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Sample records for sonora desert mexico

  1. Chihuahuan desert flora of La Calera, Municipio de Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ana Lilia Reina-Guerrero; Thomas R. Van Devender

    2013-01-01

    A total of 555 plant collections were made on 20 trips in 2002-2008 to La Calera area in the Sierra Anibácachi, Municipio de Agua Prieta, 11.3 km south of the Arizona border (31°13’59”N 109°37’53”W, elevation range from 1220 m to 1539 m) in northeastern Sonora. Chihuahuan desertscrub on limestone substrates is dominated by creosotebush (Larrrea divaricata), Chihuahuan...

  2. Food habits of pumas in northwestern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Rosas, O. C.; Valdez, R.; Bender, L.C.; Daniel, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is questionable whether food-habits studies of pumas conducted in the southwestern United States can be extrapolated to northwestern Mexico, because of differences in management, distribution, and abundance of wildlife. We determined food habits of pumas (Puma concolor) in the Sonoran Desert of northwestern Sonora, Mexico. Based on studies in the western United States, we hypothesized that desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) were the major food source of pumas in Sonoran Desert habitats of Mexico. The study area supports populations of desert mule deer, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), lagomorphs (Lepus spp. and Sylvilagus audubonii), collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), and the largest population (???300 individuals) of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) in Sonora. Based on pugmark characteristics, we recorded 3 different adult resident pumas in approximately 90 km2. We analyzed 60 puma fecal samples collected September 1996-November 1998. Primary prey items based on frequency of occurrence and estimated biomass consumed were desert bighorn sheep (40% and 45%, respectively), lagomorphs (33%, 19%), deer (17%, 17%), and collared peccary (15%, 11%). The high percentage of desert bighorn sheep in puma diets may be due to high abundance relative to mule deer, which declined in number during our study. No differences were found in puma diets between seasons (??22=2.4526, P=0.2934). Fluctuations in mule deer populations in northwestern Sonora may influence prey selection by pumas.

  3. Habitat improvement for wildlife in North-Central Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha Martin-Rivera; Fernando Ibarra-Flores; Fred S. Guthery; William P. Kublesky; Gustavo Camou-Luders; Jesus Fimbres-Preciado; Donald Johnson-Gordon

    2001-01-01

    Native vegetation of semiarid grasslands and desert ecosystems that comprise the Arbosufrutescent Desert scrub vegetation in north-central Sonora has been degraded by overgrazing, drought, farming, woodcutting, and a host of other activities over the past century. Several studies were conducted at "Rancho Grande" and at "Rancho El Carrizo," Sonora...

  4. The herpetofauna of Sonora, Mexico, with comparisons to adjoining states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enderson, E. F.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Situated in the topographically complex transition between the Neotropics and the temperate biomes of North America,the state of Sonora, Mexico, has an extraordinarily diverse herpetofauna. Surprisingly little research has been conductedon the state’s amphibians and reptiles and many systematic and biogeographic questions remain unanswered. Tofacilitate future research, we provide a checklist of Sonora’s herpetofauna, documenting species presence based onmuseum specimens, our fieldwork, and published research. Sonora’s herpetofauna is placed in a regional biogeographicperspective via a checklist for the six adjoining states together with faunal analyses. A total of 402 species ofamphibians and reptiles are recorded from these seven states. Sonora has the greatest species richness (187 species,followed by Chihuahua (169 species, and Sinaloa (146 species. Sonora's herpetofauna is most similar to that ofChihuahua, with which it shares a long border. Eleven biogeographic affinity-based faunal groups are recognized. Ofthese, three are dominant in Sonora: a core group classified as "Sonoran" demonstrates strong affinity to SonoranDesertscrub and Sinaloan Thornscrub communities; a Tropical group - with many species reaching their northerndistributional limits in the state; and a Madrean group consisting largely of montane species. Our state-level faunalanalysis provides some evidence of peninsular depauperization of the herpetofauna on the Baja California peninsula duein part to the small number of Neotropical species present in Baja California Sur. Our faunal analysis points towarddistinctive mainland and peninsular Sonoran Desert herpetofaunas centered on Sonora and the Baja CaliforniaPeninsula, respectively, each with about 50 non-insular species, and each with species-level endemism nearing 50%.

  5. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  6. Some interesting Gasteroid ans Secotioid fungi from Sonora, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, G.; Esteve-Raventós, F.

    2007-01-01

    Nine rare species of gasteroid and secotioid fungi from Sonora, Mexico are treated here: Agaricus texensis (= Longula texensis), Araneosa columellata, Calvatia bicolor, C. craniiformis, C. pygmaea, Disciseda hyalothrix, D. verrucosa, Endoptychum arizonicum, and D. stuckertii (= Abstoma stuckertii),

  7. Abundance and food habits of cougars and bobcats in the Sierra San Luis, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo Luna Soria; Carlos A. Lopez Gonzalez

    2005-01-01

    Cougars (Puma concolor) and bobcats (Lynx rufus) are present throughout the Sky Islands of the Sonoran desert. We determined the abundance and food habits in northeastern Sonora, Mexico. Abundance indicated that cougars were common (4.19±5.57 cougars/100 km2 and 0.05±0.05 scats/km). According to the scat index, bobcats were more...

  8. Flora of Chihuahuan desertscrub on limestone in northeastern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Ana Lilia Reina-Guerrero; J. Jesus. Sanchez-Escalante

    2013-01-01

    Transects were done in desertscrub on limestone to characterize the flora of the westernmost Chihuahuan Desert. Most of the sites (15) were in the Municipios of Agua Prieta and Naco in northeastern Sonora, with single sites near Ascensión, northwestern Chihuahua and east of Douglas in southeastern Arizona. A total of 236 taxa were recorded on transects. Dicot perennial...

  9. Preliminary flora of the Sierra Bacadehuachi, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Ana Lilia Reina-Guerrero; George M. Ferguson; George Yatskievych; Beatriz E. Loyola-Reina; Gertrudis Yanes-Arvayo; Maria de la Paz Montanez-Armenta; John L. Anderson; Stephen F. Hale; Sky Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    The Sierra Bacadéhuachi in east-central Sonora is the westernmost mountain range in the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), located east of Bacadéhuachi, Municipio de Bacadéhuachi, 34 km east of the Chihuahua border, and 165 km south of the Arizona border. The vegetation ranges from lowland foothills thornscrub up through desert grassland to oak woodland and pine-oak forest...

  10. OPORTUNITIES PROGRAM IN MEXICO AND SONORA: IMPACT, EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irasema Lilian Mancillas-Alvarez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of poverty is based on the monetary approach, which is measured by the method of poverty lines (Foster, Greer and Thoerbecke, 1984; Sen, 1976; while the static microsimulation technique (Bourguignon and Spadaro, 2006 helps quantify the impact of Oportunities in reducing poverty in Mexico and Sonora during the years 2010-2012. The information for this study is obtained from the National Survey of Income and Expenditure Household INEGI (2010, 2012.Lower percentages of poverty were found in Sonora in comparison with the country and no significant impact from the program; the greatest impact was seen in the country since food poverty was reduced (-2.14%, capabilities poverty (- 1.86% and patrimonial poverty (-0.81%. In regards to targeting of the program, in the country there is a slight improvement in efficiency but not in effectiveness and Sonora experienced a significant improvement in efficiency and effectiveness.

  11. Occurency and aqueous processing of tellurides from Sonora (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, S.; Perez, E.; Ecinas, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Tellurium production is limited mainly to that obtained from the treatment of electrolyte muds from copper refineries. however, there are several other sources from which the precious metal tellurides are potentially attractive. This work presents a review of the main localitiesin Sonora (Mexico), where tellurides have been found. In addition, based upon the physical chemistry fundamentals for tellurium and precious metal tellurides, the aqueous extraction and recovery routes are discussed. (Author) 51 refs

  12. Biodiversity in the Madrean Archipelago of Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Sergio Avila-Villegas; Melanie Emerson; Dale Turner; Aaron D. Flesch; Nicholas S. Deyo

    2013-01-01

    Flowery rhetoric often gives birth to new terms that convey images and concepts, lead to inspiration and initiative. On the 1892-1894 expedition to resurvey the United States-Mexico boundary, Lieutenant David Dubose Gaillard described the Arizona-Sonora borderlands as “bare, jagged mountains rising out of the plains like islands from the sea” (Mearns 1907; Hunt and...

  13. Seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi in domestic dogs from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Molina-Barrios, Ramón M; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Cedillo-Cobián, Jesús R; Henao-Díaz, Yuly A; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2017-09-05

    Chagas disease is an important health problem in Latin America due to its incapacitating effects and associated mortality. Studies on seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexican dogs have demonstrated a direct correlation between seropositivity in humans and dogs, which can act as sentinels for the disease in this region. The objective of this study was to determine the seropositivity for T.cruzi infection in dogs from Sonora, a northern borderstate of Mexico. Responsible pet owners were selected at random from an urban area of Empalme municipality, Sonora, Mexico, and from there, 180 dog samples were collected. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Reactive ELISA sera were processed by indirect immunofluorescence to confirm the presence of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. For the statistical analysis, chi-square tests were conducted. Dogs' sera showed a seropositivity rate of 4.44%. The rate of seropositivity was not associated with the dogs' age, sex, or socioeconomics pertaining to the geographical area. One sample (1/180, 0.55%) showed the acute state of the disease. The study found a presence of anti-T. cruzi antibodies in dogs in this area, which suggests vector transmission. There is a need for active surveillance programs throughout the state of Sonora and vector control strategies should also be implemented in endemic regions.

  14. The role of landowners in jaguar conservation in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Rosas, Octavio C; Valdez, Raul

    2010-04-01

    The northernmost known breeding population of jaguars occurs in the municipality of Nácori Chico, Sonora, Mexico about 270 km from the United States-Mexico border and may be the source from which jaguars sighted in the United States dispersed. Since 1999 at least 11 jaguars (Panthera onca) had been illegally killed in the area due to predator control programs. We initiated a jaguar landowner-based conservation plan in 2004. The eight participating landowners agreed to suspend predator control programs targeting jaguars and pumas (Puma concolor) only if cattle losses were compensated. A private outfitter, with the consent of landowners, initiated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) hunts in 2004 and agreed to pay the group of participating landowners US$1500 for every deer hunt permit sold. The funds paid to the landowners from deer hunts were sufficient to convince landowners to suspend all predator-control efforts of jaguars and pumas. The involvement of landowners in the jaguar conservation program in northeastern Sonora is a successful, private, wildlife-conservation initiative that provides an example for jaguar conservation efforts in northern Mexico.

  15. Residual pyrethroids in fresh horticultural products in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Madrid, Maria L; Valenzuela-Quintanar, Ana I; Silveira-Gramont, Maria I; Rodríguez-Olibarría, Guillermo; Grajeda-Cota, Patricia; Zuno-Floriano, Fabiola G; Miller, Marion G

    2011-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the presence of cyhialothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin in vegetables produced and consumed in Sonora, Mexico. A total of 345 samples were collected from cluster sampling of markets and fields. Approximately 9% of the samples tested positive for pyrethroids (residue range 0.004-0.573 mg kg(-1)). Based on the results, the potential toxicological risk of human exposure to the pyrethroid insecticides measured in vegetables appears to be minimal, with the estimated exposure being 1,000 times lower than admissible levels. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  16. Agroforestry systems in the Sonora River Watershed, Mexico: An example of effective land stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Valdez-Zamudio; Peter F. Ffolliot

    2000-01-01

    The Sonora River watershed is located in the central part of the state of Sonora,Mexico, and is one of the most important watersheds in the region. Much of the state's economy depends on the natural resources, products, and productive activities developed in this watershed. Many natural areas along the river and its tributaries have been converted to a large...

  17. Breeding colonies of least terns (Sternula antillarum) in northern Sonora, Mexico, 2006-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemartin, Alyssa; van Riper, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We document distribution of breeding least terns (Sternula antillarum) in northern Sonora, Mexico, 2006-2008. We report breeding activity at six sites with active colonies, including three previously undocumented colonies.

  18. Avian influenza survey in migrating waterfowl in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Corral, M; López-Robles, G; Hernández, J

    2011-02-01

    A two-year survey was carried out on the occurrence of avian influenza in migrating birds in two estuaries of the Mexican state of Sonora, which is located within the Pacific flyway. Cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 1262 birds, including 20 aquatic bird species from the Moroncarit and Tobari estuaries in Sonora, Mexico. Samples were tested for type A influenza (M), H5 Eurasian and North American subtypes (H5EA and H5NA respectively) and the H7 North American subtype (H7NA). Gene detection was determined by one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR). The results revealed that neither the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5 of Eurasian lineage nor H7NA were detected. The overall prevalence of avian influenza type A (M-positive) in the sampled birds was 3.6% with the vast majority in dabbling ducks (Anas species). Samples from two birds, one from a Redhead (Aythya americana) and another from a Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata), were positive for the low-pathogenic H5 avian influenza virus of North American lineage. These findings represented documented evidence of the occurrence of avian influenza in wintering birds in the Mexican wetlands. This type of study contributes to the understanding of how viruses spread to new regions of North America and highlights the importance of surveillance for the early detection and control of potentially pathogenic strains, which could affect animal and human health. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Preliminary assessment of biogeographic affinities of selected insect taxa of the state of Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Jones; Alejandro Obregon-Zuniga; Sandra Guzman-Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    The biogeographic affinites of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperidae), damsel and dragonflies (Odonata), and ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) reported from the State of Sonora, Mexico were analyzed using published species lists. The combined distribution of these taxa was proportionally greater (47.4%) for those species within the Mega-Mexico3...

  20. Bird list of San Bernardino Ranch in Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinda Cardenas-Garcia; Monica C. Olguin-Villa

    2013-01-01

    Interest and investigation of birds has been increasing over the last decades due to the loss of their habitats, and declination and fragmentation of their populations. San Bernardino Ranch is located in the desert grassland region of northeastern Sonora, México. Over the last decade, restoration efforts have tried to address the effects of long deteriorating economic...

  1. Buying land for conservation purposes in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Lucia Perez-Weil; Juan Carlos G. Bravo

    2013-01-01

    The Northern Jaguar Reserve is 50,000 acres and one of the largest privately owned wildlife preserves in Sonora. Buying land in remote parts of Sonora takes special knowledge as ownership rules may not be clear and boundaries may not be defined in the records. There are complex legal procedures to guarantee ownership in which letters of intent play a crucial role, and...

  2. [First case of chikungunya fever in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Miguel Ángel; Cañedo-Dorame, Ismael Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The Chikungunya is an arbovirus first described during a 1952 outbreak of febrile exantematic disease in southern Tanganyika (now Tanzania). It is a virus within the alphavirus genus of the Togaviridae family, it is usually transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. Typically, the disease manifests as acute onset of fever and joint pains. This study describes the clinical characteristics the first imported case infected with chikungunya fever (CHIK) in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. We report the case of a 30 years old man seen in our emergency department due to fever, polyarthralgia, rash and headache. This patient has been in Tapachula, Chiapas, a jungle area in southern México, and he returned from a 45 days trip before the onset his symptoms. The chikungunya viral infection (CHIK) was diagnosed by RT-PCR procedure. Paracetamol therapy was administered and his clinical course was self-limited. We concluded that with the increase of mosquito´s habitat by global warming and frequent traveling, CHIK reemerged and showed global distribution recently. This disease must be suspected in patients with compatible clinical symptoms returning from epidemic/endemic areas. CHIK must be diagnosed on the basis of clinical, epidemiological and laboratory criteria.

  3. The Cambrian-Ordovician rocks of Sonora, Mexico, and southern Arizona, southwestern margin of North America (Laurentia): chapter 35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William R.; Harris, Alta C.; Repetski, John E.; Derby, James R.; Fritz, R.D.; Longacre, S.A.; Morgan, W.A.; Sternbach, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cambrian and Ordovician shelf, platform, and basin rocks are present in Sonora, Mexico, and southern Arizona and were deposited on the southwestern continental margin of North America (Laurentia). Cambrian and Ordovician rocks in Sonora, Mexico, are mostly exposed in scattered outcrops in the northern half of the state. Their discontinuous nature results from extensive Quaternary and Tertiary surficial cover, from Tertiary and Mesozoic granitic batholiths in western Sonora, and from widespread Tertiary volcanic deposits in the Sierra Madre Occidental in eastern Sonora. Cambrian and Ordovician shelf rocks were deposited as part of the the southern miogeocline on the southwestern continental margin of North America.

  4. Testing the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis: Evidence from Paleoproterozoic igneous rocks and deformed Mesozoic strata in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, J.M.; Lawton, T.F.; Mauel, D.J.; Leggett, W.J.; Gonzalez-Leon, C. M.; Farmer, G.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    U-Pb ages and Nd isotope values of Proterozoic rocks in Sonora, Mexico, indicate the presence of Caborca-type basement, predicted to lie only south of the Mojave-Sonora mega-shear, 40 km north of the postulated megashear. Granitoids have U-Pb zircon ages of 1763-1737 Ma and 1076 Ma, with ??Nd(t) values from +1.4 to -4.3, typical of the Caborca block. Lower Jurassic strata near the Proterozoic rocks contain large granitic clasts with U-Pb ages and ??Nd(t) values indistinguishable from those of Caborcan basement. Caborca-type basement was thus present at this location north of the megashear by 190 Ma, the depositional age of the Jurassic strata. The Proterozoic rocks are interpreted as parautochthonous, exhumed and juxtaposed against the Mesozoic section by a reverse fault that formed a footwall shortcut across a Jurassic normal fault. Geochronology, isotope geochemistry, and structural geology are therefore inconsistent with Late Jurassic megashear displacement and require either that no major transcurrent structure is present in Sonora or that strike-slip displacement occurred prior to Early Jurassic time. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  5. Jaguar taxonomy and genetic diversity for southern Arizona, United States, and Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Melanie; Hein, Alexander Ochoa

    2016-06-28

    Executive SummaryThe jaguar is the largest Neotropical felid and the only extant representative of the genus Panthera in the Americas. In recorded history, the jaguars range has extended from the Southern United States, throughout Mexico, to Central and South America, and they occupy a wide variety of habitats. A previous jaguar genetic study found high historical levels of gene flow among jaguar populations over broad areas but did not include any samples of jaguar from the States of Arizona, United States, or Sonora, Mexico. Arizona and Sonora have been part of the historical distribution of jaguars; however, poaching and habitat fragmentation have limited their distribution until they were declared extinct in the United States and endangered in Sonora. Therefore, a need was apparent to have this northernmost (Arizona/Sonora) jaguar population included in an overall jaguar molecular taxonomy and genetic diversity analyses. In this study, we used molecular genetic markers to examine diversity and taxonomy for jaguars in the Northwestern Jaguar Recovery Unit (NJRU; Sonora, Sinaloa, and Jalisco, Mexico; and southern Arizona and New Mexico, United States) relative to jaguars in other parts of the jaguar range (Central and South America). The objectives of this study were to:Collect opportunistic jaguar samples (hide, blood, hair, saliva, and scat), from historical and current individuals, that originated in NJRU areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Sonora;Use these samples to assess molecular taxonomy of NJRU jaguars compared to data from a previous study of jaguars rangewide; andDevelop suggestions for conservation of NJRU jaguars based on the results.

  6. Volcanic materials superconductivity in desert areas of the states of Sonora and Baja California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holguín, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Research was conducted to find materials in their natural state at room temperature and exhibit the effects of superconductivity in the volcanic region of deserts Altar in Sonora and Baja California Norte. 100 were collected at random samples of materials from different parts of the region and underwent tests to determine their electromagnetic parameters of electrical resistance, magnetism, temperature and conductivity. Only it has been found that the effects of superconductivity in them is only present at very low temperatures corroborating what has been done in other investigations, however no indication that there is a material or combination of materials that can produce the effects of superconductivity other temperatures so it is suggested to continue the search for such materials and / or develop a technique at room temperature to allow mimic the behavior of atoms when superconductivity occurs at. (paper)

  7. Socio-environmental health analysis in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Caldeira, Felipe; Callegary, James; Gray, Floyd; O’ Rourke, Mary Kay; Meranza, Veronica; Van Rijn, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    In Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, some neighborhoods, or colonias, have intermittent delivery of water through pipes from the city of Nogales’s municipal water-delivery system while other areas lack piped water and rely on water delivered by truck or pipas. This research examined how lifestyles, water quality, and potential disease response, such as diarrhea, differs seasonally from a colonia with access to piped water as opposed to one using alternative water-delivery systems. Water samples were collected from taps or spigots at homes in two Nogales colonias. One colonia reflected high socio-environmental conditions where residents are supplied with municipal piped water (Colonia Lomas de Fatima); the second colonia reflected low socio-environmental conditions, lacking access to piped water and served by pipas (Colonia Luis Donaldo Colosio). A survey was developed and implemented to characterize perceptions of water quality, health impacts, and quality of life. Water samples were analyzed for microbial and inorganic water-quality parameters known to impact human health including, Escherichia coli (E. coli), total coliform bacteria, arsenic, and lead. A total of 21 households agreed to participate in the study (14 in Colosio and 7 in Fatima). In both colonias metal concentrations from water samples were all well below the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (US EPA’s) maximum contaminant levels. E. coli concentrations exceeded the US EPA’s drinking-water standard in Colosio but not Fatima. Total coliform bacteria were present in over 50 % of households in both colonias. Microbial contamination was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter in both colonias. Resulting analysis suggests that residents in colonias without piped water are at a greater risk of gastrointestinal illness from consumption of compromised drinking water. Our survey corroborated reports of gastrointestinal illness in the summer months but not in the winter. Chloride

  8. Socio-Environmental Health Analysis in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M; Caldeira, Felipe; Callegary, James; Gray, Floyd; O' Rourke, Mary Kay; Meranza, Veronica; Van Rijn, Saskia

    2012-06-01

    In Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, some neighborhoods, or colonias, have intermittent delivery of water through pipes from the city of Nogales's municipal water-delivery system while other areas lack piped water and rely on water delivered by truck or pipas. This research examined how lifestyles, water quality, and potential disease response, such as diarrhea, differs seasonally from a colonia with access to piped water as opposed to one using alternative water-delivery systems. Water samples were collected from taps or spigots at homes in two Nogales colonias. One colonia reflected high socio-environmental conditions where residents are supplied with municipal piped water (Colonia Lomas de Fatima); the second colonia reflected low socio-environmental conditions, lacking access to piped water and served by pipas (Colonia Luis Donaldo Colosio). A survey was developed and implemented to characterize perceptions of water quality, health impacts, and quality of life. Water samples were analyzed for microbial and inorganic water-quality parameters known to impact human health including, Escherichia coli (E. coli), total coliform bacteria, arsenic, and lead. A total of 21 households agreed to participate in the study (14 in Colosio and 7 in Fatima). In both colonias metal concentrations from water samples were all well below the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) maximum contaminant levels. E. coli concentrations exceeded the US EPA's drinking-water standard in Colosio but not Fatima. Total coliform bacteria were present in over 50 % of households in both colonias. Microbial contamination was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter in both colonias. Resulting analysis suggests that residents in colonias without piped water are at a greater risk of gastrointestinal illness from consumption of compromised drinking water. Our survey corroborated reports of gastrointestinal illness in the summer months but not in the winter. Chloride was found

  9. Notes from the Field: Community-Based Prevention of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - Sonora, Mexico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straily, Anne; Drexler, Naomi; Cruz-Loustaunau, Denica; Paddock, Christopher D; Alvarez-Hernandez, Gerardo

    2016-11-25

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a life-threatening tickborne zoonosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is a reemerging disease in Mexico (1,2). R. rickettsii is an intracellular bacterium that infects vascular endothelium and can cause multisystem organ failure and death in the absence of timely administration of a tetracycline-class antibiotic, typically doxycycline. Epidemic RMSF, as described in parts of Arizona and Mexico, is associated with massive local infestations of the brown dog tick (Rhiphicephalus sanguineus sensu lato) on domestic dogs and in peridomestic settings that result in high rates of human exposure; for example, during 2003-2012, in Arizona the incidence of RMSF in the three most highly affected communities was 150 times the U.S. national average (3,4). In 2015, the Mexico Ministry of Health (MOH) declared an epidemiologic emergency because of high and sustained rates of RMSF in several states in northern Mexico, including the state of Sonora. During 2004-2015, a total of 1,129 cases and 188 RMSF deaths were reported from Sonora (Sonora MOH, unpublished data, 2016). During 2009-2015, one impoverished community (community A) in Sonora reported 56 cases of RMSF involving children and adolescents, with a case-fatality rate of 40% (Sonora MOH, unpublished data, 2016). Poverty and lack of timely access to health services are risk factors for severe RMSF. Children are especially vulnerable to infection, because they might have increased contact with dogs and spend more time playing around spaces where ticks survive (5). In Sonora, case fatality rates for children aged <10 years can be as high as 30%, which is almost four times the aggregate case-fatality rate reported for the general population of the state (8%) (2), and 10-13 times higher than the case-fatality rate described for this age group in the United States (2.4%) (6).

  10. Organizational Transformation to Promote Knowledge Transfer at Universities and R&D Institutions in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderrama, Jorge Ines Leon; Lopez, Lydia Venecia Gutierrez; Lafarga, Cuitlahuac Valdez

    2013-01-01

    Using the results of an empirical study in the State of Sonora, Mexico, this paper reports on an attempt to identify trends and transformations that have taken place in the way knowledge transfer activities are organized and structured in higher education institutions and research centres. The research was designed to provide a characterization of…

  11. Habitat and conservation status of the beaver in the Sierra San Luis Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karla Pelz Serrano; Eduardo Ponce Guevara; Carlos A. Lopez Gonzalez

    2005-01-01

    The status of beaver (Castor canadensis) in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, is uncertain. We surveyed the Cajon Bonito River to assess the beaver’s status and habitat and found five colonies. Limiting factors appear to be pollution due to animal waste, deforestation of riparian trees, and human exploitation. Beavers did not appear to require habitat...

  12. Binational digital soils map of the Ambos Nogales watershed, southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura

    2004-01-01

    We have prepared a digital map of soil parameters for the international Ambos Nogales watershed to use as input for selected soils-erosion models. The Ambos Nogales watershed in southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico, contains the Nogales wash, a tributary of the Upper Santa Cruz River. The watershed covers an area of 235 km2, just under half of which is in Mexico. Preliminary investigations of potential erosion revealed a discrepancy in soils data and mapping across the United States-Mexican border due to issues including different mapping resolutions, incompatible formatting, and varying nomenclature and classification systems. To prepare a digital soils map appropriate for input to a soils-erosion model, the historical analog soils maps for Nogales, Ariz., were scanned and merged with the larger-scale digital soils data available for Nogales, Sonora, Mexico using a geographic information system.

  13. Significance of detrital zircons in upper Devonian ocean-basin strata of the Sonora allochthon and Lower Permian synorogenic strata of the Mina Mexico foredeep, central Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, F.G.; Gehrels, G.E.; Stewart, John H.

    2008-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic dating of detrital zircons from a conglomeratic barite sandstone in the Sonora allochthon and a calciclastic sandstone in the Mina Mexico foredeep of the Minas de Barita area reveals two main age groups in the Upper Devonian part of the Los Pozos Formation, 1.73-1.65 Ga and 1.44-1.42 Ga; and three main age groups in the Lower Permian part of the Mina Mexico Formation, 1.93-1.91 Ga, 1.45-1.42 Ga, and 1.1-1.0 Ga. Small numbers of zircons with ages of 2.72-2.65 Ga, 1.30-1.24 Ga, ca. 2.46 Ga, ca. 1.83 Ga, and ca. 0.53 Ga are also present in the Los Pozos sandstone. Detrital zircons ranging in age from 1.73 to 1.65 Ga are considered to have been derived from the Yavapai, Mojave, and Mazatzal Provinces and their transition zones of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. The 1.45-1.30 Ga detrital zircons were probably derived from scattered granite bodies within the Mojave and Mazatzal basement rocks in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, and possibly from the Southern and Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Provinces of the southern United States. The 1.24-1.0 Ga detrital zircons are believed to have been derived from the Grenville (Llano) Province to the east and northeast or from Grenvilleage intrusions or anatectites to the north. Several detrital zircon ages ranging from 2.72 to 1.91 Ga were probably derived originally from the Archean Wyoming Province and Early Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Lake Superior region. These older detrital zircons most likely have been recycled one or more times into the Paleozoic sandstones of central Sonora. The 0.53 Ga zircon is believed to have been derived from a Lower Cambrian granitoid or meta-morphic rock northeast of central Sonora, possibly in New Mexico and Colorado, or Oklahoma. Detrital zircon geochronology suggests that most of the detritus in both samples was derived from Laurentia to the north, whereas some detritus in the Permian synorogenic foredeep sequence was derived from the

  14. Biodiversity and conservation of the Cienega de Saracachi area, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Martin A. Villa-Andrade; Martin Reyes-Juarez; Gonzalo Luna-Salazar; Martin Padres-Contreras; Fernando Padres; Paul S. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The Ciénega de Saracachi area, including Arroyo Santo Domingo and Cañón Quemado, is in the Municipio de Cucurpe in north-central Sonora (30°21’33”N 110°35’29”W), ca. 105 km south of the Arizona border. The vegetation is cottonwood-willow riparian forest in the Ciénega and rocky stream canyons with desert grassland on the slopes above. These upper tributaries of the Río...

  15. Consequences of buffelgrass pasture development for primary productivity, perennial plant richness, and vegetation structure in the drylands of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Kimberly; Molina-Freaner, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    In large parts of northern Mexico native plant communities are being converted to non-native buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) pastures, and this conversion could fundamentally alter primary productivity and species richness. In Sonora, Mexico land conversion is occurring at a regional scale along a rainfall-driven gradient of primary productivity, across which native plant communities transition from desert scrub to thorn scrub. We used a paired sampling design to compare a satellite-derived index of primary productivity, richness of perennial plant species, and canopy-height profiles of native plant communities with buffelgrass pastures. We sampled species richness across a gradient of primary productivity in desert scrub and thorn scrub vegetation to examine the influence of site productivity on the outcomes of land conversion. We also examined the influence of pasture age on species richness of perennial plants. Index values of primary productivity were lower in buffelgrass pastures than in native vegetation, which suggests a reduction in primary productivity. Land conversion reduced species richness by approximately 50% at local and regional scales, reduced tree and shrub cover by 78%, and reduced canopy height. Land conversion disproportionately reduced shrub species richness, which reflects the common practice among Sonoran ranchers of conserving certain tree and cactus species. Site productivity did not affect the outcomes of land conversion. The age of a buffelgrass pasture was unrelated to species richness within the pasture, which suggests that passive recovery of species richness to preconversion levels is unlikely. Our findings demonstrate that land conversion can result in large losses of plant species richness at local and regional scales and in substantial changes to primary productivity and vegetation structure, which casts doubt on the feasibility of restoring native plant communities without active intervention on the part of land managers.

  16. [DNA mutations associated to rifampicin or isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolado-Martínez, Enrique; Pérez-Mendoza, Ansix; Alegría-Morquecho, Francisco Monserrat; Candia-Plata, María del Carmen; Aguayo-Verdugo, María del Rosario; Alvarez-Hernández, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    To perform the analysis of specific regions of the major genes associated with resistance to isoniazid or rifampin. Twenty two M. tuberculosis strains, isolated from human samples obtained in Sonora, Mexico. Specific primers for hotspots of the rpoB, katG, inhA genes and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region were used. The purified PCR products were sequenced. Mutations in the promoter of inhA, the ahpC-oxyR region, and codon 315 of katG and in 451 or 456 codons of rpoB, were identified. Detection of mutations not previously reported requires further genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Sonora.

  17. Dissipation of glyphosate from grapevine soils in Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma J. Salazar López

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine is one of the important crops in Sonora, due to revenue generation from its export to foreign countries. Among the most widely used herbicides for this crop is glyphosate, which is considered moderately toxic and persistent. The present research evaluates the dissipation of glyphosate in grapevine planted soil at three depths (5, 30 and 60 cm. Sampling was carried out before glyphosate application, and 5, 10, 18, 27, and 65 days after. Glyphosate was extracted from soil samples using ammonium hydroxide. The derivate extracts were partitioned with dichloromethane and analyzed using gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detector (PFPD. The results showed that average glyphosate residues are significantly greater at 5 cm (0.09 mg kg-1 than the other depths (30 and 60 cm, having a difference of 0.078 mg kg-1 between them (P < 0.03. Glyphosate concentration time profiles were similar; it reached maximum soil concentration in a range of 10 to 18 days after application. The half-life of glyphosate in soil has an average of 39 days at all depths. Our data suggests that the release in soil of glyphosate applied to weeds delays its transference to soil by 14 days, and extends residue half life to 55 days after application. These results could be the basis for further research, including more environmental parameters that could affect the dissipation or degradation process in soil.

  18. Quaternary Geochronology, Paleontology, and Archaeology of the Upper San Pedro River Valley, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, E. P.

    2013-12-01

    This poster presents the results of multi-disciplinary investigations of the preservation and extent of Quaternary fossil-bearing strata in the San Pedro River Valley in Sonora, Mexico. Geologic deposits in the portions of the San Pedro Valley in southern Arizona contain one of the best late Cenozoic fossil records known in North America and the best record of early humans and extinct mammals on the continent. The basin in the U.S. is one of the type locations for the Blancan Land Mammal Age. Hemiphilian and Irvingtonian fossils are common. Rancholabrean remains are widespread. Strata in the valley adjacent to the international border with Mexico have yielded the densest concentration of archaeological mammoth-kill sites known in the western hemisphere. Despite more than 60 years of research in the U.S., however, and the fact that over one third of the San Pedro River lies south of the international boundary, little has been known about the late Cenozoic geology of the valley in Mexico. The study reported here utilized extensive field survey, archaeological documentation, paleontological excavations, stratigraphic mapping and alluvial geochronology to determine the nature and extent of Quaternary fossil-bearing deposits in the portions of the San Pedro Valley in Sonora, Mexico. The results demonstrate that the Plio-Pleistocene fossil -bearing formations known from the valley in Arizona extend into the uppermost reaches of the valley in Mexico. Several new fossil sites were discovered that yielded the remains of Camelids, Equus, Mammuthus, and other Proboscidean species. Late Pleistocene archaeological remains were found on the surface of the surrounding uplands. AMS radiocarbon dating demonstrates the widespread preservation of middle- to late- Holocene deposits. However, the late Pleistocene deposits that contain the archaeological mammoth-kill sites in Arizona are absent in the valley in Mexico, and are now known to be restricted to relatively small portions of

  19. Insecticide residues in stored grains in Sonora, Mexico: quantification and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Madrid, M L; Valdez-Hurtado, S; Vargas-Valdez, N D; Salazar-Lopez, N J; Silveira-Gramont, M I; Loarca-Piña, F G; Rodríguez-Olibarria, G; Wong-Corral, F J; Borboa-Flores, J; Burgos-Hernández, A

    2008-02-01

    Food safety has acquired great attention by food importer and exporters. Food rejection or acceptance across international borders is based on the compliance with international food regulations. Due to the lack of recent data on pesticide residues in Mexican grains, this study focused on detecting and quantifying insecticide residues in stored wheat, corn, chickpeas, and beans, as well as to determine their mutagenic potential. Grains were sampled from primary storage sites in Sonora, Mexico. Malathion, chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin, cypermethrin, 4,4-DDE, 4,4-DDD and 4,4-DDT were analyzed in 135 samples. Grain samples were not mutagenic and most pesticide levels were within regulation limits.

  20. Erpetogomphus molossus, a new species from Sonora, Mexico (Odonata: Anisoptera: Gomphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailowitz, Richard; Danforth, Doug; Upson, Sandy

    2013-11-08

    Erpetogomphus molossus is described from 3 male and 3 female specimens (holotype and allotype in collection of Instituto Biologico de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) from the intermittent pine-oak woodland of the Yécora municipio in east-central Sonora, Mexico. Diagnostic features of the new species include the seemingly bulbous tip (in lateral view) and prominent baso-ventral process of the male cerci and the notched and denticled posteromesal corners of the female subgenital plate.

  1. Clinical Manifestations of Cryptosporidiosis and Identification of a New Cryptosporidium Subtype in Patients From Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea-Quezada, Alejandro; González-Díaz, Mariana; Villegas-Gómez, Isaac; Durazo, María; Hernández, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua; Valenzuela, Olivia

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the clinical manifestations of cryptosporidiosis and the distribution of Cryptosporidium spp. and subtypes in children in Sonora, Mexico. Two subtypes of C. parvum, including IIaA15G2R1 and IIcA5G3a, and 6 subtypes of Cryptosporidium hominis, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA12G3, IdA23, IeA11G3T3, and a new subtype IaA14R11, were identified. Cryptosporidium as an etiologic agent for acute gastroenteritis is discussed.

  2. Analysis of the Gran Desierto, Pinacte Region, Sonora, Mexico, via shuttle imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Mchone, J. F.; Asmerom, Y.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The radar discriminability of geolian features and their geological setting as imaged by the SIR-A experiment is examined. The Gran Desierto and Pincate volcanio field of Sonora, Mexico was used to analyze the radar characteristics of the interplay of aeolian features and volcano terrain. The area in the Gran Desierto covers 4000 sq. km. and contains sand dunes of several forms. The Pincate volcanio field covers more than 2.000 sq. km. and consists primarily of basaltic lavas. Margins of the field, especially on the western and northern sides, include several maar and maar-like craters; thus obtaining information on their radar characteristics for comparison with impact craters.

  3. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Pregnancy: Four Cases from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Enriquez, Jesus David; Delgado-de la Mora, Jesus; Paddock, Christopher D; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Carlos Arturo; Candia-Plata, María Del Carmen; Hernández, Gerardo Álvarez

    2017-09-01

    We present a series of four pregnant women with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) that occurred in Sonora, Mexico, during 2015-2016. Confirmatory diagnoses were made by polymerase chain reaction or serological reactivity to antigens of Rickettsia rickettsii by using an indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay. Each patient presented with fever and petechial rash and was treated successfully with doxycycline. Each of the women and one full-term infant delivered at 36 weeks gestation survived the infection. Three of the patients in their first trimester of pregnancy suffered spontaneous abortions. RMSF should be suspected in any pregnant woman presenting with fever, malaise and rash in regions where R. rickettsii is endemic.

  4. Clinical profile and predictors of fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Hernandez, Gerardo; Murillo-Benitez, Coral; Candia-Plata, Maria del Carmen; Moro, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an increasingly important cause of preventable mortality in children in Sonora, Mexico. Although early treatment with tetracycline has shown to prevent fatal outcome, the disease remains a life-threatening condition, particularly for children. This study describes the clinical factors associated with pediatric mortality due to RMSF in Sonora, in order to guide healthcare practices. This is a retrospective analysis of 104 children consecutively hospitalized at the major pediatric hospital of Sonora, diagnosed with RMSF between January 2004 and December 2013. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for fatal outcome. The case fatality ratio in this cohort was 20.2%. Children were hospitalized after a median of 6 days from onset of symptoms including fever (100%), rash involving palms and soles (88.5%) and headache (79.8%); 90.4% of fatal cases had low platelet counts (<50,000/μL) and 33.3% showed serum creatinine concentrations above the normal value. Acute kidney injury increased mortality, odds ratio (OR(adj)) = 4.84, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-16.2, as well as delay in treatment (≥ 5th day from onset) with doxycycline, OR(adj) = 2.62, 95% CI: 1.24-5.52 and hemorrhage, OR(adj) = 6.11, 95% CI: 1.89-19.69. RMSF is a public health problem in Sonora. Clinically, fatal cases differ from non-fatal cases in renal function and hemorrhagic manifestations, although these findings may occur too late for a timely intervention. First-line providers must be educated to harbor a timely suspicion of RMSF, and should provide empiric treatment with doxycycline when febrile patients first present for care.

  5. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Cambrian to Triassic miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal strata of Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, G.E.; Stewart, John H.

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and eighty two individual detrital zircon grains from Cambrian through Permian miogeoclinal strata, Ordovician eugeoclinal rocks, and Triassic post-orogenic sediments in northwestern Sonora have been analyzed. During Cambrian, Devonian, Permian, and Triassic time, most zircons accumulating along this part of the Cordilleran margin were shed from 1.40-1.45 and 1.62-1.78 Ga igneous rocks that are widespread in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Zircons with ages of approximately 1.11 Ga are common in Cambrian strata and were apparently shed from granite bodies near the sample site. The sources of 225-280 Ma zircons in our Triassic sample are more problematic, as few igneous rocks of these ages are recognized in northwestern Mexico. Such sources may be present but unrecognized, or the grains could have been derived from igneous rocks of the appropriate ages to the northwest in the Mojave Desert region, to the east in Chihuahua and Coahuila, or to the south in accreted(?) arc-type terranes. Because the zircon grains in our Cambrian and Devonian to Triassic samples could have accumulated in proximity to basement rocks near their present position or in the Death Valley region of southern California, our data do not support or refute the existence of the Mojave-Sonora megashear. Ordovician strata of both miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal affinity are dominated by >1.77 Ga detrital zircons, which are considerably older than most basement rocks in the region. Zircon grains in the miogeoclinal sample were apparently derived from the Peace River arch area of northwestern Canada and transported southward by longshore currents. The eugeoclinal grains may also have come from the Peace River arch region, with southward transport by either sedimentary or tectonic processes, or they may have been shed from off-shelf slivers of continents (perhaps Antarctica?) removed from the Cordilleran margin during Neoproterozoic rifting. It is also possible that the

  6. Assessing the extent and diversity of riparian ecosystems in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M.L.; Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.; Valdes-Casillas, C.; Erker, J.A.; Reynolds, E.W.; Shafroth, P.B.; Gomez-Limon, E.; Jones, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Conservation of forested riparian ecosystems is of international concern. Relatively little is known of the structure, composition, diversity, and extent of riparian ecosystems in Mexico. We used high- and low-resolution satellite imagery from 2000 to 2006, and ground-based sampling in 2006, to assess the spatial pattern, extent, and woody plant composition of riparian forests across a range of spatial scales for the state of Sonora, Mexico. For all 3rd and higher order streams, river bottomlands with riparian forests occupied a total area of 2,301 km2. Where forested bottomlands remained, on average, 34% of the area had been converted to agriculture while 39% remained forested. We estimated that the total area of riparian forest along the principal streams was 897 km2. Including fencerow trees, the total forested riparian area was 944 km2, or 0.5% of the total land area of Sonora. Ground-based sampling of woody riparian vegetation consisted of 92, 50 m radius circular plots. About 79 woody plant species were noted. The most important tree species, based on cover and frequency, were willow species Salix spp. (primarily S. goodingii and S. bonplandiana), mesquite species Prosopis spp. (primarily P. velutina), and Fremont cottonwood Populus fremontii. Woody riparian taxa at the reach scale showed a trend of increasing diversity from north to south within Sonora. Species richness was greatest in the willow-bald cypress Taxodium distichum var. mexicanum-Mexican cottonwood P. mexicana subsp. dimorphia ecosystem. The non-native tamarisk Tamarix spp. was rare, occurring at just three study reaches. Relatively natural stream flow patterns and fluvial disturbance regimes likely limit its establishment and spread. ?? 2008 Springer Science + Business Media BV.

  7. Trilobite-based biostratigraphy (arthropoda-trilobita) and related faunas of the Cambrian from Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuen-Romero, F. J.; Valdez-Holguín, J. E.; Buitrón-Sánchez, B. E.; Monreal, R.; Enríquez-Ocaña, L. F.; Aguirre-Hinojosa, E.; Ochoa-Granillo, J. A.; Palafox-Reyes, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    A biostratigraphic analysis based on trilobites of the main Cambrian outcrops from Sonora, Mexico is performed. The data are based on a combination of field work and published sources, including four previously studied locations from northern and eastern Sonora (Caborca, Cananea, Mazatán, and Arivechi) as well as a new location in the central part of the state of Sonora (San José de Gracia). Chronostratigraphic positions are assigned to the Cambrian outcrops according to Peng et al., 2012 and Cohen et al., 2017. In the Caborca area, the Puerto Blanco, Proveedora, Buelna, Cerro Prieto, Arrojos and El Tren formations comprise a wide range of biozones, which starts from the Fritzaspis Zone until the Glossopleura walcotti Zone (Begadean-Lincolnian Series, global Stage 3-Stage 5, Series 2-Series 3). The Bolsa Quartzite and the Abrigo Limestone exposed in Cananea area are assigned to the Cedaria/Cedarina dakotaensis Zone until the Crepicephalus Zone (Lincolnian Series-Marjuman Stage, global Series 3-Guzhangian). In the San José de Gracia area, The Proveedora, Buelna, Cerro Prieto and El Gavilán formations range from the ?Bristolia mohavensis or ?Bristolia insolens zones until the upper part of Mexicella mexicana Zone, Albertella highlandensis Subzone (Series 2-Series 3, Stage 4-Stage 5). In the Arivechi area, the La Sata, El Mogallón, La Huerta and the Milpillas formations range from Poliella denticulata Zone to the Elvinia Zone (Lincolnian-Millardan, Delamaran-Steptoean, global Series 3-Furongian, Stage 5-Paibian). Paleozoic marine fauna distribution in northwest Mexico and the southwest United States of America, suggest that during this time an extensive faunal province existed, containing a great variety of marine invertebrates with notorious intraspecific affinity. The biotic association includes poriferans, archaeocyathids, brachiopods, mollusks, arthropods and echinoderms as predominant elements.

  8. Reevaluation of the macroseismic effects of the 1887 Sonora, Mexico earthquake and its magnitude estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Gerardo; Hough, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    The Sonora, Mexico, earthquake of 3 May 1887 occurred a few years before the start of the instrumental era in seismology. We revisit all available accounts of the earthquake and assign Modified Mercalli Intensities (MMI), interpreting and analyzing macroseismic information using the best available modern methods. We find that earlier intensity assignments for this important earthquake were unjustifiably high in many cases. High intensity values were assigned based on accounts of rock falls, soil failure or changes in the water table, which are now known to be very poor indicators of shaking severity and intensity. Nonetheless, reliable accounts reveal that light damage (intensity VI) occurred at distances of up to ~200 km in both Mexico and the United States. The resulting set of 98 reevaluated intensity values is used to draw an isoseismal map of this event. Using the attenuation relation proposed by Bakun (2006b), we estimate an optimal moment magnitude of Mw7.6. Assuming this magnitude is correct, a fact supported independently by documented rupture parameters assuming standard scaling relations, our results support the conclusion that northern Sonora as well as the Basin and Range province are characterized by lower attenuation of intensities than California. However, this appears to be at odds with recent results that Lg attenuation in the Basin and Range province is comparable to that in California.

  9. Neoproterozoic diamictite-cap carbonate succession and δ13C chemostratigraphy from eastern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Frank A.; Stewart, John H.; Hagadorn, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the occurrence of Neoproterozoic strata throughout the southwestern U.S. and Sonora, Mexico, glacial units overlain by enigmatic cap carbonates have not been well-documented south of Death Valley, California. Here, we describe in detail the first glaciogenic diamictite and cap carbonate succession from Mexico, found in the Cerro Las Bolas Group. The diamictite is exposed near Sahuaripa, Sonora, and is overlain by a 5 m thick very finely-laminated dolostone with soft sediment folds. Carbon isotopic chemostratigraphy of the finely-laminated dolostone reveals a negative δ13C anomaly (down to − 3.2‰ PDB) characteristic of cap carbonates worldwide. Carbon isotopic values rise to + 10‰ across ∼ 400 m of section in overlying carbonates of the Mina el Mezquite and Monteso Formations. The pattern recorded here is mostly characteristic of post-Sturtian (ca. ≤ 700 Ma), but pre-Marinoan (ca. ≥ 635 Ma) time. However, the Cerro Las Bolas Group shares ambiguity common to most Neoproterozoic successions: it lacks useful radiometric age constraints and biostratigraphically useful fossils, and its δ13C signature is oscillatory and therefore somewhat equivocal.

  10. Medical knowledge related to Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Hernandez, Gerardo; Ernst, Kacey; Acuña-Melendrez, Natalia Haydee; Vargas-Ortega, Anabel Patricia; Candia-Plata, Maria Del Carmen

    2018-03-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate unless diagnosed promptly and treated timely with doxycycline. Physician knowledge about presentation and treatment can improve outcomes of RMSF in endemic regions, such as Sonora in northern Mexico, where RMSF has caused 1348 non-fatal cases and 247 deaths from 2003 to 2016. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 343 physicians working in medical facilities in Sonora, Mexico. A 25-item questionnaire explored physician knowledge of clinical, epidemiological and preventive aspects of RMSF. Only 62% of physicians agreed that doxycycline should be used as the first choice treatment for children under 8 years with suspected RMSF. Additionally, 40% of primary care physicians correctly identified the time to initiate doxycycline, and 32% correctly identified the case-fatality rate of untreated RMSF in all patients. Inadequate medical knowledge may adversely affect how patients infected with Rickettsia rickettsii are diagnosed and treated. Educational programs that improve the risk perception and medical knowledge about RMSF should be targeted at physicians most likely to have initial contact with diseased patients.

  11. 9 CFR 94.23 - Importation of poultry meat and other poultry products from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Importation of poultry meat and other poultry products from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico. 94.23 Section 94.23 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN...

  12. Educating "Barbaros": Educational Policies on the Latin American Frontiers between Colonies and Independent Republics (Araucania, Southern Chile/Sonora, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Lasse; Saiz, Monika Contreras

    2010-01-01

    This article compares the methods and means employed by the state to enforce the education of (semi-)autonomous indigenous groups in southern Chile and northwestern Mexico (Sonora), border regions in the Latin American periphery, covering the transition from colonial times to the consolidation of independent republics until the middle of the…

  13. Binational Dengue Outbreak Along the United States-Mexico Border - Yuma County, Arizona, and Sonora, Mexico, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jefferson M; Lopez, Benito; Adams, Laura; Gálvez, Francisco Javier Navarro; Núñez, Alfredo Sánchez; Santillán, Nubia Astrid Hernández; Plante, Lydia; Hemme, Ryan R; Casal, Mariana; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Acevedo, Veronica; Ernst, Kacey; Hayden, Mary; Waterman, Steve; Gomez, Diana; Sharp, Tyler M; Komatsu, Kenneth K

    2016-05-20

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness caused by any of four dengue virus types (DENV-1-4). DENVs are transmitted by mosquitos of the genus Aedes (1) and are endemic throughout the tropics (2). In 2010, an estimated 390 million DENV infections occurred worldwide (2). During 2007-2013, a total of three to 10 dengue cases were reported annually in Arizona and all were travel-associated. During September-December 2014, coincident with a dengue outbreak in Sonora, Mexico, 93 travel-associated dengue cases were reported in Arizona residents; 70 (75%) cases were among residents of Yuma County, which borders San Luis Río Colorado, Sonora, Mexico. San Luis Río Colorado reported its first case of locally acquired dengue in September 2014. To investigate the temporal relationship of the dengue outbreaks in Yuma County and San Luis Río Colorado and compare patient characteristics and signs and symptoms, passive surveillance data from both locations were analyzed. In addition, household-based cluster investigations were conducted near the residences of reported dengue cases in Yuma County to identify unreported cases and assess risk for local transmission. Surveillance data identified 52 locally acquired cases (21% hospitalized) in San Luis Río Colorado and 70 travel-associated cases (66% hospitalized) in Yuma County with illness onset during September-December 2014. Among 194 persons who participated in the cluster investigations in Yuma County, 152 (78%) traveled to Mexico at least monthly during the preceding 3 months. Four (2%) of 161 Yuma County residents who provided serum samples for diagnostic testing during cluster investigations had detectable DENV immunoglobulin M (IgM); one reported a recent febrile illness, and all four had traveled to Mexico during the preceding 3 months. Entomologic assessments among 105 households revealed 24 water containers per 100 houses colonized by Ae. aegypti. Frequent travel to Mexico and Ae. aegypti colonization indicate risk for local

  14. Temporal evolution and potential recombination events in PRRSV strains of Sonora Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Reséndiz-Sandoval, Mónica; Cortey, Martí; Mateu, Enric; Hernández, Jesús

    2014-12-05

    The aim of this work was to examine the evolution and potential existence of intragenic recombinations of PRRSV strains in Sonora, Mexico. In this study, 142 serum samples from farms located in Hermosillo (HMO), Cd. Obregón (OBR) and Navojoa (NAV) were sequenced from 2002 to 2012. Ninety non-redundant sequences of ORF5 gene were analyzed for temporal and spatial relationships among strains and the probability of a recombination event. The phylogenetic analysis showed 30 strains grouped into eight groups; 16 strains were closely related among the farms, while 14 were un-related. The first strain in this study was observed in 2002. A number of farms were infected with one or more strains, and in the majority of the strains, the virus was replaced by a new strain. The recombination analysis suggested the presence of four viruses as products of a recombination event; in one case, a virus close related with MLV vaccine was involved as the parent virus. This work shows the evolution of PRRSV in the field, the viral dissemination between farms and the potential recombination events. Our data suggest that PRRSV in Sonora has a specific genetic nature compared with other PRRSV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genotyping of white spot syndrome virus on wild and farm crustaceans from Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Galaviz José Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome is a viral disease affecting wild and farm crustaceans that serve as reservoirs. Previous reports have demonstrated high genomic variation in WSS viruses (WSSV isolated from distinct geographical regions. In this study, we collected wild shrimps (Litopenaeus stylirostris, crabs (Callinectes arcuatus and farmed shrimp (L. vannamei in Sonora, Mexico, between 2008 and 2010. DNA was extracted, and the variable regions and transposase genes were subjected to PCR and sequencing. Compared to strains of WSSV from other sites, Mexican samples exhibited a distinct number of repeat units (RUs in ORF94, ORF75 and ORF125, which ranged between 1-11, 3-15, and 8-11 RUs respectively, and a unique single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 48 of ORF94. A total of six Mexican genotypes were found in organism from shrimp farm and natural environment.

  16. Impacts of Participatory Modeling on Climate Change-related Water Management Impacts in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, K. E.; Kossak, D. J.; Mayer, A. S.; Vivoni, E. R.; Robles-Morua, A.; Gamez Molina, V.; Dana, K.; Mirchi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change-related impacts on water resources are expected to be particularly severe in the arid developing world. As a result, we conducted a series of participatory modeling workshops on hydrologic and water resources systems modeling in the face of climate change in Sonora, Mexico. Pre-surveys were administered to participants on Day 1 of a series of four workshops spaced out over three months in 2013. Post-surveys repeated many pre-survey questions and included questions assessing the quality of the workshops and models. We report on significant changes in participant perceptions of water resource models and problems and their assessment of the workshops. These findings will be of great value to future participatory modeling efforts, particularly within the developing world.

  17. Reinterpretation of the stratigraphy and structure of the Rancho Las Norias area, central Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, W.R.; Harris, A.G.; Poole, F.G.; Repetski, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    New geologic mapping and fossil data in the vicinity of Rancho Las Norias, 30 km east of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, show that rocks previously mapped as Precambrian instead are Paleozoic. Previous geologic maps of the Rancho Las Norias area show northeast-directed, southwest-dipping reverse or thrust faults deforming both Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks. The revised stratigraphy requires reinterpretation of some of these faults as high-angle normal or oblique-slip faults and the elimination of other faults. We agree with earlier geologic map interpretations that compressional structures have affected the Paleozoic rocks in the area, but our mapping suggests that the direction of compression is from southeast to northwest. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Plant folk medicines for gastrointestinal disorders among the main tribes of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Salazar, S F; Robles-Zepeda, R E; Johnson, D E

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the herbal remedies used by ethnic groups from Sonora, Mexico, for treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Twelve types of these illnesses are cured using 85 different species which belong to 38 families. Thirty nine spp. are used to treat diarrhea, 28 for stomach-ache, 12 for constipation, 9 for intestinal parasites, 6 for indigestion, 3 for stomach or intestinal cancer, 3 for stomach inflammation and only 1 to treat gastrointestinal sicknesses, ulcers, gastritis, colitis and colic. Regarding the use of species of plant per ethnic group the following was observed: Mayo 47; Seri, 27; Yaqui, 13; Guarijio, 12, Pima, 5 and Papago, 3. The plants are used by two or more tribes, for the same or different illness but always related to the gastrointestinal system.

  19. Arsenic drinking water exposure and urinary excretion among adults in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meza, M.M.; Kopplin, M.J.; Burgess, J.L.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine arsenic exposure via drinking water and to characterize urinary arsenic excretion among adults in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico. A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 2001 to May 2002. Study subjects were from the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico, residents of four towns with different arsenic concentrations in their drinking water. Arsenic exposure was estimated through water intake over 24 h. Arsenic excretion was assessed in the first morning void urine. Total arsenic concentrations and their species arsenate (As V), arsenite (As III), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), and dimethyl arsenic (DMA) were determined by HPLC/ICP-MS. The town of Esperanza with the highest arsenic concentration in water had the highest daily mean intake of arsenic through drinking water, the mean value was 65.5 μg/day. Positive correlation between total arsenic intake by drinking water/day and the total arsenic concentration in urine (r=0.50, P<0.001) was found. Arsenic excreted in urine ranged from 18.9 to 93.8 μg/L. The people from Esperanza had the highest geometric mean value of arsenic in urine, 65.1 μg/L, and it was statistically significantly different from those of the other towns (P<0.005). DMA was the major arsenic species in urine (47.7-67.1%), followed by inorganic arsenic (16.4-25.4%), and MMA (7.5-15%). In comparison with other reports the DMA and MMA distribution was low, 47.7-55.6% and 7.5-9.7%, respectively, in the urine from the Yaqui Valley population (except the town of Cocorit). The difference in the proportion of urinary arsenic metabolites in those towns may be due to genetic polymorphisms in the As methylating enzymes of these populations

  20. Arsenic drinking water exposure and urinary excretion among adults in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Maria Mercedes; Kopplin, Michael J; Burgess, Jefferey L; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine arsenic exposure via drinking water and to characterize urinary arsenic excretion among adults in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico. A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 2001 to May 2002. Study subjects were from the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico, residents of four towns with different arsenic concentrations in their drinking water. Arsenic exposure was estimated through water intake over 24 h. Arsenic excretion was assessed in the first morning void urine. Total arsenic concentrations and their species arsenate (As V), arsenite (As III), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), and dimethyl arsenic (DMA) were determined by HPLC/ICP-MS. The town of Esperanza with the highest arsenic concentration in water had the highest daily mean intake of arsenic through drinking water, the mean value was 65.5 microg/day. Positive correlation between total arsenic intake by drinking water/day and the total arsenic concentration in urine (r = 0.50, P < 0.001) was found. Arsenic excreted in urine ranged from 18.9 to 93.8 microg/L. The people from Esperanza had the highest geometric mean value of arsenic in urine, 65.1 microg/L, and it was statistically significantly different from those of the other towns (P < 0.005). DMA was the major arsenic species in urine (47.7-67.1%), followed by inorganic arsenic (16.4-25.4%), and MMA (7.5-15%). In comparison with other reports the DMA and MMA distribution was low, 47.7-55.6% and 7.5-9.7%, respectively, in the urine from the Yaqui Valley population (except the town of Cocorit). The difference in the proportion of urinary arsenic metabolites in those towns may be due to genetic polymorphisms in the As methylating enzymes of these populations.

  1. Stratigraphy and paleontology of Lower Permian rocks north of Cananea, northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, R.B.; Moore, T.E.; Gray, F.

    2002-01-01

    Lower Permian carbonate and overlying red bed clastic rocks are present in a 2 km2 stratigraphic window in the vicinity of Rancho La Cueva, Santa Cruz sheet (scale 1:50,000), northern Sonora, Mexico. This exposure lies unconformably beneath predominantly intermediate Upper Cretaceous volcanics yielding 40Ar/39Ar ages of 73.4?? 0.18 and 71.1 ?? 0.35 Ma. The lower part of the Permian succession consists of light- to medium-gray colored limestones of the Colina Limestone, with a minimum thickness of 235 m. Sedimentary features suggest shallow water, slightly restricted depositional environments. Although lacking observable fossils for the most part, two intervals of richly fossiliferous, silicified shell beds are present near the base and top of the Colina Limestone. The lower fauna consist mostly of gastropods and bivalves. The presence of a new microdomatid gastropod species. Glyptospira sonorensis n. sp., close to Glytospira arelela Plas, suggests a late Wolfcampian age for this horizon. The upper fauna are predominantly molluscan dominated (gastropods and bivalves), but some brachiopods (productids and the rhynchonellid genus Pontisia) are also present. Gastropod genera include Bellerophon, Warthia, Euomphalus (represented by the species, Euomphalus kaibabensis Chronic), Baylea, Worthenia, Naticopsis, Goniasma, Kinishbia, Cibecuia, and Glyptospira. The gastropods suggest a Leonardian (late Early Permian) age for this horizon, and many of the species have previously been recorded from the Supai Group and Kaibab Formation of northern and central Arizona. The Colina Limestone is conformably overlain by 11.2 m of light-gray lime mudstone and dolostone, assigned here to the Epitaph Dolomite, which in turn is succeeded by 58.8 m of red-colored sandstone and gray lime mudstone, assigned here to the Scherrer Formation. This Lower Permian succession is significant because it further strengthens the stratigraphic ties of southeastern Arizona rocks with those of northern

  2. Species richness and conservation status of medium and large terrestrial mammals from four Sky Islands in Sonora, northwestern Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Coronel-Arellano, Helí; Lara-Díaz, Nalleli; Jiménez-Maldonado, Rosa; López-González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We present the first systematic checklist of medium and large terrestrial mammals on four mountain ranges known as Sky Islands, in northeastern Sonora, Mexico. We used camera traps for recording mammals, with which we documented 25 wild species. Two of the native species are in the IUCN Red List and four are threatened at the national level. We did not document seven wild species with potential distribution at study sites, probably due to limited availability of habitat and/or local extirpati...

  3. Phylogenetic relationships of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens complex) from an isolated coastal mountain range in southern Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, E; Markow, T A

    2008-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the control region and 12S rRNA in leopard frogs from the Sierra El Aguaje of southern Sonora, Mexico, together with GenBank sequences, were used to infer taxonomic identity and provide phylogenetic hypotheses for relationships with other members of the Rana pipiens complex. We show that frogs from the Sierra El Aguaje belong to the Rana berlandieri subgroup, or Scurrilirana clade, of the R. pipiens group, and are most closely related to Rana magnaocularis from Nayarit, Mexico. We also provide further evidence that Rana magnaocularis and R. yavapaiensis are close relatives.

  4. Frequent Shifts in Aspergillus flavus Populations Associated with Maize Production in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Beltran, A; Cotty, P J

    2018-03-01

    Aspergillus flavus frequently contaminates maize, a critical staple for billions of people, with aflatoxins. Diversity among A. flavus L morphotype populations associated with maize in Sonora, Mexico was assessed and, in total, 869 isolates from 83 fields were placed into 136 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) using nitrate-nonutilizing mutants. VCG diversity indices did not differ in four agroecosystems (AES) but diversity significantly differed among years. Frequencies of certain VCGs changed manyfold over single years in both multiple fields and multiple AES. Certain VCGs were highly frequent (>1%) in 2006 but frequencies declined repeatedly in each of the two subsequent years. Other VCGs that had low frequencies in 2006 increased in 2007 and subsequently declined. None of the VCGs were consistently associated with any AES. Fourteen VCGs were considered dominant in at least a single year. However, frequencies often varied significantly among years. Only 9% of VCGs were detected all 3 years whereas 66% were detected in only 1 year. Results suggest that the most realistic measurements of both genetic diversity and the frequency of A. flavus VCGs are obtained by sampling multiple locations in multiple years. Single-season sampling in many locations should not be substituted for sampling over multiple years.

  5. Native aquatic vertebrates: Conservation and management in the Rio Sonoyta Basin, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Minckley; Izar Izaguirre Pompa; Doug Duncan; Ross Timmons; Dennis Caldwell; Jaime Lopez Mendez; Phil Rosen

    2013-01-01

    The Río Sonoyta in northern Sonora is an important aquatic ecosystem that is disappearing because of drought and groundwater withdrawal. Its native species are also threatened by introduced species. The only watered reach is an intermittent segment (

  6. Biomass and ecological production of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis link) in the coastal desert of Sonora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, W R.H.; Espericueta, B M

    1978-01-01

    The density of the best natural stand of jojoba in this part of Mexico was 641 plants/ha, with a sex ratio of 75 male plants to 100 female plants. No plants were over 10 yr old. The aerial phytomass (over 60% of total phytomass) was 1573 kg/ha, and its annual net primary productivity was 327 kg/ha. Plant biomass components were expressed as allometric functions of ht., diam. of oldest stem, or the vol. of a cylinder enclosing the aerial part of the whole plant.

  7. The El Horror uranium anomaly in northeastern Sonora, Mexico: Constraints from geochemical and mineralogical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva-Rodríguez, T.; Valencia-Moreno, M.; Calmus, T.; Del Rio-Salas, R.; Balcázar-García, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work reviews the characteristics of the El Horror uranium prospect in northeastern Sonora, Mexico. It was formerly detected by a radiometric anomaly after airborne gamma ray exploration carried out in the 70's by the Mexican government. As a promising site to contain important uranium resources, the El Horror was re-evaluated by CFE (Federal Electricity Commission) by in situ gamma ray surveys. The study also incorporates rock and stream sediment ICP-MS geochemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectrometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to provide a better understanding of the radiometric anomaly. The results show that, instead of a single anomaly, it comprises at least five individual anomalies hosted in hydrothermally altered Laramide (80-40 Ma) andesitic volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation. Concentrations for elemental uranium and uranium calculated from gamma ray surveys (i.e., equivalent uranium) are not spatially coincident within the anomaly, but, at least at some degree, they do so in specific sites. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry revealed the presence of rutile/anatase, uvite, bukouvskyte and allanite as the more likely mineral phases to contain uranium. SEM studies revealed a process of iron-rich concretion formation, suggesting that uranium was initially incorporated to the system by adsorption, but was largely removed later during incorporation of Fe+3 ions. Stream sediment geochemistry reveals that the highest uranium concentrations are derived from the southern part of the Sierra La Madera batholith (∼63 Ma), and decrease toward the El Horror anomaly.

  8. Development of spatially diverse and complex dune-field patterns: Gran Desierto Dune Field, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, C.; Kocurek, G.; Ewing, R.C.; Lancaster, N.; Morthekai, P.; Singhvi, A.K.; Mahan, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The pattern of dunes within the Gran Desierto of Sonora, Mexico, is both spatially diverse and complex. Identification of the pattern components from remote-sensing images, combined with statistical analysis of their measured parameters demonstrate that the composite pattern consists of separate populations of simple dune patterns. Age-bracketing by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) indicates that the simple patterns represent relatively short-lived aeolian constructional events since ???25 ka. The simple dune patterns consist of: (i) late Pleistocene relict linear dunes; (ii) degraded crescentic dunes formed at ???12 ka; (iii) early Holocene western crescentic dunes; (iv) eastern crescentic dunes emplaced at ???7 ka; and (v) star dunes formed during the last 3 ka. Recognition of the simple patterns and their ages allows for the geomorphic backstripping of the composite pattern. Palaeowind reconstructions, based upon the rule of gross bedform-normal transport, are largely in agreement with regional proxy data. The sediment state over time for the Gran Desierto is one in which the sediment supply for aeolian constructional events is derived from previously stored sediment (Ancestral Colorado River sediment), and contemporaneous influx from the lower Colorado River valley and coastal influx from the Bahia del Adair inlet. Aeolian constructional events are triggered by climatic shifts to greater aridity, changes in the wind regime, and the development of a sediment supply. The rate of geomorphic change within the Gran Desierto is significantly greater than the rate of subsidence and burial of the accumulation surface upon which it rests. ?? 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation 2006 International Association of Sedimentologists.

  9. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  10. Eolian deposition cycles since AD 500 in Playa San Bartolo lunette dune, Sonora, Mexico: Paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Beatriz; Schaaf, Peter; Murray, Andrew; Caballero, Margarita; Lozano, Socorro; Ramirez, Angel

    2013-12-01

    Records of past climatic changes in desert environments are scarce due to the poor preservation of biological proxies. To overcome this lack we consider the paleoenvironmental significance and age of a lunette dune at the eastern rim of Playa San Bartolo (PSB) in the Sonoran Desert (Mexico). Thermoluminescence and optical stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) provide the chronology of lunette dune development. Mineralogical, geochemical (major, trace and REE element concentrations) and rock magnetic analyses allow for the assessment of sediment provenance and changes in the composition of the PSB dune over time. The upper 6 m of dune accumulation occurred over the past 1.5 ka, largely during AD 500-1200, a period that correlates with the Medieval climatic anomaly (AD 300-1300). Variability in composition of dune sediments is attributed to changes in sediment sources. Sand sized deposits are mainly eroded from granitoids from nearby outcrops. Sandy silt deposits, rich in evaporative minerals, resulted after the flooding of PSB, later deflation and accumulation of both detritic and authigenic components in the dune. These findings suggest that main dune accretion occurred during regionally extended drought conditions, disrupted by sporadic heavy rainfall.

  11. Vascular plants diversity of El Aribabi Conservation Ranch: A private natural protected area in northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Jesus Sanchez-Escalante; Denise Z. Avila-Jimenez; David A. Delgado-Zamora; Liliana Armenta-Cota; Thomas R. Van Devender; Ana Lilia. Reina-Guerrero

    2013-01-01

    In northeastern Sonora, isolated Sky Island mountain ranges with desertscrub, desert grassland, oak woodland, and pine-oak forest have high biodiversity. El Aribabi Conservation Ranch in the Sierra Azul (from 30°51’13”N, 110°41’9”W to 30°46’38”N, 110°32’3”W) was designated a Private Protected Natural Area by the Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas in March...

  12. Aflatoxin-producing fungi in maize field soils from sea level to over 2000 masl: A three year study in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins, highly toxic carcinogens produced by several members of Aspergillus section Flavi, contaminate crops in temperate zones. Maize is cultivated from 0 to 2,100 masl under diverse growing regimes in the state of Sonora, Mexico. This is typical of the nation. In order to design sampling strat...

  13. A high-resolution land-use map; Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Gil Anaya, Claudia Z.; Diaz Arcos, Israel; Gray, Floyd

    2010-01-01

    The cities of Nogales, Sonora, and Nogales, Arizona, are located in the Ambos Nogales Watershed, a topographically irregular bowl-shaped area with a northward gradient. Throughout history, residents in both cities have been affected by flooding. Currently, the primary method for regulating this runoff is to build a series of detention basins in Nogales, Sonora. Additionally, the municipality also is considering land-use planning to help mitigate flooding. This paper describes the production of a 10-meter resolution land-use map, derived from 2008 aerial photos of the Nogales, Sonora Watershed for modeling impacts of the detention basin construction and in support of an ?Early Warning Hazard System? for the region.

  14. Antimycobacterial activity of medicinal plants used by the Mayo people of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Aceves, Enrique Wenceslao; Sánchez-Escalante, José Jesús; López-Cervantes, Jaime; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón Enrique; Velázquez, Carlos; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia Isabel; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana

    2016-08-22

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which generates 9 million new cases worldwide each year. The Mayo ethnicity of southern Sonora, Mexico is more than 2000 years old, and the Mayos possess extensive knowledge of traditional medicine. To evaluate the antimycobacterial activity levels of extracts of medicinal plants used by the Mayos against Mtb and Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) in the treatment of TB, respiratory diseases and related symptoms. A total of 34 plant species were collected, and 191 extracts were created with n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol and water. Their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were determined against Mtb H37Rv using the microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) and against Msm using the resazurin microplate assay (REMA) at 6 and 2 days of exposure, respectively, and at concentrations of 250-1.9µg/mL (n-hexane extracts) and 1000-7.81µg/mL (extracts obtained with dichloromethane, EtOAc, methanol and water). Rhynchosia precatoria (Willd.) DC. (n-hexane root extract), Euphorbia albomarginata Torr. and A. Gray. (EtOAc shoot extract) and Helianthus annuus L. (n-hexane stem extract) were the most active plants against Mtb H37Rv, with MICs of 15.6, 250, 250µg/mL and MBCs of 31.25, 250, 250µg/mL, respectively. R. precatoria (root) was the only active plant against Msm, with MIC and MBC values of ≥250µg/mL. None of the aqueous extracts were active. This study validates the medicinal use of certain plants used by the Mayo people in the treatment of TB and related symptoms. R. precatoria, E. albomarginata and H. annuus are promising plant sources of active compounds that act against Mtb H37Rv. To our knowledge, this is the first time that their antimycobacterial activity has been reported. Crude extracts obtained with n-hexane, EtOAc and dichloromethane were the most active against Mtb H37Rv. Copyright © 2016

  15. Reconstructing an Explosive Basaltic Eruption in the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki, E. E.; Clarke, A. B.; Arrowsmith, R.; Lynch, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Tephra deposits from explosive volcanic eruptions provide a means to reconstruct eruption characteristics, such as column height and erupted volume. Parameters like these are essential in assessing the explosivity of past eruptions and associated volcanic hazards. We applied such methods to a basaltic tephra deposit from one of the youngest eruptions in the Pinacate volcanic field (NW Sonora, Mexico). This roughly circular tephra blanket extends 13 km E-W and 13 km N-S, and covers an area of at least 135 km2. The source vent of this eruption is hypothesized to be the Tecolote volcano (lat 31.877, long -113.362), which is dated to 27 ± 6 ka (40Ar/39Ar). Fifty-three pits were dug across the extent of the tephra deposit to measure its thickness, record stratigraphy, characterize grain size distribution, and determine maximum clast size. Isopleth and isopach maps were created from these data to determine the column height (>9 km), estimate mass eruption rate (>2.1x106 kg/s), and calculate the erupted volume (>4.2x10-2 km3). Stratigraphic descriptions support two distinct episodes of tephra production. Unit A is dispersed in an approximately circular pattern ( 6.5 km radius) with its center shifted to the east of the vent. The distribution of Unit B is oblate ( 9.5 km major axis, 4.5 km minor axis) and trends to the southeast of the vent. Lava samples were collected from each of the seven Tecolote flows for XRF and ICP-MS geochemical analyses. These samples were compared to geochemical signatures from a Tecolote bomb, tephra from Units A and B, and cinder from the La Laja cone, which is the youngest dated cone in the field at 12 ± 4 ka (40Ar/39Ar). The La Laja sample is geochemically distinct from all Tecolote samples, confirming that it did not contribute to the two tephra units. Tephra from Unit A and Unit B have distinct signatures and fit within the geochemical evolution of the Tecolote lavas, supporting two explosive episodes from the Tecolote volcano, which has

  16. Diet of pumas (Puma concolor) in Sonora, Mexico, as determined by GPS kill sites and molecular identified scat, with comments on jaguar (Panthera onca) diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassaigne, Ivonne; Medellin, Rodrigo A.; Thompson, Ron W.; Culver, Melanie; Ochoa, Alexander; Vargas, Karla; Childs, Jack L.; Sanderson, Jim; List, Rurik; Torres-Gomez, Armando

    2016-01-01

    We documented puma (Puma concolor) and jaguar (Panthera onca) prey consumption in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, by investigating global positioning system cluster sites (n = 220), and conducting molecular analyses of scat (n = 116) collected between 2011 and 2013. We used camera trap data (n = 8,976 camera days) to estimate relative abundances of pumas and jaguars. Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was the most frequent prey for puma found at kill sites (67%) and identified from scat (74%), although based on relative numbers of prey consumed, deer represented 45% and lagomorphs 20% of the proportion of all individuals eaten. A variety of small prey (weighing Sonora.

  17. A comparison of the herpetofaunas of Ranchos Los Fresnos and El Aribabi in northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Rorabaugh; Jeffrey M. Servoss; Valerie L. Boyarski; Erin Fernandez; Doug Duncan; Carlos Robles Elias; Kevin E. Bonine

    2013-01-01

    To compare and contrast herpetofaunas at Ranchos Los Fresnos and El Aribabi in north-central Sonora, México, we conducted herpetological surveys during 2006-2011, contacted others working in these two areas, and queried 27 museums and collections for specimens collected at or near these ranches. Based on this work, nine and seven amphibian, and 27 and 24 reptile...

  18. Effects of the Chytrid fungus on the Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae) in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. Hale; Philip C. Rosen; James L. Jarchow; Gregory A. Bradley

    2005-01-01

    We conducted histological analyses on museum specimens collected 1975-1999 from 10 sites in Arizona and Sonora to test for the pathogenic chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in ranid frogs, focusing on the Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae). During 1981-2000, frogs displaying disease signs were found in the field, and...

  19. Black bear abundance, habitat use, and food habits in the Sierra San Luis, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Sierra Corona; Ivan A. Sayago Vazquez; M. del Carmen Silva Hurtado; Carlos A. Lopez Gonzalez

    2005-01-01

    We studied black bears to determine habitat use, food habits, and abundance between April 2002 and November 2003 in the Sierra San Luis, Sonora. We utilized transects to determine spoor presence, camera traps for abundance, and scat analysis. During 2002, bears fed principally on plant material, and for 2003 on animal matter, namely livestock. Habitat use differed...

  20. Aflatoxin-producing fungi in maize field soils from sea level to over 2000 masl: a three year study in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Beltran, Alejandro; Jaime, Ramon; Cotty, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    Aflatoxins, highly toxic carcinogens produced by several members of Aspergillus section Flavi, contaminate crops in temperate zones. In the state of Sonora, Mexico, maize is cultivated from 0 to 2100 masl with diverse cultivation practices. This is typical of the nation. In order to design better sampling strategies across Mexico, aflatoxin-producing fungal communities associated with maize production during 2006, 2007, and 2008 in Sonora were investigated in four agro-ecological zones (AEZ) at varying elevation. Fungal communities were dominated by the Aspergillus flavus L strain morphotype (46%), but variation occurred between years and among AEZ. Several atoxigenic isolates with potential to be used as biocontrol agents for aflatoxin mitigation were detected in all AEZ. The characteristics of each AEZ had minimal influences on fungal community structure and should not be a major consideration for future sampling designs for Mexico. Insights into the dynamics and stability of aflatoxin-producing fungal communities across AEZ are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The Laramide Mesa formation and the Ojo de Agua caldera, southeast of the Cananea copper mining district, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dennis P.; Miller, Robert J.; Woodbourne, Keith L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mesa Formation extends from Cananea, Mexico, southeast to the Sonora River and is the main host rock of Laramide porphyry copper deposits in the Cananea District and at the Alacran porphyry prospect to the east. The Mesa consists of two members-a lower andesite and an upper dacite. The lowest part of the dacite member is a crystal tuff about 100 m thick. This tuff is the outfall of a caldera centered near the village of Ojo de Agua, dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 65.8 Ma ?0.4. The Ojo de Agua Caldera is about 9 km in diameter and is filled by a light gray biotite dacite tuff with abundant flattened pumice fragments. The volume of the caldera is estimated to be 24 km3.

  2. K-Ar ages of the low-grade metamorphic rocks in the Altar massif, Northwest Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayama, Yoshikazu; Shibata, Ken; Takeda, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    The K-Ar ages of low-grade regional metamorphism, granodiorite intrusion and its contact metamorphism were studied in the Altar massif of Northwest Sonora, Mexico. The results gave the ages of 55 Ma for metamorphic hornblende and 15 to 17 Ma for mica of metamorphic rocks and granodiorite. About the meaning of these discordant ages and the too young ages of 15 to 17 Ma against the previously presented data, we pointed out the following two possibilities; 1) the contact effect of the Miocene granodiorite on the regional metamorphic rocks of the Laramide phase, 2) both regional metamorphism and granodiorite intrusion took place during the Laramide phase, whereas the young ages, 15 to 17 Ma, show the time of temperature release after the low-angle thrust movement, which is well known in the hinterland of the Sevier orogenic belt in Nevada and Utah. (author)

  3. Effects of reintroduced beaver (Castor canadensis) on riparian bird community structure along the upper San Pedro River, southeastern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glenn E.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Chapter 1.—We measured bird abundance and richness along the upper San Pedro River in 2005 and 2006, in order to document how beavers (Castor canadensis) may act as ecosystem engineers after their reintroduction to a desert riparian area in the Southwestern United States. In areas where beavers colonized, we found higher bird abundance and richness of bird groups, such as all breeding birds, insectivorous birds, and riparian specialists, and higher relative abundance of many individual species—including several avian species of conservation concern. Chapter 2.—We conducted bird surveys in riparian areas along the upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona (United States) and northern Sonora (Mexico) in order to describe factors influencing bird community dynamics and the distribution and abundance of species, particularly those of conservation concern. These surveys were also used to document the effects of the ecosystem-altering activities of a recently reintroduced beavers (Castor canadensis). Chapter 3.—We reviewed Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nest records and investigated the potential for future breeding along the upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, where in July 2005 we encountered the southernmost verifiable nest attempt for the species. Continued conservation and management of the area’s riparian vegetation and surface water has potential to contribute additional breeding sites for this endangered Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Given the nest record along the upper San Pedro River and the presence of high-density breeding sites to the north, the native cottonwood-willow forests of the upper San Pedro River could become increasingly important to E. t. extimus recovery, especially considering the anticipated effect of the tamarisk leaf beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) on riparian habitat north of the region.

  4. Residues of organochlorine pesticides in soils from the southern Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Soto, E U; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Valenzuela-Quintanar, A I; Félix-Fuentes, A; Grajeda-Cota, P; Balderas-Cortes, J J; Osorio-Rosas, C L; Acuña-García, G; Aguilar-Apodaca, M G

    2011-11-01

    Although, the Yaqui and Mayo valleys are the most important agricultural areas in Sonora, there is only limited data of the pesticides residue in soils in these valleys. This study measured the organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in 234 soil samples (residential and agricultural) from 24 communities. The global results (mean, range) indicated that benzene hexachloride (19.2, ND-938.5 μg g(-1)), endrin (6.6, ND-377.3 μg g(-1)) and DDTs (36.45, ND-679.7 μg g(-1)) were the dominant contaminants. Soil is one of the most important routes of exposure to OCPs in the population of southern Sonora and this study can be used to establish background levels of OCPs.

  5. Mutaciones asociadas con resistencia a rifampicina o isoniazida en aislamientos clínicos de M. tuberculosis de Sonora, México DNA mutations associated to rifampicin or isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Bolado-Martínez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar el análisis de regiones específicas de genes asociados con resistencia a isoniazida o rifampicina. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron 22 cepas de M. tuberculosis, aisladas en Sonora, México. Se utilizaron iniciadores para regiones específicas de los genes rpoB, katG e inhA y la región ahpC-oxyR. Los productos de PCR se secuenciaron y analizaron. RESULTADOS: Se identificaron mutaciones en la región promotora del gen inhA, región ahpC-oxyR, codón 315 del gen katG y codones 451 ó 456 del gen rpoB. CONCLUSIONES: La identificación de mutaciones no descritas previamente obliga a continuar el análisis genotípico de cepas aisladas en Sonora.OBJECTIVE: To perform the analysis of specific regions of the major genes associated with resistance to isoniazid or rifampin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty two M. tuberculosis strains, isolated from human samples obtained in Sonora, Mexico. Specific primers for hotspots of the rpoB, katG, inhA genes and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region were used. The purified PCR products were sequenced. RESULTS: Mutations in the promoter of inhA, the ahpC-oxyR region, and codon 315 of katG and in 451 or 456 codons of rpoB, were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Detection of mutations not previously reported requires further genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Sonora.

  6. QUALITY OF LIFE OF TOURIST CORRIDORS PARTICIPANTS IN SOUTHERN SONORA, MEXICO/CALIDAD DE VIDA DE LOS PARTICIPANTES DE CORREDORES TURISTICOS EN EL SUR DE SONORA, MEXICO.

    OpenAIRE

    Irma Guadalupe Esparza Garcia; Altayra Geraldine Ozuna Beltran; Marco Alberto Nunez Ramirez; Rosalva Irma Castro Alvarez; Yesenia Clark Mendivil; Maria Nelida Sanchez Banuelos.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to measure the relationship and difference between the indicators of the quality of life in the participants of the tourist communities of Mexico. Through a Pearson correlation and one-way ANOVA, the empirical evidence shows that the quality of life items within the communities are associated with a positive and significant way and, at the same time, these differ statistically from each other. The statistical analyzes show the emergence of needs, which have ...

  7. Evidence for Mojave-Sonora megashear-Systematic left-lateral offset of Neoproterozoic to Lower Jurassic strata and facies, western United States and northwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John H.

    2005-01-01

    Major successions as well as individual units of Neoproterozoic to Lower Jurassic strata and facies appear to be systematically offset left laterally from eastern California and western Nevada in the western United States to Sonora, Mexico. This pattern is most evident in units such as the "Johnnie oolite," a 1- to 2-m-thick oolite of the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member of the Johnnie Formation in the western United States and of the Clemente Formation in Sonora. The pattern is also evident in the Lower Cambrian Zabriskie Quartzite of the western United States and the correlative Proveedora Quartzite in Sonora. Matching of isopach lines of the Zabriskie Quartzite and Proveedora Quartzite suggests ???700-800 km of left-lateral offset. The offset pattern is also apparent in the distribution of distinctive lithologic types, unconformities, and fossil assemblages in other rocks ranging in age from Neoproterozoic to Early Jurassic. In the western United States, the distribution of facies in Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic strata indicates that the Cordilleran miogeocline trends north-south. A north-south trend is also suggested in Sonora, and if so is compatible with offset of the miogeocline but not with the ideas that the miogeocline wrapped around the continental margin and trends east-west in Sonora. An imperfect stratigraphic match of supposed offset segments along the megashear is apparent. Some units, such as the "Johnnie oolite" and Zabriskie-Proveedora, show almost perfect correspondence, but other units are significantly different. The differences seem to indicate that the indigenous succession of the western United States and offset segments in Mexico were not precisely side by side before offset but were separated by an area-now buried, eroded, or destroyed-that contained strata of intermediate facies. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  8. Social vulnerability of unaccompanied migrant children: a view from the urban area of Altar, Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alexander Cabrera Duarte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of research carried out by the authors on the social vulnerability of unaccompanied migrant children in the urban area of Altar, Sonora, during the years 2010-2011. The main techniques used for data collection were participant observation and semi-structured interview. The results offered are limited to evidence the social vulnerability suffered by unaccompanied migrant children, by making use of the services of food, accommodation and health. Which exposes them to a number of risks, such as food shortages, the loss of their few belongings, the drug, the physical, the suffering of diseases and limited access to medical care aggressions.

  9. Preliminary flora of Ojo de Agua Tonibabi, Sierra La Madera, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa Valenzuela-Yanez; Gertrudis Yanes-Arvayo; Maria de la Paz Montanez-Armenta; Hugo Silva-Kurumiya; Thomas R. Van Devender

    2013-01-01

    Ejido Tonibabi is located 12 kilometers east-northeast of Moctezuma in east-central Sonora, México (29°50’16’’N 109°33’45’’W, 780 m elevation). The vegetation is riparian in the wetlands and foothills thornscrub on slopes. The flora was inventoried on transects in different areas in Ejido Tonibabi. Specimens were collected to identify by comparing with specimens in the...

  10. Provenance and U-Pb geochronology of the Upper Cretaceous El Chanate Group, northwest Sonora, Mexico, and its tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques-Ayala, C.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Jacobson, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous El Chanate Group, northwest Sonora, Mexico, is a 2.8km thick clastic sedimentary sequence deposited in a continental basin closely related to volcanic activity. It consists of three formations: the Pozo Duro (oldest), the Anita, and the Escalante (youngest). Petrographic study, conglomerate pebble counts, and U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons were performed to determine the source and age of this sequence, and to interpret its tectonic setting. In the sandstones of all three formations, the most abundant grains are those of volcanic composition (Q38F22L 40, Q35F19L46, and Q 31F22L47, respectively). The Pozo Duro Formation includes well-rounded quartz-arenite clast conglomerates, whereas conglomerates of the two upper units have clasts predominantly of andesitic and rhyolitic composition. The most likely source for these sediments was the Jurassic volcanic arc exposed in northern Sonora and southern Arizona. Zircons from five sandstone samples define two main age groups, Proterozoic and Mesozoic. The first ranges mostly from 1000 to 1800Ma, which suggests the influence of a cratonic source. This zircon suite is interpreted to be recycled and derived from the same source area as the quartz-rich sandstone clasts in the basal part of the section. Mesozoic zircons range from Triassic to Late Cretaceous, which confirms the proposed Late Cretaceous age for the sequence, and also corroborates Jurassic felsic source rocks. Another possible source was the Alisitos volcanic arc, exposed along the western margin of the Baja California Peninsula. Of regional significance is the great similarity between the El Chanate Group and the McCoy Mountains Formation of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Both are Cretaceous, were deposited in continental environments, and have similar zircon-age patterns. Also, both exhibit intense deformation and locally display penetrative foliation. These features strongly suggest that both units underwent

  11. Use of System Thinking Software for Determining Climate Change Impacts in Water Balance for the Rio Yaqui Basin, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, E. M.; Minjarez, J. I.; Espinoza, I. G.; Sosa, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    Climate change in Northwestern Mexico and its hydrological impact on water balance, water scarcity and flooding events, has become a matter of increasing concern over the past several decades due to the region's semiarid conditions. Changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea level will affect agriculture, farming, and aquaculture, in addition to compromising the quality of water resources for human consumption. According to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007), Global Circulation Models (GCMs) can provide reliable estimations of future climate conditions in addition to atmospheric processes that cause them, based on different input scenarios such as A2 (higher emission of greenhouse gases) and B1 (lower emission of GHG), among others. However, GCM`s resolution results to coarse in regions which have high space and time climate variability. To remediate this, several methods based on dynamical, statistical and empirical analysis have been proposed for downcaling. In this study, we evaluate possible changes in precipitation and temperature for the "Rio Yaqui Basin" in Sonora, Mexico and assess the impact of such changes on runoff, evapotranspiration and aquifer recharge for the 2010-2099 period of time. For this purpose, we analyzed the results of a Bias Corrected and Downscaled Climate Projection from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multi-model dataset: UKMO-HADCM3 from the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction. Northwest Mexico is under the influence of the North American Monsoon (NAM), a system affecting the states of Sinaloa and Sonora where the precipitation regimes change drastically during the summer months of June, July and August. It is associated to the sharp variations of topography, precipitation and temperature regimes in the region, so the importance of analyzing the downscaled climate projections. The Rio Yaqui Basin is one of

  12. Northward laramide thrusting in the quitovac region, northwestern sonora, mexico: Implications for the juxtaposition of paleoproterozoic basement blocks and the mojave-sonora megashear hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriondo, Alexander; Martínez-Torres, Luis M.; Kunk, Michael J.; Atkinson, William W.; Premo, Wayne R.; McIntosh, William C.

    2005-01-01

    Restoration of 12%–30% Basin and Range extension allows direct interpretation of ductile fabrics associated with a stack of Laramide thrust faults in the Quitovac region in northwestern Sonora. The inferred direction of displacement of these thrusts varies gradually from N63°W to N23°E and is interpreted to represent a clockwise rotation of the direction of Laramide thrusting through time. The thrust faults represent a piggy-back sequence of thrusting propagating north, toward the foreland. The average direction and sense of displacement of the thrusts is N18°W, and the cumulative 45 km of estimated northward-directed displacement corresponds to ∼86% of shortening.Based on geochronological constraints, onset of thrusting in Quitovac occurred sometime between 75 and 61 Ma, whereas cessation occurred at ca. 39 Ma. The presence of Paleocene-Eocene orogenic gold mineralization, spatially associated with thrusting, strengthens our idea that compressional tectonism associated with the Laramide orogeny is a very important and widespread dynamometamorphic event in the region.Similarities in age, kinematics, and structural stratigraphy indicate that the thrusting in the Quitovac region may be equivalent to the Laramide Quitobaquito Thrust in southwestern Arizona. In both areas, thrust faults juxtapose the Paleoproterozoic Caborca and “North America” basement blocks. This juxtaposition was previously proposed as exclusively related to movements along the hypothetical Upper Jurassic Mojave-Sonora megashear. The Laramide northward displacements and clockwise rotations recorded in the Caborca block rocks in Quitovac contradict the southward displacements (∼800 km) and counterclockwise rotations inherent in the left-lateral Upper Jurassic Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis. We conclude that if this megashear exists in northwestern Sonora, its trace should be to the southwest of the Quitovac region.

  13. [Water resource quality as related to economic activity and health patterns in Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares Rivera, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the spatial distribution of potential pollution pathways of water resources given the economic activity in the Mexican border state of Sonora and propose a regional distribution in relation to cancer mortality rates across the state. The methodology is based in an exploratory and inferential data analysis using two sources of primary data: wastewater discharge concessions registered in the Public Registry on Water Rights [Registro Público de Derechos de Agua] (REPDA) and the records generated by the National Health Information System [Sistema Nacional de Información en Salud] (SINAIS) in the period 1998-2011 based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10). The spatial concentration analysis allows for the identification of specific cancer mortality causes at the regional level. Results indicate that the projected adjustments to the regulation NOM-250-SSA1-2014, which controls a subset of pollutants common in mining activity surroundings, is a matter of regional concern.

  14. Factors in Sustainable Development: Current and Innovative Livestock and Range Management Practices as Perceived by Cattle-Producing Ejidatarios and Private Cattle Ranchers of Sonora, Mexico. A Summary Report of Research. Department Information Bulletin 99-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Peggy J.

    A study was conducted to identify and compare livestock production and range management practices currently in use in the Texas/Mexico border corridor, and to determine the acceptance of selected innovative practices among cattle ranchers in the State of Sonora, Mexico. Information was collected from private livestock producers who were members of…

  15. Status of black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna A. Castillo-Gamez; Rafael Arenas-Wong; Luis Castillo-Quijada; Verónica Coronado-Peraza; Abigail Enríquez-Munguia; Mirna Federico-Ortega; Alejandra García-Urrutia; Alba Lozano-Gámez; Romeo Méndez-Estrella; Laura Ochoa-Figueroa; J. R. Romo-León; Guy Kruse-Llergo; Iván Parra-Salazar

    2005-01-01

    Prairie dog is a keystone species throughout the habitat where it occurs, but its populations have declined about 98% in the last century. This species has been considered of international importance for the United States of America, Canada, and Mexico. Only two populations are recorded for Mexico, and the westernmost (isolated by Sierra Madre...

  16. Richness of mammals on the San Bernardino Ranch in the municipality of Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mario Erandi Bonillas-Monge; Carlos Manuel Valdez-Coronel

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the San Bernardino Ranch has performed, as economical activities, livestock and farming, which has contributed to the deterioration of regional ecosystems. The ranch is ecologically important due to the diverse types of habitats of conservation interest such as the semi-desert grassland, the riparian vegetation, and a large ciénega, in which restoration...

  17. Factors associated with work-related accidents and sickness among maquiladora workers: the case of Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, H; Denman, C; Lara, F

    1995-01-01

    The health problems of maquiladora workers were explored in a sample of 497 workers of Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. The workers were interviewed using a structured questionnaire containing four sections: a sociodemographic profile, occupational history, working conditions, and a health profile. Overall, 12.6 percent of the workers reported having an accident while working in the maquila, more than 40 percent of these requiring at least one day of disability, and 18.3 percent of workers reported having an episode of sickness/disease. More than 60 percent perceived health-related risks associated with working conditions. The presence of a doctor or nurse in the plant (odds ratio = 0.30), a perception of risk associated with working conditions (odds ratio = 1.85), and the plant offering information about work-related risks (odds ratio = 0.39) were among the significant predictors of work-related accidents and disease/sickness. The authors discuss the implications of these results for programs and policies to improve safety conditions in the maquiladora industry.

  18. Human (Clovis)–gomphothere (Cuvieronius sp.) association ∼13,390 calibrated yBP in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Guadalupe; Holliday, Vance T.; Gaines, Edmund P.; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquín; Martínez-Tagüeña, Natalia; Kowler, Andrew; Lange, Todd; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.; Mentzer, Susan M.; Sanchez-Morales, Ismael

    2014-01-01

    The earliest known foragers to populate most of North America south of the glaciers [∼11,500 to ≥ ∼10,800 14C yBP; ∼13,300 to ∼12,800 calibrated (Cal) years] made distinctive “Clovis” artifacts. They are stereotypically characterized as hunters of Pleistocene megamammals (mostly mammoth) who entered the continent via Beringia and an ice-free corridor in Canada. The origins of Clovis technology are unclear, however, with no obvious evidence of a predecessor to the north. Here we present evidence for Clovis hunting and habitation ∼11,550 yBP (∼13,390 Cal years) at “El Fin del Mundo,” an archaeological site in Sonora, northwestern Mexico. The site also includes the first evidence to our knowledge for gomphothere (Cuvieronius sp.) as Clovis prey, otherwise unknown in the North American archaeological record and terminal Pleistocene paleontological record. These data (i) broaden the age and geographic range for Clovis, establishing El Fin del Mundo as one of the oldest and southernmost in situ Clovis sites, supporting the hypothesis that Clovis had its origins well south of the gateways into the continent, and (ii) expand the make-up of the North American megafauna community just before extinction. PMID:25024193

  19. Paleomagnetism in the Determination of the Emplacement Temperature of Cerro Colorado Tuff Cone, El Pinacate Volcanic Field, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Trejo, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Vidal Solano, J. R.; Garcia Amador, B.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cerro Colorado Maar is located at the World Heritage Site, biosphere reserve El Pinacate and Gran Desierto del Altar, at the NNW region of Sonora, Mexico (in El Pinacate Volcanic Field). It is a tuff cone, about 1 km diameter, result of several phreatomagmatic episodes during the late Quaternary. We report paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties from fusiform volcanic bombs obtained from the borders of Cerro Colorado. This study is based in the thermoremanent magnetization TRM normally acquired by volcanic rocks, which can be used to estimate the emplacement temperature range. We performed the experiments on 20 lithic fragments (10 cm to 20 cm approximately), taking 6-8 paleomagnetic cores from each. Rock magnetic experiments (magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature (k-T), hysteresis curves and FORC analysis, shows that the main magnetic mineral carriers of magnetization are titanomagnetite and titanohematite in different levels of intergrowth. The k-T curves suggest in many cases, only one magnetic phase, but also in other cases a second magnetic phase. Thermal demagnetization was used to demagnetize the specimens in detailed short steps and make a well-defined emplacement temperature determination ranges. We found that temperature emplacement determination range for these two magnetic phases is between 350-450 °C, and 550-580 °C, respectively. These results are consistent with those expected in an eruption of Surtsey type, showing a distinct volcanic activity compared to the other craters from El Pinacate volcanic field.

  20. Human (Clovis)-gomphothere (Cuvieronius sp.) association ∼13,390 calibrated yBP in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Guadalupe; Holliday, Vance T.; Gaines, Edmund P.; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquín; Martínez-Tagüeña, Natalia; Kowler, Andrew; Lange, Todd; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.; Mentzer, Susan M.; Sanchez-Morales, Ismael

    2014-07-01

    The earliest known foragers to populate most of North America south of the glaciers [∼11,500 to ≥ ∼10,800 14C yBP; ∼13,300 to ∼12,800 calibrated (Cal) years] made distinctive "Clovis" artifacts. They are stereotypically characterized as hunters of Pleistocene megamammals (mostly mammoth) who entered the continent via Beringia and an ice-free corridor in Canada. The origins of Clovis technology are unclear, however, with no obvious evidence of a predecessor to the north. Here we present evidence for Clovis hunting and habitation ∼11,550 yBP (∼13,390 Cal years) at "El Fin del Mundo," an archaeological site in Sonora, northwestern Mexico. The site also includes the first evidence to our knowledge for gomphothere (Cuvieronius sp.) as Clovis prey, otherwise unknown in the North American archaeological record and terminal Pleistocene paleontological record. These data (i) broaden the age and geographic range for Clovis, establishing El Fin del Mundo as one of the oldest and southernmost in situ Clovis sites, supporting the hypothesis that Clovis had its origins well south of the gateways into the continent, and (ii) expand the make-up of the North American megafauna community just before extinction.

  1. A survey of environmental and occupational work practices in the automotive refinishing industry of a developing country: Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Luis; Bello, Dhimiter; Munguia, Nora; Zavala, Andrea; Marin, Amina; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The automotive repair and refinishing industry has been studied intensively in industrialized countries, in part due to use of hazardous chemicals such as isocyanates and solvents, but little is known about industry practices in the developing world. The main objective of this paper was to investigate environmental and occupational work practices of this industry in a developing region, Sonora, Mexico. An integrated survey approach maximizes the opportunity for identifying risks as well as reducing risks. This investigation included detailed workplace visits to 41 body shops and 6 paint suppliers, as well as a survey of shop owners and 24 workers. Information was collected on work practices, level of technology in the shops, use of personal protective equipment, consumption and handling of hazardous chemicals and waste, hazard communication, and environmental consciousness. Most shops had little capital, outdated technology for exposure control, poor working conditions, high potential for exposure to hazardous chemicals, and little awareness of environmental and occupational health and safety. We concluded that work practices in the Sonoran auto refinishing industry are unsustainable and may pose a health risk to workers and the environment.

  2. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Longevity and Differential Emergence of Dengue Fever in Two Cities in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Kacey C; Walker, Kathleen R; Reyes-Castro, Pablo; Joy, Teresa K; Castro-Luque, A Lucia; Diaz-Caravantes, Rolando E; Gameros, Mercedes; Haenchen, Steven; Hayden, Mary H; Monaghan, Andrew; Jeffrey-Guttierez, Eileen; Carrière, Yves; Riehle, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus, primarily transmitted by the Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquito, has rapidly expanded in geographic extent over the past several decades. In some areas, however, dengue fever has not emerged despite established Ae. aegypti populations. The reasons for this are unclear and have sometimes been attributed to socio-economic differences. In 2013 we compared Ae. aegypti adult density and population age structure between two cities in Sonora, Mexico: Hermosillo, which has regular seasonal dengue virus transmission, and Nogales, which has minimal transmission. Larval and pupal abundance was greater in Nogales, and adult density was only higher in Hermosillo during September. Population age structure, however, was consistently older in Hermosillo. This difference in longevity may have been one factor that limited dengue virus transmission in Nogales in 2013, as a smaller proportion of Ae. aegypti females survived past the extrinsic incubation period. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [Taphonomy of the gastropod cf. Donaldina robusta (Heterobranchia: Streptacididae) from the Middle Pennsylvanian, La Joya Formation, Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez E, Catalina; Buitrón S, Blanca; Vachard, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Gastropods are an important component in most of the fossil record; however, investigations have focused mainly on the characterization of the tafofacies and signatures in determined environments. We present qualitative and quantitative taphonomic data for the gastropod cf. Donaldina robusta assemblages from the La Joya Formation of the Sierra Agua Verde, Sonora State, (NW) Mexico. We analyzed 176 shells. Good preservation received ahigh taphonomic grade (A) and poor preservation a D. The shells were complete in 72% of cases (taphonomic grade B). Less than 10% are corroded or are parallel to the layer (grade A). This rock is petrographycally classified as wackestone, sedimentologically it is characterized by middle sorting (grade B) and low grading (grade A). The fossiliferous assemblage grades as A and B. Biostratinomic features of the skeletal assemblage are characteristic of sedimentologic concentrations of autochthonous-parautochthonous elements at the accumulation site. There was minimal reworking and transport in an environment of low energy, locally produced during a short period of accumulation.

  4. Late Cretaceous porphyry copper mineralization in Sonora, Mexico: Implications for the evolution of the Southwest North America porphyry copper province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Fernando; Valencia, Victor A.

    2014-10-01

    Two porphyry Cu-Mo prospects in northern Sonora, Mexico (Fortuna del Cobre and Los Humos) located within the southwestern North American porphyry province have been dated in order to constrain the timing of crystallization and mineralization of these ore deposits. In Fortuna del Cobre, the pre-mineralization granodiorite porphyry yielded an U-Pb zircon age of 76.5 ± 2.3 Ma, whereas two samples from the ore-bearing quartz feldespathic porphyry were dated at 74.6 ± 1.3 and 75.0 ± 1.4 Ma. Four molybdenite samples from Los Humos porphyry Cu prospect yielded a weighted average Re-Os age of 73.5 ± 0.2 Ma, whereas two samples from the ore-bearing quartz monzonite porphyry gave U-Pb zircon ages of 74.4 ± 1.1 and 74.5 ± 1.3 Ma, showing a Late Cretaceous age for the emplacement of this ore deposit. The results indicate that Laramide porphyry Cu mineralization of Late Cretaceous age is not restricted to northern Arizona as previously thought and provide evidence for the definition of NS trending metallogenic belts that are parallel to the paleo-trench. Porphyry copper mineralization follows the inland migration trend of the magmatic arc as a result of the Farallon slab flattening during the Laramide orogeny.

  5. Sr and Nd isotope geochemistry and tectonics during subduction and rifting in Sierra Santa Ursula, Sonora, Northwestern Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora-Klepeis, G.

    2000-01-01

    The western margin of North America was affected by a convergent plate boundary from the Cretaceous through the Early Tertiary. Volcanic rocks produced by subduction-related arc magmatism in northwestern Mexico are concentrated in two northwest-trending belts subparallel to the continental margin. One of these is the Sierra Madre Occidental, where mid-Tertiary magmatism consisted mostly of calc-alkaline rhyolitic ignimbrite and minor andesite produced between ∼ 46 and 28 Ma (McDowell et al., 1990). The second (younger) northwest-trending belt is located along the eastern margin of the Baja California Peninsula and in the Gulf of California region of mainland Mexico. This belt is composed mostly of andesite, but includes some basalt and dacite whose ages range from about 24 to 11 Ma (Hausback, 1984). A transition to rifting began after a mid-Tertiary cessation of subduction, eventually creating the Gulf of California extensional province. Four markedly different magma types comprising mainly tholeiitic and alkalic rocks and minor calc-alkaline and peralkaline rocks were erupted throughout the last 13 Ma and record the history of rifting of the Gulf of California (Sawlan, 1991). The aim of the present paper is to distinguish the nature of the 24-8.5 Ma magmatism emplaced on the eastern side of the Gulf of California in the state of Sonora, by the use of stratigraphic, geochemical and isotopic data. Preliminary Sr and Nd results show that three groups of magmas are present in the area suggesting a heterogeneous source. This can be interpreted as the result of magmas being erupted at different stages of subduction and rifting during the tectonic evolution of this part on North America

  6. Stratigraphy and Mesozoic–Cenozoic tectonic history of northern Sierra Los Ajos and adjacent areas, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William R.; Gray, Floyd; Iriondo, Alexander; Miggins, Daniel P.; Blodgett, Robert B.; Maldonado, Florian; Miller, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the northern Sierra Los Ajos reveals new stratigraphic and structural data relevant to deciphering the Mesozoic–Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the range. The northern Sierra Los Ajos is cored by Proterozoic, Cambrian, Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian strata, equivalent respectively to the Pinal Schist, Bolsa Quartzite and Abrigo Limestone, Martin Formation, Escabrosa Limestone, and Horquilla Limestone. The Proterozoic–Paleozoic sequence is mantled by Upper Cretaceous rocks partly equivalent to the Fort Crittenden and Salero Formations in Arizona, and the Cabullona Group in Sonora, Mexico.Absence of the Upper Jurassic–Lower Cretaceous Bisbee Group below the Upper Cretaceous rocks and above the Proterozoic–Paleozoic rocks indicates that the Sierra Los Ajos was part of the Cananea high, a topographic highland during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Deposition of Upper Cretaceous rocks directly on Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks indicates that the Sierra Los Ajos area had subsided as part of the Laramide Cabullona basin during Late Cretaceous time. Basal beds of the Upper Cretaceous sequence are clast-supported conglomerate composed locally of basement (Paleozoic) clasts. The conglomerate represents erosion of Paleozoic basement in the Sierra Los Ajos area coincident with development of the Cabullona basin.The present-day Sierra Los Ajos reaches elevations of greater than 2600 m, and was uplifted during Tertiary basin-and-range extension. Upper Cretaceous rocks are exposed at higher elevations in the northern Sierra Los Ajos and represent an uplifted part of the inverted Cabullona basin. Tertiary uplift of the Sierra Los Ajos was largely accommodated by vertical movement along the north-to-northwest-striking Sierra Los Ajos fault zone flanking the west side of the range. This fault zone structurally controls the configuration of the headwaters of the San Pedro River basin, an important bi-national water resource in the US-Mexico

  7. [Anorgasmy prevalence in women attended at Familiar Medicine Unit no. 1 in Obregon, Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Sánchez, Oscar; Flores García, Eloísa; López del Castillo Sánchez, David; Cortés Gil, Humberto

    2005-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of anorgasmy in women. An observational, descriptive and transversal study was done from August 2002 to January 2003 surveying women with sexual activity in a clinic of the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Obregon, Sonora. The questionnaire was validated by the UNAM. The analyzed variables were: age, scholar degree, the age in which women started sexual activity, number of children, marital status, the number of sexual partners, pleasure to sex for the women, satisfaction and feeling like doing sex, who decides and begins to do sex, frequency of sexual intercourse, knowledge about orgasm and one's own experience, as well as psychosomatic symptoms. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, chi square test and Likert's scale. Seventy-three women were surveyed, with ages between 16 and 46 years. Anorgasmy frequency was of 6.8%; 53.4% of the women had secondary education and 37% superior education. Time of active sexual life varied between 1 and 30 years; the knowledge about orgasm was of 74%. The orgasmic dysfunction is lower in this region than that reported in the bibliography, this could be due to the greater scholar degree of women, social and cultural issues, and the women's independence. Nevertheless, the health team must be qualified to detect and treat it, in order to avoid complications.

  8. Water resource quality as related to economic activity and health patterns in Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Manzanares Rivera

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the spatial distribution of potential pollution pathways of water resources given the economic activity in the Mexican border state of Sonora and propose a regional distribution in relation to cancer mortality rates across the state. The methodology is based in an exploratory and inferential data analysis using two sources of primary data: wastewater discharge concessions registered in the Public Registry on Water Rights [Registro Público de Derechos de Agua] (REPDA and the records generated by the National Health Information System [Sistema Nacional de Información en Salud] (SINAIS in the period 1998-2011 based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10. The spatial concentration analysis allows for the identification of specific cancer mortality causes at the regional level. Results indicate that the projected adjustments to the regulation NOM-250-SSA1-2014, which controls a subset of pollutants common in mining activity surroundings, is a matter of regional concern.

  9. Proceedings of a USGS Workshop on Facing Tomorrow's Challenges Along the U.S.-Mexico Border - Monitoring, Modeling, and Forecasting Change Within the Arizona-Sonora Transboundary Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Hirsch, Derrick D.; Ward, A. Wesley

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO THE WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS Competition for water resources, habitats, and urban areas in the Borderlands has become an international concern. In the United States, Department of Interior Bureaus, Native American Tribes, and other State and Federal partners rely on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide unbiased science and leadership in the Borderlands region. Consequently, the USGS hosted a workshop, ?Facing Tomorrow?s Challenges along the U.S.-Mexico Border,? on March 20?22, 2007, in Tucson, Ariz., focused specifically on monitoring, modeling, and forecasting change within the Arizona-Sonora Transboundary Watersheds

  10. Exposure assessment of organochlorine pesticides, arsenic, and lead in children from the major agricultural areas in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Montenegro, Maria M; Valenzuela-Quintanar, Ana I; Balderas-Cortés, José J; Yañez-Estrada, Leticia; Gutiérrez-Coronado, Maria L; Cuevas-Robles, Alberto; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2013-04-01

    There is a lack of information of exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and some metals, such as lead (Pb) and arsenic (As), both of which were used as arsenicals pesticides, in children living in the major agricultural areas of Mexico. The objective of this study was to assess the exposure of children to different OCP, As, and Pb in the Yaqui and Mayo valleys of Sonora to generate population baseline levels of these toxins. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 165 children (age 6-12 years old) from 10 communities from both valleys during 2009. Blood samples were analyzed for OCP and Pb and first morning void urine for inorganic As (InAs). All of the blood samples had detectable levels of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) ranging from 0.25 to 10.3 μg/L. However lindane, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), aldrin, and endosulfan were detected in far less of the population (36.4, 23.6, 9.1, and 3 %, respectively). Methoxychlor and endrin were not found in any sample. The average value of Pb in this population was 3.2 μg Pb/dL (range 0.17-9.0) with 8.5 % of the samples having levels 50 μg/L were observed in 12.7 % of the samples. Our results show that is important to start a risk-reduction program to decrease exposure to these toxins in Mexican communities. In addition, the results can be used to establish the baseline levels of exposure to these toxins in this agricultural region and may be used as a reference point for regulatory agencies.

  11. Participatory Water Resources Modeling in a Water-Scarce Basin (Rio Sonora, Mexico) Reveals Uncertainty in Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A. S.; Vivoni, E. R.; Halvorsen, K. E.; Kossak, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Rio Sonora Basin (RSB) in northwest Mexico has a semi-arid and highly variable climate along with urban and agricultural pressures on water resources. Three participatory modeling workshops were held in the RSB in spring 2013. A model of the water resources system, consisting of a watershed hydrology model, a model of the water infrastructure, and groundwater models, was developed deliberatively in the workshops, along with scenarios of future climate and development. Participants were asked to design water resources management strategies by choosing from a range of supply augmentation and demand reduction measures associated with water conservation. Participants assessed water supply reliability, measured as the average daily supply divided by daily demand for historical and future periods, by probing with the climate and development scenarios. Pre- and post-workshop-surveys were developed and administered, based on conceptual models of workshop participants' beliefs regarding modeling and local water resources. The survey results indicate that participants believed their modeling abilities increased and beliefs in the utility of models increased as a result of the workshops. The selected water resources strategies varied widely among participants. Wastewater reuse for industry and aquifer recharge were popular options, but significant numbers of participants thought that inter-basin transfers and desalination were viable. The majority of participants indicated that substantial increases in agricultural water efficiency could be achieved. On average, participants chose strategies that produce reliabilities over the historical and future periods of 95%, but more than 20% of participants were apparently satisfied with reliabilities lower than 80%. The wide range of strategies chosen and associated reliabilities indicate that there is a substantial degree of uncertainty in how future water resources decisions could be made in the region.

  12. Fractionation and risk assessment of Fe and Mn in surface sediments from coastal sites of Sonora, Mexico (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Marini, Martín E; García-Camarena, Raúl; Gómez-Álvarez, Agustín; García-Rico, Leticia

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Fe and Mn distribution in geochemical fractions of the surface sediment of four oyster culture sites in the Sonora coast, Mexico. A selective fractionation scheme to obtain five fractions was adapted for the microwave system. Surface sediments were analyzed for carbonates, organic matter contents, and Fe and Mn in geochemical fractions. The bulk concentrations of Fe ranged from 10,506 to 21,918 mg/kg (dry weight, dry wt), and the bulk concentrations of Mn ranged from 185.1 to 315.9 mg/kg (dry wt) in sediments, which was low and considered as non-polluted in all of the sites. The fractionation study indicated that the major geochemical phases for the metals were the residual, as well as the Fe and Mn oxide fractions. The concentrations of metals in the geochemical fractions had the following order: residual > Fe and Mn oxides > organic matter > carbonates > interchangeable. Most of the Fe and Mn were linked to the residual fraction. Among non-residual fractions, high percentages of Fe and Mn were linked to Fe and Mn oxides. The enrichment factors (EFs) for the two metals were similar in the four studied coasts, and the levels of Fe and Mn are interpreted as non-enrichment (EF < 1) because the metals concentrations were within the baseline concentrations. According to the environmental risk assessment codes, Fe and Mn posed no risk and low risk, respectively. Although the concentrations of Fe and Mn were linked to the residual fraction, the levels in non-residual fractions may significantly result in the transference of other metals, depending on several physico-chemical and biological factors.

  13. Health Risk Assessment and Urinary Excretion of Children Exposed to Arsenic through Drinking Water and Soils in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rico, Leticia; Meza-Figueroa, Diana; Jay Gandolfi, A; Del Rivero, Carlos Ibañez; Martínez-Cinco, Marco A; Meza-Montenegro, Maria M

    2018-05-02

    Environmental arsenic exposure is associated with increased risk of non-cancerous chronic diseases and a variety of cancers in humans. The aims of this study were to carry out for the first time a health risk assessment for two common arsenic exposure routes (drinking water and soil ingestion) in children living in the most important agricultural areas in the Yaqui and Mayo valleys in Sonora, Mexico. Drinking water sampling was conducted in the wells of 57 towns. A cross-sectional study was done in 306 children from 13 villages in the valleys. First morning void urine samples were analyzed for inorganic arsenic (InAs) and monomethyl and dimethyl arsenic (MMA and DMA) by HPLC/ICP-MS. The results showed a wide range of arsenic levels in drinking water between 2.7 and 98.7 μg As/L. Arsenic levels in agricultural and backyard soils were in the range of water, agricultural soil, and backyard soil showed values > 1 in 100% of the study towns, and the carcinogenic risk (CR) was greater than 1E-04 in 85%. The average of arsenic excreted in urine was 31.7 μg As/L, and DMA had the highest proportion in urine, with averages of 77.8%, followed by InAs and MMA with 11.4 and 10.9%, respectively, percentages similar to those reported in the literature. Additionally, positive correlations between urinary arsenic levels and HI values were found (r = 0.59, P = 0.000). These results indicated that this population is at high risk of developing chronic diseases including cancer.

  14. Preliminary United States-Mexico border watershed analysis, twin cities area of Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Laura Margaret; Gray, Floyd; Castaneda, Mario; Bultman, Mark; Bolm, Karen Sue

    2002-01-01

    The United States - Mexico border area faces the challenge of integrating aspects of its binational physical boundaries to form a unified or, at least, compatible natural resource management plan. Specified geospatial components such as stream drainages, mineral occurrences, vegetation, wildlife, and land-use can be analyzed in terms of their overlapping impacts upon one another. Watersheds have been utilized as a basic unit in resource analysis because they contain components that are interrelated and can be viewed as a single interactive ecological system. In developing and analyzing critical regional natural resource databases, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal and non-governmental agencies have adopted a ?watershed by watershed? approach to dealing with such complicated issues as ecosystem health, natural resource use, urban growth, and pollutant transport within hydrologic systems. These watersheds can facilitate the delineation of both large scale and locally important hydrologic systems and urban management parameters necessary for sustainable, diversified land-use. The twin border cities area of Nogales, Sonora and Nogales, Arizona, provide the ideal setting to demonstrate the utility and application of a complete, cross-border, geographic information systems (GIS) based, watershed analysis in the characterization of a wide range of natural resource as well as urban features and their interactions. In addition to the delineation of a unified, cross-border watershed, the database contains sewer/water line locations and status, well locations, geology, hydrology, topography, soils, geomorphology, and vegetation data, as well as remotely sensed imagery. This report is preliminary and part of an ongoing project to develop a GIS database that will be widely accessible to the general public, researchers, and the local land management community with a broad range of application and utility.

  15. Interpretation of Gravimetric and Aeromagnetic Data of the Tecoripa Chart in Southeast Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Retama, S.; Montaño-Del Cid, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Tecoripa chart H12-D64 is located southeast of the state of Sonora, México, south of Arizona. The geology is represented by sedimentary rocks of the Ordovician and Triassic, volcanic rocks of the Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary, intrusive rocks from the Upper Cretaceous- Tertiary and sedimentary rocks of the Cenozoic. In this paper a gravimetric study was conducted to determine the configuration and depth of the basement and to develop a structural model of the subsurface. For this purpose a consistent gravimetric survey in 3 profiles was conducted. To complement this study, gravimetric data obtained by INEGI (96 gravimetric stations spaced every 4000 m) that correspond to a regional survey was also used. The two sets of data were corrected and processed with the WinGLink software. The profiles were then modeled using the Talwani method. 4 Profiles corresponding to the gravimetric survey and 5 data profiles from INEGI were modeled. Aeromagnetic data from the total field of Tecoripa chart were also processed. The digital information was integrated and processed by generating a data grid. Processes applied to data consisted of reduction to the pole, regional-residual separation and upward continuations. In general, the obtained structural models show intrusive bodies associated with well-defined high gravimetric and magnetic and low gravimetric and magnetic are associated with basins and sedimentary rocks. The obtained geological models show the basement represented by volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation from the Upper Cretaceous which are in contact with sedimentary rocks from the Barranca Group from Upper Cretaceous and limestones from the Middle Ordovician. Both volcanic and sedimentary rocks are intruded by granodiorite- granite with ages of the Tertiary-Oligocene. Based on the superficial geology as well as in the configuration of the basement and the obtained structural model the existence of faults with NW-SE orientation that originate Horst and

  16. Paleomagnetic data from the Caborca terrane, Mexico: Implications for Cordilleran tectonics and the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Garza, Roberto S.; Geissman, John W.

    1999-04-01

    or below the detection limit of paleomagnetism (displacement, yet evidence for statistically significant clockwise rotation, and the overall similarity of Jurassic magnetizations in the Cordilleran arc with those of the Caborca block, despite the fact that some of them are clearly secondary, are not consistent with the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis of Late Jurassic left-lateral strike-slip motion of the crust of northern Mexico.

  17. Frequency-dependence of mating success in Poeciliopsis monacha (Pisces, Cyprinodontiformes reproductive complex, Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Neuza Rejane Wille

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A diversity of all-female fishes of the genus Poeciliopsis coexists with their sexual ancestor species in streams of western Mexico. All-females are hybrids that depend on the sperm of paternal species to reproduce. Rare-female advantage is one of several hypotheses that attempt to explain how the diversity of all-female biotypes is maintained within the Poeciliopsis reproductive complexes. According to this hypothesis, the uncommon all-female biotype has a mating advantage over the common ones and has been maintained by a dynamic equilibrium process. In the P. monacha reproductive complex at Arroyo de los Platanos the density of two all-female biotypes (P. 2monacha-lucida I and II varies across pools. The objective of this study was to analyse fecundity and mating success of females from this arroyo to test the hypothesis. Female mating success was inversely correlated to their density, supporting this hypothesis.

  18. The lower Mesozoic record of detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Sonora, Mexico, and its paleogeographic implications

    OpenAIRE

    González-León, Carlos M.; Valencia, Víctor A.; Lawton, Timothy F.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Gehrels, George E.; Leggett, William J.; Montijo-Contreras, Óscar; Fernández, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology from each of the formations of the Triassic-Lower Jurassic Barranca and El Antimonio groups of central and northwestern Sonora and from the Lower Jurassic Basomari and Middle Jurassic Lily formations of northern Sonora indicate they contain distinctive zircon populations. A Proterozoic population has peak ages near 1.8, 1.7, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.1 Ga. A population of Permo-Triassic grains with important peak ages near 269, 254, 245, 234 and 227 Ma. A third popula...

  19. Comparison of the tropical floras of the Sierra la Madera and the Sierra Madre Occidental, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Gertrudis Yanes-Arvayo; Ana Lilia Reina-Guerrero; Melissa Valenzuela-Yanez; Maria de la Paz Montanez-Armenta; Hugo Silva-Kurumiya

    2013-01-01

    The floras of the tropical vegetation in the Sky Island Sierra la Madera (SMA) near Moctezuma in northeastern Sonora (30°00’N 109°18’W) and the Yécora (YEC) area in the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) in eastern Sonora (28°25’N 109°15”W) were compared. The areas are 175 km apart. Tropical vegetation includes foothills thornscrub (FTS) in both areas and tropical deciduous...

  20. Waterborne disease-related risk perceptions in the Sonora River basin, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morua, Agustin Robles; Halvorsen, Kathleen E; Mayer, Alex S

    2011-05-01

    Waterborne disease is estimated to cause about 10% of all diseases worldwide. However, related risk perceptions are not well understood, particularly in the developing world where waterborne disease is an enormous problem. We focus on understanding risk perceptions related to these issues in a region within northern Mexico. Our findings show how waterborne disease problems and solutions are understood in eight small communities along a highly contaminated river system. We found major differences in risk perceptions between health professionals, government officials, and lay citizens. Health professionals believed that a high level of human-waste-related risk existed within the region. Few officials and lay citizens shared this belief. In addition, few officials and lay citizens were aware of poor wastewater-management-related disease outbreaks and water contamination. Finally, aside from health professionals, a few interviewees understood the importance of basic hygiene and water treatment measures that could help to prevent disease. Our results add to the literature on environmentally-related risk perceptions in the developing world. We discuss recommendations for improving future human-wastewater-related risk communication within the region. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Evolution of the knowledge system for agricultural development in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Ellen B; Matson, Pamela A

    2016-04-26

    Knowledge systems-networks of linked actors, organizations, and objects that perform a number of knowledge-related functions that link knowledge and know how with action-have played a key role in fostering agricultural development over the last 50 years. We examine the evolution of the knowledge system of the Yaqui Valley, Mexico, a region often described as the home of the green revolution for wheat, tracing changes in the functions of critical knowledge system participants, information flows, and research priorities. Most of the knowledge system's key players have been in place for many decades, although their roles have changed in response to exogenous and endogenous shocks and trends (e.g., drought, policy shifts, and price trends). The system has been agile and able to respond to challenges, in part because of the diversity of players (evolving roles of actors spanning research-decision maker boundaries) and also because of the strong and consistent role of innovative farmers. Although the agricultural research agenda in the Valley is primarily controlled from within the agricultural sector, outside voices have become an important influence in broadening development- and production-oriented perspectives to sustainability perspectives.

  2. Water, land, climate change and agrarian livelihood in an arid region riparian corridor: Rayón, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R.; Scott, C. A.; Curl, K.; House-Peters, L.; Buechler, S.

    2012-12-01

    Results of recent fieldwork in Rayón, Sonora, Mexico (funded by NSF's "Strengthening Resilience of Arid Region Riparian Corridors") indicate that the coupled natural and human (CNH) system that has persisted since the town's founding in 1626 is being degraded and destabilised by a confluence of social and ecological pressures. System change or loss of key system services and products has important implications for ecological services and human economic activity in the riparian corridor. Less water quantity is the primary factor responsible for driving system degradation and change. Drought caused by climate change is widely perceived by agriculturists as responsible for reduced water quantity in the riparian area. Reductions in water quantity are so severe that the once perennial Rio San Miguel did not run during 2012's summer months for the first time in residents' memory. Ninety-percent of wells are dry. Fields irrigated by surface-water acequias were not planted. Starvation or dehydration has thinned herd sizes. Residents fear they will lose the ability to practice their traditional livelihoods: ranching, farming and cheese production. Drought conditions and resource management in response to climatic change have had a net negative impact on ecological services. Agriculturists have responded to less forage and pasture for cattle by clearing mesquite forests, putting land into production, and increasing water demand. From interviews it appears this process is cyclical: agriculturists widely believe access to more water or an end to the drought are the only ways to improve conditions. Interviews also reveal (a) agriculturists view technology, especially that which is able to improve water-use efficiency, as means to reduce stress in the CNH system and (b) a holistic view that couples natural well-being to human well-being is absent from the majority of respondents' worldviews. Technological and adoption of holistic perceptions are adaptations that may potentially

  3. Flux frequency analysis of seasonally dry ecosystem fluxes in two unique biomes of Sonora Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, V. S.; Yepez, E. A.; Robles-Morua, A.; Garatuza, J.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Watts, C.

    2013-05-01

    Complex dynamics from the interactions of ecosystems processes makes difficult to model the behavior of ecosystems fluxes of carbon and water in response to the variation of environmental and biological drivers. Although process oriented ecosystem models are critical tools for studying land-atmosphere fluxes, its validity depends on the appropriate parameterization of equations describing temporal and spatial changes of model state variables and their interactions. This constraint often leads to discrepancies between model simulations and observed data that reduce models reliability especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In the semiarid north western Mexico, ecosystem processes are fundamentally controlled by the seasonality of water and the intermittence of rain pulses which are conditions that require calibration of specific fitting functions to describe the response of ecosystem variables (i.e. NEE, GPP, ET, respiration) to these wetting and drying periods. The goal is to find functions that describe the magnitude of ecosystem fluxes during individual rain pulses and the seasonality of the ecosystem. Relaying on five years of eddy covariance flux data of a tropical dry forest and a subtropical shrubland we present a flux frequency analysis that describe the variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 to highlight the relevance of pulse driven dynamics controlling this flux. Preliminary results of flux frequency analysis of NEE indicate that these ecosystems are strongly controlled by the frequency distribution of rain. Also, the output of fitting functions for NEE, GPP, ET and respiration using semi-empirical functions applied at specific rain pulses compared with season-long statistically generated simulations do not agree. Seasonality and the intrinsic nature of individual pulses have different effects on ecosystem flux responses. This suggests that relationships between the nature of seasonality and individual pulses can help improve the

  4. [CONSUMPTION OF OMEGA- 3 FATTY ACIDS AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN COLLEGE STUDENTS FROM SONORA, MEXICO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi Vargas, María; González Lomelí, Daniel; Terrazas Medina, Efraín A; Peralta Peña, Sandra L; Jordán Jinez, Ma Lourdes; Ruiz Paloalto, Ma Laura; Cupul Uicab, Lea A

    2015-10-01

    recent studies suggest that low serum levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 are associated with a higher prevalence of depression. to evaluate whether low consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids is associated with a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms in a sample of college students from the Northwest of Mexico, and to assess the potential effect modification by alcohol consumption. we conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample of 706 college students (males and females) aged 18 to 24. The presence of depressive symptoms was identified with the Depression Scale of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies (CES-D), using a cutoff point of ≥ 24. The intake of omega-3 was obtained by a food frequency questionnaire validated for Mexican population. We estimated the weekly intake of alpha-linolenic fatty acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) derived from the diet in mg/g of food. The association between omega-3 from diet and the presence of depressive symptoms was assessed using logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders. 67% of the participants were females; 16.6% were classified as having depressive symptoms. A low intake of ALA and EPA + DHA was not associated with depressive symptoms before and after adjusting for confounders. Median levels of ALA (from nuts only) were significantly lower among those with depressive symptoms compared to those without these symptoms. in this population of Mexican college students, a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids was not associated with depressive symptoms. The potential association between nut consumption and depressive symptoms deserve more attention. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, Jayne; Webb, Robert H.; Esque, Todd; Brooks, Matthew L.; DeFalco, Lesley; MacMahon, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The deserts of California (Lead photo, Fig. 1) occupy approximately 38% of California’s landscape (Table 1) and consist of three distinct deserts: the Great Basin Desert, Mojave Desert, and Colorado Desert, the latter of which is a subdivision of the Sonoran Desert (Brown and Lowe 1980). The wide range of climates and geology found within each of these deserts result in very different vegetative communities and ecosystem processes and therefore different ecosystem services. In deserts, extreme conditions such as very high and low temperatures and very low rainfall result in abiotic factors (climate, geology, geomorphology, and soils) controlling the composition and function of ecosystems, including plant and animal distributions. This is in contrast to wetter and milder temperatures found in other ecosystems, where biotic interactions are the dominant driving force. However, despite the harsh conditions in deserts, they are home to a surprisingly large number of plants and animals. Deserts are also places where organisms display a wide array of adaptations to the extremes they encounter, providing some of the best examples of Darwinian selection (MacMahon and Wagner 1985, Ward 2009). Humans have utilized these regions for thousands of years, despite the relatively low productivity and harsh climates of these landscapes. Unlike much of California, most of these desert lands have received little high-intensity use since European settlement, leaving large areas relatively undisturbed. Desert landscapes are being altered, however, by the introduction of fire following the recent invasion of Mediterranean annual grasses. As most native plants are not fire-adapted, they Many do not recover, whereas the non-native grasses flourish. Because desert lands are slow to recover from disturbances, energy exploration and development, recreational use, and urban development will alter these landscapes for many years to come. This chapter provides a brief description of where the

  6. Prevalence, types, and geographical distribution of Listeria monocytogenes from a survey of retail Queso Fresco and associated cheese processing plants and dairy farms in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Enriquez, R I; Garcia-Galaz, A; Acedo-Felix, E; Gonzalez-Rios, I H; Call, J E; Luchansky, J B; Diaz-Cinco, M E

    2007-11-01

    In the first part of this study, samples were collected from farms, cheese processing plants (CPPs), and retail markets located in various geographical areas of Sonora, Mexico, over a 12-month period during the summer of 2004 and winter of 2005. Four (all Queso Fresco [QF] from retail markets) of 349 total samples tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Of these four positive samples, three were collected in the northern region and one in the southern region of Sonora. Additionally, two were collected during the winter months, and two were collected during the summer months. For the second part of the study, a total of 39 samples from a farm, a CPP, and retail markets were collected and processed according to a combination of the Norma Oficial Mexicana NOM-143-SSA1-1995.10 method (NOM) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual method, and 27 samples from these same locations were collected and processed according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service method (USDA-FSIS). The NOM-FDA method recovered the pathogen from 6 (15%) of 39 samples (one cheese and five product contact surfaces), while the USDA-FSIS method recovered the pathogen from 5 (18.5%) of 27 samples (all product contact surfaces). In addition, the 40 isolates recovered from the 15 total samples that tested positive for Lm grouped into five distinct pulsotypes that were ca. 60% related, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The results of this study confirmed a 3.4% prevalence of Lm in QF collected from retail markets located in Sonora and no appreciable difference in the effectiveness of either the NOM-FDA or USDA-FSIS method to recover the pathogen from cheese or environmental samples.

  7. Observations on the seasonal distribution of native fish in a 10-kilometer reach of San Bernardino Creek, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. O. Minckley

    2013-01-01

    San Bernardino Creek is a northern tributary of the Río Yaqui that originates in the United States and crosses the International Border just east of Douglas, Arizona/Agua Prieta, Sonora and immediately south of San Bernardino/Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge. Six of eight Río Yaqui native fishes occur in this reach:four minnows, a sucker, and a poeciliid....

  8. Preliminary assessment of the moth (Lepidoptera: Heterocera) fauna of Rincon de Guadalupe, Sierra de Bacadehuachi, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Palting

    2013-01-01

    The Sierra de Bacadéhuachi is a poorly sampled extension of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) located in east-central Sonora near the town of Bacadéhuachi. Sampling of moths using mercury vapor and ultraviolet lights occurred in summer and fall 2011, and spring 2012 at Rincón de Guadalupe, located in pine-oak forest at 1680 m elevation. Approximately 400 taxa of moths...

  9. Tectono-Stratigraphy of the Seeps on the Guaymas Basin at the Sonora Margin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Albornoz, L. J.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Escobar-Briones, E. G.; Godfroy, A.; Fouquet, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Recently several hydrothermal and gas seeps systems has been located precisely at the Sonora margin within the Guaymas Basin (GB), Gulf of California. Since late 1970's , several marine studies had reported two main hydrothermal systems in the Guaymas Rift (one at the Northern Rift, and other at the Southern Rift) and a cold seeps system at the Satellite Basin in the Sonora-margin lower edge. During the campaign BIG10, onboard the IFREMER vessel, NO L'Atalante, the EM122 echo-sounder log more than 30,000 water column acoustic images, which allows us to create a data base of the bubble plumes active systems on the northern part of the GB and the Sonora Margin. These plumes are the expression on the water column of an active seeps site during the cruise time. These images document the presence of the cold seep activity around the scarp of the Guaymas Transform Fault (GTF), and within the Satellite Basin. Few active plumes are first located off-axis, on both sides of the Northern Rift. Although it is not observed any plume within NR. Sub-bottom profiles and bathymetric data logged during the campaign GUAYRIV10, onboard the UNAM vessel, BO EL PUMA, are analyzed to determine the shallow tectonic-stratigraphy of GB near the Sonora Margin. We analyze 17 high-resolution seismic profiles (13 with NE-SW strike and 3 with NW-SE strike). From this data set, the continental shelf stratigraphy at the Sonora Margin tilts toward the slope, showing 3 low angle unconformities due to tectonics and slope angle changes. The strata slope changes angle up to 60°. However, the constant trans-tension shear along the GTF causes gravitation instability on the slope, generating a few submarine landslides close to the Northern Rift, and the rotation of blocks, tilting toward the shelf. To the north, the GTF splits in two fault escarpments, forming a narrow pull-apart basin, known as Satellite Basin. The submarine canyon from the Sonora River flows through the Satellite Basin into the GB

  10. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults.

  11. Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors for Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Healthy Blood Donors: A Cross-Sectional Study in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Rascón-Careaga, Antonio; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Corella-Madueño, María Alba Guadalupe; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Aldana-Madrid, María Lourdes; Velasquez-Vega, Edgar; Quizán-Plata, Trinidad; Navarro-Henze, José Luis; Badell-Luzardo, Joel Alberto; Gastélum-Cano, José María; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) can be transmitted by blood transfusion. We determined the prevalence of T. gondii infection in healthy blood donors in Hermosillo city, Mexico, and the association of infection with T. gondii with the sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of blood donors. Four hundred and eight blood donors who attended two public blood banks in Hermosillo city were examined for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Of the 408 blood donors (mean age 31.77 ± 9.52; range 18-60 years old) studied, 55 (13.5%) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies, and 12 (21.8%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that seropositivity to T. gondii was associated with age (OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.03-2.94; P = 0.03) and tobacco use (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.02-4.29; P = 0.04). Seropositivity to T. gondii was correlated with the number of pregnancies, deliveries, and cesarean sections. The seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in blood donors in Sonora is the highest reported in blood donors in northern Mexico so far. This is the first report of an association of T. gondii exposure and tobacco use. Further research to confirm this association is needed.

  12. Stratigraphy, geochronology and regional tectonic setting of the Late Cretaceous (ca. 82-70 Ma) Cabullona basin, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-León, Carlos M.; Solari, Luigi A.; Madhavaraju, Jayagopal

    2017-12-01

    The Cabullona basin in northeastern Sonora is a continental depocenter whose origin is related to the adjacent Sierra Anibacachi uplift that bounds its tectonic eastern flank. Its exposed, mostly fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary fill, the Cabullona Group, was deposited between 81.9 ± 0.7 and 69.8 ± 0.7 Ma and its outcrops extends for 70 km from north to south. The oldest measured stratigraphic column of the Cabullona Group is the Los Atolillos column of the southern part of the basin, but its base is not exposed. A basal conglomerate in the younger El Malacate (ca. 80 Ma), Cuauhtémoc (ca. 75 Ma) and San Joaquín (ca. 70 Ma) columns onlaps deformed basement rocks. The type section in which the Cabullona Group was previously named is herein referred as the Naco section and is dated ∼73-72 Ma. The younger strata of the Cabullona Group correspond to the fluvial San Joaquín column that onlaps the eastern tectonic boundary of the basin and to the lacustrine Esqueda column. These columns are dated at ca. 70 Ma and may represent the late evolution of the Cabullona basin. Sandstone petrography and detrital zircon geochronology are used to infer provenance of sediments of the Cabullona Group. Sandstones consist of lithic arkose to feldespathic litharenite, indicating provenance from dissected to transitional volcanic arc, but samples of the El Malacate column classify as arkose and lithic arkose with possible provenance from basement uplift of Sierra Los Ajos; litharenite from the Esqueda column indicate arc provenance. Detrital zircons yielded mostly Proterozoic and Mesozoic ages with age peaks at ca. 1568, 167, 100, 80 and 73 Ma indicating possible provenance from the Precambrian basement rocks and the Jurassic continental magmatic arc that underlie the region, the Alisitos arc and La Posta plutons in Baja California, and from the Laramide magmatic arc of Sonora. The Cabullona basin developed nearly contemporaneous to the early, eastwards migrating Laramide

  13. Análisis del tamaño del genoma y cariotipo de Agave aktites Gentry (Agavaceae de Sonora, México Genome size and karyotype analysis of Agave aktites Gentry (Agavaceae from Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Palomino

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó el tamaño del genoma y la estructura del cariotipo de 2 poblaciones silvestres de Agave aktites Gentry de Las Bocas y San Carlos, Sonora, México. El contenido de ADN nuclear en tejido foliar se determinó por citometría de flujo y los cromosomas se observaron en metafase mitótica de meristemos radiculares. Las plantas en ambas poblaciones son diploides (2n= 2x= 60. El contenido promedio 2C de ADN nuclear fue de 8.404 pg; 1Cx= 4 120 millones de pares de nucleótidos. El cariotipo bimodal fue similar en las 2 poblaciones y consistió de 10 cromosomas grandes y 50 pequeños y correspondió a 46m+6st+8t: también mostró un par de cromosomas telocéntricos grandes con constricción secundaria. El cociente de los brazos cromosómicos fue diferente en los pares 7, 8, 14 y 16 del grupo de cromosomas pequeños que presentan diferencias morfológicas entre las 2 poblaciones. Estos rearreglos cromosómicos podrían deberse a intercambios cromosómicos heterocigóticos espontáneos y son evidencia de que los genomas de distintas poblaciones de A. aktites se encuentran en un activo proceso de diferenciación que podría llevar a la especiación. Los análisis son básicos para conocer la diversidad genética intraespecífica de A. aktites y para establecer estrategias de conservación in situ y ex situ para esta especie.Genome size and karyotype structure of 2 wild populations of Agave aktites Gentry from Las Bocas and San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico were determined. Nuclear DNA content of leaf tissue was measured through flow cytometry, and chromosomes were observed in mitotic metaphase of root tips. All individual plants studied in both populations are diploids (2n= 2x= 60. The mean 2C nuclear DNA content was 8.404 pg; 1Cx= 4 120 million of base pairs. All plants of the 2 populations of A. aktites show a bimodal karyotype consisting of 10 large + 50 small chromosomes and corresponded to 46m+6st+8t; they also have a pair of large telocentric

  14. Development of a high-resolution binational vegetation map of the Santa Cruz River riparian corridor and surrounding watershed, southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Norman, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of a binational vegetation map developed for the Santa Cruz Watershed, which straddles the southern border of Arizona and the northern border of Sonora, Mexico. The map was created as an environmental input to the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM) that is being created by the U.S. Geological Survey for the watershed. The SCWEPM is a map-based multicriteria evaluation tool that allows stakeholders to explore tradeoffs between valued ecosystem services at multiple scales within a participatory decision-making process. Maps related to vegetation type and are needed for use in modeling wildlife habitat and other ecosystem services. Although detailed vegetation maps existed for the U.S. side of the border, there was a lack of consistent data for the Santa Cruz Watershed in Mexico. We produced a binational vegetation classification of the Santa Cruz River riparian habitat and watershed vegetation based on NatureServe Terrestrial Ecological Systems (TES) units using Classification And Regression Tree (CART) modeling. Environmental layers used as predictor data were derived from a seasonal set of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images (spring, summer, and fall) and from a 30-meter digital-elevation-model (DEM) grid. Because both sources of environmental data are seamless across the international border, they are particularly suited to this binational modeling effort. Training data were compiled from existing field data for the riparian corridor and data collected by the NM-GAP (New Mexico Gap Analysis Project) team for the original Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project (SWReGAP) modeling effort. Additional training data were collected from core areas of the SWReGAP classification itself, allowing the extrapolation of the SWReGAP mapping into the Mexican portion of the watershed without collecting additional training data.

  15. Monitoring Colonias Development along the United States-Mexico Border: A Process Application using GIS and Remote Sensing in Douglas, Arizona, and Agua Prieta, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Donelson, Angela J.; Pfeifer, Edwin L.; Lam, Alven H.; Osborn, Kenneth J.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have developed a joint project to create Internet-enabled geographic information systems (GIS) that will help cities along the United States-Mexico border deal with issues related to colonias. HUD defines colonias as rural neighborhoods in the United States-Mexico border region that lack adequate infrastructure or housing and other basic services. They typically have high poverty rates that make it difficult for residents to pay for roads, sanitary water and sewer systems, decent housing, street lighting, and other services through assessment. Many Federal agencies recognize colonias designations and provide funding assistance. It is the intention of this project to empower Arizona-Sonora borderland neighborhoods and community members by recognizing them as colonias. This recognition will result in eligibility for available economic subsidies and accessibility to geospatial tools and information for urban planning. The steps to achieve this goal include delineation of colonia-like neighborhoods, identification of their urbanization over time, development of geospatial databases describing their infrastructure, and establishment of a framework for distributing Web-based GIS decision support systems. A combination of imagery and infrastructure information was used to help delineate colonia boundaries. A land-use change analysis, focused on urbanization in the cities over a 30-year timeframe, was implemented. The results of this project are being served over the Internet, providing data to the public as well as to participating agencies. One of the initial study areas for this project was the City of Douglas, Ariz., and its Mexican sister-city Agua Prieta, Sonora, which are described herein. Because of its location on the border, this twin-cities area is especially well suited to international manufacturing and commerce, which has, in turn, led to an uncontrolled spread of

  16. Concentrations of heavy metals in sediment and organisms during a harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Kun Kaak Bay, Sonora, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Jaqueline [Centro de investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo AC (CIAD) Guaymas Unit, Carretera al Varadero Nal. Km 6.6, Apdo. Postal 284, CP 85480 Guaymas, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: jaqueline@cascabel.ciad.mx; Garcia-Rico, Leticia [Centro de investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo AC (CIAD), Carretera a la Victoria Km 0.6, Apdo. Postal 1735, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgarciar@cascabel.ciad.mx; Jara-Marini, Martin E. [Centro de investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo AC (CIAD), Carretera a la Victoria Km 0.6, Apdo. Postal 1735, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: mjara@cascabel.ciad.mx; Barraza-Guardado, Ramon [Departamento de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas de la Universidad de Sonora (DICTUS), Rosales y Ninos Heroes s/n Col. Centro, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: rbarraza@rtn.uson.mx; Hudson Weaver, Amy [Comunidad y Biodiversidad AC - COBI, Terminacion Bahia de Bacochibampo s/m, Fraccionamiento Lomas de Cortes, CP 85450 Guaymas, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: ahw@cobi.org.mx

    2005-07-01

    In early April 2003, fishermen from Kino Bay Sonora alerted us about a massive die-off of fish and mollusks occurring at Kun Kaak Bay. Phytoplankton samples taken on 17 May 2003 reported the presence of a harmful algal bloom composed of Chatonella marina, Chatonella cf. ovata, Gymnodinium catenatum and Gymnodinium sanguineum. On 22 of May, we collected samples of water, sediment and organisms at the affected area. Physicochemical parameters and nutrients were measured in water samples from different depths. Sediment and benthic organisms were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg. We found concentrations of heavy metals higher than background levels for this area. Cadmium and Lead concentrations in sediment from the HAB area were up to 6x greater than background levels and Cd in mollusks was 8x greater than regulations allow. A relationship between elevated Cd and Pb concentrations in sediment and the survival of toxic dinoflagellates is suspected.

  17. Concentrations of heavy metals in sediment and organisms during a harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Kun Kaak Bay, Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Jaqueline; Garcia-Rico, Leticia; Jara-Marini, Martin E.; Barraza-Guardado, Ramon; Hudson Weaver, Amy

    2005-01-01

    In early April 2003, fishermen from Kino Bay Sonora alerted us about a massive die-off of fish and mollusks occurring at Kun Kaak Bay. Phytoplankton samples taken on 17 May 2003 reported the presence of a harmful algal bloom composed of Chatonella marina, Chatonella cf. ovata, Gymnodinium catenatum and Gymnodinium sanguineum. On 22 of May, we collected samples of water, sediment and organisms at the affected area. Physicochemical parameters and nutrients were measured in water samples from different depths. Sediment and benthic organisms were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg. We found concentrations of heavy metals higher than background levels for this area. Cadmium and Lead concentrations in sediment from the HAB area were up to 6x greater than background levels and Cd in mollusks was 8x greater than regulations allow. A relationship between elevated Cd and Pb concentrations in sediment and the survival of toxic dinoflagellates is suspected

  18. Concentration of Naegleria fowleri in natural waters used for recreational purposes in Sonora, Mexico (November 2007-October 2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares-Villa, Fernando; Hernández-Peña, Claudia

    2010-09-01

    A survey was designed to know the concentration of Naegleria fowleri in recreational areas in Hornos, Sonora, during a year. Samples were taken monthly at La Isleta and Las Palmas and the total amoeba counts were obtained by the most probable number method (MPN). The identification of N. fowleri was made by PCR. The maximum concentration of total thermophilic amoebae was 9175 MPN/L for La Isleta and 3477 MPN/L for Las Palmas. Thermophilic Naegleria were present mainly during summer and fall. October's concentrations were up to 201 MPN/L, at both places. The maximum concentrations of N. fowleri were 201 MPN/L and 18 MPN/L for La Isleta and Las Palmas respectively, and were isolated from August to October. The presence of N. fowleri in these particular natural bodies of water reinforces the need for adaptation of preventive measures to avoid cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Concentrations of heavy metals in sediment and organisms during a harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Kun Kaak Bay, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, Jaqueline; García-Rico, Leticia; Jara-Marini, Martin E; Barraza-Guardado, Ramón; Hudson Weaver, Amy

    2005-07-01

    In early April 2003, fishermen from Kino Bay Sonora alerted us about a massive die-off of fish and mollusks occurring at Kun Kaak Bay. Phytoplankton samples taken on 17 May 2003 reported the presence of a harmful algal bloom composed of Chatonella marina, Chatonella cf. ovata, Gymnodinium catenatum and Gymnodinium sanguineum. On 22 of May, we collected samples of water, sediment and organisms at the affected area. Physicochemical parameters and nutrients were measured in water samples from different depths. Sediment and benthic organisms were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg. We found concentrations of heavy metals higher than background levels for this area. Cadmium and Lead concentrations in sediment from the HAB area were up to 6x greater than background levels and Cd in mollusks was 8x greater than regulations allow. A relationship between elevated Cd and Pb concentrations in sediment and the survival of toxic dinoflagellates is suspected.

  20. Ingestión y excreción de fluoruros en niños de Hermosillo, Sonora, México Flouride intake and excretion among children in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Grijalva-Haro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar la ingestión de fluoruros (F- y su relación con la excreción urinaria en un grupo de niños escolares de 8 y 9 años de edad. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: En un estudio transversal se evaluaron 31 niños del sexo masculino, residentes de la ciudad de Hermosillo, Sonora, México, y vecinos de tres colonias abastecidas con agua de diferentes concentraciones de fluoruros, de febrero a noviembre de 1997. La ingestión de F- se estimó mediante el registro y medición del consumo de agua y de la colección de un duplicado de los alimentos consumidos durante un periodo de 24 horas. La excreción de F- se midió en una muestra de orina de 24 horas. La concentración de éstos se determinó por el método de potenciómetro de ion selectivo. RESULTADOS: La concentración de fluoruros en el agua de consumo fue de 2.77, 0.78 y 0.54 mg/l, para las colonias Bugambilias, Cuauhtémoc y Balderrama, respectivamente, encontrándose diferencias significativas (phttp://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlOBJECTIVE: To estimate the fluoride intake and urinary excretion among 8-9 year-old school children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to November 1997. Study subjects were 31 male children from Hermosillo, Mexico, living in three neighborhoods with different drinking water fluoride levels. Fluoride intake was measured through water intake and collection of food samples ingested in 24 hr. Fluoride excretion was measured in 24-hour urine samples. The fluoride concentration was measured by the potentiometer method using a fluoride-specific ion electrode. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences of fluoride levels in drinking water were found in the 3 different neighborhoods: 2.77, 0.78 and 0.54 mg/L, respectively (phttp://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  1. Biological dimensions of tern management-a case study of the least tern in Sonora, Mexico, and a comparative analysis of reproductive investment in terns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemartin, Alyssa; van Riper, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Least terns (Sternula antillarum) are threatened by rapid human development on the northern coast of Sonora, Mexico. Terns are bellwethers for changes along the world's coastlines, as their coastal breeding habitat is vulnerable to flooding and development. We conducted targeted ground and aerial surveys for least tern colonies along 160 kilometers of coast, and document our findings on colony sizes at nine sites over 3 years in the first portion of this report. Like many taxa, terns lay larger clutches at higher latitudes. In the second portion of this report, we evaluate least tern breeding lifespan, food availability, and nest predation as potential ecological reasons behind this differing clutch-size pattern. After correcting for phylogenetic relationships, we found that food availability, not breeding lifespan or nest predation rate, was related to reproductive investment across 46 species and populations of terns. We conclude that coastal development may have a greater impact on nesting terns in tropical regions as compared to temperate breeding locations, because global oceanic patterns of decreased food availability reduce reproductive investment in the tropics.

  2. Ground-Water Flow Model of the Sierra Vista Subwatershed and Sonoran Portions of the Upper San Pedro Basin, Southeastern Arizona, United States, and Northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.; Dickinson, Jesse

    2007-01-01

    A numerical ground-water model was developed to simulate seasonal and long-term variations in ground-water flow in the Sierra Vista subwatershed, Arizona, United States, and Sonora, Mexico, portions of the Upper San Pedro Basin. This model includes the simulation of details of the groundwater flow system that were not simulated by previous models, such as ground-water flow in the sedimentary rocks that surround and underlie the alluvial basin deposits, withdrawals for dewatering purposes at the Tombstone mine, discharge to springs in the Huachuca Mountains, thick low-permeability intervals of silt and clay that separate the ground-water flow system into deep-confined and shallow-unconfined systems, ephemeral-channel recharge, and seasonal variations in ground-water discharge by wells and evapotranspiration. Steady-state and transient conditions during 1902-2003 were simulated by using a five-layer numerical ground- water flow model representing multiple hydrogeologic units. Hydraulic properties of model layers, streamflow, and evapotranspiration rates were estimated as part of the calibration process by using observed water levels, vertical hydraulic gradients, streamflow, and estimated evapotranspiration rates as constraints. Simulations approximate observed water-level trends throughout most of the model area and streamflow trends at the Charleston streamflow-gaging station on the San Pedro River. Differences in observed and simulated water levels, streamflow, and evapotranspiration could be reduced through simulation of climate-related variations in recharge rates and recharge from flood-flow infiltration.

  3. A new species of Metacyclops Kiefer, 1927 (Copepoda, Cyclopidae, Cyclopinae) from the Chihuahuan desert, northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Salas, Nancy F.; Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Maeda-Martínez, Alejandro M.; Silva-Briano, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the freshwater cyclopoid copepod genus Metacyclops Kiefer, 1927 is described from a single pond in northern Mexico, within the binational area known as the Chihuahuan Desert. This species belongs to a group of Metacyclops species with a 3443 spine formula of swimming legs. It is morphologically similar to Metacyclops lusitanus Lindberg, 1961 but differs from this and other congeners by having a unique combination of characters, including a caudal rami length/width proportion of 3.5–3.8, a innermost terminal seta slightly longer than the outermost terminal seta, intercoxal sclerites of legs 1-4 naked, a strong apical spine of the second endopodal segment of leg 1 and one row of 6-8 small spinules at the insertion of this spine. The finding of this species represents also the first record of the genus in Mexico and the third in North America, where only two other species, Metacyclops gracilis (Lilljeborg, 1853)and Metacyclops cushae Reid, 1991 have been hitherto reported. This is also the first continental record of a species of Metacyclops from an arid environment in the Americas. This species appears to be endemic to the Chihuahuan Desert, thus emphasizing the high endemicity of this area. PMID:23794845

  4. The continuous education as a process of academic studies for graduate students at high educational levels in Sonora (Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Andrade Paco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The continuous education, that the productive sector demands, is not only the accumulation of new knowledge, supported inthe education-learning process, but also a focus on the new tendencies that the labor field demands, where the universities havethe opportunity to extend their involvement, through graduations or specializations, that contribute the strength of the acquiredskills in the classroom. The objective is to know the kind of graduation interests that motivate the graduates, as a process ofcontinuous education. The study is based on the application of a questionnaire to 50 students of different degrees from publicuniversities in Sonora, whose excellent results are: 51% of those surveyed, indicate that at the end of their degree they do notobtain the tools to compete in their labor field. 92% of the students mention that universities should offer within the educativeprogram some area of financial or specialization, related to other disciplines. Another important data is that the financial areasthat graduates prefer are related to the social administrative and financial areas and in smaller proportion they prefer the engineeringdisciplines. 70% of those surveyed, indicate that universities have infrastructure, learning spaces and the skilled humanresources to offer this type of courses. The conclusion of this work, is that public universities follow training programs related tocertain areas and disciplines, centered on the student and learning, like part of their formation, but they do not have the educativeflexibility and the graduates will need to know other disciplines to complement their professional education.

  5. Investigation of time-resolved atmospheric conditions and indoor/outdoor particulate matter concentrations in homes with gas and biomass cook stoves in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports findings from a case study designed to investigate indoor and outdoor air quality in homes near the United States-Mexico border During the field study, size-resolved continuous particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured in six homes, while outdoor PM was simultaneously monitored at the same location in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, during March 14-30, 2009. The purpose of the experiment was to compare PM in homes using different fuels for cooking, gas versus biomass, and to obtain a spatial distribution of outdoor PM in a region where local sources vary significantly (e.g., highway, border crossing, unpaved roads, industry). Continuous PM data were collected every 6 seconds using a valve switching system to sample indoor and outdoor air at each home location. This paper presents the indoor PM data from each home, including the relationship between indoor and outdoor PM. The meteorological conditions associated with elevated ambient PM events in the region are also discussed. Results indicate that indoor air pollution has a strong dependence on cooking fuel, with gas stoves having hourly averaged median PM3 concentrations in the range of 134 to 157 microg m(-3) and biomass stoves 163 to 504 microg m(-1). Outdoor PM also indicates a large spatial heterogeneity due to the presence of microscale sources and meteorological influences (median PM3: 130 to 770 microg m(-3)). The former is evident in the median and range of daytime PM values (median PM3: 250 microg m(-3), maximum: 9411 microg m(-3)), while the meteorological influences appear to be dominant during nighttime periods (median PM3: 251 microg m(-3), maximum: 10,846 microg m(-3)). The atmospheric stability is quantified for three nighttime temperature inversion episodes, which were associated with an order of magnitude increase in PM10 at the regulatory monitor in Nogales, AZ (maximum increase: 12 to 474 microg m(-3)). Implications: Regulatory air quality standards are based on outdoor

  6. Comparison of preliminary herpetofaunas of the Sierras la Madera (Oposura) and Bacadehuachi with the mainland Sierra Madre Occidental in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Erik F. Enderson; Dale S. Turner; Roberto A. Villa; Stephen F. Hale; George M. Ferguson; Charles. Hedgcock

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians and reptiles were observed in the Sierra La Madera (59 species), an isolated Sky Island mountain range, and the Sierra Bacadéhuachi (30 species), the westernmost mountain range in the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) range in east-central Sonora. These preliminary herpetofaunas were compared with the herpetofauna of the Yécora area in eastern Sonora in the main...

  7. First records of Eupompha imperialis (Wellman, 1912 (Coleoptera: Meloidae in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Estrada, E. Karen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Three populations of Eupompha imperialis (Wellman, 1912 were located in the Mexican states of Baja California and Sonora, in close proximity to the Mexico-USA border. These populations represent the first records for E. imperialis in Mexico. The specimens were observed in sandy areas of the Sonoran Desert, associated with flowering Tiquilia palmeri (Boraginaceae. These new records suggest that, despite the rarity of some species of Eupomphini, further exploration of the northernmost areas of Sonora and Baja California may increase the number of species of Eupomphini and other tribes of Meloidae present in Mexico.Se localizaron tres poblaciones de Eupompha imperialis (Wellman, 1912 en los estados mexicanos de Baja California y Sonora, en las proximidades de la frontera México-Estados Unidos. Estas poblaciones representan los primeros registros de E. imperialis en México. Los ejemplares de E. imperialis se observaron en zonas arenosas del desierto de Sonora, asociados a ejemplares en flor de Tiquilia palmeri (Boraginaceae. Estos nuevos registros sugieren que, a pesar de la rareza de algunas especies de Eupomphini, el desarrollo de nuevas exploraciones en las áreas más septentrionales de Sonora y Baja California permitiría incrementar el número de especies de Eupomphini y de otras tribus de Meloidae presentes en México.

  8. Evaluation of the air quality regarding total suspended particles and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) in the Hermosillo city, Sonora, Mexico, during a yearly period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz C, M. E.; Quintero N, M.; Gomez A, A.; Varela S, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the air quality of the city of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico was assessed considering total suspended particulates (tsp) and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) from June 2001 through May 2002 in three monitoring sites Centro (Mazon), Nor este (CESUES) and Noroeste (CBTIS). The filter-samples used for that purpose were provided by the Air Quality Evaluation and Improvement Program (PEMCA) of the municipality of Hermosillo. The sampling method was based on high volume sampling frequency set every 6 days with non-simultaneous sampling among the three sampling sites. Filters were dissolved for metal determination by acidic-extraction, and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results indicate that tsp concentrations at Centro and Noroeste sites were frequently higher than the maximum daily permissible level (260 μg/m 3 ), while in the three sites the annual average was higher than the maximum annual permissible level (75 μg/m 3 ) both established in the standard NOM-024-Ssa-1993 (Ssa 1994a). According to the Air Quality Standard Index (US EPA 1992a), used in Mexico by Air Quality Metropolitan Index (IMECA) the results indicate that the air quality in the city of Hermosillo regarding tsp was placed between no satisfactory and poor. In regard to heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr), concentrations detected were below the maximum permissible levels and/or criteria taking into account the standard NOM-026-Ssa-1993 (Ssa 1994b), the Who criterion (2000), the European Union criterion (Cec 2003), and the European Environmental Agency criteria (EEA 2004). Such findings would mean that airborne metals are of no concern; however, air quality is still classified as no satisfactory due to high particulate matter concentrations. Keeping air quality parameters monitoring is recommended in order to get extensive data for use in risk studies of air quality and health (morbidity/mortality), as well as topographic conditions, meteorological and

  9. Genetic analysis among environmental strains of Balamuthia mandrillaris recovered from an artificial lagoon and from soil in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares-Jiménez, Luis Fernando; Booton, Gregory C; Lares-Villa, Fernando; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos Arturo; Fuerst, Paul A

    2014-11-01

    Since the first report of Balamuthia mandrillaris as a causative agent of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis in humans, the environmental niche of this amoeba was assumed to be restricted to soil and dust. A single isolation from water was recently made independently by us from Northern Mexico. Now we report the isolation of 8 new strains of B. mandrillaris from Mexico. This continues the pattern of an excess of isolates from North America, compared to other parts of the world. All of the new isolates are environmental isolates, 7 from water samples and one from soil. The identity of each isolate was confirmed by PCR and by examining the sequences of the mitochondrial 16S-like rRNA gene. Success in amplification was determined using comparisons of amplifications of DNA from the strain CDC: V039 and the water strain (ITSON-BM1) as positive controls. The DNA sequences of the new isolates were compared to older strains from clinical cases using phylogenetic analysis, showing very high sequence similarity. The similarity among the new isolates and with previous clinical and environmental isolates of B. mandrillaris was also examined using biochemical and immunological studies. High homogeneity of total protein products, and similarity in antigenic moiety among the eight new isolates and two controls was found. Taken together, the molecular and biochemical studies indicate very low levels of genetic variation within B. mandrillaris. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selected heavy metals and selenium in the blood of black sea turtle (Chelonia mydas agasiizzi) from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley-Quiñónez, C P; Zavala-Norzagaray, A A; Réndon-Maldonado, J G; Espinosa-Carreón, T L; Canizales-Román, A; Escobedo-Urías, D C; Leal-Acosta, M L; Hart, C E; Aguirre, A A

    2013-12-01

    The concentration of heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu, Mn) and selenium (Se) was analyzed in blood collected from 12 black turtles (Chelonia mydas agasiizzi) captured in Canal del Infiernillo, Punta Chueca, Mexico. The most abundant metals were Zn (63.58 μg g(-1)) and Se (7.66 μg g(-1)), and Cd was the lower (0.99 μg g(-1)). The sequential concentrations of trace metals were Zn > Se > Cu > Mn > Ni > Cd. In conclusion, this information is important as a baseline when using blood as tissue analysis of heavy metals; however, these levels could represent recent exposure in foraging grounds of black turtles in the Sea of Cortez.

  11. Dispersal and oviposition of laboratory-reared gravid females of Toxorhynchites moctezuma in an arid urban area of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Duarte, Alberto; Alvarado-Castro, J Andrés; Dórame-Navarro, María E; Félix-Torres, A Amalia

    2009-12-01

    Dengue is a serious public health problem worldwide. Biological control of its vector, Aedes aegypti, remains a feasible option in light of increasing urbanization and insecticide resistance. We studied the dispersal and oviposition activity of Toxorhynchites moctezuma in a dengue-endemic urban area in SSonora, Mexico, to provide information about the potential of Toxorhynchites as a control agent for Ae. aegypti in arid areas. We released 210 and 100 laboratory-reared gravid females of Tx. moctezuma in 2 city blocks during the summer and fall of 1993. We set 3 1-liter containers and 1 car tire as sentinel traps at each of 10 backyards within each city block. Spatial and temporal patterns of dispersal and oviposition activity differed between city blocks and between releases. However, a Cox regression analysis showed no significant difference in the per-day probability of Tx. moctezuma oviposition events in sentinel traps between summer and fall releases. Per-day oviposition probability was nearly 5 times greater for sentineltraps that contained larvae of Ae. aegypti, suggesting a high specificity of the predator for its prey. The proportion of sentinel traps positive for Tx. moctezuma eggs did not increase substantially after the 8th day piost-release, reaching 66% and 23% for sentinel traps with and without Ae. aegypti larvae, respectively.

  12. Kawasaki disease: a rare pediatric pathology in Mexico. Twenty cases report from the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Norberto; González, Luis Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an etiological illness that is relatively unknown and scarcely identified in Mexico; it affects children mainly aged 1-4 years, evolves with fever, vasculitis in diverse organs, and in the heart the disease mainly affects the coronary arteries. Our aim was to inform the clinical findings and evolution of 20 patients diagnosed with KD. We reviewed the patient clinical files retrospectively and descriptively to obtain information with regard to age, sex, clinical signs, laboratory and consultory results, echocardiography findings, complications, evolution during hospitalization, followup, and out-patient ambulatory consultations. Eighteen patients were male, two were female, six developed coronary damage, two aortic mitral-valve insufficiency, one pericardial shedding, and one, myocarditis. All patients received gamma globulin treatment with aspirin, and 16 were controlled during 6-8 months after the acute medical profile. The opportune clinical diagnostic it is fundamental to establish an early treatment with gammmaglobuline to avoid injuries in the arterial coronary level. This injury may cause eventualy ischemia or myocardial infarct

  13. Ten-Year Experience of Renal Transplantation at the Northwest National Medical Center, Sonora Mexico: A Survival Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M A; Laguna-Teniente, I R

    2016-03-01

    To improve survival after kidney transplantation, it is important to identify the variables that affect it. The aim of this work was to determine the survival of renal grafts from living and cadaveric donors and the survival of patients with graft failure in a tertiary medical unit in northwest Mexico. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who received transplants since 2004 at the center. Database and medical records of patients were reviewed. The data were captured in a database previously designed in the SPSS v21.1 program for statistical processing. A descriptive analysis with frequencies and percentages and numeric variables measure of central tendency and dispersion was conducted. The survival analysis was made with the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate the graft survive. A total of 412 transplantations were performed during the 2004-2013 period. We analyzed 331 records, and the 10-year survival rates of donor allografts from living and cadaveric donors were 86.64% and 72.78%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A legacy of change: The lower Colorado River, Arizona-California-Nevada, USA, and Sonora-Baja California Norte, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, G.A.; Marsh, P.C.; Minckley, W.L.

    2005-01-01

    The lower Colorado is among the most regulated rivers in the world. It ranks as the fifth largest river in volume in the coterminous United States, but its flow is fully allocated and no longer reaches the sea. Lower basin reservoirs flood nearly one third of the river channel and store 2 years of annual flow. Diverted water irrigates 1.5 million ha of cropland and provides water for industry and domestic use by 22 million people in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. The native fish community of the lower Colorado River was among the most unique in the world, and the main stem was home to nine freshwater species, all of which were endemic to the basin. Today, five are extirpated, seven are federally endangered, and three are being reintroduced through stocking. Decline of the native fauna is attributed to predation by nonnative fishes and physical habitat degradation. Nearly 80 alien species have been introduced, and more than 20 now are common. These nonnative species thrived in modified habitats, where they largely eliminated the native kinds. As a result, the lower Colorado River has the dubious distinction of being among the few major rivers of the world with an entirely introduced fish fauna. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  15. Sulfur isotopic study of sulfate in the aquifer of Costa de Hermosillo (Sonora, Mexico) in relation to upward intrusion of saline groundwater, irrigation pumping and land cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Medina, Miguel Rangel; Modelska, Magdalena; Monreal, Rogelio; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Groundwater from the Costa de Hermosillo aquifer has been used extensively for irrigation over the past 60 a in the Sonora region of northwestern Mexico resulting in salinization of fresh groundwater resources. Salinization of groundwater is most pronounced on the western/coastal side of the aquifer, with an aerial extent of 26.7 km 2 , where maximum values are reported for conductivity (31 mS/cm) and Cl - concentrations (16,271 mg/L). Salinization is likely to increase if groundwater pumping continues at levels comparable to the present time. Upward incursion of marine water into the aquifer is inferred from δ 2 H (-7.2 per mille ) and δ 18 O (+1.6 per mille ) compositions of groundwater samples with the highest conductivity. Compared to modern seawater in the Gulf of California, ratios of SO 4 /Cl and Cl/Br are small (0.01 and 33, respectively) and the S isotopic composition of SO 4 2- is high (+32.7%) in the most saline portions of the Costa de Hermosillo. This saline groundwater is inferred to result from an earlier phase of dissimilatory bacterial SO 4 2- reduction coupled to decomposition of organic matter in marine blue clays deposited during the Miocene/Pliocene transgression. The isotopic composition of present-day surface discharge from agricultural fields is substantially enriched in 32 S due to widespread application of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 fertilizers and potential mobilization of S from mineral resources. Surface water discharging from irrigated fields has δ 34 S values ranging from -2.1 to 3.3 per mille which are distinctly different from groundwater and surface water in adjacent non-agricultural areas with δ 34 S values ranging from 5.2 to 13.5 per mille . Prolonged irrigation pumping that promotes the incursion of air to the subsurface could enhance the weathering of S-bearing minerals such as magmatic sulfides, producing 32 S-enriched SO 4 2-

  16. Floristic analysis of heterogeneous landscape patches in a biological corridor in the El Rodeo-Basora Area near Moctezuma, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ana Lilia Hernandez-Rodriguez; Maria de la Paz Montanez-Armenta; Gertrudis Yanes-Arvayo; Hugo Silva-Kurumiya

    2013-01-01

    A floristic study was conducted in a heterogeneous landscape near Moctezuma, Sonora. From August to December 2011, Ranchos El Rodeo and El Básora were visited three times. The vegetation at about 900 m elevation is foothills thornscrub, oak woodland, and induced buffelgrass grassland. A total of 120 plant taxa in 95 genera and 41 families were documented. Taxa were...

  17. Evaluation of the air quality regarding total suspended particles and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) in the Hermosillo city, Sonora, Mexico, during a yearly period; Evaluacion de la calidad del aire respecto de particulas suspendidas totales y metales pesados (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) en la Ciudad de Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, durante un periodo anual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz C, M. E.; Quintero N, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Instituto de Ingenieria, Campus Mexicali, Calle de la Normal s/n, y Blvd. Benito Juarez, Col. Insurgentes Este, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Gomez A, A.; Varela S, J., E-mail: martincruzcampas@hotmail.com [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia, Blvd. Rosales y Luis Ensina s/n, Edificio 5B, Col. Centro, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, the air quality of the city of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico was assessed considering total suspended particulates (tsp) and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) from June 2001 through May 2002 in three monitoring sites Centro (Mazon), Nor este (CESUES) and Noroeste (CBTIS). The filter-samples used for that purpose were provided by the Air Quality Evaluation and Improvement Program (PEMCA) of the municipality of Hermosillo. The sampling method was based on high volume sampling frequency set every 6 days with non-simultaneous sampling among the three sampling sites. Filters were dissolved for metal determination by acidic-extraction, and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results indicate that tsp concentrations at Centro and Noroeste sites were frequently higher than the maximum daily permissible level (260 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), while in the three sites the annual average was higher than the maximum annual permissible level (75 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) both established in the standard NOM-024-Ssa-1993 (Ssa 1994a). According to the Air Quality Standard Index (US EPA 1992a), used in Mexico by Air Quality Metropolitan Index (IMECA) the results indicate that the air quality in the city of Hermosillo regarding tsp was placed between no satisfactory and poor. In regard to heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr), concentrations detected were below the maximum permissible levels and/or criteria taking into account the standard NOM-026-Ssa-1993 (Ssa 1994b), the Who criterion (2000), the European Union criterion (Cec 2003), and the European Environmental Agency criteria (EEA 2004). Such findings would mean that airborne metals are of no concern; however, air quality is still classified as no satisfactory due to high particulate matter concentrations. Keeping air quality parameters monitoring is recommended in order to get extensive data for use in risk studies of air quality and health (morbidity/mortality), as well as topographic conditions

  18. Precipitation, density, and population dynamics of desert bighorn sheep on San Andres National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, L.C.; Weisenberger, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of population size and performance for desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) is critical to develop effective recovery and management strategies. In arid environments, plant communities and consequently herbivore populations are strongly dependent upon precipitation, which is highly variable seasonally and annually. We conducted a retrospective exploratory analysis of desert bighorn sheep population dynamics on San Andres National Wildlife Refuge (SANWR), New Mexico, 1941-1976, by modeling sheep population size as a function of previous population sizes and precipitation. Population size and trend of desert bighorn were best and well described (R 2=0.89) by a model that included only total annual precipitation as a covariate. Models incorporating density-dependence, delayed density-dependence, and combinations of density and precipitation were less informative than the model containing precipitation alone (??AlCc=8.5-22.5). Lamb:female ratios were positively related to precipitation (current year: F1,34=7.09, P=0.012; previous year: F1,33=3.37, P=0.075) but were unrelated to population size (current year. F1,34=0.04, P=0.843; previous year: F1,33 =0.14, P=0.715). Instantaneous population rate of increase (r) was related to population size (F1,33=5.55; P=0.025). Precipitation limited populations of desert bighorn sheep on SANWR primarily in a density-independent manner by affecting production or survival of lambs, likely through influences on forage quantity and quality. Habitat evaluations and recovery plans for desert bighorn sheep need to consider fundamental influences on desert bighorn populations such as precipitation and food, rather than focus solely on proximate issues such as security cover, predation, and disease. Moreover, the concept of carrying capacity for desert bighorn sheep may need re-evaluation in respect to highly variable (CV =35.6%) localized precipitation patterns. On SANWR carrying capacity for desert

  19. Paleoproterozoic mojaveprovince in northwestern Mexico? Isotopic and U-Pb zircon geochronologic studies of precambrian and Cambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Caborca, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Farmer G.; Bowring, S.A.; Matzel, J.; Maldonado, G.E.; Fedo, C.; Wooden, J.

    2005-01-01

    Whole-rock Nd isotopic data and U-Pb zircon geochronology from Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Caborca area, northern Sonora, reveal that these rocks are most likely a segment of the Paleoproterozoic Mojave province. Supporting this conclusion are the observations that paragneiss from the ??? 1.75 Ga Bamori Complex has a 2.4 Ga Nd model age and contains detrital zircons ranging in age from Paleo- proterozoic (1.75 Ga) to Archean (3.2 Ga). Paragneisses with similar age and isotopic characteristics occur in the Mojave province in southern California. In addition, "A-type" granite exposed at the southern end of Cerro Rajon has ca 2.0 Ga Nd model age and a U-Pb zircon age of 1.71 Ga, which are similar to those of Paleoproterozoic granites in the Mojave province. Unlike the U.S. Mojave province, the Caborcan crust contains ca. 1.1 Ga granite (Aibo Granite), which our new Nd isotopic data suggest is largely the product of anatexis of the local Precambrian basement. Detrital zircons from Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian miogeoclinal arenites at Caborca show dominant populations ca. 1.7 Ga, ca. 1.4 Ga, and ca. 1.1 Ga, with subordinate Early Cambrian and Archean zircons. These zircons were likely derived predominately from North American crust to the east and northeast, and not from the underlying Caborcan basement. The general age and isotopic similarities between Mojave province basement and overlying miogeoclinal sedimentary rocks in Sonora and southern California is necessary, but not sufficient, proof of the hypothesis that Sonoran crust is allochthonous and was transported to its current position during the Mesozoic along the proposed Mojave-Sonora megashear. One viable alternative model is that the Caborcan Precambrian crust is an isolated, autochthonous segment of Mojave province crust that shares a similar, but not identical, Proterozoic geological history with Mojave province crust found in the southwest United States ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  20. Fossil content and structural relationships of the San Luis zone and the Caborca zone of NW Sonora, Mexico, suppression of the precambrian Z of Caborca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radelli, Luigi; Solis Weiss, Vivianne; Dorame Navarro, Miguel; De La Cruz Ortega, Lissette del Carmen; Urrutia, Jose

    2008-01-01

    In the Caborca region of western Sonora a Precambrian Z does not cover a unique Precambrian socle as previously believed. Two tectonic zones occur there instead: the San Luis Zone and the Caborca Zone. The first is comprised of the Precambrian San Luis socle of gneiss and granite, crossed by 1.1 Ga old anorthosites, the San Luis sedimentary cover, and, above it, a Lower Jurassic volcano-sedimentary sequence. The Caborca Zone consists of the Precambrian Bamori socle of parametamorphic rocks crossed by 1.1 Ga old Aibo granite, and of the Gamuza sedimentary cover. 1.1 Ga ago the two zones were far away from each other. They have been brought together by the Nevadian orogeny. Both zones are allochthonous, and the Caborca Zone is a nappe upon the San Luis Zone. The lowermost units of the Gamuza cover furnished psammocorals and a possible Pterophyllum jageri (?). Accordingly, its geological age is either Palaeozoic or Triassic.The San Luis cover furnished Nematophites [Prototaxites (?) and Nematothallus] from its lower part; Calcispongiae, Cardaicarpus' seeds, and Artisia from its upper part Thus, it is a Devono-Carboniferous unit. The study area belongs in the Baja-Borderland block, which underwent, an Eocene northwards drifting of about 900 - 1000 km, and a 30 celsius degrade to 40 celsius degrade clockwise rotation relative to the main part of Sonora.

  1. Financial viability of the Sonora-Baja California interconnection line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, G.; Ortega, G.

    2017-09-01

    In the Development Program of the National Electricity Sector 2015-2029, an electric interconnection line between Sonora and Baja California (Mexico) is proposed, this study analyzes the financial viability of this interconnection line based on the maximum hourly and seasonal energy demand between both regions and proposes alternatives for the supply of electric power that supports the economic convenience of this interconnection line. The results show that additional capacity is required in Sonora to cover the maximum demands of both regions since in the current condition of the National Electric System the interconnection line is not justified. (Author)

  2. Deaths in the Desert: The Human Rights Crisis on the U.S.--Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androff, David K.; Tavassoli, Kyoko Y.

    2012-01-01

    Many would acknowledge that immigration is a major issue in the United States and that immigration reform should be a priority. However, there is little attention to the human rights crisis on the U.S.-Mexican border. As a result of tightened border security since 1994, it is estimated that over 5,000 migrants have died in the Sonoran desert. The…

  3. Working and benefit project by the in-situ leaching of the copper-uranium ore of the deposit named Luz del Cobre, in the municipality of Soyopa, state of Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga P, J.de J.

    1976-01-01

    This research was carried out with the object to recover the existing uranium in the copper-uranium deposit of Luz del Cobre located at 1300 Kms. approximately of the NW of Mexico City in the state of Sonora this deposit is geologically formed by a partially mineralized chimney which contains 572,732 tons of uranium ore with an average of 362.26g. of U 3 O 8 per ton, which represents 207,374 tons of U 3 O 8 in situ. To recover the uranium from this deposit, the only technical and economical possibility which presents a real interest is the system of leaching in situ. This operation will consist in the selective dissolution of the copper and uranium through leaching solution with a pH varying from 2.2 to 2.5, leaving the gangue on the ground and collecting the enriched solutions at the lower level of the mine, precipitating the copper subsequently through scrap iron and recovering the uranium from the tails of the copper precipitation plant through an ionic interchange process in counter current and its subsequent elution solvent extraction, reextraction and precipitation. This system makes possible to recover an uranium concentrate up to 98% of U 3 O 8 and practically free from impurities. The production cost would cost exceeding $300.00 Mexican currency per Kg of U 3 O 8 . (author)

  4. Learning processes and productive modernization of learning in agriculture from northwestern Mexico: Cases of commercial agriculture of the coast of Hermosillo, Sonora and organic agriculture of the southern zone of Baja California Sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel O. Villa Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of open markets has created import changes in the Mexican agriculture sector, very much noted in the so called crop pattern, the institutional frame that guides the agro–productive commercial relationships and trade organization. The agriculture in the Northwest region, particularly La Costa de Hermosillo in the State of Sonora and southern Baja in Baja Peninsula, shows a big transformation. This corresponds to Global Production Networks (gpn, a vertical integration with intensive extraterritorial interaction resulting in a process of productive escalation that favors; learning and the creation of new competitive capabilities indispensable to comply with high standards in international markets. These capabilities are reflected in improvements in product quality, productive efficiency and the development of new functions for the players involved in the production and trade of produce. It also reflects the transition to more sophisticated productive units where players are located in other territories. This study focuses on analyzing the roll of gpn in the transformation of the agricultural sector in the northwest region of Mexico, particularly the process that took place in modernizing both places.

  5. A paleomagnetic investigation of vertical-axis rotations in coastal Sonora, Mexico: Evidence for distributed transtensional deformation during the Proto-Gulf shift from a subduction-dominated to transform-dominated plate boundary in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Scott William

    The history of late Miocene (Proto-Gulf) deformation on the Sonoran margin of the Gulf of California is key to understanding how Baja California was captured by the Pacific plate and how strain was partitioned during the Proto-Gulf period (12.5-6 Ma). The Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen are located in southwestern coastal Sonora, Mexico, and represent the eastern rifted margin of the central Gulf of California. The ranges are composed of volcanic units and their corresponding volcaniclastic units which are the result of persistent magmatic activity between 20 and 8.8 Ma, including three packages of basalt and andesite that make excellent paleomagnetic recorders. Based on cross cutting relations and geochronologic data for pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic volcanic units, most of the faulting and tilting in the Sierra El Aguaje is bracketed between 11.9 and 9.0 Ma, thus falling entirely within Proto-Gulf time. A paleomagnetic investigation into possible vertical axis rotations in the Sierra el Aguaje has uncovered evidence of clockwise rotations between ~13º and ~105º with possible translations. These results are consistent with existing field relations, which suggest the presence of large (>45°) vertical axis rotations in this region. This evidence includes: a) abrupt changes in the strike of tilted strata in different parts of the range, including large domains characterized by E-W strikes b) ubiquitous NE-SW striking faults with left lateral-normal oblique slip, that terminate against major NW-trending right lateral faults, and c) obliquity between the general strike of tilted strata and the strike of faults. These rotations occurred after 12 Ma and largely prior to 9 Ma, thus falling into the Proto-Gulf period. Such large-scale rotations lend credence to the theory that the area inboard of Baja California was experiencing transtension during the Proto-Gulf period, rather than the pure extension that would be the result of strain partitioning

  6. Population status of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in the San Pedro River Basin, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efren Moreno-Arzate; Carlos A. Lopez Gonzalez; Gerardo Carreon Arroyo

    2013-01-01

    The black tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a species of conservation concern for Mexico, the United States and Canada. Populations in Mexico (including those in Sonora), which are considered endangered by the Mexican authority, require additional conservation efforts to maintain them on the long term. Our objective was to determine population size and...

  7. Structure, agency, and the transformation of the Sonoran Desert by buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare): An application of land change science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jacob C.

    A regional land transformation is underway in the Sonoran Desert of southwestern North America as a result of the conversion of native rangeland to exotic pasture. In northwestern Sonora, Mexico the process involves clearing native vegetation for cultivation of buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare). Southern African buffelgrass was introduced to Sonora through the United States in the 1950s with generous support from the Mexican federal and Sonoran state governments. The ascendance of buffelgrass as a range management tool in Sonora has been conditioned by an international political economy of beef production. However, land use decisions regarding buffelgrass are also conditioned by factors internal to the ranch household. This research examines the expansion of buffelgrass in the Sonoran Desert, addressing its extent and drivers. Through the use of systematic interviews with ranchers, key informant interviews with government officials, and an examination of northern Mexico's cattle ranching history and policy, the dissertation documents why buffelgrass has spread as a policy program and management choice. This part of the work addresses a "structure-agency debate" in human-environment geography. Next the research turns to landscape impacts of buffelgrass cultivation, through vegetation plot and transect sampling. The extent, cover, and density of buffelgrass inside and outside fenced pastures are examined, confirming the hypothesis that disturbance facilitates invasion from pastures onto surrounding lands. Finally, the research employs novel methods of remote sensing and geographic information science using a 1973-2006 time series of Landsat imagery to characterize the patterns and temporal trajectories of land change by buffelgrass across the site. Object-based image processing techniques are combined with traditional maximum likelihood techniques and classification tree analysis to address the difficult task of distinguishing buffelgrass from other prevalent land

  8. Deaths in the desert: the human rights crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androff, David K; Tavassoli, Kyoko Y

    2012-04-01

    Many would acknowledge that immigration is a major issue in the United States and that immigration reform should be a priority. However, there is little attention to the human rights crisis on the U.S.-Mexican border. As a result of tightened border security since 1994, it is estimated that over 5,000 migrants have died in the Sonoran desert. The criminalization of immigration has resulted in a human rights crisis in three areas: (1) the rise of deaths and injuries of migrants crossing the border in harsh and remote locations, (2) the use of mass hearings to prosecute apprehended migrants, and (3) abuses of migrants in immigration detention. These policies and practices have serious repercussions for the affected vulnerable population. Despite recent legislation designed to discourage undocumented immigration, such as Arizona's Senate Bill 1070, the deterrence strategy has not diminished migration--it has only increased the suffering and deaths of migrants. Humanitarian groups are working to prevent more deaths but also have been targeted for criminalization. The profession's ethics compel social workers to work with humanitarian organizations to prevent more deaths and to advocate for humane immigration reform.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp. from the Sonoran Desert of North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Pfeiler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented.

  10. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp.) from the Sonoran Desert of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Edward; Flores-López, Carlos A.; Mada-Vélez, Jesús Gerardo; Escalante-Verdugo, Juan; Markow, Therese A.

    2013-01-01

    The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented. PMID:24302868

  11. Temperature and Heat-Related Mortality Trends in the Sonoran and Mojave Desert Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polioptro F. Martinez-Austria

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extreme temperatures and heat wave trends in five cities within the Sonoran Desert region (e.g., Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona, in the United States and Ciudad Obregon and San Luis Rio Colorado, Sonora; and Mexicali, Baja California, in Mexico and one city within the Mojave Desert region (e.g., Las Vegas, Nevada were assessed using field data collected from 1950 to 2014. Instead of being selected by watershed, the cities were selected because they are part of the same arid climatic region. The data were analyzed for maximum temperature increases and the trends were confirmed statistically using Spearman’s nonparametric test. Temperature trends were correlated with the mortality information related with extreme heat events in the region. The results showed a clear trend of increasing maximum temperatures during the months of June, July, and August for five of the six cities and statically confirmed using Spearman’s rho values. Las Vegas was the only city where the temperature increase was not confirmed using Spearman’s test, probably because it is geographically located outside of the Sonoran Desert or because of its proximity to the Hoover Dam. The relationship between mortality and temperature was analyzed for the cities of Mexicali, Mexico and Phoenix. Arizona.

  12. The impact of unconfined mine tailings in residential areas from a mining town in a semi-arid environment: Nacozari, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Figueroa, Diana; Maier, Raina M; de la O-Villanueva, Margarita; Gómez-Alvarez, Agustín; Moreno-Zazueta, Alan; Rivera, Jacinto; Campillo, Alberto; Grandlic, Christopher J; Anaya, Ricardo; Palafox-Reyes, Juan

    2009-09-01

    Past mining activities in northern Mexico left a legacy of delerict landscapes devoid of vegetation and seasonal formation of salt efflorescence. Metal content was measured in mine tailings, efflorescent salts, soils, road dust, and residential soils to investigate contamination. Climatic effects such as heavy wind and rainfall events can have great impact on the dispersion of metals in semi-arid areas, since soils are typically sparsely vegetated. Geochemical analysis of this site revealed that even though total metal content in mine tailings was relatively low (e.g. Cu= 1000 mg kg(-1)), metals including Mn, Ba, Zn, and Cu were all found at significantly higher levels in efflorescence salts formed by evaporation on the tailings impoundment surface following the rainy season (e.g. Cu= 68,000 mg kg(-1)). Such efflorescent fine-grained salts are susceptible to wind erosion resulting in increased metal spread to nearby residential soils. Our results highlight the importance of seasonally dependent salt-formation and wind erosion in determining risk levels associated with potential inhalation or ingestion of airborne particulates originating from contaminated sites such as tailings impoundments. In low metal-content mine tailings located in arid and semi-arid environments, efflorescence salts could represent a human health risk and a challenge for plant establishment in mine tailings.

  13. From Fireproof Desert to Flammable Grassland: Buffelgrass Invasion in the Sonoran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Only a few decades ago, the Sonoran Desert of northwestern Mexico and southern Arizona was considered mostly fireproof, a case of not enough fine fuel to connect the dominant shrubs and cacti. This has changed with invasions by non-native, winter annual and summer-flower perennial grasses that are rapidly transforming fireproof desert into flammable grassland. Of particular concern is buffelgrass, Pennisetum ciliare, a fire-prone and invasive African perennial grass that has already converted millions of hectares across Sonora since the mid-1960s and has made quick headway in southern and central Arizona beginning in the 1980s. Near Tucson and Phoenix, AZ, buffelgrass invasion is proceeding exponentially, with population expansion (and the costs of mitigation) more than doubling every year. As this conversion progresses, there will be increased fire risks, lost tourist revenue, diminished property values, insurmountable setbacks to conservation efforts, and the threat of large ignition fronts in desert valleys routinely spreading into the mountains. Although somewhat belated, an integrated, multi-jurisdictional effort is being organized to reduce ecological and economic impacts. My presentation will summarize the history and context of buffelgrass introduction and invasion, the disconnect in attitudes and policies across state and international boundaries, ongoing management efforts, the role of science and responsibilities of scientists, accelerated spread with changing climate, and impacts to regional ecosystems and economies. This narrative may serve as a template for other semi-arid lands where buffelgrass and similar grasses have become invasive, including Australia, South America, and many islands in the Pacific Ocean (including Hawaii), Indian Ocean, and Caribbean Sea.

  14. Financial viability of the Sonora-Baja California interconnection line; Viabilidad financiera de la linea de interconexion Sonora-Baja California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Touca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortega, G., E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Rio Rodano No. 14, Col. Cuauhtemoc, 06500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    In the Development Program of the National Electricity Sector 2015-2029, an electric interconnection line between Sonora and Baja California (Mexico) is proposed, this study analyzes the financial viability of this interconnection line based on the maximum hourly and seasonal energy demand between both regions and proposes alternatives for the supply of electric power that supports the economic convenience of this interconnection line. The results show that additional capacity is required in Sonora to cover the maximum demands of both regions since in the current condition of the National Electric System the interconnection line is not justified. (Author)

  15. Identification and interpretation of tectonic features from Skylab imagery. [Mojave Desert block of Texas, Arizona, and Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two alternate models for the extension of the Texas zone through the Mojave Desert block have been developed: (1) along the Pisgah Line, and (2) along the eastern Transverse Ranges; this model suggests a counterclockwise rotation of the Mojave block. Analysis of S190B photographs of the western Mojave Desert provides strong evidence for the feasibility of identifying recent fault breaks.

  16. A letter of Marcus Antonius Kappus to Eusebius Franciscus Kino (Sonora in 1690

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Nabergoj

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The life and work of the Slovene Jesuit, Marcus Antonius Kappus (1657 -1717 who, three centuries ago, worked as a missionary in Sonora, north-west Mexico, has, in recent years, been the subject of several short studies in Slovenia. In this journal, Professor Janez Stanonik has, so far, published five letters which Kappus sent home to his relatives and friends, and one letter which he sent to hi s friend in Vienna, as well as a study on the collection of poems (276 chronograms in Latin, which Kappus published in Mexico City, in 1708, entitled IHS. Enthusiasmus sive solemnes ludi poetici. Prompted by the above publications, the author of this paper spent a month in Sonora while journeying in Mexico in 1991. In Archivo General de la Nación (the general Mexican archives in Mexico City, he happened to find another letter written by Marcus Antonius Kappus.

  17. Land cover changes in central Sonora Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Valdez-Zamudio; Alejandro Castellanos-Villegas; Stuart Marsh

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been demonstrated to be very effective tools to help detect, analyze, and evaluate land cover changes in natural areas of the world. Changes in land cover can generally be attributed to either natural or anthropogenic forces. Multitemporal satellite imagery and airborne videography were used to detect, analyze, and evaluate land cover...

  18. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  19. Depredación de aves acuáticas por la nutria neotropical (Lontra longicaudis annectens, en el río Yaqui, Sonora, México Aquatic bird predation by neotropical river otter (Lontra longicaudis annectens, at Rio Yaqui, Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Gallo-Reynoso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registra la depredación de aves acuáticas por la nutria neotropical (L. longicaudis annectens en el río Yaqui, Sonora. Se colectaron e identificaron 25 cráneos, porciones de esqueleto postcraneal y plumas de aves encontrados en los comederos de las nutrias; las especies identificadas fueron el cormorán neotropical (Phalacrocorax brasilianus con 16 individuos, el pato de collar (Anas platyrhynchos diazi, 4 individuos; la garza blanca (Ardea alba, 3 individuos; el huaco de corona amarilla (Nyctanassa violacea y el pelícano café (Pelecanus occidentalis, ambos con 1 individuo. En los peces se encontró la tilapia del género Oreochromis. Probablemente los hábitos alimenticios de esta especie responden a la estacionalidad y al consumo de presas más disponibles en el hábitat. Estos registros confirman que las nutrias de río son depredadores oportunistas cuya dieta tiene una amplio rango de uso de especies de los ambientes riparios, además dichos registros son una razón más para considerar la nutria neotropical como especie sombrilla para la conservación de ecosistemas completos, ya que su presencia es un indicador de alta disponibilidad energética y de alta biodiversidad.We report the predation of aquatic birds by neotropical river otters (L. longicaudis annectens at Río Yaqui, Sonora. As many as 25 skulls, post-cranial skeletons and feathers were found at river otter feeding sites. The neotropical cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus was the most predated bird with 16 individuals, followed by Mexican mallard (Anas platyrhynchos diazi with 4 individuals, great egret (Ardea alba with 3 individuals, yellow-crowned night-heron (Nyctanassa violacea, and brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis, both with 1 individual. With respect to fish, the tilapia Oreochromis, was the only species found in scats. Neotropical river otter feeding habits were associated with food availability at different seasons of the year. These records show that

  20. Ranching and conservation in the Santa Cruz River Region, Sonora: Milpillas Case Study (Ganaderia y Conservacion en la Region del Rio Santa Cruz, Sonora: El Caso del Grupo Milpillas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joaquin Murrieta-Saldivar

    2006-01-01

    The Sonoran Institute (SI) is a non-profit organization working with people toward common conservation goals. Two objectives guide the work of the Sonoran Institute in the Santa Cruz River Region in Sonora, Mexico: to establish projects with community participation that can result in tangible and long-lasting benefits to the environment, and to ensure success by...

  1. La carrera delictiva de un adolescente traficante de drogas de Sonora, México: reflexiones desde la elección racional del crimen/The crime career of a teenage drug dealer from Sonora, Mexico: Reflections from the rational choice of crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio de Jesús Barragán Bórquez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza desde la criminología cualitativa la relación individuo-ambiente social en el caso de un joven interno por Delitos Contra la Salud en un Centro para Adolescentes en conflicto con la Ley de Sonora, México. Como parte de una investigación realizada en dicho centro se entrevistó a Rodrigo, a quien por cuestiones de seguridad y éticas llamaremos así, quien estuvo por más de un año en el Centro Intermedio de Hermosillo. Era narcomenudista, en su casa montó su propio “tiradero”, fue detenido cuando llevaba más de tres años en el “negocio”, el cual prosperaba hasta el momento de su detención. Desde su voz y relato es posible detectar factores individuales y sociales que permiten entender su delincuencia. Donde la simple “decisión” que da pauta para el emprendimiento de una carrera delictiva contiene complejos trasfondos que remiten al análisis de eventos importantes en su historia de vida.

  2. Estructura territorial de la actividad pesquera en Guaymas, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Yurkievich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to ascertain the territorial dimension of the fishing economy in Guaymas, Mexico. The geographical studies addressing this economic activity in Mexico and published in the last decades are scarce. For this reason, this research work is particularly important, as it outlines the fishery activities in one of the most active sea-ports of northwest Mexico, from a territorial perspective. The first part of this article explains why and how Economic Geography addresses fishery activities and which methodology we pursued to carry out this investigation, based on studies carried out by geographers, particularly in France and Argentina. Then the paper describes the natural conditions prevailing in the Gulf of California (also known as Sea of Cortez, a large inlet of the eastern Pacific Ocean that is rich in marine resources and where most of the main national fisheries are located. Guaymas is one of the most important sea ports located along the Gulf of California for its long fishing history and the variety of fishing species captured. This port, located in the southern coast of the state of Sonora, is a mediumsized city with a little over 100 thousand inhabitants; a considerable proportion of the local labor force works in the fishery sector and associated industries. Today, the fishery sector in Guaymas is characterized by a large number of artisan fishermen, a prominent fleet preciand the regular practise of illegal catching. This port is the seat of large enterprises, such as Ocean Garden, involved in the industrialization of catches (basically fish oil and fish meal and their further commercialization within and outside Mexico. Two commercially important species have played a key role in the evolution and outline of the current territorial structure of fisheries in Guaymas. One is shrimp, with a fishery that recorded a boom during 1970-1990, bringing along a number of benefits for local fishermen in Sonora. This fishery

  3. Social-ecological dynamics of change and restoration attempts in the Chihuahuan Desert grasslands of Janos Biosphere Reserve, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrub encroachment and grassland loss are widespread throughout the US-Mexico borderlands with negative consequences for production of livestock and ecosystem services. In this paper we detail the complex social and ecological phenomena associated with this pattern of degradation in a large area in ...

  4. Remote sensing analysis of riparian vegetation response to desert marsh restoration in the Mexican Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel; Pulliam, H. Ronald; Minckley, Robert L.; Gass, Leila; Tolle, Cindy; Coe, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Desert marshes, or cienegas, are extremely biodiverse habitats imperiled by anthropogenic demands for water and changing climates. Given their widespread loss and increased recognition, remarkably little is known about restoration techniques. In this study, we examine the effects of gabions (wire baskets filled with rocks used as dams) on vegetation in the Cienega San Bernardino, in the Arizona, Sonora portion of the US-Mexico border, using a remote-sensing analysis coupled with field data. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), used here as a proxy for plant biomass, is compared at gabion and control sites over a 27-year period during the driest months (May/June). Over this period, green-up occurred at most sites where there were gabions and at a few of the control sites where gabions had not been constructed. When we statistically controlled for differences among sites in source area, stream order, elevation, and interannual winter rainfall, as well as comparisons of before and after the initiation of gabion construction, vegetation increased around gabions yet did not change (or decreased) where there were no gabions. We found that NDVI does not vary with precipitation inputs prior to construction of gabions but demonstrates a strong response to precipitation after the gabions are built. Field data describing plant cover, species richness, and species composition document increases from 2000 to 2012 and corroborate reestablished biomass at gabions. Our findings validate that gabions can be used to restore riparian vegetation and potentially ameliorate drought conditions in a desert cienega.

  5. Late Paleozoic fusulinids from Sonora, Mexcio: importance for interpretation of depositional settings, biogeography, and paleotectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Poole, Forrest G.; Amaya-Martínez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Three sets of fusulinid faunas in Sonora, Mexico, discussed herein, record different depositional and paleotectonic settings along the southwestern margin of Laurentia (North America) during Pennsylvanian and Permian time. The settings include: offshelf continental rise and ocean basin (Rancho Nuevo Formation in the Sonora allochthon), shallow continental shelf (La Cueva Limestone), and foredeep basin on the continental shelf (Mina México Formation). Our data represent 41 fusulinid collections from 23 localities with each locality providing one to eight collections.Reworked fusulinids in the Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian part of the Rancho Nuevo Formation range in age from Desmoinesian into Virgilian (Moscovian-Gzhelian). Indigenous Permian fusulinids in the La Cueva Limestone range in age from middle or late Wolfcampian to middle Leonardian (late Sakmarian-late Artinskian), and reworked Permian fusulinids in the Mina México Formation range in age from early to middle Leonardian (middle-late Artinskian). Conodonts of Guadalupian age occur in some turbidites in the Mina México Formation, indicating the youngest foredeep deposit is at least Middle Permian in age. Our fusulinid collections indicate a hiatus of at least 10 m.y. between the youngest Pennsylvanian (Virgilian) rocks in the Sonora allochthon and the oldest Permian (middle Wolfcampian) rocks in the region.Most fusulinid faunas in Sonora show affinities to those of West Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona; however, some genera and species are similar to those in southeastern California. As most species are similar to those east of the southwest-trending Transcontinental arch in New Mexico and Arizona, this arch may have formed a barrier preventing large-scale migration and mixing of faunas between the southern shelf of Laurentia in northwestern Mexico and the western shelf in the southwestern United States.The Sonora allochthon, consisting of pre-Permian (Lower Ordovician to Upper Pennsylvanian) deep

  6. Prohibir el mestizaje con chinos: solicitudes de amparo, Sonora, 1921-1935

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine-Adams, Kif

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the state of Sonora, Mexico, at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, the Chinese population faced vicious discrimination including Law 31. Promulgated by the state legislature in late 1923, Law 31 prohibited marriage and other intimate relations between Chinese men and Mexican women. Through amparo petitions in federal court, up to and including the Supreme Court of Mexico, Chinese Mexican couples challenged the discrimination inherent in Law 31. Chinese Mexican amparo petitions against Law 31 demonstrate both the challenges and possibilities that law provided to the disenfranchised in Mexico at the beginning of the Twentieth Century.

    En el estado de Sonora la población china enfrentó una manifiesta discriminación expresada en la Ley 31 de 1923. Esta Ley prohibía el matrimonio y la mestización entre hombres chinos y mujeres mexicanas. Por medio de peticiones de amparo, parejas mexicano-chinas desafiaron esta legislación, llegando con los procesos legales hasta la Suprema Corte de Justicia. En los años 1924 y 1925, jueces federales en Sonora aplicaron los principios de la Constitución y de la legislación federal para proteger a la población china. Las peticiones de amparo demuestran tanto los desafíos como las posibilidades que el derecho otorgó a los residentes de México en las primeras décadas del siglo XX.

  7. Gopherus agassizii: Desert tortoise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kristen H.; Swingland, Ian Richard; Klemens, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    The desert tortoise is one of four allopatric North American tortoises. It occurs in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico.Auffenberg (1976) divided the genus Gopherus (consisting of four species, G. agassizi, G. berlandieri, G.flavomarginatus, and G. polyphemus) in two osteological groups. Bramble (1982), using morphological and palaeontological data, divided the genus Gopherus into two separate complexes, each with two species. He established a new genus, Scaptochelys, for agassizi and berlandieri, retaining Gopherus for polyphemus and flavomarginatus. Bour and Dubois (1984) noted that Xerobates Agassiz had priority over Scaptochelys Bramble. Using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Lamb et al. (1989) evaluated the evolutionary relationships of the North American tortoises, particularly the desert tortoise. They concluded that the mtDNA analysis provides strong support for generic recognition of the two distinct species groups described by Bramble (1982).Until a few decades ago, the desert tortoise was widespread at lower elevations throughout the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the U.S.A. In the northern and western parts of the geographic range, large and relatively homogeneous populations with densities exceeding 1,000/sq km extended throughout parts of California, and probably into Nevada and Utah. In terms of biomass, the tortoise played an important role in the ecosystems. In most areas, numbers have declined dramatically and the extent of populations has been reduced. Most populations are now isolated and low in numbers. Conservation of the desert tortoise is a highly visible and political issue in the U.S.A., but not in Mexico.

  8. Rupture of the Pitáycachi Fault in the 1887 Mw 7.5 Sonora, Mexico earthquake (southern Basin-and-Range Province): Rupture kinematics and epicenter inferred from rupture branching patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Max

    2015-01-01

    During the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5 Sonora earthquake (surface rupture end-to-end length: 101.8 km), an array of three north-south striking Basin-and-Range Province faults (from north to south Pitáycachi, Teras, and Otates) slipped sequentially along the western margin of the Sierra Madre Occidental Plateau. This detailed field survey of the 1887 earthquake rupture zone along the Pitáycachi fault includes mapping the rupture scarp and measurements of surface deformation. The surface rupture has an endpoint-to-endpoint length of ≥41.0 km, dips 70°W, and is characterized by normal left-lateral extension. The maximum surface offset is 487 cm and the mean offset 260 cm. The rupture trace shows a complex pattern of second-order segmentation. However, this segmentation is not expressed in the 1887 along-rupture surface offset profile, which indicates that the secondary segments are linked at depth into a single coherent fault surface. The Pitáycachi surface rupture shows a well-developed bipolar branching pattern suggesting that the rupture originated in its central part, where the polarity of the rupture bifurcations changes. Most likely the rupture first propagated bilaterally along the Pitáycachi fault. The southern rupture front likely jumped across a step over to the Teras fault and from there across a major relay zone to the Otates fault. Branching probably resulted from the lateral propagation of the rupture after breaching the seismogenic part of the crust, given that the much shorter ruptures of the Otates and Teras segments did not develop branches.

  9. Determinants of Competitiveness in Companies that Comprise the Aerospace Cluster in the State of Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika OLIVAS-VALDEZ

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the leading countries in the world production of the aerospace sector, over time, have triangulated their production, by installing plants in other countries, to reduce costs. The United States concentrates most of the world production of aircraft. Consequently, Mexico has joined this dynamic production process through the operation of almost four hundred companies in this industrial sector. The states of Baja California, Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, Querétaro and Sonora, lead the production of this sector in Mexico. The objective of this work is to determine if the companies in the aerospace sector of the state of Sonora are competitive in a regional context with respect to the growth of the entire sector in the country. The degree of competitiveness was calculated using the Competitive Advantage Index in two levels –the aerospace sector at the national level and at the state level-. The results of this research confirm that the competitiveness of companies in the aerospace sector in Sonora is high and that their competitiveness is determined mainly by the technological development of their products, quality of service, guarantees offered, price, and the operation and production costs.

  10. The Migrant Border Crossing Study: A methodological overview of research along the Sonora-Arizona border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Daniel E; Slack, Jeremy; Beyerlein, Kraig; Vandervoet, Prescott; Klingman, Kristin; Molina, Paola; Manning, Shiras; Burham, Melissa; Walzak, Kylie; Valencia, Kristen; Gamboa, Lorenzo

    2017-07-01

    Increased border enforcement efforts have redistributed unauthorized Mexican migration to the United States (US) away from traditional points of crossing, such as San Diego and El Paso, and into more remote areas along the US-Mexico border, including southern Arizona. Yet relatively little quantitative scholarly work exists examining Mexican migrants' crossing, apprehension, and repatriation experiences in southern Arizona. We contend that if scholars truly want to understand the experiences of unauthorized migrants in transit, such migrants should be interviewed either at the border after being removed from the US, or during their trajectories across the border, or both. This paper provides a methodological overview of the Migrant Border Crossing Study (MBCS), a unique data source on Mexican migrants who attempted an unauthorized crossing along the Sonora-Arizona border, were apprehended, and repatriated to Nogales, Sonora in 2007-09. We also discuss substantive and theoretical contributions of the MBCS.

  11. Las elecciones de gobernador en Sonora, 1997*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Poom Medina

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente artículo es analizar el desarrollo y resultados de las elecciones de gobernador re alizadas en Sonora en 1997. Se exponen y analizan las distintas fases que confo rm a ron dicho proceso elector al, tomando como punto de partida la caracterización de las elecciones en México.

  12. Status and distribution of Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands in the United States and Mexico (Evaluacion del estado y distribucion de los pastizales del Desierto Chihuahuense en los Estados Unidos y Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha Desmond; Jennifer Atchley Montoya

    2006-01-01

    Grasslands comprise a small part of the Chihuahuan Desert but are vital to the biological diversity of the ecoregion. Characteristic grasses of the Chihuahuan Desert are tobosa (Pleuraphis mutica) and black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) but other common species include alakali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides), big alkali sacaton (S. wrightii), mesa dropseed (S. flexuosus),...

  13. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations.

  14. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes the key energy data for Mexico: 1 - energy organizations and policy: Ministry of energy (SENER), Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE), Ministry of Finances, Ministry of trade and industrial development (SECOFI), national commission for energy savings (CONAE); 2 - companies: federal commission of electricity (CFE), Minera Carbonifera Rio Escondido (MICARE - coal), Pemex (petroleum); 3 - energy production: resources, electric power, petroleum, natural gas; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - stakes and perspectives. Some economic and energy indicators are summarized in a series of tables: general indicators, supply indicators (reserves, refining and electric capacity, energy production, foreign trade), demand indicators (consumption trends, end use, energy independence, energy efficiency, CO 2 emissions), energy status per year and per energy source. (J.S.)

  15. Gopherus agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Non-native seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, J.R.; Loughran, Caleb L.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Sahara Mustard (Brassica tournefortii) is a non-native, highly invasive weed species of southwestern U.S. deserts. Sahara Mustard is a hardy species, which flourishes under many conditions including drought and in both disturbed and undisturbed habitats (West and Nabhan 2002. In B. Tellman [ed.], Invasive Plants: Their Occurrence and Possible Impact on the Central Gulf Coast of Sonora and the Midriff Islands in the Sea of Cortes, pp. 91–111. University of Arizona Press, Tucson). Because of this species’ ability to thrive in these habitats, B. tournefortii has been able to propagate throughout the southwestern United States establishing itself in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. Unfortunately, naturally disturbed areas created by native species, such as the Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), within these deserts could have facilitated the propagation of B. tournefortii. (Lovich 1998. In R. G. Westbrooks [ed.], Invasive Plants, Changing the Landscape of America: Fact Book, p. 77. Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds [FICMNEW], Washington, DC). However, Desert Tortoises have never been directly observed dispersing Sahara Mustard seeds. Here we present observations of two Desert Tortoises dispersing Sahara Mustard seeds at the interface between the Mojave and Sonoran deserts in California.

  16. Perception on the Risk of the Sonora River Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Aragonés

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study applies the “psychometric paradigm” of risk perception to the heavy mineral spill in the Sonora River (Mexico. A total of 241 inhabitants of the polluted area with a mean age of 46.3 years participated in the study, completing an interview questionnaire at the onset of the disaster. The results allow us to establish a profile of the 18 characteristics comprising the model and a multiple regression analysis shows that some characteristics of the dimensions of dread risk and unknown risk explain a percentage of the magnitude of the perceived risk. In addition, the behaviors recommended by the authorities were classified by the participants according to their estimated usefulness. Significant differences were observed. Avoiding contact with the water was considered the most effective, followed by recommendations on the use of the water, with actions related to the environment and how to avoid pollution being considered the least effective. In sum, the strategy deployed allows us to observe how the victims perceive the disaster and organize the behaviors proposed by the authorities.

  17. A predictable suite of helminth parasites in the long-billed dowitcher, Limnodromus scolopaceus, from the Chihuahua desert in Texas and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaris, Albert G; Ortiz, Rafael; Canaris, Gay J

    2010-12-01

    Eighty-eight long-billed dowitchers, Limnodromus scolopaceus, were examined for helminth parasites, 62 from Texas and 26 from Mexico. In total, 3,558 helminth parasites were obtained from this host, 2,273 from Texas birds and 1,285 from birds from Mexico. The component communities consisted of 22 species of helminths in Texas, and 19 in Mexico. Of a total of 26 helminth species recorded from the 2 localities, 15 were common to both, 7 found only in Texas, and 4 only in Mexico. Fifty-nine of 62 Texas birds and 25 of 26 birds from Mexico were infected. The most prevalent helminth for Texas was the cestode Shipleya inermis. The cestode Aploparaksis retroversa was the most abundant, accounting for 37% of the total abundance, and was second highest in prevalence. Five species of cestodes, A. retroversa, Aploparaksis diagonalis, Aploparaksis occidentalis, Aploparaksis rissae, and Shipleya inermis accounted for 79% of total abundance. In the sample from Mexico, S. inermis was also highest in prevalence, followed by the nematode Hystrichis tricolor. The cestode A. retroversa was highest in abundance at 50% of the total, and was third highest in prevalence. Mean species richness, diversity, and evenness were similar among the component communities of Texas and Mexico. A predictable suite of aploparaksid cestodes, together with the cestode S. inermis, constituted 79%, and 61%, of total abundance for the component communities of Texas and Mexico, respectively, and were present in all component communities for locality, season, and year. The cestodes, A. retroversa and S. inermis, were the dominant species in all component communities. Differences among component communities and low similarities for all other comparisons were largely caused by less predictable suites of helminth species. A checklist of helminth parasites reported for long-billed dowitchers is included.

  18. Novas tecnologias no estudo de ondas sonoras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Almeida Cavalcante

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7941.2013v30n3p579 O presente trabalho propõe a construção de um Tubo de Kundt adaptado às novas tecnologias disponíveis para o ensino de física. Tem como principal objetivo utilizar a placa Arduino em experimentos didáticos envolvendo o estudo de ondas sonoras. O Arduino é uma placa de controle I/O baseada no micro-controlador Atmega (Atmel e foi projetado inicialmente para fins didáticos. O fato da linguagem de programação utilizada e hardware serem do tipo open source (código aberto possibilitou sua ampla difusão em diversas áreas. Uma das intenções deste projeto é difundir o uso deste recurso para fins educacionais e particularmente no estudo de ondas sonoras estacionarias em tubos, contribuindo com a melhora na abordagem deste conteúdo no ensino e aprendizagem de Física.

  19. Prevalence of Asthma in School Children on the Arizona-Sonora Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Tara F; Beamer, Paloma I; Rothers, Janet; Stern, Debra A; Gerald, Lynn B; Rosales, Cecilia B; Van Horne, Yoshira Ornelas; Pivniouk, Oksana N; Vercelli, Donata; Halonen, Marilyn; Gameros, Mercedes; Martinez, Fernando D; Wright, Anne L

    Mexican-born children living in the United States have a lower prevalence of asthma than other US children. Although children of Mexican descent near the Arizona (AZ)-Sonora border are genetically similar, differences in environmental exposures might result in differences in asthma prevalence across this region. The objective of this study was to determine if the prevalence of asthma and wheeze in these children varies across the AZ-Sonora border. The International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Children written and video questionnaires were administered to 1753 adolescents from 5 middle schools: Tucson (school A), Nogales, AZ (schools B, C), and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico (schools D, E). The prevalence of asthma and symptoms was compared, with analyses in the AZ schools limited to self-identified Mexican American students. Compared with the Sonoran reference school E, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for asthma was significantly higher in US schools A (OR 4.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.72-8.80), B (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.88-6.42), and C (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.78-9.60). The adjusted OR for wheeze in the past year was significantly higher in schools A (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.20-4.01) and B (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.42-5.01) on the written questionnaire and significantly higher in A (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.22-3.75), B (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.07-3.53), and Sonoran school D (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.28-4.30) on the video questionnaire compared with school E. Asthma and wheeze prevalence differed significantly between schools and was higher in the United States. Environmental factors that may account for these differences could provide insight into mechanisms of protection from asthma. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Abiotic drivers of Chihuahuan Desert plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura Marie Ladwig

    2014-01-01

    Within grasslands, precipitation, fire, nitrogen (N) addition, and extreme temperatures influence community composition and ecosystem function. The differential influences of these abiotic factors on Chihuahuan Desert grassland communities was examined within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, located in central New Mexico, U.S.A. Although fire is a natural...

  1. Sonora Legislators and their Constitution, 1857-1861

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulema Trejo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the members of the Sonora constituent congress (1857-61, and analyzes the debates they held regarding the project for the state's Constitution, which would follow the lines estblished by the 1857 Federal Constitution. It also points out the relations between each legislator's trajectory and politicial affiliation (as far as available sources allow for this, and the proposals he presented during the legislative debates that gave place to the 1861 Constitution of Sonora.

  2. NATURAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE HALOPHYTE Salicornia bigelovii (TOR. IN COASTAL AREA OF SONORA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Omar Rueda Puente

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase knowledge about the vegetative structure and environmental conditions, two coastal areas (north and south in Sonora, Mexico, where Salicornia bigelovii develops in natural form were investigated. Based on the abundance of Salicornia, three locations were selected in the two areas. Transects in each of the three sites were developed. The sediments in the northern areas showed higher values compared with the south areas of Sonora in organic matter. Plant biomass, density, height and frequency of occurrence were higher in frequently flooded areas compared to sparsely or less often by the tides. The average total biomass ranged from 2.23 to 6.33 kg (dry weight m-2 and is composed primarily of surface components. The maximum values of biomass of Salicornia were observed in February to May in both areas. The growth of Salicornia bigelovii is influenced mainly by the frequency of flooding, duration of exposure to air during low tide, rainfall, salinity and salt content of the ambient water and sediment, respectively. The carbon content increased with plant age, while protein content decreased by 233.6%. The steady increase in human pressure on coastal areas where Salicornia and other halophytes growth, require immediate protection order to prevent vulnerabilities in their populations.

  3. Irrigation and avifaunal change in coastal Northwest Mexico: has irrigated habit attracted threatened migratory species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Emily; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    Irrigation in desert ecosystems can either reduce or increase species diversity. Groundwater pumping often lowers water tables and reduces natural wetlands, whereas canal irrigation often creates mesic habitat, resulting in great increases in avian diversity from irrigation. Here we compare a dataset of potential natural vegetation to recent datasets from areal and satellite imagery to show that 60% of the land in the coastal plain of southern Sonora and northern Sinaloa lying below 200 m elevation has been converted by irrigation to more mesic habitats. We then use the record of bird specimens in the world’s museums from this same region of Mexico to examine the avian community before and after the development of extensive irrigation. In general these museum records show an increase in the abundance and diversity of breeding birds associated with mesic habitats. Although thorn forest birds have likely decreased in total numbers, most are common enough in the remaining thorn forest that collection records did not indicate their probable decline. Four migrants having most of their breeding ranges in the US or Canada, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Cliff Swallow, Bell’s Vireo, and Orchard Oriole, apparently have increased dramatically as breeders in irrigated habitats of NW Mexico. Because these species have decreased or even largely disappeared as breeding birds in parts of the US or Canada, further research should assess whether their increases in new mesic habitats of NW Mexico are linked to their declines as breeding birds in Canada and the US For Bell’s Vireo recent specimens from Sinaloa suggest its new breeding population in NW Mexico may be composed partly of the endangered Least Bell’s Vireo. PMID:26312181

  4. Merchants, Prices and Salaries in Sonora during the Late Colonial Period. Description of a Captive Trade Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Refugio de la Torre Curiel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a critical view on the existence of regional markets and the New Spain market,  based on the analysis of the presence, in the state of Sonora, of different forms of participation in the deals that depended on, and nurtured, the local trade circuits. Sonoran economies are shown to have been part of a captive trade net managed at a distance from the center of New Spain by Mexico City merchants, and locally manipulated by several middlemen who transferred the system's operational costs to the final consumers through mechanisms such as salaries in kind and compulsory indebtedness.

  5. Helminth parasites of freshwater fishes from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico: inventory and biogeographical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Aguilar, Rogelio; Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Espinosa-Pérez, Héctor; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    As part of an ongoing inventory of the helminth parasites of freshwater fishes in Mexico, 570 individual fish were collected between Apr 2008 and Oct 2011 in 26 localities along the Cuatro Ciénegas region in Coahuila State, northern Mexico. Seventeen species of hosts, mostly corresponding to Nearctic freshwater elements, were studied. A total of 8324 individual worms were collected during this survey, representing 25 species of helminths, of which 9 were digeneans, 3 monogeneans, 3 acanthocephalans, 9 nematodes and 1 cestode. Most of the records in this checklist represent new host or locality records. The information provided in this checklist may be helpful for our understanding of the biodiversity and historical biogeography of this host-parasite system, because in the Cuatro Ciénegas region occur a Nearctic freshwater fish fauna, along with Neotropical and endemic elements, and from a biogeographical point of view, this may represent a transitional area. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Jojoba could stop the desert creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-25

    The Sahara desert is estimated to be expanding at a rate of 5km a year. The Sudanese government is experimenting with jojoba in six different regions as the bush has the potential to stop this ''desert creep''. The plant, a native to Mexico, is long known for its resistance to drought and for the versatile liquid wax that can be extracted from its seeds. It is estimated that one hectare of mature plants could produce 3000 kg of oil, currently selling at $50 per litre, and so earn valuable foreign currency.

  7. Cytogeography of Larrea tridentata at the Chihuahuan-Sonoran Desert ecotone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Laport; Robert L.. Minckley

    2013-01-01

    The long separation of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran Deserts is reflected in the high species richness and endemism of their floras. Although many endemic species from both deserts reach their distributional limits where the Sierra Madre Occidental massif fragments into smaller mountain complexes in northern Mexico and adjoining areas of the United States, indicator...

  8. Preliminary survey of bee (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) richness in the northwestern Chihuahuan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Minckley; John S. Ascher

    2013-01-01

    Museum records indicate that the peak number of bee species occurs around the Mediterranean Sea and in the warm desert areas of North America, whereas flowering plants are most diverse in the tropics. We examine this biogeographic pattern for the bee species known from a limited area of northeastern Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico/United States. This topographically complex...

  9. Defeating Mexico’s Drug Trafficking Organizations: The Range of Military Operations in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Nuevo Leon, Chihuahua , Baja California, and Sinaloa (see figure 2) with 60 percent of all killings in 2008 reported in three cities: Tijuana, Baja...California; Culiacan, Sinaloa; and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua .2 Ciudad Juarez had the highest rate of DTO related deaths; this is significant for the U.S...Northern Mexico states are: Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sonora, Chihuahua , Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, and Sinaloa (see figure 2

  10. National wildlife refuge management on the United States/Mexico border

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Radke

    2013-01-01

    Many conservation strategies have been developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in cooperation with others to protect habitat and enhance the recovery of fish and wildlife populations in the San Bernardino Valley, which straddles Arizona, United States, and Sonora, Mexico. Habitats along this international border have been impacted by illegal activities,...

  11. Trajectory and rate of desert vegetation response following cattle removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Minckley

    2013-01-01

    Cattle have grazed continuously over the past three centuries in the Sky Island region and most work has focused on how these grazers have affected riparian and grassland habitats. I examined the effects of grazing on a fuller spectrum of desert habitats that occur in the close proximity to the San Bernardino Valley of Mexico and the United States. Plots in each of...

  12. Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregion: Chapter 27 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlman, Jana; Gass, Leila; Middleton, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The Chihuahuan Desert is the largest of the North American deserts, extending from southern New Mexico and Texas deep into Mexico, with approximately 90 percent of its area falling south of the United States–Mexico border (Lowe, 1964, p. 24). The Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregion covers approximately 174,472 km2 (67,364 mi2) within the United States, including much of west Texas, southern New Mexico, and a small portion of southeastern Arizona (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). The ecoregion is generally oriented from northwest to southeast, with the Madrean Archipelago Ecoregion to the west; the Arizona/New Mexico Mountains, Arizona/New Mexico Plateau, Southwestern Tablelands, and Western High Plains Ecoregions to the north; and the Edwards Plateau and Southern Texas Plains Ecoregions to the east (fig. 1).

  13. Lut Desert, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Iran is a large country with several desert regions. In the Dasht-E-Lut (Lut Desert) (30.5N, 58.5E) an area known as Namak-Zar, about 100 miles east of the city of Kerman, is at the center of this photograph. Some of the world's most prominent Yardangs (very long, parallel ridges and depressions) have been wind eroded in these desert dry lake bed sediments. At the left of the photo is a large field of sand dunes at right angles to the wind.

  14. Desert Pavement Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haff, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Combining plan view information from aerial photography showing details of stream channels on desert pavement surfaces with process-based erosion models, a high-resolution, synthetic topography DEM...

  15. Desert Pavement Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haff, P

    2003-01-01

    Combining plan view information from aerial photography showing details of stream channels on desert pavement surfaces with process-based erosion models, a high-resolution, "synthetic topography" DEM...

  16. Mapping Socio-Environmentally Vulnerable Populations Access and Exposure to Ecosystem Services at the U.S.- Mexico Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USGS is developing a binational decision support tool to understand the exchange of ecosystem services in the Santa Cruz Watershed located on the border between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. Ecosystem services are life-sustaining benefits human societies receive from the enviro...

  17. Canto pré-natal: alquimias sonoras para gestantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Trasel Martins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo irá focar no canto pré-natal; nos benefícios da música e do canto durante a gestação; na audição do feto no ventre e na escuta da gestante do seu corpo. Como metodologia para pesquisar sobre estes temas foram realizados estudos teóricos nas áreas da musicoterapia obstétrica, da terapia sonora e da medicina e também foram realizadas práticas de canto pré-natal. Arte, movimento e saúde são integrados com as alquimias sonoras para ampliar a consciência da corporeidade da mulher durante a gestação. Com cantos femininos em um círculo de mulheres, nos apoiamos e nos fortalecemos durante a gestação e enviamos vibrações sonoras harmoniosas para o bebê no ventre. ABSTRACT This article will focus on prenatal singing; on the benefits of music and singing during pregnancy; on the baby's hearing in the womb and on the listening of the pregnant woman to her body. To determine the methodology for researching these themes, theoretical studies were done in obstetrical music therapy, sound therapy, medicine and also practical research in prenatal singing classes. Art, movement and health are integrated with sound alchemy to widen the woman’s body awareness during pregnancy. With feminine chants in a circle of women, we support and strengthen ourselves during pregnancy and we send harmonious sounds vibrations to the baby in the womb. KEYWORDS Prenatal singing, prenatal music, pregnancy, listening, consciousness.

  18. Aniversarios astronómicos en Cananea, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Pérez – Enríquez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El 21 de marzo de 1913, en la ciudad de México, nació Guillermo Haro Barraza y el 27 de abril de 1988, se inauguró el Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, en Cananea, Sonora. Estos dos muy importantes aniversarios astronómicos se conmemoraron el pasado 27 de abril. Aquí se da cuenta de la relevancia de ambos festejos, de la fructuosa vida del homenajeado y de las actividades desarrolladas ese día allá donde está instalada “Una mina de estrellas”.

  19. Comportamiento alimentario y obesidad infantil en Sonora, México

    OpenAIRE

    Juana María Hernández; Gloria María Cañez; Hevilat Frías

    2010-01-01

    Este trabajo tiene como objetivo identificar los factores sociales asociados con la obesidad y con los comportamientos alimentarios de riesgo en un grupo de niños y niñas de 7 a 12 años de edad, en Hermosillo, Sonora, México. Los resultados muestran que el 40% de la población estudiada presentó sobrepeso y obesidad; el 39 % tuvo predisposición a prácticas alimentarias de riesgo y el 30% ya presentaba dichos rasgos. Se encontró que el miedo a la obesidad y la obsesión por la delgadez, la ansi...

  20. Comportamiento alimentario y obesidad infantil en Sonora, México

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez, Juana María; Cañez, Gloria María; Frías, Hevilat

    2010-01-01

    Este trabajo tiene como objetivo identificar los factores sociales asociados con la obesidad y con los comportamientos alimentarios de riesgo en un grupo de niños y niñas de 7 a 12 años de edad, en Hermosillo, Sonora, México. Los resultados muestran que el 40% de la población estudiada presentó sobrepeso y obesidad; el 39 % tuvo predisposición a prácticas alimentarias de riesgo y el 30% ya presentaba dichos rasgos. Se encontró que el miedo a la obesidad y la obsesión por la delgadez, la ansie...

  1. Food patterns characterization for Mexico and Sonora’s households, 2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Borbón-Morales

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a descriptive analysis about the characterization of the consumption’s pattern in Mexico and Sonora, by determining how much money is spent in households and the proportion that those intended to consume on goods and services. Income level is considered to account for such classification. A comparison between the patterns of consumption is made for Mexico and Sonora in 2005, by emphasizing on food expenditures and some specific food products such as vegetables; including tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers. The study also performs a look into the spending behavior in Mexico from 2000 to 2006, by contrasting the hypothesis of Modigliani and Friedman (Dornbusch, 2004; Camacho, 2000 and the mathematical formulation of Campbell and Mankiw (1989 on the assumption of the society’s consumption. It finally outlines a series of proposals for future studies.

  2. Amphibians and reptiles of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, with comparisons with adjoining states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A; Smith, Geoffrey R; Woolrich-Piña, Guillermo A; Cruz, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Chihuahua is Mexico's largest state, and its physiographic complexity affects the distribution of its herpetofauna. We list amphibians and reptiles for the state of Chihuahua, with their conservation status. We also compare this list to those of six adjoining states in the United States and Mexico (New Mexico, Texas, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, and Sonora). A total of 175 species of amphibians and reptiles is found in Chihuahua. Thirty-eight are amphibians, and 137 reptiles. Chihuahuan amphibians and reptiles represent just over 37% of such species from Chihuahua and neighboring states. Chihuahua shares the highest proportion of its herpetofauna with Sonora and Durango. Most of the herpetofauna of Chihuahua falls in IUCNs least concern category and is not listed by SEMARNAT. However, turtles in Chihuahua are a group of particular conservation concern.

  3. Música y sensación sonora: John Tavener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarado, Boris

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to examine the act of sound sensation in John Tavener Work (1944-2013 following the idea of logic of sensation created by Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995 and phenomenology of the body Xavie Zubiri (1898-1983. Through the concepts of from both philosophers it might be possible to draw the sound experience of vibration that proposes the sacred art of minimalism in the Anglo- Saxon composer.Lo que busca este artículo es investigar el bello y difícil acto de la sensación sonora de la obra de John Tavener (1944-2013 a la luz de una lógica de la sensación de Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995 y de la fenomenología del cuerpo de Xavie Zubiri (1898-1983. Creemos que con los conceptos acuñados por ambos filósofos pueden dar cuenta de un modo más acabado de ese estilo único de la experiencia sonora en la vibración que propone el arte sacro de la música minimal del compositor anglosajón.

  4. La passeggiata sonora ad Alghero - The soundwalk at Alghero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Brambilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nel presente articolo viene descritta la metodologia impiegata per la passeggiata sonora organizzata ad Alghero in occasione del seminario didattico AIA “L’approccio del soundscape nella tutela e nel recupero dell’ambiente urbano”, svolto il 24-25 maggio 2016, prima del 43° Convegno Nazionale AIA. Nei dieci siti scelti lungo il percorso della passeggiata sonora è stata eseguita la registrazione binaurale dell’ambiente sonoro, contemporaneamente alla raccolta delle valutazioni soggettive dei partecipanti, espresse su apposito questionario. Vengono illustrati anche alcuni risultati preliminari. ------ The paper describes the methodology used for the soundwalk organized at Alghero during the AIA teaching seminar “L’approccio del soundscape nella tutela e nel recupero dell’ambiente urbano” held on 24-25th May 2016, immediately before the 43rd AIA National Congress. In the ten sites selected along the soundwalk path binaural recording of the sonic environment was performed at the same time of collection of subjective appraisals of participants given on a specific questionnaire. Some of the preliminary results are reported too.

  5. La "gente del desierto" en el norte de Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Javier Salas Quintanal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La construcción de la frontera política administrativa, a mediados del siglo diecinueve, entre Arizona (Estados Unidos y Sonora (México provocó una dispersión entre los pápagos que quedaron al lado mexicano y los que se ubicaron al norte de la línea fronteriza. Durante años esta división generó un alejamiento en los estilos de vida y en la forma de habitar un ambiente desértico; en la actualidad, la frontera política se expresa en las esferas de la vida social, económica y cultural. En este artículo se hace referencia a la situación de los pápagos, la "gente del desierto" que habita el desierto de Altar, al norte de Sonora, quienes actualizan sus referentes comunes para identificarse como etnia y como grupo.

  6. Minerals in deserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    Almost any kind of mineral deposit can occur in desert areas, and the lack of vegetation and soil cover makes finding them easier. Some kinds of deposits, though, are more likely to occur in deserts than elsewhere. Some of these result from processes genetically related to the present desert climate that improved lower grade deposits of ore. One such process, termed secondary enrichment, is most effective in areas with deep water tables, and many low-grade copper, silver, and uranium deposits have been converted into mineable ore by the downward migration and redeposition of soluble metals. In a desert terrane, placer processes are effective whenever running water flowing over steep slopes erodes outcropping ore bodies and transports and concentrates the heavier ore minerals at lower levels, thus converting low-grade or hard-to-mine bedrock deposits into economically workable concentrations. Other kinds of deposits are better preserved in deserts because the lower rainfall at the surface, and the lower volume of flow and the greater depths to groundwater, result in less destruction of soluble ores; deposits of salines and phosphates are the most notable ores affected by these factors. Still other ore deposits are created as a consequence of the arid climate, mostly because the high evaporation rates operating on standing bodies of water produce brines that can lead directly to concentrations of salts and indirectly to secondary minerals, such as zeolites, that are produced by reaction of silicate minerals with saline waters

  7. Effect of Atmospheric Conditions on Coverage of Fogger Applications in a Desert Surface Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Salyani, T. W. Walker, M. Farooq ABSTRACT. Near-ground aerosol fogs were applied in the Chihuahua Desert of New Mexico, which has widely spaced, low...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Near-ground aerosol fogs were applied in the Chihuahua Desert of...1.6° surrounded by sparse Chihuahua De- sert vegetation approximately 2 m tall (fig. 1). The vegeta- tion was primarily mesquite and creosote bushes

  8. Book Review: And then there were none: The demise of Desert Bighorn Sheep in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, James W.

    2018-01-01

    And Then There Were None: The Demise of Desert Bighorn Sheep in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness. Paul R.Krausman. 2017. The University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. 248 pp. $65.00 hardcover. ISBN 978‐0‐8263‐5785‐4.

  9. Some evidence of uranium in volcanic feldspar rocks in the state of Sonora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquina M, O. E. [Uranio Mexicano, Mexico City

    1983-05-15

    Description is given of four projects of exploration and survey for uranium associated with tertiary volcanic feldspar rocks importantly dispersed in the State of Sonora and being carried out by Uranium Mexicano.

  10. Radiometric geological exploration method used in the central part of the State of Sonora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco R, R.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to make known the importance of the radiometric data, the physical principles on which they are based and the geological interpretation which will permit in an indirect way to select important radioactive areas in order to carry out verification studies on the ground to see if there are sufficient reasons to show any interest in these areas. Till now this work has been realized in the State of Sonora (Mexico) in an area of 51,000 Km 2 subdivided in 14 zones, numbered from 201 to 214, and for the present work the zone 208 has been selected. This Zone is located at the north-west of the City of Hermosillo, and has a total area of 3400 Km 2 which has been the object of the study by plane through systematic flights in an east-west direction, in order to obtain the configuration and interpret it from a radiometrical point of view. The obtained isorads configuration plans of 4 channels of detection are the following: total counting, potassium, bismuth and thallium as well as their relations. From the 14 verified anomalies the anomaly Noche Buena was selected in order to carry out reconnaissance surveys and preliminary and detailed geological studies. The geology of the area is represented by extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks as well as sedimentary. The uraniferous mineralization is secondary and is represented by autunite, meta-autunite and torbenite which represent an average of 200 g to 3.08 Kg. of U 3 O 8 per ton. (author)

  11. How desert varnish forms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Randall S.; Kolb, Vera M.; Lynne, Bridget Y.; Sephton, Mark A.; Mcloughlin, Nicola; Engel, Michael H.; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Brasier, Martin; Staley, James T., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    Desert varnish is a black, manganese-rich rock coating that is widespread on Earth. The mechanism underlying its formation, however, has remained unresolved. We present here new data and an associated model for how desert varnish forms, which substantively challenges previously accepted models. We tested both inorganic processes (e.g. clays and oxides cementing coatings) and microbial methods of formation. Techniques used in this preliminary study include SEM-EDAX with backscatter, HRTEM of focused ion beam prepared (FIB) wafers and several other methods including XRPD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and Tof-SIMS. The only hypothesis capable of explaining a high water content, the presence of organic compounds, an amorphous silica phase (opal-A) and lesser quantities of clays than previously reported, is a mechanism involving the mobilization and redistribution of silica. The discovery of silica in desert varnish suggests labile organics are preserved by interaction with condensing silicic acid. Organisms are not needed for desert varnish formation but Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya, and other organic compounds are passively incorporated and preserved as organominerals. The rock coatings thus provide useful records of past environments on Earth and possibly other planets. Additionally this model also helps to explain the origin of key varnish and rock glaze features, including their hardness, the nature of the "glue" that binds heterogeneous components together, its layered botryoidal morphology, and its slow rate of formation.

  12. Comportamiento alimentario y obesidad infantil en Sonora, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana María Hernández

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene como objetivo identificar los factores sociales asociados con la obesidad y con los comportamientos alimentarios de riesgo en un grupo de niños y niñas de 7 a 12 años de edad, en Hermosillo, Sonora, México. Los resultados muestran que el 40% de la población estudiada presentó sobrepeso y obesidad; el 39 % tuvo predisposición a prácticas alimentarias de riesgo y el 30% ya presentaba dichos rasgos. Se encontró que el miedo a la obesidad y la obsesión por la delgadez, la ansiedad por los alimentos consumidos, las prácticas alimentarias restrictivas, así como la presión social sobre la imagen corporal, fueron los principales factores asociados con los comportamientos alimentarios de riesgo en la niñez.

  13. Comportamiento alimentario y obesidad infantil en Sonora, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana María Meléndez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene como objetivo identificar los factores sociales asociados con la obesidad y con los comportamientos alimentarios de riesgo en un grupo de niños y niñas de 7 a 12 años de edad, en Hermosillo, Sonora, México. Los resultados muestran que el 40% de la población estudiada presentó sobrepeso y obesidad; el 39 % tuvo predisposición a prácticas alimentarias de riesgo y el 30% ya presentaba dichos rasgos. Se encontró que el miedo a la obesidad y la obsesión por la delgadez, la ansiedad por los alimentos consumidos, las prácticas alimentarias restrictivas, así como la presión social sobre la imagen corporal, fueron los principales factores asociados con los comportamientos alimentarios de riesgo en la niñez.

  14. GOPHERUS AGASSIZII (Desert Tortoise)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAMES L. BOONE, DANNY L. RAKESTRAW, AND KURT R. RAUTENSTRAUCH

    1997-01-01

    GOPHERLTS AGAISSIZII (Desert Tortoise). Predation. A variety of predators, most notably coyotes (Canis Iatrans) and Common Ravens (Corvis corau) have been reported to prey on hatchling desert tortoises (Emst et al. 1994). Turtles of the United States and Canada (Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C. 578 pp.). Here, we report an observation of a hatchling tortoise, fitted with a radiotransmitter, that was preyed upon by native fire ants (Solenopsis sp.) in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (36 degrees 50 minutes N, 116 degree 25 minutes E). On 8/27/94, tortoise No.9315 (carapace length = 45 mm, age = 5 d) was found alive with eyes, chin, and parts of the head and legs being eaten by ants. The tortoise was alive, but lethargic, and responded little when touched. Eight of 74 other radiomarked hatchlings monitored at Yucca Mountain during 1992-1994 were found dead with fire ants on their carcass 3-7 days after the hatchlings emerged from their nests. It is not known whether those tortoises were killed by ants or were being scavenged when found. While imported fire ants (S. invicta) have long been known to kill hatchling gopher tortoises (G. polyphemus; Mount 1981. J. Alabama Acad. Sci. 52: 71-78), native fire ants have previously not been implicated as predators of desert tortoises. However, only 1 of 75 (or at worst 9 of 75) was killed by fire ants, suggesting that although fire ants do kill hatchlings, they were not important predators on desert tortoises during this study. Tortoise specimens were deposited at the University of California at Berkeley

  15. A Paleomagnetic Investigation of Large-Scale Vertical Axis Rotations in Coastal Sonora: Evidence for Transtensional Proto-Gulf Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, S. W.; Gans, P. B.

    2006-12-01

    A paleomagnetic investigation into possible vertical axis rotations has been conducted in the Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen, Sonora, Mexico, in order assess proposed styles for oblique continental rifting in the Gulf of California. Two styles of rifting have been proposed; (1) strain partitioning (Stock and Hodges, 89), and (2) transtension (Gans, 97), for the Proto-Gulf period of the Gulf of California. The presence of large- scale vertical axis rotations would lend weight to the argument for transtension. The Sierra el Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen are located in southwestern coastal Sonora, Mexico. The ranges represent the eastern-rifted margin of the central Gulf of California. This is one of the few areas of that margin which is entirely above water, with new ocean crust of the Guaymas basin lying immediately offshore of the western edge of the ranges. The ranges are composed of volcanic units and their corresponding volcaniclastic units that are the result of persistent magmatic activity between 20 and 8.8 Ma, including three packages of basalt and andesite that make excellent paleomagnetic recorders. Based on cross cutting relations and geochronologic data for pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic volcanic units, most of the faulting and tilting in the Sierra El Aguaje and Sierra Tinajas del Carmen is bracketed between 11.9 and 9.0 Ma, thus falling entirely within Proto-Gulf time. Existing field relations suggest the presence of large (>45°) vertical axis rotations in this region. This evidence includes: a) abrupt changes in the strike of tilted strata in different parts of the range b) ubiquitous NE-SW striking faults with left lateral-normal oblique slip, that terminate against major NW-trending right lateral faults, and c) obliquity between the general strike of tilted strata and the strike of faults. The results of the paleomagnetic investigation are consistent with the field evidence and show large clockwise rotations between ~30° and

  16. Mexico, maquiladoras, and occupational medicine training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, D H; Rea, D F; Schwartz, I; Rea, J

    1989-01-01

    Industrialization and its concomitant social and environmental effects in developing countries are considered in this paper. Mexico offers one example of economic progress achieved through the promotion of industrial growth. Recognising the need for trained experts with global experience in occupational health, the University of Arizona (UA) has begun a programme to train occupational and preventive medicine residents in international aspects of occupational health in the nearby industrialized border regions of Mexico. By using the maquiladora (assembly plant) industries and the resources of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social with the State of Sonora, residents observe existing problems in occupational safety and health in addition to adding to their understanding of the need for worldwide cooperation for research and reform in this field.

  17. New Mexico: The Land of Enchantment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    New Mexico, a state of brown plains and sand deserts, is nicknamed "The Land of Enchantment." One reason is that the very starkness of the land adds to its enchantment. Another reason is that the rich history of the state has resulted in a landscape filled with remnants of the Pueblo people, Spanish colonizers, and Mexican settlers.

  18. Amphibians and reptiles of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, with comparisons with adjoining states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Lemos-Espinal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chihuahua is Mexico’s largest state, and its physiographic complexity affects the distribution of its herpetofauna. We list amphibians and reptiles for the state of Chihuahua, with their conservation status. We also compare this list to those of six adjoining states in the United States and Mexico (New Mexico, Texas, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, and Sonora. A total of 175 species of amphibians and reptiles is found in Chihuahua. Thirty-eight are amphibians, and 137 reptiles. Chihuahuan amphibians and reptiles represent just over 37% of such species from Chihuahua and neighboring states. Chihuahua shares the highest proportion of its herpetofauna with Sonora and Durango. Most of the herpetofauna of Chihuahua falls in IUCNs least concern category and is not listed by SEMARNAT. However, turtles in Chihuahua are a group of particular conservation concern.

  19. Perspectiva del (desempleo en Sonora, 2000-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Peralta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es pronosticar el número de personas que ofrecerán sus servicios frente al de los que podrían tener un empleo permanente1 en el estado mexicano de Sonora entre los años 2000 y 2015, contrastando el escenario de continuar las tendencias históricas del empleo con el de una propuesta de mayor crecimiento y reestructuración productiva que priorice actividades que exigen mano de obra en abundancia. Generar empleo formal o permanente implica esfuerzos de investigación e instrumentación en áreas como las de tecnología, educación, capacitación o financiamiento a la inversión, entre otras, lo cual requiere del análisis de especialistas. El objetivo aquí planteado es más modesto, pero dimensionar el número de los que ofrecerán sus servicios de trabajo contra la perspectiva de creación de empleos permanentes implica un reto a la economía sonorense, pues las personas que buscarán trabajo en el horizonte referido ya existen. La hipótesis que aquí se plantea es: si no se promueve el empleo permanente más allá de lo que la extensión de la tendencia histórica conlleva entre los años 2000 y 2015, la generación de este tipo de empleo se rezagará considerablemente respecto a la población que buscará ocuparse, ampliando el desempleo abierto y disfrazado.2 Este artículo tiene cuatro secciones. En la primera se presenta el rezago del empleo permanente respecto a la fuerza de trabajo; en la segunda se describe el marco teórico y el respectivo modelo de referencia; en la tercera, el método de trabajo y sus resultados, incluyendo las actividades propuestas para aumentar el empleo y las tasas de inversión para acelerar el crecimiento económico y la creación de empleos formales; la cuarta contiene conclusiones y recomendaciones. Se presenta un anexo estadístico con proyecciones demográficas y de fuerza de trabajo, así como la matriz de insumo-producto de Sonora.

  20. EFFECTS OF PLANT SIZE ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND WATER RELATIONS IN THE DESERT SHRUB PROSOPIS GLANDULOSA (FABACEAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Jornada del Muerto basin of the Chihuahuan Desert of southern New Mexico, USA, has undergone a marked transition of plant communities. Shrubs such as mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) have greatly increased or now dominate in areas that were previously dominated by perennial gra...

  1. Foraging behavior of heritage versus recently introduced herbivores on desert landscapes of the American Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 1800s managed grasslands and shrublands of the arid American Southwest have been grazed predominantly by cattle originally bred for temperate climates in northern Europe. A heritage breed, the criollo cattle, has survived in northern Mexico for more than 400 years under desert-like conditi...

  2. Lizard community structure across a grassland - creosote bush ecotone in the Chihuahuan Desert

    OpenAIRE

    Menke, Sean B

    2003-01-01

    I investigated the distribution and abundance of lizard species (Aspidoscelis inornatus, Aspidoscelis tesselatus, Aspidoscelis tigris, Aspidoscelis uniparens, Cophosaurus texanus, Crotaphytus collaris, Eumeces obsoletus, Gambelia wislizenii, Holbrookia maculata, Phrynosoma cornutum, Sceloporus magister, and Uta stansburiana) across a desert grassland - creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) ecotone in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. The ecotonal area in the Jomada del Muerto basin has increased drama...

  3. Population, desert expanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The conditions of desert expansion in the Sahara are highlighted. On the southern border the desert is growing at a rate of 3-6 miles/year. This growth is encroaching on arable land in Ethiopia and Mauritania. The region loses up to 28,000 sq miles/year of farmland. 33% of Africa's fertile land is threatened. Land-use patterns are responsible for the deterioration of the soil. Traditional practices are not effective because the practices are not suitable for permanent farming. Farmers also have stopped environmentally sound practices such as letting the fields remain fallow in order to renew soil fertility. Nomads overgraze areas before moving on. A recent study by the World Bank's Africa Region Office was released; the report details some of the links between rapid population growth, poor agricultural performance, and environmental degradation. Soil conditions are such that valuable topsoil is blow away by the wind because the layer is too thin. Vegetation at the desert's edge is used for cooking purposes or for heating fuel. Tropical and savannah areas are depleted when tree replacement is inadequate. Only 9 trees are planted for every 100 removed. The report emphasized the role of women and children in contributing to population pressure by increased fertility. Women's work load is heavy and children are a help in alleviating some of the burden of domestic and agricultural work. There is hope in meeting demographic, agricultural, food security, and environmental objectives over the next 30 years if the needs of women are met. The needs include access to education for young women, lessening the work loads of women, and decreasing child mortality through improved health care and access to safe water.

  4. Physiological adaptation in desert birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI; Williams, Joseph B.

    We call into question the idea that birds have not evolved unique physiological adaptations to desert environments. The rate at which desert larks metabolize energy is lower than in mesic species within the same family, and this lower rate of living translates into a lower overall energy requirement

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Hernández, Gerardo; Roldán, Jesús Felipe González; Milan, Néstor Saúl Hernández; Lash, R Ryan; Behravesh, Casey Barton; Paddock, Christopher D

    2017-06-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne zoonosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is among the most lethal of all infectious diseases in the Americas. In Mexico, the disease was first described during the early 1940s by scientists who carefully documented specific environmental determinants responsible for devastating outbreaks in several communities in the states of Sinaloa, Sonora, Durango, and Coahuila. These investigators also described the pivotal roles of domesticated dogs and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (brown dog ticks) as drivers of epidemic levels of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. After several decades of quiescence, the disease re-emerged in Sonora and Baja California during the early 21st century, driven by the same environmental circumstances that perpetuated outbreaks in Mexico during the 1940s. This Review explores the history of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico, current epidemiology, and the multiple clinical, economic, and social challenges that must be considered in the control and prevention of this life-threatening illness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. La banda sonora del programa «Rá-Tim-Bum»

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Duarte, Mônica de

    2005-01-01

    Esta comunicación trata de los resultados parciales de la investigación vuelta para el análisis de la banda sonora del programa televisivo Rá-Tim-Bum, de TV Educativa, empresa gubernamental. Se utiliza un cuadro teórico-metodológico de análisis de los discursos aplicado a la música propuesto por Amparo Porta por medio de tres niveles de aproximación: verosimilitud referencial (las calidades sonoras), poética (tratamiento de frases y de finalización) y tópica (ideologia difundida). El...

  7. Reconstrucción de Atmósferas Sonoras Tridimensionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhosimar Aguacía Fisco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este proyecto es la reconstrucción de atmósferas sonoras tridimensionales, por medio de la tecnología Ambisonics, implementando un sistema de captura Native B-Format, codificación de fuentes puntuales y el uso de algunos audios grabados con micrófonos Soundfield, para crear así atmósferas sonoras naturales y artificiales, que serán reproducidas en un sistema 10.2, con el fin de generar un envolvimiento total, incluyendo alturas.

  8. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-01-01

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1) R gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking

  9. 76 FR 36049 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Utah...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... applications, including the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and possibly memory disorders, such as Alzheimer's... and Sonora, Mexico; and in small portions of the Chihuahuan Desert in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico (Beck 2005, p. 26). Its range throughout the United States and Mexico encompasses...

  10. Geophysical Characterization and Structural Model of the Santa ROSALÍA Aquifer, Sonora, MÉXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Retama, S.; Montaño-Del Cid, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of this work was to determine the morphology and depth of the basement, as well as the elaboration of a structural model for the Santa Rosalía aquifer, from the processing and interpretation of gravimetric and aeromagnetic data and its correlation with the Geology of the area. The study area is located in the central portion of the State of Sonora, Mexico. In general, the geology of the site is characterized by sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks whose ages vary from the Precambrian to Recent. Chronologically, the geology of the study area consists of igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age, considered as a metamorphic complex. The Paleozoic is represented by a sequence of prebatolytic rocks. This sequence is intruded by rocks of the Upper Cretaceous. The Triassic-Jurassic periods consist of arenaceous units of the Barranca Group. The Cretaceous is constituted by the Tarahumara Formation, as well as granite bodies. The Quaternary is composed of alluvial deposits, which are overlain by sediments of Recent. In this work a gravimetric survey was performed, registering a total of 7 profiles. In addition, measured data from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI) were used. The aeromagnetic study was carried out with data from the Mexican Geological Service (SGM). In order to reduce the ambiguity in the modeling process, a rock sampling was taken from the study area and its density and magnetic susceptibility were measured. Finally, two-dimensional models of gravimetric and magnetic profiles were made to obtain the structural model of the study area. The geological-structural models obtained show gravimetric anomalies (low)associated with sedimentary basins with depths of 800 m to 1,500 m., indicating the most susceptible áreas to water storage. The basement is represented by volcanic and granite rocks that are in contact with Paleozoic sedimentary rocks (Limestone) and in some areas with volcanic rocks of the

  11. The Plant Genetic Engineering Laboratory For Desert Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, John D.; Phillips, Gregory C.

    1985-11-01

    The Plant Genetic Engineering Laboratory for Desert Adaptation (PGEL) is one of five Centers of Technical Excellence established as a part of the state of New Mexico's Rio Grande Research Corridor (RGRC). The scientific mission of PGEL is to bring innovative advances in plant biotechnology to bear on agricultural productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. Research activities focus on molecular and cellular genetics technology development in model systems, but also include stress physiology investigations and development of desert plant resources. PGEL interacts with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a national laboratory participating in the RGRC. PGEL also has an economic development mission, which is being pursued through technology transfer activities to private companies and public agencies.

  12. Aircraft and satellite remote sensing of desert soils and landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, G. W.; Connors, K. F.; Miller, D. A.; Day, R. L.; Gardner, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sensing data on desert soils and landscapes, obtained by the Landsat TM, Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), Simulated SPOT, and Thermal IR Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) aboard an aircraft, are discussed together with the analytical techniques used in the studies. The TM data for southwestern Nevada were used to discriminate among the alluvial fan deposits with different degrees of desert pavement and varnish, and different vegetation cover. Thermal-IR data acquired from the HCMM satellite were used to map the spatial distribution of diurnal surface temperatures and to estimate mean annual soil temperatures in central Utah. Simulated SPOT data for northwestern New Mexico identified geomorphic features, such as differences in eolian sand cover and fluvial incision, while the TIMS data depicted surface geologic features of the Saline Valley in California.

  13. Livestock grazing and the desert tortoise in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldemeyer, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A large part of the Mojave Desert is not in pristine condition, and some current conditions can be related to past grazing-management practices. No information could be found on densities of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) or on vegetative conditions of areas that had not been grazed to allow managers a comparison of range conditions with data on tortoises. Experimental information to assess the effect of livestock grazing on tortoises is lacking, and researchers have not yet examined whether the forage that remains after grazing is sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of desert tortoises.

  14. Geologic and radiometric study of the Santa Rosalia area, Arizpe Department, Sonora Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez M, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of the radiometrical anomaly, discovered in the Santa Rosalia area, Arizpe Department, Sonota, is defined in this study through topographical and geological surveying of the area by the outline and systematical survey of rocks for sampling and registration of the radioactivity. Two radioactive anomalies were defined and called IIIA and IIIB, identifying the existence of secondary uranium minerals (Torbernite) in the IIIB anomaly. According to the results of the work which was carried out we can't deduce that both localities present signs of the existence of important uranium concentrations. We can conclude that the presence of uranium minerals obliges us to realize a more detailed exploration, suggesting the opening of little excavations and ditches and stretching out of the geochemical, geological and radiometrical exploration to adjacent areas. (author)

  15. Distribution of the Sonora Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi) in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Blake R.; Muths, Erin L.; Rorabaugh, James C.; Lemos Espinal, Julio A.; Sigafus, Brent H.; Chambert, Thierry A.; Carreon Arroyo, Gerardo; Hurtado Felix, David; Toyos Martinez, Daniel; Jones, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sonoran Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi Lowe, 1954) was listed as federally endangered in the USA in 1997 (USFWS 1997). In the USA, the distribution of A. mavortium stebbinsi is limited to the San Rafael Valley (approximately 567 km2), between the Sierra San Antonio (called the Patagonia Mountains in Arizona) and Huachuca Mountains, and south of the Canelo Hills, Arizona (Fig. 1). The USA listing was triggered by loss of natural wetland habitats, threats from invasive predators, frequent die-offs from disease, introgression with the introduced Barred Tiger Salamander (A. mavortium mavortium), and small range and number of breeding sites that increases susceptibility to stochastic events (USFWS 1997). Small population sizes and limited gene flow have caused inbreeding, which may further reduce population viability and the potential for recovery (Jones et al. 1988; Storfer et al. 2014). 

  16. PARTICIPATORY DIAGNOSIS TO DEVELOP TOURISM PROJECT IN THE COMMUNITY ALTERNATIVE AGIABAMPO, HUATABAMPO, SONORA, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adán Guillermo Ramírez-García

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Agiabampo is a fishing community facing the lack of options for productive activities, which puts enormous pressure on natural resources. This paper aims to identify the areas with tourism potential through a participatory diagnosis to assess the relevance of such projects that contribute to sustainable development. It is located at coordinates 26 ° 21 'north latitude and 58''de 109 ° 08' 37 '' west longitude, down from 15 meters altitude. It is within the Ramsar site called "lagoon system Agiabampo-Bacorehuis-Rio Fuerte Old" also form part of the priority terrestrial region "Las Bocas" (RTP-21 and program CONABIO Areas of Importance for the Conservation of Birds (IBA, AICA 131 "Agiabampo". According to the rules of operation of CONAFOR (2009 for the tourist diagnosis proceeded to conduct the inventory and prioritization of natural and cultural resources, also five workshops with community residents and municipal authorities were carried out interviews semi structured with key players in the CONANP and three field trips to community guides. The identified natural attractions are the Horseshoe bay, cove San Lucas, Isla Bocanita Beach Baths, Bamocha Peninsula and Isle of ducks. The identified cultural appeal considered gastronomy, traditional medicine, crafts, customs and traditions. Two paths are proposed by the Laguna maritime lasts 3.5 hours, the Earth is Bamocha Peninsula lasting 3 hours. It is indisputable Agiabampo the potential to develop alternative tourism project due to its geographical location and natural and cultural attractions are there, allowing preserve and create jobs in the community.

  17. Medium and large mammals in the Sierra La Madera, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erick Oswaldo Bermudez-Enriquez; Rosa Elena Jimenez-Maldonado; Gertrudis Yanes-Arvayo; Maria de la Paz Montanez-Armenta; Hugo Silva-Kurumiya

    2013-01-01

    Sierra La Madera is a Sky Island mountain range in the Madrean Archipelago. It is in Fracción V of the Ajos-Bavispe CONANP Reserve in the Municipios (= Counties) of Cumpas, Granados, Huásabas, Moctezuma, and Villa Hidalgo. Medium and large mammals were inventoried using camera traps. Eighteen Wild View 2® camera traps were deployed during four sampling periods: August...

  18. [ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICATORS AND CARDIOMETABOLIC EVENTS AMONG SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN FROM SONORA, MEXICO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Peña, Sandra Lidia; Reséndiz González, Eunice; Rubí Vargas, María; Terrazas Medina, Efraín Alonso; Cupul Uicab, Lea Aurora

    2015-10-01

    obesity in childhood is predictive of obesity in adulthood and it is associated with adverse health effect apparent since childhood; however, the joint assessment of obesity and adverse events among children in clinical settings is unusual. to assess the association of overweight and obesity, abdominal obesity, and excess body fat with systolic [SBP] and diastolic [DBP] blood pressure, lipid profile and glucose levels; and to identify the best anthropometric indicator of such events. we conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample of 412 schoolchildren. The presence of overweight and obesity, abdominal obesity and excess body fat was determined among all participants; levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, high and low density lipoproteins, and glucose were measured in a subsample (n = 133). The associations of interest were assessed using adjusted linear and logistic regression models. 33% of the children were overweight or obese. Overall, overweight, obesity, abdominal obesity, and excess body fat were associated with elevated SBP and DBP and with a lipid profile and glucose levels that could indicate health risks among these children. Overweight and obesity were the best predictors of such events. among these school-aged children, we observed that obesity was associated with high odds of having adverse health outcomes such as high blood pressure, lipids and glucose. Such adverse events can be predicted by the presence of obesity measured by BMI, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive and easy to implement measure. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Antioxidant and antifungal potential of methanol extracts of Phellinus spp. from Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Zavala, Jesús Fernando; Silva-Espinoza, Brenda Adriana; Cruz-Valenzuela, Manuel Reynaldo; Villegas-Ochoa, Mónica Alejandra; Esqueda, Martín; González-Aguilar, Gustavo Adolfo; Calderón-López, Yazaric

    2012-01-01

    Among the potential natural sources of bioactive compounds, those of the macroscopic fungi Phellinus spp. have been identified by previous researches. Phenolic compounds are among the major antioxidant and antimicrobial contributors due to their bioactive properties. The goal of this study was to determine the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, and its relation with the antioxidant and antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of Phellinus gilvus, Phellinus rimosus and Phellinus badius, respectively. The collected and identified organisms of Phellinus spp. were treated with methanol and the generated aqueous extract was analyzed to quantified total phenolic compounds, total flavonoids, radical scavenging activity against DPPH, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and oxygen absorbance capacity. The antifungal property of the extracts was evaluated against Alternaria alternata. The content of phenolic compounds was of 49.31, 46.51 and 44.7 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g, for P. gilvus, P. rimosus and P. badius, respectively. The total flavonoid content followed the same pattern with values of 30.58, 28, and 26.48 mg of quercetin equivalents/g for P. gilvus, P. rimosus and P. badius, respectively. The variation on the content of phenolic components was reflected on the antioxidant activity of every organism. The antioxidant activity ranked as follows: P. gilvus>P. rimosus>P. badius. The antifungal effect of the different extracts against A. alternata showed a significant effect, all of them, inhibiting the growth of this pathogen. P. gilvus showed the best potential to inactivate free radicals, being all the tested fungi effective to inhibit A. alternata growth. Copyright © 2011 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Bedded Barite Deposits from Sonora (nw Mexico): a Paleozoic Analog for Modern Cold Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, C.; Anadón, P.; González-Partida, E.; Alfonso, P.; Rajabi, A.; Pérez-Segura, E.; Alba-Aldave, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    The Mazatán barite deposits represent an outstanding example of Paleozoic bedded barite, a poorly understood type of mineral deposit of major economic interest. The largest barite bodies of Mazatán are hosted within an Upper Carboniferous flysch succession, which formed part of an accretionary wedge related to the subduction of the Rheic Ocean beneath Gondwana. As well, a few barite occurrences are hosted in Upper Devonian, pre-orogenic turbidites. A variety of mineralized structures is displayed by barite, including: septaria nodules, enterolitic structures, rosettes and debris-flow conglomerates. Barite is accompanied by chalcedony, pyrite (framboids) and berthierine. Gas-rich fluid inclusions in barite were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and methane was identified, suggesting the occurrence of light hydrocarbons in the environment within which barite precipitated. 13C-depleted carbonates (δ13C: -24.3 to -18.8‰) were found in the barite deposits; they formed through anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction, and yield negative δ18O values (-11.9 to -5.2‰) reflecting the isotopic composition of Devonian-Carboniferous seawater. Methane-derived carbonates occur in modern hydrocarbon seeps and have been reported from Mesozoic and Cenozoic seep sediments, but they have never before been described in Paleozoic bedded barite deposits. δ34S of barite varies from +17.6 to +64.1‰, with the lowest values overlapping the range for coeval seawater sulfate; this distribution indicates a process of sulfate reduction. Barite precipitation can be explained by mixing of methane- and barium-rich fluids with pore-water (seawater) containing sulfate residual from microbial reduction. Two analyses from barite gave an 87Sr/86Sr within and slightly above the range for seawater at the time of deposition, with 0.708130 and 0.708588, which would preclude the involvement of hydrothermal fluids in the mineralization process.

  1. Extent and character of early tertiary penetrative deformation, Sonora, Northwest Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Reconnaissance field work has led to the recognition of extensive Early Tertiary gneiss and schist which are distinguished by weakly developed to highly conspicous northeast to east-trending stretching lineation commonly accompanied by low-dipping foliation. This structural fabric has been imposed on Precambrian to Paleogene rocks. Regionally, minimum ages of deformation are based upon interpreted U-Pb isotopic ages from suites of cogenetic zircon from the Paleogene orthogneiss. Locally, the interpreted ages indicate that ductile deformation continued as late as Oligocene (Anderson and others, 1980; Silver and Anderson, 1984). The consistency of the deformational style is such that, although considerable variation in intensity exists, the fabric can be recognized and correlated in rocks away from the Paleogene orthogneiss.

  2. Family functionality in pediatric asthma patients in a public hospital in Sonora, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Vázquez Armenta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The family and psychological approaches in asthma patients are essential because a dysfunctional family can increase asthma symptoms of the sick child. Aim: To determine family functioning and classification of asthma in pediatric patients, and the condition in the areas that comprises it. Method: A cross-sectional study in asthmatic patients treated in pediatrics Regional General Hospital No. 1 between April and July 2015 was done. Asthma severity was classified in response to the GINA 2010 guide. The Dr. Emma Espejel Scale of Family Functioning was applied to the patient's family. Results: The male presented more severe asthma by 70%, especially in school age. The dysfunction of the control area of family dynamics in the Mexican family impact on the severity of asthma. Discussion and Conclusion: 50% of families with a carrier member of asthma reflect dysfunction; control area was the most affected. Family and psychological approaches in patients with asthma are basic to prevent changes in family function.

  3. Coyote abundance in relation to habitat characteristics in Sierra San Luis, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardo Ponce Guevara; Karla Pelz Serrano; Carlos A. Lopez Gonzalez

    2005-01-01

    Coyotes have expanded their historical distribution range because of anthropogenic activities and habitat transformation, where forests have been considered marginal habitat. We tested the relationship between vegetation structure and coyote abundance in different habitat types. We expected to find a higher abundance in open lands than in thicker areas. We used scent...

  4. A preliminary floristic inventory in the Sierra de Mazatan, Municipios of Ures and Mazatan, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Jesus Sanchez-Escalante; Manuel Espericueta-Betancourt; Reyna Amanda Castillo-Gamez

    2005-01-01

    Presently, the flora of the Sierra de Mazatán contains 357 species of vascular plants distributed in 248 genera and 80 families. The families with the most species are Asteraceae (48), Fabaceae (45), Poaceae (28), Euphorbiaceae (18), and Acanthaceae, Cactaceae, Scrophulariaceae, and Solanaceae (11 each). The results show that the flora of the Sierra de Mazat...

  5. [Sodium, potassium and calcium content in regional dishes consumed in Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Valencia, M E; Wyatt, J

    1990-06-01

    The content of sodium, potassium and calcium was determined in 15 regional dishes, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The Na:K ratio was high in most of the dishes due to the high sodium content and low content of potassium found. The higher sources of the studied minerals were "tortilla de harina" with 1,372.8 mg/100 g of sodium; "chorizo con papas" with 466 mg/100 g of potassium, and "calabacitas con queso" with 244.1 mg/100 g of calcium. Two of the dishes considered as desserts, "capirotada" and "arroz con leche" showed the lowest Na:K ratio (0.66 and 0.81, respectively).

  6. Confianza institucional y violencia estructural en Nogales, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Germán Palafox Moyers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available En México, la violencia se ha incrementado exponencialmente en los últimos años; representa un constructo social con elementos multifactoriales y multicausales que, para erradicarse se deben contener y controlar con medidas de prevención y participación ciudadana. El objetivo de este artículo es determinar la influencia de la acción colectiva y la cooperación y también la cohesión e inclusión social sobre la confianza institucional, y a su vez sobre la violencia estructural generada por el proceso de inmigración y deportación en Nogales, Sonora. Para contrastar las hipótesis formuladas se aplicó un instrumento estadístico a una muestra aleatoria-estratificada en las colonias más violentas de esta ciudad fronteriza. Los resultados demostraron que la confianza y solidaridad de los habitantes es mayor hacia las instituciones públicas: gobierno local, central e instancias policiacas; en cambio, no confían tanto en las instituciones educativas (profesores y de seguridad social (enfermeras y médicos. Sin embargo, a partir de un análisis de medias aritméticas, con muestras separadas por rango de edad, se demostró que en todas las categorías de edad se confiaba más en las enfermeras y médicos y los profesores. También, se puso de manifiesto que tanto hombres como mujeres confían más en los trabajadores de la salud y la educación.

  7. A cigarra e a formiga: por uma paisagem sonora da sociedade globalizada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa de Araújo Valente

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Há pouco mais de cem anos, a paisagem sonora urbana conhecia uma série de sons bizarros que, desde então, só se multiplicaram, a ponto de formar uma massa sonora de baixa definição acústica (lo-fi. Trata-se do som contínuo dos motores que, em última análise, transmitem mensagens repetitivas. De outra parte, a globalização deste final de século abocanha, a cada dia, um território espaço-cultural cada vez mais amplo. A música- pelo menos a música das mídias- já nasce cosmopolita, fazendo ressoar um mesmo repertório em todos os restaurantes e aeroportos do mundo. Cria-se, assim, uma mesma trilha sonora para o grande formigueiro humano que habita o planeta. O presente trabalho pretende discutir, através do exemplo da música, o papel da paisagem sonora atual, numa sociedade humana que adquire traços de uma sociedade entômica.

  8. Programa de desayunos escolares en Sonora. Un recuento de experiencias y retos nuevos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Guadalupe González Valencia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue el analizar el desarrollo y resultados del programa de desayunos escolares (PDE en Sonora y discutir los retos futuros. La metodología fue la siguiente: se analizan y discuten los resultados del PDE en Sonora (1997-2011, publicados en tres artículos, tres tesis de maestría y reportes técnicos entregados al DIF-Sonora. Como resultados podemos exponer que la vigilancia y evaluación del PDE ha permitido cambios congruentes con las necesidades de los niños y los recursos disponibles y no constituye un riesgo para el desarrollo de obesidad. Encontramos limitaciones tales como que es necesaria la educación nutricional en los contextos escuela y hogar para lograr cambios sostenibles en las prácticas alimentarias y de actividad física. Podemos concluir que el proceso de seguimiento e institucionalización del PDE en Sonora, permite un ambiente organizacional adecuado para el desarrollo de un programa de educación nutricional conducente a la prevención de obesidad.

  9. Remote Sensing Field Guide - Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    experienced boatmen. Most river water, even in deserts, contains Giardia micro -organisms that can cause serious diarrhea. Sich water should be boiled...water. The solutes and suspended micro -matter can be moved up and down by an oscillating water table and redeposited or precipitated at differ- ent...McCauley, U.S. Geological Survey, Desert Studies Group, Flagstaff, AZ, Nov 1973. B. Servicio Aerofotografia Nacional del Peru (on back). / ...... CONN:MFI

  10. Powering Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines Mexico's demand for electricity and the market for independent power generation. The topics discussed in the article include the outlook for the 1990s for growth in Mexico's economy and energy demand, renewable energy, energy conservation, small-scale, off-grid renewable energy systems, and estimates of Mexico's market for electric power generating equipment

  11. Mexico Geoid Heights (MEXICO97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for Mexico, and North-Central America, is the MEXICO97 geoid model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine gravity...

  12. Localização sonora em usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual Sound localization by hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar o desempenho, no teste de localização de fontes sonoras, de usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual (AASI do tipo retroauricular e intracanal, com o desempenho de ouvintes normais, nos planos espaciais horizontal e sagital mediano, para as frequências de 500, 2.000 e 4.500 Hz; e correlacionar os acertos no teste de localização sonora com o tempo de uso dos AASI. MÉTODOS: foram testados oito ouvintes normais e 20 usuários de próteses auditivas, subdivididos em dois grupos. Um formado por 10 indivíduos usuários de próteses auditivas do tipo intracanal e o outro grupo formado por 10 usuários de próteses auditivas do tipo retroauricular. Todos foram submetidos ao teste de localização de fontes sonoras, no qual foram apresentados, aleatoriamente, três tipos de ondas quadradas, com frequências fundamentais em 0,5 kHz, 2 kHz e 4,5 kHz, na intensidade de 70 dBA. RESULTADOS: encontrou-se percentuais de acertos médios de 78,4%, 72,2% e 72,9% para os ouvintes normais, em 0,5 kHz, 2 kHz e 4,5 kHz, respectivamente e 40,1%, 39,4% e 41,7% para os usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual. Quanto aos tipos de aparelhos, os usuários do modelo intracanal acertaram a origem da fonte sonora em 47,2% das vezes e os usuários do modelo retroauricular em 37,4% das vezes. Não foi observada correlação entre o percentual de acertos no teste de localização sonora e o tempo de uso da prótese auditiva. CONCLUSÃO: ouvintes normais localizam as fontes sonoras de maneira mais eficiente que os usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual e, dentre estes, os que utilizam o modelo intracanal obtiveram melhor desempenho. Além disso, o tempo de uso não interferiu no desempenho para localizar a origem das fontes sonoras.PURPOSE: to compare the sound localization performance of hearing aids users, with the performance of normal hearing in the horizontal and sagittal planes, at 0.5, 2 and 4

  13. Current Status of Carl Sagan Observatory in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ibarra, A.

    The current status of Observatory "Carl Sagan" (OCS) of University of Sonora is presented. This project was born in 1996 focused to build a small solar-stellar observatory completely operated by remote control. The observatory will be at "Cerro Azul", a 2480 m peak in one of the best regions in the world for astronomical observation, at the Sonora-Arizona desert. The OCS, with three 16 cm solar telescopes and a 55 cm stellar telescope is one of the cheapest observatories, valuated in US200,000 Added to its scientific goals to study solar coronal holes and Supernovae Type 1A, the OCS has a strong educative and cultural program in Astronomy to all levels. At the end of 2001, we started the Program "Constelacion", to build small planetariums through all the countries with a cost of only US80,000. Also, the webcast system for transmission of the solar observations from the prototype OCS at the campus, was expanded to webcast educational programs in Astronomy since July of this year, including courses and diplomats for Latin American people. All of these advances are exposed here.

  14. Removal of nonnative slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) and effects on native Sonora mud turtles (Kinosternon sonoriense) at Montezuma Well, Yavapai County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Charles A.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Madrak, Sheila V.; Monatesti, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) estimates that 234 national parks contain nonnative, invasive animal species that are of management concern (National Park Service, 2004). Understanding and controlling invasive species is thus an important priority within the NPS (National Park Service, 1996). The slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) is one such invasive species. Native to the Southeastern United States (Ernst and Lovich, 2009), as well as Mexico, Central America, and portions of South America (Ernst and Barbour, 1989), the slider turtle has become established throughout the continental United States and in other locations around the world (Burke and others, 2000). Slider turtle introductions have been suspected to be a threat to native turtles (Holland 1994; da Silva and Blasco, 1995), however, there has not been serious study of their effects until recently. Cadi and Joly (2003) found that slider turtles outcompeted European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis) for preferred basking sites under controlled experimental conditions, demonstrating for the first time direct competition for resources between a native and an exotic turtle species. Similarly, Spinks and others (2003) suggested that competition for basking sites between slider turtles and Pacific pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) was partly responsible for the decline of Pacific pond turtles observed at their study site in California. They concluded that the impact of introduced slider turtles was 'almost certainly negative' for the western pond turtle. In the most recent critical study to assess the effects of introduced slider turtles on native turtles, Cadi and Joly (2004) demonstrated that European pond turtles that were kept under experimentally controlled conditions with slider turtles lost body weight and exhibited higher rates of mortality than in control groups of turtles comprised of the same species, demonstrating potential population-level effects on native species. Slider turtles are not native to

  15. Aborigines of the nuclear desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujula, A. de

    1985-01-01

    The chart of 'stable nuclides' extends from Hydrogen, to Z proportional 98, A proportional 263. It contains another island of stability - neutron stars - in a narrow range around Z proportional 10 56 , A proportional 10 57 . In between lies a supposedly barren region encompassing more than 50 orders of magnitude. This desert may be populated by strange quark balls: Stable single bags containing similar proportions of u, d and s quarks. These balls are candidates for the constituency of the 'dark mass' in galaxies and in the Universe. We describe seven ways to search for these possible inhabitants of the nuclear desert. (orig.)

  16. Incidencia y costo de la Mastitis en un establo del Municipio de Santa Ana, Sonora

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlach B., Francisco Arturo; Ayala Alvarez, Felix; Denogean Ballesteros, Francisco G.; Moreno Medina, Salomon; Gerlach B., Luis Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    With the objective to know the mastitis cost for milk producer, was developed this study, with duration of a year in a milk farm of the North region of Sonora. The cost of the clinical and subclinical mastitis was estimated, taking into account the milk production, treatment costs and commercial milk value. The information was recorded monthly, the incidence of subclinical mastitis was obtained using California MastitisTest (CMT) and clinical mastitis incidence was obtained from farm health r...

  17. Breeding Double-crested Cormorants and Wading Birds on Isla Alcatraz, Sonora, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer N. Duberstein; Virginia Jimenez-Serrania; Tad A. Pfister; Kirsten E. Lindquist; Lorayne Meltzer

    2005-01-01

    Isla Alcatraz is a small volcanic island in the Eastern Midriff Island region of the Gulf of California, approximately 1.4 km from the fishing community of Bahía de Kino, Sonora, México. The island falls under the protection of the Gulf Island Reserve system for wildlife and migratory birds. Isla Alcatraz is home to one of the largest Double-crested Cormorant (

  18. Nível de pressão sonora em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vendramini Peixoto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo foram verificar o nível de pressão sonora (NPS de duas salas de Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal (UTIN e identificar as suas fontes. É uma pesquisa quantitativa, descritiva, conduzida em duas salas de UTIN de hospital universitário de São Paulo - SP, Brasil. Registros de NPS foram realizados por três dosímetros, totalizando 261 horas de mensuração. Obteve-se 48 horas de registros das fontes que produzem ruídos. Os resultados indicam elevados níveis de pressão sonora nos dois ambientes. Os maiores níveis de Leq foram 71,0 dBA na sala A e 68,0 dBA na sala B. As principais fontes de ruído encontradas nas duas unidades foram ruído no corredor, trânsito e conversa entre os profissionais. Os resultados revelam que os NPS das salas da UTIN estão distantes dos recomendados pelos órgãos regulamentadores. Foi desenvolvido um protocolo e implementado um programa educativo, visando à redução dos níveis de pressão sonora.

  19. Recursos y alternativas de tratamiento para los minerales de teluro de Sonora (México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguayo, S.

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium production is limited mainly to that obtained from the treatment of electrolyte muds from copper refineries. However, there are several other sources from which the precious metal tellurides are potentially attractive. This work presents a review of the main localities in Sonora (México, where tellurides have been found. In addition, based upon the physical chemistry fundamentals for tellurium and precious metal tellurides, the aqueous extraction and recovery routes are discussed.

    El teluro es un elemento escaso, pero con un espectro amplio de aplicaciones. Su producción está limitada a la obtenida por el tratamiento de los lodos electrolíticos de las refinerías de cobre. De las fuentes alternativas de teluro, los telururos de metales preciosos son atractivos por la asociación natural de estos dos elementos, con la posibilidad de obtener el teluro como subproducto. Sonora (México, se caracteriza por ser una zona rica en teluros con más de treinta especies registradas. Este artículo describe las principales localizaciones en que se encuentran minerales de teluro en Sonora (México, señalando sus principales características, así como las especies hasta ahora registradas. Se analizan, además, las posibles rutas de extracción y recuperación acuosa de teluro, de acuerdo con la fisicoquímica de los sistemas teluro-metales preciosos.

  20. Russian deserters of World War I

    OpenAIRE

    Os'kin Maksim

    2014-01-01

    Desertion is one of the most active forms of ordinary resistance of the people to the state pressure during the low-popular war which is conducting for the purposes unclear for the people. At the same time, mass desertion is a manifestation of «total» war in the world conflicts of the XX century. During World War I in all armies of the world there was the desertion often accepting mass character. In the Russian army, as well as in other, deserters appeared from the war beginning. Desertion sca...

  1. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Reserves of uranium are located in the north eastern part of Mexico, primarily in the states of Tamaulipas and Chihuahua. Most of the remainder of Mexico's reserves are near the Tamaulipas-Neuvo Leon state border in the Tertiary Frio Formation, where they apparently occur in the types of uranium deposits found in Texas, U.S.A. There are two deposits, La Coma and Buenavista, but nothing has been published on dimensions of the ore bodies. Forty-five miles northeast of Hermosillo, in Sonora state is the Los Amoles district where uranium is found associated with gold and other metals in low-grade deposits on the margins of a Cretaceous batholith. Another occurrence is reported in the mining district of Placer de Guadelupe and Puerto del Aire, about 40-50 km northeast of Chihuahua City, in the state of Chihuahua. Reserves of U 3 O 8 which were published in January 1977 by Nuclear Exchange Corporation of Menlo Park, California, are listed. The government of Mexico has not estimated potential resources. It should be noted that much of Mexico appears favourable for uranium, and only 10 percent has been explored. According to NUEXCO (1977), efforts to find uranium are being increased in an attempt to supply Mexico's nuclear reactor requirements through 1990. Activity is reported to be centered in Tamaulipas and Chihuahua states and to a lesser extent in Nueva Leon, Sonora, Coahuila, and Baja California. Major effort will continue to be placed in Chihuahua state to supply the Penna Bianca mill. Correspondence between favorable geological settings for uranium and the geologic regions of Mexico is reported. Mexico is a country with considerable areas that appear promising for discovery of sandstone, vein, and tuff-related deposits. On the other hand, its potential for Precambrian conglomerate and unconformity-related deposits is limited. Considering these geologic factors, as well as the relatively limited amount of exploration done to date, a guesstimate of speculative

  3. Historic distribution and challenges to bison recovery in the northern Chihuahuan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Rurik; Ceballos, Gerardo; Curtin, Charles; Gogan, Peter J.; Pacheco, Jesus; Truett, Joe

    2007-01-01

    Ecologists and conservationists have long assumed that large grazers, including bison (Bison bison), did not occur in post-Pleistocene southwestern North America. This perception has been influential in framing the debate over conservation and land use in the northern Chihuahuan Desert. The lack of an evolutionary history of large grazers is being used to challenge the validity of ranching as a conservation strategy and to limit the protection and reintroduction of bison as a significant component of desert grassland ecosystems. Archeological records and historical accounts from Mexican archives from AD 700 to the 19th century document that the historic range of the bison included northern Mexico and adjoining areas in the United States. The Janos-Hidalgo bison herd, one of the few free-ranging bison herds in North America, has moved between Chihuahua, Mexico, and New Mexico, United States, since at least the 1920s. The persistence of this cross-border bison herd in Chihuahuan Desert grasslands and shrublands demonstrates that the species can persist in desert landscapes. Additional lines of evidence include the existence of grazing-adapted grasslands and the results of experimental studies that document declines in vegetation density and diversity following the removal of large grazers. The Janos-Hidalgo herd was formed with animals from various sources at the turn of the 19th century. Yet the future of the herd is compromised by differing perceptions of the ecological and evolutionary role of bison in the Desert Grasslands of North America. In Mexico they are considered native and are protected by federal law, whereas in New Mexico, they are considered non-native livestock and therefore lack conservation status or federal protection. Evidence written in Spanish of the presence of bison south of the accepted range and evidence from the disciplines of archaeology and history illustrate how differences in language and academic disciplines, in addition to

  4. Management implications of the biodiversity and socio-economic impacts of shrimp trawler by-catch in Bahía de Kino, Sonora, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lorayne; Blinick, Naomi S; Fleishman, Abram B

    2012-01-01

    The shrimp fishery is the most economically important fishery in Mexico. The trawler-based portion of this fishery results in high rates of by-catch. This study quantifies and describes the biodiversity of by-catch associated with trawling in the Bahía de Kino region of Sonora, Mexico. Data were collected from 55 trawls, on six boats, over 14 nights, during November of 2003, 2004, 2006-2009. By-catch rates within trawl samples averaged 85.9% measured by weight. A total of 183 by-catch species were identified during the course of this study, including 97 species of bony fish from 43 families, 19 species of elasmobranchs from 12 families, 66 species of invertebrates from eight phyla, and one species of marine turtle; seven of the documented by-catch species are listed on the IUCN Red List, CITES, or the Mexican NOM-059-ECOL-2010; 35 species documented in the by-catch are also targeted by local artisanal fishers. Some of the species frequently captured as juveniles in the by-catch are economically important to small-scale fishers in the region, and are particularly sensitive to overexploitation due to their life histories. This study highlights the need for further research quantifying the impacts of high levels of by-catch upon small-scale fishing economies in the region and presents strong ecological and economic rationale for by-catch management within the shrimp fishery of the Gulf of California. Site-specific by-catch management plans should be piloted in the Bahía de Kino region to address the growing momentum in national and international fisheries policy regimes toward the reduction of by-catch in shrimp fisheries.

  5. Influence of surface roughness of a desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Smith, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical simulation study, using the current GLAS climate GCM, was carried out to examine the influence of low bulk aerodynamic drag parameter in the deserts. The results illustrate the importance of yet another feedback effect of a desert on itself, that is produced by the reduction in surface roughness height of land once the vegetation dies and desert forms. Apart from affecting the moisture convergence, low bulk transport coefficients of a desert lead to enhanced longwave cooling and sinking which together reduce precipitation by Charney's (1975) mechanism. Thus, this effect, together with albedo and soil moisture influence, perpetuate a desert condition through its geophysical feedback effect. The study further suggests that man made deserts is a viable hypothesis.

  6. Forecasting urban growth across the United States-Mexico border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, L.M.; Feller, M.; Phillip, Guertin D.

    2009-01-01

    The sister-city area of Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, is known collectively as Ambos (both) Nogales. This area was historically one city and was administratively divided by the Gadsden Purchase in 1853. These arid-lands have limited and sensitive natural resources. Environmental planning can support sustainable development to accommodate the predicted influx of population. The objective of this research is to quantify the amount of predicted urban growth for the Ambos Nogales watershed to support future planning for sustainable development. Two modeling regimes are explored. Our goal is to identify possible growth patterns associated with the twin-city area as a whole and with the two cities modeled as separate entities. We analyzed the cross-border watershed using regression analysis from satellite images from 1975, 1983, 1996, and 2002 and created urban area classifications. We used these classifications as input to the urban growth model, SLEUTH, to simulate likely patterns of development and define projected conversion probabilities. Model results indicate that the two cities are undergoing very different patterns of change and identify locations of expected growth based on historical development. Growth in Nogales, Arizona is stagnant while the urban area in Nogales, Sonora is exploding. This paper demonstrates an application that portrays how future binational urban growth could develop and affect the environment. This research also provides locations of potential growth for use in city planning.

  7. The first educational interferometer in Mexico (FEYMANS): A novel project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villicana Pedraza, Ilhuiyolitzin; Guesten, Rolf; Saucedo Morales, Julio Cesar; Carreto, Francisco; Valdes Estrada, Erik; Wendolyn Blanco Cardenas, Monica; Rodríguez Garza, Carolina B.; Pech Castillo, Gerardo A.; Ángel Vaquerizo, Juan

    2016-07-01

    An interferometer is composed of several radio telescopes (dishes) separated by a defined distance and used in synchrony. This kind of array produces a superior angular resolution, better than the resolution achieved by a single dish of the same combined area. In this work we propose the First Educational Youth Mexican Array North South, FEYMANS. It consists of an educational interferometer with initially four dishes. This array harvests Mexico's geography by locating each dish at the periphery of the country; creating new scientific links of provincial populations with the capital. The FEYMANS project focus in high school students and their projects on physics, chemistry and astronomy as a final project. Also, it can be used for bachelor theses. The initial and central dish-node is planed to be in Mexico City. After its construction, the efforts will focus to build subsequent nodes, on the Northwest region, Northeast, or Southeast. Region Northwest will give service to Baja California, Sonora and Chihuahua states. Region Northeast will cover Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas. Finally, region Southeast will give access to Yucatan, Quintana Roo, Campeche, Tabasco and Chiapas. This project has been conceived by young professional astronomers and Mexican experts that will operate each node. Also, we have the technical support of the "Max Planck Institute fuer Radioastronomy in Bonn Germany" and the educational model of the "PARTNeR" project in Spain. This interferometer will be financed by Mexico's Federal Congress and by Mexico City's Legislative Assembly (ALDF).

  8. el ejido Cruz Gálvez de la Costa de Hermosillo, Sonora (1964-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Ma. Cañez de la Fuente

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo aborda un estudio de caso acerca de un grupo de campesinos ganaderos de Sonora en el norte de México. Se analiza desde una perspectiva antropológica e histórica la influencia de la introducción de la modernización ganadera como uno de los factores que ha limitado el desarrollo de las acciones colectivas dirigidas al mejoramiento de las condiciones de vida, y ha propiciado la división social y productiva del grupo estudiado.

  9. Fatty acids, phenols content, and antioxidant activity in Ibervillea sonorae callus cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada-Zúñiga, M.E.; Arano-Varela, H.; Buendía-González, L.; Orozco-Villafuerte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ibervillea sonorae callus cultures were established in order to produce fatty acids (lauric, myristic, pentadecanoic, palmitic and stearic acids) and phenolic compounds. Highest callus induction (100%) was obtained in treatments containing 2.32 or 4.65 μM Kinetin (KIN) with 2.26 or 6.80 μM 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Highest fatty acids (FA) production (48.57 mg g-1), highest total phenol content (TPC; 57.1 mg gallic acid equivalents [GAE] g-1) and highest antioxidant activity (EC...

  10. Sympatric cattle grazing and desert bighorn sheep foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kyle R.; Cain, James W.; Rominger, Eric M.; Goldstein, Elise J.

    2015-01-01

    Foraging behavior affects animal fitness and is largely dictated by the resources available to an animal. Understanding factors that affect forage resources is important for conservation and management of wildlife. Cattle sympatry is proposed to limit desert bighorn population performance, but few studies have quantified the effect of cattle foraging on bighorn forage resources or foraging behavior by desert bighorn. We estimated forage biomass for desert bighorn sheep in 2 mountain ranges: the cattle-grazed Caballo Mountains and the ungrazed San Andres Mountains, New Mexico. We recorded foraging bout efficiency of adult females by recording feeding time/step while foraging, and activity budgets of 3 age-sex classes (i.e., adult males, adult females, yearlings). We also estimated forage biomass at sites where bighorn were observed foraging. We expected lower forage biomass in the cattle-grazed Caballo range than in the ungrazed San Andres range and lower biomass at cattle-accessible versus inaccessible areas within the Caballo range. We predicted bighorn would be less efficient foragers in the Caballo range. Groundcover forage biomass was low in both ranges throughout the study (Jun 2012–Nov 2013). Browse biomass, however, was 4.7 times lower in the Caballo range versus the San Andres range. Bighorn in the Caballo range exhibited greater overall daily travel time, presumably to locate areas of higher forage abundance. By selecting areas with greater forage abundance, adult females in the Caballo range exhibited foraging bout efficiency similar to their San Andres counterparts but lower overall daily browsing time. We did not find a significant reduction in forage biomass at cattle-accessible areas in the Caballo range. Only the most rugged areas in the Caballo range had abundant forage, potentially a result of intensive historical livestock use in less rugged areas. Forage conditions in the Caballo range apparently force bighorn to increase foraging effort by

  11. World School Life Versus Habitus: The breeding ground of an Educational Backward Mexico Migrant Mundo de la Vida Versus Habitus Escolar:El Caldo de Cultivo del Rezago Educativo en unMéxico de Migrantes

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Yurén; Miriam de la Cruz; Alfonso Cruz; S. Stella Araújo-Oliveray; Marcos J. Estrada

    2005-01-01

    In this article, three topics are interrelated: school desertion, poverty and migration. The situation in Mexico with respect to desertion and the relationship between this and several factors associated with poverty is presented. It is argued that scholastic desertion has an expanding effect which depends on the concurrence of two factors: disenchantment with schools and the "habitus" people adopt in cases of extreme poverty to assure their survival. In regard to the first of these factors, ...

  12. Urban birds in the Sonoran Desert: estimating population density from point counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Johnston López

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted bird surveys in Hermosillo, Sonora using distance sampling to characterize detection functions at point-transects for native and non-native urban birds in a desert environment. From March to August 2013 we sampled 240 plots in the city and its surroundings; each plot was visited three times. Our purpose was to provide information for a rapid assessment of bird density in this region by using point counts. We identified 72 species, including six non-native species. Sixteen species had sufficient detections to accurately estimate the parameters of the detection functions. To illustrate the estimation of density from bird count data using our inferred detection functions, we estimated the density of the Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto under two different levels of urbanization: highly urbanized (90-100% of urban impact and moderately urbanized zones (39-50% of urban impact. Density of S. decaocto in the highly-urbanized and moderately-urbanized zones was 3.97±0.52 and 2.92±0.52 individuals/ha, respectively. By using our detection functions, avian ecologists can efficiently relocate time and effort that is regularly used for the estimation of detection distances, to increase the number of sites surveyed and to collect other relevant ecological information.

  13. The Riparianness of a Desert Herpetofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Lowe

    1989-01-01

    Within the Mojave, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Desert subdivisions of the North American Desert in the U.S., more than half of 143 total amphibian and reptilian species perform as riparian and/or wetland taxa. For the reptiles, but not the amphibians, there is a significant inverse relationship between riparianness (obligate through preferential and facultative to...

  14. Historical explanation of the origin of the herpetofauna of Mexico Explicación histórica del origen de la herpetofauna de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Flores-Villela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A hypothesis of historical area relationships for Mexico, Central, and South America was investigated by a cladistic biogographic analysis using 10 taxon cladograms of the herpetofauna of Mexico. A hypothesis is presented based on previous narrative biogeographic scenarios and compared with the general area cladograms (GACs obtained using reconciled trees of COMPONENT 2.0 and Brooks Parsimony Analysis (BPA. For tree reconciliation, 1 000 trees were saved after the analysis. BPA yielded 18 GACs (CI = 0.805, RI= 0.549. The GAC derived from tree reconciliation is more or less pectinate and has only 3 groups of 2 areas each. These groups consist of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran deserts as sister areas on the one hand (DCHI, DSON, and the Sierra Madre Oriental and Occidental as sister areas on the other (SMOR, SMOC. This latter clade is sister to the Chihuahuan and Sonoran desert clade. The third group has the Transvolcanic Belt and Sierra Madre del Sur as sister areas (TVA, SMEX. The GAC obtained by BPA showed 4 main groups of areas: the first is comprised of the Pacific coast of Mexico and the Balsas Depression (PCBAL, the Sierra Madre del Sur (SMEX, and the Transvolcanic Belt (TVA; the second group includes the Sierra Madre Oriental (SMOR, Sierra Madre Occidental (SMOC, Sonoran (DSON and Chihuahuan deserts (DCHI; the third comprised the Highlands of Chiapas and Guatemala (CHIG, the Eastern Lowlands, on the Atlantic coast (ELL and the Semiarid Lands of Tamaulipas-Texas (TAMS; the fourth group contains the Western Lowlands, in the Pacific coast (WLL and northern South America (SA; the Talamanca Ridge (TALA is isolated at the base of the 3 first groups. The GAC from narrative biogeography contains 3 groups: the first has areas of northern Mexico (DSON, DCHI, TAMPS, the second has areas from central Mexico (PCBAL, SMOR, SMOC, TV A, and third has areas from southern Mexico and Central America (SMEX, CHIG, TALA, WLL, ELL, SA. In general, the GAC from the

  15. El patrimonio natural y cultural como base para estrategias de turismo sustentable en la Sonora Rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L. Salido Araiza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Para la región del Río Sonora, el turismo es considerado una atractiva oportunidad de desarrollo regional, a la vez que un reto para el manejo de su patrimonio natural y cultural. Desde hace décadas, sus comunidades han venido perdiendo dinamismo económico de manera constante, reflejado en la depresión de su sector agropecuario, así como una tendencia decreciente de la población ante la falta de alternativas económicas regionales. Este trabajo se enfoca en el examen de las oportunidades y desafíos que presentan los factores naturales y culturales de la región, como bases de una propuesta de desarrollo turístico sustentable. Los resultados muestran que la Ruta del Río Sonora constituye, más que nada, un itinerario fundamentado en un área con alto contenido históricocultural y definido particularmente por la demanda del visitante actual. Es el significado de este patrimonio aunado al medio ambiente natural constituye una parte importante de su imagen. De ahí la necesidad de reconocer los valores de sus recursos naturales, históricos y culturales para resaltar el desarrollo del producto turístico y en particular el manejo sustentable de sus lugares en el largo plazo.

  16. Acute and chronic hypoglycemic effect of Ibervillea sonorae root extracts-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Calzada-Bermejo, F; Hernandez-Galicia, E; Ruiz-Angeles, C; Roman-Ramos, R

    2005-03-21

    Ibervillea sonorae's root, or "wareque" (Cucurbitaceae), is widely used in Mexican traditional medicine for the control of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the hypoglycemic effects produced by the acute and chronic administration of various extracts of Ibervillea sonorae were investigated. Both the traditional preparation (aqueous decoction) and the raw extract (juice) from the root resulted in significant reductions of glycemia in healthy mice after intraperitoneal administration at a dose of 600 mg/kg. Additionally, ground dried root was used to obtain a dichloromethane (DCM) extract and a methanol (MeOH) extract. The DCM extract induced a clear reduction of glycemia in healthy (P < 0.05) and in alloxan-diabetic mice. The intraperitoneally administered DCM extract caused a severe hypoglycemia that produced lethality in all the treated animals when doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg body weight were used. Since the DCM extract showed a marked hypoglycemic activity, it was administered daily per os to alloxan diabetic rats, employing corn oil and tolbutamide as controls. After 41 days of DCM extract administration at a dose of 300 mg/kg/day, diabetic rats showed improvement in glycemia, body weight, triglycerides, and GPT in comparison with the diabetic control group. Total cholesterol, GOT, and uric acid blood levels were not affected.

  17. Características del desarrollo del sector de servicios en Sonora (1975-1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenia Velázquez Contreras

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de terciarización económica no es reciente. Sin embargo, llama la atención el hecho de que su dinamismo haya alcanzado ritmos incluso superiores a las actividades industriales. Este fenómeno se presenta principalmente en economías desarrolladas, aunque cada vez es más notorio también en países como México. El objetivo del trabajo consiste en detectar el papel que el proceso de acelerado crecimiento de los servicios juega en el desarrollo de un país o una región, en este caso, el estado de Sonora. El documento se divide en las siguientes partes: la primera, es una breve introducción para ubicar la importancia del estudio del sector servicios. La segunda presenta algunas de las características que reviste el proceso denominado ?revolución de los servicios? . En la tercera, se plantean los rasgos generales que ha asumido el crecimiento económico de Sonora, ubicando la situación que guarda el sector terciario, para luego desglosar las características propias de los servicios. Finaliza con una cuarta parte a manera de conclusiones.

  18. Antiobesity and Hypoglycaemic Effects of Aqueous Extract of Ibervillea sonorae in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet with Fructose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ramírez, Fabiola; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N.; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; Paniagua-Castro, Norma

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, type II diabetes, and hyperlipidaemia, which frequently coexist and are strongly associated with oxidative stress, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. An increase in carbohydrate intake, especially of fructose, and a high-fat diet are both factors that contribute to the development of these metabolic disorders. In recent studies carried out in diabetic rats, authors reported that Ibervillea sonorae had hypoglycaemic activity; saponins and monoglycerides present in the plant could be responsible for the effects observed. In the present study, we determined the effects of an aqueous I. sonorae extract on a murine model of obesity and hyperglycaemia, induced by a high-calorie diet, and the relationship of these effects with hepatic oxidation. A high-fat diet over a period of 8 weeks induced weight gain in the mice and increased triglycerides and blood glucose levels. Simultaneous treatment with I. sonorae aqueous extracts, at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, decreased triglycerides and glycaemia levels, prevented an increase in body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased hepatic lipid oxidation at a dose of 200 mg/kg. These data suggest that the aqueous extract from I. sonorae root prevents obesity, dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia induced by a hypercaloric diet; however, high doses may induce toxicity. PMID:22174560

  19. Antiobesity and hypoglycaemic effects of aqueous extract of Ibervillea sonorae in mice fed a high-fat diet with fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ramírez, Fabiola; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; Paniagua-Castro, Norma

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, type II diabetes, and hyperlipidaemia, which frequently coexist and are strongly associated with oxidative stress, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. An increase in carbohydrate intake, especially of fructose, and a high-fat diet are both factors that contribute to the development of these metabolic disorders. In recent studies carried out in diabetic rats, authors reported that Ibervillea sonorae had hypoglycaemic activity; saponins and monoglycerides present in the plant could be responsible for the effects observed. In the present study, we determined the effects of an aqueous I. sonorae extract on a murine model of obesity and hyperglycaemia, induced by a high-calorie diet, and the relationship of these effects with hepatic oxidation. A high-fat diet over a period of 8 weeks induced weight gain in the mice and increased triglycerides and blood glucose levels. Simultaneous treatment with I. sonorae aqueous extracts, at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, decreased triglycerides and glycaemia levels, prevented an increase in body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased hepatic lipid oxidation at a dose of 200 mg/kg. These data suggest that the aqueous extract from I. sonorae root prevents obesity, dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia induced by a hypercaloric diet; however, high doses may induce toxicity.

  20. Antiobesity and Hypoglycaemic Effects of Aqueous Extract of Ibervillea sonorae in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet with Fructose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Rivera-Ramírez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, type II diabetes, and hyperlipidaemia, which frequently coexist and are strongly associated with oxidative stress, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. An increase in carbohydrate intake, especially of fructose, and a high-fat diet are both factors that contribute to the development of these metabolic disorders. In recent studies carried out in diabetic rats, authors reported that Ibervillea sonorae had hypoglycaemic activity; saponins and monoglycerides present in the plant could be responsible for the effects observed. In the present study, we determined the effects of an aqueous I. sonorae extract on a murine model of obesity and hyperglycaemia, induced by a high-calorie diet, and the relationship of these effects with hepatic oxidation. A high-fat diet over a period of 8 weeks induced weight gain in the mice and increased triglycerides and blood glucose levels. Simultaneous treatment with I. sonorae aqueous extracts, at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, decreased triglycerides and glycaemia levels, prevented an increase in body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased hepatic lipid oxidation at a dose of 200 mg/kg. These data suggest that the aqueous extract from I. sonorae root prevents obesity, dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia induced by a hypercaloric diet; however, high doses may induce toxicity.

  1. Rural childhoods in Egypt's desert lands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    Based on fieldwork in Egypt’s desert lands, this paper discusses rural childhoods in an area experiencing rapid social and cultural change. Since 1987, the Egyptian Government has made new villages in the desert as a means to increase agricultural production and solving problems of unemployment....... Many settlers move to the Mubarak villages in order to give their children a good start in life. The desert villages are associated with a type of ‘rural idyll’. The process of settling in the desert impacts upon the children’s possible pathways to adulthood and their identities and social......’s new roles impact upon the children’s lives. The social contexts shaping the desert childhoods are in some ways more similar to contexts in ‘developed’ countries than in other parts of rural Egypt. The paper ends up by contrasting ideas of rural childhoods in Egypt with those found in ‘developed...

  2. Defective modernization and health in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, J M

    1987-01-01

    This paper uses data gathered in a semi-arid, mountain region of the border state of Sonora, Mexico to illustrate that modernization and the importation of urban ideas and values can influence health status in unexpected ways. It traces the historic process of modernization in a rural municipio, relating this to social promises and economic cycles in Mexico. Modernization is seen to encompass life standard improvements and access to medical care; extension of road and transportation systems; and the widespread availability of information and education, as well as lifestyle changes required to incorporate these 'urban' influences. Reviewing the link between climate and health in arid lands, the paper notes that such modernization can be a well-meaning intrusion upon a set of cultural and social practices which had proved adaptive in dealing with climatic extremes. Initial modernization produces impressive declines in mortality and morbidity, as illustrated in an analysis of mortality figures and causes in relation to age cohorts and decades for the years 1955-1984. However, reductions in epidermic-related infant mortality are shown to be offset by increases in deaths due to trauma, chronic conditions and endemic disease. An analysis of morbidity for the year 1983-84 indicates that continuing high rates of infectious disease are related to conditions which result from increasingly defective modernization. To maintain technology, including water, electrical, and sewage systems, continual capital expenditure on both the public and private level is required. The economic crisis in Mexico is reducing available funds at a time when the community has adjusted its traditional lifestyle to incorporate technological improvements. In light of this, it is likely that inroads against infectious disease will not just continue to be stalemated, but could actually be reversed. This finding has implications for towns and villages on both sides of the Mexican-American border.

  3. Russian deserters of World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Os'kin Maksim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Desertion is one of the most active forms of ordinary resistance of the people to the state pressure during the low-popular war which is conducting for the purposes unclear for the people. At the same time, mass desertion is a manifestation of «total» war in the world conflicts of the XX century. During World War I in all armies of the world there was the desertion often accepting mass character. In the Russian army, as well as in other, deserters appeared from the war beginning. Desertion scales in the Russian army explained as objective factors - diffi cult fights, shortage of supply, defeat at the front, and subjective - unwillingness to participate in war, melancholy for the house, desire to help a family the work. Desertion in different years of war had various forms. If at the beginning of war there were mainly «self-arrows», in 1915, during defeats at the front - evasion from entrenchments. By the end of 1916, because of the general fatigue from war, desertion takes the real form - flight from the front to the back. After February revolution desertion becomes mass in which hundreds thousands military personnel take part already. Disorder of army and development of revolutionary process extremely strengthen desertion scales that is explained by the actual lack of punishment for this crime. Destruction of the Russian state during revolution became the main reason of coming to power of Bolsheviks, an exit of Russia from war and the army demobilization which essential part in 1917 already deserted from the front.

  4. PROBLEMS IN THE ADMISSION TO HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE LOWER SIERRA DE SONORA, CASE: UNIVERSITY OF SIERRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Ángel Vásquez-Navarro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to clarify the issues and find solutions to align somewhat academic models of institutions of higher average level and above found in the central highlands of the state of Sonora, as are the University of Sierra, and the CBTA 53 and confront the culture of the people of the importance of young people studying a degree in that region.The above educational institutions are located in the geographical catchment area and education, in fact, in the same population, in the northeastern state of Sonora. The mountains of Sonora had always intended to have a school of higher education. To justify the town of Montezuma as a geographically strategic point, and thanks to the efforts made by the governor in turn was as the University of Sierra opens its doors to students on the mountain in August 2002.For the analysis of the functioning of an educational institution in the rural sector, should take into account a wide range of factors, however, this work will be key to analyze the dislocation and inconsistency of educational models from an institution of higher average level in relationship to another level, which serve as a unique educational opportunities for the people of Sonora and surrounding Montezuma. In addition, the cultural aspect, which reflects a regional behavior of the inhabitants of the region. La Sierra University is located in the mountainous region of the state of Sonora, in the town of Montezuma, with a catchment area of more than 30 municipalities in this area, which lacked a college until recently time.

  5. Gopherus Agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Predation/Mountain Lions (Pre-Print)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul D. Greger and Philip A. Medica

    2009-01-01

    sized Mountain Lion. By comparison, a 2 year old male Mountain Lion salvaged on NTS had an upper intercanine bite width of 45 mm, and a 6 month old kitten measured 35mm respectively. The Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) is the only predator that exists in southern Nevada that could possibly have a bite with a gap between its upper canine teeth that large (Murmann et al. 2006. J. Forensic Sci. 51:846-860). The appearance of the shell remains in Figure 1A is similar to that depicting Jaguar (Panthera onca) predation, on the Amazonian Tortoise (Geochelone denticulata) as illustrated by Emmons (1989. J. Herpetol. 23:311-314) with the majority of the carapace broken open and the plastron still intact. Predation of Desert Tortoises by Mountain Lions was also documented in 1993 in southern Arizona (Little Shipp Wash Plot), where 7 of 8 carcasses found were attributed to Mountain Lion predation (Averill-Murray et al. 2002. In. T.R.Van Devender [ed.], The Sonoran Desert Tortoise: Natural History, Biology, and Conservation, pp.109-134. University of Arizona Press and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona). Similarly, predation by a Mountain Lion has been reported on the Argentine Tortoise (Chelonoidis chilensis) in Argentina (Acosta et al. 2004. Herpetol. Review 35:53-54), and a Mountain Lion kitten was observed to kill and consume a portion of the carapace of a Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri) in west Texas (Adams et al. 2006. Southwestern Nat. 51:581-581). Over the past 45 years this Desert Tortoise population has been monitored yearly, with no prior evidence of predation to tortoises within the fenced enclosures. On several occasions other predators such as Bobcats (Lynx rufus) have been observed within the study enclosures for as long as a week. Evidence of Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotus) sign has been observed on numerous occasions, and a Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) and Longtail Weasels (Mustela frenata) have been captured and released (B.G. Maza, pers. comm

  6. Contaminantes en los cuerpos de agua del sur de Sonora Population, environment and health: pollution in water bodies in the South of Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga López-Ríos

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Ahondar en el conocimiento sobre la incidencia de las actividades productivas del hombre en su medio, y el riesgo potencial que representa el deterioro ambiental para su propia salud y la sobrevivencia de especies animales. Material y métodos. Se utilizó el paquete informático Decision Support System for Industrial Pollution Control DSS (IPC, desarrollado por el Banco Mundial, la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS y la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS, que se aplicó a un estudio de caso sobre los cuerpos de agua del sur de Sonora, durante 1996. Resultados. Estos sugieren que existen al menos tres factores que han contribuido a la desaparición de criaderos naturales de pescado y camarón en el municipio de Huatabampo: a la filtración de fertilizantes y pesticidas en las aguas de los drenes; b el asolvamiento producido por el depósito continuo, en el pasado, de agua de cola de la industria, c y la descarga inapropiada de aguas negras en los drenes. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjective. To contribute to the knowledge on the impact of human productive activities on the environment, human health, and the survival of animal species. Material and Methods. A study case of water bodies in the south of Sonora was conducted in 1996. The software Decision Support System for Industrial Pollution Control DSS-IPC (IPCIPC developed by the World Bank and the Pan American Health Organization was used to analyze data. Results. At least three factors have contributed to the loss of fish and shrimp hatcheries in the municipality of Huatabampo: the filtration of fertilizers and pesticides into the irrigation drainage system, blockage produced by the continuous disposal of industrial waste water, and the discharge of sewer water into the drainage system. Conclusions. Study findings provide evidence that environmental deterioration resulting from human activity

  7. Technological innovations in the horticultural sector in northwestern Mexico: adoption speed and diffusion networks analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem Dolores Avendaño-Ruiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the identification of innovation adoption and diffusion processes in the export horticultural sector in northwestern Mexico, and the differences identified taking into account the type of producer depending on the production size. The results of the adoption speed index suggests that large producers are distinguished as being early adopters and leaders in innovation adoption in this activity; but as long as there is a technological gap between small and large producers, that is increased even more by economical limita-tions, these will be identified as late adopters for this activity, supported by public programs for its adoption. The study was conducted in four entities of northwestern Mexico, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sonora and Sinaloa, that in average contribute with 17 % of the national horticultural production. The international market is a strong promotor in innovation adoption, particularly in those related to food safety standards that are adopted by 84 % of the producers. The network analysis highlights the role of union organizations as technological innovation diffusors, e.g. the Confederation of Agricultural Associations of the Sinaloa State, and the Local Agricultural Association of horticulture, Fruits and Legumes of Hermosillo in Sonora.

  8. The impact of desert solar power utilization on sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq Ali Shah; Yang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the prospects of developing a solar based desert economy in the deserts of solar-rich countries. The potential deserts are analysed to study their positive impact on the sustainable development processes in these regions. The sustainability of the processes is established on the basis of self-contained nature of energy generation, environmental emission reduction and desert land reclamation. (authors)

  9. Evolution of the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene Cordilleran arc magmatism in NW Mexico: a review from updated geochronological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Moreno, M.; Iriondo, A.; Perez-Segura, E.; Noguez-Alcantara, B.

    2007-05-01

    During most of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, the locus of subduction related arc magmatism in northwestern Mexico was relatively mobile, probably due to changes in the mechanical conditions of the Farallon-North America plate convergence. The older Mesozoic events recognized in this region occurred in the Late Triassic and Jurassic, but the associated rocks are poorly preserved. However, a belt of Late Cretaceous through Paleogene magmatic rocks is well exposed along Baja California, Sonora and Sinaloa. Since the late 70's, it was noted that during the Early Cretaceous the igneous activity along this belt remained relatively static in the westernmost part, but migrated eastward in the Late Cretaceous, penetrating more than 1000 km into the continent. The arc magmatism reached western Sonora at about 90 Ma, and then it started to move faster inland, presumably due to flattening of the subducted oceanic slab. Recent U-Pb zircon data revealed unexpected old ages (89-95 Ma) near the eastern edge of Sonora, which are difficult to explain on the basis of the classic tectonic interpretations. A model based on two synchronic sites for magma emplacement may explain the age overlapping observed along the belt; however, a profound re-evaluation a proper geodynamic scenario to support this model is required. Even if restoration of the large Neogene crustal extension is made, particularly for central and northern Sonora, the relatively flat-subduction regime commonly accepted for the Laramide event appears unable to explain the anomalously broad expression of the magmatic belt in northwestern Mexico. An alternative model based on two synchronic sites of magma emplacement, as suggested by the new age data, may better explain the large volume of igneous rocks produced during this time in Sonora and most of Chihuahua. This mechanism may differ southwards in Sinaloa, where the magmatic belt becomes considerably narrower. Moreover, the possible existence of two spatially distinct sites

  10. Deserts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graulund, Rune

    2016-01-01

    , comic sketches and lyrical reveries; travel writing is now a crucial focus for discussion across many subjects within the humanities and social sciences. An ideal starting point for beginners, but also offering new perspectives for those familiar with the field, The Routledge Companion to Travel Writing...

  11. Effects of desert wildfires on desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and other small vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esque, T.C.; Schwalbe, C.R.; DeFalco, L.A.; Duncan, R.B.; Hughes, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of standardized surveys to determine the effects of wildfires on desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and their habitats in the northeastern Mojave Desert and northeastern Sonoran Desert. Portions of 6 burned areas (118 to 1,750 ha) were examined for signs of mortality of vertebrates. Direct effects of fire in desert habitats included animal mortality and loss of vegetation cover. A range of 0 to 7 tortoises was encountered during surveys, and live tortoises were found on all transects. In addition to desert tortoises, only small (reptiles (11 taxa) were found dead on the study areas. We hypothesize that indirect effects of fire on desert habitats might result in changes in the composition of diets and loss of vegetation cover, resulting in an increase in predation and loss of protection from temperature extremes. These changes in habitat also might cause changes in vertebrate communities in burned areas.

  12. Black bear population and connectivity in the Sky Islands of Mexico and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. E. Lara-Diaz; C. A. Lopez-Gonzalez; H. Coronel-Arellano; A. Gonzalez-Bernal

    2013-01-01

    The Sky Island region is a mountainous region surrounded by grasslands, deserts and intermountain valleys, located between Mexico and the United States. However, different land management and human impact can have an effect on its wildlife populations. Currently, the border wall poses an immediate threat to the survival of black bears (Ursus americanus), considered an...

  13. Desertions in nineteenth-century shipping: modelling quit behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Jari Ojala; Jaakko Pehkonen; Jari Eloranta

    2013-01-01

    Ship jumping in foreign ports was widespread throughout the age of sail. Desertion by seamen was illegal, it occurred abroad, and men who deserted only seldom returned home. We analyse desertion quantitatively and link it to the broader question of quit behaviour and labour turnover. Though the better wages paid at the foreign ports were the main reason for desertion, the regression model of the determinants of desertion indicates that outside opportunities, such as migration, and monetary in...

  14. High-resolution carbonate isotopic study of the Mural Formation (Cerro Pimas section), Sonora, México: Implications for early Albian oceanic anoxic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavaraju, J.; Lee, Yong Il; Scott, R. W.; González-León, C. M.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Saucedo-Samaniego, J. C.; Ramasamy, S.

    2018-03-01

    The 420-m thick stratigraphic section of the Mural Formation that is exposed in the Cerro Pimas area of northern Sonora, Mexico, is composed of limestone lithofacies ranging from bioclastic wackestone to boundstone, whose biota is characterized by low diversity. Prominent age-diagnostic fossils are benthic foraminifera and long-ranging calcareous algae that indicate the Aptian/Albian boundary is close to the base of the Los Coyotes Member. The carbonates of this formation have negative to positive δ13C values (-4.63 to +2.6‰) and highly depleted δ18O values that range from -12.74 to -8.34‰. The absence of correlation between δ13C and δ18O values supports a primary marine origin for the δ13C values of these limestones. The carbon-isotopic curve of the Cerro Pimas stratigraphic section has well-defined δ13C segments (C8 - C15) that compare with published curves of similar age. In the lower part of the early Albian Los Coyotes Member, the presence of OAE 1b is indicated by an increase followed by a decrease in δ13C values, suggesting correlation with the Kilian Event. The middle part of the Los Coyotes Member has a significant negative carbon-isotope excursion correlated with the globally recognizable early Albian Paquier event. Moreover, another significant negative carbon-isotope shift is observed in the upper part of the Los Coyotes Member, which can be correlated with the Leenhardt Event. The occurrence of the Kilian, Paquier and Leenhardt Events (OAE 1b cluster) in the Cerro Pimas stratigraphy confirms the global nature of these early Albian disturbances of the carbon cycle.

  15. Desert potholes: Ephemeral aquatic microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M.A.; Moser, K.; Davis, J.M.; Southam, G.; Hughes, K.; Graham, T.

    2005-01-01

    An enigma of the Colorado Plateau high desert is the "pothole", which ranges from shallow ephemeral puddles to deeply carved pools. The existence of prokaryotic to eukaryotic organisms within these pools is largely controlled by the presence of collected rainwater. Multivariate statistical analysis of physical and chemical limnologic data variables measured from potholes indicates spatial and temporal variations, particularly in water depth, manganese, iron, nitrate and sulfate concentrations and salinity. Variation in water depth and salinity are likely related to the amount of time since the last precipitation, whereas the other variables may be related to redox potential. The spatial and temporal variations in water chemistry affect the distribution of organisms, which must adapt to daily and seasonal extremes of fluctuating temperature (0-60 ??C), pH changes of as much as 5 units over 12 days, and desiccation. For example, many species become dormant when potholes dry, in order to endure intense heat, UV radiation, desiccation and freezing, only to flourish again upon rehydration. But the pothole organisms also have a profound impact on the potholes. Through photosynthesis and respiration, pothole organisms affect redox potential, and indirectly alter the water chemistry. Laboratory examination of dried biofilm from the potholes revealed that within 2 weeks of hydration, the surface of the desiccated, black biofilm became green from cyanobacterial growth, which supported significant growth in heterotrophic bacterial populations. This complex biofilm is persumably responsible for dissolving the cement between the sandstone grains, allowing the potholes to enlarge, and for sealing the potholes, enabling them to retain water longer than the surrounding sandstone. Despite the remarkable ability of life in potholes to persist, desert potholes may be extremely sensitive to anthropogenic effects. The unique limnology and ecology of Utah potholes holds great scientific

  16. Deciphering the Role of Desert Dust in the Climate Puzzle: The Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment (MEIDEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Zev; Joseph, Joachim; Mekler, Yuri; Israelevich, Peter; Ganor, Eli; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Janz, Scott

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that aerosol particles may be one of the primary agents that can offset the climate warming induced by the increase in the amount of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Desert aerosols are probably the most abundant and massive type of aerosol particles that are present in the atmosphere worldwide. These aerosols are carried over large distances and have various global impacts. They interact with clouds, impact the efficiency of their rain production and change their optical properties. They constitute one of the primary sources of minerals for oceanic life and influence the health of coral reefs. They have direct effects on human health, especially by inducing breathing difficulties in children. It was lately discovered that desert particles carry pathogens from the Sahara desert over the Atlantic Ocean, a fact that may explain the migration of certain types of diseases. Aerosols not only absorb solar radiation but also scatter it, so that their climatic effect is influenced not only by their physical properties and height distribution but also by the reflectivity of the underlying surface. This latter property changes greatly over land and is low over ocean surfaces. Aerosol plumes are emitted from discrete, sporadic sources in the desert areas of the world and are transported worldwide by the atmosphere's wind systems. For example, Saharan dust reaches Mexico City, Florida, Ireland, Switzerland and the Mediterranean region, while Asian dust reaches Alaska, Hawaii and the continental United States. This means that in order to assess its global effects, one must observe dust from space. The Space Shuttle is a unique platform, because it flies over the major deserts of our planet, enabling measurements and remote sensing of the aerosols as they travel from source to sink regions. Such efforts must always be accompanied by in-situ data for validation and calibration, with direct sampling of the airborne particles. MEIDEX is a joint project of

  17. Ecological Transformation and Territorial Synergies in the hermosillo, Sonora Coastal Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo César DE LA TORRE VALDEZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available en este artículo se analizan las implicaciones territoriales que generan tres actividades pro-ductivas en la franja costera de Hermosillo,sonora: elaboración de carbón vegetal, captura deespecies marinas y cultivo de camarón.se obtuvieron datos por medio de entrevistas semies-tructuradas y construcción de indicadores territoriales.los resultados señalan: pérdida deecosistemas de mezquite, incremento de suelos desnudos en agostaderos, variación de especiesde captura ribereña, pérdida de vegetación y modificación de hidrología en áreas acuícolas.Finalmente se analiza un conjunto de sinergias que, en algunos casos, articulan positivamenteel aprovechamiento de las tres actividades, mientras que en otros provocan competencia.

  18. Distribution of birds and plants at the western and southern edges of the Madrean Sky Islands in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron D. Flesch; Lisa A. Hahn

    2005-01-01

    The western and southern edges of the Madrean Sky Island region are poorly defined and have received little study. After exploring mountains in these areas, we documented range extensions and additional records for several species of interest. Although many of these disjunct mountains have not been considered Sky Islands, their flora and fauna are similar to other...

  19. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites.

  20. Optical absorption, TL and IRSL of basic plagioclase megacrysts from the Pinacate (Sonora (Mexico)) quaternary alkalic volcanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Paz-Moreno, F.; Piters, T. M.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of an investigation on optical absorption (OA), thermally and infrared stimulated luminescence (TL and IRSL) of the Pinacate plagioclase (labradorite). The OA spectra reveal two bands with maxima at 1.0 and 3.2 eV connected with absorption of the Fe 3+ and Fe 2+ and IR absorption at wavelengths longer than 2700 nm. The ultraviolet absorption varies exponentially with the photon energy following the 'vitreous' empirical Urbach rule indicating exponential distribution of localised states in the forbidden band. The natural TL is peaked at 700 K. Laboratory beta irradiation creates a very broad TL peak with maximum at 430 K. The change of the 430 K TL peak shape under the thermal cleaning procedure and dark storage after irradiation reveals a monotonous increasing of the activation energy that can be explained by the exponential distribution of traps. The IRSL response is weak and exhibits a typical decay behaviour. (authors)

  1. In vitro anti-mycobacterial activity of nine medicinal plants used by ethnic groups in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón Enrique; Coronado-Aceves, Enrique Wenceslao; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos Arturo; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo; Navarro-Navarro, Moisés; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana

    2013-11-25

    Sonoran ethnic groups (Yaquis, Mayos, Seris, Guarijíos, Pimas, Kikapúes and Pápagos) use mainly herbal based preparations as their first line of medicinal treatment. Among the plants used are those with anti-tuberculosis properties; however, no formal research is available. Organic extracts were obtained from nine medicinal plants traditionally used by Sonoran ethnic groups to treat different kinds of diseases; three of them are mainly used to treat tuberculosis. All of the extracts were tested against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using the Alamar Blue redox bioassay. Methanolic extracts from Ambrosia confertiflora, Ambrosia ambrosioides and Guaiacum coulteri showed minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 200, 790 and 1000 μg/mL, respectively, whereas no effect was observed with the rest of the methanolic extracts at the concentrations tested. Chloroform, dichloromethane, and ethyl acetate extracts from Ambrosia confertiflora showed a MIC of 90, 120 and 160 μg/mL, respectively. A. confertiflora and A. ambrosioides showed the best anti-mycobacterial activity in vitro. The activity of Guaiacum coulteri is consistent with the traditional use by Sonoran ethnic groups as anti-tuberculosis agent.For these reasons, it is important to investigate a broader spectrum of medicinal plants in order to find compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  2. Optical absorption, TL and IRSL of basic plagioclase megacrysts from the pinacate (Sonora, Mexico) quaternary alkalic volcanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, V; Paz-Moreno, F; Piters, T M; Barboza-Flores, M

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of an investigation on optical absorption (OA), thermally and infrared stimulated luminescence (TL and IRSL) of the Pinacate plagioclase (labradorite). The OA spectra reveal two bands with maxima at 1.0 and 3.2 eV connected with absorption of the Fe3+ and Fe2+ and IR absorption at wavelengths longer than 2700 nm. The ultraviolet absorption varies exponentially with the photon energy following the 'vitreous' empirical Urbach rule indicating exponential distribution of localised states in the forbidden band. The natural TL is peaked at 700 K. Laboratory beta irradiation creates a very broad TL peak with maximum at 430 K. The change of the 430 K TL peak shape under the thermal cleaning procedure and dark storage after irradiation reveals a monotonous increasing of the activation energy that can be explained by the exponential distribution of traps. The IRSL response is weak and exhibits a typical decay behaviour.

  3. Estimating ET using scintillometers and satellites in an irrigated vineyard in the Costa De Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.; Lopez-Ibarra, J.A.; Watts, C.J.; Rodriquez, J.C.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Moene, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Observation techniques for surface energy balance
    components on kilometer scale. Several methods have been proposed to estimate ET over
    large areas which combine Earth Observation Satellite data
    with standard climate data. Here we use the Makkink
    approach where incoming solar

  4. Anogenital distance: A longitudinal evaluation of its variants and indices in boys and girls of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto-Gómez, Carmen; Farías, Paulina; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Romano-Riquer, S P; Riojas-Rodríguez, Horacio

    2017-10-01

    There is no consensus on which anogenital distance (AGD) variant to use and how to adjust it by body size in humans. This study quantitatively evaluated AGD variants and body size adjustments to determine which would be the best choice. AGD variants, height, and weight were measured on five occasions during the first year of life of 307 infants. The ratio of anoscrotal distance (ASD) in boys and anofourchette distance (AFD) in girls increased from 1.9 at birth to 2.3 at 12 months of age. Each AGD variant was divided by each body size variable to generate different indices. Such indices were standardized to make them comparable when analyzing their performance through mixed models. ASD and AFD adjusted by height generated precise (p<0.05) AGD indices: 0.4-0.5 and 0.2, respectively. Results suggest that the best body size adjustment for all AGD variants in the first year of life is height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Salinity monitoring using remote sensing in the 038 Rio Mayo Irrigation District. Sonora, Mexico, by remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulido Madrigal, L.; Gonzalez Meraz, J.

    2009-01-01

    a soil salinity survey was carried out in the Rio Mayo irrigation district (ID) in 1996, using satellite imagery along with and EM-38 electromagnetic (EM) device. Data from Landsat TM imagery were calibrated with field data, according to the Plant Indicator methodology. This methodology yielded a partial salinity map of the ID, but including only those areas where indicator crops were cultivated. The remaining non-mapped areas were surveyed with an EM-38 electromagnetic device, generating a second partial salinity map. Both partial maps were integrated to get a complete soil salinity map of the ID. In 2001, another soil salinity survey was carried out using solely the EM device. The results of both methodologies were analyzed, resulting in less affected areas in 2001 compared too those obtained in 1996. (Author) 4 refs.

  6. The Arizona-Sonora Region: A Decade of Transborder Region Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Pavlakovich-Kochi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo se centra en el periodo 1990-2000, una década de intensificada integración económica en la región Sonora-Arizona. En parte, este proceso representa un resultado anticipado de la implementación del TLCAN y, por otro lado, el efecto de la yuxtaposición con otras tendencias regionales y globales. En particular, esta década manifiesta un tiempo de intensificación de la integración económica, por medio de la cooperación transfronteriza para el desarrollo económico entre gobiernos y asociaciones público-privadas apoyadas por éstos. Entre los objetivos centrales del Plan Estratégico Binacional de Desarrollo Económico de la Región Sonora-Arizona estaban fortalecer la competitividad regional en los mercados del TLCAN y global, atraer más inversión y, a través del incremento en las exportaciones, mejorar el crecimiento económico general y elevar el ingreso. Los resultados del análisis realizado sugieren un creciente papel de las exportaciones en la economía de la región. Sin embargo, quienes toman las decisiones enfrentan dos preocupaciones fundamentales. Primero, indicadores seleccionados de la participación en los mercados sugieren que la región está perdiendo posición relativa dentro del área del TLCAN. Segundo, parece ser que los beneficios de la creciente integración económica y la consecuente expansión del comercio no se han aprovechado cabalmente y, hasta ahora, no se han manifestado en indicadores promedio de bienestar. Estos eventos demandan una reevaluación urgente de las estrategias económicas regionales.

  7. Prevalencia de polifarmacia en adultos mayores residentes de asilos de Hermosillo, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Canale Segovia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El término polifarmacia se refiere a la utilización de múltiples fármacos por una persona, de manera constante. Debido a que los adultos mayores constituyen el grupo etario con mayor prevalencia de enfermedades crónico-degenerativas, la polifarmacia es un fenómeno común en poblaciones geriátricas. No se conoce con precisión cuál es la prevalencia en un grupo de ancianos asilados del estado de Sonora. Se realizó un estudio transversal, para estimar la prevalencia de polifarmacia en una muestra no probabilística de adultos mayores residentes de asilos de ancianos de Hermosillo, Sonora. La prevalencia de polifarmacia (definida como consumo concomitante de 4 o más fármacos fue de 36.1%, sin diferencias significativas respecto al tipo de enfermedades crónicas padecidas, así como a la edad y sexo de los ancianos asilados. Los sujetos con polifarmacia tuvieron un exceso de riesgo, superior a 10 veces, cuando la prescripción farmacológica era realizada por más de un médico, y tuvieron 5 veces más probabilidad de presentar algún efecto adverso a medicamentos respecto a los sujetos con ausencia de polifarmacia. La polifarmacia es un fenómeno que requiere mayor atención, control e investigación futura, toda vez que los adultos mayores son el grupo poblacional con mayor tendencia de crecimiento en México.

  8. Monoglycerides and fatty acids from Ibervillea sonorae root: isolation and hypoglycemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Galicia, Erica; Calzada, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Rubén; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco J

    2007-03-01

    Eleven monoglycerides (MG), 1-monopalmitin (1), glyceryl 1-monomargarate (2), 1-monostearin (3), glyceryl 1-monononadecylate ( 4), glyceryl 1-monoarachidate (5), glyceryl 1-monobehenate (6), glyceryl 1-monotricosanoate (7), glyceryl 1-monotetracosanoate (8), glyceryl 1-monopentacosanoate (9), glyceryl 1-monohexacosanoate (10) and glyceryl 1-monooctacosanoate (11), together with five fatty acids (FA), lauric acid (12), myristic acid (13), pentadecanoic acid (14), palmitic acid (15) and stearic acid (16) were isolated of the root of IBERVILLEA SONORAE Greene (Cucurbitaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods as well as GC-MS analysis. The hypoglycemic activity of the dichloromethane (DCM) extract, of fractions (F1-F10 and SF1-SF5), of monoglycerides (MG) and of fatty acids (FA) mixtures obtained of the root from I. SONORAE was evaluated in normoglycemic and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The results showed that by intraperitoneal administration the DCM extract (300 mg/kg), F9 (300 mg/kg) and SF1 (150 mg/kg) significantly reduced glucose levels in both models. For fraction SF1, the hypoglycemic activity was more pronounced than that of tolbutamide (150 mg/kg) used as control. However, neither MG (75 mg/kg) nor FA (75 mg/kg) mixtures isolated from SF1 exhibited a significant hypoglycemic effect. However, when MG and FA were combined in equal proportions (75 mg: 75 mg/kg), their effect was comparable to that of SF1. The observed activity for the DCM extract, F9, SF1 and the MG-FA mixture provides additional support for the popular use of this plant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in Mexican traditional medicine.

  9. Política ambiental y territorios indígenas de Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Luque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La política ambiental en México ya es parte de la agenda de seguridad nacional, sin embargo, uno de sus instrumentos de planeación clave es el OET (Ordenamiento Ecológico del Territorio, el cual no ha logrado el impacto previsto. Se propone a los pueblos y territorios indígenas de Sonora como sector estratégico para la implementación de los OET, para lo cual se considera necesario profundizar en su problemática actual. Por ello, se realiza un análisis socioambiental de los complejos bioculturales de Sonora, a partir del marco de reflexión de la ecología política y la perspectiva biocultural. Esto se logra a partir de un análisis interdisciplinario donde se conjugan epistemologías y metodologías de los campos de las ciencias sociales y de la ecología. El análisis socioambiental se organiza a partir de dos grandes temas: la territorialidad y la comunidad indígena contemporánea. Se concluye que el formato actual de los OET es poco operativo, por lo que se dan recomendaciones para eficientar su implementación. Por último, se resalta la importancia de la atención de los complejos bioculturales, en primera instancia como un tema de justicia ambiental, así como por su capacidad para incidir a favor de los temas globales ambientales, como el cambio climático y la disponibilidad y calidad del agua.

  10. Geology and uranium favorability of the Sonora Pass region, Alpine and Tuolumne Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, J.S.; Short, W.O.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium mineralization at the Juniper Mine is restricted to host rocks of the Relief Peak Formation and is most common in coarse-grained lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and lithic wacke. The richest beds contain as much as 0.5% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Uranium is present as coffinite, uraninite, and unidentified minerals. Thorium/uranium ratios are generally low and erratic. Equivalent uranium determinations are low in comparison with chemical uranium values, indicating that uranium mineralization of the Juniper Mine is geologically young. Core drilling at 16 localities shows that widely separated exposures of the Relief Peak Formation have very similar lithology, geochemistry, and stratigraphy. Some sections are similar to the Juniper Mine section. Core from the bottom of drill hole SP-1 contains 83 ppM uranium, the greatest known concentration outside the mine area. Significant uranium deposits may be concealed beneath the thick Tertiary volcanic cover of the region. The quartz latitic Eureka Valley Tuff is fairly widespread in east-central California and western Nevada. It contains 12 to 14 ppM uranium and stratigraphically overlies the Relief Peak Formation. It is permeable and contains abundant alkali metals and volcanic glass. Because of its petrology, geochemistry, and position, this formation is the most likely source for uranium mineralization of the Sonora Pass region. It should be examined as a potential source rock in other areas with special regard to its relationship to carbonaceous sedimentary formations. The uraniferous granite pegmatitite dike that crops out in the Niagara Creek area appears too small to be a significant source rock. The most favorable rocks in the Sonora Pass region occur near the Juniper Mine and west of it, in the Dardanelles, the Whittakers Dardanelles, and the area of the Big Meadow Quadrangle. Potential uranium host rocks crop out in areas along the crest of the Sierra Nevada from Lake Tahoe to Yosemite.

  11. Geology and uranium favorability of the Sonora Pass region, Alpine and Tuolumne Counties, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, J.S.; Short, W.O.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium mineralization at the Juniper Mine is restricted to host rocks of the Relief Peak Formation and is most common in coarse-grained lithic sandstone, conglomerate, and lithic wacke. The richest beds contain as much as 0.5% U 3 O 8 . Uranium is present as coffinite, uraninite, and unidentified minerals. Thorium/uranium ratios are generally low and erratic. Equivalent uranium determinations are low in comparison with chemical uranium values, indicating that uranium mineralization of the Juniper Mine is geologically young. Core drilling at 16 localities shows that widely separated exposures of the Relief Peak Formation have very similar lithology, geochemistry, and stratigraphy. Some sections are similar to the Juniper Mine section. Core from the bottom of drill hole SP-1 contains 83 ppM uranium, the greatest known concentration outside the mine area. Significant uranium deposits may be concealed beneath the thick Tertiary volcanic cover of the region. The quartz latitic Eureka Valley Tuff is fairly widespread in east-central California and western Nevada. It contains 12 to 14 ppM uranium and stratigraphically overlies the Relief Peak Formation. It is permeable and contains abundant alkali metals and volcanic glass. Because of its petrology, geochemistry, and position, this formation is the most likely source for uranium mineralization of the Sonora Pass region. It should be examined as a potential source rock in other areas with special regard to its relationship to carbonaceous sedimentary formations. The uraniferous granite pegmatitite dike that crops out in the Niagara Creek area appears too small to be a significant source rock. The most favorable rocks in the Sonora Pass region occur near the Juniper Mine and west of it, in the Dardanelles, the Whittakers Dardanelles, and the area of the Big Meadow Quadrangle. Potential uranium host rocks crop out in areas along the crest of the Sierra Nevada from Lake Tahoe to Yosemite

  12. La informalidad de los mercados laborales de Sonora y la frontera norte de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Camberos Castro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo muestra cómo se intensificó la info rm alidad del mercado de trabajo de Sonora y la frontera n o rte de México (F N M en la última década, a pesar de la modernización de la economía. De entre los diferentes conceptos de info rmalidad que existen, consideramos dos reconocidos y que pueden ser mensurabl e s : a la población económicamente activa (P E A que no p e rtenecía a un sistema de seguridad social como el I M S S en 1990 y en el 2000 y b la P E A s u b e m p l e a d a, calificada de acuerdo con el nivel de ingreso menor a dos salarios mínimos (S M en 1990 y menor de tres S M e n el 2000. E l aboramos un índice para medir la informalidad y su intensidad durante la última década. Los resultados muestran que de acuerdo con la p rimera definición, la informalidad se intensificó en la última década, alcanzando en el año 2000 al 46.6% de la P E A en Sonora, por encima del 39.4% de la F N M y menor al 60% de México. Por su part e, la informalidad por subempleo llegó a 65.5% en el mercado laboral de S o n o r a , mayor al 59% de la F N M y menor al 68.6% del p a í s.

  13. Vegetation - Central Mojave Desert [ds166

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Department of Defense and the other desert managers are developing and organizing scientific information needed to better manage the natural resources of the...

  14. Microbial ecology of hot desert edaphic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Valverde, Angel; Gunnigle, Eoin; Frossard, Aline; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Cowan, Don A

    2015-03-01

    A significant proportion of the Earth's surface is desert or in the process of desertification. The extreme environmental conditions that characterize these areas result in a surface that is essentially barren, with a limited range of higher plants and animals. Microbial communities are probably the dominant drivers of these systems, mediating key ecosystem processes. In this review, we examine the microbial communities of hot desert terrestrial biotopes (including soils, cryptic and refuge niches and plant-root-associated microbes) and the processes that govern their assembly. We also assess the possible effects of global climate change on hot desert microbial communities and the resulting feedback mechanisms. We conclude by discussing current gaps in our understanding of the microbiology of hot deserts and suggest fruitful avenues for future research. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Determinants of harsh parenting in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-Armenta, M; McCloskey, L A

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a structural model of the determinants of harsh parenting among Mexican mothers. One hundred five mothers (46 from the community; 59 referred to agencies for child maltreatment) were recruited from Sonora (Northern) Mexico and interviewed. In this model the use of physical punishment was explained by (1) authoritarian parenting style (mothers' beliefs concerning the effective use of physical punishment and mothers' lack of disciplinary skills) and (2) family dysfunction (a latent variable constructed from reports of interspousal violence and the parents' use of alcohol and drugs). In addition, the indirect effects of demographic and historical variables on harsh parenting was included. The findings show that the most important factor influencing the use of physical punishment in these families was authoritarian parenting style, exerting a significant direct effect on the mothers' reports of their use of harsh punishment. Family dysfunction had an indirect effect through parenting style. Some sociodemographic variables also indirectly influenced the use of beliefs maternal punishment It is concluded that cultural beliefs play a major role in parenting within the framework of Mexican family relations.

  16. In vitro germination of desert rose varieties(

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiane Lemos Varella; Gizelly Mendes Silva; Kaliane Zaira Camacho Maximiliano da Cruz; Andréia Izabel Mikovski; Josué Ribeiro da Silva Nunes; Ilio Fealho Carvalho; Maurecilne Lemes Silva

    2015-01-01

    The drought stress resistance is a characteristic of the desert rose and its estimable beauty flowers, which gave it great relevance in the ornamental market. However, the desert rose production and germination is hampered by possible sterility of their male and female flowers and frequent problems in pollination, so the tissue culture is a promising alternative to the propagation of these plants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gibberellic acid on four commercial varieties of dese...

  17. Late Quaternary history of the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Claudio; Betancourt, Julio L.; Rech, Jason A.; Quade, Jay; Holmgren, Camille; Placzek, Christa; Maldonado, Antonio; Vuille, Mathias; Rylander, Kate A.; Smith, Mike; Hesse, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Of the major subtropical deserts found in the Southern Hemisphere, the Atacama Desert is the driest. Throughout the Quaternary, the most pervasive climatic influence on the desert has been millennial-scale changes in the frequency and seasonality of the scant rainfall, and associated shifts in plant and animal distributions with elevation along the eastern margin of the desert. Over the past six years, we have mapped modern vegetation gradients and developed a number of palaeoenvironmental records, including vegetation histories from fossil rodent middens, groundwater levels from wetland (spring) deposits, and lake levels from shoreline evidence, along a 1200-kilometre transect (16–26°S) in the Atacama Desert. A strength of this palaeoclimate transect has been the ability to apply the same methodologies across broad elevational, latitudinal, climatic, vegetation and hydrological gradients. We are using this transect to reconstruct the histories of key components of the South American tropical (summer) and extratropical (winter) rainfall belts, precisely at those elevations where average annual rainfall wanes to zero. The focus has been on the transition from sparse, shrubby vegetation (known as the prepuna) into absolute desert, an expansive hyperarid terrain that extends from just above the coastal fog zone (approximately 800 metres) to more than 3500 metres in the most arid sectors in the southern Atacama.

  18. Reptilian prey of the sonora mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense) with comments on saurophagy and ophiophagy in North American Turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, J.; Drost, C.; Monatesti, A.J.; Casper, D.; Wood, D.A.; Girard, M.

    2010-01-01

    We detected evidence of predation by the Sonora mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense) on the Arizona alligator lizard (Elgaria kingii nobilis) and the ground snake (Sonora semiannulata) at Montezuma Well, Yavapai County, Arizona. Lizards have not been reported in the diet of K. sonoriense, and saurophagy is rare in turtles of the United States, having been reported previously in only two other species:, the false map turtle (Graptemys pseudogeographica) and the eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina). While the diet of K. sonoriense includes snakes, ours is the first record of S. semiannulata as food of this turtle. Ophiophagy also is rare in turtles of the United States with records for only five other species of turtles. Given the opportunistic diets of many North American turtles, including K. sonoriense, the scarcity of published records of saurophagy and ophiophagy likely represents a shortage of observations, not rarity of occurrence.

  19. La industria automotriz y el fomento a las cadenas productivas en Sonora: el caso de la Ford en Hermosillo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Galicia-Bretón Mora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La formación de cadenas productivas es una condición indispensable para el desarrollo económico local en el nuevo escenario que genera un entorno globalmente competitivo. En el caso de Sonora, a partir de la instalación de la planta de estampado y ensamble de la Ford Motor Company en Hermosillo en 1986, las empresas locales no han podido integrarse plenamente a los procesos productivos de la planta. Este fracaso tiene su principal origen en la inadecuada política industrial aplicada por los organismos gubernamentales y privados, junto con la falta de una cultura emprendedora que asuma mayores riesgos. En este artículo se presenta la historia de la industria automotriz en México, en especial el caso de Sonora. Los resultados permiten prever que difícilmente -en el corto plazo- se generarán encadenamientos productivos.

  20. Egg Parasitoids of Proconiini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in Northwestern Mexico, with Description of a New Species of Gonatocerus (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triapitsyn, Serguei V.; Bernal, Julio S.

    2009-01-01

    Nine species of Mymaridae and Trichogrammatidae parasitic on eggs of Proconiini sharpshooters (Cicadellidae: Cicadellinae) were collected in northwestern Mexico in relation to neoclassical biological control efforts against glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), in California. Gonatocerus chula Triapitsyn and Bernal sp. n., which belongs to the ater species group of Gonatocerus Nees (Mymaridae), is described. Specimens of G. chula sp. n. were reared from eggs of the smoke-tree sharpshooter, Homalodisca liturata Ball, on jojoba [Simmondsia chinensis (Link) C. K. Schneider] leaves collected in central Sonora state, Mexico. Also given are new data on other egg parasitoids of Homalodisca spp. and Oncometopia spp. in Sinaloa and Sonora states, Mexico, including Gonatocerus atriclavus Girault, G. morrilli (Howard), and G. novifasciatus Girault, and the Trichogrammatidae Burksiella sp(p)., Ittys sp., Pseudoligosita sp., Ufens ceratus Owen, and U. principalis Owen. For the first time, a species of Ittys is recorded from eggs of Proconiini, and U. principalis from Mexico. Colonies of G. atriclavus, G. novifasciatus and Pseudoligosita sp. were successfully established in a quarantine laboratory at University of California, Riverside, on eggs of the glassy-winged sharpshooter. These three parasitoid species had never been reared under laboratory conditions. In addition, seven species of Proconiini were collected in central and northwestern Mexico: Cyrtodisca major (Signoret), Homalodisca insolita (Walker), H. liturata Ball, Oncometopia sp. cf. clarior (Walker), O. sp. cf. trilobata Melichar, O. (Similitopia) sp., and Phera centrolineata (Signoret). Oncometopia sp. cf. clarior, O. sp. cf. trilobata, and O. (Similitopia) sp. appeared to be undescribed species. PMID:19611244

  1. HIGH FOLIAR NITROGEN IN DESERT SHRUBS: AN IMPORTANT ECOSYSTEM TRAIT OR DEFECTIVE DESERT DOCTRINE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen concentrations in green and senesced leaves of perennial desert shrubs were compiled from a worldwide literature search to test the validity of the doctrine that desert shrubs produce foliage and leaf litter much richer in nitrogen than that in the foliage of plants from...

  2. Análise dos níveis de pressão sonora emitidos por brinquedos infantis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricila Sleifer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar os níveis de pressão sonora emitidos por brinquedos infantis sem certificação. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com brinquedos sonoros ofertados em lojas de comércio popular, chamado de setor informal. Foram considerados brinquedos eletrônicos, mecânicos e musicais. A mensuração de cada produto foi realizada por um engenheiro acústico, em cabine isolada acusticamente, por meio de um decibelímetro. Para obter os parâmetros sonoros de intensidade e frequência, os brinquedos foram acionados a uma distância de 10 e 50cm da orelha do pesquisador. A intensidade foi verificada em nível de pressão sonora em decibéis dB(A e a frequência, em hertz (Hz. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 48 brinquedos. Nas medidas a 10cm da orelha, foi registrada uma faixa de pressão sonora de 102±10 dB(A e, a 50cm, a média foi de 94±8 dB(A, com p<0,05. A maioria dos brinquedos apresentou nível de pressão sonora acima de 85dB(A. A frequência variou de 413 a 6.635Hz, sendo que 56,3% dos brinquedos emitiram som com frequência superior a 2.000Hz. CONCLUSÕES: Constatou-se que a maioria dos brinquedos emitiu sons com elevado nível de pressão.

  3. Antiobesity and Hypoglycaemic Effects of Aqueous Extract of Ibervillea sonorae in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet with Fructose

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera-Ram?rez, Fabiola; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N.; Gardu?o-Siciliano, Leticia; Galaviz-Hern?ndez, Carlos; Paniagua-Castro, Norma

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, type II diabetes, and hyperlipidaemia, which frequently coexist and are strongly associated with oxidative stress, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. An increase in carbohydrate intake, especially of fructose, and a high-fat diet are both factors that contribute to the development of these metabolic disorders. In recent studies carried out in diabetic rats, authors reported that Ibervillea sonorae had hypoglycaemic activity; saponins and monoglycerides present in the plant ...

  4. Prevalence and associated risk factors for Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections among children of northwest Mexico: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Quihui-Cota

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G. intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for gastrointestinal infections worldwide. Contaminated food, feces, drinking water and predictors such as poverty, cultural and behavioral aspects have been involved in their transmission. Published studies about these infections are limited in Mexico. Cananea, Sonora is located in northwest Mexico and is one of the regions with the lowest marginalization index in the Sonora state. However, its rate of gastrointestinal infections increased from 48.7/1000 in 2003 to 77.9/1000 in 2010 in the general population. It was estimated that the prevalence of giardiasis can range from 20 to 30% in the Sonoran childhood population. However, the prevalence of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are unknown in Cananea, Sonora and they are likely contributing to its gastrointestinal infections rates. Methods A total of 173 children (average age 8.8 ± 2.8 years participated in this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements and stool analysis were performed. Socioeconomic, cultural and symptomatology information were collected. The association between the risk factors and intestinal parasitic infections was analyzed by multivariate analysis using the STATA/SE package at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results More than half of the children (n = 103, 60% had intestinal parasitic infections. Cryptosporidium spp. showed the highest prevalence (n = 47, 27%, which was followed by G. intestinalis (n = 40, 23%. Children with giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis had lower H/A and BMI/A Z scores than children who were free of these infections. Children with giardiasis were at higher risk (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 1.11–13.02; p = 0.030 of reporting abdominal pain, and children who drank tap water were at higher risk (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.41–17.20; p = 0.012 of cryptosporidiosis. Conclusions This was the first epidemiological study conducted in

  5. Prevalence and associated risk factors for Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections among children of northwest Mexico: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; Morales-Figueroa, Gloria Guadalupe; Javalera-Duarte, Aarón; Ponce-Martínez, José Antonio; Valbuena-Gregorio, Edith; López-Mata, Marco Antonio

    2017-10-30

    G. intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for gastrointestinal infections worldwide. Contaminated food, feces, drinking water and predictors such as poverty, cultural and behavioral aspects have been involved in their transmission. Published studies about these infections are limited in Mexico. Cananea, Sonora is located in northwest Mexico and is one of the regions with the lowest marginalization index in the Sonora state. However, its rate of gastrointestinal infections increased from 48.7/1000 in 2003 to 77.9/1000 in 2010 in the general population. It was estimated that the prevalence of giardiasis can range from 20 to 30% in the Sonoran childhood population. However, the prevalence of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are unknown in Cananea, Sonora and they are likely contributing to its gastrointestinal infections rates. A total of 173 children (average age 8.8 ± 2.8 years) participated in this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements and stool analysis were performed. Socioeconomic, cultural and symptomatology information were collected. The association between the risk factors and intestinal parasitic infections was analyzed by multivariate analysis using the STATA/SE package at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. More than half of the children (n = 103, 60%) had intestinal parasitic infections. Cryptosporidium spp. showed the highest prevalence (n = 47, 27%), which was followed by G. intestinalis (n = 40, 23%). Children with giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis had lower H/A and BMI/A Z scores than children who were free of these infections. Children with giardiasis were at higher risk (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 1.11-13.02; p = 0.030) of reporting abdominal pain, and children who drank tap water were at higher risk (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.41-17.20; p = 0.012) of cryptosporidiosis. This was the first epidemiological study conducted in children in the region of Cananea, Sonora in northwest Mexico. The

  6. September 1985 Mexico City, Mexico Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The magnitude 8.1 earthquake occurred off the Pacific coast of Mexico. The damage was concentrated in a 25 square km area of Mexico City, 350 km from the epicenter....

  7. Imaginación histórica, forma y experiencia estética en las instalaciones sonoras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Halaban

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se indaga sobre el problema de la forma en un tipo específico de instalaciones sonoras y su implicancia política. Se considera que una concepción historizada de la imaginación permite desgarrar el continuum destemporalizado e indeterminado de esos dispositivos artísticos y reconstruir las relaciones materiales allí cifradas. Para esto se propone articular el análisis empírico de algunas instalaciones sonoras con un recorrido teórico. En este último se discute la lectura de Jacques Rancière sobre políticas estéticas para centrar el debate sobre el arte sublime lyotardiano y la tensión con la propuesta adorniana. El arte sublime, para François Lyotard, es aquel que posibilita el desborde de la razón por la experiencia sensible y se caracteriza por ser "pura diferencia", una "materia inmaterial" indeterminada –en música esto se encuentra en el timbre. Se sostiene, sin embargo, que los experimentos de Pierre Schaeffer indican que en la contemporaneidad no es posible una experiencia tal. La propuesta del artículo es que se puede recuperar el pensamiento formal en las instalaciones sonoras como la síntesis que opera la razón de los fragmentos producidos por la imaginación historizada que penetra al interior de aquello "indeterminado".

  8. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols from native plants in the Mexican desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Paz, Jorge E; Muñiz Márquez, Diana B; Martínez Ávila, Guillermo C G; Belmares Cerda, Ruth E; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2015-01-01

    Several plants that are rich in polyphenolic compounds and exhibit biological properties are grown in the desert region of Mexico under extreme climate conditions. These compounds have been recovered by classic methodologies in these plants using organic solvents. However, little information is available regarding the use of alternative extraction technologies, such as ultrasound. In this paper, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) parameters, such as the liquid:solid ratio, solvent concentration and extraction time, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) for the extraction of polyphenols from desert plants including Jatrophadioica,Flourensiacernua, Turneradiffusa and Eucalyptuscamaldulensis. Key process variables (i.e., liquid:solid ratio and ethanol concentration) exert the greatest influence on the extraction of all of the phenolic compounds (TPC) in the studied plants. The best conditions for the extraction of TPC involved an extraction time of 40min, an ethanol concentration of 35% and a liquid:solid ratio ranging from 8 to 12mlg(-1) depending on the plant. The highest antioxidant activity was obtained in the E. camaldulensis extracts. The results indicated the ability of UAE to obtain polyphenolic antioxidant preparations from desert plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Proterozoic of NW Mexico revisited: U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes of Sonoran rocks and their tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, L. A.; González-León, C. M.; Ortega-Obregón, C.; Valencia-Moreno, M.; Rascón-Heimpel, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Several Proterozoic basement units crop out in the Sonora State of NW Mexico, and the same can be correlated with crustal provinces of southern Laurentia in the neighboring southwestern USA. Zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic determinations in more than 300 grains separated from igneous and metaigneous rocks from these units indicate that the crystalline basement in Sonora is made up of different components, which are from west to east: (1) The Caborca-Mojave province to the west, characterized by the so-called Bámori Complex, have U-Pb ages between 1696 and 1772 Ma, with moderately juvenile to slightly evolved ɛHf values, yielding T DM ages of ca. 2.1-2.4 Ga; (2) in the intermediate area, east of Hermosillo, the Palofierral and La Ramada orthogneiss units yield an age of 1640 and 1703 Ma, respectively, both having juvenile ɛHf with the Palofierral overlapping the depleted mantle curve at ca. 1.65 Ga; and (3) in the northeastern Sonora, samples from the southern extension of the Mazatzal province, represented by the Pinal Schist, yielded ages between 1674 and 1694 Ma, with moderately juvenile to juvenile ɛHf values and a T DM age of ca. 1.9 Ga. In addition, a suite of post-tectonic granites was also studied in Caborca (San Luis granite) as well as in northeastern Sonora (Cananea granite), both yielding ages of ca. 1.44 Ga with moderately juvenile ɛHf values ranging from -1 to +8 and T DM dates of ca. 1.8-1.9 Ga and 1.6-1.7 Ga, respectively. These two isotopically contrasting provinces may imply the existence of a Proterozoic paleo-suture. However, if the Palofierral gneiss, of which the Hf signature straddles the depleted mantle array, is taken as the source for the 1.44 Ga Cananea granite, then the location of such a suture zone should lay farther south than the proposed trace of the Mojave-Sonora megashear.

  10. Desert basins of the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Konieczki, Alice D.; Rees, Julie A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Ground water is among the Nation’s most important natural resources. It provides drinking water to urban and rural communities, supports irrigation and industry, sustains the flow of streams and rivers, and maintains riparian and wetland ecosystems. In many areas of the Nation, the future sustainability of ground-water resources is at risk from overuse and contamination. Because ground-water systems typically respond slowly to human actions, a long-term perspective is needed to manage this valuable resource. This publication is one in a series of fact sheets that describe ground-water-resource issues across the United States, as well as some of the activities of the U.S. Geological Survey that provide information to help others develop, manage, and protect ground-water resources in a sustainable manner. Ground-water resources in the Southwest are among the most overused in the United States. Natural recharge to aquifers is low and pumping in many areas has resulted in lowering of water tables. The consequences of large-scale removal of water from storage are becoming increasingly evident. These consequences include land subsidence; loss of springs, streams, wetlands and associated habitat; and degradation of water quality. Water managers are now seeking better ways of managing ground-water resources while looking for supplemental sources of water. This fact sheet reviews basic information on ground water in the desert basins of the Southwest. Also described are some activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that are providing scientific information for sustainable management of ground-water resources in the Southwest. Ground-water sustainability is defined as developing and using ground water in a way that can be maintained for an indefinite time without causing unacceptable environmental, economic, or social consequences.

  11. Jojoba, Simmondsia chinensis: an alternative for the economic development of the arid and semi arid zones of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda Betancourt, J I; Parra Hake, H

    1976-01-01

    Simmondsia chinensis is, in spite of its name, a species indigenous to SE California and Arizona (US) and to the states of Sonora, Baja California Norte and Baja California Sur in Mexico. It is a shrubby forage plant that reaches a height of 1.5 m and can grow under conditions of extreme drought and high salinity provided that frost does not occur; it is thus suitable for many arid and semi-arid parts of Mexico as well as other similar regions of the world. The seed, traditionally associated with medicinal properties, was found in 1933 to produce a liquid wax with properties similar to those of sperm-whale oil, an increasingly scarce product used for the lubrication of machinery run at high temperatures and speeds. Some other uses for S. chinensis wax are listed, and silvicultural research on the species in progress in Baja California Sur and elsewhere is briefly described.

  12. Jojoba, Simmondsia chinensis. An alternative for the economic development of the arid and semi arid zones of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda Betancourt, J I; Parra Hake, H

    1976-01-01

    S. chinensis is, in spite of its name, a species indigenous to SE California and Arizona (US) and to the states of Sonora, Baja California Norte and Baja California Sur in Mexico. It is a shrubby forage plant that reaches a height of 1.5 m and can grow under conditions of extreme drought and high salinity provided that frost does not occur; it is thus suitable for many arid and semi-arid parts of Mexico as well as other similar regions of the world. The seed, traditionally associated with medicinal properties, was found in 1933 to produce a liquid wax with properties similar to those of sperm-whale oil, an increasingly scarce product used for the lubrication of machinery run at high temperatures and speeds. Some other uses for S. chinensis wax are listed, and silvicultural research on the species in progress in Baja California Sur and elsewhere is briefly described.

  13. Wide ranges of functional traits in the flora from the central region of Sonora: A diversity to be explored

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar Hinojo Hinojo; Alejandro E. Castellanos; Jose M. Llano. Sotelo

    2013-01-01

    Although the Sonoran Desert does not have the highest plant species richness, it has been documented with the highest growth form diversity from the North American deserts. It is not known if this high growth form diversity could also harbor a high functional diversity. In this study we characterize the ecophysiological functional traits of photosynthetic capacity,...

  14. Multimodal Literacies, Pedagogy, and the Construction of Identity-Based Social Movements: The Case of "Espina y Jugo" in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mein, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This article looks closely at how the process of artmaking linked to social critique unfolds in one community-based educational setting in Latin America. Drawing on nine months of ethnographic fieldwork with a community-based popular education organization in the northern desert of Mexico, the article examines the pedagogical uses of poetry,…

  15. Oxalosis in wild desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Berry, Kristin H.; Stacy, Brian; Huzella, Louis M.; Kalasinsky, Victor F.; Fleetwood, Michelle L.; Mense, Mark G.

    2009-01-01

    We necropsied a moribund, wild adult male desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) with clinical signs of respiratory disease and elevated plasma biochemical analytes indicative of renal disease (blood urea nitrogen [415 mg/dl], uric acid [11.8 mg/dl], sodium >180 mmol/l] and chloride [139 mmol/l]). Moderate numbers of birefringent oxalate crystals, based on infrared and electron microscopy, were present within renal tubules; small numbers were seen in colloid within thyroid follicles. A retrospective analysis of 66 additional cases of wild desert tortoises was conducted to determine whether similar crystals were present in thyroid and kidney. The tortoises, from the Mojave and Sonoran deserts, were necropsied between 1992 and 2003 and included juveniles and adults. Tortoises were classified as healthy (those that died due to trauma and where no disease was identified after necropsy and evaluation by standard laboratory tests used for other tortoises) or not healthy (having one or more diseases or lesions). For all 67 necropsied tortoises, small numbers of crystals of similar appearance were present in thyroid glands from 44 of 54 cases (81%) and in kidneys from three of 65 cases (5%). Presence of oxalates did not differ significantly between healthy and unhealthy tortoises, between age classes, or between desert region, and their presence was considered an incidental finding. Small numbers of oxalate crystals seen within the kidney of two additional tortoises also were considered an incidental finding. Although the source of the calcium oxalate could not be determined, desert tortoises are herbivores, and a plant origin seems most likely. Studies are needed to evaluate the oxalate content of plants consumed by desert tortoises, and particularly those in the area where the tortoise in renal failure was found.

  16. Regional signatures of plant response to drought and elevated temperature across a desert ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Seth M.; Muldavin, Esteban H.; Belnap, Jayne; Peters, Debra P.C.; Anderson, John P.; Reiser, M. Hildegard; Gallo, Kirsten; Melgoza-Castillo, Alicia; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Christiansen, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of many desert plant species in North America may decline with the warmer and drier conditions predicted by climate change models, thereby accelerating land degradation and reducing ecosystem productivity. We paired repeat measurements of plant canopy cover with climate at multiple sites across the Chihuahuan Desert over the last century to determine which plant species and functional types may be the most sensitive to climate change. We found that the dominant perennial grass, Bouteloua eriopoda, and species richness had nonlinear responses to summer precipitation, decreasing more in dry summers than increasing with wet summers. Dominant shrub species responded differently to the seasonality of precipitation and drought, but winter precipitation best explained changes in the cover of woody vegetation in upland grasslands and may contribute to woody-plant encroachment that is widespread throughout the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Temperature explained additional variability of changes in cover of dominant and subdominant plant species. Using a novel empirically based approach we identified ‘‘climate pivot points’’ that were indicative of shifts from increasing to decreasing plant cover over a range of climatic conditions. Reductions in cover of annual and several perennial plant species, in addition to declines in species richness below the long-term summer precipitation mean across plant communities, indicate a decrease in the productivity for all but the most drought-tolerant perennial grasses and shrubs in the Chihuahuan Desert. Overall, our regional synthesis of long-term data provides a robust foundation for forecasting future shifts in the composition and structure of plant assemblages in the largest North American warm desert.

  17. CAMEL REARING IN CHOLISTAN DESERT OF PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    I. ALI, M. SHAFIQ CHAUDHRY1 AND U. FAROOQ

    2009-01-01

    The camel is one of the typical and the best adopted animals of the desert, capable of enduring thirst and hunger for days and is the most patient of land animals. For desert nomads of Pakistani Cholistan, it is a beloved companion, a source of milk and meat, transport facility provider and a racing/dancing animal, thus, playing an important role in the socioeconomic uplift of the local community. Camels of Marrecha or Mahra breed are mainly used for riding and load carrying but may be traine...

  18. Mexico; Mexique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes the key energy data for Mexico: 1 - energy organizations and policy: Ministry of energy (SENER), Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE), Ministry of Finances, Ministry of trade and industrial development (SECOFI), national commission for energy savings (CONAE); 2 - companies: federal commission of electricity (CFE), Minera Carbonifera Rio Escondido (MICARE - coal), Pemex (petroleum); 3 - energy production: resources, electric power, petroleum, natural gas; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - stakes and perspectives. Some economic and energy indicators are summarized in a series of tables: general indicators, supply indicators (reserves, refining and electric capacity, energy production, foreign trade), demand indicators (consumption trends, end use, energy independence, energy efficiency, CO{sub 2} emissions), energy status per year and per energy source. (J.S.)

  19. Invertebrados Fósiles del Paleozoico de Sonora, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Cuen Romero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A través de los fósiles es posible conocer la vida en el pasado geológico. La vida se originó en el mar hace 3700 Ma, siendo formas muy sencillas atribuibles a algas e invertebrados como las medusas; las primeras formas complejas se originaron a inicios del Paleozoico hace 541 Ma. El Paleozoico se divide en seis periodos: Cámbrico, Ordovícico, Silúrico, Devónico, Carbonífero y Pérmico; los cuales se caracterizan por una gran biodiversidad y abundancia de invertebrados. En Sonora se conocen diversas localidades con fósiles marinos del Paleozoico, destacando la presencia de poríferos, celenterados, braquiópodos, briozoarios, moluscos, artrópodos y equinodermos. El Paleozoico termina hace 252 Ma con la mayor extinción conocida en la historia de la biosfera, culminando con el 95% de las especies marinas.

  20. Use of technology as a competitive advantage in micro and small retail business in Hermosillo, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Bocanegra Gastelum

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The advance of new technologies of information and communication technologies (icts are not distributed evenly between companies in different sectors of the economy. These include not only the use of Internet and computer, but other tools related to the administrative operations of firms as well as knowledge of the profile of the consumer. This is especially true in enterprises of trade and services sector, where there is a significant gap between the micro, small, medium and large farms. Therefore, the study aims to examine whether the micro and small retailers in Hermosillo, Sonora, ict and know where, if applied as a competitive advantage. To achieve the goal we worked a representative sample of 450 establishments. The result obtained in February 2009, shows that despite advances in the use of these technological tools, knowledge and degree of applicability is still insufficient for micro and small businesses. Therefore, do not have the competitive edge that represents the use of ict to remain successful in the local market.

  1. Mercado de trabajo e industria maquiladora en Sonora y la frontera norte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Díaz González

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se analiza el mercado laboral en Sonora y los demás estados de la frontera norte de México, a partir de la evolución de la industria maquiladora y su relación con el empleo y los salarios regionales. Para una economía de bienes comercializables y no comercializables, que utiliza un modelo en el que el comercio internacional influye sobre el empleo y los salarios de la región, y con base en una estimación con datos de panel, se estudia el efecto de la demanda del empleo y los salarios provenientes de la demanda de exportaciones de bienes manufacturados sobre el sector no maquilador, de 1997 a 2004, con énfasis en la etapa de cierre de empresas maquiladoras en 2001 y 2003. Los resultados sugieren que, para este periodo en particular, el empleo en los sectores distintos a la maquila determina el equilibrio en el mercado de trabajo, y que los salarios de las maquiladoras son influidos por el equilibrio en la oferta y demanda de dichos sectores.

  2. Personas que se inyectan drogas en Hermosillo, Sonora. Metodología para su registro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Ospina-Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conocer el tamaño de las poblaciones es fundamental para estimar universos de necesidad, planear intervenciones y evaluarlas. La estigmatización y criminalización del uso de drogas en México hace que las personas que se las inyectan sean difíciles de alcanzar, sin embargo tienen derecho a la salud, y el Estado está obligado a garantizarla, lo que incluye diseñar acciones efectivas para prevenir el sida. En Hermosillo, Sonora, el peso de la trasmisión del virus de inmunodeficiencia humana por drogas inyectadas ha ganado relevancia en la última década, no obstante, se desconoce el tamaño de la población que se inyecta drogas. En este artículo se describe detalladamente cómo se construye una aproximación mixta de metodologías cualitativas y cuantitativas para estimar el tamaño de dicha población en Hermosillo, y se ofrecen recomendaciones para mejorar los sistemas para registrarla en los servicios de tratamiento de adicciones, y cómo potenciar las intervenciones comunitarias de reducción de daños en la ciudad.

  3. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey national topographic map: Sonora, Texas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Sonora National Topographic Map NH14-4 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also

  4. [A fatal case series of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Sonora, México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-De la Mora, Jesús; Licona-Enríquez, Jesús David; Leyva-Gastélum, Marcia; Delgado-De la Mora, David; Rascón-Alcantar, Adela; Álvarez-Hernández, Gerardo

    2018-03-15

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a highly lethal infectious disease, particularly if specific treatment with doxycycline is given belatedly. To describe the clinical profile of fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever cases in hospitalized patients in the state of Sonora, México. We conducted a cross-sectional study on a series of 47 deaths caused by Rickettsia rickettsii from 2013 to 2016. The diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was confirmed in a single blood sample by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or by a four-fold increase in immunoglobulin G measured in paired samples analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were compared stratifying subjects into two groups: pediatric and adult. There were no differences in clinical characteristics between groups; petechial rash was the most frequent sign (96%), followed by headache (70%) and myalgia (67%). Although that doxycycline was administered before the fifth day from the onset of symptoms, death occurred in 55% of patients. In clinical laboratory, thrombocytopenia, and biomarkers of liver acute failure and acute kidney failure were the most frequent. Rocky Mountain spotted fever remains as one of the most lethal infectious diseases, which may be related not only to the lack of diagnostic suspicion and delayed administration of doxycycline, but to genotypic characteristics of Rickettsia rickettsii that may play a role in the variability of the fatality rate that has been reported in other geographical regions where the disease is endemic.

  5. Regiones y distribución espacial de las actividades económicas en Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Sánchez Gamboa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo es demostrar que la distribución espacial de los sectores no siem- pre responde a la presencia de externalida- des regionales. Se analiza el comportamien- to de veintitrés sectores agregados para el caso de Sonora, considerando inicialmente su distribución en el espacio y, posterior- mente, la infl uencia del espacio en esta dis- tribución, con base en las herramientas ana- líticas “I de Moran global” y LISA (Local Indicators of Spatial Association. Se obser- va una alta concentración o especialización espacial, a la vez que una muy baja correla- ción espacial, lo que nos lleva a concluir que la localización de los sectores estudiados no responde a externalidades regionales, sino más bien a economías de urbanización u otras no regionales.

  6. Divining Jordan's desert waters | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... in the area have a long history of being water-conservers, and the idea of using the ... Dr Abu-Jaber examined is covered by an ancient, volcanic rock called basalt. ... When a desert cloudburst drops rain on the area, the raindrops quickly roll ...

  7. Liquid Water Restricts Habitability in Extreme Deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S; Brown, Sarah; Landenmark, Hanna; Samuels, Toby; Siddall, Rebecca; Wadsworth, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Liquid water is a requirement for biochemistry, yet under some circumstances it is deleterious to life. Here, we show that liquid water reduces the upper temperature survival limit for two extremophilic photosynthetic microorganisms (Gloeocapsa and Chroococcidiopsis spp.) by greater than 40°C under hydrated conditions compared to desiccated conditions. Under hydrated conditions, thermal stress causes protein inactivation as shown by the fluorescein diacetate assay. The presence of water was also found to enhance the deleterious effects of freeze-thaw in Chroococcidiopsis sp. In the presence of water, short-wavelength UV radiation more effectively kills Gloeocapsa sp. colonies, which we hypothesize is caused by factors including the greater penetration of UV radiation into hydrated colonies compared to desiccated colonies. The data predict that deserts where maximum thermal stress or irradiation occurs in conjunction with the presence of liquid water may be less habitable to some organisms than more extreme arid deserts where organisms can dehydrate prior to being exposed to these extremes, thus minimizing thermal and radiation damage. Life in extreme deserts is poised between the deleterious effects of the presence and the lack of liquid water. Key Words: Deserts-Extremophiles-Stress-High temperatures-UV radiation-Desiccation. Astrobiology 17, 309-318.

  8. Preventing desert locust plagues: optimizing management interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, van A.; Cressman, K.; Magor, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    Solitarious desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), inhabit the central, arid, and semi-arid parts of the species¿ invasion area in Africa, the Middle East, and South-West Asia. Their annual migration circuit takes them downwind to breed sequentially where winter,

  9. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  10. Ibervillea sonorae (Cucurbitaceae) induces the glucose uptake in human adipocytes by activating a PI3K-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Bustos, Rocio; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Gómez-Sánchez, Maricela; Salazar-Olivo, Luis A

    2014-03-28

    Ibervillea sonorae (S. Watson) Greene (Cucurbitaceae), a plant used for the empirical treatment of type 2 diabetes in México, exerts antidiabetic effects on animal models but its mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the antidiabetic mechanism of an Ibervillea sonorae aqueous extract (ISE). Non-toxic ISE concentrations were assayed on the glucose uptake by insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine and human cultured adipocytes, both in the absence or the presence of insulin signaling pathway inhibitors, and on murine and human adipogenesis. Chemical composition of ISE was examined by spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. ISE stimulated the 2-NBDGlucose uptake by mature adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. ISE 50 µg/ml induced the 2-NBDG uptake in insulin-sensitive 3T3-F442A, 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes by 100%, 63% and 33%, compared to insulin control. Inhibitors for the insulin receptor, PI3K, AKT and GLUT4 blocked the 2-NBDG uptake in murine cells, but human adipocytes were insensitive to the PI3K inhibitor Wortmannin. ISE 50 µg/ml also stimulated the 2-NBDG uptake in insulin-resistant adipocytes by 117% (3T3-F442A), 83% (3T3-L1) and 48% (human). ISE induced 3T3-F442A adipogenesis but lacked proadipogenic effects on 3T3-L1 and human preadipocytes. Chemical analyses showed the presence of phenolics in ISE, mainly an appreciable concentration of gallic acid. Ibervillea sonorae exerts its antidiabetic properties by means of hydrosoluble compounds stimulating the glucose uptake in human preadipocytes by a PI3K-independent pathway and without proadipogenic effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Geology and geochemistry of the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, J; González, R; Townley, B; Oliveros, V; Álvarez, F; Aguilar, G; Menzies, A; Calderón, M

    2018-02-14

    The Atacama Desert, the driest of its kind on Earth, hosts a number of unique geological and geochemical features that make it unlike any other environment on the planet. Considering its location on the western border of South America, between 17 and 28 °S, its climate has been characterized as arid to hyperarid for at least the past 10 million years. Notably dry climatic conditions of the Atacama Desert have been related to uplift of the Andes and are believed to have played an important role in the development of the most distinctive features of this desert, including: (i) nitrates and iodine deposits in the Central Depression, (ii) secondary enrichment in porphyry copper deposits in the Precordillera, (iii) Li enrichment in salt flats of the Altiplano, and (iv) life in extreme habitats. The geology and physiography of the Atacama Desert have been largely shaped by the convergent margin present since the Mesozoic era. The geochemistry of surface materials is related to rock geochemistry (Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, V, and Zn), salt flats, and evaporite compositions in endorheic basins (As, B, and Li), in addition to anthropogenic activities (Cu, Mo, and Pb). The composition of surface water is highly variable, nonetheless in general it presents a circumneutral pH with higher conductivity and total dissolved solids in brines. Major water constituents, with the exception of HCO 3 - , are generally related to the increase of salinity, and despite the fact that trace elements are not well-documented, surface waters of the Atacama Desert are enriched in As, B, and Li when compared to the average respective concentrations in rivers worldwide.

  12. Alfabetización ambiental en estudiantes de ingeniería de la universidad de sonora

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Alberto a La Torre Islas; Andrea Zavala Reyna; Juana Alvarado Ibarra.

    2014-01-01

    La presente investigación muestra el nivel de alfabetización ambiental de los alumnos de la División de Ingeniería de la Universidad de Sonora en cuanto a las variables: actitud ambiental, conducta ambiental y conocimiento ambiental, derivados de la aplicación de un instrumento de investigación diseñado por el Centro de Educación Ambiental en Wisconsin (WCEE), E.U.A. de ingeniería es bajo (58.79%); mientras que el análisis por componentes ambientales, indica que el nivel de actitud ambient...

  13. Oferta institucional y marginación social. Experiencias de un grupo de bordadoras en Tesopaco, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli del Carmen Andablo Reyes

    2010-01-01

    en la visión gubernamental sobre el desarrollo rural abre áreas de oportunidad para los pobres, la oferta institucional todavía está lejos de cumplir con lo que ofrece la LDRS. Este artículo presenta la experiencia de un grupo de campesinas de la comunidad de Rosario, Sonora, en la gestión de recursos públicos para un proyecto productivo, enfatizando los retos y oportunidades que les ha significado iniciar su proyecto productivo y garantizar su continuidad, en el contexto que establece la ley.

  14. New Mexico Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of parks in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data from a...

  15. New Mexico State Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the generalized physical boundaries of New Mexico State Parks, in polygonal form with limited attributes, compiled using...

  16. New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data provides locations and non-spatial attributes of many ghost towns in the State of New Mexico, compiled from various sources. Locations provided with...

  17. Usos y ocurrencia de los principales metales que se producen en Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lourdes Vega Granillo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available México posee gran cantidad de recursos minerales producto de la naturaleza, por lo que su explotación a través de la minería y el cuidado del medio ambiente deben de coexistir de una manera armoniosa. A través del tiempo la minería ha desempeñado un papel fundamental en la vida económica del país, ya que su desarrollo ha permitido que en la actualidad sea la tercera fuente generadora de ingresos. Asimismo, la minería permite que se desarrollen actividades, como la agrícola y la industrial (automotriz, acerera, cinematográfica, etcétera, entre otras. A nivel mundial, México ocupa el primer lugar en producción de plata, existiendo otros minerales metálicos importantes, como el oro, plomo, hierro, zinc, cobre, uranio y torio. Se considera a la minería como una actividad económica primaria debido a que los minerales se toman directamente de la naturaleza, encontrándose sobre la superficie o bien en el subsuelo a diferentes profundidades. Algunos de los principales centros mineros se localizan al norte del país, pero en los últimos años, Sonora se ha revelado como el estado productor de minerales más importante de México. Los principales minerales son: cobre y metales preciosos, como el oro y la plata. Por ello en el presente artículo, se mencionan los usos más comunes de estos metales, así como su ocurrencia en el estado, y su importancia económica a escala regional.

  18. Sonora: A New Generation Model Atmosphere Grid for Brown Dwarfs and Young Extrasolar Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Morley, Caroline; Lupu, Roxana Elena; Freedman, Richard; Visscher, Channon

    2017-01-01

    Brown dwarf and giant planet atmospheric structure and composition has been studied both by forward models and, increasingly so, by retrieval methods. While indisputably informative, retrieval methods are of greatest value when judged in the context of grid model predictions. Meanwhile retrieval models can test the assumptions inherent in the forward modeling procedure. In order to provide a new, systematic survey of brown dwarf atmospheric structure, emergent spectra, and evolution, we have constructed a new grid of brown dwarf model atmospheres. We ultimately aim for our grid to span substantial ranges of atmospheric metallilcity, C/O ratios, cloud properties, atmospheric mixing, and other parameters. Spectra predicted by our modeling grid can be compared to both observations and retrieval results to aid in the interpretation and planning of future telescopic observations. We thus present Sonora, a new generation of substellar atmosphere models, appropriate for application to studies of L, T, and Y-type brown dwarfs and young extrasolar giant planets. The models describe the expected temperature-pressure profile and emergent spectra of an atmosphere in radiative-convective equilibrium for ranges of effective temperatures and gravities encompassing 200 less than or equal to T(sub eff) less than or equal to 2400 K and 2.5 less than or equal to log g less than or equal to 5.5. In our poster we briefly describe our modeling methodology, enumerate various updates since our group's previous models, and present our initial tranche of models for cloudless, solar metallicity, and solar carbon-to-oxygen ratio, chemical equilibrium atmospheres. These models will be available online and will be updated as opacities and cloud modeling methods continue to improve.

  19. El microfinanciamiento: una alternativa en el combate a la pobreza extrema en Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rentería Guerrero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo examina críticamente la experiencia del Banco Grameen (BG de Bangladesh a fin de comprender los elementos esenciales de su operación. El BG es una institución única en su género que ha logrado desarrollar un método efectivo para llegar a los más pobres de los pobres. Este banco elaboró un modelo financiero que sustituye los requerimientos de garantías colaterales en los préstamos por la responsabilidad de los grupos. El BG organiza a los individuos pobres en grupos, con lo que los hace socialmente aptos para recibir crédito. El modelo de intermediación financiera que esta institución practica, mejora la productividad y el ingreso de la gente pobre. De la misma manera, la aplicación del modelo contribuye a elevar la tasa de recuperación de créditos, lo que a su vez aumenta la viabilidad financiera de la institución. Asimismo, este documento presenta un diseño y un plan de negocios para implantar un prototipo del BG en el poblado Miguel Alemán, municipio de Hermosillo, Sonora. Replicar el modelo Grameen en el México rural es un reto que exige importantes adaptaciones al modelo original. Las diferencias sociales, culturales y religiosas entre México y Bangladesh exigen consideraciones especiales al establecer los métodos administrativos y operativos de un programa de crédito del estilo Grameen. Sin embargo, basados en el plan de negocios, se ha considerado que un programa de crédito para mujeres pobres en la Costa de Hermosillo tiene viabilidad económica y perdurabilidad en el tiempo.

  20. Recursos florísticos de la cuenca baja del río mayo, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Duarte Ruiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available En México se presentan prácticamente todos los grandes tipos de vegetación que existen en el mundo y su distribución a menudo es compleja. El objetivo del trabajo consistió en realizar un listado de la flora silvestre ribereña del Río Mayo, localizado en el sur del estado de Sonora, para conocer su composición. La recolección de especímenes se realizó mediante la técnica de intercepción o línea de Canfield (1941, en 15 sitios con dos repeticiones sumando 30 transectos. Se encontraron un total de 40 familias, 79 géneros y 99 especies. Las familias mejor representadas fueron: Leguminoseae, Cactaceae, Gramineae, Compositae, Chenopodiaceae, Salicaceae, Solanaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Amaranthaceae y Asteraceae. La dominante fue Leguminoseae con vegetación de bosque espinoso compuesta por Acacia cymbispina, Acacia farnesiana, Parkinsonia aculeata y Prosopis juliflora. Resulta perceptible la pérdida de flora debido al cambio de uso de suelo. Especies representativas de la zona riparia como Populus fremontii y Salix bonplandiana están desapareciendo por alteración del ecosistema. Poblaciones de mangle como Rhizophora mangle y Conocarpus erectus están disminuidas. El área estudiada es rica en especies a pesar de la perturbación. La diversidad varía de acuerdo al gradiente altitudinal y el número de especies guarda relación con los géneros y familias recolectadas. La agricultura, acuicultura, ganadería, la industria pesquera y la urbanización, son los giros que causan mayor afectación en los ecosistemas

  1. Mexico joins the venture: Joint Implementation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaz, M.; Gay, C.; Friedmann, R.; Goldberg, B.

    1998-11-01

    Joint Implementation (JI) and its pilot phase of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) are envisioned as an economic way of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper draws upon the Mexican experience with AIJ to identify Mexican concerns with AIJ/JI and proposed solutions to these. Three approved Mexican AIJ projects (Ilumex, Scolel Te, and Salicornia) are described in detail. The Ilurnex project promotes the use of compact fluorescent lamps in Mexican homes of the States of Jalisco and Nuevo Leon, to reduce electric demand. Scolel Te is a sustainable forest management project in Chiapas. Salicornia examines the potential for carbon sequestration with a Halophyte-based crop irrigated with saline waters in Sonora. These three projects are reviewed to clarify the issues and concerns that Mexico has with AIJ and JI and propose measures to deal with them. These initial Mexican AIJ projects show that there is a need for creation of standard project evaluation procedures, and criteria and institutions to oversee project design, selection, and implementation. Further JI development will be facilitated by national and international clarification of key issues such as additionality criteria, carbon-credit sharing, and valuation of non-GHG environmental and/or social benefits and impacts for AIJ projects. Mexico is concerned that JI funding could negatively impact official development assistance or that OECD countries will use JI to avoid taking significant GHG mitigation actions in their own countries. The lack of carbon credit trading in the AIJ stage must be removed to provide useful experience on how to share carbon credits. National or international guidelines are needed to ensure that a portion of the carbon credits is allocated to Mexico.

  2. English Teaching in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses teaching English in Mexico, a country with important social, cultural, and economic ties to the United States. Looks at the various English teaching situations as well as teacher education for teachers in Mexico. Concludes that the English teaching situation in Mexico reflects great diversity and growth, and that the knowledge of English…

  3. Psychology in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eleonora Rubio

    2011-01-01

    The first formal psychology course taught in Mexico was in 1896 at Mexico's National University; today, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM in Spanish). The modern psychology from Europe and the US in the late 19th century were the primary influences of Mexican psychology, as well as psychoanalysis and both clinical and experimental…

  4. Growth status of children 6-12 years from two different geographic regions of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Reyes, M E; Cárdenas Barahona, E E; Cahuich, M B; Barragán, A; Malina, R M

    2002-01-01

    The purposes of the study are to assess the growth status of urban Mexican children living in different geographic areas of the country, to estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity, and to explore secular trends in body size. Cross-sectional surveys of 293 children 6-11 years from Sonora in the north-west of the country (155 boys, 138 girls), and 356 children 7-12 years from Veracruz on the Gulf Coast (194 boys, 162 girls) were undertaken in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Height and weight were measured; the body mass index (BMI, kg m(-2)) was calculated. Growth status was compared to USA reference data and to samples of Mexican children in 1926 and 1975. The prevalence of overweight (BMI > or = 85th and or = 95th percentile) was estimated. Girls and boys from Sonora and Veracruz do not differ in height, weight and the BMI. Mean heights are at (girls) or below (boys) the medians of USA growth charts, while mean weights are at (boys) or just below (girls) the 75th percentiles at most ages. As a result, mean BMIs are above (boys) and below (girls) the 75th percentiles over the age range studied. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is 40% in boys and 35% in girls, whereas the prevalence of obesity per se is 23% in boys and 17% in girls. Compared to urban Mexican children in the Federal District surveyed in 1926, children in the present sample are taller and heavier, but the secular trend in body weight is more pronounced since the mid-1960s. Heights of the current samples are similar to those of well-off children in Mexico City in the early 1970s, but weights are heavier. The gap in height between well-off and lower socioeconomic status children in different regions of Mexico has been reduced, but there is an increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity.

  5. Factors controlling As and U in shallow ground water, southern Carson Desert, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, A.H.; Lico, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Hydrologic and geochemical conditions that produced some sandstone-tyPe U-ore deposits, including those in the non-marine, closed-basin sediments of the Morrison Formation near Grants, New Mexico, suggest that the Carson Desert may be a modern analog for those systems.

  6. Factors controlling As and U in shallow ground water, southern Carson Desert, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lico, M.S.; Welch, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    . Hydrologic and geochemical conditions that produced some sandstone-type U-ore deposits, including those in the non-marine, closed-basin sediments of the Morrison Formation near Grants, New Mexico, suggest that the Carson Desert may be a modern analog for those systems. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Tradiciones performativas regionales y discurso nacional: Sonora en el repertorio del Ballet Folklórico de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Brenscheidt genannt Jost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Se busca indagar la influencia del nacionalismo posrevolucionario y los diferentes discursos regionales que se le contraponen. S e estudia una tradición escénic a y musical mexicana particular surgida a mediados del s iglo XX : el Ballet Folk lórico de México de Amalia Hernández, lo que permite describir la interrelación (así como el conflic to y el entrecruzamiento entre el discurso escénico nacional, regional y su respe ctivo marco de competencia. Desde una perspectiva etnocultural, estética y performativa, apoyada en entrevistas y estudios de caso, se retoma el lugar de Sonora en el program a del ballet, específicamente la Danza del venado y el repertorio denominado “Sonora bronco”. Se analizan aspectos como la disposición corporal, la vestimenta o el estilo, que ponen de manifiesto diferencias y adaptaciones, así como la negociación continua entre el discurso nacional homogene izante y la identidad regional que lo cuestiona.

  8. Cinco especies nuevas de Pselliopus (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Harpactorinae: Harpactorini para México Five new species of Pselliopus (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Harpactorinae from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Brailovsky

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describen 5 especies nuevas de Pselliopus Bergroth (Reduviidae: Harpactorinae recolectadas en México (Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Michoacán, Nayarit, Nuevo León, Oaxaca, Puebla, Querétaro, San Luis Potosí, Sinaloa, Sonora y Tamaulipas y en los Estados Unidos de América (Arizona. Pselliopus karlenae Hussey se registra por primera vez para la República Mexicana. Se ilustran caracteres diagnósticos del pronoto, del borde posterior del segmento abdominal VII, de la cápsula genital del macho (pigóforo y parámeros. Se incluye una clave para la identificación de las especies basada principalmente en los genitales masculinos.Five new species of Pselliopus Bergroth (Reduviidae: Harpactorinae from Mexico (Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco,Michoacán, Nayarit, Nuevo León, Oaxaca, Puebla, Querétaro, San Luis Potosí, Sinaloa, Sonora and Tamaulipas and from the United States of America (Arizona are described. Pselliopus karlenae Hussey is a new record for Mexico. Diagnostic taxonomic characters of pronotum, posterior border of abdominal segment VII, male genital capsule (pygophore and parameres are illustrated. An identification key based mainly on the male genitalia is included.

  9. Biodiversity effects on ecosystem function due to land use: The case of buffel savannas in the Sky Islands Seas in the central region of Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. E. Castellanos; H. Celaya; C. Hinojo; A. Ibarra; J. R. Romo

    2013-01-01

    Buffel savannas have been an important landscape on cattle grazing ranches in Sonora over the past 50 years or more. Changes in land use result in biodiversity changes that may produce ecosystem functional changes; however, these are less well documented. Although fire driven processes have been proposed for Buffel savannas, this is not generally the case, and other...

  10. Transtensional Rifting in the Late Proto-Gulf of California Near Bahía Kino, Sonora, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S. E.; Oskin, M. E.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the role of obliquity in continental rupture from the example of the Gulf of California rift. Focused transtensional strain adjacent to strike-slip faults, ubiquitous in oblique rifts, may act as a catalyst for lithospheric rupture. To test this hypothesis we completed detailed structural mapping, fault kinematic analysis, basin analysis, and paleomagnetism of pre- and syn-rift volcanic and sedimentary rocks exposed in coastal Sonora, near Bahía Kino, México. This area is host to the NW-striking, dextral Sacrificio and Bahía Kino faults onshore that are likely linked to the offshore De Mar transform fault that accommodated Gulf opening. Three fault-bounded sedimentary basins formed unconformably above the 12.50 ± 0.08 Ma Tuff of San Felipe. The 6.53 ± 0.18 Ma Tuff of Cerro Tordillo and the 6.39 ± 0.02 Ma Tuffs of Mesa Cuadrada are interbedded in the lower part of the non-marine basin fill. In one of these basins, we used these tuff markers to calibrate a sedimentation rate of 1.2 ± 0.2 mm/yr and a tilting rate of 0.12 ± 0.02 °/kyr. These rapid rates suggest transtensional strain and related basin subsidence initiated ca. 6.6 Ma, near the end of proto-Gulf time. Paleomagnetism of the Tuff of San Felipe and Tuffs of Mesa Cuadrada in coastal Sonora show variable amounts of clockwise vertical-axis rotation when compared to paleomagnetic reference sites in Baja California. Fault blocks in the central and southern parts of the study area are rotated counter-clockwise 15° to clockwise 35°. Strike-slip faults in this area accommodate up to 10 km of slip. In contrast, ~53° of clockwise rotation occurred in the northern part of the study area, where strike-slip faults are absent. In this northern area, transtensional deformation occurred primarily by block rotation and ~6 km of normal slip on the low-angle (5-15°) Punta Chueca fault. After correcting for variable amounts of rotation, fault blocks display a consistent tilt down to the ENE. Pre

  11. Desert wetlands in the geologic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, Jeff S.; Rech, Jason A.; Quade, Jay; Bright, Jordon; Edwards, L.; Springer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Desert wetlands support flora and fauna in a variety of hydrologic settings, including seeps, springs, marshes, wet meadows, ponds, and spring pools. Over time, eolian, alluvial, and fluvial sediments become trapped in these settings by a combination of wet ground conditions and dense plant cover. The result is a unique combination of clastic sediments, chemical precipitates, and organic matter that is preserved in the geologic record as ground-water discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits contain information on the timing and magnitude of past changes in water-table levels and, therefore, are a potential source of paleohydrologic and paleoclimatic information. In addition, they can be important archeological and paleontological archives because desert wetlands provide reliable sources of fresh water, and thus act as focal points for human and faunal activities, in some of the world's harshest and driest lands. Here, we review some of the physical, sedimentological, and geochemical characteristics common to GWD deposits, and provide a contextual framework that researchers can use to identify and interpret geologic deposits associated with desert wetlands. We discuss several lines of evidence used to differentiate GWD deposits from lake deposits (they are commonly confused), and examine how various types of microbiota and depositional facies aid in reconstructing past environmental and hydrologic conditions. We also review how late Quaternary GWD deposits are dated, as well as methods used to investigate desert wetlands deeper in geologic time. We end by evaluating the strengths and limitations of hydrologic and climatic records derived from GWD deposits, and suggest several avenues of potential future research to further develop and utilize these unique and complex systems.

  12. Biology of the Central Desert of Oman

    OpenAIRE

    GHAZANFAR, Shahina A

    2004-01-01

    A biological survey of the central desert of Oman was done using long distance transects. Vegetation was sparse and consisted of 200+ plant species, 22 species of mammals, 17 species of reptiles and amphibians, and more than 50 species of birds (migratory and resident). Three main vegetation types were identified based on ground substrate and the dominance of species. These were communities with Acacia Willd., Zygophyllum L., and open woodlands of Prosopis cineraria (L.) Druce. Over-grazing a...

  13. Joint by Design: The Western Desert Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Introduction Seated in a dusty tent, finally cooling in the Egyptian night, the “Desert Fox” had a serious problem. German Lieutenant General Erwin...Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture , 2nd ed. (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006), 30-32. 65 Lewin, Montgomery, 121. 29 Allies...Benghazi and Tobruk, and the Egyptian port of Matruh were operating at 60 percent of their potential capacity. By the end of August, the Axis loss rate of

  14. Extrafloral nectar fuels ant life in deserts

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda-Rickert, Adriana; Diez, Patricia; Marazzi, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Interactions mediated by extrafloral nectary (EFN)-bearing plants that reward ants with a sweet liquid secretion are well documented in temperate and tropical habitats. However, their distribution and abundance in deserts are poorly known. In this study, we test the predictions that biotic interactions between EFN plants and ants are abundant and common also in arid communities and that EFNs are only functional when new vegetative and reproductive structures are developing. In a seasonal dese...

  15. Liquid Water Restricts Habitability in Extreme Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Brown, Sarah; Landenmark, Hanna; Samuels, Toby; Siddall, Rebecca; Wadsworth, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Liquid water is a requirement for biochemistry, yet under some circumstances it is deleterious to life. Here, we show that liquid water reduces the upper temperature survival limit for two extremophilic photosynthetic microorganisms (Gloeocapsa and Chroococcidiopsis spp.) by greater than 40°C under hydrated conditions compared to desiccated conditions. Under hydrated conditions, thermal stress causes protein inactivation as shown by the fluorescein diacetate assay. The presence of water was also found to enhance the deleterious effects of freeze-thaw in Chroococcidiopsis sp. In the presence of water, short-wavelength UV radiation more effectively kills Gloeocapsa sp. colonies, which we hypothesize is caused by factors including the greater penetration of UV radiation into hydrated colonies compared to desiccated colonies. The data predict that deserts where maximum thermal stress or irradiation occurs in conjunction with the presence of liquid water may be less habitable to some organisms than more extreme arid deserts where organisms can dehydrate prior to being exposed to these extremes, thus minimizing thermal and radiation damage. Life in extreme deserts is poised between the deleterious effects of the presence and the lack of liquid water.

  16. The Palm Desert renewable [hydrogen] transportation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, C.E.; Lehman, P. [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States). Schatz Energy Research Center

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period June 1997 through May 1998. The project began in March 1996. The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project demonstrates the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a vehicle power system. The project includes designing and building 4 fuel cell powered vehicles, a solar hydrogen generating and refueling station, and a fuel cell vehicle diagnostic center. Over this last year, SERC has built a fuel cell powered neighborhood electric vehicle and delivered it to the City of Palm Desert. The design of the hydrogen refueling station is near completion and it is anticipated that construction will be complete in the fall of 1998. The vehicles are currently being refueled at a temporary refueling station. The diagnostic center is being designed and maintenance procedures as well as computer diagnostic programs for the fuel cell vehicles are being developed. City employees are driving the vehicles daily and monitoring data are being collected. The drivers are pleased with the performance of the vehicles.

  17. ON PHYTOCOENOTICAL MAPPING OF CASPIAN DESERT REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. SAFRONOVA

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The phytoecological map (l :2.500.000 for Desert Region, including the Caspian Lowland and the Mangyshlak. has been compiled. It gives an idea of latitudinal differentiation cf vegetation. Edaphic variants and lithological composition in low mountains. The legend has been constructed according to zonal-typological principle e using an ecological-phytocoenotic classification. Heterogeneity of vegetation is reflected by means of territoria1 units (complex, series, combination and additional marks above the vegetation background. In the northern subzone vegetation is fairly monotonous and characterized by prevalence of wormwood communities (Artemisia of subgenus Seriphidium, joined in three formations: Artemisia lerchiana, A. arenaria. A. pauciflora. Small areas are occupied by shrub deserts of Calligollum aphyllum and Tamarix ramosissima. To southward of 47° N in the middle subzone on the Caspian Lowland the communities of halophyte perennial saltworts essential1y dominate, and to less extent-wormwood communities of hemipsammophytic Artemisia terrae-albae and psammophytic Artemisia arenaria and A. lerchiana. Deserts of Mangyshlak are much diverse. Dwarf semishrubs are presented by species of perennial saltworts (Anabasis salsa, Nanophyton erinaceum,Arthrophytum lehnwnianum, Salsola orientaUs and wonnwood (Artemisia terrae-albae, A. gurganica. A. santolina. To southward of 43° N in the southern subzone dwarf semishrub Salsola gemmascens and Artemisia kemrudica corrnnunities prevail.

  18. ON PHYTOCOENOTICAL MAPPING OF CASPIAN DESERT REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. SAFRONOVA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The phytoecological map (l :2.500.000 for Desert Region, including the Caspian Lowland and the Mangyshlak. has been compiled. It gives an idea of latitudinal differentiation cf vegetation. Edaphic variants and lithological composition in low mountains. The legend has been constructed according to zonal-typological principle e using an ecological-phytocoenotic classification. Heterogeneity of vegetation is reflected by means of territoria1 units (complex, series, combination and additional marks above the vegetation background. In the northern subzone vegetation is fairly monotonous and characterized by prevalence of wormwood communities (Artemisia of subgenus Seriphidium, joined in three formations: Artemisia lerchiana, A. arenaria. A. pauciflora. Small areas are occupied by shrub deserts of Calligollum aphyllum and Tamarix ramosissima. To southward of 47° N in the middle subzone on the Caspian Lowland the communities of halophyte perennial saltworts essential1y dominate, and to less extent-wormwood communities of hemipsammophytic Artemisia terrae-albae and psammophytic Artemisia arenaria and A. lerchiana. Deserts of Mangyshlak are much diverse. Dwarf semishrubs are presented by species of perennial saltworts (Anabasis salsa, Nanophyton erinaceum,Arthrophytum lehnwnianum, Salsola orientaUs and wonnwood (Artemisia terrae-albae, A. gurganica. A. santolina. To southward of 43° N in the southern subzone dwarf semishrub Salsola gemmascens and Artemisia kemrudica corrnnunities prevail.

  19. CAMEL REARING IN CHOLISTAN DESERT OF PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. ALI, M. SHAFIQ CHAUDHRY1 AND U. FAROOQ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The camel is one of the typical and the best adopted animals of the desert, capable of enduring thirst and hunger for days and is the most patient of land animals. For desert nomads of Pakistani Cholistan, it is a beloved companion, a source of milk and meat, transport facility provider and a racing/dancing animal, thus, playing an important role in the socioeconomic uplift of the local community. Camels of Marrecha or Mahra breed are mainly used for riding and load carrying but may be trained for dancing or racing. Berella is another heavy and milch breed of camel famous for milk production and can produce upto 10-15 liters of milk per day. This breed is also suitable for draught purpose, though comparatively slow due to heavy body. The present paper also describes the traditional camel rearing system used by nomads of Cholistan desert. Some aspects of camel health, production, feeding, socio-economic values, marketing and some constraints and suggestions are also given so that the policy makers may consider them for the welfare of this animal.

  20. Use of climate information for drought risk management in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, C.; Magaña Rueda, V.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of meteorological droughts in Mexico has brought to light the large vulnerability of the central-northern part of the country to water shortages. This region is facing current and future water shortages due to the increased demand of water from urban growth in addition to droughts. Assessing droughts requires considering long-term losses and side effects. However, governments generally invest little resources in the creation of drought risk reduction programs, even in regions where droughts have been documented in historical records, such as in the northern region of Mexico. It is not clear until now, what is our capacity to predict droughts on seasonal time scale, and even the Drought Monitor for North America not always reflect the severity of the condition at the regional level. An analysis of strategies that focus on droughts show that one of the principal limits in the management of drought risks and preventive decision making is the use of inadequate definitions of drought predictability. In addition, the means to communicate confidence in seasonal climate forecasts has inhibited the use of climate information in the planning of various socioeconomic activities. Although some sectors such as agriculture have programs to reduce the impacts of drought, their efforts have focused in providing subsidies to get along with dry conditions. In other words, there are no actions to reduce the potential impacts of drought. The characterization of the vulnerability of water user groups, particularly in Sonora as case of study, has been useful to identifying what type of climate information decision makers needed. This information will be included in a proposal of a drought early warming for Mexico. A key element in a drought early warming for Mexico is the development of reliable climate information and the use of indicators to determine of the onset, maximum intensity and duration of the event. The occurrence and severity of drought may be estimated using

  1. 77 FR 65133 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District AGENCY... limited disapproval of revisions to the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District (MDAQMD) portion of.... * * * * * (c) * * * (379) * * * (i) * * * (E) Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District. (1) Rule 1159...

  2. Nationwide desert highway assessment: a case study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuesong; Wang, Fuchun; Wang, Binggang

    2011-07-01

    The natural environment affects the construction of desert highways. Conversely, highway construction affects the natural environment and puts the ecological environment at a disadvantage. To satisfy the variety and hierarchy of desert highway construction and discover the spatio-temporal distribution of the natural environment and its effect on highway construction engineering, an assessment of the natural regional divisions of desert highways in China is carried out for the first time. Based on the general principles and method for the natural region division, the principles, method and index system for desert highway assessment is put forward by combining the desert highway construction features and the azonal differentiation law. The index system combines the dominant indicator and four auxiliary indicators. The dominant indicator is defined by the desert's comprehensive state index and the auxiliary indicators include the sand dune height, the blown sand strength, the vegetation coverage ratio and the annual average temperature difference. First the region is divided according to the dominant indicator. Then the region boundaries are amended according to the four auxiliary indicators. Finally the natural region division map for desert highway assessment is presented. The Chinese desert highways can be divided into three sections: the east medium effect region, the middle medium-severe effect region, and the west slight-medium effect region. The natural region division map effectively paves the way for the route planning, design, construction, maintenance and ongoing management of desert highways, and further helps environmental protection.

  3. The provenance of Taklamakan desert sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittner, Martin; Vermeesch, Pieter; Carter, Andrew; Bird, Anna; Stevens, Thomas; Garzanti, Eduardo; Andò, Sergio; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Dutt, Ripul; Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Huayu

    2016-03-01

    Sand migration in the vast Taklamakan desert within the Tarim Basin (Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous region, PR China) is governed by two competing transport agents: wind and water, which work in diametrically opposed directions. Net aeolian transport is from northeast to south, while fluvial transport occurs from the south to the north and then west to east at the northern rim, due to a gradual northward slope of the underlying topography. We here present the first comprehensive provenance study of Taklamakan desert sand with the aim to characterise the interplay of these two transport mechanisms and their roles in the formation of the sand sea, and to consider the potential of the Tarim Basin as a contributing source to the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP). Our dataset comprises 39 aeolian and fluvial samples, which were characterised by detrital-zircon U-Pb geochronology, heavy-mineral, and bulk-petrography analyses. Although the inter-sample differences of all three datasets are subtle, a multivariate statistical analysis using multidimensional scaling (MDS) clearly shows that Tarim desert sand is most similar in composition to rivers draining the Kunlun Shan (south) and the Pamirs (west), and is distinctly different from sediment sources in the Tian Shan (north). A small set of samples from the Junggar Basin (north of the Tian Shan) yields different detrital compositions and age spectra than anywhere in the Tarim Basin, indicating that aeolian sediment exchange between the two basins is minimal. Although river transport dominates delivery of sand into the Tarim Basin, wind remobilises and reworks the sediment in the central sand sea. Characteristic signatures of main rivers can be traced from entrance into the basin to the terminus of the Tarim River, and those crossing the desert from the south to north can seasonally bypass sediment through the sand sea. Smaller ephemeral rivers from the Kunlun Shan end in the desert and discharge their sediment there. Both river run

  4. Estimate potential evaporation and solar radiation in the Yaqui valley, Sonora, Mexico, using data from satellite; Estimacion de evaporacion y radiacion solar en el valle del Yaqui, Sonora, usando datos de satelite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Watts, Christopher; Rodriguez, Julio Cesar [Instituto del Medio Ambiente y el Desarrollo sustentable del estado de Sonora (Mexico); Garatuza Payan, Jaime [Instituto Tecnologico de Sonora (Mexico); Henk de Bruin [Universidad Agricola de Wageningen (Netherlands); Stewart, John [Universidad de Southampton (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    The data from tow automatic weather stations in the Yaqui valley were used to estimate potential evaporation using the Makkink formula, based on observed incoming solar radiation and climatological values of air temperature. The usefulness of this formula was assessed by comparison with the Penman-Monteith, Penman and Priestley-Taylor formula and measurements of net radiation. A methodology was presented for estimating incoming solar radiation using visible band data from the GOES satellite. Comparisons against ground-based measurements from two pyranometers installed in the Yaqui valley gave good results, particularly in months with low cloud cover. Images for August 1993 were used to produce a map of the spatial distribution of potential evaporation. [Spanish] Para calcular la evaporacion potencial en el valle del Yaqui, usando la formula de Makkink, se utilizaron datos de dos estaciones meteorologicas automaticas. La mencionada formula se basa en la radiacion solar incidente observada y en ciertos valores climatologicos de temperatura del aire. Se evaluo la utilidad de esta formula, comparandola con las de Penman-Monteith, Pennan y Priestley-Taylor, asi como con mediciones de radiacion neta. Se desarrollo una metodologia para estimar la radiacion solar incidente usando la banda visible del satelite GOES. Se hizo una comparacion con mediciones de dos piranometros instalados en el valla del Yaqui, obteniendose buenos resultados, principalmente en meses con poca nubosidad. Se utilizaron imagenes de agosto de 1993 para producir un mapa de la distribucion espacial de la evaporacion potencial.

  5. The Use of Water During the Crew 144, Mars Desert Research Station, Utah Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Well. from November 29th to December 14th, 2014, the author conducted astrobiological and geological surveys, as analog astronaut member of the international Crew 144, at the site of the Mars Society's Mars Desert Research Station, located at a remote location in the Utah desert, United States. The use of water for drinking, bathing, cleaning, etc., in the crew was a major issue for consideration for a human expedition to the planet Mars in the future. The author would like to tell about the factors of the rationalized use of water.

  6. Cost estimates for Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm: a budgetary analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Andrew.

    1991-01-01

    Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm (DS/DS) presented unique challenges for estimating the cost of that conflict. This analysis reviews the cost estimates and methodologies developed for that purpose by DoD, CBO and GAO. It considers the budget climate and the role of foreign cash and in-kind contributions. Finally, it reviews the budgeting innovations used to provide and monitor DS/DS defense spending. At the outset of the crisis, costs were estimated to determine the defense funding requir...

  7. LA EXPERIMENTACIÓN SONORA COMO ELEMENTO EDUCATIVO. UNA PROPUESTA PARA EL FOMENTO DE LA LECTURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto González Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available El siguiente escrito pretende ser un primer acercamiento a la relación que puede tener el sonido y el fomento de la lectura. Mucho se ha escrito sobre el tema del fomento a la lectura, de los hábitos lectores y qué textos son considerados materiales de lectura. Sin embargo, el fracaso de diversos proyectos se debe a una concepción errónea y limitado que tenemos del término lectura, ya que comúnmente encerramos esa expresión a una interacción con los libros de texto, todo lo que no entra en ese estándar no es considerado como “material para leer”. De ahí que un primer paso sea ampliar la noción de lectura para incorporar otros elementos. Es así como nace la inquietud por pensar el sonido como un elemento que tiene la potencialidad de ampliar nuestra visión de la lectura.PALABRAS CLAVE: fomento de la lectura; experimentación sonora; elemento educativoTHE SOUND EXPERIMENTATION AS EDUCATIONAL ELEMENT. A PROPOSAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE READING ABSTRACTThe following one written it seeks to be a first approach to the relationship that can have the sound and the development of the reading. A lot it has been written on the topic from the development to the reading, of the habits readers and what texts reading materials are considered. However, the failure of diverse projects is due since commonly to an erroneous and limited conception that we have of the term reading, we contain that expression to an interaction with the text books, all that doesn't enter in that standard is not considered as "material to read". With the result that a first step is to enlarge the reading notion to incorporate other elements. It is as well as the restlessness is born to think the sound like an element that has the potentiality of enlarging our vision of the reading.KEYWORDS: foment of the reading; sound experimentation; educational element

  8. Quadrulella texcalense sp. nov. from a Mexican desert: An unexpected new environment for hyalospheniid testate amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Juárez, Horacio; Serrano-Vázquez, Angélica; Kosakyan, Anush; Mitchell, Edward A D; Rivera Aguilar, Víctor M; Lahr, Daniel J G; Hernández Moreno, Mayra M; Cuellar, Humberto Macías; Eguiarte, Luis E; Lara, Enrique

    2017-10-01

    Quadrulella (Amoebozoa, Arcellinida, Hyalospheniidae) is a genus of testate amoebae with unmistakable morphology, which secretes characteristic square plates to reinforce the test. They are mainly known from fens and freshwater habitats and have never been documented in deserts. We describe a new species, Quadrulella texcalense, from biological soil crusts in the intertropical desert of Tehuacán (state of Puebla, Mexico). Quadrulella texcalense occurred only at altitudes between 2140 and 2221m.a.s.l., together with the bryophyte genera Pseudocrossidium, Weissia, Bryum, Didymodon, Neohyophyla and Aloina. The soil was extremely dry (moisture of 1.97-2.6%), which contrasts sharply with previous reports for the Quadrulella genus. Single cell mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) barcoding of thirteen isolated cells showed an important morphological variability despite having all the same COI barcode sequence. Quadrulella texcalense was placed in a tree containing other Hyalsopheniidae, including a newly barcoded South African species, Q. elegans. Q. texcalense unambiguously branched within genus Quadrulella in a compact clade but with a long branch, suggesting accelerated evolution due to a transition towards a new environment and/or under-sampling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Neighborhood socio-environmental vulnerability and infant mortality in Hermosillo, Sonora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Valencia, Francisco; Álvarez-Hernández, Gerardo; Harlow, Siobán D; Denman, Catalina; García-Pérez, Hilda

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of contextual variables at the neighborhood level on a health marker in the city of Hermosillo, Mexico and discusses the importance of collaboration between planners and health professional to minimize the negative effect of contextual factors on urban health. Few studies in Mexico have assessed health outcomes at the intra-urban scale and their interaction with neighborhood-level contextual variables. Using spatial analysis and geographical information systems, the paper explores the association between infant mortality and an index of socio-environmental vulnerability used to measure urban contextual factors. Two high infant mortality clusters were detected within neighborhoods characterized by relatively good environmental conditions and one in a neighborhood with a poor environment. Our results show the clustering of high infant mortality areas and some association with built environment factors in Hermosillo. The results support the need to reconnect public health and urban planning as a way to create healthier environments in Mexican cities.

  10. Are Wildlife Detector Dogs or People Better at Finding Desert Tortoises (Gopherus Agassizii)?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C; Heaton, Jill S; Cablk, Mary E; Drake, Kristina K; Valentin, Cindee; Yee, Julie L; Medica, Philip A

    2008-01-01

    .... Recent studies highlight the effectiveness of trained detector dogs to locate wildlife during field surveys, including Desert Tortoises in a semi-natural setting. Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii...

  11. Neighborhood socio-environmental vulnerability and infant mortality in Hermosillo, Sonora Vulnerabilidad socioambiental y mortalidad infantil en barrios de Hermosillo, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lara-Valencia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This paper explores the impact of contextual variables at the neighborhood level on a health marker in the city of Hermosillo, Mexico and discusses the importance of collaboration between planners and health professional to minimize the negative effect of contextual factors on urban health. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Few studies in Mexico have assessed health outcomes at the intra-urban scale and their interaction with neighborhood-level contextual variables. Using spatial analysis and geographical information systems, the paper explores the association between infant mortality and an index of socio-environmental vulnerability used to measure urban contextual factors. RESULTS: Two high infant mortality clusters were detected within neighborhoods characterized by relatively good environmental conditions and one in a neighborhood with a poor environment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show the clustering of high infant mortality areas and some association with built environment factors in Hermosillo. The results support the need to reconnect public health and urban planning as a way to create healthier environments in Mexican cities.OBJETIVO: Este artículo explora el papel de factores contextuales a nivel de colonia sobre un marcador de salud en la ciudad de Hermosillo, México y discute la importancia de la colaboración entre planificadores urbanos y profesionales de la salud para minimizar el impacto negativo de factores contextuales sobre la salud de la población urbana. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Pocos estudios en México han evaluado las condiciones de salud a escala intra-urbana y su interacción con variables contextuales a nivel de colonia. Utilizando análisis espacial y sistemas de información geográfica, el artículo explora la relación entre mortalidad infantil y un índice de vulnerabilidad socio-ambiental construido para medir factores contextuales urbanos. RESULTADOS: Dos conglomerados de alta mortalidad infantil fueron detectados

  12. List of participants of the VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics 17-25 November 2015, Chiapas, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Lecturers: 1.- Oscar Saavedra San Martín Università di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di FisicaNucleare (INFN, Italy) 2.- Mario Rodríguez Cahuantzi Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP) 3.- Alberto Carramiñana Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE, Mexico) 4.- Marco Casolino Rikagaku Kenkyusho, Research Institute (RIKEN, Japan) and INFN (Italy) 5.- Paolo Desiati Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC), Department of Astronomy (Madison, USA) 6.- Paolo Lipari Sezione Roma I dell’ INFN, Universita’ degli Studi “La Sapienza” c/o Istituto di Fisica (Italy) 7.- Juan Carlos Arteaga Velázquez Instituto de Física y Matemáticas of Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo (IFM-UMSNH, Mexico) 8.- Karen Salomé Caballero Mora Facultad de Ciencias en Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas (FCFM-UNACH, Mexico) 9.- Pat Harding Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL, USA) 10.- Omar Miranda Romagnoli Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-Mexico) 11.- Pierluigi Belli INFN Roma Tor Vergata (Italy) 12.- Giuseppe Di Sciascio Departament of Physics (INFN, Italy) 13.- César Álvarez Ochoa FCFM-UNACH, Mexico 14.- Luis Villaseñor IFM-UMSNH, Mexico 15.- Jorge Romo FCFM-UNACH, Mexico 16.- Lukas Nellen Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (ICN-UNAM, Mexico) Students: 1.- Ibrahim Torres, INAOE, Mexico 2.-Andrea Correa, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Ecuador 3.- Humberto Martínez Huerta, CINVESTAV, Mexico 4.- Iván Antonio Cárdenas Muñoz, Universidad de Sonora, Mexico 5.- Juan Antonio Salazar Contreras, Escuela de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala, USAC, Guatemala 6.- Pravda Linda Flor Cabrera Vogel, USAC, Guatemala 7.- Luis Guillermo García Ordóñez, USAC, Guatemala 8.- Marco Antonio Morales Ovalle, USAC, Guatemala 9.- Joshua Raphael L

  13. AVALIAÇÃO DA POLUIÇÃO SONORA NO CAMPUS III - CAMPUS CENTRO POLITÉCNICO E CAMPUS JARDIM BOTÂNICO - DA UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO PARANÁ - CURITIBA, PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Carvalho da PAZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta os resultados das medições dos níveis de pressão sonora realizadas no Campus III da Universidade Federal do Paraná, no qual estão locados os campis Centro Politécnico e Jardim Botânico. As medições sonoras foram realizadas conforme método descrito na norma brasileira NBR- 10151 e as recomendações da norma ISO-1996, Partes 1 e 2. Foram realizadas além das medições dos níveis de pressão sonora equivalente, a medição dos níveis de pressão sonora estatísticos. Os dados medidos foram comparados com os valores limites para imissões sonoras, prescritos pela Lei do Município de Curitiba, nº 10.625 de 19/12/2002, e pela norma brasileira para a avaliação do ruído em comunidades NBR-10151. Os resultados mostram que há um quadro de poluição sonora, no qual o nível de ruído ambiental no campus está muito acima dos valores recomendados, o que é incompatível para uma área educacional.

  14. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef Friedjung, Avital; Choudhary, Sikander Pal; Dudai, Nativ; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds) were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  15. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Yosef Friedjung

    Full Text Available Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  16. Birds and conservation significance of the Namib Desert's least ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -long Namib Desert and it remains the least known coastal wetland on a desert coast rich in shorebirds. Two surveys of the Baia dos Tigres region in 1999 and 2001 indicated a rich wetland bird diversity consisting of 25 species, with a total of ...

  17. Screening the Egyptian desert actinomycetes as candidates for new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a screening program to study the antimicrobial activities of desert actinomycetes as potential producers of active metabolites, 75 actinomycete strains were isolated from the Egyptian desert habitats and tested. Out of the isolated 75 organisms, 32 (42.67%) showed activity against the used test organisms.

  18. Pastoralist rock art in the Black Desert of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brusgaard, N.O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current problems that exist with the rock art research of the Black Desert in Jordan and presents some preliminary field results of the author’s research on the petroglyphs. It also explore the possibilities that the rock art affords to learn more about the elusive desert

  19. Pastoralist rock art in the Black Desert of Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Brusgaard, N.O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current problems that exist with the rock art research of the Black Desert in Jordan and presents some preliminary field results of the author’s research on the petroglyphs. It also explore the possibilities that the rock art affords to learn more about the elusive desert societies and the limitations about studying rock art in archaeologically unfamiliar territories.

  20. The politics of accessing desert land in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, Al Majd; Molle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    With the dramatic increase of the population in Jordan, the value of land has rocketed up. Urban sprawl into semi-desert or desert areas, initially not surveyed or settled by the British and considered as state land, has brought to the surface the problematic status of those lands. Likewise, the

  1. Aeromycobiota of Western Desert of Egypt | Ismail | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of airborne mycobiota at six different regions of Western desert (5 regions) and Eastern desert (1) of Egypt was determined using the exposed-plate method. A total of 44 genera, 102 species and one variety in addition to some unidentified yeasts and dark sterile mycelia were collected. Of the above, only 5 ...

  2. The Desert and the Sown Project in Northern Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerner, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The desert and sown project, which started in 1999 and continued in 2008-2009, studied the region between the settled areas east of Irbid and Ramtha and the surrounding desert at Mafraq (northern Jordan). Large parts of the material comes from the Palaeolithic period, while some smaller tells date...

  3. Desert tortoise use of burned habitat in the Eastern Mojave desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Karla K.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; DeFalco, Lesley; Scoles, Sara; Modlin, Andrew T.; Medica, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Wildfires burned 24,254 ha of critical habitat designated for the recovery of the threatened Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in southern Nevada during 2005. The proliferation of non-native annual grasses has increased wildfire frequency and extent in recent decades and continues to accelerate the conversion of tortoise habitat across the Mojave Desert. Immediate changes to vegetation are expected to reduce quality of critical habitat, yet whether tortoises will use burned and recovering habitat differently from intact unburned habitat is unknown. We compared movement patterns, home-range size, behavior, microhabitat use, reproduction, and survival for adult desert tortoises located in, and adjacent to, burned habitat to understand how tortoises respond to recovering burned habitat. Approximately 45% of home ranges in the post-fire environment contained burned habitat, and numerous observations (n = 12,223) corroborated tortoise use of both habitat types (52% unburned, 48% burned). Tortoises moved progressively deeper into burned habitat during the first 5 years following the fire, frequently foraging in burned habitats that had abundant annual plants, and returning to adjacent unburned habitat for cover provided by intact perennial vegetation. However, by years 6 and 7, the live cover of the short-lived herbaceous perennial desert globemallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua) that typically re-colonizes burned areas declined, resulting in a contraction of tortoise movements from the burned areas. Health and egg production were similar between burned and unburned areas indicating that tortoises were able to acquire necessary resources using both areas. This study documents that adult Mojave desert tortoises continue to use habitat burned once by wildfire. Thus, continued management of this burned habitat may contribute toward the recovery of the species in the face of many sources of habitat loss.

  4. Violencia intrafamiliar y divorcio: las contradicciones entre los dichos legales y los hechos conservadores en Hermosillo, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela García Figueroa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo es resultado de un proyecto de investigación, cuyo objetivo es mostrar de qué modo el fortalecimiento del conservadurismo moral, que tiende a desecularizar espacios supuestamente secularizados, se manifiesta también a través de políticas que buscan la permanencia de la institución familiar, por encima de los derechos humanos de quienes padecen violencia intrafamiliar, así como de la legislación vigente que los protege. Esto con el fin de reconocer las contradicciones existentes entre lo que establecen las leyes y su aplicación, así como para reflexionar sobre el contexto católico conservador en el que se toman las decisiones públicas en Sonora.

  5. Alfabetización ambiental en estudiantes de ingeniería de la universidad de sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alberto a La Torre Islas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación muestra el nivel de alfabetización ambiental de los alumnos de la División de Ingeniería de la Universidad de Sonora en cuanto a las variables: actitud ambiental, conducta ambiental y conocimiento ambiental, derivados de la aplicación de un instrumento de investigación diseñado por el Centro de Educación Ambiental en Wisconsin (WCEE, E.U.A. de ingeniería es bajo (58.79%; mientras que el análisis por componentes ambientales, indica que el nivel de actitud ambiental fue de 71.76%; en cambio en conducta ambiental y conocimiento ambiental se obtuvieron valores promedio de 47.69% y 56.92% respectivamente. Asimismo, se muestra el análisis de los resultados por género.

  6. El imaginario de lo mexicano en la arquitectura de los turistas residenciales de Álamos, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caro Alicia Palma Romero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El imaginario social se ha convertido en un método de estudio de la imagen, que establece relaciones entre forma y significado en busca del sentido, del fin, de la intención y del propósito de la forma representada por un grupo de individuos. Por esto se emplea como instrumento metodológico, para conformar un modelo que ayude en el estudio de algunas imágenes que aluden a lo mexicano. En este artículo, “lo mexicano” se entiende como un conjunto de prácticas y representaciones arquitectónicas realizadas y compartidas por la colonia de turistas extranjeros establecidos en Álamos, Sonora, una ciudad pequeña del noroeste de México.

  7. Análisis socioeconómico de la pesquería de calamar gigante en Guaymas, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier de la Cruz-González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo hacemos un análisis socioeconómico de la pesquería de calamar gigante en Guaymas, Sonora. Se generó una base de datos con información pesquera y se aplicó una encuesta a pescadores y a trabajadores de la industria del calamar para determinar sus principales características socioeconómicas. Los resultados muestran que esta pesquería ha tenido una participación importante en la estructura productiva del sector pesquero de la región; sin embargo, el repunte en las capturas de calamar gigante en los últimos años ha permitido el crecimiento de esta pesquería, pero no su desarrollo. El documento resalta la necesidad de orientar las políticas de manejo al aprovechamiento integral de este recurso.

  8. Algae-production in the desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, H.

    1988-11-01

    The company Koor Food Ltd. (Israel) developed in co-operation with the Weizmann-Institute (Israel) a production-plant for the industrial cultivation of algae in the desert area of Elat. For almost a year now, they succeed in harvesting large amounts of algae material with the help of the intensive sun and the Red Sea water. The alga Dunaliella with the natural US -carotine, as well as the alga Spirulina with the high content of protein find their market in the food-, cosmetic- and pharma-industry. This article will give a survey of a yet here unusual project.

  9. Background aerosol composition in the Namib desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annegarn, H.J.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Van Grieken, R.E.; Winchester, J.W.

    The sulfur content of atmospheric particulate matter in non-urban areas is apparently rising above natural levels in the Northern Hemisphere. Sulfur emissions to the atmosphere are also increasing with increasing combustion of fossil fuels. Current research is being focussed not only on gaseous sulfur dioxide, but also on particulate forms, including sulfates and sulfuric acid. A global network of non urban studies using proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) of which the sampling site at Gobabeb in the Namib desert is one, are developing a data base on which questions of natural levels of sulfur can be answered

  10. Fog water chemistry in the Namib desert, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Frank D.; Schemenauer, Robert S.

    This study documents the ion concentrations and ion enrichment relative to sea water, in Namib Desert fog water, with the purpose of establishing its suitability for future fogwater collection schemes, while also examining claims that Namib Desert fog water carries exceptionally high concentrations of sulphate, which may be responsible for the formation of gypsum deposits in the desert. The work suggests that Namibian fog water is at least as clean as has been reported from other coastal deserts in South America and Arabia, and provides a source of very clean water for the coastal desert region of south-western Africa. It does not appear that fog is an efficient sulphur source for the formation of the gypsum deposits, unless rare events with high concentrations of marine sulphur compounds occur.

  11. The vascular flora and floristic relationships of the Sierra de La Giganta in Baja California Sur, Mexico La flora vascular y las relaciones florísticas de la sierra de La Giganta de Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis León de la Luz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sierra de La Giganta is a semi-arid region in the southern part of the Baja California peninsula of Mexico. Traditionally, this area has been excluded as a sector of the Sonoran Desert and has been more often lumped with the dry-tropical Cape Region of southern Baja California peninsula, but this classical concept of the vegetation has not previously been analyzed using formal documentation. In the middle of the last century, Annetta Carter, a botanist from the University of California, began explorations in the Sierra de La Giganta that lasted 24 years, she collected 1 550 specimens and described several new species from this area, but she never published an integrated study of the flora. Our objectives, having developed extensive collections in the same area over the past years, are to provide a comprehensive species list and description of the vegetation of this mountain range. We found a flora of 729 taxa, poorly represented in tree life-forms (3.1%, a moderate level (4.4% of endemism, and the dominance of plants in the sampling plots is composed mainly for legume trees and shrubs. Additionally, using a biogeographical approach, we compare our list with other known lists of plants from 5 areas, 3 in the Cape Region, 1 in the Sonoran Desert, and other in the thornscrub area of NW Mexico. We conclude that the La Giganta flora has a mixed composition, primarily made up of plants shared with the lowlands of the southern Cape Region, but also share an important proportion of the flora with the desert mountains of the central peninsula and some with the Sonoran desertscrub of mainland Mexico. Consequently we support that the La Giganta flora is part of a floristic continuum along the volcanic mountains of the southern peninsula that eventually could be considered a new eco-region in the same peninsular land.La sierra de La Giganta se localiza en el estado de Baja California Sur, México, en una región semi-árida. Tradicionalmente, esta

  12. Plant responses to an edaphic gradient across an active sand dune/desert boundary in the great basin desert.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenthal, D.M.; Ludwig, F.; Donovan, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    In arid ecosystems, variation in precipitation causes broad-scale spatial heterogeneity in soil moisture, but differences in soil texture, development, and plant cover can also create substantial local soil moisture heterogeneity. The boundary between inland desert sand dunes and adjacent desert

  13. Alimentos tradicionales en Sonora, México: factores que influyen en su consumo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Enrique Espejel Blanco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available La alimentación se considera un fenómeno biocultural, ya que cumple funciones biológicas de supervivencia y se basa en componentes culturales que se encuentran asociados a los patrones de consumo de los individuos. Desde el punto de vista de marketing, los elementos culturales, junto con las características de los productos, así como sus valores simbólicos, emocionales, de seguridad, de riesgo percibido y personales, pueden llegar a condicionar las elecciones y preferencias de los individuos. Cuando se trata de alimentos tradicionales, resulta probable que la conjugación de elementos culturales y del producto se vuelvan fundamentales en las decisiones de los consumidores. Al analizar alimentos tradicionales/típicos, se los puede identificar desde una visión “nacional”; sin embargo, se trata de una perspectiva muy generalista, ya que dentro de un mismo territorio existe una amplia variabilidad alimentaria. Los componentes y características regionales también pueden variar y favorecer con ello la formación de una identidad gastronómica regional. En esta línea, la investigación que se realiza se centra específicamente en los alimentos tradicionales de Sonora -estado ubicado al noroeste de México-, en donde existe una cocina que mantiene elementos en común con la tradicional cocina mexicana, pero que a su vez tiene un sentido emblemático y de identidad regional. En este contexto, el objetivo general de esta investigación es analizar la influencia que ejercen distintos atributos sobre la satisfacción del consumidor respecto a los alimentos tradicionales sonorenses. Para ello, primero se analiza cómo la calidad extrínseca afecta la seguridad y confianza alimentaria, y cómo a su vez la seguridad, confianza y conveniencia alimentaria influyen sobre la satisfacción del consumidor. Para llevar a cabo la investigación se ha realizado un muestreo aleatorio estratificado considerando la edad y el género como los criterios de

  14. Gender, aging, and work: aging workers' strategies to confront the demands of production in maquiladora plants in nogales, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarga, Mireya Scarone; Becerril, Leonor Cedillo; Champion, Catalina Denman

    2010-01-01

    This work is part of a qualitative socio-cultural investigation with a group of men and women 40 years and older in the maquila export industry in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. In 1994, as a result of the North American Free Trade Agreement, maquila plants combined traditional intensive work methods with new "just in time" production norms that impacted work and health conditions, particularly in older, or aging, workers. The workers that were interviewed for this study show a reduction in their functional ability to work starting at 40 years of age. Work organization demands, general health conditions, and a decrease in physical abilities brings these 40-year-old workers to prematurely construct an image of themselves as aging workers and to develop coping strategies that vary by gender.

  15. Male preventive health behaviors: perceptions from men, women, and clinical staff along the U.S. Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer B; Fernandez, Maria Lourdes; Lacy-Martinez, Charles R; Dunne-Sosa, Andrea M; Coe, M Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Mexican American males have higher levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, higher body mass indexes, and a higher prevalence of diabetes than do non-Hispanic White males. They are the least likely Hispanic subgroup to be insured, to have recently visited a physician, or to have preventive exams. To explore factors related to the use of preventive exams among mature men, and specifically among Mexican American men residing along the Arizona, United States/Sonora, Mexico border, information on barriers and motivating factors to male participation in preventive screening exams was collected. Interviews were conducted with mature men and women from a single border community and with clinical staff from three different border communities who deliver services to similar populations. Responses were triangulated. Common themes identified include health education/information/advertisement and female/family support as motivating factors and machismo/denial/fatalism as a barrier to male health-seeking behavior.

  16. The US/Mexico Border: A Binational Approach to Framing Challenges and Constructing Solutions for Improving Farmworkers’ Lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Aranda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexican migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the US-Mexico border region face health hazards and occupational risks and are becoming commonly known in the public health literature. According to several studies, farmworkers have high levels of chronic diseases such as diabetes and respiratory problems, are at risk for infectious diseases, and experience among the highest incidences of work-related injuries of any profession. The findings from two studies are considered and presented with the objective of contributing to an overall understanding of migrant farmworkers as a workforce moving across national boundaries and affected by the work environments and health stressors both shared and unique to each context. We propose a binational approach to comprehensively address the health problems and socioeconomic challenges faced by migrant and seasonal farmworkers. In this paper we present the results of two distinct but complementary studies of farmworker health on the Arizona-Sonora border.

  17. Administrative Structure of the Second Empire: The Case of Imperial Administration in Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulema Trejo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the many different aspects that made up Mexico's Second Empire, this work seeks to describe and analyze its administra­tive structure, both at the national and departmental levels. For analyzing the departmental level, the author chose the case of So­nora, focusing on conflicts between Sonoran imperial officials and the commissioner of the Eighth Territorial division, in order to stress the pragmatism and autonomy that characterized Sonoran officials all along the nineteenth century,  regardless of the type of government adopted at the national level.

  18. Evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Inman, Richard D.; Barr, Kelly R.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wood, Dustin A.; Medica, Philip A.; Breinholt, Jesse W.; Stephen, Catherine L.; Gottscho, Andrew D.; Marks, Sharyn B.; Jennings, W. Bryan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity within species provides the raw material for adaptation and evolution. Just as regions of high species diversity are conservation targets, identifying regions containing high genetic diversity and divergence within and among populations may be important to protect future evolutionary potential. When multiple co-distributed species show spatial overlap in high genetic diversity and divergence, these regions can be considered evolutionary hotspots. We mapped spatial population genetic structure for 17 animal species across the Mojave Desert, USA. We analyzed these in concurrence and located 10 regions of high genetic diversity, divergence or both among species. These were mainly concentrated along the western and southern boundaries where ecotones between mountain, grassland and desert habitat are prevalent, and along the Colorado River. We evaluated the extent to which these hotspots overlapped protected lands and utility-scale renewable energy development projects of the Bureau of Land Management. While 30–40% of the total hotspot area was categorized as protected, between 3–7% overlapped with proposed renewable energy project footprints, and up to 17% overlapped with project footprints combined with transmission corridors. Overlap of evolutionary hotspots with renewable energy development mainly occurred in 6 of the 10 identified hotspots. Resulting GIS-based maps can be incorporated into ongoing landscape planning efforts and highlight specific regions where further investigation of impacts to population persistence and genetic connectivity may be warranted.

  19. Landscape Sustainability in a Sonoran Desert City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris A. Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss concepts of landscape sustainability in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Phoenix is situated in the greater Salt River Valley of the lower Sonoran Desert in the southwest United States. In this paper I use the ecological frameworks of ecosystem services and resiliency as a metric for understanding landscape sustainability. An assessment of landscape sustainability performance benchmarks were made by surveying research findings of scientists affiliated with the Central Arizona Phoenix Long Term Ecological Research Project (CAP LTER. In Phoenix, present day emphases on cultural, aesthetic, and habitat formation ecosystem services within an arid ecoregion of low natural resilience coupled to a complex matrix of socioeconomic stratification, excessive landscape water use and pruning practices has had the undesired effect of degrading landscape sustainability. This has been measured as mixed patterns of plant diversity and human-altered patterns of carbon regulation, microclimate control, and trophic dynamics. In the future, sustainable residential landscaping in desert cities such as Phoenix may be fostered through use of water-conserving irrigation technologies, oasis-style landscape design motifs, recycling of landscape green waste, and conservative plant pruning strategies.

  20. [Aging in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras de Lehr, E

    1986-01-01

    Demographic social and economic aspects of the situation of the elderly in Mexico are described with special emphasis upon education programmes and types of care in nursing homes. Considering the future trends of an increase in Mexico's elderly population, the author calls for more efforts in research and training in the field of gerontology. First results in this area are reported.

  1. Airborne particle accumulation and composition at different locations in the northern Negev desert.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric desert dust was collected over 36 months in ground-level collectors at four stations in the northern Negev desert, Israel. Three stations (Shivta, Sede Boqer and Avdat) are located in the desert itself whereas the fourth station (Sayeret Shaked) is situated at the desert fringe, in the

  2. Influencia de la estimulación sonora binaural en la generación de ondas cerebrales. Estudio electroencefalográfico

    OpenAIRE

    González Velasco, Pedro Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos. La audición binaural permite al sistema auditivo realizar un correcto análisis de la información que portan las ondas sonoras al posibilitar la comparación de la señal que llega a cada oído. La relación de ambos lados de la vía auditiva sucede casi desde el inicio de la misma, ya en el tronco cerebral, mediante decusaciones de fibras al lado contralateral de la vía auditiva. De esta manera, la estimulación sonora influye en la actividad del sistema nervioso y, pos...

  3. Meta Salud Diabetes study protocol: a cluster-randomised trial to reduce cardiovascular risk among a diabetic population of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo Vucovich, Elsa; Ingram, Maia; Valenica, Celina; Castro Vasquez, Maria del Carmen; Gonzalez-Fagoaga, Eduardo; Geurnsey de Zapien, Jill

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Northern Mexico has among the highest rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes in the world. This research addresses core gaps in implementation science to develop, test and scale-up CVD risk-reduction interventions in diabetics through a national primary care health system. Methods and analysis The Meta Salud Diabetes (MSD) research project is a parallel two-arm cluster-randomised clinical behavioural trial based in 22 (n=22) health centres in Sonora, Mexico. MSD aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the MSD intervention for the secondary prevention of CVD risk factors among a diabetic population (n=320) compared with the study control of usual care. The MSD intervention consists of 2-hour class sessions delivered over a 13-week period providing educational information to encourage sustainable behavioural change to prevent disease complications including the adoption of physical activity. MSD is delivered within the context of Mexico’s national primary care health centre system by health professionals, including nurses, physicians and community health workers via existing social support groups for individuals diagnosed with chronic disease. Mixed models are used to estimate the effect of MSD by comparing cardiovascular risk, as measured by the Framingham Risk Score, between the trial arms. Secondary outcomes include hypertension, behavioural risk factors and psychosocial factors. Ethics and dissemination This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (1R01HL125996-01) and approved by the University of Arizona Research Institutional Review Board (Protocol 1508040144) and the Research Bioethics Committee at the University of Sonora. The first Internal Review Board approval date was 31 August 2015 with five subsequent approved amendments. This article refers to protocol V.0.2, dated 30 January 2017. Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and presentation at

  4. Lessons for Integrated Water Resources Management from the San Pedro HELP Basin on the U.S.-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, A.; Goodrich, D.; Varady, R.; Richter, H.

    2007-12-01

    The San Pedro Basin sits within an intermountain ecotone with the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts to the west and east and the Rocky Mountain and Sierra Madre Mountain habitats to the north and south. The headwaters of the basin originate in northern Sonora and flow north into southeast Arizona. As the region's only remaining perennial stream, the San Pedro River serves as an international flyway for over 400 bird species. It is one of the western hemisphere's most ecologically diverse areas with some 20 different biotic communities, and "possesses one of the richest assemblages of land mammal species in the world." Large mining, military, and municipal entities are major users of the same groundwater resources that maintain perennial flow in the San Pedro. This presentation describes empirical evidence of the positive impacts on watershed management of scientists and policy researchers working closely with water managers and elected officials in a functioning HELP basin. We posit that when hydrologists help watershed groups understand the processes controlling water quality and quantity, and when managers and stakeholders connect these processes to social, economic and legal issues then transboundary cooperation in policymaking and water management is most effective. The distinctive physical and socioeconomic characteristics of the basin as well as differences in institutional regulations, water law issues, and their local implementations in Arizona and Sonora are discussed. We illustrate how stakeholders and scientific researchers in both countries strive to balance ecosystem needs with human demands to create new, integrated basin management. Finally, we describe how the accomplishments of the San Pedro collaborative process, including the use of environmental-conflict-resolution tools, have contributed to the UNESCO HELP (Hydrology for the Environment, Life, and Policy) agenda.

  5. ESTUDIO DE GENERACIÓN DE RESIDUOS ESPECIALES EN LA CONSTRUCCIÓN DEL FRACCIONAMIENTO PORTAL DE ROMANZA EN HERMOSILLO, SONORA

    OpenAIRE

    Israel Miranda Pasos; Ana Cecilia Borbón Almada; Jesús Fernando García Arvizu; Jesús Quintana Pacheco; Elsa Elizabeth Morales Morales; Gilberto Rivera Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Los residuos sólidos municipales (RSM) urbanos provienen de diferentes fuentes de generación como viviendas, comercios, tiendas de conveniencia, supermercados, parques, construcción de obra civil, entre otras. Esta última fuente es el sector que genera una importante cantidad de residuos clasificados como De Manejo Especial según la norma Mexicana NOM-161-SEMARNAT-2011, por lo que no deben ser vaciados en rellenos sanitarios municipales. En la ciudad de Hermosillo, Sonora, los residuos de ...

  6. La responsabilidad social y su relación con el compromiso organizacional, en la universidad de sonora, unidad regional centro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lozano Taylor

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta investigación se desea determinar si existe relación entre la responsabilidad social universitaria y el compromiso organizacional de su personal, utilizando como caso la Universidad de Sonora, Unidad Regional Centro. Para lograrlo se utilizó la técnica multivariada de análisis de correlación canónica con 56 variables independientes de responsabilidad social universitaria y 9 variables dependientes de compromiso organizacional.

  7. HLA-DQ genetic risk gradient for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease in northwestern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-León, M E; Ruiz-Dyck, K M; Calderón de la Barca, A M

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) are the 2 most common autoimmune childhood diseases that share their HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genetic origin. There has currently been an increase in both diseases worldwide. In children from the low-population State of Sonora (15 inhabitants/km(2)) in north-western Mexico, there is no information on their genetic risk or the distribution of the related alleles in the general population. To compare the HLA-DQ allele frequency in a representative sample of newborns from Sonora with that of T1D and CD patients to determine the risk gradient, and to identify the presence of celiac autoimmunity in the T1D group. The study included 397 Sonoran newborns, with 44 cases of T1D, and 25 CD cases. The CD and T1D cases were clinically diagnosed by specialists at the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora, and the autoantibodies were determined by ELISA. Whole blood was collected, gDNA was extracted, and HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 were typed by PCR-SSP. The risk gradient was calculated by comparing the allele frequencies of the cases with those of the newborns. The Sonoran HLA-DQ risk heterodimer proportion was 16.1% for HLA-DQ2 and 13.6% for HLA-DQ8, with an HLA-DQ2:HLA-DQ8 ratio of 1.2:1. The DQ8/DQ2 genotype represented a 1:14 risk for T1D, whereas the DQ8/DQB1*0201 combination showed a 1:6 risk for CD. The prevalence of CD autoimmunity in T1D children was 7%. The Sonoran population has a distinctive HLA-DQ allele distribution due to its ancestry. The HLA-DQ8 combinations with DQ2 or one of its alleles conferred the highest risk for both diseases, and T1D and CD frequently appear together. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion: Chapter 10 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlman, Jana; Gass, Leila; Middleton, Barry

    2012-01-01

    As the name suggests, the Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion includes much of the mountainous regions of these two states, plus a very small part in the Guadalupe Mountains of northwestern Texas. Several isolated areas of higher terrain in Arizona and New Mexico are also included in the ecoregion, which occupies approximately 108,432 km2 (41,866 mi2) (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). The ecoregion is bounded on the south by the Sonoran Basin and Range, Madrean Archipelago, and Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregions; to the north, the ecoregion is both bounded and surrounded by the Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion (fig. 1). The ecoregion encompasses the largest contiguous ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest in the United States (Strom and Fulé, 2007), which stretches from Williams, Arizona, along the Mogollon Rim, Arizona, into southwestern New Mexico, north and west of Silver City, New Mexico.

  9. El empleo informal en la frontera norte de México y el caso de Sonora: un análisis de expectativas en los ingresos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Huesca Reynoso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente documento se muestra la distribución de los ingresos para trabajadores formales e informales en la frontera norte y en Sonora; se observó más participación de los jornaleros agrícolas informales y de quienes trabajan por cuenta propia. Con la base de datos de la Encuesta nacional de ocupación y empleo de 2006, se calculó un escenario contrafactual con la asunción de lo que pasaría con la distribución de los salarios si los informales se desempeñaran como empleados formales. Los resultados indican que los informales asalariados y por cuenta propia están en mejor situación, y es menos favorable la expectativa para los segundos en Sonora, así como para los jornaleros agrícolas en ambos lugares. Los informales por cuenta propia no cambian sustancialmente sus ingresos, si se ubican en la parte alta de la distribución en Sonora, y hay una polarización de las percepciones en los asalariados en la frontera.

  10. Water sources for cyanobacteria below desert rocks in the Negev Desert determined by conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    We present year round meteorological and conductivity measurements of colonized hypolithic rocks in the Arava Valley, Negev Desert, Israel. The data indicate that while dew is common in the Negev it is not an important source of moisture for hypolithic organisms at this site. The dominance of cyanobacteria in the hypolithic community is consistent with predictions that cyanobacteria are confined to habitats supplied by rain. To monitor the presence of liquid water under the small Negev rocks ...

  11. Integrating Army Aviation into the Combined Arms Team: Operational Art in Desert Shield and Desert Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    King of Saudi Arabia. The conversation took place prior to an Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) meeting of Arab Gulf members...Blumberg and Christopher C. French, eds., The Persian Gulf War: Views from the Social and Behavioral Sciences (Lanham, MD: University Press of America...1994), 17. 72 Blumberg and French, The Persian Gulf War, 29. 20 building up forces in northeast Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield, in

  12. In vitro germination of desert rose varieties(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Lemos Varella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The drought stress resistance is a characteristic of the desert rose and its estimable beauty flowers, which gave it great relevance in the ornamental market. However, the desert rose production and germination is hampered by possible sterility of their male and female flowers and frequent problems in pollination, so the tissue culture is a promising alternative to the propagation of these plants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gibberellic acid on four commercial varieties of desert rose (Adenium obesum cultivated in vitro. The seeds of the varieties ‘Orange Pallet’, ‘Carnation violet’, ‘Diamond ring’ and ‘Vermiliont’ were sterilized and inoculated on Water + Agar (T0, medium MS (T1, ½ MS (T2, MS + 0.25 mg L-1 GA3 (T3, MS + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 (T4, ½ MS + 0.25 mg L-1 GA3 (T5, ½ MS 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 (T6. The seeds germination of A. obesum was initiated on the fourth day of cultivation and on the tenth day was possible to observe the expansion of the cotyledons and leaf expansion with subsequent development of early secondary root. The ‘Orange pallet’ variety germinated 100% of seeds on water + agar and MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 of GA3. For ‘Diamond Ring’ and ‘Carnation violet’ the highest rate of germination occurred in treatments MS ½; 0.25 mg L-1 GA3; MS + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 averaging 80% and 70%, respectively. For ‘Vermiliont’ the best response was in MS and MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 ranging between 70-90% germinated embryos. It was registered different malformations in all treatments like absence of roots and apexes during seedling development. The concentrations of GA3 did not affect significantly the seed germination.

  13. Properties of Desert Sand and CMAS Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2014-01-01

    As-received desert sand from a Middle East country has been characterized for its phase composition and thermal stability. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the presence of quartz (SiO2), calcite (CaCO3), gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), and NaAlSi3O8 phases in as-received desert sand and showed weight loss of approx. 35 percent due to decomposition of CaCO3 and CaSO4.2H2O when heated to 1400 C. A batch of as-received desert sand was melted into calcium magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass at approx. 1500 C. From inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, chemical composition of the CMAS glass was analyzed to be 27.8CaO-4MgO-5Al2O3-61.6SiO2-0.6Fe2O3-1K2O (mole percent). Various physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the glass have been evaluated. Bulk density of CMAS glass was 2.69 g/cc, Young's modulus 92 GPa, Shear modulus 36 GPa, Poisson's ratio 0.28, dilatometric glass transition temperature (T (sub g)) 706 C, softening point (T (sub d)) 764 C, Vickers microhardness 6.3 +/- 0.4 GPa, indentation fracture toughness 0.75 +/- 0.15 MPa.m (sup 1/2), and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) 9.8 x 10 (exp -6)/degC in the temperature range 25 to 700 C. Temperature dependence of viscosity has also been estimated from various reference points of the CMAS glass using the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) equation. The glass remained amorphous after heat treating at 850 C for 10 hr but crystallized into CaSiO3 and Ca-Mg-Al silicate phases at 900 C or higher temperatures. Crystallization kinetics of the CMAS glass has also been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA). Activation energies for the crystallization of two different phases in the glass were calculated to be 403 and 483 kJ/mol, respectively.

  14. Chemical constituents of Cenchrus ciliaris L. from the Cholistan desert, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Muhammad Aqeel; Mahmood Karamat; Yusoff Ismail; Qureshi Ahmad Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    The Cholistan Desert is an extension of the Great Indian Desert, covering an area of 26,330 km2. The desert can be divided into two main geomorphic regions: the northern region, known as Lesser Cholistan, constituting the desert margin and consisting of a series of saline alluvial flats alternating with low sand ridges/dunes; and the southern region, known as Greater Cholistan, a wind-resorted sandy desert comprised of a number of old Hakra River terraces w...

  15. Mexico and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, M

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and HIV/AIDS in Mexico and Central America, including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Most migrants travel to the US through Mexico. US-Mexico trade agreements created opportunities for increased risk of HIV transmission. The research literature focuses on Mexico. Most countries, with the exception of Belize and Costa Rica, are sending countries. Human rights of migrants are violated in transit and at destination. Migration policies determine migration processes. The Mexican-born population in the US is about 3% of US population and 8% of Mexico's population. About 22% arrived during 1992-97, and about 500,000 are naturalized US citizens. An additional 11 million have a Mexican ethnic background. Mexican migrants are usually economically active men who had jobs before leaving and were urban people who settled in California, Texas, Illinois, and Arizona. Most Mexican migrants enter illegally. Many return to Mexico. The main paths of HIV transmission are homosexual, heterosexual, and IV-drug-injecting persons. Latino migrants frequently use prostitutes, adopt new sexual practices including anal penetration among men, greater diversity of sexual partners, and use of injectable drugs.

  16. Remontant erosion in desert soils of Tamaulipas, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ortiz, P.; Andrade-Limas, E.; De la Garza-Requena, F.; Castro-Meza, B.

    2012-04-01

    REMONTANT EROSION IN DESERT SOILS OF TAMAULIPAS MÉXICO Rivera-Ortiz, P.1; Andrade-Limas, E.1; De la Garza-Requena, F.1 and Castro-Meza, B.1 1Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, México The degradation of soil reduces the capacity of soils to produce food and sustain life. Erosion is one of the main types of soil degradation. Hydric erosion of remontant type can occur in soils located close to the channel of a river through the expansion of a gully that begins as a fluvial incision over the ravine of one side of the river. The incision takes place at the point of greatest flow of runoff from areas adjacent to empty into the river. The depth of the incision causes the growth of the gully by collapse to move their heads back, upstream. The soil loss by remontant erosion on land use in agriculture and livestock was estimated in order to understand the evolution of gullies formed by this type of erosion. Through measurements on satellite images and GPS (Global Positioning System) two gullies, developed on alluvial soils which drain into the river Chihue, were studied. The investigation was conducted during 2003 to 2010 period in the municipality of Jaumave, Tamaulipas, in northeastern Mexico. Soil loss in gullies developed by remontant erosion was large and it was caused by soil collapse and drag of soil on the headers. The estimated loss of soil by remontant erosion was 3500 t in the deeper gully during 2010 and nearly 1200 t per year in the period 2003-2009. New sections of gully of about 20 m length, with more than 3 m deep and up to 13 m wide, were formed each year. This degradation has significantly reduced the productive surface of soil that for many years has been used to the cultivation of maize (Zea mays) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as pasture production.

  17. Fog deposition to the Atacama desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbeld, A.; Klemm, O.; Griessbaum, F.; Sträter, E.; Larrain, H.; Osses, P.; Cereceda, P.

    2010-07-01

    In the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth, fog deposition plays an important role for the water balance and for the survival of vulnerable ecosystems. The eddy covariance method, previously applied for the quantification of fog deposition to forests in various parts of the world, was used for the first time to measure deposition of fog water to a desert. We estimated the amount of water available for the ecosystem by deposition and determined the relevant processes driving fog deposition. This is especially important for the species Tillandsia landbecki living in coastal Atacama at the limit of plant existence with fog and dew being the only sources of liquid water. Between 31 July and 19 August, 2008, measurements were realized in a 31 ha large Tillandsia carpet at Cerro Guanaco, located 15 km south of Iquique, northern Chile. Several data quality assurance procedures were applied. For the values in compliance with the applied criteria, the mean total deposition per hour was determined (0.04 L per m2) for foggy periods. This number was applied to estimate the amount of water deposited during the measuring period, during the entire month of August 2008, and throughout a whole year. For August 2008, a frequency of fog of 16 %, as established during the measuring period, was assumed. The frequency for a whole year was estimated from the differences of the collected amount of water obtained with standard fog collectors installed at Cerro Guanaco in an earlier study. Calculations resulted in an amount of 2.5 L per m2 of deposited fog water for the measuring period. During the entire August, 4.4 L per m2 have likely been available, and for a whole year, a total of 25 L per m2 was estimated to have reached the surface. Inaccuracies could have been caused by the low amount of data applied, and by a possible underestimation of the deposition due to additional formation of radiation fog during the fog events. Three days were used for further analysis because

  18. Desert ants learn vibration and magnetic landmarks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Buehlmann

    Full Text Available The desert ants Cataglyphis navigate not only by path integration but also by using visual and olfactory landmarks to pinpoint the nest entrance. Here we show that Cataglyphis noda can additionally use magnetic and vibrational landmarks as nest-defining cues. The magnetic field may typically provide directional rather than positional information, and vibrational signals so far have been shown to be involved in social behavior. Thus it remains questionable if magnetic and vibration landmarks are usually provided by the ants' habitat as nest-defining cues. However, our results point to the flexibility of the ants' navigational system, which even makes use of cues that are probably most often sensed in a different context.

  19. [Prevalence of non-fatal road traffic injuries in Mexico: results from ENSANUT 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Medina-Solís, Carlo E; Pérez-Núñez, Ricardo; Híjar-Medina, Martha; Aracena-Genao, Belkis; Hidalgo-Solórzano, Elisa; Palma-Coca, Oswaldo

    2008-01-01

    To determine non-fatal road traffic injuries (NFRTI) prevalence and its distribution in Mexico. Data from ENSANUT Survey 2006 were used. Using simple random sampling, one adult, one adolescent and one child were selected in each household, constituting a final sample of 94,197 representing an N of 102,886,482 people. The dependent variable was the prevalence of road traffic injuries (RTI) during the 12 months prior to the survey. The general accident prevalence was 6.0%; 16.7% corresponded to NFRTI. Men in the 20 to 44 age group living in urban areas and with high socioeconomic status had a higher RTI prevalence (p<0.05). Jalisco, Aguascalientes and Sonora were states with the highest prevalence of RTI, while Guerrero, Michoacan and Oaxaca were those with the lowest. NFRTI are frequent in Mexico and they are concentrated among men in productive ages in urban areas; they are associated with socioeconomic status at the individual level and with the state's development at the population level.

  20. [Fusarium species associated with basal rot of garlic in North Central Mexico and its pathogenicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ortiz, Juan C; Ochoa-Fuentes, Yisa M; Cerna-Chávez, Ernesto; Beltrán-Beache, Mariana; Rodríguez-Guerra, Raúl; Aguirre-Uribe, Luis A; Vázquez-Martínez, Otilio

    Garlic in Mexico is one of the most profitable vegetable crops, grown in almost 5,451ha; out of which more than 83% are located in Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Sonora, Puebla, Baja California and Aguascalientes. Blossom-end rot caused by Fusarium spp is widely distributed worldwide and has been a limiting factor in onion and garlic production regions, not only in Mexico but also in other countries. The presence of Fusarium oxysporum has been reported in Guanajuato and Aguascalientes. Fusarium culmorum has been reported in onion cultivars of Morelos; and Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium verticillioides, Fusarium solani and Fusarium acuminatum have been previously reported in Aguascalientes. The goal of this work was identifying the Fusarium species found in Zacatecas, Guanajuato and Aguascalientes, to assess their pathogenicity. Plants with disease symptoms were collected from hereinabove mentioned States. The samples resulted in the identification of: F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. solani and F. acuminatum species; out of which Aguascalientes AGS1A (F. oxysporum), AGS1B (F. oxysporum) and AGSY-10 (F. acuminatum) strains showed higher severity under greenhouse conditions. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating maquiladora hazardous waste generation on the U.S./Mexico border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Mace M.; Kontuly, Thomas; Hepner, George F.

    1995-03-01

    Maquiladoras, manufacturing plants that primarily assemble foreign components for reexport, are located in concentrations along the northern frontier of the US/Mexico border. These plants process a wide variety of materials using modern industrial technologies within the context of developing world institutions and infrastructure. Hazardous waste generation by maquiladoras represents a critical environmental management issue because of the spatial concentration of these plants in border municipalities where the infrastructure for waste management is nonexistent or poor. These border municipalities contain rapidly increasing populations, which further stress their waste handling infrastructure capacities while exposing their populations to greater contaminant risks. Limited empirical knowledge exists concerning hazardous waste types and generation rates from maquiladorsas. There is no standard reporting method for waste generation or methodology for estimating generation rates at this time. This paper presents a method that can be used for the rapid assessment of hazardous waste generation. A first approximation of hazardous waste generation is produced for maquiladoras in the three municipalities of Nogales, Sonora, Mexicali, Baja California, and Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, using the INVENT model developed by the World Bank. In addition, our intent is to evaluate the potential of the INVENT model for adaptation to the US/Mexico border industrial situation. The press of border industrial development, especially with the recent adoption of the NAFTA, make such assessments necessary as a basis for the environmental policy formulation and management needed in the immediate future.

  2. Evaluation of the community-based chronic disease prevention program Meta Salud in Northern Mexico, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Catalina A; Rosales, Cecilia; Cornejo, Elsa; Bell, Melanie L; Munguía, Diana; Zepeda, Tanyha; Carvajal, Scott; Guernsey de Zapien, Jill

    2014-09-11

    Meta Salud is a community health worker-facilitated intervention in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, and was adapted from Pasos Adelante, a similar evidence-based intervention developed for a Latino population in the United States-Mexico border region. The objective of this study was to examine outcomes for Meta Salud and compare them with outcomes for Pasos Adelante. This pretest-posttest study took place during 13 weeks among low-income residents of an urban area. The program provided information on topics such as heart health, physical activity, nutrition, diabetes, healthy weight, community health, and emotional well-being; included individual and group activities aimed at motivating behavior change; and encouraged participants to engage in brisk physical activity. We found significant decreases from baseline to conclusion in body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, weight, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. From baseline to 3-month follow-up, we found significant decreases in body mass index, waist circumference, weight, LDL cholesterol, and glucose, and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Outcomes for Meta Salud were similar to those found for Pasos Adelante. The physiological improvements found among participants in Meta Salud and comparable changes among participants in Pasos Adelante suggest a scalable and effective behavioral intervention for regions of the United States and Mexico that share a common boundary or have similar cultural and linguistic characteristics.

  3. Mexico's nuclear paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redclift, M.

    1989-01-01

    Opposition to Mexico's nuclear reactors at Laguna Verde has grown during the last two years. The nuclear programme is blamed for being expensive and wasteful, and the decision to rely on the USA contradicts Mexico's espoused policy of greater independence from the USA. The way in which petroleum revenues were used to precipitate the nuclear option is compared with the lack of urgency given to renewable energy and greater energy efficiency. From a social and environmental perspective, as well as an economic one, Mexico's nuclear programme is judged expensive and irrelevant. (author)

  4. The Human Footprint in Mexico: Physical Geography and Historical Legacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Rubio, Alfredo; Kolb, Melanie; Bezaury Creel, Juan E.

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a) physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b) historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony. PMID:25803839

  5. The human footprint in Mexico: physical geography and historical legacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Abraham, Charlotte; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Garcillán, Pedro P; Ortega-Rubio, Alfredo; Kolb, Melanie; Bezaury Creel, Juan E

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a) physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b) historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony.

  6. Investigating water resources of the desert: How isotopes can help

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonfiantini, R.

    1992-01-01

    Newspapers and magazines from time to time write about the enormous reserves of water stored underground in the Sahara, whose rational exploitation would allow the agricultural development of the desert. Although the practical implementation of such projects is rather problematic, it is true that groundwater is relatively abundant under most of the Sahara (as well as in other deserts in the world), but it is seldom easily accessible. What do we really know about these resources of groundwater and how they have accumulated in areas where rainfall is so scarce. What do we know of the hydrological history of the desert. These problems are important for the correct evaluation and use of the groundwater in the desert. Isotope techniques help in their solution, and are described in this document. 6 figs

  7. Investigating water resources of the desert: how isotopes can help

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonfiantini, R.

    1981-01-01

    Newspapers and magazines from time to time write about the enormous reserves of water stored underground in the Sahara, whose rational exploitation would allow the agricultural development of the desert. Although the practical implementation of such projects is rather problematic, it is true that groundwater is relatively abundant under most of the Sahara (as well as in other deserts in the world), but it is seldom easily accessible. What do we really know about these resources of groundwater and how they have accumulated in areas where rainfall is so scarce. What do we know of the hydrological history of the desert. These problems are important for the correct evaluation and use of the groundwater in the desert. Isotope techniques help in their solution, and are described in this document

  8. Vegetation - Anza-Borrego Desert State Park [ds165

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Anza Borrego Desert State Park (ABDSP) Vegetation Map depicts vegetation within the Park and its surrounding environment. The map was prepared by the Department...

  9. The potential of energy farming in the southeastern California desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, V.

    1980-04-01

    The use of energy forms to provide future sources of energy for California is considered. Marginal desert lands in southeastern California are proposed for the siting of energy farms using acacia, eucalyptus, euphorbia, guayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk.

  10. Modeling Agassiz's Desert Tortoise Population Response to Anthropogenic Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojave Desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) populations are exposed to a variety of anthropogenic threats, which vary in nature, severity, and frequency. Tortoise management in conservation areas can be compromised when the relative importance of these threats is not well underst...

  11. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-10-21

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments.

  12. Desert Peak East Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemach, Ezra [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Drakos, Peter [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Spielman, Paul [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Akerley, John [Ormat Technologies Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This manuscript is a draft to replaced with a final version at a later date TBD. A summary of activities pertaining to the Desert Peak EGS project including the planning and resulting stimulation activities.

  13. Silencing criticism in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Suárez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Journalists and human rights defenders in Mexico are being attacked in an attempt to silence their criticism. Many are forced to flee or risk being assassinated. The consequences are both personal and of wider social significance.

  14. New Mexico State Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The TIGER/Line Shapefiles are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the Census MAF/TIGER database. The Census MAF/TIGER database...

  15. New Mexico Federal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This map layer consists of federally owned or administered lands of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Only areas of 640 acres or more are...

  16. New Mexico Mountain Ranges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) actively seeks data from and partnerships with Government agencies at all levels and other interested organizations....

  17. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  18. Tambores, rádios e vídeoclipes: Sobre paisagens sonoras, territórios e multiterritorialidades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alberto Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Os sons, transmitidos por meio de propagações ondulatórias, são produzidos e reproduzidos de diferentes formas e maneiras, seja pela natureza ou pelos seres humanos. Pela natureza têm-se os sons dos ventos, das águas, dos animais. Pelos humanos têm-se os sons das falas, do trabalho, da música, dentre outros. Os seres humanos, dessa forma, organizam sons para comunicação e, mais recentemente na história da humanidade, encontraram a possibilidade técnica do acondicionamento dos sons, para a posterior reprodução em diferentes localidades, marcando uma nova fase nas paisagens sonoras do mundo. Seja pela fala, seja pela música, a humanidade comunica ideias e valores permeados pela cultura. As mais recentes propagações musicais, que se atrelam à linguagem audiovisual, marcam a paisagem dos lugares, que comunica, retrata, e possibilita a existência de distintas territorialidades no espaço. O presente artigo objetiva tecer relações entre a paisagem sonora e a construção de multiterritorialidades, a partir de exemplos de identidades criadas com base em movimentos e estilos musicais, seus territórios e territorialidades. Abstract DRUMS, RADIOS AND VIDEO-CLIPS: ABOUT SOUNDSCAPES, TERRITORIES AND MULTITERRITORIALITIES The sounds transmitted through vibrations in air are produced in different forms and ways, by nature or by human beings. Many sounds exist in the nature like wind sounds, water sounds and animal sounds. The humans produced sounds like speech, work sounds, musics and others. Therefore, they can organize sounds to communicate and nowadays they found out the possibility of the keep sounds to reproduce it in differents places. The humanity communicate ideas and cultural values through the speech or music. The most recent spread musics that are related with audiovisual language showed the landscapes of places and it also communicate, reflect and gives rise distinct territorialities space. It research verifies the relations

  19. GESTIÓN DE LA AUDITORÍA FORENSE ANTE LA NECESIDAD DE TRANSPARENCIA DEL IMPUESTO AL HOSPEDAJE EN SONORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esthela Carrillo Cisneros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los sectores que contribuye al progreso socioeconómico del país es el turismo, y el estado de Sonora ocupa el lugar diecisiete (de las 32 entidades federativas respecto a la ocupación hotelera, según el Compendio Estadístico del Turismo en México 2014. En esta actividad turística surgen los sujetos fiscales obligados a contribuir al impuesto al servicio de hospedaje; no obstante, la opacidad en las finanzas públicas en el manejo de este impuesto, no permite visualizar si la aplicación del ingreso tributario impacta efectivamente hacia la promoción turística en el estado. En contraparte y ante la necesidad de transparencia surge la auditoría forense como mecanismo fiscalizador; por lo que para este trabajo se establece como objetivo general evaluar la gestión gubernamental de la auditoría forense y del impuesto al servicio de hospedaje, además de ubicar los elementos necesarios para que exista este tipo de auditoría especial en el estado de Sonora, la que contribuye a la transparencia en los procedimientos de control en la administración del impuesto.      En la presente investigación exploratoria de tipo documental, se aplicó una encuesta con escala Likert a una muestra no probabilística de auditores adscritos a los órganos de fiscalización del estado. Para determinar la confiabilidad del instrumento se empleó el coeficiente de Alfa de Cronbach. Los avances a nivel estatal en materia de auditoría forense no han sido significativos. El elemento “Acciones gubernamentales para el combate a la corrupción” se considera necesario para el proceso de auditoría forense, así como el elemento “Elevar la calidad del sistema jurídico, optimizarlo y eliminar la impunidad”. Respecto al análisis del impuesto, las cifras públicas del ítem fueron limitadas.

  20. Water appropriation and ecosystem stewardship in the Baja desert

    OpenAIRE

    de las Heras Alejandro; Rodriguez Mario A.; Islas-Espinoza Marina

    2014-01-01

    The UNESCO San Francisco Rock Paintings polygon within El Vizcaino Biosphere Reserve in the Baja California Peninsula derives its moisture from the North American monsoon. There, ranchers have depended on the desert since the 18th century. More recently, the desert has depended on the environmental stewardship of the ranchers who have allayed mining exploitation and archaeological looting. Using a Rapid Assessment Procedure (RAP), climate data, and geographical informa...

  1. MX Siting Investigation. Gravity Survey - Sevier Desert Valley, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-24

    Cheyenne, Wyoming. DMAHTC reduces the data to Simple Bouguer Anomaly (see Section A1.4, Appendix Al.0). The Defense Mapping Agency Aerospace Center...Desert Valley, Utah ......... 2 2 Topographic Setting - Sevier Desert Valley, Utah . 3 LIST OF DRAWINGS Drawing Number 1 Complete Bouguer Anomaly...gravity stations were distributed throughout the valley at an approxi- mate interval of 1.4 miles (2.3 km). Drawing 1 is a Complete Bouguer Anomaly

  2. SIMULAÇÕES SEMI-EMPÍRICAS EM ACÚSTICA: INOVAÇÃO TECNOLÓGICA NA PREDIÇÃO DE NÍVEIS DE PRESSÃO SONORA NO INTERIOR DE EDIFICAÇÕES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonatha Junio Lopes Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A poluição sonora é um problema onipresente que beira o intolerável, causando danos à saúde das pessoas e ao meio ambiente. Dessa forma, dentre as estratégias para avaliar e combater a poluição sonora destacam-se as simulações computacionais. Nessa pesquisa, o programa Enhaced Acoustic Simulator for Engineers-EASE foi pela primeira vez utilizado em conjunto com dados experimentais visando simular o nível de pressão sonora (NPS em dois ambientes do Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Goiás (IFG – Campus Goiânia, sendo que, em ambientes educacionais a poluição sonora pode provocar prejuízos tanto para docentes como para discentes. As simulações foram comparadas com resultados experimentais mostrando-se eficientes para predizer o NPS em ambientes fechados, tendo como parâmetros apenas os níveis de pressão sonora da área externa. Portanto, o EASE pode ser utilizado como uma ferramenta útil para determinar NPS com dados provenientes de medições experimentais reduzindo assim custos operacionais e consequentemente investigando inovações na área de acústica.

  3. Doing Business in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    On 1 July 2001, a far-reaching free trade agreement between the EFTA States and Mexico entered into force. ”Doing Business in Mexico” provides targeted assistance to Swiss Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) that wish to tap the potential of Mexico as both an export destination and investment location. This comprehensive guide contains information and advice on market research, market entry, and investment in this fascinating country. Part I introduces the reader to this fascinating ...

  4. Mexico tornado climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Macías Medrano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A brief introduction on some features of tornado database in Mexico is exposed showing its substantive criteria. We resent a brief analysis about main Mexican tornadoes´ characteristics, based on data collected between 2000 to 2010, talking about spatial and temporal expressions (historical, seasonal and horary in order to show the importance of it destruction capacity and also the people´s vulnerability in Mexico.

  5. Occupational health in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, Tania; Santos-Burgoa, Carlos; Baron, Sherry; Hernández, Sendy

    2002-01-01

    The authors discuss the maquiladoras and child labor, and offer an overview of the history of occupational safety and health in Mexico that covers laws and regulations, social security, unions, and enforcement of legislation. The organization and structure of the various institutions responsible for occupational safety and health (OSH), as well as administrative procedures, are described. This article concludes with a list of the new challenges for OSH in Mexico.

  6. Localized extinction of an arboreal desert lizard caused by habitat fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Rodriguez-Estrella, Ricardo; Shaw, William W.; Culver, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    We adopted a species’ perspective for predicting extinction risk in a small, endemic, and strictly scansorial lizard (Urosaurus nigricaudus), in an old (∼60 year) and highly fragmented (8% habitat remaining) agricultural landscape from the Sonoran Desert, Mexico. We genotyped 10 microsatellite loci in 280 individuals from 11 populations in fragmented and continuous habitat. Individual dispersal was restricted to less than 400 m, according to analyses of spatial autocorrelation and spatially explicit Bayesian assignment methods. Within this scale, continuous areas and narrow washes with native vegetation allowed high levels of gene flow over tens of kilometers. In the absence of the native vegetation, cleared areas and highways were identified as partial barriers. In contrast, outside the scale of dispersal, cleared areas behaved as complete barriers, and surveys corroborated the species went extinct after a few decades in all small (less than 45 ha), isolated habitat fragments. No evidence for significant loss of genetic diversity was found, but results suggested fragmentation increased the spatial scale of movements, relatedness, genetic structure, and potentially affected sex-biased dispersal. A plausible threshold of individual dispersal predicted only 23% of all fragments in the landscape were linked with migration from continuous habitat, while complete barriers isolated the majority of fragments. Our study suggested limited dispersal, coupled with an inability to use a homogeneous and hostile matrix without vegetation and shade, could result in frequent time-delayed extinctions of small ectotherms in highly fragmented desert landscapes, particularly considering an increase in the risk of overheating and a decrease in dispersal potential induced by global warming.

  7. Local extinction and unintentional rewilding of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis on a desert island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Wilder

    Full Text Available Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis were not known to live on Tiburón Island, the largest island in the Gulf of California and Mexico, prior to the surprisingly successful introduction of 20 individuals as a conservation measure in 1975. Today, a stable island population of ∼500 sheep supports limited big game hunting and restocking of depleted areas on the Mexican mainland. We discovered fossil dung morphologically similar to that of bighorn sheep in a dung mat deposit from Mojet Cave, in the mountains of Tiburón Island. To determine the origin of this cave deposit we compared pellet shape to fecal pellets of other large mammals, and extracted DNA to sequence mitochondrial DNA fragments at the 12S ribosomal RNA and control regions. The fossil dung was 14C-dated to 1476-1632 calendar years before present and was confirmed as bighorn sheep by morphological and ancient DNA (aDNA analysis. 12S sequences closely or exactly matched known bighorn sheep sequences; control region sequences exactly matched a haplotype described in desert bighorn sheep populations in southwest Arizona and southern California and showed subtle differentiation from the extant Tiburón population. Native desert bighorn sheep previously colonized this land-bridge island, most likely during the Pleistocene, when lower sea levels connected Tiburón to the mainland. They were extirpated sometime in the last ∼1500 years, probably due to inherent dynamics of isolated populations, prolonged drought, and (or human overkill. The reintroduced population is vulnerable to similar extinction risks. The discovery presented here refutes conventional wisdom that bighorn sheep are not native to Tiburón Island, and establishes its recent introduction as an example of unintentional rewilding, defined here as the introduction of a species without knowledge that it was once native and has since gone locally extinct.

  8. Local extinction and unintentional rewilding of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) on a desert island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Benjamin T.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Epps, Clinton W.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; Mead, Jim I.; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2014-01-01

    Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were not known to live on Tiburón Island, the largest island in the Gulf of California and Mexico, prior to the surprisingly successful introduction of 20 individuals as a conservation measure in 1975. Today, a stable island population of ~500 sheep supports limited big game hunting and restocking of depleted areas on the Mexican mainland. We discovered fossil dung morphologically similar to that of bighorn sheep in a dung mat deposit from Mojet Cave, in the mountains of Tiburón Island. To determine the origin of this cave deposit we compared pellet shape to fecal pellets of other large mammals, and extracted DNA to sequence mitochondrial DNA fragments at the 12S ribosomal RNA and control regions. The fossil dung was 14C-dated to 1476–1632 calendar years before present and was confirmed as bighorn sheep by morphological and ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis. 12S sequences closely or exactly matched known bighorn sheep sequences; control region sequences exactly matched a haplotype described in desert bighorn sheep populations in southwest Arizona and southern California and showed subtle differentiation from the extant Tiburón population. Native desert bighorn sheep previously colonized this land-bridge island, most likely during the Pleistocene, when lower sea levels connected Tiburón to the mainland. They were extirpated sometime in the last ~1500 years, probably due to inherent dynamics of isolated populations, prolonged drought, and (or) human overkill. The reintroduced population is vulnerable to similar extinction risks. The discovery presented here refutes conventional wisdom that bighorn sheep are not native to Tiburón Island, and establishes its recent introduction as an example of unintentional rewilding, defined here as the introduction of a species without knowledge that it was once native and has since gone locally extinct.

  9. Local Extinction and Unintentional Rewilding of Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) on a Desert Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Benjamin T.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Epps, Clinton W.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; Mead, Jim I.; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2014-01-01

    Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were not known to live on Tiburón Island, the largest island in the Gulf of California and Mexico, prior to the surprisingly successful introduction of 20 individuals as a conservation measure in 1975. Today, a stable island population of ∼500 sheep supports limited big game hunting and restocking of depleted areas on the Mexican mainland. We discovered fossil dung morphologically similar to that of bighorn sheep in a dung mat deposit from Mojet Cave, in the mountains of Tiburón Island. To determine the origin of this cave deposit we compared pellet shape to fecal pellets of other large mammals, and extracted DNA to sequence mitochondrial DNA fragments at the 12S ribosomal RNA and control regions. The fossil dung was 14C-dated to 1476–1632 calendar years before present and was confirmed as bighorn sheep by morphological and ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis. 12S sequences closely or exactly matched known bighorn sheep sequences; control region sequences exactly matched a haplotype described in desert bighorn sheep populations in southwest Arizona and southern California and showed subtle differentiation from the extant Tiburón population. Native desert bighorn sheep previously colonized this land-bridge island, most likely during the Pleistocene, when lower sea levels connected Tiburón to the mainland. They were extirpated sometime in the last ∼1500 years, probably due to inherent dynamics of isolated populations, prolonged drought, and (or) human overkill. The reintroduced population is vulnerable to similar extinction risks. The discovery presented here refutes conventional wisdom that bighorn sheep are not native to Tiburón Island, and establishes its recent introduction as an example of unintentional rewilding, defined here as the introduction of a species without knowledge that it was once native and has since gone locally extinct. PMID:24646515

  10. Stable Isotopic Analysis on Water Utilization of Two Xerophytic Shrubs in a Revegetated Desert Area: Tengger Desert, China

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Huang; Zhishan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope studies on stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water within plants provide new information on water sources and water use patterns under natural conditions. In this study, the sources of water uptake for two typical xerophytic shrubs, Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica, were determined at four different-aged revegetated sites (1956, 1964, 1981, and 1987) in the Tengger Desert, a revegetated desert area in China. Samples from precipitation, soil water at dif...

  11. Respondence and feedback of modern sand deserts to climate change--A case study in Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The research on the respondence and feedback of modern sand deserts to the climate change is an important component part in the studies on the global climate change. Deserts respond to the climate change, meanwhile, they affect the climate with their feedback of peculiar environment during the respondence. Many researches on desert climate have been carried out at home and abroad. However, there is little research on the respondence and feedback of modern fixed, semi-fixed and mobile deserts in arid areas to the climate change, in which the factor analysis as well as the parameter changing effects is especially the difficult problem all along. In this note, the parameters of the respondence and feedback of Gurbantunggut Desert to the climate change are measured and analyzed, some variable parameters of water-heat exchange are obtained, and a numerical model of desertification is developed according to a series of climate change of about 40 years and the variable relations of meteorological and physical features of the sand surface in Gurbantunggut Desert.

  12. Acceso oportuno y permanencia escolar de alumnos de 6 a 14 años en Sonora, 2003-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alfredo Flores Valdez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El concepto de calidad educativa se interpreta mejor a través del análisis de las diversas dimensiones que lo componen, en particular mediante juicios de valor acerca de la eficacia, eficiencia, pertinencia y equidad del sistema en su conjunto. Con este enfoque se han orientado varios estudios sobre la eficacia del sistema educativo basados en el análisis de los resultados académicos como sinónimo de calidad educativa, y han dejado de lado las concepciones que la relacionaban con el hecho de ofrecer acceso a la educación, como si este aspecto estuviera resuelto. Falta mucho por hacer, el análisis detallado de la cobertura en edad y grado permite apreciar avances significativos en Sonora de 2003 a 2005, y detectar con precisión las deficiencias principales. Así, se observan las mayores debilidades de acceso oportuno y permanencia, claves para el éxito escolar en la población de 10 a 12 y 14 años de edad, las etapas finales de educación primaria y secundaria. El reto es disminuir los índices de repetición en primaria, como medida decisiva y precautoria, para evitar otro problema grave en secundaria, la deserción.

  13. Las flores del desierto. Opciones de vida en pueblos de la región central de Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Amalia Gracia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aunque la búsqueda de las localidades rurales por generar opciones de vida se observa en el esfuerzo de algunos pobladores, en México la política pública se restringe a ofrecer garantías sociales; le deja al mercado la creación de alternativas económicas, que no alcanzan para producir desarrollo local y regional. El presente artículo reflexiona sobre esto, a partir de una iniciativa de trabajo asociativo surgida hace más de seis años en pueblos de la región central del norte de Sonora, y muestra cómo se resuelven temporal y dinámicamente las tensiones entre prácticas de cooperación y reciprocidad y las de intercambio con el mercado utilizando postulados teóricos de distintas disciplinas, retomadas por las propuestas de economía solidaria. El caso ilustra las dificultades, riqueza y potencialidad de iniciativas como ésta, y la importancia del apoyo gubernamental en localidades a las que la baja capacidad económica y la generalización del narcotráfico las vuelve frágiles para contrarrestar procesos profundos de despoblamiento.

  14. Infanticidio y disciplina popular en el sistema ju dicial de Sonora, México entre 1855 y 1929

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Shelton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo explora por qué las comunidades locales en el estado de Sonora utilizaron la judicatura estatal en nuevas maneras para disciplinar a mujeres acusadas de infanticidio, aborto provocado y abandono infantil durante el porfiriato. Analiza los proce sos penales contra mujeres para descubrir los cambios en los sistemas de género y proponer que éstos contribuyeron al aumento de la vigilancia de la conducta sexual de las mujeres por las identidades masculinas de la época. Los juicios por infanticidio die ron pie a los discursos de inferioridad étnica, económica y de género hacia las mujeres, especialmente con las jóvenes que ocultaban sus embarazos. Concluye que los agentes estatales no se unificaron en su tratamiento de la delincuencia femenina, pero la p resión popular desempeñó un papel represivo en la expansión del poder del Estado para imponer el orden moral y asegurar un espacio para la vergüenza pública de la sexualidad femenina.

  15. Medio ambiente y organizaciones de la sociedad civil: análisis de las redes civiles ambientalistas en Hermosillo, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    América N. Lutz Ley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El surgimiento de organizaciones civiles ambientalistas en Sonora ha ocurrido desde hace más de dos décadas, sin que haya investigaciones suficientes sobre sus características y estrategias. En el presente trabajo se analizan las relaciones de información, apoyo, recursos materiales y financieros que 11 de ellas en Hermosillo establecen entre sí y con otras de fuera del municipio, así como con instituciones académicas y organismos gubernamentales. Para cada tipo de relación se evaluó la densidad y jerarquización de la red interna y de las externas, y se detectaron las organizaciones más sobresalientes. Los resultados indican que entre mayores sean los costos de las ligas, su densidad o frecuencia disminuye. La red hermosillense tiene una estructura jerárquica y las mayores densidades en las relaciones de información, apoyo y materiales; mientras que para los recursos financieros, esta característica se observa en las ligas de organismos gubernamentales hacia los civiles.

  16. La fiscalización sin dientes en el gobierno del estado de Sonora 2004 y 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Pineda Pablos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo aborda dos temas relacionados con la revisión de las cuentas públicas de la administración directa dependiente del ejecutivo del estado de Sonora. Uno es indagar qué tantas faltas o deficiencias se encuentran en la revisión de las cuentas públicas y cómo se hacen las observaciones y señalamientos. El segundo es ver si, en los casos de las observaciones, se aplican sanciones y si se busca reparar el daño. Para ello, se analizaron las observaciones de los informes de resultados de los años 2004 y 2005 y se indagó sobre los procedimientos de solventación y sanciones aplicadas. El estudio arroja que hay deficiencias serias en la de rendición de cuentas y que es vaga y difusa a la hora de resolver las deficiencias y de la aplicación de sanciones.

  17. Una aproximación al valor del suelo habitacional: caso hermosillo, sonora, méxico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Quintana Pacheco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una primera aproximación al valor del suelo habitacional en la ciudad a partir de 430 casos de terrenos ofertados en el mercado, complementados con información del Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, de la Dirección de Catastro del Municipio de Hermosillo y del Colegio de Valuadores Profesionales del estado de Sonora. Se utiliza una plataforma de sistemas de información geográfica, un software estadístico y se parte de la premisa, de que el valor del suelo, es el resultado de la conjunción de una serie de atributos intrínsecos y extrínsecos, considerados a través del concepto de modelos de precios hedónicos resueltos con la técnica de regresión lineal múltiple. Los resultados muestran una importante asociación del valor del suelo con indicadores como la educación, seguida del acceso a internet, la densidad habitacional y la accesibilidad a centros comerciales

  18. El agua en Sonora: tan cerca y tan lejos. Estudio de caso del ejido Molino de Camou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando E. Díaz Caravantes

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La presa Rodolfo Félix Valdés, mejor conocida como El Molinito, se construyó en 1991, con el propósito de evitar derrames eventuales de la presa Abelardo L. Rodríguez, y abastecer de agua a Hermosillo, capital del estado de Sonora. Esta obra benefició a un gran número de personas, pero perjudicó a los ejidatarios del Molino de Camou, quienes vieron disminuida su dotación de agua para riego, y ya no pudieron sembra r sus tierras como lo hacían. En este artículo, se analizan los cambios en la unidad de riego del ejido, debidos a la nueva presa. El trabajo está dividido en tres partes. La primera contiene datos generales sobre el ejido Molino de Camou, y antecedentes de la construcción de la presa E l Molinito y sus funciones en relación con Hermosillo. En la segunda, se describen las principales modificaciones realizadas en el sistema de riego, y se estudia el nuevo escenario para el uso y control del agua. En la tercera, se analizan los cambios en las actividades productivas, generados a partir de que la Comisión Nacional del Agua (cna tomó el control de la presa.

  19. Estimación del potencial de energías renovables en el estado de Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Taddei Bringas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available La etapa de uso de combustibles fósiles está llegando a su fin, debido principalmente a la escasez y problemas de contaminación que originan. En la actualidad existe una marcada tendencia en aprovechar las fuentes renovables de energía, por su bajo impacto ambiental y menor emisión de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI, lo cual contribuye a independizar las políticas energéticas locales de las del mercado global, basadas en la supremacía petrolera. Para obtener el mayor provecho de las energías renovables, es importante determinar el potencial de los distintos recursos energéticos existentes en una región. En este trabajo se presenta una relación del potencial para explotar energías renovables en el estado de Sonora, México, como un paso previo para establecer acciones y políticas que busquen su posible utilización a gran escala.

  20. Enhancing and restoring habitat for the desert tortoise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Scott R.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat has changed unfavorably during the past 150 y for the desert tortoise Gopherus agassizii, a federally threatened species with declining populations in the Mojave Desert and western Sonoran Desert. To support recovery efforts, we synthesized published information on relationships of desert tortoises with three habitat features (cover sites, forage, and soil) and candidate management practices for improving these features for tortoises. In addition to their role in soil health and facilitating recruitment of annual forage plants, shrubs are used by desert tortoises for cover and as sites for burrows. Outplanting greenhouse-grown seedlings, protected from herbivory, has successfully restored (>50% survival) a variety of shrubs on disturbed desert soils. Additionally, salvaging and reapplying topsoil using effective techniques is among the more ecologically beneficial ways to initiate plant recovery after severe disturbance. Through differences in biochemical composition and digestibility, some plant species provide better-quality forage than others. Desert tortoises selectively forage on particular annual and herbaceous perennial species (e.g., legumes), and forage selection shifts during the year as different plants grow or mature. Nonnative grasses provide low-quality forage and contribute fuel to spreading wildfires, which damage or kill shrubs that tortoises use for cover. Maintaining a diverse “menu” of native annual forbs and decreasing nonnative grasses are priorities for restoring most desert tortoise habitats. Reducing herbivory by nonnative animals, carefully timing herbicide applications, and strategically augmenting annual forage plants via seeding show promise for improving tortoise forage quality. Roads, another disturbance, negatively affect habitat in numerous ways (e.g., compacting soil, altering hydrology). Techniques such as recontouring road berms to reestablish drainage patterns, vertical mulching (“planting” dead plant material