing metal ions, as well as reaction kinetic and equilibrium conditions. To evaluate the reversibility of Cd2+ sorption onto HAP, desorption characteristics in water, Ca, EDTA, and HUM-solutions were determined. Additionally to solution analysis the surface composition of solid phases was analysed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy XPS. The information from the chemical analyses was used to design an equilibration model that takes into account dissolution, surface potential, solution and surface complexation, as well as possible phase transformations. It was revealed that apatites effectively sorb Cd2+ and Zn2+ by ion exchange reactions on surface by formation of new surface phases. Using XPS the formation of a Me-enriched HAP surface was found, which was interpreted as the formation of a solid solution with the general formula: Ca8.4-xMex(HPO41.6(PO44.4(OH0.4. In a binary solution (Cd+Zn the competition of metals reduced individual sorbed amount compared with the single component solutions but the total adsorption maximum was approximately constant. The presence of EDTA reduces the metal sorption on apatite due to [CdEDTA]2- and [ZnEDTA]2- complexes and increases apatite solubility due to [CaEDTA]2- complex formation. The dissolved humic substance was bound on apatite in suspensions but the amount of Cd2+ bound was not changed. The results showed that the solution pH and the presence of complexing ligands have a significant effect on heavy metal sorption on apatite and must be considered if apatites are used as remediation agent. The proposed model can be used to predict

  2. Effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honghua; Lin Kunde; Wang Hailong; Gan, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Biochars are anthropogenic carbonaceous sorbent and their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants need to be characterized. Here we evaluated the effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene. Two biochars separately produced at 350 o C and 700 o C and three soils were tested. Biochar amendment generally enhanced the soil sorption of phenanthrene. The biochar produced at 700 o C generally showed a greater ability at enhancing a soil's sorption ability than that prepared at 350 o C. The single-step desorption measurement showed an apparent hysteresis in biochar-amended soils. After 28 d equilibration, the sorptive capacity of biochar-amended soil (with an organic carbon content of 0.16%) significantly decreased. This study clearly suggested that biochar application enhanced soil sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds, but the magnitude of enhancement depended on the preparation of biochars, the indigenous soil organic carbon levels, and the contact time between soil and biochar. - Pinus radiata derived biochars influence soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene.

  3. Use of radiotracers for studies of metal sorption behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCubbin, D.; Leonard, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    Radiotracers provide a convenient tool to study the behaviour of metal ions and other contaminants in natural waters. Furthermore, the use of radiotracers in controlled laboratory experiments provides an ideal approach for investigating, in a systematic manner, the role of individual parameters on processes, at mass concentrations found in the environment. A simplistic procedure has been developed to produce a thorium radiotracer ( 234 Th), in a similar chemical form (non-acidic) to that of the aquatic medium under investigation, to determine the kinetics of sorption to marine particulate material. The benefit of this procedure is that the system is likely to be perturbed to a lesser extent by changes in pH and dissolved Th species following tracer addition. Results from filtering different tracer batches through membranes, to determine the sorption characteristics prior to use, indicate that the physico-chemical behaviour of individual batches was extremely variable. Not surprisingly, the amount of uptake immediately following tracer additions to solutions containing marine particulate material was also variable. It is suggested that the role of tracer may be underestimated if added in acid form. Nevertheless, having accounted for the initial sorption, the subsequent uptake between different batches was reasonably reproducible. The usefulness of radiotracers is discussed in the context of these observations

  4. Iodine sorption of bentonite - radiometric and polarographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konirova, R.; Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Ernestova, M.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments focused on kinetics of iodine retardation on bentonite, influence of aqueous phase pH, buffering properties of bentonite, etc. were carried out by batch method. Distribution coefficient KD was the criterion applied for evaluation of iodine interaction with solid phase. High sorption potential of bentonite to cationic forms of various radionuclides, resulting from relatively high cation exchange capacity, is generally known. On the other hand the inorganic anions are not adsorbed strongly to mineral surface of clays thus uptake of iodine (occurring mainly at iodide (I - ) or iodate (IO 3 - ) form under oxoic conditions) is limited. The distribution coefficients of iodine anions' sorption on bentonite R reach order of magnitude 10 -1 mL/g. In order to increase the sorption capacity of the solid phase, several additives were added to bentonite. Most of them didn't provide satisfactory results except of the addition of activated carbon, which has high surface area. Electromigration and polarographic methods were used for investigation of the redox state of iodine in aqueous phase and determination of KD values as well. Acquired results were compared with data obtained by radiometric measurements. (authors)

  5. Sorption of metaldehyde using granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salvestrini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the ability of granular activated carbon (GAC to sorb metaldehyde was evaluated. The kinetic data could be described by an intra-particle diffusion model, which indicated that the porosity of the sorbent strongly influenced the rate of sorption. The analysis of the equilibrium sorption data revealed that ionic strength and temperature did not play any significant role in the metaldehyde uptake. The sorption isotherms were successfully predicted by the Freundlich model. The GAC used in this paper exhibited a higher affinity and sorption capacity for metaldehyde with respect to other GACs studied in previous works, probably as a result of its higher specific surface area and high point of zero charge.

  6. Radionuclide sorption on granitic drill core material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Locklund, B.

    1987-11-01

    Distribution ratios were determined for Sr-85, Cs-134 and Eu-152 on crushed granite and fissure coating/filling material from Stripa mines. Measurements were also carried out on intact fissure surfaces. The experimental data for Sr-85, Cs-134 on crushed material can be accomodated by a sorption model based on the assumption that the crushed material consists of porous spheres with outer and inner surfaces available for sorption. In the case of Eu-152 only sorption on the outer surfaces of the crushed material was observed. The absence of sorption on inner surfaces is most probably due to high depletion of the more strongly sorbed Eu-152 in the water phase and very low diffusivity of Eu-152 in the sorbed state. (orig./HP)

  7. The Comparison of Sorption and Solubility Behavior of Four Different Resin Luting Cements in Different Storage Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giti, Rashin; Vojdani, Mahroo; Abduo, Jaafar; Bagheri, Rafat

    2016-06-01

    Structural integrity and dimensional stability are the key factors that determine the clinical success and durability of luting cements in the oral cavity. Sorption and solubility of self-adhesive resin luting cements in food-simulating solutions has not been studied sufficiently. This study aimed to compare the sorption and solubility of 2 conventional and 2 self-adhesive resin-based luting cements immersed in four different storage media. A total of 32 disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of four resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray), and Choice 2 (Bisco). Eight specimens of each material were immersed in all tested solutions including n-heptane 97%, distilled water, apple juice, or Listerine mouth wash. Sorption and solubility were measured by weighing the specimens before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 18, using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test with p≤ 0.05 set as the level of significance. There was a statistically significant interaction between the materials and solutions. The effect of media on the sorption and solubility was material-dependent. While seT showed the highest values of the sorption in almost all solutions, Choice 2 showed the least values of sorption and solubility. Immersion in apple juice caused more sorption than other solutions (p≤ 0.05). The sorption and solubility behavior of the studied cements were significantly affected by their composition and the storage media. The more hydrophobic materials with higher filler content like Choice 2 resin cement showed the least sorption and solubility. Due to their lower sorption and solubility, these types of resin-based luting cements are recommended to be used clinically.

  8. Sorption of trace amounts of 67Ga and 65Zn on some divalent and trivalent metal hydroxides