WorldWideScience

Sample records for somatically hypermutated immunoglobulin

  1. Somatic immunoglobulin hypermutation

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Marilyn; Casali, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    Immunoglobulin hypermutation provides the structural correlate for the affinity maturation of the antibody response. Characteristic modalities of this mechanism include a preponderance of point-mutations with prevalence of transitions over transversions, and the mutational hotspot RGYW sequence. Recent evidence suggests a mechanism whereby DNA-breaks induce error-prone DNA synthesis in immunoglobulin V(D)J regions by error-prone DNA polymerases. The nature of the targeting mechanism and the t...

  2. Reevaluation of the role of DNA polymerase theta in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martomo, Stella A; Saribasak, Huseyin; Yokoi, Masayuki; Hanaoka, Fumio; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2008-09-01

    DNA polymerase theta has been implicated in the process of somatic hypermutation in immunoglobulin variable genes based on several reports of alterations in the frequency and spectra of mutations from Polq(-/-) mice. However, these studies have contrasting results on mutation frequencies and the types of nucleotide substitutions, which question the role of polymerase theta in hypermutation. DNA polymerase eta has a dominant effect on mutation and may substitute in the absence of polymerase theta to affect the pattern. Therefore, we have examined mutation in mice deficient for both polymerases theta and eta. The mutation frequencies in rearranged variable genes from Peyer's patches were similar in wild type, Polq(-/-), Polh(-/-), and Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice. The types of substitutions were also similar between wild type and Polq(-/-) clones, and between Polh(-/-) and Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) clones. Furthermore, there was no difference in heavy chain class switching in splenic B cells from the four groups of mice. These results indicate that polymerase theta does not play a significant role in the generation of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes.

  3. Immunoglobulin transcript sequence and somatic hypermutation computation from unselected RNA-seq reads in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachly, James S; Ruppert, Amy S; Zhao, Weiqiang; Long, Susan; Flynn, Joseph; Flinn, Ian; Jones, Jeffrey; Maddocks, Kami; Andritsos, Leslie; Ghia, Emanuela M; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; de la Chapelle, Albert; Byrd, John C

    2015-04-07

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) are produced by B lymphocytes as secreted antibodies or as part of the B-cell receptor. There is tremendous diversity of potential Ig transcripts (>1 × 10(12)) as a result of hundreds of germ-line gene segments, random nucleotide incorporation during joining of gene segments into a complete transcript, and the process of somatic hypermutation at individual nucleotides. This recombination and mutation process takes place in the maturing B cell and is responsible for the diversity of potential epitope recognition. Cancers arising from mature B cells are characterized by clonal production of Ig heavy (IGH@) and light chain transcripts, although whether the sequence has undergone somatic hypermutation is dependent on the maturation stage at which the neoplastic clone arose. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults and arises from a mature B cell with either mutated or unmutated IGH@ transcripts, the latter having worse prognosis and the assessment of which is routinely performed in the clinic. Currently, IGHV mutation status is assessed by Sanger sequencing and comparing the transcript to known germ-line genes. In this paper, we demonstrate that complete IGH@ V-D-J sequences can be computed from unselected RNA-seq reads with results equal or superior to the clinical procedure: in the only discordant case, the clinical transcript was out-of-frame. Therefore, a single RNA-seq assay can simultaneously yield gene expression profile, SNP and mutation information, as well as IGHV mutation status, and may one day be performed as a general test to capture multidimensional clinically relevant data in CLL.

  4. Antigen receptors and somatic hypermutation in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with Richter's transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Laura A.; van Maldegem, Febe; Langerak, Anton W.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; de Wit, Mireille J.; Bea, Silvia; Campo, Elias; Bende, Richard J.; van Noesel, Carel J. M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is essential for somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin genes in B cells. It has been proposed that aberrant targeting of the somatic hypermutation machinery is instrumental in initiation and

  5. Ancient Phylogenetic Beginnings of Immunoglobulin Hypermutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubrycht, J.; Sigler, Karel; Růžička, Michal; Souček, P.; Borecký, J.; Ježek, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (2006), s. 691-706 ISSN 0022-2844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : immunoglobulin * hypermutation * antigen Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.767, year: 2006

  6. A diverse repertoire of human immunoglobulin variable genes in a chicken B cell line is generated by both gene conversion and somatic hypermutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Leighton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chicken immune responses to human proteins are often more robust than rodent responses because of the phylogenetic relationship between the different species. For discovery of a diverse panel of unique therapeutic antibody candidates, chickens therefore represent an attractive host for human-derived targets. Recent advances in monoclonal antibody technology, specifically new methods for the molecular cloning of antibody genes directly from primary B cells, has ushered in a new era of generating monoclonal antibodies from non-traditional host animals that were previously inaccessible through hybridoma technology. However, such monoclonals still require post-discovery humanization in order to be developed as therapeutics. To obviate the need for humanization, a modified strain of chickens could be engineered to express a human sequence immunoglobulin variable region repertoire. Here, human variable genes introduced into the chicken immunoglobulin loci through gene targeting were evaluated for their ability to be recognized and diversified by the native chicken recombination machinery that is present in the B-lineage cell line DT40. After expansion in culture the DT40 population accumulated genetic mutants that were detected via deep sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the human targeted constructs are performing as expected in the cell culture system, and provide a measure of confidence that they will be functional in transgenic animals.

  7. A role for PCNA ubiquitination in immunoglobulin hypermutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Arakawa

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a DNA polymerase cofactor and regulator of replication-linked functions. Upon DNA damage, yeast and vertebrate PCNA is modified at the conserved lysine K164 by ubiquitin, which mediates error-prone replication across lesions via translesion polymerases. We investigated the role of PCNA ubiquitination in variants of the DT40 B cell line that are mutant in K164 of PCNA or in Rad18, which is involved in PCNA ubiquitination. Remarkably, the PCNA(K164R mutation not only renders cells sensitive to DNA-damaging agents, but also strongly reduces activation induced deaminase-dependent single-nucleotide substitutions in the immunoglobulin light-chain locus. This is the first evidence, to our knowledge, that vertebrates exploit the PCNA-ubiquitin pathway for immunoglobulin hypermutation, most likely through the recruitment of error-prone DNA polymerases.

  8. Methods for engineering polypeptide variants via somatic hypermutation and polypeptide made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, Roger Y; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-13

    Methods using somatic hypermutation (SHM) for producing polypeptide and nucleic acid variants, and nucleic acids encoding such polypeptide variants are disclosed. Such variants may have desired properties. Also disclosed are novel polypeptides, such as improved fluorescent proteins, produced by the novel methods, and nucleic acids, vectors, and host cells comprising such vectors.

  9. A regulatory role for NBS1 in strand-specific mutagenesis during somatic hypermutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Du

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID is believed to initiate somatic hypermutation (SHM by deamination of deoxycytidines to deoxyuridines within the immunoglobulin variable regions genes. The deaminated bases can subsequently be replicated over, processed by base excision repair or mismatch repair, leading to introduction of different types of point mutations (G/C transitions, G/C transversions and A/T mutations. It is evident that the base excision repair pathway is largely dependent on uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG through its uracil excision activity. It is not known, however, which endonuclease acts in the step immediately downstream of UNG, i.e. that cleaves at the abasic sites generated by the latter. Two candidates have been proposed, an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE and the Mre11-Rad50-NBS1 complex. The latter is intriguing as this might explain how the mutagenic pathway is primed during SHM. We have investigated the latter possibility by studying the in vivo SHM pattern in B cells from ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder (Mre11 deficient and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS1 deficient patients. Our results show that, although the pattern of mutations in the variable heavy chain (V(H genes was altered in NBS1 deficient patients, with a significantly increased number of G (but not C transversions occurring in the SHM and/or AID targeting hotspots, the general pattern of mutations in the V(H genes in Mre11 deficient patients was only slightly altered, with an increased frequency of A to C transversions. The Mre11-Rad50-NBS1 complex is thus unlikely to be the major nuclease involved in cleavage of the abasic sites during SHM, whereas NBS1 might have a specific role in regulating the strand-biased repair during phase Ib mutagenesis.

  10. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longerich, Simonne; Meira, Lisiane; Shah, Dharini; Samson, Leona D; Storb, Ursula

    2007-12-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes require the cytosine deaminase AID, which deaminates cytosine to uracil in Ig gene DNA. Paradoxically, proteins involved normally in error-free base excision repair and mismatch repair, seem to be co-opted to facilitate SHM and CSR, by recruiting error-prone translesion polymerases to DNA sequences containing deoxy-uracils created by AID. Major evidence supports at least one mechanism whereby the uracil glycosylase Ung removes AID-generated uracils creating abasic sites which may be used either as uninformative templates for DNA synthesis, or processed to nicks and gaps that prime error-prone DNA synthesis. We investigated the possibility that deamination at adenines also initiates SHM. Adenosine deamination would generate hypoxanthine (Hx), a substrate for the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag). Aag would generate abasic sites which then are subject to error-prone repair as above for AID-deaminated cytosine processed by Ung. If the action of an adenosine deaminase followed by Aag were responsible for significant numbers of mutations at A, we would find a preponderance of A:T>G:C transition mutations during SHM in an Aag deleted background. However, this was not observed and we found that the frequencies of SHM and CSR were not significantly altered in Aag-/- mice. Paradoxically, we found that Aag is expressed in B lymphocytes undergoing SHM and CSR and that its activity is upregulated in activated B cells. Moreover, we did find a statistically significant, albeit low increase of T:A>C:G transition mutations in Aag-/- animals, suggesting that Aag may be involved in creating the SHM A>T bias seen in wild type mice.

  11. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3' enhancer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Collins, John T; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-23

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3' enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3' heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3' enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3' enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to approximately 1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3' enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene.

  12. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3′ enhancer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John T.; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3′ enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3′ heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3′ enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3′ enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to ∼1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3′ enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene. PMID:19887393

  13. Somatic Hypermutation-Induced Changes in the Structure and Dynamics of HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thaddeus M; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M Gordon; Zhou, Tongqing; Soto, Cinque; Guttman, Miklos; Moquin, Stephanie; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-08-02

    Antibody somatic hypermutation (SHM) and affinity maturation enhance antigen recognition by modifying antibody paratope structure to improve its complementarity with the target epitope. SHM-induced changes in paratope dynamics may also contribute to antibody maturation, but direct evidence of this is limited. Here, we examine two classes of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for SHM-induced changes in structure and dynamics, and delineate the effects of these changes on interactions with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). In combination with new and existing structures of unmutated and affinity matured antibody Fab fragments, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to directly measure Fab structural dynamics. Changes in antibody structure and dynamics were positioned to improve complementarity with Env, with changes in dynamics primarily observed at the paratope peripheries. We conclude that SHM optimizes paratope complementarity to conserved HIV-1 epitopes and restricts the mobility of paratope-peripheral residues to minimize clashes with variable features on HIV-1 Env. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Somatic hypermutations confer rheumatoid factor activity in hepatitis C virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Edgar D; Orloff, Michael I M; Nishiuchi, Eiko; Marukian, Svetlana; Rice, Charles M; Dustin, Lynn B

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most frequent cause of mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), which is characterized by endothelial deposition of rheumatoid factor (RF)-containing immune complexes and end-organ vasculitis. MC is a lymphoproliferative disorder in which B cells express RF-like Ig, yet its precise antigenic stimulus is unknown. We have proposed that IgG-HCV immune complexes stimulate B cell expansion and somatic hypermutation (SHM)-induced affinity maturation in part via engagement of an RF-like B cell receptor. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that SHM augments RF activity. RFs cloned from single B cells from 4 patients with HCV-associated MC (HCV-MC) were expressed as IgM, IgG, or IgG Fab. Selected Ig were reverted to germline. RF activity of somatically mutated Ig and germline-reverted Ig was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ig with SHM had RF activity, with the preference for binding being highest for IgG1, followed by IgG2 and IgG4, and lowest for IgG3, where there was no detectable binding. In contrast, reverted germline IgG exhibited markedly diminished RF activity. Competition with 1 μg/ml of protein A abrogated RF activity, suggesting specificity for IgG Fc. Swapping of mutated heavy-chain pairs and light-chain pairs also abrogated RF activity, suggesting that context-specific pairing of appropriate IgH and Igκ, in addition to SHM, is necessary for RF activity. SHM significantly contributes to RF activity in HCV-MC patients, suggesting that autoreactivity in these patients arises through antigen-dependent SHM, as opposed to nondeletion of autoreactive germline Ig. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Classical Mus musculus Igκ enhancers support transcription but not high level somatic hypermutation from a V-lambda promoter in chicken DT40 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga Rama Kothapalli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Somatic hypermutation (SHM of immunoglobulin genes is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID in activated B cells. This process is strictly dependent on transcription. Hence, cis-acting transcriptional control elements have been proposed to target SHM to immunoglobulin loci. The Mus musculus Igκ locus is regulated by the intronic enhancer (iE/MAR and the 3' enhancer (3'E, and multiple studies using transgenic and knock-out approaches in mice and cell lines have reported somewhat contradictory results about the function of these enhancers in AID-mediated sequence diversification. Here we show that the M. musculus iE/MAR and 3'E elements are active solely as transcriptional enhancer when placed in the context of the IGL locus in Gallus gallus DT40 cells, but they are very inefficient in targeting AID-mediated mutation events to this locus. This suggests that either key components of the cis-regulatory targeting elements reside outside the murine Igκ transcriptional enhancer sequences, or that the targeting of AID activity to Ig loci occurs by largely species-specific mechanisms.

  16. Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of virus-neutralizing antibodies are not essential for control of friend retrovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Maiko; Tsuji-Kawahara, Sachiyo; Kawasaki, Yuri; Kinoshita, Saori; Chikaishi, Tomomi; Takamura, Shiki; Fujisawa, Makoto; Kawada, Akira; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-15

    Toll-like receptor 7 and Myd88 are required for antiretroviral antibody and germinal center responses, but whether somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination are required for antiretroviral immunity has not been examined. Mice deficient in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) resisted Friend virus infection, produced virus-neutralizing antibodies, and controlled viremia. Passive transfer demonstrated that immune IgM from AID-deficient mice contributes to Friend virus control in the presence of virus-specific CD4+ T cells. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Analysis of somatic hypermutation in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome shows specific deficiencies in mutational targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Nancy S.; Lugar, Patricia L.; Yavuz, Sule; Zhang, Wen; Krijger, Peter H. L.; Russ, Daniel E.; Jima, Dereje D.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Grammer, Amrie C.

    2009-01-01

    Subjects with X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (X-HIgM) have a markedly reduced frequency of CD27+ memory B cells, and their Ig genes have a low level of somatic hypermutation (SHM). To analyze the nature of SHM in X-HIgM, we sequenced 209 nonproductive and 926 productive Ig heavy chain genes. In nonproductive rearrangements that were not subjected to selection, as well as productive rearrangements, most of the mutations were within targeted RGYW, WRCY, WA, or TW motifs (R = purine, Y = pyrimidine, and W = A or T). However, there was significantly decreased targeting of the hypermutable G in RGYW motifs. Moreover, the ratio of transitions to transversions was markedly increased compared with normal. Microarray analysis documented that specific genes involved in SHM, including activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA) and uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG2), were up-regulated in normal germinal center (GC) B cells, but not induced by CD40 ligation. Similar results were obtained from light chain rearrangements. These results indicate that in the absence of CD40-CD154 interactions, there is a marked reduction in SHM and, specifically, mutations of AICDA-targeted G residues in RGYW motifs along with a decrease in transversions normally related to UNG2 activity. PMID:19023113

  18. The effects of somatic hypermutation on neutralization and binding in the PGT121 family of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Sok

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bnAbs are typically highly somatically mutated, raising doubts as to whether they can be elicited by vaccination. We used 454 sequencing and designed a novel phylogenetic method to model lineage evolution of the bnAbs PGT121-134 and found a positive correlation between the level of somatic hypermutation (SHM and the development of neutralization breadth and potency. Strikingly, putative intermediates were characterized that show approximately half the mutation level of PGT121-134 but were still capable of neutralizing roughly 40-80% of PGT121-134 sensitive viruses in a 74-virus panel at median titers between 15- and 3-fold higher than PGT121-134. Such antibodies with lower levels of SHM may be more amenable to elicitation through vaccination while still providing noteworthy coverage. Binding characterization indicated a preference of inferred intermediates for native Env binding over monomeric gp120, suggesting that the PGT121-134 lineage may have been selected for binding to native Env at some point during maturation. Analysis of glycan-dependent neutralization for inferred intermediates identified additional adjacent glycans that comprise the epitope and suggests changes in glycan dependency or recognition over the course of affinity maturation for this lineage. Finally, patterns of neutralization of inferred bnAb intermediates suggest hypotheses as to how SHM may lead to potent and broad HIV neutralization and provide important clues for immunogen design.

  19. Integrating multiple immunogenetic data sources for feature extraction and mining somatic hypermutation patterns: the case of "towards analysis" in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakiotis, Ioannis; Xochelli, Aliki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Tsoumakas, Grigorios; Maglaveras, Nicos; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Vlahavas, Ioannis; Chouvarda, Ioanna

    2016-06-06

    Somatic Hypermutation (SHM) refers to the introduction of mutations within rearranged V(D)J genes, a process that increases the diversity of Immunoglobulins (IGs). The analysis of SHM has offered critical insight into the physiology and pathology of B cells, leading to strong prognostication markers for clinical outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent adult B-cell malignancy. In this paper we present a methodology for integrating multiple immunogenetic and clinocobiological data sources in order to extract features and create high quality datasets for SHM analysis in IG receptors of CLL patients. This dataset is used as the basis for a higher level integration procedure, inspired form social choice theory. This is applied in the Towards Analysis, our attempt to investigate the potential ontogenetic transformation of genes belonging to specific stereotyped CLL subsets towards other genes or gene families, through SHM. The data integration process, followed by feature extraction, resulted in the generation of a dataset containing information about mutations occurring through SHM. The Towards analysis performed on the integrated dataset applying voting techniques, revealed the distinct behaviour of subset #201 compared to other subsets, as regards SHM related movements among gene clans, both in allele-conserved and non-conserved gene areas. With respect to movement between genes, a high percentage movement towards pseudo genes was found in all CLL subsets. This data integration and feature extraction process can set the basis for exploratory analysis or a fully automated computational data mining approach on many as yet unanswered, clinically relevant biological questions.

  20. ADAR deaminase A-to-I editing of DNA and RNA moieties of RNA:DNA hybrids has implications for the mechanism of Ig somatic hypermutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Edward J; Lindley, Robyn A

    2017-07-01

    The implications are discussed of recently published biochemical studies on ADAR-mediated A-to-I DNA and RNA deamination at RNA:DNA hybrids. The significance of these data are related to previous work on strand-biased and codon-context mutation signatures in B lymphocytes and cancer genomes. Those studies have established that there are two significant strand biases at A:T and G:C base pairs, A-site mutations exceed T-site mutations (A>T) by 2.9 fold and G-site mutations exceed C-site mutations (G>C) by 1.7 fold. Both these strand biases are inconsistent with alternative "DNA Deamination" mechanisms, yet are expected consequences of the RNA/RT-based "Reverse Transcriptase" mechanism of immunoglobulin (Ig) somatic hypermutation (SHM). The A-to-I DNA editing component at RNA:DNA hybrids that is likely to occur in Transcription Bubbles, while important, is of far lower A-to-I editing efficiency than in dsRNA substrates. The RNA moiety of RNA:DNA hybrids is also edited at similar lower frequencies relative to the editing rate at dsRNA substrates. Further, if the A-to-I DNA editing at RNA:DNA hybrids were the sole cause of A-to-I (read as A-to-G) mutation events for Ig SHM in vivo then the exact opposite strand biases at A:T base pairs (T>A) of what is actually observed (A>T) would be predicted. It is concluded that the strand-biased somatic mutation patterns at both A:T and G:C base pairs in vivo are best interpreted by the sequential steps of the RNA/RT-based mechanism. Further, the direct DNA A-to-I deamination at Transcription Bubbles is expected to contribute to the T-to-C component of the strand-biased Ig SHM spectrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. DNA polymerases eta and theta function in the same genetic pathway to generate mutations at A/T during somatic hypermutation of Ig genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Keiji; Ouchida, Rika; Hikida, Masaki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Yokoi, Masayuki; Masutani, Chikahide; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D; Hanaoka, Fumio; O-Wang, Jiyang

    2007-06-15

    Somatic hypermutation of the Ig genes requires the activity of multiple DNA polymerases to ultimately introduce mutations at both A/T and C/G base pairs. Mice deficient for DNA polymerase eta (POLH) exhibited an approximately 80% reduction of the mutations at A/T, whereas absence of polymerase (POLQ) resulted in approximately 20% reduction of both A/T and C/G mutations. To investigate whether the residual A/T mutations observed in the absence of POLH are generated by POLQ and how these two polymerases might cooperate or compete with each other to generate A/T mutations, here we have established mice deficient for both POLH and POLQ. Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice, however, did not show a further decrease of A/T mutations as compared with Polh(-/-) mice, suggesting that POLH and POLQ function in the same genetic pathway in the generation of these mutations. Frequent misincorporation of nucleotides, in particular opposite template T, is a known feature of POLH, but the efficiency of extension beyond the misincorporation differs significantly depending on the nature of the mispairing. Remarkably, we found that POLQ catalyzed extension more efficiently than POLH from all types of mispaired termini opposite A or T. Moreover, POLQ was able to extend mispaired termini generated by POLH albeit at a relatively low efficiency. These results reveal genetic and biochemical interactions between POLH and POLQ and suggest that POLQ might cooperate with POLH to generate some of the A/T mutations during the somatic hypermutation of Ig genes.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Repertoire-Scale Immunoglobulin Properties in Vaccine-Induced B-Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-10

    following the recombination of discrete variable (V), 41 diverse ( D ) and joining (J) immunoglobulin (Ig) gene segments into a diverse library of B-cells...Quantitative analysis of repertoire-scale immunoglobulin properties in vaccine-induced B-cell responses Ilja V. Khavrutskii1, Sidhartha Chaudhury*1...qualitative trends in immunoglobulin (Ig) properties, such as V-family usage or 21 somatic hypermutation (SHM) rates, and in reducing the complex Ig

  3. Germline and somatic polymerase ε and δ mutations define a new class of hypermutated colorectal and endometrial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sarah; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-06-01

    Polymerases ε and δ are the main enzymes that replicate eukaryotic DNA. Accurate replication occurs through Watson-Crick base pairing and also through the action of the polymerases' exonuclease (proofreading) domains. We have recently shown that germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) of POLE and POLD1 confer a high risk of multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma (CRC). POLD1 mutations also predispose to endometrial cancer (EC). These mutations are associated with high penetrance and dominant inheritance, although the phenotype can be variable. We have named the condition polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). Somatic POLE EDMs have also been found in sporadic CRCs and ECs, although very few somatic POLD1 EDMs have been detected. Both the germline and the somatic DNA polymerase EDMs cause an 'ultramutated', apparently microsatellite-stable, type of cancer, sometimes leading to over a million base substitutions per tumour. Here, we present the evidence for POLE and POLD1 as important contributors to the pathogenesis of CRC and EC, and highlight some of the key questions in this emerging field. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Lower IgG somatic hypermutation rates during acute dengue virus infection is compatible with a germinal center-independent B cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth Ernestina; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Sámano-Sánchez, Hugo; Aguilar-Salgado, Andrés; Salinas-Rodríguez, Aarón; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; Vivanco-Cid, Héctor; Hernández-Flores, Karina; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa Elena; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; López-Martínez, Irma; Rodriguez, Mario H; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2016-02-25

    The study of human B cell response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is critical to understand serotype-specific protection and the cross-reactive sub-neutralizing response. Whereas the first is beneficial and thus represents the ultimate goal of vaccination, the latter has been implicated in the development of severe disease, which occurs in a small, albeit significant, fraction of secondary DENV infections. Both primary and secondary infections are associated with the production of poly-reactive and cross-reactive IgG antibodies. To gain insight into the effect of DENV infection on the B cell repertoire, we used VH region high-throughput cDNA sequencing of the peripheral blood IgG B cell compartment of 19 individuals during the acute phase of infection. For 11 individuals, a second sample obtained 6 months later was analyzed for comparison. Probabilities of sequencing antibody secreting cells or memory B cells were estimated using second-order Monte Carlo simulation. We found that in acute disease there is an increase in IgG B cell diversity and changes in the relative use of segments IGHV1-2, IGHV1-18, and IGHV1-69. Somewhat unexpectedly, an overall low proportion of somatic hypermutated antibody genes was observed during the acute phase plasmablasts, particularly in secondary infections and those cases with more severe disease. Our data are consistent with an innate-like antiviral recognition system mediated by B cells using defined germ-line coded B cell receptors, which could provide a rapid germinal center-independent antibody response during the early phase of infection. A model describing concurrent T-dependent and T-independent B cell responses in the context of DENV infection is proposed, which incorporates the selection of B cells using hypomutated IGHV segments and their potential role in poly/cross-reactivity. Its formal demonstration could lead to a definition of its potential implication in antibody-dependent enhancement, and may contribute to

  5. Germline PMS2 and somatic POLE exonuclease mutations cause hypermutability of the leading DNA strand in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, Maria A; Chetan, Ghati Kasturirangan; Sibin, Madathan Kandi; Mckee, Thomas; Merkler, Doron; Narasinga, Rao Kvl; Ribaux, Pascale; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Nikolaev, Sergey I

    2017-11-01

    Biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) in tumours is frequently associated with somatic mutations in the exonuclease domains of DNA polymerases POLE or POLD1, and results in a characteristic mutational profile. In this article, we describe the genetic basis of ultramutated high-grade brain tumours in the context of bMMRD. We performed exome sequencing of two second-cousin patients from a large consanguineous family of Indian origin with early onset of high-grade glioblastoma and astrocytoma. We identified a germline homozygous nonsense variant, p.R802*, in the PMS2 gene. Additionally, by genome sequencing of these tumours, we found extremely high somatic mutation rates (237/Mb and 123/Mb), as well as somatic mutations in the proofreading domain of POLE polymerase (p.P436H and p.L424V), which replicates the leading DNA strand. Most interestingly, we found, in both cancers, that the vast majority of mutations were consistent with the signature of POLE exo - , i.e. an abundance of C>A and C>T mutations, particularly in special contexts, on the leading strand. We showed that the fraction of mutations under positive selection among mutations in tumour suppressor genes is more than two-fold lower in ultramutated tumours than in other glioblastomas. Genetic analyses enabled the diagnosis of the two consanguineous childhood brain tumours as being due to a combination of PMS2 germline and POLE somatic variants, and confirmed them as bMMRD/POLE exo - disorders. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Sequence similarities of protein kinase substrates and inhibitors with immunoglobulins and model immunoglobulin homologue: cell adhesion molecule from the living fossil sponge Geodia cydonium. Mapping of coherent database similarities and implications for evolution of CDR1 and hypermutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubrycht, J.; Borecký, Jiří; Souček, P.; Ježek, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2004), s. 219-246 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MZd NJ6747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : CDR1 * immunoglobulin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  7. Expression of members of immunoglobulin gene family in somatic cell hybrids between human B and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozbor, D.; Burioni, R.; Ar-Rushdi, A.; Zmijewski, C.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Somatic cell hybrids were obtained between human T and B cells and tested for the expression of differentiated traits of both cell lineages. The T-cell parent SUP-T1 is CD3 - , CD4 + , CD1 + , CD8 + , is weakly positive for HLA class I determinants, and has an inversion of chromosome 14 due to a site-specific recombination event between an immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable gene and the joining segment of the T-cell receptor α chain. The B-cell parent, the 6-thioguanine- and ouabain-resistant mutant GM1500, is a lymphoblastoid cell line that secretes IgG2, K chains, and expresses B1, B532, and HLA class I and II antigens. All hybrids expressed characteristics of B cells (Ig + , B1 + , B532 + , EBNA + , HLA antigens), whereas only CD4 among the T-cell markers was expressed. The level of T-cell receptor β-chain transcript was greatly reduced and no RNA of the chimeric T-cell receptor α-chain joining segment-immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region was detected. Southern blot analysis indicated that absence of T-cell differentiation markers in the hybrids was not due to chromosomal loss. Rather, some B-cell-specific factor present in the hybrids may account for the suppression

  8. Variable Domain N-Linked Glycans Acquired During Antigen-Specific Immune Responses Can Contribute to Immunoglobulin G Antibody Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur S. van de Bovenkamp

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG can contain N-linked glycans in the variable domains, the so-called Fab glycans, in addition to the Fc glycans in the CH2 domains. These Fab glycans are acquired following introduction of N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation and contribute to antibody diversification. We investigated whether Fab glycans may—in addition to affecting antigen binding—contribute to antibody stability. By analyzing thermal unfolding profiles of antibodies with or without Fab glycans, we demonstrate that introduction of Fab glycans can improve antibody stability. Strikingly, removal of Fab glycans naturally acquired during antigen-specific immune responses can deteriorate antibody stability, suggesting in vivo selection of stable, glycosylated antibodies. Collectively, our data show that variable domain N-linked glycans acquired during somatic hypermutation can contribute to IgG antibody stability. These findings indicate that introducing Fab glycans may represent a mechanism to improve therapeutic/diagnostic antibody stability.

  9. The effect of immunoglobulins and somatic cells on the gravity separation of fat, bacteria, and spores in pasteurized whole milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, S R; Barbano, D M

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the role that immunoglobulins and somatic cells (SC) play in the gravity separation of milk. The experiment comprised 9 treatments: (1) low-temperature pasteurized (LTP; 72°C for 17.31s) whole milk; (2) LTP (72°C for 17.31s) whole milk with added bacteria and spores; (3) recombined LTP (72°C for 17.31s) whole milk with added bacteria and spores; (4) high-temperature pasteurized (HTP; 76°C for 7min) whole milk with added bacteria and spores; (5) HTP (76°C for 7min) whole milk with added bacteria and spores and added colostrum; (6) HTP (76°C for 7min) centrifugally separated, gravity-separated (CS GS) skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) low-SC cream with added bacteria and spores; (7) HTP (76°C for 7min) CS GS skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) high-SC cream with added bacteria and spores; (8) HTP (76°C for 7min) CS GS skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) low-SC cream with added bacteria and spores and added colostrum; and (9) HTP (76°C for 7min) CS GS skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) high-SC cream with added bacteria and spores and added colostrum. The milks in the 9 treatments were gravity separated at 4°C for 23h in glass columns. Five fractions were collected by weight from each of the column treatments, starting from the bottom of the glass column: 0 to 5%, 5 to 90%, 90 to 96%, 96 to 98%, and 98 to 100%. The SC, fat, bacteria, and spores were measured in each of the fractions. The experiment was replicated 3 times in different weeks using a different batch of milk and different colostrum. Portions of the same batch of the frozen bacteria and spore solutions were used for all 3 replicates. The presence of both SC and immunoglobulins were necessary for normal gravity separation (i.e., rising to the top) of fat, bacteria, and spores in whole milk. The presence of immunoglobulins alone without SC was not sufficient to cause bacteria, fat, and spores to rise to the top. The interaction between SC and immunoglobulins was

  10. Quantifying selection in high-throughput Immunoglobulin sequencing data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaari, Gur; Uduman, Mohamed; Kleinstein, Steven H

    2012-09-01

    High-throughput immunoglobulin sequencing promises new insights into the somatic hypermutation and antigen-driven selection processes that underlie B-cell affinity maturation and adaptive immunity. The ability to estimate positive and negative selection from these sequence data has broad applications not only for understanding the immune response to pathogens, but is also critical to determining the role of somatic hypermutation in autoimmunity and B-cell cancers. Here, we develop a statistical framework for Bayesian estimation of Antigen-driven SELectIoN (BASELINe) based on the analysis of somatic mutation patterns. Our approach represents a fundamental advance over previous methods by shifting the problem from one of simply detecting selection to one of quantifying selection. Along with providing a more intuitive means to assess and visualize selection, our approach allows, for the first time, comparative analysis between groups of sequences derived from different germline V(D)J segments. Application of this approach to next-generation sequencing data demonstrates different selection pressures for memory cells of different isotypes. This framework can easily be adapted to analyze other types of DNA mutation patterns resulting from a mutator that displays hot/cold-spots, substitution preference or other intrinsic biases.

  11. The immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-11-24

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more "conventional" mammalian species.

  12. Structure and Function of Immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Harry W; Cavacini, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are heterodimeric proteins composed of two heavy (H) and two light (L) chains. They can be separated functionally into variable (V) domains that binds antigens and constant (C) domains that specify effector functions such as activation of complement or binding to Fc receptors. The variable domains are created by means of a complex series of gene rearrangement events, and can then be subjected to somatic hypermutation after exposure to antigen to allow affinity maturation. Each V domain can be split into three regions of sequence variability, termed the complementarity determining regions, or CDRs, and four regions of relatively constant sequence termed the framework regions, or FRs. The three CDRs of the H chain are paired with the three CDRs of the L chain to form the antigen binding site, as classically defined. There are five main classes of heavy chain C domains. Each class defines the IgM, IgG, IgA, IgD, and IgE isotypes. IgG can be split into four subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, each with its own biologic properties; and IgA can similarly be split into IgA1 and IgA2. The constant domains of the H chain can be switched to allow altered effector function while maintaining antigen specificity. PMID:20176268

  13. Effects of milking frequency in automatic milking systems on salivary cortisol, immunoglobulin A, somatic cell count and melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, S; Wechsler, B; Hauser, R; Gygax, L

    2016-03-01

    In barns with an automatic milking system (AMS), both the milking frequency and the number of nighttime milkings vary between cows. A low milking frequency might indicate problems in gaining access to the milking unit. Also, nighttime lighting in the waiting area of the AMS and in the milking unit increases exposure to light at night and could suppress nocturnal melatonin synthesis. These effects could result in increased stress, suppressed immune response, and poor udder health. A total of 125 cows (14-16/farm) on 8 farms with AMS were selected based on their average milking frequency. Eight to 10 saliva samples per cow were taken over the course of 4 days, and cortisol, IgA and melatonin concentrations were determined. Somatic cell counts (SCC) were determined in milk samples. Milking frequency had no significant relationship with mean cortisol and IgA levels, but a higher milking frequency tended to be associated with lower SCC levels. Nocturnal melatonin levels tended to be negatively associated with the number of nighttime milkings. In conclusion, no indication of increased stress or reduced immune defense was found in relation to milking frequency on farms with an AMS.

  14. Generation of Immunoglobulin diversity in human gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Jo; Barone, Francesca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah

    2009-06-01

    The organised gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) exists adjacent to an extensive and diverse luminal flora. The follicle associated epithelium and associated dendritic cells and lymphocytes form a tightly fortified gateway between the flora and the host that permits connectivity between them and chronic activation of the lymphoid compartment. As a consequence, plasma cell precursors are generated continuously, and in abundance, in GALT by clonal proliferation. Clonal proliferation alone on this scale would reduce the spectrum of B cell specificity. To compensate, GALT also houses molecular machinery that diversifies the receptor repertoire by somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and receptor revision. These three processes of enhancing the diversity of mature B cells ensure that although clonally related plasma cells may secrete immunoglobulin side by side in the mucosa they rarely have identical antigen binding sites.

  15. Polymerase proofreading domain mutations: New opportunities for immunotherapy in hypermutated colorectal cancer beyond MMR deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdais, Rémi; Rousseau, Benoît; Pujals, Anaïs; Boussion, Helene; Joly, Charlotte; Guillemin, Aude; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Neuzillet, Cindy; Tournigand, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibition is a new therapeutic strategy that has shown promising efficacy in many cancer types. Significant activity associated with mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency has been observed in hypermutated, microsatellite unstable (MSI) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Beyond deficient-MMR tumors, somatic or germline DNA polymerase D1 (POLD1) or DNA polymerase E (POLE) alterations cause a hypermutated phenotype in CRC. This recently identified and rare subgroup of proficient-MMR tumors may also benefit from immunotherapy. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of recent data on CRC tumors harboring POLD1 or POLE mutations, with a focus on their molecular, histological, and clinical features. We also examine the evidence supporting the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors in this specific subgroup of CRC patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypermutation and stress adaptation in bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... [Jayaraman R. 2011 Hypermutation and stress adaptation in bacteria. J. Genet. 90, 383–391]. Introduction. Adaptive evolution by natural selection depends upon the supply of mutations, especially beneficial mutations. (reviewed by Sniegowski and Gerrish 2010). Generally, spontaneous mutation rates are ...

  17. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghiotto, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV-diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥ 2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation.

  18. Parp3 Negatively Regulates Immunoglobulin Class Switch Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Isabelle; Gaudot, Léa; Rogier, Mélanie; Heyer, Vincent; Noll, Aurélia; Dantzer, Françoise; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    To generate highly specific and adapted immune responses, B cells diversify their antibody repertoire through mechanisms involving the generation of programmed DNA damage. Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) are initiated by the recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to immunoglobulin loci and by the subsequent generation of DNA lesions, which are differentially processed to mutations during SHM or to double-stranded DNA break intermediates during CSR. The latter activate the DNA damage response and mobilize multiple DNA repair factors, including Parp1 and Parp2, to promote DNA repair and long-range recombination. We examined the contribution of Parp3 in CSR and SHM. We find that deficiency in Parp3 results in enhanced CSR, while SHM remains unaffected. Mechanistically, this is due to increased occupancy of AID at the donor (Sμ) switch region. We also find evidence of increased levels of DNA damage at switch region junctions and a bias towards alternative end joining in the absence of Parp3. We propose that Parp3 plays a CSR-specific role by controlling AID levels at switch regions during CSR. PMID:26000965

  19. High Throughput Sequencing Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene from Flow-Sorted B Cell Sub-Populations Define the Dynamics of Follicular Lymphoma Clonal Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Carlotti

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of evolution of Follicular Lymphoma (FL clones during disease progression is important for monitoring and targeting this tumor effectively. Genetic profiling of serial FL biopsies and examples of FL transmission following bone marrow transplant suggest that this disease may evolve by divergent evolution from a common ancestor cell. However where this ancestor cell resides and how it evolves is still unclear. The analysis of the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig is traditionally used for tracking the physiological clonal evolution of B cells within the germinal center and allows to discriminate those cells that have just entered the germinal center and display features of ancestor cells from those B cells that keep re-circulating across different lymphoid organs. Here we investigated the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin gene (IgH-VH in 4 flow-sorted B cells subpopulations belonging to different stages of differentiation, from sequential lymph node biopsies of cases displaying diverse patterns of evolution, using the GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. We observed an unexpectedly high level of clonality, with hundreds of distinct tumor subclones in the different subpopulations from the same sample, the majority detected at a frequency <10-2. By using a lineage trees analysis we observed in all our FL and t-FL cases that the oligoclonal FL population was trapped in a narrow intermediate stage of maturation that maintains the capacity to undergo SHM, but was unable to further differentiate. The presence of such a complex architecture highlights challenges currently encountered in finding a cure for this disease.

  20. Immunoglobulin gene alterations in normal and neoplastic B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maldegem, F.

    2009-01-01

    The production of high affinity antibodies is crucial in the combat of pathogenic invaders. Somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination are two DNA modifying processes that take place in the lymph node germinal centres, in order to increase antibody affinity and determine its effector

  1. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli paradigm. R. Jayaraman*. R. H. 35, Palaami Enclave, New Natham Road, Madurai 625 014, India. Abstract. Mutators (also called hypermutators) are mutants which show higher than normal spontaneous mutation frequencies, ranging from 10–20 fold to ...

  2. Characterizing immunoglobulin repertoire from whole blood by a personal genome sequencer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Gao

    Full Text Available In human immune system, V(DJ recombination produces an enormously large repertoire of immunoglobulins (Ig so that they can tackle different antigens from bacteria, viruses and tumor cells. Several studies have demonstrated the utility of next-generation sequencers such as Roche 454 and Illumina Genome Analyzer to characterize the repertoire of immunoglobulins. However, these techniques typically require separation of B cell population from whole blood and require a few weeks for running the sequencers, so it may not be practical to implement them in clinical settings. Recently, the Ion Torrent personal genome sequencer has emerged as a tabletop personal genome sequencer that can be operated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. In this study, we explored the technical feasibility to use multiplex PCR for amplifying V(DJ recombination for IgH, directly from whole blood, then sequence the amplicons by the Ion Torrent sequencer. The whole process including data generation and analysis can be completed in one day. We tested the method in a pilot study on patients with benign, atypical and malignant meningiomas. Despite the noisy data, we were able to compare the samples by their usage frequencies of the V segment, as well as their somatic hypermutation rates. In summary, our study suggested that it is technically feasible to perform clinical monitoring of V(DJ recombination within a day by personal genome sequencers.

  3. Immunoglobulin genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honjo, T; Alt, F. W; Rabbitts, T. H

    1989-01-01

    ... Cataloguing in Publication Data Immunoglobulin genes 1. Vertebrates. Immunoglobulins 1. Honjo, T. II. Alt, F.W. III. Rabbitts, T.H. 612'. 118223 ISBN 0-12-354865-9 This book is printed on acid-free paper ( T...

  4. Somatic microindels in human cancer: the insertions are highly error-prone and derive from nearby but not adjacent sense and antisense templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringe, William A; Li, Kai; Gu, Dongqing; Gonzalez, Kelly D; Chen, Zhenbin; Hill, Kathleen A; Sommer, Steve S

    2008-09-15

    Somatic microindels (microdeletions with microinsertions) have been studied in normal mouse tissues using the Big Blue lacI transgenic mutation detection system. Here we analyze microindels in human cancers using an endogenous and transcribed gene, the TP53 gene. Microindel frequency, the enhancement of 1-2 microindels and other features are generally similar to that observed in the non-transcribed lacI gene in normal mouse tissues. The current larger sample of somatic microindels reveals recurroids: mutations in which deletions are identical and the co-localized insertion is similar. The data reveal that the inserted sequences derive from nearby but not adjacent sequences in contrast to the slippage that characterizes the great majority of pure microinsertions. The microindel inserted sequences derive from a template on the sense or antisense strand with similar frequency. The estimated error rate of the insertion process of 13% per bp is by far the largest reported in vivo, with the possible exception of somatic hypermutation in the immunoglobulin gene. The data constrain possible mechanisms of microindels and raise the question of whether microindels are 'scars' from the bypass of large DNA adducts by a translesional polymerase, e.g. the 'Tarzan model' presented herein.

  5. Requirement for enhancer specificity in immunoglobulin heavy chain locus regulation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Igor I.; Bagaeva, Ludmila; Young, Faith M.; Bottaro, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The intronic Eμ enhancer has been implicated in immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus transcription, VDJ recombination, class switch recombination (CSR)2 and somatic hypermutation (SHM). How Eμ controls these diverse mechanisms is still largely unclear, but transcriptional enhancer activity is thought to play a central role. Here we compare the phenotype of mice lacking the Eμ element (ΔEμ) with that of mice in which Eμ was replaced with the ubiquitous SV40 transcriptional enhancer (SV40eR mutation), and show that SV40e cannot functionally complement Eμ loss in pro-B cells. Surprisingly, in fact, the SV40eR mutation yields a more profound defect than ΔEμ, with an almost complete block in μ0 germline transcription in pro-B cells. This active transcriptional suppression caused by enhancer replacement appears to be specific to the early stages of B cell development, as mature SV40eR B cells express μ0 transcripts at higher levels than ΔEμ mice, and undergo complete DNA demethylation at the IgH locus. These results indicate an unexpectedly stringent, developmentally-restricted requirement for enhancer specificity in regulating IgH function during the early phases of B cell differentiation, consistent with the view that coordination of multiple independent regulatory mechanisms and elements is essential for locus activation and VDJ recombination. PMID:18490744

  6. SMRT sequencing provides insight into the diversity of the bovine immunoglobulin heavy chain repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vertebrate immune system produces a diverse antibody repertoire capable of responding to a vast array of antigens. This diversity is generated through a multifaceted process of gene segment recombination and somatic hypermutation or gene conversion. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencin...

  7. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Being a mutator is advantageous to the organism when adapting to environmental changes or stressful situations, such as moving from one habitat to another, one host to another, exposure to antibiotics etc. However, this advantage is only a short-term benefit. In the long run, hypermutability leads to a fitness disadvantage ...

  8. Immunoglobulin Classification Using the Colored Antibody Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonissone, Stefano R; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-06-01

    The somatic recombination of V, D, and J gene segments in B-cells introduces a great deal of diversity, and divergence from reference segments. Many recent studies of antibodies focus on the population of antibody transcripts that show which V, D, and J gene segments have been favored for a particular antigen, a repertoire. To properly describe the antibody repertoire, each antibody must be labeled by its constituting V, D, and J gene segment, a task made difficult by somatic recombination and hypermutation events. While previous approaches to repertoire analysis were based on sequential alignments, we describe a new de Bruijn graph-based algorithm to perform VDJ labeling and benchmark its performance.

  9. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) immunoglobulin heavy chain suggests the importance of clan III variable segments in repertoire diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaux, Breanna; Deiss, Thaddeus C.; Chen, Patricia L.; Cruz-Schneider, Maria Paula; Sena, Leonardo; Hunter, Margaret E.; Bonde, Robert K.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Manatees are a vulnerable, charismatic sentinel species from the evolutionarily divergent Afrotheria. Manatee health and resistance to infectious disease is of great concern to conservation groups, but little is known about their immune system. To develop manatee-specific tools for monitoring health, we first must have a general knowledge of how the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain locus is organized and transcriptionally expressed. Using the genomic scaffolds of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris), we characterized the potential IgH segmental diversity and constant region isotypic diversity and performed the first Afrotherian repertoire analysis. The Florida manatee has low V(D)J combinatorial diversity (3744 potential combinations) and few constant region isotypes. They also lack clan III V segments, which may have caused reduced VH segment numbers. However, we found productive somatic hypermutation concentrated in the complementarity determining regions. In conclusion, manatees have limited IGHV clan and combinatorial diversity. This suggests that clan III V segments are essential for maintaining IgH locus diversity.

  10. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypermutation by intersegmental transfer of APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Shiloach, Tamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2008-10-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is an important mechanism by which apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) enzymes restrict endogenous and exogenous viruses. The dynamic process underlying APOBEC-induced hypermutation is not fully understood. Here we show that enzymatically active APOBEC3G can be detected in wild-type Vif(+) HIV-1 virions, albeit at low levels. In vitro studies showed that single enzyme-DNA encounters result in distributive deamination of adjacent cytidines. Nonlinear translocation of APOBEC3G, however, directed scattered deamination of numerous targets along the DNA. Increased ssDNA concentrations abolished enzyme processivity in the case of short, but not long, DNA substrates, emphasizing the key role of rapid intersegmental transfer in targeting the deaminase. Our data support a model by which APOBEC3G intersegmental transfer via monomeric binding to two ssDNA segments results in dispersed hypermutation of viral genomes.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. © 2016 Kalchschmidt et al.

  13. In vivo HIV-1 hypermutation and viral loads among antiretroviral-naive Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Stein, Mariana Leão; Alkmim, Wagner Tadeu; Bizinoto, Maria Clara de Souza; Lopez, Luis Fernandez; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Maricato, Juliana Terzi; Giron, Leila; Sucupira, Maria Cecília Araripe; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie; Janini, Luiz Mario

    2014-09-01

    Hypermutation alludes to an excessive number of specific guanine-to-adenine (G- >A) substitutions in proviral DNA and this phenomenon is attributed to the catalytic activity of cellular APOBECs. Population studies relating hypermutation and the progression of infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been performed to elucidate the effect of hypermutation on the natural course of HIV-1 infection. However, the many different approaches employed to assess hypermutation in nucleotide sequences render the comparison of results difficult. This study selected 157 treatment-naive patients and sought to correlate the hypermutation level of the proviral sequences in clinical samples with demographic variables, HIV-1 RNA viral load, and the level of CD4(+) T cells. Nested touchdown polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed with specific primers to detect hypermutation in the region of HIV-1 integrase, and the amplified sequences were run in agarose gels with HA-Yellow. The analysis of gel migration patterns using the k-means clustering method was validated by its agreement with the results obtained with the software Hypermut. Hypermutation was found in 31.2% of the investigated samples, and a correlation was observed between higher hypermutation levels and higher viral load levels. These findings suggest a high frequency of hypermutation detection in a Brazilian cohort, which can reflect a particular characteristic of this population, but also can result from the method approach by aiming at hypermutation-sensitive sites. Furthermore, we found that hypermutation events are pervasive during HIV-1 infection as a consequence of high viral replication, reflecting its role during disease progression.

  14. Immunoglobulin M

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleass, Richard J; Moore, Shona C; Stevenson, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is an ancient antibody class that is found in all vertebrates, with the exception of coelacanths, and is indispensable in both innate and adaptive immunity. The equally ancient human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, formed an intimate relationship with IgM with whic...

  15. Clonal relationships between thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor-stimulating antibodies illustrate the effect of hypermutation on antibody function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padoa, Carolyn J; Larsen, Sanne L; Hampe, Christiane S

    2009-01-01

    Summary Graves' disease is characterized by production of agonist antibodies to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), but knowledge of the genetic and somatic events leading to their aberrant production is limited. We describe the genetic analysis of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) wi......, in experimentally immunized mice, multiple pathogenic antibodies to TSHR can arise from a single clone by a series of somatic mutations in the V-region genes and may give an insight into how such antibodies develop spontaneously in autoimmune Graves' disease....... relationship and derivation from a single precursor B-cell clone. The IGHV-region genes of the two mAbs underwent high degrees of somatic hypermutation by sharing numerous mutations before diverging, while the IGLV genes evolved separately. Interestingly, the mutations were present in both the complementarity...... that the chimeras retained TSAb activities, confirming the close functional relatedness of the V-region genes. Importantly, the IGLV genes in chimeric rFabs had a dominant stimulatory effect at low concentrations, while the IGHV genes had a dominant effect at higher concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that...

  16. Frequency patterns of T-cell exposed motifs in immunoglobulin heavy chain peptides presented by MHCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Bremel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEM. TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM. Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of T-cell exposed motif re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by clonal expansion that develop along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs.

  17. Thermodynamic stability contributes to immunoglobulin specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Jordan D; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Antigen-binding specificity of immunoglobulins is important for their function in immune defense. However, immune repertoires contain a considerable fraction of immunoglobulins with promiscuous binding behavior, the physicochemical basis of which is not well understood. Evolution of immunoglobulin specificity occurs through iterative processes of mutation and selection, referred to as affinity maturation. Recent studies reveal that some somatic mutations could compromise the thermodynamic stability of the variable regions of immunoglobulins. By integrating this observation with the wealth of data on the evolution of novel enzyme activities, we propose that antibody specificity is linked to the thermodynamic stability of the antigen-binding regions, which provides a quantitative distinction between highly specific and promiscuous antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunoglobulins in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of intrathecally synthesised immunoglobulin is an important part of routine cerebrospinal fl uid (CSF) analysis. Immunoglobulins can be detected in normal CSF and are derived from plasma. The appearance of immunoglobulins in normal CSF is readily explained by size-dependent diffusion...

  19. Genomic and Global Approaches to Unravelling How Hypermutable Sequences Influence Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadil A. Bidmos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid adaptation to fluctuations in the host milieu contributes to the host persistence and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Adaptation is frequently mediated by hypermutable sequences in bacterial pathogens. Early bacterial genomic studies identified the multiplicity and virulence-associated functions of these hypermutable sequences. Thus, simple sequence repeat tracts (SSRs and site-specific recombination were found to control capsular type, lipopolysaccharide structure, pilin diversity and the expression of outer membrane proteins. We review how the population diversity inherent in the SSR-mediated mechanism of localised hypermutation is being unlocked by the investigation of whole genome sequences of disease isolates, analysis of clinical samples and use of model systems. A contrast is presented between the problematical nature of analysing simple sequence repeats in next generation sequencing data and in simpler, pragmatic PCR-based approaches. Specific examples are presented of the potential relevance of this localized hypermutation to meningococcal pathogenesis. This leads us to speculate on the future prospects for unravelling how hypermutable mechanisms may contribute to the transmission, spread and persistence of bacterial pathogens.

  20. Antigen presentation profiling reveals recognition of lymphoma immunoglobulin neoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Michael S; Olsson, Niclas; Wagar, Lisa E; Haabeth, Ole A W; Chen, Binbin; Swaminathan, Kavya; Rawson, Keith; Liu, Chih Long; Steiner, David; Lund, Peder; Rao, Samhita; Zhang, Lichao; Marceau, Caleb; Stehr, Henning; Newman, Aaron M; Czerwinski, Debra K; Carlton, Victoria E H; Moorhead, Martin; Faham, Malek; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Carette, Jan; Green, Michael R; Davis, Mark M; Levy, Ronald; Elias, Joshua E; Alizadeh, Ash A

    2017-03-30

    Cancer somatic mutations can generate neoantigens that distinguish malignant from normal cells. However, the personalized identification and validation of neoantigens remains a major challenge. Here we discover neoantigens in human mantle-cell lymphomas by using an integrated genomic and proteomic strategy that interrogates tumour antigen peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules. We applied this approach to systematically characterize MHC ligands from 17 patients. Remarkably, all discovered neoantigenic peptides were exclusively derived from the lymphoma immunoglobulin heavy- or light-chain variable regions. Although we identified MHC presentation of private polymorphic germline alleles, no mutated peptides were recovered from non-immunoglobulin somatically mutated genes. Somatic mutations within the immunoglobulin variable region were almost exclusively presented by MHC class II. We isolated circulating CD4 + T cells specific for immunoglobulin-derived neoantigens and found these cells could mediate killing of autologous lymphoma cells. These results demonstrate that an integrative approach combining MHC isolation, peptide identification, and exome sequencing is an effective platform to uncover tumour neoantigens. Application of this strategy to human lymphoma implicates immunoglobulin neoantigens as targets for lymphoma immunotherapy.

  1. Analysis of mice deficient in both REV1 catalytic activity and POLH reveals an unexpected role for POLH in the generation of C to G and G to C transversions during Ig gene hypermutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Chie; Hanaoka, Fumio; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2012-03-01

    Multiple DNA polymerases are involved in the generation of somatic mutations during Ig gene hypermutation. Mice expressing a catalytically inactive REV1 (REV1AA) exhibit reduction of both C to G and G to C transversions and moderate decrease of A/T mutations, whereas DNA polymerase η (POLH) deficiency causes greatly reduced A/T mutations. To investigate whether REV1 and POLH interact genetically and functionally during Ig gene hypermutation, we established REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice and analyzed Ig gene hypermutation in the germinal center (GC) B cells. REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice were born at the expected ratio and developed normally with no apparent gross abnormalities. B-cell development, maturation, Ig gene class switch and the GC B-cell expansion were not affected in these mice. REV1AA Polh(-/-) B cells also exhibited relatively normal sensitivity to etoposide and ionizing radiation. Analysis of somatic mutations in the J(H)4 intronic region revealed that REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice had a further decrease of overall mutation frequency compared with REV1AA or Polh(-/-) mice, indicating that the double deficiency additively affected the generation of mutations. Remarkably, REV1AA Polh(-/-) mice had nearly absent C to G and G to C transversions, suggesting that POLH is essential for the generation of residual C to G and G to C transversions observed in REV1AA mice. These results reveal genetic interactions between REV1 catalytic activity and POLH and identify an alternative pathway, mediated by non-catalytic REV1 and POLH, in the generation of C to G and G to C transversions.

  2. VDJ-Seq: Deep Sequencing Analysis of Rearranged Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene to Reveal Clonal Evolution Patterns of B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Nie, Kui; Redmond, David; Melnick, Ari M; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-12-28

    Understanding tumor clonality is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis and disease progression. In addition, understanding the clonal composition changes that occur within a tumor in response to certain micro-environment or treatments may lead to the design of more sophisticated and effective approaches to eradicate tumor cells. However, tracking tumor clonal sub-populations has been challenging due to the lack of distinguishable markers. To address this problem, a VDJ-seq protocol was created to trace the clonal evolution patterns of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) relapse by exploiting VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM), two unique features of B cell lymphomas. In this protocol, Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) libraries with indexing potential were constructed from amplified rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) VDJ region from pairs of primary diagnosis and relapse DLBCL samples. On average more than half million VDJ sequences per sample were obtained after sequencing, which contain both VDJ rearrangement and SHM information. In addition, customized bioinformatics pipelines were developed to fully utilize sequence information for the characterization of IgH-VDJ repertoire within these samples. Furthermore, the pipeline allows the reconstruction and comparison of the clonal architecture of individual tumors, which enables the examination of the clonal heterogeneity within the diagnosis tumors and deduction of clonal evolution patterns between diagnosis and relapse tumor pairs. When applying this analysis to several diagnosis-relapse pairs, we uncovered key evidence that multiple distinctive tumor evolutionary patterns could lead to DLBCL relapse. Additionally, this approach can be expanded into other clinical aspects, such as identification of minimal residual disease, monitoring relapse progress and treatment response, and investigation of immune repertoires in non-lymphoma contexts.

  3. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3’ immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Birshtein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination. Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully-differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ~1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5′ constant region gene, Cμ; and an ~40 kb 3′ regulatory region (3′ RR that is located downstream of the most 3′ CH gene, Cα. The 3′ RR is a candidate for an end of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3′ RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4, which are essential for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3′ RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3’ RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3’ RR with its CTCF binding region interacts with target sequences in the VH, Eμ and CH regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Repertoire-Scale Immunoglobulin Properties in Vaccine-Induced B-Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja V. Khavrutskii

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the next-generation sequencing of B-cell receptors (BCRs enable the characterization of humoral responses at a repertoire-wide scale and provide the capability for identifying unique features of immune repertoires in response to disease, vaccination, or infection. Immunosequencing now readily generates 103–105 sequences per sample; however, statistical analysis of these repertoires is challenging because of the high genetic diversity of BCRs and the elaborate clonal relationships among them. To date, most immunosequencing analyses have focused on reporting qualitative trends in immunoglobulin (Ig properties, such as usage or somatic hypermutation (SHM percentage of the Ig heavy chain variable (IGHV gene segment family, and on reducing complex Ig property distributions to simple summary statistics. However, because Ig properties are typically not normally distributed, any approach that fails to assess the distribution as a whole may be inadequate in (1 properly assessing the statistical significance of repertoire differences, (2 identifying how two repertoires differ, and (3 determining appropriate confidence intervals for assessing the size of the differences and their potential biological relevance. To address these issues, we have developed a technique that uses Wilcox’ robust statistics toolbox to identify statistically significant vaccine-specific differences between Ig repertoire properties. The advantage of this technique is that it can determine not only whether but also where the distributions differ, even when the Ig repertoire properties are non-normally distributed. We used this technique to characterize murine germinal center (GC B-cell repertoires in response to a complex Ebola virus-like particle (eVLP vaccine candidate with known protective efficacy. The eVLP-mediated GC B-cell responses were highly diverse, consisting of thousands of clonotypes. Despite this staggering diversity, we identified statistically

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Repertoire-Scale Immunoglobulin Properties in Vaccine-Induced B-Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavrutskii, Ilja V; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Stronsky, Sabrina M; Lee, Donald W; Benko, Jacqueline G; Wallqvist, Anders; Bavari, Sina; Cooper, Christopher L

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the next-generation sequencing of B-cell receptors (BCRs) enable the characterization of humoral responses at a repertoire-wide scale and provide the capability for identifying unique features of immune repertoires in response to disease, vaccination, or infection. Immunosequencing now readily generates 10 3 -10 5 sequences per sample; however, statistical analysis of these repertoires is challenging because of the high genetic diversity of BCRs and the elaborate clonal relationships among them. To date, most immunosequencing analyses have focused on reporting qualitative trends in immunoglobulin (Ig) properties, such as usage or somatic hypermutation (SHM) percentage of the Ig heavy chain variable (IGHV) gene segment family, and on reducing complex Ig property distributions to simple summary statistics. However, because Ig properties are typically not normally distributed, any approach that fails to assess the distribution as a whole may be inadequate in (1) properly assessing the statistical significance of repertoire differences, (2) identifying how two repertoires differ, and (3) determining appropriate confidence intervals for assessing the size of the differences and their potential biological relevance. To address these issues, we have developed a technique that uses Wilcox' robust statistics toolbox to identify statistically significant vaccine-specific differences between Ig repertoire properties. The advantage of this technique is that it can determine not only whether but also where the distributions differ, even when the Ig repertoire properties are non-normally distributed. We used this technique to characterize murine germinal center (GC) B-cell repertoires in response to a complex Ebola virus-like particle (eVLP) vaccine candidate with known protective efficacy. The eVLP-mediated GC B-cell responses were highly diverse, consisting of thousands of clonotypes. Despite this staggering diversity, we identified statistically significant

  6. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterizing the Hypermutated Subtype of Advanced Prostate Cancer as a Predictive Biomarker for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Eur Urol (2016), Fig. 1 – An overview of the most important DNA damage–inducing stresses and the corresponding molecular pathways that eukaryotic cells ...box) DNA breaks. Eukaryotic cells developed various molecular mechanisms that repair such damage. DNA double-strand breaks are the most toxic DNA...chemotherapy and targeted therapy in LuCaP tumor cell lines xenografted in mice 12-36 Partially Subtask 1: Use xenograft LuCaP hypermutated prostate

  8. A Novel Hybrid Clonal Selection Algorithm with Combinatorial Recombination and Modified Hypermutation Operators for Global Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingjing; Jing, Honglei

    2016-01-01

    Artificial immune system is one of the most recently introduced intelligence methods which was inspired by biological immune system. Most immune system inspired algorithms are based on the clonal selection principle, known as clonal selection algorithms (CSAs). When coping with complex optimization problems with the characteristics of multimodality, high dimension, rotation, and composition, the traditional CSAs often suffer from the premature convergence and unsatisfied accuracy. To address these concerning issues, a recombination operator inspired by the biological combinatorial recombination is proposed at first. The recombination operator could generate the promising candidate solution to enhance search ability of the CSA by fusing the information from random chosen parents. Furthermore, a modified hypermutation operator is introduced to construct more promising and efficient candidate solutions. A set of 16 common used benchmark functions are adopted to test the effectiveness and efficiency of the recombination and hypermutation operators. The comparisons with classic CSA, CSA with recombination operator (RCSA), and CSA with recombination and modified hypermutation operator (RHCSA) demonstrate that the proposed algorithm significantly improves the performance of classic CSA. Moreover, comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms shows that the proposed algorithm is quite competitive. PMID:27698662

  9. Evidence for ADAR-induced hypermutation of the Drosophila sigma virus (Rhabdoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Mary A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADARs are RNA editing enzymes that target double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine, which is read by translation machinery as if it were guanosine. Aside from their role in generating protein diversity in the central nervous system, ADARs have been implicated in the hypermutation of some RNA viruses, although why this hypermutation occurs is not well understood. Results Here we describe the hypermutation of adenosines to guanosines in the genome of the sigma virus--a negative sense RNA virus that infects Drosophila melanogaster. The clustering of these mutations and the context in which they occur indicates that they have been caused by ADARs. However, ADAR-editing of viral RNA is either rare or edited viral RNA are rapidly degraded, as we only detected evidence for editing in two of the 104 viral isolates we studied. Conclusion This is the first evidence for ADARs targeting viruses outside of mammals, and it raises the possibility that ADARs could play a role in the antiviral defences of insects.

  10. Somatic symptom disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Somatic symptom disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing; 2013: ...

  11. IMGT(®) tools for the nucleotide analysis of immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TR) V-(D)-J repertoires, polymorphisms, and IG mutations: IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/HighV-QUEST for NGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamyar, Eltaf; Duroux, Patrice; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Giudicelli, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    IMGT/V-QUEST is the highly customized and integrated online IMGT(®) tool for the standardized analysis of the immunoglobulin (IG) or antibody and T cell receptor (TR) rearranged nucleotide sequences. The analysis of these antigen receptors represents a crucial challenge for the study of the adaptive immune response in normal and disease-related situations. The expressed IG and TR repertoires represent a potential of 10(12) IG and 10(12) TR per individual. This huge diversity results from mechanisms that occur at the DNA level during the IG and TR molecular synthesis. These mechanisms include the combinatorial rearrangements of the variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) genes, the N-diversity (deletion and addition at random of nucleotides during the V-(D)-J rearrangement) and, for IG, somatic hypermutations. IMGT/V-QUEST identifies the V, D, J genes and alleles by alignment with the germline IG and TR gene and allele sequences of the IMGT reference directory. The tool describes the V-REGION mutations and identifies the hot spot positions in the closest germline V gene. IMGT/V-QUEST integrates IMGT/JunctionAnalysis for a detailed analysis of the V-J and V-D-J junctions and IMGT/Automat for a complete annotation of the sequences and also provides IMGT Collier de Perles. IMGT/HighV-QUEST, the high-throughput version of IMGT/V-QUEST, implemented to answer the needs of deep sequencing data analysis from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), allows the analysis of thousands of IG and TR sequences in a single run. IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/HighV-QUEST are available at the IMGT(®) Home page, http://www.imgt.org.

  12. Characterization of immunoglobulin G fragments in liquid intravenous immunoglobulin products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemel, Robert V.; ter Hart, Hendricus G. J.; Derksen, Gerardus J. A.; Koenderman, Anky H. L.; Aalberse, Rob C.

    2005-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products formulated as a liquid instead of a powder have become commercially available. Preferably, such liquid products should not alter after storage outside the refrigerator. Therefore, a thorough characterization of immunoglobulin G (IgG) fragmentation at

  13. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunoglobulins for preventing hepatitis A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian Ping; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Fei, Yutong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention.......Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention....

  15. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  16. Somatization in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Bech, Per; Patierno, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The current systematic review study is aimed at critically analyzing from a clinimetric viewpoint the clinical consequence of somatization in Parkinson's Disease (PD). By focusing on the International Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we...... consequence of such psychiatric symptom should be further evaluated by replacing the clinically inadequate diagnostic label of psychogenic parkinsonism with the psychosomatic concept of persistent somatization as conceived by the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR)....

  17. DNA polymerases ν and θ are required for efficient immunoglobulin V gene diversification in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nishihara, Kana; Hirota, Kouji; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Yoshimura, Michio; Ekino, Shigeo; Butler, John E.; Watanabe, Masami; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2010-01-01

    The chicken DT40 B lymphocyte line diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) V genes through translesion DNA synthesis–dependent point mutations (Ig hypermutation) and homologous recombination (HR)–dependent Ig gene conversion. The error-prone biochemical characteristic of the A family DNA polymerases Polν and Polθ led us to explore the role of these polymerases in Ig gene diversification in DT40 cells. Disruption of both polymerases causes a significant decrease in Ig gene conversion events, although POLN−/−/POLQ−/− cells exhibit no prominent defect in HR-mediated DNA repair, as indicated by no increase in sensitivity to camptothecin. Polη has also been previously implicated in Ig gene conversion. We show that a POLH−/−/POLN−/−/POLQ−/− triple mutant displays no Ig gene conversion and reduced Ig hypermutation. Together, these data define a role for Polν and Polθ in recombination and suggest that the DNA synthesis associated with Ig gene conversion is accounted for by three specialized DNA polymerases. PMID:20584917

  18. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  19. Role of Hypermutability in the Evolution of the Genus Oenococcus▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Angela M.; Sela, David A.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Makarova, Kira S.; Mills, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is an alcohol-tolerant, acidophilic lactic acid bacterium primarily responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. A recent comparative genomic analysis of O. oeni PSU-1 with other sequenced lactic acid bacteria indicates that PSU-1 lacks the mismatch repair (MMR) genes mutS and mutL. Consistent with the lack of MMR, mutation rates for O. oeni PSU-1 and a second oenococcal species, O. kitaharae, were higher than those observed for neighboring taxa, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Sequence analysis of the rpoB mutations in rifampin-resistant strains from both oenococcal species revealed a high percentage of transition mutations, a result indicative of the lack of MMR. An analysis of common alleles in the two sequenced O. oeni strains, PSU-1 and BAA-1163, also revealed a significantly higher level of transition substitutions than were observed in other Lactobacillales species. These results suggest that the genus Oenococcus is hypermutable due to the loss of mutS and mutL, which occurred with the divergence away from the neighboring Leuconostoc branch. The hypermutable status of the genus Oenococcus explains the observed high level of allelic polymorphism among known O. oeni isolates and likely contributed to the unique adaptation of this genus to acidic and alcoholic environments. PMID:17993526

  20. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  1. APOBEC3G-induced hypermutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 is typically a discrete "all or nothing" phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armitage, Andrew E; Deforche, Koen; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    The rapid evolution of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) allows studies of ongoing host-pathogen interactions. One key selective host factor is APOBEC3G (hA3G) that can cause extensive and inactivating Guanosine-to-Adenosine (G-to-A) mutation on HIV plus-strand DNA (termed hypermutation). HIV ...

  2. Colon and endometrial cancers with mismatch repair deficiency can arise from somatic, rather than germline, mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Tomsic, Jerneja; Frankel, Wendy L; Pearlman, Rachel; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pritchard, Colin C

    2014-12-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome carry germline mutations in single alleles of genes encoding the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2; when the second allele becomes mutated, cancer can develop. Increased screening for Lynch syndrome has identified patients with tumors that have deficiency in MMR, but no germline mutations in genes encoding MMR proteins. We investigated whether tumors with deficient MMR had acquired somatic mutations in patients without germline mutations in MMR genes using next-generation sequencing. We analyzed blood and tumor samples from 32 patients with colorectal or endometrial cancer who participated in Lynch syndrome screening studies in Ohio and were found to have tumors with MMR deficiency (based on microsatellite instability and/or absence of MMR proteins in immunohistochemical analysis, without hypermethylation of MLH1), but no germline mutations in MMR genes. Tumor DNA was sequenced for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM, POLE, and POLD1 with ColoSeq and mutation frequencies were established. Twenty-two of 32 patients (69%) were found to have 2 somatic (tumor) mutations in MMR genes encoding proteins that were lost from tumor samples, based on immunohistochemistry. Of the 10 remaining tumors 3 had one somatic mutation in a MMR gene, with possible loss of heterozygosity that could lead to MMR deficiency, 6 were found to be false-positive results (19%), and 1 had only one mutation in a MMR gene and remained unexplained. All of the tumors found to have somatic MMR mutations were of the hypermutated phenotype (>12 mutations/megabase); 6 had mutation frequencies >200/megabase, and 5 of these had somatic mutations in POLE, which encodes a DNA polymerase. Some patients are found to have tumors with MMR defects during screening for Lynch syndrome, yet have no identifiable germline mutations in MMR genes. We found that almost 70% of these patients acquire somatic mutations in MMR genes, leading to a hypermutated phenotype of tumor

  3. Genome analysis of a transmissible lineage of pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals pathoadaptive mutations and distinct evolutionary paths of hypermutators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Lykke Marvig

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing of bacterial pathogens has advanced our understanding of their evolution, epidemiology, and response to antibiotic therapy. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of the molecular changes in in vivo evolving bacterial populations in relation to long-term, chronic infections. For example, it remains unclear what genes are mutated to facilitate the establishment of long-term existence in the human host environment, and in which way acquisition of a hypermutator phenotype with enhanced rates of spontaneous mutations influences the evolutionary trajectory of the pathogen. Here we perform a retrospective study of the DK2 clone type of P. aeruginosa isolated from Danish patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF, and analyze the genomes of 55 bacterial isolates collected from 21 infected individuals over 38 years. Our phylogenetic analysis of 8,530 mutations in the DK2 genomes shows that the ancestral DK2 clone type spread among CF patients through several independent transmission events. Subsequent to transmission, sub-lineages evolved independently for years in separate hosts, creating a unique possibility to study parallel evolution and identification of genes targeted by mutations to optimize pathogen fitness (pathoadaptive mutations. These genes were related to antibiotic resistance, the cell envelope, or regulatory functions, and we find that the prevalence of pathoadaptive mutations correlates with evolutionary success of co-evolving sub-lineages. The long-term co-existence of both normal and hypermutator populations enabled comparative investigations of the mutation dynamics in homopolymeric sequences in which hypermutators are particularly prone to mutations. We find a positive exponential correlation between the length of the homopolymer and its likelihood to acquire mutations and identify two homopolymer-containing genes preferentially mutated in hypermutators. This homopolymer facilitated differential

  4. Assessing hypermutation operators of a clonal selection algorithm for the unequal area facility layout problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haktanirlar Ulutas, Berna; Kulturel-Konak, Sadan

    2013-03-01

    A mutation operator is critical for the performance of a clonal selection algorithm (CSA) since it diversifies the search directions and avoids early convergence to local optima. This article introduces a CSA approach for the unequal area facility layout problem (UAFLP) with flexible bay structure. A new encoding, the use of mutation types with different combinations, and different static and dynamic mutation application strategies are also proposed. In addition, a guideline in parameter optimization of the CSA is provided. An experimental study is performed on five cases of the UAFLP. It is concluded that the hypermutation types studied in this article, especially the inverse mutation followed by pairwise mutation, can be used to obtain good results within short computation times.

  5. Length of the hypermutation motif DGYW/WRCH in the focus of statistical limits. Implications for a double-motif or extended motif recognition models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubrycht, J.; Sigler, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 255, - (2008), s. 8-15 ISSN 0022-5193 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cytidine deaminase * hypermutation * immunogloulin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.454, year: 2008

  6. Biased hypermutation occurred frequently in a gene inserted into the IC323 recombinant measles virus during its persistence in the brains of nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Sanae; Ayata, Minoru; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shintaku, Haruo; Ogura, Hisashi

    2014-08-01

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of measles and its neurological complications, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE). Biased hypermutation in the M gene is a characteristic feature of SSPE and MIBE. To determine whether the M gene is the preferred target of hypermutation, an additional transcriptional unit containing a humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) gene was introduced into the IC323 MV genome, and nude mice were inoculated intracerebrally with the virus. Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene and also in the hrGFP gene when it was inserted between the leader and the N gene, but not between the H and L gene. These results indicate that biased hypermutation is usually found in a gene whose function is not essential for viral proliferation in the brain and that the location of a gene in the MV genome can affect its mutational frequency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The interaction between calreticulin and immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllegaard, Karen Mai; Duus, Karen; Træholt, Sofie Dietz

    2011-01-01

    accumulating in support of calreticulin as a polypeptide binding chaperone. In contrast to mammalian immunoglobulin G (IgG), which has complex type N-glycans, chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY) possesses a monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked glycan, which is a ligand for calreticulin. Here, we have used solid...... and solution-phase assays to analyze the in vitro binding of calreticulin, purified from human placenta, to human IgG and chicken IgY in order to compare the interactions. In addition, peptides from the respective immunoglobulins were included to further probe the binding specificity of calreticulin....... The experiments demonstrate the ability of calreticulin to bind to denatured forms of both IgG and IgY regardless of the glycosylation state of the proteins. Furthermore, calreticulin exhibits binding to peptides (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) derived from trypsin digestion of both immunoglobulins...

  8. Biased hypermutation occurred frequently in a gene inserted into the IC323 recombinant measles virus during its persistence in the brains of nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Sanae [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Ayata, Minoru, E-mail: maverick@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Takeuchi, Kaoru [Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Division of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Makoto [Department of Virology 3, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Shintaku, Haruo [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Ogura, Hisashi [Department of Virology and Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of measles and its neurological complications, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE). Biased hypermutation in the M gene is a characteristic feature of SSPE and MIBE. To determine whether the M gene is the preferred target of hypermutation, an additional transcriptional unit containing a humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) gene was introduced into the IC323 MV genome, and nude mice were inoculated intracerebrally with the virus. Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene and also in the hrGFP gene when it was inserted between the leader and the N gene, but not between the H and L gene. These results indicate that biased hypermutation is usually found in a gene whose function is not essential for viral proliferation in the brain and that the location of a gene in the MV genome can affect its mutational frequency. - Highlights: • Wild-type MV can cause persistent infections in nude mice. • Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene. • Biased hypermutation occurred in an inessential gene inserted between the leader and the N gene.

  9. Biased hypermutation occurred frequently in a gene inserted into the IC323 recombinant measles virus during its persistence in the brains of nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Sanae; Ayata, Minoru; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shintaku, Haruo; Ogura, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of measles and its neurological complications, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE). Biased hypermutation in the M gene is a characteristic feature of SSPE and MIBE. To determine whether the M gene is the preferred target of hypermutation, an additional transcriptional unit containing a humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) gene was introduced into the IC323 MV genome, and nude mice were inoculated intracerebrally with the virus. Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene and also in the hrGFP gene when it was inserted between the leader and the N gene, but not between the H and L gene. These results indicate that biased hypermutation is usually found in a gene whose function is not essential for viral proliferation in the brain and that the location of a gene in the MV genome can affect its mutational frequency. - Highlights: • Wild-type MV can cause persistent infections in nude mice. • Biased hypermutation occurred in the M gene. • Biased hypermutation occurred in an inessential gene inserted between the leader and the N gene

  10. MSIseq: Software for Assessing Microsatellite Instability from Catalogs of Somatic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mi Ni; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Patrick; Rozen, Steven G

    2015-08-26

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a form of hypermutation that occurs in some tumors due to defects in cellular DNA mismatch repair. MSI is characterized by frequent somatic mutations (i.e., cancer-specific mutations) that change the length of simple repeats (e.g., AAAAA…., GATAGATAGATA...). Clinical MSI tests evaluate the lengths of a handful of simple repeat sites, while next-generation sequencing can assay many more sites and offers a much more complete view of their somatic mutation frequencies. Using somatic mutation data from the exomes of a 361-tumor training set, we developed classifiers to determine MSI status based on four machine-learning frameworks. All frameworks had high accuracy, and after choosing one we determined that it had >98% concordance with clinical tests in a separate 163-tumor test set. Furthermore, this classifier retained high concordance even when classifying tumors based on subsets of whole-exome data. We have released a CRAN R package, MSIseq, based on this classifier. MSIseq is faster and simpler to use than software that requires large files of aligned sequenced reads. MSIseq will be useful for genomic studies in which clinical MSI test results are unavailable and for detecting possible misclassifications by clinical tests.

  11. The discovery of immunoglobulin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) was a breakthrough in the field of allergy and immunology. Our understanding of mechanisms of allergic reactions and the role of IgE in these disorders has paralleled to the discovery of treatment modalities for patients with allergy. The first clue to the existence of a substance responsible for hypersensitivity reactions was demonstrated in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, and after four decades it was identified as an immunoglobulin subclass by Ishizakas and co-workers. In 1968, the WHO International Reference Centre for Immunoglobulins announced the presence of a fifth immunoglobulin isotype, IgE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Zago Novaretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin is the most used blood product in the clinical practice. Immunoglobulin applications have increased quickly since the elucidation of its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties which turned this blood product into a precious tool in the treatment of numerous diseases that present with humoral immune deficiency or that cause immune system dysfunction. Currently, the approved indications for Ig are: primary immunodeficiencies, secondary immunodeficiencies (multiple myeloma or chronic lymphoid leukemia, Kawasaki syndrome, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, graft-versus-host disease following bone marrow transplantation and repeat infections in HIV children. On the other hand, there are numerous "off-label" indications of immunoglobulin, which represent 20-60% of all clinical applications of this drug. It is important to study all these indications and, above all, the scientific evidence for its use, in order to provide patients with a new therapeutic option without burdening the health system. This review results from a wide selection of papers identified in the Pubmed and Lilacs scientific electronic databases. A group of descriptors were used from human immunoglobulin to the names of each disease that immunoglobulin is clinically applied. Our main objective is to list the numerous indications of immunoglobulin, both authorized and "off-label" and to analyze these indications in the light of the most recent scientific evidence.

  13. Hypermutability of a UV-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    An ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive thymidine auxotroph of Chinese hamster V79 cells that exhibits pleiotropic effects such as a high level of deoxycytidine triphosphate, slow growth, sensitivity to cytidine, and high frequencies of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine-dependent chromosomal aberrations was selected by its resistance to aphidicolin. The UV-induced mutability of this mutant and one of its revertants, which retains some of the phenotypes listed above, was studied in 3 mutation assay systems. The results showed that the mutant was hypermutable for ouabain and diphtheria-toxin-resistant mutations compared to wild-type V79 cells at the same UV dose or the same survival level. The mutant exhibits a delayed expression of maximal frequency of induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants. When maximal frequencies are compared at the same UV dose, the mutant also has higher mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The revertant was similar to the wild-type in UV sensitivity and mutability. (orig./AJ)

  14. [Multiple myeloma with D immunoglobulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchekroun, Laila; Ouzzif, Zohra; Bouabdillah, Mounya; Jaouhar, Nouzha; Aoufir, Fatiha; Aoufi, Farida; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma is a rare form of multiple myeloma and affects a young population. It is characterized by its clinical severity and poor prognosis. We report four cases of multiple myeloma immunoglobulin D diagnosed and supported in the university hospital Center of Sale and Rabat-Morocco. We propose to study the epidemiological, clinical and biological characteristics of this rare type of monoclonal gammopathy. Through the observations reported, the clinical aspect of myeloma is characterized by the high frequency of extra-bone manifestations including impaired kidney function. The immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma is mainly type λ, the IgD κ is rare, the predominance of λ light chains could be explained by rearrangements at the immunoglobulin genes. Bence-Jones proteinuria is almost constant in the multiple myeloma immunoglobulin D, it is mainly type λ, reflecting excess production of light chains by plasma cells. The marrow is invaded by plasma cells in very different proportions of up to 95%. It's a clinical entity, difficult to diagnose, particularly when low homogeneous band on electrophoresis goes unnoticed for an eye inexperienced or when immune serum anti-IgD was not used during the immunotyping.

  15. Hypermutation of the inactive X chromosome is a frequent event in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jäger, Natalie; Schlesner, Matthias; Jones, David T. W.; Raffel, Simon; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Junge, Kristin M.; Weichenhan, Dieter; Bauer, Tobias; Ishaque, Naveed; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Korshunov, Andrey; Drews, Ruben M.; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Richter, Julia; Hummel, Michael; Mack, Stephen C.; Taylor, Michael D.; Witt, Hendrik; Swartman, Benedict; Schulte-Bockholt, Dietrich; Sultan, Marc; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Lehrach, Hans; Hutter, Barbara; Brors, Benedikt; Wolf, Stephan; Plass, Christoph; Siebert, Reiner; Trumpp, Andreas; Rippe, Karsten; Lehmann, Irina; Lichter, Peter; Pfister, Stefan M.; Eils, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Mutation is a fundamental process in tumorigenesis. However, the degree to which the rate of somatic mutation varies across the human genome and the mechanistic basis underlying this variation remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we performed a cross-cancer comparison of 402 whole genomes comprising

  16. Mutator/hypermutable fetal/juvenile metakaryotic stem cells and human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohith G. Kini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates increase exponentially from maturity, reach a maximum, then decline in extreme old age. Armitage and Doll (1957 postulated that the exponential increase resulted from n mutations occurring throughout adult life in normal cells at risk that initiated the growth of a preneoplastic colony in which subsequent m mutations promoted one of the preneoplastic cells at risk to form a lethal neoplasia. We have reported cytologic evidence that these cells at risk are fetal/juvenile organogenic, then preneoplastic metakaryotic stem cells. Metakaryotic cells display stem-like behaviors of both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear divisions and peculiarities such as bell shaped nuclei and amitotic nuclear fission that distinguish them from embryonic, eukaryotic stem cells. Analyses of mutant colony sizes and numbers in adult lung epithelia supported the inferences that the metakaryotic organogenic stem cells are constitutively mutator/hypermutable and that their contributions to cancer initiation are limited to the fetal/juvenile period. We have amended the two-stage model of Armitage and Doll and incorporated these several inferences in a computer program CancerFit v.5.0. We compared the expectations of the amended model to adult (15-104 yr age-specific colon cancer rates for European American males born 1890-99 and observed remarkable concordance. When estimates of normal colonic fetal/juvenile APC and OAT gene mutation rates (~2-5 x 10-5 per stem cell doubling and preneoplastic colonic gene loss rates (~ 8 x 10-3 were applied, the model was in accordance only for the values of n = 2 and m = 4 or 5.

  17. No evidence for the use of DIR, D-D fusions, chromosome 15 open reading frames or VH replacement in the peripheral repertoire was found on application of an improved algorithm, JointML, to 6329 human immunoglobulin H rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohm-Laursen, Line; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Stine R

    2006-01-01

    Antibody diversity is created by imprecise joining of the variability (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) gene segments of the heavy and light chain loci. Analysis of rearrangements is complicated by somatic hypermutations and uncertainty concerning the sources of gene segments and the precise way...... in which they recombine. It has been suggested that D genes with irregular recombination signal sequences (DIR) and chromosome 15 open reading frames (OR15) can replace conventional D genes, that two D genes or inverted D genes may be used and that the repertoire can be further diversified by heavy chain V...

  18. Germline amino acid diversity in B cell receptors is a good predictor of somatic selection pressures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Warren Schwartz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the immune repertoire is important for the adaptive immunesystem's ability to detect pathogens. Much of this diversity is generated in twosteps, first through the recombination of germline gene segments and secondthrough hypermutation during an immune response. While both steps are to someextent based on the germline level repertoire of genes, the final structure andselection of specific receptors is at the somatic level. How germline diversityand selection relate to somatic diversity and selection has not been clear.To investigate how germline diversity relates to somatic diversityand selection, we considered the published repertoire of Ig heavy chain Vgenes taken from the blood of 12 individuals, post-vaccination againstinfluenza, sequenced by 454 high-throughput sequencing. We here show that whenwe consider individual amino acid positions in the heavy chain V gene sequence,there exists a strong correlation between the diversity of the germlinerepertoire at a position and the number of B cell clones that change amino acidat that position. At the same time, we find that the diversity of amino acidsused in the mutated positions is greater than in the germline, albeit stillcorrelated to germline diversity. From these findings, we proposethat while germline diversity and germline amino acid usage at a givenposition do not fully specify the amino acid mutant needed to promotesurvival of specific clones, germline diversity at a given position is agood indicator for the potential to survive after somatic mutation at thatposition. We would therefore suggest that germline diversity at eachspecific position is the better a priori model for the effects of somaticmutation and selection, than simply the division into complementaritydetermining and framework regions.

  19. Somatic Symptom Disorders in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical symptoms without any identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities on detailed clinical examination and investigations, are common in children. Some children may have persistent physical discomfort which can lead to debilitating impact on their academic and social functioning. These children seek repeated medical consultations and are usually subjected to unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. It is extremely important to understand that emotional factors can contribute to the development as well as maintenance of impairing physical symptoms. There is scientific evidence for the association of anxiety and functional somatic symptoms in children. The diagnostic category which was previously called somatoform disorders is now included in somatic symptom disorders. The main feature of the somatic symptom disorders is the excessive concern with somatic symptoms. Detailed clinical examination and investigations will not reveal any abnormalities to explain the symptoms. The somatic symptom disorders are common in childhood. Cognitive behavioural therapy by experts in child guidance, will relieve the somatic symptoms related to anxiety and stress. If not intervened at the earliest, the persistent physical symptoms associated with emotional stress will cause significant functional disability in childhood. Unnecessary invasive medical interventions cause more agony to the child. These children also have high risk for developing anxiety disorders and depressive disorders in young adulthood. Hence, early intervention using cognitive behavioural techniques should be provided to all children with somatic symptom disorders, which will definitely improve their quality of life.

  20. Occurrence of hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with the oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Riis, Bente; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    .4% of the CF patients. The earliest mutator P. aeruginosa isolates were found after 5 years from the onset of the chronic lung infection, and once they were present in the CF lung, the prevalence increased with time. The hypermutable isolates were significantly more resistant to antipseudomonal antibiotics......Oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is characterized by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) liberated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We formulated the hypothesis that oxidation...

  1. Somatic embryogenesis in elm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, E; Vieitez, A M; Ballester, A

    2002-05-01

    We show that isolated zygotic embryos of Ulmus minor and U. glabra can produce embryogenic cultures provided they are isolated from immature seeds before storage proteins begin to accumulate. Rates of somatic embryogenesis were highest among zygotic embryos collected 6 weeks post-anthesis when they were at the midcotyledonary stage, were about 5 mm long and had a fresh weight of approx. 10 mg. At this time, induction was even possible in Murashige and Skoog basal medium with no plant growth regulators, but addition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was necessary at earlier stages of zygotic development. In medium supplemented with benzyladenine (BA) only, no embryogenic induction was observed. The formation of callus was an essential step not only for the induction of embryogenic masses, but also for the maintenance of embryogenic competence through successive subculture of callus on induction media supplemented with 0.1 mg l(-1) BA. Nine embryogenic U. minor lines and 24 U. glabra lines have been maintained in this way for 3 years. However, conversion into plantlets has occurred only rarely.

  2. Grand Gestures: A Somatic Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Trish

    2015-01-01

    This is a 'Plain English' report on the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project 'A Somatic Ethnography of Grand Gestures Elders Dance Group'. It is written for the communities of practice around elders dance and participatory arts more generally.

  3. Somatic embryogenesis of Carica Papaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvina Lindsay Mijen; Rusli Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the somatic embryogenesis of Carica papaya. Culture medium used was1/2 strength MS basal medium supplemented with 6% sucrose, 0.27 % agar, glutamine and various concentrations of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). After 8 weeks in culture, the best concentration of 2,4-D to induce somatic embryo is at 45.2 μM. (Author)

  4. Antioxidant enzymes activities during secondary somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis was achieved from immature cotyledon explants of Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) cave. "Chandler" on DKW medium. Secondary somatic embryogenesis, the process by which adventitious embryos are formed from primary somatic embryos, is frequent during somatic embryogenesis in Persian ...

  5. Monitoring Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Şteţca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of somatic cells in milk is a widely disputed issue in milk production sector. The somatic cell counts in raw milk are a marker for the specific cow diseases such as mastitis or swollen udder. The high level of somatic cells causes physical and chemical changes to milk composition and nutritional value, and as well to milk products. Also, the mastitic milk is not proper for human consumption due to its contribution to spreading of certain diseases and food poisoning. According to these effects, EU Regulations established the maximum threshold of admitted somatic cells in raw milk to 400000 cells / mL starting with 2014. The purpose of this study was carried out in order to examine the raw milk samples provided from small farms, industrial type farms and milk processing units. There are several ways to count somatic cells in milk but the reference accepted method is the microscopic method described by the SR EN ISO 13366-1/2008. Generally samples registered values in accordance with the admissible limit. By periodical monitoring of the somatic cell count, certain technological process issues are being avoided and consumer’s health ensured.

  6. Functional Versatility of AGY Serine Codons in Immunoglobulin Variable Region Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Detanico

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In systemic autoimmunity, autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens (Ag often arise by somatic hypermutation (SHM that converts AGT and AGC (AGY Ser codons into Arg codons. This can occur by three different single-base changes. Curiously, AGY Ser codons are far more abundant in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs of IgV-region genes than expected for random codon use or from species-specific codon frequency data. CDR AGY codons are also more abundant than TCN Ser codons. We show that these trends hold even in cartilaginous fishes. Because AGC is a preferred target for SHM by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, we asked whether the AGY abundance was solely due to a selection pressure to conserve high mutability in CDRs regardless of codon context but found that this was not the case. Instead, AGY triplets were selectively enriched in the Ser codon reading frame. Motivated by reports implicating a functional role for poly/autoreactive specificities in anti-viral antibodies, we also analyzed mutations at AGY in antibodies directed against a number of different viruses, and found that mutations producing Arg codons in anti-viral antibodies were indeed frequent. Unexpectedly, however, we also found that AGY codons mutated often to encode nearly all of the amino acids that are reported to provide the most frequent contacts with antigen (Ag. In many cases, mutations producing codons for these alternative amino acids in anti-viral antibodies were more frequent than those producing Arg codons. Mutations producing each of these key amino acids required only single-base changes in AGY. AGY is the only codon group in which 2/3rds of random mutations generate codons for these key residues. Finally, by directly analyzing x-ray structures of immune complexes from the RCSB protein database, we found that Ag-contact residues generated via somatic hypermutation occurred more often at AGY than at any other codon group. Thus, preservation of

  7. SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS AND MORPHOANATOMY OF Ocotea porosa SOMATIC EMBRYOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Luiza Pelegrini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509812343Ocotea porosa seeds have strong tegument dormancy, recalcitrant behavior, low and irregular germinationand that makes its natural propagation difficult. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol ofregeneration of Ocotea porosa from somatic embryogenesis. Immature embryonic axes were inoculatedon WPM culture medium supplemented with 2.4-D (200 μM combined or not with hydrolyzed casein orglutamine (0.5 or 1 g l-1, during 90 days. The repetitive embryogenesis was induced on medium with 2.4-D(22.62 μM combined with 2-iP (2.46 μM followed by transfer to culture medium with hydrolyzed caseinor glutamine (1 g l-1 during 90 days. The maturation of somatic embryos was tested in culture mediumcontaining NAA (0.5 μM and 2-iP (5; 10 and 20 μM. The highest percentage of somatic embryos induction(8.3% was observed in WPM culture medium containing 200 μM 2.4-D and 1 g L-1 hydrolyzed casein andthe development of somatic embryos occurred indirectly. Repetitive somatic embryogenesis was promotedin WPM medium containing hydrolyzed casein or glutamine. However, the culture medium containinghydrolyzed casein promoted the maintenance of embryogenic capacity for more than two years. Duringthe maturity phase, there was a low progression of globular embryos to cordiform and torpedo stages.The different ontogenetic stages of somatic embryos of Ocotea porosa were characterized by histologicalstudies.

  8. SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS AND MORPHOANATOMY OF Ocotea porosa SOMATIC EMBRYOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Luiza Pelegrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocotea porosa seeds have strong tegument dormancy, recalcitrant behavior, low and irregular germination and that makes its natural propagation difficult. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol of regeneration of Ocotea porosa from somatic embryogenesis. Immature embryonic axes were inoculated on WPM culture medium supplemented with 2.4-D (200 μM combined or not with hydrolyzed casein or glutamine (0.5 or 1 g l-1, during 90 days. The repetitive embryogenesis was induced on medium with 2.4-D (22.62 μM combined with 2-iP (2.46 μM followed by transfer to culture medium with hydrolyzed casein or glutamine (1 g l-1 during 90 days. The maturation of somatic embryos was tested in culture medium containing NAA (0.5 μM and 2-iP (5; 10 and 20 μM. The highest percentage of somatic embryos induction (8.3% was observed in WPM culture medium containing 200 μM 2.4-D and 1 g L-1 hydrolyzed casein and the development of somatic embryos occurred indirectly. Repetitive somatic embryogenesis was promoted in WPM medium containing hydrolyzed casein or glutamine. However, the culture medium containing hydrolyzed casein promoted the maintenance of embryogenic capacity for more than two years. During the maturity phase, there was a low progression of globular embryos to cordiform and torpedo stages. The different ontogenetic stages of somatic embryos of Ocotea porosa were characterized by histological studies.

  9. The vectorial release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, M J

    1971-03-01

    A microsomal preparation from a mouse plasmacytoma, MOPC 47A, that secretes immunoglobulin A was used to study the release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides in vitro. Nascent chains were released with puromycin and characterized with specific antiserum against the immunoglobulin product of the tumour. When the tissue had been prelabelled with [(3)H]leucine the experiments were complicated by the large background of completed radioactive polypeptides in the microsomal preparation. Up to one-third of the released radioactivity in the microsomal preparation could be recognized as immunoglobulin. With [(3)H]-puromycin as the radioactive label, however, the results are much easier to interpret, although the proportion of released radioactivity that can be identified as immunoglobulin is lower (up to one-tenth). Both types of experiment demonstrate that all of the recognizable nascent immunoglobulin chains remain in association with the microsomal vesicles after release from the ribosomes.

  10. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishman, E.C.; Jewell, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/10 6 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/10 6 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG [pt

  11. Genome Analysis of a Transmissible Lineage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Pathoadaptive Mutations and Distinct Evolutionary Paths of Hypermutators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing of bacterial pathogens has advanced our understanding of their evolution, epidemiology, and response to antibiotic therapy. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of the molecular changes in in vivo evolving bacterial populations in relation to long-term, chronic...... infections. For example, it remains unclear what genes are mutated to facilitate the establishment of long-term existence in the human host environment, and in which way acquisition of a hypermutator phenotype with enhanced rates of spontaneous mutations influences the evolutionary trajectory of the pathogen...... genomes shows that the ancestral DK2 clone type spread among CF patients through several independent transmission events. Subsequent to transmission, sub-lineages evolved independently for years in separate hosts, creating a unique possibility to study parallel evolution and identification of genes...

  12. Somatically acquired structural genetic differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magaard Koldby, Kristina; Nygaard, Marianne; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    twin pairs. Furthermore, the presence of mosaic structural variants was explored. We identified four mosaic acquired uniparental disomy events on chromosome 4q and 14q in the follow-up samples from four individuals, and our study thereby supports the increasing prevalence of somatic mosaic variants...

  13. Monosymptomatic Hypochondriacal Psychosis (somatic delusional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    classified as a somatic type of delusional disorder in DSM- IV2 and is defined as an erroneous conviction of bodily ... disorder); delusions of foul body odours or halitosis or delusional bromosis (also known as olfactory ... concentrated on the trunk and the pubic region. He believed that the crawling sensation was a sign that.

  14. Deciphering the importance of the palindromic architecture of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain 3' regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintamand, Alexis; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Garot, Armand; Rouaud, Pauline; Oruc, Zeliha; Magnone, Virginie; Cogné, Michel; Denizot, Yves

    2016-02-17

    The IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR) controls class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells. The mouse 3'RR contains four enhancer elements with hs1,2 flanked by inverted repeated sequences and the centre of a 25-kb palindrome bounded by two hs3 enhancer inverted copies (hs3a and hs3b). hs4 lies downstream of the palindrome. In mammals, evolution maintained this unique palindromic arrangement, suggesting that it is functionally significant. Here we report that deconstructing the palindromic IgH 3'RR strongly affects its function even when enhancers are preserved. CSR and IgH transcription appear to be poorly dependent on the 3'RR architecture and it is more or less preserved, provided 3'RR enhancers are present. By contrast, a 'palindromic effect' significantly lowers VH germline transcription, AID recruitment and SHM. In conclusion, this work indicates that the IgH 3'RR does not simply pile up enhancer units but also optimally exposes them into a functional architecture of crucial importance.

  15. Adaptive antibody diversification through N-linked glycosylation of the immunoglobulin variable region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bovenkamp, Fleur S; Derksen, Ninotska I L; Ooijevaar-de Heer, Pleuni; van Schie, Karin A; Kruithof, Simone; Berkowska, Magdalena A; van der Schoot, C Ellen; IJspeert, Hanna; van der Burg, Mirjam; Gils, Ann; Hafkenscheid, Lise; Toes, René E M; Rombouts, Yoann; Plomp, Rosina; Wuhrer, Manfred; van Ham, S Marieke; Vidarsson, Gestur; Rispens, Theo

    2018-02-20

    A hallmark of B-cell immunity is the generation of a diverse repertoire of antibodies from a limited set of germline V(D)J genes. This repertoire is usually defined in terms of amino acid composition. However, variable domains may also acquire N -linked glycans, a process conditional on the introduction of consensus amino acid motifs ( N -glycosylation sites) during somatic hypermutation. High levels of variable domain glycans have been associated with autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, as well as certain follicular lymphomas. However, the role of these glycans in the humoral immune response remains poorly understood. Interestingly, studies have reported both positive and negative effects on antibody affinity. Our aim was to elucidate the role of variable domain glycans during antigen-specific antibody responses. By analyzing B-cell repertoires by next-generation sequencing, we demonstrate that N -glycosylation sites are introduced at positions in which glycans can affect antigen binding as a result of a specific clustering of progenitor glycosylation sites in the germline sequences of variable domain genes. By analyzing multiple human monoclonal and polyclonal (auto)antibody responses, we subsequently show that this process is subject to selection during antigen-specific antibody responses, skewed toward IgG4, and positively contributes to antigen binding. Together, these results highlight a physiological role for variable domain glycosylation as an additional layer of antibody diversification that modulates antigen binding.

  16. Antioxidant enzymes activities during secondary somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... somatic embryogenesis has been reported in many tree species and is the basis of embryo cloning ... These brown tissues frequently produce globular somatic embryos which could be removed and used ... increasing number of publications link reactive oxygen species (ROS) and somatic embryogenesis ...

  17. Detection of inflammatory lesions with radiolabelled immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden; Ogtrop, M. van; Arndt, J.W.; Camps, J.A.J.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous reports on the use of radiolabelled immunoglobulins led us to undertake a pilot experiment in an animal model to investigate the potentials sodium pertechnate Tc 99m-immunoglobulin scintigraphy in the detection of infectious foci. Mice infected in one leg with staphylococcus infection in were injected with sodium pertechnote Tc 99m-immunoglobulin, albumin aggregated technetium Tc 99m or gallium citrate Ga 67. The results obtained by scintigraphy suggested a specific accumulation of radiolabelled immunoglobulin at the site of infection. Visualization of the infection and the image quality, especially the 6- and 24-h images, were clearly enhanced after the use of immunoglobulin preparations as compared with those labelled with gallium. (orig.)

  18. Cognitive-affective neuroscience of somatization disorder and functional somatic syndromes: reconceptualizing the triad of depression-anxiety-somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Muller, Jacqueline

    2008-05-01

    Somatization disorder is a somatoform disorder that overlaps with a number of functional somatic syndromes and has high comorbidity with major depression and anxiety disorders. Proposals have been made for revising the category of somatoform disorders, for simplifying the criteria for somatization disorder, and for emphasizing the unitary nature of the functional somatic syndromes in future classifications. A review of the cognitive-affective neuroscience of somatization disorder and related conditions suggests that overlapping psychobiological mechanisms mediate depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms. Particular genes and environments may contribute to determining whether symptoms are predominantly depressive, anxious, or somatic, and there are perhaps also overlaps and distinctions in the distal evolutionary mechanisms that produce these symptoms.

  19. Alternative Affinity Ligands for Immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruljec, Nika; Bratkovič, Tomaž

    2017-08-16

    The demand for recombinant therapeutic antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins is expected to increase in the years to come. Hence, extensive efforts are concentrated on improving the downstream processing. In particular, the development of better-affinity chromatography matrices, supporting robust time- and cost-effective antibody purification, is warranted. With the advances in molecular design and high-throughput screening approaches from chemical and biological combinatorial libraries, novel affinity ligands representing alternatives to bacterial immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding proteins have entered the scene. Here, we review the design, development, and properties of diverse classes of alternative antibody-binding ligands, ranging from engineered versions of Ig-binding proteins, to artificial binding proteins, peptides, aptamers, and synthetic small-molecular-weight compounds. We also provide examples of applications for the novel affinity matrices in chromatography and beyond.

  20. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  1. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Jianhua; Shao, Yiming; Qiao, Wentao; Liu, Xinqi

    2013-01-01

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process

  2. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jianhua [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Shao, Yiming [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, and National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Qiao, Wentao, E-mail: wentaoqiao@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Xinqi, E-mail: liu2008@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  3. Labelling of immunoglobulins with metal radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budsky, F.; Prokop, J.; Hradil, M.

    1989-01-01

    The general principles are briefly described of labelling immunoglobulins with metal radionuclides. Bicyclic anhydrides cDTPAA and cEDTAA were selected for experiments by the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez near Prague. The compounds show sufficient reactivity to immunoglobulins and can be stored in an evacuated dessicator with calcium chloride at laboratory temperature for an unlimited time. The procedure is described of the preparation of the two anhydrides and of their labelling with 111 In and 99m Tc. For both radionuclides, favourable results have been obtained in labelling immunoglobulins, which creates preconditions for the introduction of immunoscintigraphy in Czechoslovak nuclear medicine. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 13 refs

  4. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriaroon, Panida; Ballow, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been standard treatment in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases for the past 3 decades. The goal of therapy is to reduce serious bacterial infections in individuals with antibody function defects. Approximately one-third of patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment experience adverse reactions. Recent advances in manufacturing processes have resulted in products that are safer and better tolerated. Self-infusion by the subcutaneous route has become popular and resulted in better quality of life. This review summarizes the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency diseases including its properties, dosing, adverse effects, and different routes of administration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    The pan-European survey provides useful information on the accessibility and trends of intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IVIg/SCIg) therapy, which is used to treat primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Although immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the first-line treatment for PIDs, the mechanisms of action of Ig therapy may differ according to the condition it is used to treat. Moreover, intriguing presentations suggest that further investigation is required to understand more clearly both the haematological and immunoregulatory effects of therapeutic immunoglobulin. This can ultimately provide more information on optimizing Ig therapy efficacy, and establish whether individualized dosing regimens for patients will be conducive to better clinical outcomes. In addition to treating autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, there is evidence to suggest that immunoglobulins can potentially play a role in transplantation, which warrants further investigation for future use. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B.; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. This review was first published in 2002 and has since

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftimov, Filip; Winer, John B.; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) causes progressive or relapsing weakness and numbness of the limbs, developing over at least two months. Uncontrolled studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) helps. Objectives To review systematically the

  8. Somatic symptom profiles in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Jørgensen, Torben; Schröder, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify and describe somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population in order to enable further epidemiological research within multiple somatic symptoms. METHODS: Information on 19 self-reported common somatic symptoms was achieved from a population....... The profiles were further described by their association with age, sex, chronic disease, and self-perceived health. RESULTS: We identified 10 different somatic symptom profiles defined by number, type, and site of the symptoms. The majority of the population (74.0%) had a profile characterized......, and self-perceived health. CONCLUSION: The identified somatic symptom profiles could be distinguished by number, type, and site of the symptoms. The profiles have the potential to be used in further epidemiological studies on risk factors and prognosis of somatic symptoms but should be confirmed in other...

  9. Immunoglobulin profile of Nigerian children with Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The immunoglobulin profiles of 126 Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum in their peripheral blood were investigated. The mean malarial parasitaemia was 4699.17 ± 3695.2 ìl. The mean immunoglobulin profile of these infected children were 2.68 ± 0.019 mg/dl for IgA, 0.031 ± 0.01 mg/dl for IgD, 1358.29 ...

  10. Conservation and divergence of immunoglobulin VH pseudogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, J B; Givol, D

    1983-01-01

    The 12 immunoglobulin VH pseudogenes, that have been characterized to date, differ from most pseudogenes of other multigene families in two aspects: (i) they carry only one (11 cases) or at the most two (1 case) deleterious mutations and (ii) they show no evidence of increased divergence from intact VH genes. We describe here the first immunoglobulin VH pseudogene that does not have these characteristics. This pseudogene accumulated numerous deleterious mutations and diverged considerably fro...

  11. Personality characteristics in patients with somatized disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Anatolyevna Tolkach

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study personality characteristics, behavioral style, and modes of relations with their people in patients with somatized disorder. Subjects and methods. Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having somatized disorder were examined using Leary's interpersonal diagnosis system. Results. The author revealed the following personality characteristics and behavioral styles: a depressed need for authoritarianism, dominance, autonomy, aggressiveness, a display of qualities, such as superfriendliness, benevolence, submissiveness, dependency, and suspiciousness. These characteristics give an insight into the development of somatization in patients with somatized disorder.

  12. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Maurer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of autoimmunity mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE autoantibodies, which may be termed autoallergy, is in its infancy. It is now recognized that systemic lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid (BP, and chronic urticaria, both spontaneous and inducible, are most likely to be mediated, at least in part, by IgE autoantibodies. The situation in other conditions, such as autoimmune uveitis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroid Graves’ disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, and even asthma, is far less clear but evidence for autoallergy is accumulating. To be certain of an autoallergic mechanism, it is necessary to identify both IgE autoantibodies and their targets as has been done with the transmembrane protein BP180 and the intracellular protein BP230 in BP and IL-24 in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Also, IgE-targeted therapies, such as anti-IgE, must have been shown to be of benefit to patients as has been done with both of these conditions. This comprehensive review of the literature on IgE-mediated autoallergy focuses on three related questions. What do we know about the prevalence of IgE autoantibodies and their targets in different diseases? What do we know about the relevance of IgE autoantibodies in different diseases? What do we know about the cellular and molecular effects of IgE autoantibodies? In addition to providing answers to these questions, based on a broad review of the literature, we outline the current gaps of knowledge in our understanding of IgE autoantibodies and describe approaches to address them.

  13. Cow's milk with active immunoglobulins against Campylobacter jejuni: effects of temperature on immunoglobulin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; Alvarez, Alejandro; Espi, Alberto; Prieto, Miguel; de la Roza, Begoña; Vicente, Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Adult Holstein cows were injected with an antiserum against Campylobacter jejuni and immunoglobulin activities in vitro were determined in blood and milk several weeks after injection. The immunoactivity of immunoglobulins in milk was measured by an ELISA after different temperature-time treatments (60-91°C and 4-3600 s) at laboratory and pilot-plant scales. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were determined. An increase in immunoglobulin activity in milk was detected several days after injection. Optical densities increased by three- to seven-fold in this period. The activity started to decay 4-5 weeks after injection. Immunoglobulins maintained most of their in vitro activity under pasteurisation conditions (72°C and 15 s) and were denatured following first-order kinetics. The injection protocol applied allows milk with specific immunoglobulins against Campylobacter jejuni to be obtained. Traditional pasteurisation did not reduce this activity. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Sulphur depletion altered somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis is a useful tool for Theobroma cacao improvement and propagation. Depending on culture medium composition, different morphogenetic structures (including somatic embryo) occur in response to alteration of genes expression patterns and biochemical changes. The effect of SO42- ion deficiency ...

  15. The social evolution of somatic fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Debets, A.J.M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    The widespread potential for somatic fusion among different conspecific multicellular individuals suggests that such fusion is adaptive. However, because recognition of non-kin (allorecognition) usually leads to a rejection response, successful somatic fusion is limited to close kin. This is

  16. Direct somatic embryogenesis in Swietenia macrophylla King

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Collado

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Swietenia macrophylla King is difficult to be propagated by tissue culture and there is not an efficient system via organogenesis, due to problems of microbial contamination, phenolic oxidation and death of tissue in the phase of in vitro establishment of explants. In order to establish a protocol for obtaining somatic embryos, zygotic embryos were used as initial plant material. Three combinations of 2,4-D with kinetin were studied, to obtain the formation of somatic embryos. After six weeks of culture, the number of explants with high and low somatic embryogenesis frequency were determined. So that the somatic embryos in globular stage reach the final stages of torpedo and cotyledonal, these were placed in three treatments with 6-BAP (0.2, 0.4 y 0.6 mg.l-1. The number of somatic embryos that reached the torpedo and cotyledonal stages were evaluated after 30 days of culture. Results demonstrated that direct somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic embryos is obtained in the culture medium composed by MS salts with 4.0 mg.l-1 of 2,4-D and 1.0 mg.l-1 of kinetin. Higher percentage of somatic embryos in cotiledonal stage (91.7 %, was obtained with 0.4 mg.l-1 of 6-BAP. Key word: forestry, growth regulator, mahogany, somatic embryo, tissue culture

  17. Mediators between bereavement and somatic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konkolÿ Thege Barna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our research we examined the frequency of somatic symptoms among bereaved (N = 185 and non-bereaved men and women in a national representative sample (N = 4041 and investigated the possible mediating factors between bereavement status and somatic symptoms. Methods Somatic symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15, anxiety with a four-point anxiety rating scale, and depression with a nine-item shortened version of the Beck Depression Inventory. Results Among the bereaved, somatic symptoms proved to be significantly more frequent in both genders when compared to the non-bereaved, as did anxiety and depression. On the multivariate level, the results show that both anxiety and depression proved to be a mediator between somatic symptoms and bereavement. The effect sizes indicated that for both genders, anxiety was a stronger predictor of somatic symptoms than depression. Conclusions The results of our research indicate that somatic symptoms accompanying bereavement are not direct consequences of this state but they can be traced back to the associated anxiety and depression. These results draw attention to the need to recognize anxiety and depression looming in the background of somatic complaints in bereavement and to the importance of the dissemination of related information.

  18. Chitinases and arabinogalactan proteins in somatic embryogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengel, van A.J.

    1998-01-01

    In vitro cultured carrot suspension cells can function as starting material for the generation of somatic embryos. Compounds secreted by suspension cells can influence the process of somatic embryogenesis. One class of such compounds, the secreted EP3 endochitinases,

  19. Optimization of somatic embryogenesis procedure for commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... The first objective of this study was to assess and optimize somatic embryo production in a genetically diverse range of cacao genotypes. The primary and secondary somatic embryogenesis response of eight promising cacao clones and a positive control was evaluated using modified versions of standard.

  20. Optimization of somatic embryogenesis procedure for commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first objective of this study was to assess and optimize somatic embryo production in a genetically diverse range of cacao genotypes. The primary and secondary somatic embryogenesis response of eight promising cacao clones and a positive control was evaluated using modified versions of standard protocols.

  1. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of ciprofloxacin concentration on the frequency and nature of resistant mutants selected from Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutS and mutT hypermutators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morero, Natalia R; Monti, Mariela R; Argaraña, Carlos E

    2011-08-01

    The rapid emergence of drug resistance upon treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections with fluoroquinolones is a serious concern. In this study, we report the effect of hypermutability on the mutant selection window for ciprofloxacin (CIP) by comparing the hypermutator MPAO1 mutS and mutT strains with the wild-type strain. The mutant selection window was shifted to higher CIP concentrations for both hypermutators, presenting the mutS strain with a broader selection window in comparison to the wild-type strain. The mutation prevention concentrations (MPC) determined for mutT and mutS strains were increased 2- and 4-fold over the wild-type level, respectively. In addition, we analyzed the molecular bases for resistance in the bacterial subpopulations selected at different points in the window. At the top of the window, the resistant clones isolated were mainly mutated in GyrA and ParC topoisomerase subunits, while at the bottom of the window, resistance was associated with the overexpression of MexCD-OprJ and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps. Accordingly, a greater proportion of multidrug-resistant clones were found among the subpopulations isolated at the lower CIP concentrations. Furthermore, we found that the exposure to CIP subinhibitory concentrations favors the accumulation of cells overexpressing MexCD-OprJ (due to mutations in the transcriptional repressor NfxB) and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps. We discuss these results in the context of the possible participation of this antibiotic in a mutagenic process.

  3. A novel Bayesian method for detection of APOBEC3-mediated hypermutation and its application to zoonotic transmission of simian foamy viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A Matsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Simian Foamy Virus (SFV can be transmitted from non-human primates (NHP to humans. However, there are no documented cases of human to human transmission, and significant differences exist between infection in NHP and human hosts. The mechanism for these between-host differences is not completely understood. In this paper we develop a new Bayesian approach to the detection of APOBEC3-mediated hypermutation, and use it to compare SFV sequences from human and NHP hosts living in close proximity in Bangladesh. We find that human APOBEC3G can induce genetic changes that may prevent SFV replication in infected humans in vivo.

  4. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in colostrum and milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide...... a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases......, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes...

  5. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  6. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta...

  7. Place du dosage des immunoglobulines e totales en pratique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots clés: Immunoglobulines E, allergie, Togo. English Abstract. Place of total immunoglobulin E dosage in common practice in Togo. Objective: to determine the place of total immunoglobulin E (IgE) dosage in common practice in Togo. Material and methods: 650 total IgE dosages performed during 4 years (2008 to 2011) ...

  8. Gravity separation of fat, somatic cells, and bacteria in raw and pasteurized milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Z; Melilli, C; Barbano, D M

    2013-04-01

    The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the extent of gravity separation of milk fat, bacteria, and somatic cells is influenced by the time and temperature of gravity separation or the level of contaminating bacteria present in the raw milk. The objective of experiment 2 was to determine if different temperatures of milk heat treatment affected the gravity separation of milk fat, bacteria, and somatic cells. In raw milk, fat, bacteria, and somatic cells rose to the top of columns during gravity separation. About 50 to 80% of the fat and bacteria were present in the top 8% of the milk after gravity separation of raw milk. Gravity separation for 7h at 12°C or for 22h at 4°C produced equivalent separation of fat, bacteria, and somatic cells. The completeness of gravity separation of fat was influenced by the level of bacteria in the milk before separation. Milk with a high bacterial count had less (about 50 to 55%) gravity separation of fat than milk with low bacteria count (about 80%) in 22h at 4°C. Gravity separation caused fat, bacteria, and somatic cells to rise to the top of columns for raw whole milk and high temperature, short-time pasteurized (72.6°C, 25s) whole milk. Pasteurization at ≥76.9°C for 25s prevented all 3 components from rising, possibly due to denaturation of native bovine immunoglobulins that normally associate with fat, bacteria, and somatic cells during gravity separation. Gravity separation can be used to produce reduced-fat milk with decreased bacterial and somatic cell counts, and may be a critical factor in the history of safe and unique traditional Italian hard cheeses produced from gravity-separated raw milk. A better understanding of the mechanism of this natural process could lead to the development of new nonthermal thermal technology (that does not involve heating the milk to high temperatures) to remove bacteria and spores from milk or other liquids. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  9. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for secondary recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Larsen, E C; Egerup, P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether infusions with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) during early pregnancy increase live birth rate in women with secondary recurrent miscarriage compared with placebo. DESIGN: A single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING: A tertiary...

  10. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Zhao, Y.; Šinkora, Marek; Wertz, N.; Kacskovics, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2009), s. 321-333 ISSN 0145-305X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/07/0088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : swine * immunoglobulin * b cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.290, year: 2009

  11. Immunoglobulin for necrotising soft tissue infections (INSTINCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Martin Bruun; Lange, Theis; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Necrotising soft tissue infections (NSTI) are aggressive infections that can result in severe disability or death. Intravenous polyspecific immunoglobulin G (IVIG) is used as supplementary treatment for patients with NSTIs. The level of evidence is very low, but suggests that IVIG may...

  12. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Cruz, E.; Kaveri, S. V.; Peter, H.-H.; Durandy, A.; Cantoni, N.; Quinti, I.; Sorensen, R.; Bussel, J. B.; Danieli, M. G.; Winkelmann, A.; Bayry, J.; Käsermann, F.; Späth, P.; Helbert, M.; Salama, A.; van Schaik, I. N.; Yuki, N.

    2009-01-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on

  13. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: Poster presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Cruz, E.; Kaveri, S.V.; Peter, H.H.; Durandy, A.; Cantoni, N.; Quinti, I.; Sorensen, R.; Bussel, J.B.; Danieli, M.G.; Winkelmann, A.; Bayry, J.; Kaesermann, F.; Spaeth, P.; Helbert, M.; Salama, A.; van Schaik, I.N.; Yuki, N.

    2009-01-01

    P>The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on

  14. Intravenous immunoglobulin prophylaxis in neonates on artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of the prophylactic use of intravenous immunoglobulin (Ig) was evaluated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 21 pairs of ventilated neonates weighing more than 1 500 g, Each infant received 0.4 g/kglday of intravenous Ig or a similar volume of placebo daily for 5 days. Criteria used to assess the ...

  15. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) What's in this article? What It Is Why It's Done Preparation The Procedure What to Expect Getting the Results Risks Helping Your Child If You Have Questions Print en español Análisis de sangre: inmunoglobulina A (IgA) What It Is An IgA ...

  16. Immunoglobulins and their fragments on solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, J.A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Summary

    Adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a common step in the production of immunological tests and biosensors. The use of IgG in these applications stems from its ability to specifically bind all kinds of molecules (antigens). In these tests the IgG

  17. Killer immunoglobulin receptor genes in spondyloarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Taco W.; Vendelbosch, Sanne; van den Berg, Merlijn; Baeten, Dominique L. P.

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the role of killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) interactions with the human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-B27 ligand and the potential contribution of KIR-expressing natural killer and T cells in spondyloarthritis, more specifically in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In AS strong

  18. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Conlon, Niall; Petermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    and diverse medical needs that treatments for SID management should strive to meet. In this special report, we study the opportunities provided by facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration (fSCIg) to treat patients for whom the conventional routes (intravenous and subcutaneous) are sub...

  19. Pilates, Mindfulness and Somatic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Karen; Adams, Marianne; Quin, Rebecca; Harrison, Mandy; Greeson, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    The Pilates Method is a form of somatic education with the potential to cultivate mindfulness - a mental quality associated with overall well-being. However, controlled studies are needed to determine whether changes in mindfulness are specific to the Pilates Method or also result from other forms of exercise. This quasi-experimental study compared Pilates Method mat classes and recreational exercise classes on measures of mindfulness and well-being at the beginning, middle and end of a 15 week semester. Total mindfulness scores increased overall for the Pilates Method group but not for the exercise control group, and these increases were directly related to end of semester ratings of self-regulatory self-efficacy, perceived stress and mood. Findings suggest that the Pilates Method specifically enhances mindfulness, and these increases are associated with other measures of wellness. The changes in mindfulness identified in this study support the role of the Pilates Method in the mental well-being of its practitioners and its potential to support dancers' overall well-being.

  20. symptomatology and comorbidity of somatization disorder amongst

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    consenting patient were screened for somatization using a validated structured questionnaire administered by the attending physicians and research assistants. Consecutive individuals who satisfied the screening criteria were then administered the diagnostic tool; however respondents who satisfied the initial screening.

  1. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara R. Litwin; Megan A. Clarke; Michael Dean; Nicolas Wentzensen

    2017-01-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability ...

  2. Biological phenotypes underpin the physio-somatic symptoms of somatization, depression, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G; Berk, M; Maes, M

    2014-02-01

    Somatization is a symptom cluster characterized by 'psychosomatic' symptoms, that is, medically unexplained symptoms, and is a common component of other conditions, including depression and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). This article reviews the data regarding the pathophysiological foundations of 'psychosomatic' symptoms and the implications that this has for conceptualization of what may more appropriately be termed physio-somatic symptoms. This narrative review used papers published in PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar electronic databases using the keywords: depression and chronic fatigue, depression and somatization, somatization and chronic fatigue syndrome, each combined with inflammation, inflammatory, tryptophan, and cell-mediated immune (CMI). The physio-somatic symptoms of depression, ME/CFS, and somatization are associated with specific biomarkers of inflammation and CMI activation, which are correlated with, and causally linked to, changes in the tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway. Oxidative and nitrosative stress induces damage that increases neoepitopes and autoimmunity that contribute to the immuno-inflammatory processes. These pathways are all known to cause physio-somatic symptoms, including fatigue, malaise, autonomic symptoms, hyperalgesia, intestinal hypermotility, peripheral neuropathy, etc. Biological underpinnings, such as immune-inflammatory pathways, may explain, at least in part, the occurrence of physio-somatic symptoms in depression, somatization, or myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and thus the clinical overlap among these disorders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The use of somatic embryogenesis for plant propagation in cassava

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raemakers, K.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.

    2000-01-01

    In cassava, somatic embryogenesis starts with the culture of leaf explants on solid Murashige and Skoog-based medium supplemented with auxins. Mature somatic embryos are formed within 6 wk. The cotyledons of the primary somatic embryos are used as explants for a new cycle of somatic embryogenesis.

  4. Dance and Somatic Inquiry in Studios and Community Dance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Martha Hart

    2002-01-01

    Addresses pragmatic aspects of somatics in the public sector, investigating the fit of somatics within various institutions and settings, including universities, professional schools, and community programs. The article explores issues such as somatic movement approaches, certification, academic degrees in somatic study, confusions within the…

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulins prevent the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in experimentally induced sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Figen; Senturk, Evren; Ozcan, Perihan E; Ahishali, Bulent; Arican, Nadir; Orhan, Nurcan; Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Kucuk, Mutlu; Kaya, Mehmet

    2012-04-01

    The effects of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulins enriched with immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M on blood-brain barrier integrity and survival rates in septic rats were comparatively investigated. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and perforation in Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were divided into the following groups: Sham, cecal ligation and perforation, cecal ligation and perforation plus immunoglobulin G (250 mg/kg, intravenous), and cecal ligation and perforation plus immunoglobulins enriched with immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M (250 mg/kg, intravenous). Immunoglobulins were administered 5 mins before cecal ligation and perforation and the animals were observed for behavioral changes for 24 hrs following cecal ligation and perforation. Blood-brain barrier permeability was functionally and structurally evaluated by determining the extravasation of Evans Blue and horseradish peroxidase tracers, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting for occludin were performed. The high mortality rate (34%) noted in the septic rats was decreased to 15% and 3% by immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulins enriched with immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M, respectively (p immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulins enriched with immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M alleviated the symptoms of sickness behavior in the septic rats, with the animals becoming healthy and active. Increased extravasation of Evans Blue into the brain tissue of the septic rats was markedly decreased with the administration of both immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulins enriched with immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M (p immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulins enriched with immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M treatment, no ultrastructural evidence of leaky capillaries in the brain was observed in the septic rats, indicating the blockade of the transcellular pathway by immunoglobulins administration. Our study suggests that immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulins enriched with

  6. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  7. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulins: A Promising Alternative for Immunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ramon, Silvia; Corbi, Angel L; Fidalgo, Agueda Garcia; Dominguez-Soto, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative recent evidence from clinical trials, observational studies and case reports has shown that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulin (SCIg) exerts similar immunomodulatory capacity than intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in autoimmune neurological diseases. Besides the beneficial clinical effects, the profile of safety and autonomy for the patient is higher for SCIg, while it is cost-saving in terms of the health resources used. However, there are still very few approved indications for SCIg and a certain resistance to choose SCIg for other autoimmune conditions even despite patients' interests. Here we present an updated review of the known immunomodulatory mechanisms of action of Ig and the current hypothesis supporting the clinical and immunological advantages of SCIg over IVIg that derive from their specific pharmacokinetic features. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. [Use of intravenous immunoglobulins in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duse, M; Plebani, A; Crispino, P; Ugazio, A G

    1991-01-01

    Intramuscular Immunoglobulin (IMIG) have been used for 40 years in substitution therapy for antibody deficiencies and as prophylaxis for and treatment of several infectious diseases. Modified and intact intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIG) have now been available for more than 10 years: only the intact product express full Fc- mediated functions with a biological half-life of IgG (3-4 weeks). These preparations have constituted an important achievement in the treatment of humoral immunodeficiencies also resulting in a dramatic improvement of the prognosis. The use of IVIG has also modified the therapeutic approach to several secondary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Treatment with IVIG for immune modulation in several diseases is investigated: substantial data indicate a useful role in selected cases of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, Kawasaky disease and in some neurologic diseases. IVIG are substantially safe and severe side effects have been rarely reported.

  9. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for refractory recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Fresno, M Rosa; Peralta, Julio E; Granados, Miguel Ángel; Enríquez, Eugenia; Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; de Inocencio, Jaime

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a troublesome complication of idiopathic acute pericarditis and occurs more frequently in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery (postpericardiotomy syndrome). Conventional treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and colchicine is not always effective or may cause serious adverse effects. There is no consensus, however, on how to proceed in those patients whose disease is refractory to conventional therapy. In such cases, human intravenous immunoglobulin, immunosuppressive drugs, and biological agents have been used. In this report we describe 2 patients with refractory recurrent pericarditis after cardiac surgery who were successfully treated with 3 and 5 monthly high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin until resolution of the effusion. Our experience supports the effectiveness and safety of this therapy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Deep Sequencing of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Baseline Drug Resistance Showed No Indications for Hidden Resistance and Is Biased by Strong Interference of Hypermutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Kenny; Staelens, Delfien; Vancoillie, Leen; Mortier, Virginie; Verhofstede, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Deep sequencing of plasma RNA or proviral DNA may be an interesting alternative to population sequencing for the detection of baseline transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance. Using a Roche 454 GS Junior HIV-1 prototype kit, we performed deep sequencing of the HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase genes on paired plasma and buffy coat samples from newly diagnosed HIV-1-positive individuals. Selection was based on the outcome of population sequencing and included 12 patients with either a revertant amino acid at codon 215 of the reverse transcriptase or a singleton resistance mutation, 4 patients with multiple resistance mutations, and 4 patients with wild-type virus. Deep sequencing of RNA and DNA detected 6 and 43 mutations, respectively, that were not identified by population sequencing. A subsequently performed hypermutation analysis, however, revealed hypermutation in 61.19% of 3,188 DNA reads with a resistance mutation. The removal of hypermutated reads dropped the number of additional mutations in DNA from 43 to 17. No hypermutation evidence was found in the RNA reads. Five of the 6 additional RNA mutations and all additional DNA mutations, after full exclusion of hypermutation bias, were observed in the 3 individuals with multiple resistance mutations detected by population sequencing. Despite focused selection of patients with T215 revertants or singleton mutations, deep sequencing failed to identify the resistant T215Y/F or M184V or any other resistance mutation, indicating that in most of these cases there is no hidden resistance and that the virus detected at diagnosis by population sequencing is the original infecting variant. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Rubella antibodies in Australian immunoglobulin products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Megan K; Bertolini, Joseph; Kotharu, Pushpa; Maher, Darryl; Cripps, Allan W

    2017-08-03

    Rubella antibodies are not routinely measured in immunoglobulin products and there is a lack of information on the titer in Australian products. To facilitate future studies of the effectiveness of passive immunisation for preventing rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, this study measured the concentration of rubella-specific antibodies in Australian intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) human immunoglobulin products suitable for post-exposure prophylaxis using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. The GMT ± GSD for the IM product was 19 ± 1.2 IU/mg (2980 ± 1.2 IU/mL). The GMT ± GSD for the IV product was 12 ± 1.5 IU/mg (729 ± 1.5 IU/mL). At present, Australian guidelines recommend offering non-immune pregnant women exposed to rubella 20 mL of intramuscular immunoglobulin within 72 hours of exposure. This equates to 42,160 IU of rubella antibodies if the lowest titer obtained for the Australian IM product is considered. The same dose would be delivered by 176 mL of the Australian IV product at the lowest measured rubella-specific antibody titer.

  12. Cryopreservation of Arachis pintoi (leguminosae) somatic embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, H Y; Faloci, M; Medina, R; Dolce, N; Engelmann, F; Mroginski, L

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we successfully cryopreserved cotyledonary somatic embryos of diploid and triploid Arachis pintoi cytotypes using the encapsulation-dehydration technique. The highest survival rates were obtained when somatic embryos were encapsulated in calcium alginate beads and precultured in agitated (80 rpm) liquid establishment medium (EM) with daily increasing sucrose concentration (0.50, 0.75, and 1.0 M). The encapsulated somatic embryos were then dehydrated with silica gel for 5 h to 20% moisture content (fresh weight basis) and cooled either rapidly (direct immersion in liquid nitrogen, LN) or slowly (1 degree C per min from 25 degree C to -30 degree C followed by immersion in LN). Beads were kept in LN for a minimum of 1 h and then were rapidly rewarmed in a 30 degree C water-bath for 2 min. Finally, encapsulated somatic embryos were post-cultured in agitated (80 rpm) liquid EM with daily decreasing sucrose concentration (0.75 and 0.5 M) and transferred to solidified EM. Using this protocol, we obtained 26% and 30% plant regeneration from cryopreserved somatic embryos of diploid and triploid cytotypes. No morphological abnormalities were observed in any of the plants regenerated from cryopreserved embryos and their genetic stability was confirmed with 10 isozyme systems and nine RAPD profiles.

  13. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Clarke, Megan A; Dean, Michael; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-08-03

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha ( PIK3CA ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ), human leukocyte antigen A and B ( HLA-A and HLA-B ) -A/B , and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 ( TP53 ) and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 ( RB1 ) tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  14. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R. Litwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, human leukocyte antigen A and B (HLA-A and HLA-B-A/B, and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 (TP53 and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 (RB1 tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  15. The use of somatic embryogenesis for plant propagation in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raemakers, K; Jacobsen, E; Visser, R

    2000-03-01

    In cassava, somatic embryogenesis starts with the culture of leaf explants on solid Murashige and Skoog-based medium supplemented with auxins. Mature somatic embryos are formed within 6 wk. The cotyledons of the primary somatic embryos are used as explants for a new cycle of somatic embryogenesis. The cotyledons undergo secondary somatic embryogenesis on both liquid and solid Murashige and Skoog-based medium supplemented with auxins. Depending on the auxin, new somatic embryos are formed after 14-30 d after which they can be used for a new cycle of somatic embryogenesis. In liquid medium, more than 20 secondary somatic embryos are formed per initial cultured embryo. In both primary and secondary somatic embryogenesis, the somatic embryos originate directly from the explants. Transfer of clumps of somatic embryos to a Gresshoff and Doy-based medium supplemented with auxins results in indirect somatic embryogenesis. The direct form of somatic embryogenesis has a high potential for use in plant propagation, whereas the indirect has a high potential for use in genetic modification of cassava. Mature somatic embryos germinate into plants after desiccation and culture on a Murashige and Skoog-based medium supplemented with benzylaminopurine (BA). Depending on the used BA concentration, plants can either be transferred either directly to the greenhouse or after using standard multiplication protocols.

  16. Cellular Mechanisms of Somatic Stem Cell Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yunjoon

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity rely on rare populations of somatic stem cells endowed with the potential to self-renew and differentiate. During aging, many tissues show a decline in regenerative potential coupled with a loss of stem cell function. Cells including somatic stem cells have evolved a series of checks and balances to sense and repair cellular damage to maximize tissue function. However, during aging the mechanisms that protect normal cell function begin to fail. In this review, we will discuss how common cellular mechanisms that maintain tissue fidelity and organismal lifespan impact somatic stem cell function. We will highlight context-dependent changes and commonalities that define aging, by focusing on three age-sensitive stem cell compartments: blood, neural, and muscle. Understanding the interaction between extrinsic regulators and intrinsic effectors that operate within different stem cell compartments is likely to have important implications for identifying strategies to improve health span and treat age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24439814

  17. Analysis of Ig gene hypermutation in Ung(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice suggests that UNG and A:T mutagenesis pathway target different U:G lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyin; Zhao, Yaofeng; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2013-03-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ig gene hypermutation by converting cytosine to uracil (U) and generating a U:G lesion. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the AID-triggered U:G lesions are processed by three mutagenic pathways to induce mutations at both C:G and A:T pairs. First, direct replication of the U:G lesion leads to C to T and G to A transitions. Second, U can be excised by the uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) and the replication/processing of the resulting abasic site leads to transversions and transitions at C:G pairs. Third, the U:G lesion is recognized by an atypical mismatch repair (MMR) pathway which generates mutations at A:T pairs in a DNA polymerase η (POLH)-dependent manner. To further explore whether these three mutagenic pathways function competitively or independently, we have analyzed Ig gene hypermutation in mice deficient in both UNG and POLH. Compared with WT mice, UNG deficiency caused elevated frequency of C:G mutations, suggesting that UNG-mediated U excision led to error-free as well as error-prone repair. In contrast, UNG deficiency did not affect the frequency and patterns of A:T mutations, suggesting that the MMR did not target U:G lesions normally recognized and processed by UNG. In addition, POLH deficiency did not affect the frequency and patterns of C:G mutations and UNG POLH double deficiency showed an additive effect of single deficiency. Based on these observations and previous results, along with the recent finding that UNG excises AID-triggered U predominantly during G1 phase of the cell cycle, it appears that UNG and MMR targets U:G lesions generated during G1 and S phases of the cell cycle, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  19. The Nuts and Bolts of Immunoglobulin Treatment for Antibody Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Richard L

    Immunoglobulin therapy is a key element in the management of most patients with primary immunodeficiency disease. Allergist/immunologists should be familiar with the appropriate evaluation of candidates for immunoglobulin, the characteristics of immunoglobulin products, and how to use them to provide the best care to their patients. Available immunoglobulin products appear to be equally efficacious, but they are not interchangeable. Minimizing the risk of serious adverse events and controlling minor side effects is important to ideal patient care. Immunoglobulin may be administered intravenously or subcutaneously. Individualizing the choice of immunoglobulin product, mode of administration, and site of care can optimize the clinical outcome and minimize the burden of care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum immunoglobulins during and after postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, A.H.; Stoeck, R.

    1982-01-01

    In 115 operated patients with breast cancer of the TNM-B stages 1-3 the levels of immunoglobulins A, G and M were determined before and after radiotherapy. The results show that radiotherapy does not bring about significant change of the levels of immunoglobulins. Therefore the determination of the immunoglobulins is not suitable both for prognostic statements and as indicator of immunologic changes during radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Somatic Symptoms in Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Brittany B.; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B.; Truax, Tatyana V.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the…

  4. Somatic And Behavioral Changes Associated With Difuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The effects of diffuse transcranial electrical stimulation on somatic and behavioral changes in anaesthetized and unanaesthetized normal male and female Wister rats was studied. Method: Diffuse transcranial electrical stimulation (0-25v, frequency 90Hz,pulse width 1ms) was administered via two electrodes clipped ...

  5. Efficient plant regeneration through somatic embryogenesis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... sugarcane is decreasing due to a number of external environmental factors. Today, innovative cellular and molecular approaches like genetic transformation are based on efficient plant regeneration through somatic embryogenesis from calluses. In this regard, in vitro plant regeneration of sugarcane is the ...

  6. Writing Bodies: Somatic Mind in Composition Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Kristie S.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the somatic mind, a permeable materiality in which mind and body resolve into a single entity which is (re)formed by the constantly shifting boundaries of discursive and corporeal intertextualities. Addresses its importance in composition studies. Critiques the poststructuralist disregard of corporeality. (CR)

  7. Symptomatology and comorbidity of somatization disorder amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Individuals with somatization may be the most difficult to manage because of the diverse and frequent complaints across many organ systems. They often use impressionistic language to describe circumstantial symptoms which though bizarre, may resemble genuine diseases. The disorder is best understood ...

  8. Induction of somatic embryogenesis in recalcitrant sweetpotato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) and 4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) were investigated in this study for enhancing somatic embryogenesis from various plant organs of recalcitrant African sweetpotato cultivars. 2,4-D was found to be the best (p . 0.05) for ...

  9. Somatic embryogenesis and plantlet regeneration from protoplast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryo development was observed either on half strength MS medium PGR-free or with 1 mg/l abscisic acid at 25°C under continuous illumination with fluorescent light. Maturated embryos germinated and then converted to plantlets on half strength MS medium containing 1 mg/l BA after 3 months. The plantlets left ...

  10. Genetic transformation of olive somatic embryos through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-20

    Jun 20, 2011 ... 2Department of Biochemistry, National Center of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran. Accepted 9 March, 2011. Transformed olive plants were regenerated from inoculated somatic embryos with Agrobacterium tumefacience strain GV3101, which carries the plasmid pBI-P5CS containing ...

  11. Somatic Embryogenesis in Juniperus Procera using Juniperus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim for this particular research was initially an adaptation of optimum half strength lithium chloride-sodium propionate (LP) medium protocol for growth and proliferation of embryogenic ... Additional study on the effect of seed extraction to the growing embryogenic culture showed no effect on mature somatic embryos.

  12. Somatic Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Lawrence J.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly reviews number of theories which address role of psychological factors in etiology of somatic disorders. Focuses on psychological treatment approaches that have been used to alleviate or reduce symptomatic behaviors associated with eating disorders, elimination disorders, and headaches in children. Discusses role of school psychologists in…

  13. Somatic polyploidization and characterization of induced polyploids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic polyploidization and its effect on phenotypic traits of Dioscorea species such as D. alata, D. japonica and D. zingiberensis has been reported; however, optimization of this method in two major yam species, D. rotundata and D. cayenensis, is yet to be achieved and the effect of polyploidization on phenotypic traits of ...

  14. [Interdependance between somatic symptoms, sleep and dreams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Assya

    2014-03-19

    Even in an established illness, somatic complains can hide other emotional inquiries. The therapist, always with a kind attitude, can ask more about patient's sexual life. This can be use of having a better idea of patient's life and problems. Talking about dreams can also be useful: it gives new and surprising elements about patient's personality and helps to progress on healing's way.

  15. Studies for Somatic Embryogenesis in Sweet Potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J. Rasheed; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the somatic embryo (SE) system for plant production of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L(Lam)). Explants isolated from SE-derived sweet potato plants were compared with control (non SE-derived) plants for their competency for SE production. Leaf explants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.2 mg/L) and 6-benzylaminopurine (2.5 mg/L) for 2 weeks in darkness and transferred to MS medium with abscisic acid (2.5 mg/L). Explants isolated from those plants developed through somatic embryogenesis produced new somatic embryos rapidly and in higher frequency than those isolated from control plants They also appeared to grow faster in tissue culture than the control plants. Current studies in the laboratory are examining whether plants derived from a cyclical embryogenesis system (five cycles) would have any further positive impact on the rapidity and frequency of somatic embryo development. More detailed studies using electron microscopy are expected to show the point of origin of the embryos and to allow determination of their quality throughout the cyclical process. This study may facilitate improved plant micropropagation, gene transfer and germplasm conservation in sweet potato.

  16. Screening for congenital toxoplasmosis: accuracy of immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A tests after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Ruth E; Thalib, Lukman; Tan, Hooi Kuan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the accuracy of postnatal screening for toxoplasma-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgA. SETTING: Ten centres in three European countries. METHODS: We compared results of the first postnatal IgM or IgA test in infants with infected mothers identified by prenatal screeni...

  17. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [Dermatomyositis and Panniculitis: the function of immunoglobulins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Toujeni, Sana; Kefi, Asma; Bousetta, Najeh; Sayhi, Sameh; Gharsallah, Imen; Othmani, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Panniculitis is an inflammatory disease of subcutaneous adipose tissue which is rarely associated with dermatomyositis. It can occur before, after or simultaneously with muscle damage. In most cases, the evolution of panniculitis and of other dermatomyositis affections is favorable with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient who developed panniculitis lesions 2 months before having muscular signs. Skin involvement was resistant to corticosteroid treatment associated with immunosuppressants drugs. This led to the use of polyvalent immunoglobulin treatment improving both skin and muscle damage.

  19. Immunoglobulin therapy for enteroviral meningitides in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Kimirilova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the material of their own observations on the clinical and laboratory efficacy of the Russian intravenous immunoglobulin Gabriglobin for the treatment of enteroviral meningitides in children.The performed trials indicated that the use of Gabriglobin in the combination therapy of severe enteroviral meningitides in children reduced the duration of intoxication, global cerebral symptoms, meningeal syndrome, the time of cerebrospinal fluid sanitation by 1,5 times, and that of in-hospital treatment by 5,8±1,8 days as compared to those who received conventional basic therapy.

  20. Sleep and somatic complaints in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlarb AA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Angelika A Schlarb,1,* Merle Claßen,1,* Sara M Hellmann,1 Claus Vögele,2 Marco D Gulewitsch3 1Faculty of Psychology and Sports Science, University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany; 2Faculty of Psychology, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg; 3Faculty of Science, Department of Psychology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Sleep problems are common among university students. Poor sleep is associated with impaired daily functioning, increased risk of psychiatric symptoms, and somatic complaints such as pain. Previous results suggest that poor sleep exacerbates pain, which in turn negatively affects sleep. The purpose of the present study was to determine prevalence rates, comorbidity, and role of depression as a factor of moderating the relationship between sleep and physical complaints in German university students. Samples and methods: In total, 2443 German university students (65% women completed a web survey. Self-report measures included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, three modules of the Patient Health Questionnaire, and a questionnaire on the functional somatic syndromes (FSSs. Results: More than one-third (36.9% reported poor sleep as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Somatoform syndrome was identified in 23.5%, and the prevalence of any FSS was 12.8%. Self-reported sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep disturbances, use of sleep medications, and daytime dysfunctioning were significant predictors of somatoform syndrome, whereas sleep efficiency and sleep duration influenced somatic complaints indirectly. Moderate correlations were found between stress, anxiety, somatoform syndrome, depression, and overall sleep quality. The effect of somatic complaints on sleep quality was associated with the severity of depression. Anxiety shows direct effects on somatization and depression but only indirect associations with sleep quality

  1. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy: When You Need It -- and When You Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Patient Resources Adult Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy When you need it—and when you ... germ-fighting antibodies. A treatment known as immunoglobulin replacement (IgG) therapy can be a lifesaver for them. ...

  2. Development of direct somatic embryogenesis and regeneration on citrus sinesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Saw Peng; Alvina Lindsay Mijen; Rusli Ibrahim

    2004-01-01

    The plant regeneration processes in Citrus sinensis involves direct somatic embryogenesis. Culture medium used was MS basal supplemented with 50 mg/L sucrose, 0.27% agar and 0.1% vitamin at pH 5.8. Sucrose is the major carbon source for the induction of somatic embryo and also the maturation and germination of somatic embryo. (Author)

  3. Epigenetic regulation of individual modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3’ regulatory region (3’ RR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Birshtein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J segments (VDJ joining. B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR, which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3’ of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3’ RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region of four enhancers and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3’ RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3’ RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. We propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3’ RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus.

  4. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Carter, R.L.; Yamakido, Michio

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Identification of sequence variants influencing immunoglobulin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Stefan; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; de Lapuente Portilla, Aitzkoa Lopez; Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Plomp, Rosina; Dekkers, Gillian; Ajore, Ram; Ali, Mina; Bentlage, Arthur E H; Elmér, Evelina; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Gullberg, Urban; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Hansson, Markus; Holm, Hilma; Johansson, Åsa; Johnsson, Ellinor; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Ludviksson, Bjorn R; Oddsson, Asmundur; Olafsson, Isleifur; Olafsson, Sigurgeir; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Stefansdottir, Lilja; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Wuhrer, Manfred; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vidarsson, Gestur; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Nilsson, Björn; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-08-01

    Immunoglobulins are the effector molecules of the adaptive humoral immune system. In a genome-wide association study of 19,219 individuals, we found 38 new variants and replicated 5 known variants associating with IgA, IgG or IgM levels or with composite immunoglobulin traits, accounted for by 32 loci. Variants at these loci also affect the risk of autoimmune diseases and blood malignancies and influence blood cell development. Notable associations include a rare variant at RUNX3 decreasing IgA levels by shifting isoform proportions (rs188468174[C>T]: P = 8.3 × 10 -55 , β = -0.90 s.d.), a rare in-frame deletion in FCGR2B abolishing IgG binding to the encoded receptor (p.Asn106del: P = 4.2 × 10 -8 , β = 1.03 s.d.), four IGH locus variants influencing class switching, and ten new associations with the HLA region. Our results provide new insight into the regulation of humoral immunity.

  6. Intravenous polyclonal human immunoglobulins in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta-analysis ......Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established therapy for demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. IVIG exerts a number of effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). Four double-blind IVIG trials have been performed in relapsing-remitting MS. A meta......-analysis of the four trials has shown that IVIG reduces the relapse rate and, possibly, disease progression. In patients with a first episode of demyelinating disease, IVIG delays the time to the second relapse and thereby to the diagnosis of definite MS. In patients with an acute MS relapse, IVIG as add-on therapy...... to methylprednisolone does not make remission of symptoms faster or more complete. IVIG does not seem to be of any benefit to chronic visual or motor symptoms in MS. In secondary progressive MS, IVIG has not shown any effect on disease progression, relapses or new magnetic resonance imaging lesions. Experimental...

  7. Pasteurization of IgM-enriched Immunoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Mousavi Hosseini

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Human plasma proteins are important for therapy or prophylaxis of human diseases. Due to the preparation of human plasma proteins from human plasma pools and risk of contamination with human viruses, different viral reduction treatments such as: pasteurization, solvent/detergent, dry heat treatment, steam treatment, beta-propiolactone/UV and nanofiltration have been implemented. As pasteurization can be performed for liquid protein, this method (a 10-hour heat treatment of the aqueous solutions at 60°C was introduced into the manufacturing procedure of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin, to improve its safety further. The efficiency of this method for inactivation of viruses was evaluated by the use of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (a non-enveloped virus and Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR Virus (a lipid-enveloped virus. Pasteurization inactivated Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by 7 log10 and for IBR Virus by 5log10. These findings show a significant added measure of virus safety associated with pasteurization of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin preparation.

  8. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  9. Ingestion of host immunoglobulin by Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is one of the most important diseases in human and veterinary medicine. The available control measures that rely on acaricides are unsustainable, costly and environmentally unfriendly. Vaccination which is supposedly the most attractive alternative control, is sustainable, potentially cheap and environmentally friendly. Recent development in protein biochemistry and recombinant technology have facilitated the development of anti-parasite vaccine which in the past was impossible. One prerequisite for the anti-parasite-vaccine development is that the parasite has to ingest its host immunoglobulin. This study, therefore, was designed to determine whether Sarcoptes scabiei, a non blood-feeding parasite that resides on the avascular cornified layer of the skin, ingest its host immunoglobulin. Sections of routinely processed mites and skin from a mangy goat were probed with peroxidase-conjugated-anti-goat IgG and the immune complex was visualised with diaminobenzidine solution. To determine whether the ingested IgG was still intact or had been fragmented by the proteolytic enzymes, immunoblotting analysis of SDS-PAGE- fractionated proteins extracted from washed mites was performed. Quantification of IgG was done byan Elisa using purified goat IgG as control. This study showed that IgG in the mites confined to the mite’s gut only, and only a fraction of mite population ingested the IgG. The ingested IgG, as shown by immunoblot analysis, was mostly still intact. This study indicates that development of anti-scabies vaccines is reasonable.

  10. Functional anatomy of the immunoglobulin heavy chain 3΄ super-enhancer needs not only core enhancer elements but also their unique DNA context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Noir, Sandrine; Boyer, François; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Brousse, Mylène; Oruc, Zeliha; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel

    2017-06-02

    Cis-regulatory elements feature clustered sites for transcription factors, defining core enhancers and have inter-species homology. The mouse IgH 3΄ regulatory region (3'RR), a major B-cell super-enhancer, consists of four of such core enhancers, scattered throughout more than 25 kb of packaging 'junk DNA', the sequence of which is not conserved but follows a unique palindromic architecture which is conserved in all mammalian species. The 3'RR promotes long-range interactions and potential IgH loops with upstream promoters, controlling class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). It was thus of interest to determine whether this functional architecture also involves the specific functional structure of the super-enhancer itself, potentially promoted by its symmetric DNA shell. Since many transgenic 3'RR models simply linked core enhancers without this shell, it was also important to compare such a 'core 3'RR' (c3'RR) with the intact full-length super-enhancer in an actual endogenous IgH context. Packaging DNA between 3'RR core enhancers proved in fact to be necessary for optimal SHM, CSR and IgH locus expression in plasma cells. This reveals that packaging DNA can matter in the functional anatomy of a super-enhancer, and that precise evaluation of such elements requires full consideration of their global architecture. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Analysis of 6912 unselected somatic hypermutations in human VDJ rearrangements reveals lack of strand specificity and correlation between phase II substitution rates and distance to the nearest 3' activation-induced cytidine deaminase target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben

    2007-01-01

    -nucleotide motifs present on both strands of the V(H) gene showed significant correlations between the substitution frequencies in reverse complementary motifs, suggesting that the SHM machinery targets both strands equally well. An analysis of individual J(H) and D gene segments showed that the substitution...

  12. Analysis of 6912 unselected somatic hypermutations in human VDJ rearrangements reveals lack of strand specificity and correlation between phase II substitution rates and distance to the nearest 3' activation-induced cytidine deaminase target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben

    2007-01-01

    -23*01) from blood B lymphocytes enriched for CD27-positive memory cells. Analyses of 6,912 unique, unselected substitutions showed that in vivo hot and cold spots for the SHM of C and G residues corresponded closely to the target preferences reported for AID in vitro. A detailed analysis of all possible four......-nucleotide motifs present on both strands of the V(H) gene showed significant correlations between the substitution frequencies in reverse complementary motifs, suggesting that the SHM machinery targets both strands equally well. An analysis of individual J(H) and D gene segments showed that the substitution...... rates in G and T residues correlated inversely with the distance to the nearest 3' WRC AID hot spot motif on both the nontranscribed and transcribed strands. This suggests that phase II SHM takes place 5' of the initial AID deamination target and primarily targets T and G residues or, alternatively...

  13. Immunoglobulin Concentration in Tears of Contact Lens Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra P Maurya

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The relation of immunoglobulin concentration with increasing duration of wear and material of contact lens shows that tear immunoglobulin rise accrues due to mechanical stimulation, hence contact lenses should not be used for a long period and lenses of hard nature should be discouraged. The maintenance, cleaning and deproteinization of the lenses are of high importance to avoid immunostimulation.

  14. Genomic structure and expression of immunoglobulins in Squamata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, David N; Garet, Elina; Estevez, Olivia; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The Squamata order represents a major evolutionary reptile lineage, yet the structure and expression of immunoglobulins in this order has been scarcely studied in detail. From the genome sequences of four Squamata species (Gekko japonicus, Ophisaurus gracilis, Pogona vitticeps and Ophiophagus hannah) and RNA-seq datasets from 18 other Squamata species, we identified the immunoglobulins present in these animals as well as the tissues in which they are found. All Squamata have at least three immunoglobulin classes; namely, the immunoglobulins M, D, and Y. Unlike mammals, however, we provide evidence that some Squamata lineages possess more than one Cμ gene which is located downstream from the Cδ gene. The existence of two evolutionary lineages of immunoglobulin Y is shown. Additionally, it is demonstrated that while all Squamata species possess the λ light chain, only Iguanidae species possess the κ light chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analyse des génomes à la recherche de répétitions en tandem polymorphes : outils d?épidémiologie bactérienne et locus hypermutables humains

    OpenAIRE

    Denoeud , France

    2003-01-01

    thèse soutenue par la DGA; Tandem repeats are consecutive occurrences of a DNA unit. Such structures are found in all organisms, prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes. Although their biological function is not fully understood, they have diverse practical applications. In bacteria, polymorphic tandem repeats (with varying copy numbers), are powerful tools for strain identification in bacterial epidemiology. In humans, some tandem repeats mutate at a very high rate: hypermutable minisatellites are...

  16. Dogs cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hossein, M Shamim; Shamim, M Hossein; Kim, Jung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Schatten, Gerald; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2005-08-04

    Several mammals--including sheep, mice, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, cats, a mule, a horse and a litter of three rats--have been cloned by transfer of a nucleus from a somatic cell into an egg cell (oocyte) that has had its nucleus removed. This technology has not so far been successful in dogs because of the difficulty of maturing canine oocytes in vitro. Here we describe the cloning of two Afghan hounds by nuclear transfer from adult skin cells into oocytes that had matured in vivo. Together with detailed sequence information generated by the canine-genome project, the ability to clone dogs by somatic-cell nuclear transfer should help to determine genetic and environmental contributions to the diverse biological and behavioural traits associated with the many different canine breeds.

  17. Is Pilates a Somatic Education Method?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper renews the discussion about the relevance of the Pilates method to the field of Somatic Education. The impact of marketing – which sells the method as a fitness activity – and the academic research on the application of the method in the treatment of various medical disorders, as well as its role in the construction of contemporary dance aesthetics, are put into perspective.

  18. Somatic DNA Damages in Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Supriya Simon, A.; Dinesh Roy, D.; Jayapal, V.; Vijayakumar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is one of the most clinically significant complications of diabetes mellitus. Even though many ethological factors have been attributed for the pathogenesis of this disease no attempts were made to correlate DNA damage as a causative factor. Hence the present study was undertaken to asses the extent of somatic DNA damages by cytokinesis-block micronuclei assay (CBMN). An attempt is also being made to correlate the habits and/or risk factors and socioe...

  19. Germinal and somatic mutations in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, A.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The role of germinal and somatic mutations in carcinogenesis leads to the conclusion that environmental carcinogens probably exert their effects via somatic mutations. Susceptibility to this process may itself be genetically determined, so we may deduce that two groups, one genetic and one non-genetic, are included in the 'environmental' class. Other individuals seem to acquire cancer even in the absence of such environmental agents, and these too may be classified into a genetic and a non-genetic group. It has been estimated that in industrial countries, the environmental groups include 70-80% of all cancer cases, but we are only beginning to know how to separate the genetic and non-genetic subgroups. The genetic subgroup of the 'non-environmental' group is very small, probably of the order of magnitude of 1-2% for cancer as a whole. The remainder, about 25%, comprises a non-genetic, non-environmental subgroup that seems to arise as a consequence of 'spontaneous' somatic mutations. The incidence of these 'background' cancers is what we should combat with preventive and therapeutic measures

  20. Predictors of a functional somatic syndrome diagnosis in patients with persistent functional somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Eva M; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2013-06-01

    Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are characterized by the existence of multiple persistent functional somatic symptoms. Not many patients fulfilling the criteria for an FSS, receive a formal diagnosis, and it is unknown which factors explain this discrepancy. Patients that tend to worry and patients that gather more health information may have an increased chance of an FSS diagnosis. We hypothesized that high intelligence and high neuroticism increase the probability of an FSS diagnosis in patients with persistent functional somatic symptoms. This study aims to investigate patient factors that might be important in the process of syndrome labeling. Our study was performed in a large, representative population cohort (n = 976) in Groningen, The Netherlands, and included two assessment waves. Intelligence was measured using the General Aptitude Test Battery version B 1002-B. Neuroticism was measured using the 12-item neuroticism scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised. Functional somatic symptoms were measured with the somatization section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Current FSS diagnosis was assessed with a questionnaire. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses including sum scores of neuroticism, intelligence scores, sex, number of functional somatic symptoms, and age as potential predictors of having an FSS diagnosis. From the 976 participants that completed measurements at follow-up, 289 (26.4 %) participants reported at least one persistent functional somatic symptom, and these subjects were included in the main analyses (38.4 % males, mean age of 55.2 years (SD = 10.7), 36-82 years). High numbers of functional somatic symptoms ((OR) = 1.320; 95 % (CI) = 1.097-1.588), female sex (OR = 9.068; 95 % CI = 4.061-20.251), and high intelligence (OR = 1.402; 95 % CI = 1.001-1.963) were associated with an FSS diagnosis, while age (OR = 0.989; 95 % CI = 960-1.019) and

  1. Interference of immunoglobulins in two glucagon radioimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schenck, H.; Grubb, A.O.

    1982-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays of glucagon in plasma may be complicated by interaction with other substances of high molecular mass. Precipitates of such substances with ammonium sulfate showed, after isoelectric focusing, two fractions having glucagon immunoreactivity. One fraction (pI approx.10) evidently is associated with the Fc portion (but not the Fab portion) of purified polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). Equal amounts of purified monoclonal IgG of various subclasses, especially IgG 1, gave different ''glucagon'' readings, suggesting that some IgG may interfere more strongly than others. The other fraction (pI 5-6) appeared less consistently, and on gel chromatography appeared to be slightly larger than IgG. Together these fractions add about 50-100 ng/L to the immunoreactive glucagon values in plasma. Therefore methods in which glucagon is extracted before assay should be used for determining the concentration of glucagon present physiologically

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin, pharmacogenomics, and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wu, Mei-Shin; Chien, Shu-Chen; Liu, Shih-Feng; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2016-02-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology and it is therefore worth examining the multifactorial interaction of genes and environmental factors. Targeted genetic association and genome-wide association studies have helped to provide a better understanding of KD from infection to the immune-related response. Findings in the past decade have contributed to a major breakthrough in the genetics of KD, with the identification of several genomic regions linked to the pathogenesis of KD, including ITPKC, CD40, BLK, and FCGR2A. This review focuses on the factors associated with the genetic polymorphisms of KD and the pharmacogenomics of the response to treatment in patients with intravenous immunoglobulin resistance. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Solar urticaria successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Idiopathic solar urticaria (SU) is a rare, debilitating photodermatosis, which may be difficult to treat. First-line treatment with antihistamines is effective in mild cases, but remission after phototherapeutic induction of tolerance is often short-lived. Other treatment options include plasma exchange, photopheresis and cyclosporin. We present two cases of severe, idiopathic SU, which were resistant to conventional treatment. Both patients achieved remission after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and have remained in remission at 13 months and 4 years, respectively. There are only two case reports of successful treatment of solar urticaria with IVIg. In our experience IVIg given at a total dose of 2 g\\/kg over several 5-day courses about a month apart is an effective treatment option for severe idiopathic SU. It is also generally safe, even if certainly subject to significant theoretical risks, such as induction of viral infection or anaphylaxis.

  4. Structural repertoire of immunoglobulin λ light chains

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    The immunoglobulin λ isotype is present in nearly all vertebrates and plays an important role in the human immune system. Despite its importance, few systematic studies have been performed to analyze the structural conformation of its variable regions, contrary to what is the case for κ and heavy chains. We show here that an analysis of the structures of λ chains allows the definition of a discrete set of recurring conformations (canonical structures) of their hypervariable loops and, most importantly, the identification of sequence constraints that can be used to predict their structure. We also show that the structural repertoire of λ chains is different and more varied than that of the κ chains, consistently with the current view of the involvement of the two major light-chain families in complementary strategies of the immune system to ensure a fine tuning between diversity and stability in antigen recognition. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. A single-strand specific lesion drives MMS-induced hyper-mutability at a double-strand break in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-08-05

    Localized hyper-mutability (LHM) can be important in evolution, immunity, and genetic diseases. We previously reported that single-strand DNA (ssDNA) can be an important source of damage-induced LHM in yeast. Here, we establish that the generation of LHM by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) during repair of a chromosomal double-strand break (DSB) can result in over 0.2 mutations/kb, which is approximately 20,000-fold higher than the MMS-induced mutation density without a DSB. The MMS-induced mutations associated with DSB repair were primarily due to substitutions via translesion DNA synthesis at damaged cytosines, even though there are nearly 10 times more MMS-induced lesions at other bases. Based on this mutation bias, the promutagenic lesion dominating LHM is likely 3-methylcytosine, which is single-strand specific. Thus, the dramatic increase in mutagenesis at a DSB is concluded to result primarily from the generation of non-repairable lesions in ssDNA associated with DSB repair along with efficient induction of highly mutagenic ssDNA-specific lesions. These findings with MMS-induced LHM have broad biological implications for unrepaired damage generated in ssDNA and possibly ssRNA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Evaluation of somatic embryos of alfalfa for recombinant protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guohua; Grbic, Vojislava; Ma, Shengwu; Tian, Lining

    2015-02-01

    Somatic embryos of alfalfa can accumulate higher levels of recombinant proteins comparing to vegetative organs. Somatic embryos may be explored as a new system for new protein production for plants. Plants have been explored via genetic engineering as an inexpensive system for recombinant protein production. However, protein expression levels in vegetative tissues have been low, which limits the commercial utilization of plant expression systems. Somatic embryos resemble zygotic embryos in many aspects and may accumulate higher levels of proteins as true seed. In this study, somatic embryo of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was investigated for the expression of recombinant proteins. Three heterologous genes, including the standard scientific reporter uid that codes for β-glucuronidase and two genes of interest: ctb coding for cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), and hIL-13 coding for human interleukin 13, were independently introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic plants carrying these genes. Somatic embryos accumulated approximately twofold more recombinant proteins than vegetative organs including roots, stems, and leaves. The recombinant proteins of CTB and hIL-13 accumulated up to 0.15 and 0.18 % of total soluble protein in alfalfa somatic embryos, respectively. The recombinant proteins expressed in somatic embryos also exhibited biological activities. As somatic embryos can be induced in many plant species and their production can be scaled up via different avenues, somatic embryos may be developed as an efficient expression system for recombinant protein production.

  7. Subcutaneous versus intravenous immunoglobulin in multifocal motor neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, T; Andersen, Henning; Hess, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: For treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), we hypothesized that (i) infusion of equivalent dosages of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is as effective as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and that (ii) subcutaneous infusion at home is associated with a better...... at the injection sites for a few weeks. All other adverse effects during SCIG were mild and transient. No differences between treatments of health-related quality of life occurred. Conclusion: In MMN, short-term subcutaneous infusion of immunoglobulin is feasible, safe and as effective as intravenous infusion...

  8. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy : Immunoglobulin And Immune Complex Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shripad A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM and immune complexes IgG (IcG were measured in 58 cases of acute inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, popularly known as Guillian Barre′ syndrome, and in 30 healthy controls using single radial immunodiffusion assay. Immunoglobulin and immune complex levels were significantly elevated in patients as compared to controls. The increased levels of immunoglobulins and immune complexes may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease and provide rationale for therapeutic plasmapheresis.

  9. FaSD-somatic: a fast and accurate somatic SNV detection algorithm for cancer genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixin; Wang, Panwen; Xu, Feng; Luo, Ruibang; Wong, Maria Pik; Lam, Tak-Wah; Wang, Junwen

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled us to sequence large number of cancer samples to reveal novel insights into oncogenetic mechanisms. However, the presence of intratumoral heterogeneity, normal cell contamination and insufficient sequencing depth, together pose a challenge for detecting somatic mutations. Here we propose a fast and an accurate somatic single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) detection program, FaSD-somatic. The performance of FaSD-somatic is extensively assessed on various types of cancer against several state-of-the-art somatic SNV detection programs. Benchmarked by somatic SNVs from either existing databases or de novo higher-depth sequencing data, FaSD-somatic has the best overall performance. Furthermore, FaSD-somatic is efficient, it finishes somatic SNV calling within 14 h on 50X whole genome sequencing data in paired samples. The program, datasets and supplementary files are available at http://jjwanglab.org/FaSD-somatic/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Indirect somatic embryogenesis in cassava for genetic modification purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raemakers, Krit; Pereira, Isolde; van Putten, Herma Koehorst; Visser, Richard

    2006-01-01

    In cassava both direct and indirect somatic embryogenesis is described. Direct somatic embryogenesis starts with the culture of leaf explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with auxins. Somatic embryos undergo secondary somatic embryogenesis when cultured on the same medium. Indirect somatic embryogenesis is initiated by subculture of directly induced embryogenic tissue on auxin-supplemented medium with Gresshoff and Doy salts and vitamins. A very fine friable embryogenic callus (FEC) is formed after a few rounds of subculture and stringent selection. This FEC is maintained by subculture on auxin supplemented medium. Lowering of the auxin concentration allows the FEC to form mature somatic embryos that develop into plants when transferred to a cytokinin-supplemented medium.

  11. Immunoglobulin for alloimmune hemolytic disease in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; Scheffer-Rath, Mirjam Ea; Lopriore, Enrico; de Haas, Masja; Liley, Helen G

    2018-03-18

    Exchange transfusion and phototherapy have traditionally been used to treat jaundice and avoid the associated neurological complications. Because of the risks and burdens of exchange transfusion, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been suggested as an alternative therapy for alloimmune hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) to reduce the need for exchange transfusion. To assess the effect and complications of IVIg in newborn infants with alloimmune HDN on the need for and number of exchange transfusions. We performed electronic searches of CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase (Ovid), Web of Science, CINAHL (EBSCOhost), Academic Search Premier, and the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov and controlled-trials.com in May 2017. We also searched reference lists of included and excluded trials and relevant reviews for further relevant studies. We considered all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of IVIg in the treatment of alloimmune HDN. Trials must have used predefined criteria for the use of IVIg and exchange transfusion therapy to be included. We used the standard methods of Cochrane and its Neonatal Review Group. We assessed studies for inclusion and two review authors independently assessed quality and extracted data. We discussed any differences of opinion to reach consensus. We contacted investigators for additional or missing information. We calculated risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for categorical outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) for continuous variables. We used GRADE criteria to assess the risk of bias for major outcomes and to summarize the level of evidence. Nine studies with 658 infants fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Term and preterm infants with Rh or ABO (or both) incompatibility were included. The use of exchange transfusion decreased significantly in the immunoglobulin treated group (typical RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.49; typical RD -0.22, 95% CI -0.27 to

  12. Somatic Embryogenesis in Yam (Dioscorea rotundata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Elías Suárez Padrón

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenic yam (Dioscorea rotundata cultures were induced from petioles of leaves of in vitro grown plants on medium supplemented with different 2.4-D concentrations. Cultures were maintained either on semisolid or in liquid MS medium supplemented with 4.52 µM 2.4-D. The effect of sucrose concentration on somatic embryo development was also evaluated and the effects of different BAP concentrations on somatic embryo conversion were determined. Treatments were distributed using a complete randomized design. The highest rate of induction occurred with 4.52 µM 2.4-D. Sucrose at 131.46 mM significantly enhanced somatic embryo development. The conversion rate was not affected by BAP.Cultivos embriogénicos de ñame (Dioscorea rotundata fueron inducidos a partir de explantes consistentes de hojas con peciolos, aisladas de plantas establecidas en condiciones in vitro, en presencia de diferentes concentraciones de 2,4-D. Los cultivos inducidos fueron mantenidos en medio MS líquido o semisólido suplido con 4,52 µM 2,4-D. El efecto de las concentraciones de sacarosa sobre el desarrollo de embriones somáticos y el efecto de varias concentraciones de BAP sobre la tasa de conversión de embriones somáticos en plantas también fueron evaluados. Todos los tratamientos fueron distribuidos usando un diseño completamente al azar. El mayor porcentaje de inducción de tejidos embriogénicos ocurrió con 4,52 µM de 2,4-D. La adición de 131,46 mM de sacarosa incrementó significativamente el desarrollo de embriones somáticos. La tasa de conversión de embriones somáticos en plantas no fue afectada por las concentraciones de BAP.

  13. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  14. Detection of dentin antigenic fractions by salivary immunoglobulin G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of dentin antigenic fractions by salivary immunoglobulin G in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. TMP Soares da Costa, S de Paula Ramos, MM Hidalgo, A Consolaro, SA Khan, EN Itano ...

  15. Immunoglobulins in granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H U; Bojsen-Møller, M; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    Three patients with granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I underwent corneal grafting, and cryostat sections of the corneal buttons were examined immunohistochemically for immunoglobulins. Positive results were obtained for IgG, Kappa-, and Lambda chains with immunofluorescence technique...

  16. Human placental immunoglobulins show unique re-association ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study re-association pattern of human placental eluate immunoglobulins with acid treated isologous and third party trophoblast derived placental microvesicles. Design: Laboratory based experimentation. Setting: Biological Sciences Department and Discipline for Reproductive Medicine University of ...

  17. Immunoglobulin G antisperm antibodies and prediction of spontaneous pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leushuis, Esther; van der Steeg, Jan Willem; Steures, Pieternel; Repping, Sjoerd; Schöls, Willem; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hompes, Peter G. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the predictive capacity of immunoglobulin G ASA (direct MAR test) for spontaneous ongoing pregnancy in subfertile couples. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Nine fertility centers in The Netherlands. Patient(s): Consecutive ovulatory subfertile couples.

  18. Beneficial use of immunoglobulins in the treatment of Sydenham chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.D. van Immerzeel (Tabitha); R.M. van Gilst (Ruud); N.G. Hartwig (Nico)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis double case report indicates that treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) is effective in patients with Sydenham chorea (SC). SC is a rare but impressive clinical manifestation following streptococcal infection. This movement disorder characterised by chorea, emotional

  19. Somatic symptom disorder treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Augsburger, Jay Alan

    2017-05-01

    Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) is a challenging condition to treat with chronic pain, a common and disabling symptom. We present a patient who received electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for SSD with significant improvement in pain and gastrointestinal symptoms. We also present a brief literature review of similar cases treated with ECT. Preliminary evidence suggests that ECT should be considered for treatment of SSD comorbid with major depressive disorder, when standard treatments fail. Further research is needed to clarify whether ECT can be used for SSD without associated depression.

  20. Nonimmune binding of equine immunoglobulin by the causative organism of contagious equine metritis, Taylorella equigenitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widders, P R; Stokes, C R; Newby, T J; Bourne, F J

    1985-05-01

    This study identifies nonimmune binding of equine immunoglobulin by the causative organism of contagious equine metritis. Immunoglobulin binding to the bacterium was strongest for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and less for IgM; IgA was not bound. Binding of equine IgG was inhibited by human IgG, but not by IgG of domestic animals. Immunoglobulin binding by the bacterium appeared to be directed towards an epitope in the hinge region of the immunoglobulin molecule.

  1. High prevalence of immunoglobulin A deficiency in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus detected by ELISA

    OpenAIRE

    Loraine Farias Landgraf; Nelson Augusto Rosário; Juliana Ferreira de Moura; Katherine Andrew Wells; Bonald Cavalcanti Figueiredo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To measure serum levels of immunoglobulin A byimmunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1)patients and to verify the prevalence of immunoglobulin A deficiency(IgAD) in diabetic patients. Methods: The serum immunoglobulin Alevel was determined in 149 DM-1 patients by three methods. IgADwas defined as serum immunoglobulin A level lower than 5 mg/dl.If serum immunoglobulin A level was undetectable by turbidimetry,radial immunodiffusion was performed in low plate co...

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen

    2015-01-01

    was evaluated. A distinct distribution pattern of aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G deposition was observed in the subarachnoid and subpial spaces where vessels penetrate the brain parenchyma, via a paravascular route with intraparenchymal perivascular deposition. Perivascular astrocyte-destructive lesions were...... associated with blood-borne horseradish peroxidase leakage indicating blood-brain barrier breakdown. The cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G therefore distributes widely in brain to initiate astrocytopathy and blood-brain barrier breakdown....

  3. Ballet as Somatic Practice: A Case Study Exploring the Integration of Somatic Practices in Ballet Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores one teacher's integration of Alexander Technique and the work of neuromuscular retrainer Irene Dowd in ballet pedagogy to establish a somatic approach to teaching, learning, and performing ballet technique. This case study highlights the teacher's unique teaching method called IMAGE TECH for dancers (ITD) and offers…

  4. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR, to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence. All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50, none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  6. Immunoglobulin Expression in Non-Lymphoid Lineage and Neoplastic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengshan; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Gu, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    It has traditionally been believed that the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules is restricted to B lineage cells. However, immunoglobulin genes and proteins have been recently found in a variety of types of cancer cells, as well as some proliferating epithelial cells and neurons. The immunoglobulin molecules expressed by these cells consist predominantly of IgG, IgM, and IgA, and the light chains expressed are mainly kappa chains. Recombination activating genes 1 and 2, which are required for V(D)J recombination, are also expressed in these cells. Knowledge about the function of these non-lymphoid cell-derived immunoglobulins is limited. Preliminary data suggests that Ig secreted by epithelial cancer cells has some unidentified capacity to promote the growth and survival of tumor cells. As immunoglobulins are known to have a wide spectrum of important functions, the discovery of non-lymphoid cells and cancers that produce immunoglobulin calls for in-depth investigation of the functional and pathological significance of this previously unrecognized phenomenon. PMID:19246641

  7. Immunoglobulin expression in non-lymphoid lineage and neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengshan; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Gu, Jiang

    2009-04-01

    It has traditionally been believed that the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules is restricted to B lineage cells. However, immunoglobulin genes and proteins have been recently found in a variety of types of cancer cells, as well as some proliferating epithelial cells and neurons. The immunoglobulin molecules expressed by these cells consist predominantly of IgG, IgM, and IgA, and the light chains expressed are mainly kappa chains. Recombination activating genes 1 and 2, which are required for V(D)J recombination, are also expressed in these cells. Knowledge about the function of these non-lymphoid cell-derived immunoglobulins is limited. Preliminary data suggests that Ig secreted by epithelial cancer cells has some unidentified capacity to promote the growth and survival of tumor cells. As immunoglobulins are known to have a wide spectrum of important functions, the discovery of non-lymphoid cells and cancers that produce immunoglobulin calls for in-depth investigation of the functional and pathological significance of this previously unrecognized phenomenon.

  8. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  9. Restricted, canonical, stereotyped and convergent immunoglobulin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Dunand, Carole J; Wilson, Patrick C

    2015-09-05

    It is becoming evident that B-cell responses to particular epitopes or in particular contexts can be highly convergent at the molecular level. That is, depending on the epitope targeted, persons of diverse genetic backgrounds and immunological histories can use highly similar, stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs) for a particular response. In some cases, multiple people with immunity to a particular epitope or with a type of B-cell neoplasia will elicit antibodies encoded by essentially identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements. In other cases, particular VH genes encode antibodies important for immunity against pathogens such as influenza and HIV. It appears that the conserved antibody structures driving these stereotyped responses are highly limited and selected. There are interesting and important convergences in the types of stereotyped BCRs induced in conditions of immunity and B-cell-related pathology such as cancer and autoimmunity. By characterizing and understanding stereotyped B-cell responses, novel approaches to B-cell immunity and in understanding the underlying causes of B-cell pathology may be discovered. In this paper, we will review stereotyped BCR responses in various contexts of B-cell immunity and pathology. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Killer immunoglobulin receptor genes in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Taco W; Vendelbosch, Sanne; Berg, Merlijn van den; Baeten, Dominique L P

    2016-07-01

    We focus on the role of killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) interactions with the human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-B27 ligand and the potential contribution of KIR-expressing natural killer and T cells in spondyloarthritis, more specifically in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In AS strong epidemiological evidence of significant genetic associations with the major histocompatibility complex was convincingly identified. HLA-B27-positive first-degree relatives of AS cases are 5-16 times more likely to develop disease than HLA-B27-positive carriers in the general community. The GWAS era has enabled rapid progress in identifying non-major histocompatibility complex associations of AS. These findings show a number of important pathways in AS pathogenesis, including the IL-23-IL-17 pathway, aminopeptidases, peptide presentation, and KIR-HLA-B27 interactions. Studies using genetic markers, including KIRs may be used for a risk assessment about whom may benefit most from the various treatment protocols in spondyloarthritis, now that alternative therapeutic options have become feasible.

  11. Mutations in specific structural regions of immunoglobulin light chains are associated with free light chain levels in patients with AL amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L Poshusta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amyloidoses are protein misfolding diseases characterized by the deposition of amyloid that leads to cell death and tissue degeneration. In immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL, each patient has a unique monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain (LC that forms amyloid deposits. Somatic mutations in AL LCs make these proteins less thermodynamically stable than their non-amyloidogenic counterparts, leading to misfolding and ultimately the formation of amyloid fibrils. We hypothesize that location rather than number of non-conservative mutations determines the amyloidogenicity of light chains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed sequence alignments on the variable domain of 50 kappa and 91 lambda AL light chains and calculated the number of non-conservative mutations over total number of patients for each secondary structure element in order to identify regions that accumulate non-conservative mutations. Among patients with AL, the levels of circulating immunoglobulin free light chain varies greatly, but even patients with very low levels can have very advanced amyloid deposition. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that in specific secondary structure elements, there are significant differences in the number of non-conservative mutations between normal and AL sequences. AL sequences from patients with different levels of secreted light chain have distinct differences in the location of non-conservative mutations, suggesting that for patients with very low levels of light chains and advanced amyloid deposition, the location of non-conservative mutations rather than the amount of free light chain in circulation may determine the amyloidogenic propensity of light chains.

  12. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of 282 Pediatric Low- and High-Grade Gliomas Reveals Genomic Drivers, Tumor Mutational Burden, and Hypermutation Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adrienne; Severson, Eric; Gay, Laurie; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Elvin, Julia; Suh, James; Daniel, Sugganth; Covert, Mandy; Frampton, Garrett M; Hsu, Sigmund; Lesser, Glenn J; Stogner-Underwood, Kimberly; Mott, Ryan T; Rush, Sarah Z; Stanke, Jennifer J; Dahiya, Sonika; Sun, James; Reddy, Prasanth; Chalmers, Zachary R; Erlich, Rachel; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Fabrizio, David; Schrock, Alexa B; Ali, Siraj; Miller, Vincent; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey; Crawford, John R; Ramkissoon, Shakti H

    2017-12-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death for children with cancer in the U.S. Incorporating next-generation sequencing data for both pediatric low-grade (pLGGs) and high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) can inform diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling on 282 pediatric gliomas (157 pHGGs, 125 pLGGs), sequencing 315 cancer-related genes and calculating the tumor mutational burden (TMB; mutations per megabase [Mb]). In pLGGs, we detected genomic alterations (GA) in 95.2% (119/125) of tumors. BRAF was most frequently altered (48%; 60/125), and FGFR1 missense (17.6%; 22/125), NF1 loss of function (8.8%; 11/125), and TP53 (5.6%; 7/125) mutations were also detected. Rearrangements were identified in 35% of pLGGs, including KIAA1549-BRAF , QKI-RAF1 , FGFR3-TACC3 , CEP85L-ROS1 , and GOPC-ROS1 fusions. Among pHGGs, GA were identified in 96.8% (152/157). The genes most frequently mutated were TP53 (49%; 77/157), H3F3A (37.6%; 59/157), ATRX (24.2%; 38/157), NF1 (22.2%; 35/157), and PDGFRA (21.7%; 34/157). Interestingly, most H3F3A mutations (81.4%; 35/43) were the variant K28M. Midline tumor analysis revealed H3F3A mutations (40%; 40/100) consisted solely of the K28M variant. Pediatric high-grade gliomas harbored oncogenic EML4-ALK , DGKB-ETV1 , ATG7-RAF1 , and EWSR1-PATZ1 fusions. Six percent (9/157) of pHGGs were hypermutated (TMB >20 mutations per Mb; range 43-581 mutations per Mb), harboring mutations deleterious for DNA repair in MSH6, MSH2, MLH1, PMS2, POLE , and POLD1 genes (78% of cases). Comprehensive genomic profiling of pediatric gliomas provides objective data that promote diagnostic accuracy and enhance clinical decision-making. Additionally, TMB could be a biomarker to identify pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients who may benefit from immunotherapy. By providing objective data to support diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making, comprehensive genomic profiling is necessary for

  13. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bruun Krøigård

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing is extensively applied to catalogue somatic mutations in cancer, in research settings and increasingly in clinical settings for molecular diagnostics, guiding therapy decisions. Somatic variant callers perform paired comparisons of sequencing data from cancer tissue and matched normal tissue in order to detect somatic mutations. The advent of many new somatic variant callers creates a need for comparison and validation of the tools, as no de facto standard for detection of somatic mutations exists and only limited comparisons have been reported. We have performed a comprehensive evaluation using exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing data of paired tumor-normal samples from five breast cancer patients to evaluate the performance of nine publicly available somatic variant callers: EBCall, Mutect, Seurat, Shimmer, Indelocator, Somatic Sniper, Strelka, VarScan 2 and Virmid for the detection of single nucleotide mutations and small deletions and insertions. We report a large variation in the number of calls from the nine somatic variant callers on the same sequencing data and highly variable agreement. Sequencing depth had markedly diverse impact on individual callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high sensitivity and robustness to changes in sequencing depths.

  14. Stress-induced hypermutation as a physical property of life, a force of natural selection and its role in four thought experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Lennart

    2013-04-01

    The independence of genetic mutation rate from selection is central to neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory. However, it has been continuously challenged for more than 30 years by experimental evidence of genetic mutation rate transiently increasing in response to stress (stress-induced hypermutation, SIH). The prominent concept of evolved evolvability (EE) explains that natural selection for strategies more competitive at evolutionary adaptation itself gives rise to mechanisms dynamically adjusting mutation rates to environmental stress. Here, we theoretically investigate the alternative (not mutually exclusive) hypothesis that SIH is an inherent physical property of all genetically reproducing life. We define stress as any condition lowering the capability of utilizing metabolic resources for genome storage and replication. This thermodynamical analysis indicates stress-induced increases in the genetic mutation rate in genome storage and in genome replication as inherent physical properties of genetically reproducing life. Further integrating SIH into an overall organismic thermodynamic budget identifies SIH as a force of natural selection, alongside death rate, replication rate and constitutive mutation rate differences. We execute four thought experiments with a non-recombinant lesion mutant strain to predict experimental observations due to SIH in response to different stresses and stress combinations. We find (1) acceleration of adaptation over models without SIH, (2) possibility of adaptation at high stresses which are not explicable by mutation in genome replication alone and (3) different adaptive potential under high growth-inhibiting versus high lethal stresses. The predictions are directly comparable to culture experiments (colony size time courses, antibacterial resistance assay and occurrence of lesion-reversion mutant colonies) and genome sequence analysis. Considering suggestions of drug-mediated disruption of SIH and attempts to target mutation

  15. Stress-induced hypermutation as a physical property of life, a force of natural selection and its role in four thought experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    The independence of genetic mutation rate from selection is central to neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory. However, it has been continuously challenged for more than 30 years by experimental evidence of genetic mutation rate transiently increasing in response to stress (stress-induced hypermutation, SIH). The prominent concept of evolved evolvability (EE) explains that natural selection for strategies more competitive at evolutionary adaptation itself gives rise to mechanisms dynamically adjusting mutation rates to environmental stress. Here, we theoretically investigate the alternative (not mutually exclusive) hypothesis that SIH is an inherent physical property of all genetically reproducing life. We define stress as any condition lowering the capability of utilizing metabolic resources for genome storage and replication. This thermodynamical analysis indicates stress-induced increases in the genetic mutation rate in genome storage and in genome replication as inherent physical properties of genetically reproducing life. Further integrating SIH into an overall organismic thermodynamic budget identifies SIH as a force of natural selection, alongside death rate, replication rate and constitutive mutation rate differences. We execute four thought experiments with a non-recombinant lesion mutant strain to predict experimental observations due to SIH in response to different stresses and stress combinations. We find (1) acceleration of adaptation over models without SIH, (2) possibility of adaptation at high stresses which are not explicable by mutation in genome replication alone and (3) different adaptive potential under high growth-inhibiting versus high lethal stresses. The predictions are directly comparable to culture experiments (colony size time courses, antibacterial resistance assay and occurrence of lesion-reversion mutant colonies) and genome sequence analysis. Considering suggestions of drug-mediated disruption of SIH and attempts to target mutation

  16. Effects of spaceflight on the immunoglobulin repertoire of unimmunized C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Claire; Rettig, Trisha A.; Hlavacek, Savannah; Bye, Bailey A.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2018-02-01

    Spaceflight has been shown to suppress the adaptive immune response, altering the distribution and function of lymphocyte populations. B lymphocytes express highly specific and highly diversified receptors, known as immunoglobulins (Ig), that directly bind and neutralize pathogens. Ig diversity is achieved through the enzymatic splicing of gene segments within the genomic DNA of each B cell in a host. The collection of Ig specificities within a host, or Ig repertoire, has been increasingly characterized in both basic research and clinical settings using high-throughput sequencing technology (HTS). We utilized HTS to test the hypothesis that spaceflight affects the B-cell repertoire. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the impact of spaceflight on the unimmunized Ig repertoire of C57BL/6 mice that were flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) during the Rodent Research One validation flight in comparison to ground controls. Individual gene segment usage was similar between ground control and flight animals, however, gene segment combinations and the junctions in which gene segments combine was varied among animals within and between treatment groups. We also found that spontaneous somatic mutations in the IgH and Igκ gene loci were not increased. These data suggest that space flight did not affect the B cell repertoire of mice flown and housed on the ISS over a short period of time.

  17. [Premenstrual symptomatology, somatization and physical anhedonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridou, M; Aguerre, C

    2013-12-01

    Physical (headache, abdominal pain, e.g.), emotional (irritability, diminution of self-esteem, e.g.) and/or behavioral disturbances (fatigue, decrease of libido, e.g.) appear frequently during the premenstrual phase of menstrual cycles. Of moderate to severe intensity, these varied symptoms sometimes hinder the usual personal, social and/or professional functioning by generating significant suffering. Thus, premenstrual syndrome (PS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PDD) are closely related to depressive disorders in many prior studies. In spite of solid links associating depression with premenstrual disorders in the literature, the psychological dimension of the premenstrual symptomatology still remains underestimated. The objective of this study is to examine the nature of possible relationships between a moderate premenstrual symptomatology and different modes of information processing with physical and emotional stimuli, such as somatization and physical anhedonia, well-known symptoms of depressive disorders. One hundred and five students in psychology from the François Rabelais university (France), aged between 18 to 50 years old (M=20.98, SD=3.43), were invited to fill in French versions of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire [25] (Moos, 1991), the somatization subscale of the Symptom Check-List 90 [26] (Derogatis & Cleary, 1977), and the Physical Anhedonia Scale [28] (Chapman et al., 1976). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated and a multiple regression analysis was conducted with Statistica software. Main results reveal that premenstrual symptomatology is positively related to somatization (r=0.58; Pphysical anhedonia (r=-0.27; PPhysical anhedonia (β=-0.20; Pappearance of a premenstrual symptomatology. These results allow us to enrich our knowledge on the origin and the nature of the premenstrual symptomatology, which would be physiological, psychological and social, in order to adapt and widen the therapeutic options by proposing, in

  18. Efficient somatic embryo production of Limau madu (Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fbn

    concentrations for producing cell suspension and somatic embryos of Limau madu (Citrus suhuiensis ... Citrus. The successful performance of all the stages of somatic embryogenesis has been reported, from the growth of embryogenic cells to embryo maturation in ..... line I and Cleopatra, line II and C. limonia L. Osbeck, cv.

  19. High frequency induction of somatic embryos and plantlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High frequency induction of somatic embryos and plantlet regeneration from nodal explants of Hygrophila spinosa T. Anders. A Varshney, A Shahzad, M Anis. Abstract. An efficient protocol is described for the rapid in vitro plant regeneration of a medicinally important plant, Hygrophila spinosa through direct somatic ...

  20. BABY BOOM-induced somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.

    2015-01-01

    Under appropriate tissue culture conditions, somatic plant cells can be induced to form embryos in a process called somatic embryogenesis (SE). SE provides a way to clonally propagate desirable plants and is therefore an important plant breeding tool. SE has also fascinated scientists for decades as

  1. Comparison of callus induction and somatic embryogenesis of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Kerman genotype did not show embryogenesis. In the histological studies, the different development stages of the embryos (globular, heart, torpedo and cotyledonary) together with callus cells were showed. Key words: Hypocotyl explants, somatic embryo, in vitro regeneration, germination, somatic embryogenesis ...

  2. Somatic delusions and obsessive-compulsive disorder in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient was later referred to the psychiatry department of the same hospital and diagnosed with schizophrenia with somatic delusions and OCS according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria. He was screened for schizophrenia, OCS and olfactory and somatic delusions by ...

  3. Improving somatic health of outpatients with severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, Fenneke M.; Oud, Marian J. T.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Postma, Maarten J.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with severe mental illness (SMI) experience a 13-to 30-year reduction in life expectancy compared with the general population. The majority of these deaths can be attributed to somatic health problems. The risk on somatic health problems is partly increased due to a reduced

  4. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from leaf explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to study the somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from the in vitro leaf explants of Rumex vesicarius L. a renowned medicinal plant, which belongs to polygonaceae family. Effective in vitro regeneration of R. vesicarius was achieved via young leaf derived somatic embryo cultures.

  5. Alcohol dependence and risk of somatic diseases and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Charlotte; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Sørensen, Holger Jelling

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To (1) estimate sex-specific risks of a comprehensive spectrum of somatic diseases in alcohol-dependent individuals versus a control population, and in the same population to (2) estimate sex-specific risks of dying from the examined somatic diseases. DESIGN: Register-based matched cohort...

  6. Effect of polyethylene glycol and mannitol on somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of polyethylene glycol and mannitol on somatic embryogenesis of pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. ... or callus were cultured on semisolid Murashige and Skoog (MS) + 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) (5 μM) + glutamine (0.03 mM) and the cultures formed only globular and heart shaped somatic embryos.

  7. Noise and somatic symptoms : A role for personality traits?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlema, W. L.; Morley, D. W.; Stolk, R. P.; Rosmalen, J. G. M.

    Objectives: We investigated the role of a stress-sensitive personality on relations between noise, noise annoyance and somatic symptom reporting. First, we investigated the cross-sectional association of road traffic noise exposure and somatic symptoms, and its modification by hostility and

  8. Immunoglobulin E and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by intense polyclonal production of autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes. Some reports have associated SLE with a Th2 immune response and allergy. In the present study 21 female patients with SLE were investigated for total IgE and IgE antibodies to dust house aeroallergens by an automated enzyme-linked fluorescent assay, and were also evaluated for antinuclear IgE autoantibodies by a modified indirect immunofluorescence test using HEp-2 cells as antigen substrate. Additionally, immunocapture ELISA was used to investigate serum anti-IgE IgG autoantibodies. Serum IgE above 150 IU/ml, ranging from 152 to 609 IU/ml (median = 394 IU IgE/ml, was observed in 7 of 21 SLE patients (33%, 5 of them presenting proteinuria, urinary cellular casts and augmented production of anti-dsDNA antibodies. While only 2 of 21 SLE patients (9.5% were positive for IgE antibodies to aeroallergens, all 10 patients with respiratory allergy (100% from the atopic control group (3 males and 7 females, had these immunoglobulins. SLE patients and healthy controls presented similar anti-IgE IgG autoantibody titers (X = 0.37 ± 0.20 and 0.34 ± 0.18, respectively, differing from atopic controls (0.94 ± 0.26. Antinuclear IgE autoantibodies were detected in 17 of 21 (81% sera from SLE patients, predominating the fine speckled pattern of fluorescence, that was also observed in IgG-ANA. Concluding, SLE patients can present increased IgE levels and antinuclear IgE autoantibodies without specific clinical signs of allergy or production of antiallergen IgE antibodies, excluding a possible association between SLE and allergy.

  9. Immunoglobulin heavy chains in medaka (Oryzias latipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambón-Deza Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bony fish present an immunological system, which evolved independently from those of animals that migrated to land 400 million years ago. The publication of whole genome sequences and the availability of several cDNA libraries for medaka (Oryzias latipes permitted us to perform a thorough analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chains present in this teleost. Results We identified IgM and IgD coding ESTs, mainly in spleen, kidney and gills using published cDNA libraries but we did not find any sequence that coded for IgT or other heavy chain isotypes described in fish. The IgM - ESTs corresponded with the secreted and membrane forms and surprisingly, the latter form only presented two constant heavy chain domains. This is the first time that this short form of membrane IgM is described in a teleost. It is different from that identified in Notothenioid teleost because it does not present the typical splicing pattern of membrane IgM. The identified IgD-ESTs only present membrane transcripts, with Cμ1 and five Cδ exons. Furthermore, there are ESTs with sequences that do not have any VH which disrupt open reading frames. A scan of the medaka genome using transcripts and genomic short reads resulted in five zones within a region on chromosome 8 with Cμ and Cδ exons. Some of these exons do not form part of antibodies and were at times interspersed, suggesting a recombination process between zones. An analysis of the ESTs confirmed that no antibodies are expressed from zone 3. Conclusions Our results suggest that the IGH locus duplication is very common among teleosts, wherein the existence of a recombination process explains the sequence homology between them.

  10. Predictive factors for somatization in a trauma sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Ask; Christiansen, Dorte M

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Unexplained somatic symptoms are common among trauma survivors. The relationship between trauma and somatization appears to be mediated by posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, only few studies have focused on what other psychological risk factors may predispose...... a trauma victim towards developing somatoform symptoms. METHODS: The present paper examines the predictive value of PTSD severity, dissociation, negative affectivity, depression, anxiety, and feeling incompetent on somatization in a Danish sample of 169 adult men and women who were affected by a series...... of incompetence significantly predicted somatization in the trauma sample whereas dissociation, depression, and anxiety were not associated with degree of somatization. PTSD as a risk factor was mediated by negative affectivity....

  11. Anatomy of somatic embryogenesis in Carica papaya L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Juliana A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mature zygotic embryos of Carica papaya L. ?Sunrise Solo? were used as explants for embryogenesis induction. The explants were inoculated on Murashige and Skoog culture medium supplemented with 2 mg.L-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and incubated in darkness at 25+2°C. Histological analysis of callogenesis and somatic embryogenesis indicated occurrence of direct and indirect somatic embryogenesis development. Direct somatic embryo formation was observed from hypocotyledonary epidermic cells only from explant 18 days after inoculation. Somatic embryos formed indirectly were originated from embryogenic superficial cells of pre-embryonic complexes located on peripherical and on internal cell layers of callus 49 days after inoculation. Diverse morphological differences including disformed embryos were observed among the somatic embryos.

  12. Somatic point mutation calling in low cellularity tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin S Kassahn

    Full Text Available Somatic mutation calling from next-generation sequencing data remains a challenge due to the difficulties of distinguishing true somatic events from artifacts arising from PCR, sequencing errors or mis-mapping. Tumor cellularity or purity, sub-clonality and copy number changes also confound the identification of true somatic events against a background of germline variants. We have developed a heuristic strategy and software (http://www.qcmg.org/bioinformatics/qsnp/ for somatic mutation calling in samples with low tumor content and we show the superior sensitivity and precision of our approach using a previously sequenced cell line, a series of tumor/normal admixtures, and 3,253 putative somatic SNVs verified on an orthogonal platform.

  13. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  14. Resolving the prevalence of somatic transposition inDrosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Christoph D; Waddell, Scott

    2017-07-25

    Somatic transposition in mammals and insects could increase cellular diversity and neural mobilization has been implicated in age-dependent decline. To understand the impact of transposition in somatic cells it is essential to reliably measure the frequency and map locations of new insertions. Here we identified thousands of putative somatic transposon insertions in neurons from individual Drosophila melanogaster using whole-genome sequencing. However, the number of de novo insertions did not correlate with transposon expression or fly age. Analysing our data with exons as 'immobile genetic elements' revealed a similar frequency of unexpected exon translocations. A new sequencing strategy that recovers transposon: chromosome junction information revealed most putative de novo transposon and exon insertions likely result from unavoidable chimeric artefacts. Reanalysis of other published data suggests similar artefacts are often mistaken for genuine somatic transposition. We conclude that somatic transposition is less prevalent in Drosophila than previously envisaged.

  15. High levels of immunoglobulin E and a continuous increase in immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M by age in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Eising, Stefanie; Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbøl

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing, either because of environmental factors accelerating onset of the disease or because of inducement of autoimmune diabetes in children who previously were at lower risk. High levels of immunoglobulin (Ig), specifically, IgM and IgA, and a low...

  16. Progression inference for somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods were employed to determine progression inference of genomic alterations in commonly occurring cancers. Using cross-sectional TCGA data, we computed evolutionary trajectories involving selectivity relationships among pairs of gene-specific genomic alterations such as somatic mutations, deletions, amplifications, downregulation, and upregulation among the top 20 driver genes associated with each cancer. Results indicate that the majority of hierarchies involved TP53, PIK3CA, ERBB2, APC, KRAS, EGFR, IDH1, VHL, etc. Research into the order and accumulation of genomic alterations among cancer driver genes will ever-increase as the costs of nextgen sequencing subside, and personalized/precision medicine incorporates whole-genome scans into the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Keywords: Oncology, Cancer research, Genetics, Computational biology

  17. Multiple somatic symptoms in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldberg, D. P.; Reed, G. M.; Robles, R.

    2016-01-01

    ) in participating countries, and the relationship of BSS and HA to depressive and anxiety disorders and to disability. Method PCPs referred patients judged to have BSS or HA, who were then interviewed using a standardized psychiatric interview and a standardized measure of disability. Results Of 587 patients......-occurring diagnoses of depression, anxiety, or both. Anxious depression was the most common co-occurring psychological disorder, associated with the greatest disability. Conclusion Study results indicate the importance of assessing for mood and anxiety disorders among patients who present multiple somatic symptoms...... without identifiable physical pathology. Although highly co-occurring with each other and with mood and anxiety disorders, BSS and HA represent distinct constructs that correspond to important presentations in primary care. © 2016 Elsevier Inc....

  18. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  19. [Somatic complaints, emotional awareness and maladjustment in schoolchildren].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, A; Maganto, C; González, R

    2015-05-01

    Somatic complaints are common in childhood. Research has shown their relationship with emotional awareness and maladjustment. The study had three objectives: 1) to analyze the prevalence of somatic complaints; 2) To explore the relationships between the variables evaluated: somatic complaints, differentiating emotions, verbal sharing of emotions, not hiding emotions, body awareness, attending to others' emotions, analysis of emotions, and personal, social, family, and school maladjustments; and 3) To identify predictors of somatic complaints. The study included a total of 1,134 randomly selected schoolchildren of both sexes between 10-12 years old (M=10.99; SD=0.88). The Somatic Complaint List, Emotional Awareness Questionnaire, and Self-reported Multifactor Test of Childhood Adaptation were used to gather information. The results showed that the prevalence of somatic complaints was 90.2%, with fatigue, headache and stomachache being the most frequently. Dizziness and headache were more common in girls, and the frequency of complaints decreases with age. Somatic complaints are negatively related to emotional awareness, and positively related to maladjustment. The variables that contribute the most to the prediction of somatic complaints are personal maladjustment (25.1%) and differentiating emotions (2.5%). The study shows that personal maladjustment is the best predictor of somatic complaints; the more emotional awareness and better adapted the child, the fewer somatic complaints they lodge. Childhood is a stage with significant physical discomfort. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Serum immunoglobulins in head and neck cancer: effect of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohli, G.S.; Yadav, S.P.S.; Chowdhry, D.; Mehta, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with head and neck cancer and 25 age-matched normal controls were investigated for serum, immunoglobulin levels (IgA, IgG and IgM). The levels of all the three immunoglobulins in the patients were significantly higher than controls, the rise in IgA being more than that of IgG or IgM. The ratios of IgA/IgG and IgA/IgM were also higher than normal. The immunoglobulin levels showed a progressive rise with the advance in stage of the tumour. A fall in the immunoglobulin levels, as well as in the ratios of IgA/IgG and IgA/IgM, was noted following radiotherapy though the levels were still higher than controls. The range of increase in immunoglobulins appears to be a satisfactory prognostic tool, and a fall after radiotherapy appears to be related to the effectiveness of treatment. (author). 3 tables, 11 refs

  1. Uninvolved immunoglobulins predicting hematological response in newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchtar, Eli; Magen, Hila; Itchaki, Gilad; Cohen, Amos; Rosenfeld, Ra'ama; Shochat, Tzippy; Kornowski, Ran; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Raanani, Pia

    2016-02-01

    Immunoparesis serves as a marker for elevated risk for progression in plasma cell proliferative disorders. However, the impact of immunoparesis in AL amyloidosis has not been addressed. Immunoparesis was defined qualitatively as any decrease below the low reference levels of the uninvolved immunoglobulins and quantitatively, as the relative difference between the uninvolved immunoglobulins and the lower reference values. Forty-one newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis patients were included. Sixty-six percent of patients had a suppression of the uninvolved immunoglobulins. The median relative difference of the uninvolved immunoglobulins was 18% above the low reference levels [range (-71%)-210%]. Ninety percent of the patients were treated with novel agents-based regimens, mostly bortezomib-containing regimens. Nineteen percent of the patients did not attain response to first line treatment. Patients with relative difference of uninvolved immunoglobulins below -25% of the low reference levels were less likely to respond to first line treatment compared to patients with a relative difference of -25% and above [odds ratio for no response vs. partial response and better 30 [(95% CI 4.1-222.2), P=0.0004]. Patients who failed first line treatment were successfully salvaged with lenalidomide-based treatment. Immunoparesis, if assessed quantitatively, may serve as a predictor of response in AL amyloidosis patients treated with bortezomib-containing regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dermatology and Immunoglobulin Therapy: Who to Treat and How to Administer Immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Triviño, F J; Pérez-López, I; Ruíz-Villaverde, R

    2018-02-08

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement therapy has been used in immune deficiency diseases for more than 50 years. The indications for this treatment have evolved, however, and IVIG therapy is now used in various diseases in which the immune system plays a prominent role. IVIG therapy has carved out a niche in dermatology for the treatment of such conditions as dermatomyositis, autoimmune bullous diseases, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Special attention has been paid to this therapy in recent years. New guidelines have been published and should be taken into consideration in dermatology. This review provides a practical guide to IVIG use in our specialty. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Extending a structural model of somatization to South Koreans: Cultural values, somatization tendency, and the presentation of depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolu; Min, Seongho; Sun, Jiahong; Kim, Se Joo; Ahn, Joung-Sook; Peng, Yunshi; Noh, Samuel; Ryder, Andrew G

    2015-05-01

    Somatization refers to the tendency to emphasize somatic symptoms when experiencing a psychiatric disturbance. This tendency has been widely reported in patients from East Asian cultural contexts suffering from depression. Recent research in two Chinese samples have demonstrated that the local cultural script for depression, involving two aspects-the experience and expression of distress (EED) and conceptualization and communication of distress (CCD)-can be evoked to help explain somatization. Given the beliefs and practices broadly shared across Chinese and South Korean cultural contexts, the current study seeks to replicate this explanatory model in South Koreans. Our sample included 209 psychiatric outpatients from Seoul and Wonju, South Korea. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess somatization tendency, adherence to traditional values, and psychological and somatic symptoms of depression. Results from SEM showed that the EED and CCD factors of somatization tendency were differently associated with cultural values and somatic symptoms, replicating our previous findings in Chinese outpatients. The reliance on a brief self-report measure of somatization tendency, not originally designed to assess separate EED and CCD factors, highlights the need for measurement tools for the assessment of cultural scripts in cross-cultural depression research. The replication of the Chinese structural model of somatization in South Korea lends empirical support to the view that somatization can be understood as the consequence of specific cultural scripts. These scripts involve the experience and expression of distress as well as culturally meaningful ways in which this distress is conceptualized and communicated to others. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Sinonasal polyposis associated with a deficiency subclass immunoglobulin G: Place of substitution immunoglobulins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoan, Nhung Tran Khai; Karmochkine, M; Laccourreye, O; Bonfils, P

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of the introduction of a substitution by intravenous Immunoglobulins (Ig IV) at patients with immunoglobulins G (IgG) subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis. Prospective study concerning five patients with IgG subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis treated by Ig IV. Rhinologic, otologic and pulmonary symptoms, exacerbations of nasal polyposis, chronic otitis and asthma as well as the number of antibiotics and corticoids treatments were counted during the Ig IV substitution. To study the association between IgIV substitution and the number of exacerbations of nasal polyposis, chronic otitis, asthma and the number of antibiotics and corticoids treatments in patients with IgG subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis. Five patients with a IgG subclass deficiency and nasal polyposis were substituted. The number of antibiotics and corticoids cures increased at one patient and remained stable at four others. The number of sinus, ear and lung infections as well as the global rhinologic score of symptoms and the endoscopic stage of the nasal polyposis remained stable. In the absence of efficiency of the treatment, this one was interrupted at the end of 6 months for patients n° 1 and n° 3, 24 months for patient n° 4 and 42 months for patient n° 5. The current study failed to highlight clinical improvement in patients wih IgG subclasses deficiency and nasal polyposis treated by Ig IV. A previous study had not allowed to find a link between IgG subclasses deficiency and severity of nasal polyposis, what seems to be confirmed by the absence of improvement brought during the substitution of this deficit in the current study.

  5. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  6. Somatic Embryogenesis of Lilium from Microbulb Transverse Thin Cell Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A reliable somatic embryogenesis protocol is a prerequisite for application of other plant biotechniques. Several protocols were reported for genus Lilium, with variable success. Between them, transverse Thin Cell Layers (tTCL) were used efficiently to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis of Lilium. Somatic embryogenesis potential is dependent on the genotype, explant, and culture medium composition, especially as for plant growth regulators and environmental conditions. Usually, the process comprises three phases: embryogenic callus induction, embryogenic callus proliferation and somatic embryo germination. Somatic embryo germination can be achieved in light or dark. In the first case, complete plantlets are formed, with green leaves and pseudobulb in the base. In darkness, microbulbs are formed from single somatic embryos or clusters. A last phase of microbulb enlargement allows plantlets or microbulbs to increase their biomass. These enlarged microbulbs do not need special acclimatization conditions when transferred to soil and quickly produce sturdy plants. This chapter describes a protocol for somatic embryogenesis of Lilium using tTCL from microbulbs.

  7. Somatic embryogenesis for efficient micropropagation of guava (Psidium guajava L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) is well known for edible fruit, environment friendly pharmaceutical and commercial products for both national and international market. The conventional propagation and in vitro organogenesis do not meet the demand for the good quality planting materials. Somatic embryogenesis for efficient micropropagation of guava (P. guajava L.) has been developed to fill up the gap. Somatic embryogenesis and plantlets regeneration are achieved from 10-week post-anthesis zygotic embryo explants by 8-day inductive treatment with different concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) on MS agar medium containing 5% sucrose. Subsequent development and maturation of somatic embryos occur after 8 days on MS basal medium supplemented with 5% sucrose without plant growth regulator. The process of somatic embryogenesis shows the highest relative efficiency in 8-day treatment of zygotic embryo explants with 1.0 mg L(-1) 2,4-D. High efficiency germination of somatic embryos and plantlet regeneration takes place on half strength semisolid MS medium amended with 3% sucrose within 2 weeks of subculture. Somatic plantlets are grown for additional 2 weeks by subculturing in MS liquid growth medium containing 3% sucrose. Well-grown plantlets from liquid medium have survived very well following 2-4 week hardening process. The protocol of somatic embryogenesis is optimized for high efficiency micropropagation of guava species.

  8. Somatic embryogenesis in cassava: A tool for mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.S.; Duren, M. Van; Morpurgo, R.

    1997-01-01

    Cassava is an important food and livestock feed crop. The effect of gamma radiation on somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in cassava clones of African origin was investigated. Explants from young leaves of cassava were cultured on MS medium, supplemented with 18.1 mM 2,4-D and 2 mM CuSO4, solidified with 0.3% Phytagel. Compact and friable calli were observed after 10-15 days of explant culture in dark, which produced somatic embryos in all but one clone. The somatic embryos showed morphological aberrations, such as fused cotyledons, lack of meristematic tip, epicotyl elongation, and had low germination rate; desiccation of embryos increased germination. Histological study showed that the somatic embryos were of multicellular origin. Leaf explants were irradiated with doses between 4 to 38 Gy of gamma rays, and cultured on somatic embryo induction medium. In addition, somatic embryos were irradiated with gamma ray doses from 10 to 18 Gy, and analyzed for germination. LD 50 for embryogenic response of leaf-explants was at around 20 Gy, while that for somatic embryo germination was ca. 10 Gy. (author). 7 refs, 2 tabs

  9. The visceromotor and somatic afferent nerves of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Djibril; Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Quillard, Jeanine; Ba, Nathalie; Allodji, Rodrigue Sètchéou; Benoit, Gérard; Bedretdinova, Dina; Bessede, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Innervation of the penis supports erectile and sensory functions. This article aims to study the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and afferent somatic (sensory) nervous systems of the penis and to investigate how these systems relate to vascular pathways. Penises obtained from five adult cadavers were studied via computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). The number of autonomic and somatic nerve fibers was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Proximally, penile innervation was mainly somatic in the extra-albugineal sector and mainly autonomic in the intracavernosal sector. Distally, both sectors were almost exclusively supplied by somatic nerve fibers, except the intrapenile vascular anastomoses that accompanied both somatic and autonomic (nitrergic) fibers. From this point, the neural immunolabeling within perivascular nerve fibers was mixed (somatic labeling and autonomic labeling). Accessory afferent, extra-albugineal pathways supplied the outer layers of the penis. There is a major change in the functional type of innervation between the proximal and distal parts of the intracavernosal sector of the penis. In addition to the pelvis and the hilum of the penis, the intrapenile neurovascular routes are the third level where the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and the afferent somatic (sensory) penile nerve fibers are close. Intrapenile neurovascular pathways define a proximal penile segment, which guarantees erectile rigidity, and a sensory distal segment. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  10. Peer emotion socialization and somatic complaints in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Naomi J; Zeman, Janice; Braunstein, Kara; Price, Natalee

    2016-07-01

    Somatic symptoms tend to increase during early adolescence and although youth's social environments and emotional functioning play a role in somatic symptoms, few studies have examined mechanisms through which social interaction could influence youth's somatic wellbeing. Participants were 132 youth (61.6% girls, Mage = 12.61 years, 84.7% Caucasian) and their mothers. Reciprocated best-friend dyads participated in a video-taped problem discussion task to assess peer emotion socialization responses. Two supportive friend responses (i.e., emotion-focused, problem-focused) and two unsupportive responses (i.e., punitive, neglect) were examined. Mothers reported on their child's somatic complaints. Friends who provided emotion-focused, problem-focused, punitive, and neglect responses to their close friend's emotional disclosures had significantly fewer somatic symptoms. However, youth who received punitive responses to their emotional disclosures from their close friends had more somatic complaints. These findings provide initial evidence of a link between emotion socialization responses within close friendships and somatic complaints in early adolescence. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Applications of Intravenous Immunoglobulins in Child Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogou, Maria; Papadopoulou-Alataki, Efimia; Spilioti, Martha; Alataki, Sofia; Evangeliou, Athanasios

    2017-11-10

    While there are guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulins in children with Guillain-Barre syndrome and myasthenia gravis based on high-level evidence studies, data are scarce for the majority of neurologic disorders in this age group. Neuronal antibodies are detected in children with seizures of autoimmune etiology. Intravenous immunoglobulins with their broad immunomodulatory mechanism of action could be ideally effective in different forms of immunedysregulated intractable epilepsies such as autoimmune epilepsy and autoimmune Rasmussen encephalitis. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for evidence of the use of intravenous immunoglobulins in a variety of neurologic diseases in childhood. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Pubmed as the medical database source without date range. Prospective studies in pediatric groups including objective measures of clinical outcomes were systematically selected. A total of 11 prospective studies were identified in the literature demonstrating a favorable effect of this therapeutic option in children with drug-resistant epilepsy and in cases of encephalitis. No serious adverse effects were reported. No prospective studies about the use of intravenous immunoglobulins in children with demyelinating disorders or neurologic paraneoplasmatic syndromes were found. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the field of intravenous immunoglobulins used in pediatric neurological diseases. Literature data supports a beneficial effect in this age group. Whilst awaiting the results of large scale studies, administration of intravenous immunoglobulins could be justified in refractory child epilepsy. Otherwise, its use should be guided by the individual needs of each child, depending on the underlying neurological disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Early Death from Rabies Despite of Receiving Immunoglobulin and Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Sadeghi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a viral disease with the high rate of mortality, which is non-curable after presenting clinical signs weather in humans or animals. Persons who are bitten by suspicious animals can be protected from rabies, in case of early referring to the health care preventive centers. However, the rate of durability and safety are questionable among those received immunoglobulin and vaccine. Here, it was reported a 57 year-old woman who was bitten by a jackal and died, despite of receiving immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine.  

  13. Intrathecal synthesis of free immunoglobulin light chains in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M; Schaldemose Nielsen, H; Jensen, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The detection of oligoclonal immunoglobulin free light chains (FLC) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was compared to IgG isoelectric focusing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 69 patients with possible first attacks of MS, 50 patients with cli......OBJECTIVE: The detection of oligoclonal immunoglobulin free light chains (FLC) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was compared to IgG isoelectric focusing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 69 patients with possible first attacks of MS, 50 patients...

  14. Bacteriostatic enterochelin-specific immunoglobulin from normal human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.G.; Yancey, R.J.; Lankford, C.E.; Earhart, C.F.

    1980-02-01

    Heat-inactivated normal human serum produces iron-reversible bacteriostasis of a number of microorganisms. This inhibitory effect was abolished by adsorption of serum with ultraviolet-killed cells of species that produce the siderophore enterochelin. Bacteriostasis also was alleviated by asorption of serum with 2,3-dihydroxy-N-benzoyl-L-serine, a degradation product of enterochelin, bound to the insoluble matrix AH-Sepharose 4B. Our results indicate that enterochelin-specific immunoglobulins exist in normal human serum. These immunoglobulins may act synergistically with transferrin to effect bacteriostasis of enterochelin-producing pathogens.

  15. Immunoglobulin Concentration in Tears of Contact Lens Wearers

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Rajendra P.; Bhushan, Prashant; Singh, Virendra P.; Singh, Mahendra K.; Kumar, Prakash; Bhatia, Ravindra P.S.; Singh, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in the concentration of tear immunoglobulins in contact lens wearers. Methods: A total of 45 cases including 23 contact lens wearers (43 eyes) and 22 age and sex matched healthy controls having no ocular pathology were studied for immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM) in their tears by single radial immunodiffusion method. Results: Most of the cases used soft (56.6%) and semi-soft gas permeable (30.4%) contact lenses. Tear IgM was detected in only 17.4% and tear I...

  16. Adhesins of immunoglobulin-like superfamily from earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, M; Hrzenjak, T; Grdisa, M; Vuković, S

    1998-05-01

    1. From the biologically active extract (G-90) isolated from the tissue homogenate of Eisenia foetida immunoglobulin-like structures were isolated and named G-90/4. 2. G-90/4 in nanogram concentrations stimulated cell proliferation more than did the original G-90. It lyses cells in microgram concentrations. 3. G-90/4 acts as an adhesion molecule between the receptors of adjacent cells. 4. The increase in proliferative activity was accompanied by the elevation of cytoplasmic protein containing tyrosine. 5. Immunohistochemical analyses confirm immunoglobulin-like transmembrane structures in the connective and muscular tissues of E. foetida.

  17. Synthetic seed production from somatic embryos of Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquea, Felipe; Poupin, María Josefina; Matus, José Tomás; Gebauer, Marlene; Medina, Consuelo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2008-10-01

    Pinus radiata is one of the most important forestry species in the southern hemisphere. This work describes the regeneration of this plant via somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic embryos. To improve this process, somatic embryogenic cell suspensions were established in liquid media for the generation of material for embryo maturation. Each developmental stage of these suspensions was characterized by microscopy and their growth phases quantified. An alginate-containing medium was used as an encapsulation method for the somatic embryos that were then germinated as artificial seeds in vitro. The protocols described in this work are both useful and reliable for industrial purposes.

  18. Dysphoria and somatization in Iranian culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliskin, K L

    1992-09-01

    Iranians express dysphoria through an undifferentiated term called narahati, meaning depressed, ill at ease, nervous, inconvenienced, or anxious. People try masking this emotion or express it in specific ways nonverbally, such as sulking or not eating. Two other dysphoric affects, sadness and anger, are not masked. Because of the social conception of persons being emotionally sensitive, the expression of narahati is guarded: expressing it not only could show that one is socially vulnerable, it could also make another sensitive empathic person narahat. The body is also sensitive, but to the physical world. Physical health is maintained by balancing a diet of "hot" and "cold" foods and avoiding exposure to cold and moisture. With the social and cultural problems brought on by revolution, war, immigration, and accommodation to a new society, Iranian refugees experience changes in family, role, status, finances, language, and other sociocultural ways of being that cause them to feel narahat and to express it verbally, nonverbally, or through somatization. Understanding Iranian conceptions of emotional and physical sensitivity will help clinicians in treating Iranian patients.

  19. Somatic Embryogenesis of Abies cephalonica Loud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajňáková, Jana; Häggman, Hely

    2016-01-01

    Greek fir (Abies cephalonica Loudon) belongs to the Mediterranean fir species and is widely distributed in the mountains of Central and Southern Greece. Considering a climatic scenario, infestation by pathogens or insects and fire episodes, it has been proposed that Mediterranean firs could be in danger in some parts of their present range but, on the other hand, could also replace other species in more northern zones with temperate humid climates (e.g., silver fir, Abies alba Mill.). As fir species are generally highly productive and therefore important for commercial forestry, they have traditionally been involved in conventional tree improvement programs. A lot of effort has been put into the development of vegetative propagation methods for firs, in order to rapidly gain the benefits of traditional breeding to be utilized in reforestation. The present paper provides up to date information on protocols for somatic embryogenesis (i.e., the most promising in vitro method for vegetative propagation) of Greek fir. Moreover, the protocols for cryopreservation and long-term storage of embryogenic material are described as well.

  20. Specification of the somatic musculature in Drosophila†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobi, Krista C.; Schulman, Victoria K.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    The somatic muscle system formed during Drosophila embryogenesis is required for larvae to hatch, feed, and crawl. This system is replaced in the pupa by a new adult muscle set, responsible for activities such as feeding, walking, and flight. Both the larval and adult muscle systems are comprised of distinct muscle fibers to serve these specific motor functions. In this way, the Drosophila musculature is a valuable model for patterning within a single tissue: while all muscle cells share properties such as the contractile apparatus, properties such as size, position, and number of nuclei are unique for a particular muscle. In the embryo, diversification of muscle fibers relies first on signaling cascades that pattern the mesoderm. Subsequently, the combinatorial expression of specific transcription factors leads muscle fibers to adopt particular sizes, shapes, and orientations. Adult muscle precursors (AMPs), set aside during embryonic development, proliferate during the larval phases and seed the formation of the abdominal, leg, and flight muscles in the adult fly. Adult muscle fibers may either be formed de novo from the fusion of the AMPs, or are created by the binding of AMPs to an existing larval muscle. While less is known about adult muscle specification compared to the larva, expression of specific transcription factors is also important for its diversification. Increasingly, the mechanisms required for the diversification of fly muscle have found parallels in vertebrate systems and mark Drosophila as a robust model system to examine questions about how diverse cell types are generated within an organism. PMID:25728002

  1. Somatic mosaicism for a DMD gene deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kayoko; Ikeya, Kiyoko; Kondo, Eri [Tokyo Women`s Medical College (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    Mosaicism is a mixed state, with two cell populations of different genetic origins caused by a cell mutation occurring after fertilization. In the present case, DNA analysis of lymphocytes led to a DMD diagnosis before death. Postmortem immunocytochemical and DNA analysis showed somatic mosaicism. At age 18 years, blood lymphocyte DNA analysis showed a DMD gene deletion, upstream from exon 7 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. As the patient`s mother and elder sister had no deletions, he was considered to have a new mutation. Immunocytochemical studies of postmortem tissues showed that dystrophin was absent from the tongue, deltoid, intercostal, psoas and rectus femoris muscles, but there was a mix of dystrophin-positive and negative fibers in the rectus abdominis, cardiac, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles. All diaphragm cells were dystrophin positive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification from all tissues except the temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles, diaphragm and kidney, in which no deletion was found, showed the deletion from at least exon 6 to the 5{prime} end containing both muscle and brain promoters. In this case, a genomic deletion of the DMD gene contributed to the formation of tissues derived from both ectoderm and endoderm, and cells of mesodermal origin showed genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Our results indicate a mutation of the present case may have occurred just before the period of germ layer formation. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  2. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system is a device that consists of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific... Test Systems § 866.5540 Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system is a device that consists of...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific... Test Systems § 866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system is a device that consists...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific... Test Systems § 866.5530 Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system is a device that consists of...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological... Test Systems § 866.5510 Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system is a device that consists of the...

  7. Journeying as Amateur and Professional – A Somatic Movement Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Eddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This account is an interactive case study co-authored by a teacher and her student on the topic of moving from amateur to professional. It highlights the role of somatic education in equalizing the experience of amateurs and professionals as well as pointing to specific curricula, public performances, participatory events and volunteer work that are made uniquely available to students of programs related to Dynamic EmbodimentTM Somatic Movement Therapy (known as the Somatic Movement Therapy Training – SMTT from 1991-2005. Written in first-person narrative style (Powdermaker 1966, this inquiry supports the primary methodology of somatic education – the process of self-discovery “from within” (Hanna 1976 emphasizing the physical body with a focus on bodily proprioception and kinesthetic awareness – as well as the humanistic nature of the student-teacher relationship and the value of each in performance and education.

  8. Effect of the somatic cell count on physicochemical components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xz

    2015-04-29

    Genetic and environmental effects on milk yield and somatic cell count of Holstein cows]. R. Bras. Zootec. 36:343-349. Beloti V, Riberio Júnior JC, Tamanine R, Yamada AK, Cavaletti L,. Shecaira CL, Novaes DG, Silva FF (2011).

  9. Somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of hermaphrodite Carica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Somatic embryogenesis from leaf explants of hermaphrodite Carica papaya: A new approach for clonal propagation. Andréa Dias Koehler, Carlos Roberto Carvalho, Isabella Santiago Abreu, Wellington Ronildo Clarindo ...

  10. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer – biological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Brian

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other specie, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle.

  11. Somatic Diseases and Conditions Before the First Diagnosis of Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising; Benros, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    the first diagnosis of schizophrenia. METHOD: Nationwide sample of the Danish population consisting of singletons (n = 954351) born 1977-1993 and followed from birth to 2009, during which period 4371 developed schizophrenia. Somatic diagnoses at all general hospital contacts (admitted or outpatient care......OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with excess physical comorbidity. Yet, to our knowledge, large studies are lacking on the associations with somatic diseases before the onset of schizophrenia. The authors conducted a nationwide study of the full spectrum of treated somatic diseases before...... at a somatic hospital) from 1977 to 2009 were used as exposures. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of schizophrenia was calculated using Poisson regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Among the 4371 persons who developed schizophrenia from 1992 to 2009, a total of 4180 (95.6%) persons had a previous...

  12. High dose intravenous immunoglobulin in Rh and ABO hemolytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin in Rh and ABO hemolytic disease of Egyptian neonates. INTRODUCTION. Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to red cell alloimmunisation is an important cause of hyperbilirubinemia with significant morbidity in the neonatal period.1,2. Hemolytic disease of the newborn has ...

  13. Levels of serum immunoglobulins in apparently healthy children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: Serum levels of the immunoglobulins: IgG, IgA and IgM were determined by the single radial immunodiffusion technique of Mancini in a total of 122 apparently healthy subjects consisting of 43 children (20 males; 23 females) aged 5-12 years and 79 adults (39 males; 40 females) aged 18-65 years resident in Port ...

  14. Uptake of Colostral Immunoglobulins by the Compromised Newborn Farm Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangild PT

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality is very high in farm animals (~10% and disease resistance is greatly influenced by an adequate passive immunisation just after birth. In piglets, foals, calves and lambs, the intestinal absorption of immunoglobulins from their mother's colostrum occurs mainly by a non-specific endocytosis of macromolecules, but the details of the absorption process, and the mechanisms regulating its cessation after 1–2 days of colostrum exposure, remain poorly understood. In both normal and 'compromised' (premature, growth-retarded, hypoxic, lethargic newborn farm animals, the intestinal capacity to absorb macromolecules is influenced by both diet- and animal-related factors. Thus, macromolecule uptake is severely reduced in response to premature birth and when macromolecules are to be absorbed from diets other than species-specific colostrum. On the other hand, fetal growth retardation, in vitro embryo production, or a stressful birth process are unlikely to reduce the ability of the intestine to absorb immunoglobulins from colostrum. More knowledge about the diet- and animal-related factors affecting intestinal immunoglobulin uptake will improve the clinical care of 'compromised' newborn farm animals. The present text gives a brief introduction to the process of intestinal immunoglobulin absorption in large farm animals and describe some recent results from the author's own studies in pigs, calves and lambs.

  15. Purification, characterization and ELISA detection of mink immunoglobulins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    2008-01-01

    This study describes easy purification methods for mink IgG, IgA and IgM immunoglobulins. IgG and IgM were purified from normal mink serum, while IgA was purified from mink bile from healthy animals. By SDS-polyacrylamid-gel-electrophoresis  (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting under reducing conditions...

  16. Pattern of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) use in a pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations are scarce biological products used for replacement or immunomodulatory effects. Guidelines have been issued by regulatory health authorities to ensure provision of the products for patients who are in severe need. Objectives: The study aimed at ...

  17. In vitro investigation of immunoglobulin treatment mechanisms in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, A.; Vuist, W. M.; van Schaik, I. N.; Vermeulen, M.

    1996-01-01

    High doses of immunoglobulins (IVIG) may have beneficial effects in patients with autoimmune diseases. In this review several different mechanisms of action are discussed. These mechanisms include effects on the effector phase of the immune response, on the initial steps of the immune response and

  18. Immunoglobulin G bound to ovine placenta is eluted by surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To elute placental bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) in situ. Design: Laboratory based experimentation. Setting: Biological Sciences Department, The University of Newcastle Australia and the Department of Biochemistry, University of Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Twelve pregnant ewes 10 to 15 days before the onset of ...

  19. Unusual recovery from acute panautonomic neuropathy after immunoglobulin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A. A.; Vermeulen, M.; Koelman, J. H.; Wieling, W.

    1997-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with acute idiopathic postganglionic panautonomic neuropathy experienced prompt recovery of all dysautonomic symptoms after receiving high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Her recovery was complete within 6 months after onset of disease. This unusually rapid and complete

  20. Levels of serum immunoglobulins in apparently healthy children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum levels of the immunoglobulins: IgG, IgA and IgM were determined by the single radial immunodiffusion technique of Mancini in a total of 122 apparently healthy subjects consisting of 43 children (20 males; 23 females) aged 5-12 years and 79 adults (39 males; 40 females) aged 18-65 years resident in Port Harcourt, ...

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin in the prevention of recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2005-01-01

    Immunological disturbances play a role in the majority of patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM) and therefore treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) has been tested in patients with RM in several trials. Seven placebo-controlled trials that were extremely heterogeneous with respect...

  2. Immunoglobulins against Tyrosine Nitrated Epitopes in Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Leonor; Tenopoulou, Margarita; Lightfoot, Richard; Tsika, Epida; Parastatidis, Ioannis; Martinez, Marissa; Greco, Todd M.; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Wu, Yuping; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence support a pathophysiological role of immunity in atherosclerosis. Tyrosine nitrated proteins, a footprint of oxygen and nitrogen derived oxidants generated by cells of the immune system, are enriched in atheromatous lesions and in circulation of coronary artery disease (CAD) subjects. However, the consequences of possible immune reactions triggered by the presence of nitrated proteins in subjects with clinically documented atherosclerosis have not been explored. Methods and Results Specific immunoglobulins that recognize 3-nitrotyrosine epitopes were identified in human lesions, as well as in circulation of CAD subjects. The levels of circulating immunoglobulins against 3-nitrotyrosine epitopes were quantified in CAD patients (n=374) and subjects without CAD (non CAD controls, n=313). A ten-fold increase in the mean level of circulating immunoglobulins against protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine was documented in the CAD subjects (3.75 ± 1.8 μg antibody Eq/mL plasma vs. 0.36 ± 0.8 μg antibody Eq/mL plasma), and was strongly associated with angiographic evidence of significant CAD. Conclusions The results of this cross sectional study suggest that post-translational modification of proteins via nitration within atherosclerotic plaque-laden arteries and in circulation serve as neoepitopes for elaboration of immunoglobulins, thereby providing an association between oxidant production and the activation of the immune system in CAD. PMID:23081989

  3. Immunoglobulin A1 protease activity in Gemella haemolysans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and nature of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease activity in members of the genus Gemella and related taxa. Among a total of 22 Gemella strains belonging to the four species Gemella haemolysans, Gemella morbillorum, Gemella sanguinis...

  4. Structure of Fc-fragment of the mouse immunoglobulin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenko, Petr; Dohnálek, Jan; Štouračová, Renata; Skálová, Tereza; Tishchenko, Galina; Dušková, Jarmila; Hašek, Jindřich

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2005), s. 146-147 ISSN 1211-5894. [Colloquium of Crystallographic Society : Structure. Třešť, 20.06.2005-23.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K05008 Keywords : immunoglobulin * x-ray crystallography * structure determination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Variations of immunoglobulins after antigenic injection in irradiated rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, P.; Borgard, J.P.

    Study on the influence of irradiation upon rabbit immunoglobulins is developed. It is tried to check if the observed delay, after cephalic irradiation, in specified antibody response of injected antigen, could be in relation with a transient hypoimmunoglobulinemia in these same animals [fr

  6. Glycosylation analysis of immunoglobulin G : method development and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selman, Maurice Henricus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) represents the most abundant antibody class in the human circulation. IgG consists of two heavy chains and two light chains. Parts of the heavy chains, together with the light chains, form two fragment antigen binding (Fab) moieties, whilst the remainders of the two heavy

  7. Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin in chronic autoimmune neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, AEJ; van der Hoeven, JH

    Objective - To investigate the effect of Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D) in patients with an autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy. Material and methods - Three patients with an autoimmune mediated neuropathy received 1000 IU anti-D weekly for 2 months. Results - Two patients worsened gradually

  8. Immunoglobulin D and cardiac amyloidosis: development and a case illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servonnet, Aurélie; Bouvier, François; Garcia Hejl, Carine; Sanmartin, Nancy; Renard, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    Amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of proteins which interfere with tissue function. We report the case of a patient with pathological heart involvement which is caused by immunoglobulin D amyloidosis, and review current data on the amyloidois diagnosis and management.

  9. Immunoglobulin coating of faecal bacteria in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waaij, Laurens A.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Visser, Annie; Nelis, Gerardus F.; Westerveld, Bram D.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Hunter, John O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: An inappropriate mucosal immune response to the commensal bacterial flora may play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study we determined the percentage of immunoglobulin-coated bacteria in the stools of patients and controls. METHODS: Faecal samples

  10. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma Presenting as Spontaneous Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hadidi, Samer; Katato, Khalil; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2017-01-01

    Immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma is a rare type of multiple myeloma that usually presents as bone pain, fatigue, or weight loss. We report a case of immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma in a 53-year-old Caucasian male patient with previous medical history of anaplastic oligodendroglioma status post-surgical resection who was evaluated for back pain while mowing the lawn. His physical examination showed tenderness over the lower thoracic vertebrae with no sensory or motor impairment. Initial lab investigations showed normocytic anemia and hypercalcemia with low parathyroid hormone. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic spine with and without contrast showed acute pathological fracture of the T12 vertebral body with enhancing soft tissue which extended into the left ventral epidural space and left T11-T12 neural foramen. Serum protein electrophoresis showed abnormal protein band in the gamma globulin. Free light chain assay showed serum free kappa which was elevated at 3,090.0 mg/L (reference range 3.3-19.4 mg/L). Immunoglobulin D was elevated at 566.0 mg/dL (reference range immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma urge clinicians to offer their patients new treatment options especially as of the earlier presentation of this subtype of multiple myeloma and the previous reports of worse prognosis.

  11. Targeting lentiviral vectors to antigen-specific immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Leslie; Yang, Lili; Joo, Kye il; Yang, Haiguang; Baltimore, David; Wang, Pin

    2008-09-01

    Gene transfer into B cells by lentivectors can provide an alternative approach to managing B lymphocyte malignancies and autoreactive B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. These pathogenic B cell populations can be distinguished by their surface expression of monospecific immunoglobulin. Development of a novel vector system to deliver genes to these specific B cells could improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy. We have developed an efficient method to target lentivectors to monospecific immunoglobulin-expressing cells in vitro and in vivo. We were able to incorporate a model antigen CD20 and a fusogenic protein derived from the Sindbis virus as two distinct molecules into the lentiviral surface. This engineered vector could specifically bind to cells expressing surface immunoglobulin recognizing CD20 (alphaCD20), resulting in efficient transduction of target cells in a cognate antigen-dependent manner in vitro, and in vivo in a xenografted tumor model. Tumor suppression was observed in vivo, using the engineered lentivector to deliver a suicide gene to a xenografted tumor expressing alphaCD20. These results show the feasibility of engineering lentivectors to target immunoglobulin- specific cells to deliver a therapeutic effect. Such targeting lentivectors also could potentially be used to genetically mark antigen-specific B cells in vivo to study their B cell biology.

  12. Acute phase proteins and immunoglobulin classes in newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: No single organic cause has been found for schizophrenia and its management has been difficult. More so, there are few data on the immune parameters of Nigerian schizophrenic patients on drug treatment and those that are not on treatment. Methodology: This study determines the levels of immunoglobulin

  13. Bacteremia and immunoglobulin classes in Nigerian women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apart from antiphospholipid- and thyroid- autoantibodies which were reported as underlying causes of recurrent pregnancy loss, specific IgG to patermal MHC and Rh was proposed. This raises the possibility of other classes of immunoglobulin in recurrent abortion. Twenty-four pregnant women with recurrent abortion ...

  14. Haemolytic anaemia as a complication to intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Christiansen, Ingelise

    performed before and two weeks after infusion of IVIg. Following treatment blood haemoglobin declined from 8.6±0.8 to 8.1±1.3mmol/l, p... naive patients are susceptible to develop haemolysis. Haemolytic anaemia is a severe side effect that seems to be more frequent after immunoglobulin infusions than previously recognized....

  15. serum immunoglobulin levels in white, asiatic and bantu blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    all assays were calculated as a percentage of the mean of. TABLE I. RESULTS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN ASSAYS OF tOO WHITE, tOO ASIATIC AND 100 BANTU DONORS, EXPRESSED AS A. PERCENTAGE OF A CONTROL SERUM. Parameter. Range. Mean. Variance. Standard deviation. CoefI. of variation.

  16. Cell phenotypes, immunoglobulins and complement in lesions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... stained positive for CD68. Type III reaction consisted of a discrete epithelioid granuloma without wellformed grains. IgG, IgM and C3 were found on the surface of the grain and the hyphae . Keywords: Madurella mycetomatis lesion, cell phenotypes, immunoglobulins, complement. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol.

  17. Pattern of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) use in a pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations are scarce biological products used for replacement or immunomodulatory effects. Guidelines have been issued by regulatory health authorities to ensure provision of the products for patients who are in severe need. Objectives: The study aimed at description of ...

  18. Mechanism of immunoglobulin G4 Fab-arm exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, Theo; Ooijevaar-de Heer, Pleuni; Bende, Onno; Aalberse, Rob C.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are symmetrical molecules that may be regarded as covalent dimers of 2 half-molecules, each consisting of a light chain and a heavy chain. Human IgG4 is an unusually dynamic antibody, with half-molecule exchange ("Fab-arm exchange") resulting in asymmetrical,

  19. Immunoglobulin G for patients with necrotising soft tissue infection (INSTINCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Martin B.; Hjortrup, Peter B.; Hansen, Marco B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the INSTINCT trial was to assess the effect of intravenous polyspecific immunoglobulin G (IVIG) compared with placebo on self-reported physical function in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with necrotising soft tissue infection (NSTI). Methods: We randomised 100 patients wit...

  20. Cryopreservation of somatic embryos of paradise tree (Melia azedarach L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Scocchi, A.; Vila, S.; Mroginski, L.; Engelmann, Florent

    2007-01-01

    In paradise tree (Melia azedarach L.), immature zygotic embryos sampled from immature fruits are the starting material for the production of somatic embryos. These somatic embryos are employed for freezing experiments. Immature fruits could be stored at 25 degrees C for up to 80 days without impairing the embryogenic potential of zygotic embryos, which represents a four-fold increase in immature fruit storage duration, compared with previous studies. Among the three cryopreservation technique...

  1. Induction and isolation of somatic mutations in vegetatively propagated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donini, B.

    1975-01-01

    Research carried out since 1963 concentrated on techniques of mutagenic treatment: problems of exposure, type of radiation (acute irradiation by x- and γ-rays, and chronic exposure in the gamma field), conditions during and after irradiation, mechanisms of mutation induction, and methodology of isolation of somatic mutations. Analyses of somatic mutations included studies on apple, pear, olive, peach, grape and cherry plants. Young trees, dormant and rooted scions, summer and floral buds or seeds were used

  2. Pattern of somatic symptoms in anxiety and depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the pattern of somatic symptoms in anxiety and depressive disorders. Design: Cross Sectional Comparative study Place of Study: Department of Psychiatry Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Duration of Study: From May to November 2002. Patients and Methods: Patients were divided in Group I of anxiety and group II of depression. Fifty patients considered in each group by convenience sampling. The organic basis of their symptoms was ruled out. The patterns of their somatic symptoms and other information like educational and economic status were recorded on Semi Structured Proforma. The patient's diagnosis was made on schedule based ICD-10 research criteria. The severity of anxiety and depression was assessed by using HARS and HDRS respectively. The pattern of somatic symptoms in both groups was then analyzed by the urdu version of Bradford Somatic Inventory. Patterns of somatic complaints were then analyzed by chi square test. Results: Out of 100 patients we placed 50 each in group I (anxiety) and group II (Depression). Males were higher in depression whereas females were higher in anxiety disorder group. P-value for headache was 0.017 while in rest of the somatic symptoms it was insignificant ranging from 0.4 to 1. Conclusion: We found that the patterns of somatic symptoms are present in both the groups of anxiety and depression like symptoms related to musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal system were commonly observed in cases of depression whereas symptoms related to autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular system is more significantly somatized in patients of anxiety. A larger sample is required for further studies to get better results. (author)

  3. Body image and self-esteem in somatizing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoz, Ozen O; Doganavsargil, Ozge; Elbi, Hayriye

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine dissatisfaction with body appearance and bodily functions and to assess self-esteem in somatizing patients. Body image and self-esteem were investigated in 128 women; 34 of those had diagnosed somatoform disorders, 50 were breast cancer patients with total mastectomy surgery alone, and 44 were healthy subjects. Body image and self-esteem were assessed using the Body Cathexis Scale and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The two clinical groups did not differ from one another (z = -1.832, P = 0.067), but differed from healthy controls in terms of body image (somatizing patients vs healthy controls, z = -3.628, P self-esteem (z = -0.936, P = 0.349) when depressive symptoms were controlled. No statistically significant difference was observed between total mastectomy patients and healthy controls in terms of self-esteem (z = -1.727, P = 0.084). The lower levels of self-esteem in somatizing patients were largely mediated by depressive symptoms. Depressed and non-depressed somatizing patients differed significantly from healthy controls with respect to their self-esteem and body image. Somatizing patients who were dissatisfied with their bodily functions and appearance had lower levels of self-esteem and high comorbidity of depression. In clinical practice it is suggested that clinicians should take into account psychiatric comorbidity, self-esteem, and body image in somatizing patients when planning treatment approaches.

  4. The Role of Somatic L1 Retrotransposition in Human Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Emma C; Devine, Scott E

    2017-05-31

    The human LINE-1 (or L1) element is a non-LTR retrotransposon that is mobilized through an RNA intermediate by an L1-encoded reverse transcriptase and other L1-encoded proteins. L1 elements remain actively mobile today and continue to mutagenize human genomes. Importantly, when new insertions disrupt gene function, they can cause diseases. Historically, L1s were thought to be active in the germline but silenced in adult somatic tissues. However, recent studies now show that L1 is active in at least some somatic tissues, including epithelial cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of these recent developments, and examine evidence that somatic L1 retrotransposition can initiate and drive tumorigenesis in humans. Recent studies have: (i) cataloged somatic L1 activity in many epithelial tumor types; (ii) identified specific full-length L1 source elements that give rise to somatic L1 insertions; and (iii) determined that L1 promoter hypomethylation likely plays an early role in the derepression of L1s in somatic tissues. A central challenge moving forward is to determine the extent to which L1 driver mutations can promote tumor initiation, evolution, and metastasis in humans.

  5. The Role of Somatic L1 Retrotransposition in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C. Scott

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The human LINE-1 (or L1 element is a non-LTR retrotransposon that is mobilized through an RNA intermediate by an L1-encoded reverse transcriptase and other L1-encoded proteins. L1 elements remain actively mobile today and continue to mutagenize human genomes. Importantly, when new insertions disrupt gene function, they can cause diseases. Historically, L1s were thought to be active in the germline but silenced in adult somatic tissues. However, recent studies now show that L1 is active in at least some somatic tissues, including epithelial cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of these recent developments, and examine evidence that somatic L1 retrotransposition can initiate and drive tumorigenesis in humans. Recent studies have: (i cataloged somatic L1 activity in many epithelial tumor types; (ii identified specific full-length L1 source elements that give rise to somatic L1 insertions; and (iii determined that L1 promoter hypomethylation likely plays an early role in the derepression of L1s in somatic tissues. A central challenge moving forward is to determine the extent to which L1 driver mutations can promote tumor initiation, evolution, and metastasis in humans.

  6. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  7. Molecular Analysis of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Gene in Immunoglobulin-E Deficient Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how class switch recombination (CSR is regulated to produce immunoglobulin E (IgE has become fundamental because of the dramatic increase in the prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. CSR requires the induction of the enzyme AICDA in B cells. Mutations in AICDA have been linked to Hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2, which shows absence of switching to IgE as well as to IgG and IgA. Although isolated IgE deficiency is a rare entity, here we show some individuals with normal serum IgM, IgG, and IgA levels that had undetectable total serum IgE levels. We have analyzed the AICDA gene in these individuals to determine if there are mutations in AICDA that could lead to selective IgE deficiency. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE and sequencing analysis of AICDA coding sequences demonstrated sequence heterogeneity due to 5923A/G and 7888C/T polymorphisms, but did not reveal any novel mutation that might explain the selective IgE deficit.

  8. Effects of Ramadan fasting on serum immunoglobulin G and M, and salivary immunoglobulin A concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Develioglu, Omer Necati; Kucur, Mine; Ipek, Havva Duru; Celebi, Saban; Can, Gunay; Kulekci, Mehmet

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of Ramadan fasting on serum concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM, and salivary IgA concentrations. Blood and saliva samples were collected one week before and during the last week of Ramadan from healthy male volunteers. Albumin, total lymphocyte count, electrolytes, and IgG and IgM concentrations were determined in serum; salivary IgA concentrations were measured. Anthropometric measurements were also recorded. Samples were collected from 35 subjects (mean age 35.86 years, range 20-59 years). Weight, body mass index, albumin levels and the nutritional risk index decreased significantly during Ramadan fasting compared with before fasting. In addition, Na(+) and Cl(-) electrolyte levels were significantly decreased during Ramadan. Serum IgG concentrations decreased significantly during Ramadan compared with before fasting, but were still within the normal range. Salivary IgA concentrations also decreased significantly, whereas serum IgM levels did not change. Lymphocyte numbers increased significantly, but there was no correlation between Ig levels and lymphocyte count. Ramadan fasting did not result in severe immunological disturbances.

  9. Gamma ray induced somatic mutations in rose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Budwood of 32 rose cultivars (Rosa spp.) was exposed to 3-4 krad of gamma rays and eyes were grafted on Rosa indica var. odorata root stock. Radiosensitivity with respect to sprouting, survival and plant height, and mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and dose of gamma rays. Somatic mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimera in 21 cultivars. The size of the mutant sector varied from a narrow streak on a petal to a whole flower and from a portion of a branch to an entire branch. 14 mutants were detected in M 1 V 1 , four in M 1 V 2 and three in M 1 V 3 . Maximum number of mutations was detected following 3 krad treatment. Eyes from mutant branches were grafted again on root stock and non-chimeric mutants were aimed at by vegetative propagation. Mutants from 11 cultivars only could be isolated in pure form. Isolation of non-chimeric mutants sometimes is difficult due to weak growth of a mutant branch. In such a case, all normal looking branches are removed to force a better growth of the mutant branch. It is advisable to maintain irradiated plants at least for four years with drastic pruning in each year. Nine mutants viz. 'Sharada', 'Sukumari', 'Tangerine Contempo', 'Yellow Contempo', 'Pink Contempo', 'Striped Contempo', 'Twinkle', 'Curio' and 'Light Pink Prize' have already been released as new cultivars for commercialization [ref. MBNL No. 23 and 31] and others are being multiplied and assessed. The mutation spectrum appears to be wider for the cultivars 'Contempo' and 'Imperator'. Pigment composition of the original variety is relevant for the kind of flower colour mutations that can be induced

  10. Immunoglobulin concentration in blood serum of postcolostral calves: Ratio between immunoglobulin level and appearance of enzootic pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonić Branko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The timely supply of newborn calves with optimal quantities of colostrum has a key role in the process of immune protection in the early phase of their lives. Passively acquired antibodies can protect the digestive organs from infection caused by E.coli bacteria, and it seems also from the appearance of diseases of the respiratory tract. These examinations were performed on a cattle farm where bronchopneumonia was one of the most significant health problems, and a group of 39 calves were selected for the investigations. The calves were fed with their mothers’ colostrum after birth, and then with collective milk. Immunoglobulin concentration was determined in blood samples taken during the postcolostral period, with the method using zinc-sulphate. At the age of 40 days, the calves were administered a polyvalent inactivated vaccine, and revaccinated 20 days after that (Vibak, Veterinary Department Subotica. In 74.34% calves, the immunoglobulin G concentration ranged from 26 to 40 g/l. In 25.66% calves, the immunoglobulin concentration was lower, from 8 to 25 g/l. The calves found to have a lower concentration of immunoglobulin in blood contracted bronchopneumonia more frequently, and the outcome of the disease in some cases was mortality, even.

  11. Studies on the association between immunoglobulin E autoreactivity and immunoglobulin E-dependent histamine-releasing factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budde, Ilona Kleine; de Heer, Pleuni G.; Natter, Susanne; Mahler, Vera; van der Zee, Jaring S.; Valenta, Rudolf; Aalberse, Rob C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been reported that serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) from certain atopic patients can sensitize basophils to release histamine in response to IgE-dependent histamine-releasing factors (HRFs). It has also been shown that patients suffering from severe forms of atopy may contain IgE autoantibodies.

  12. Successful Treatment of Rotavirus-induced Diarrhoea in Suckling Mice with Egg Yolk Immunoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Shafiqul A.; Pant, Neha; Juneja, Lekh R.; Hammarström, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    The role of specific immunoglobulins at mucosal sites in imparting protection against disease, such as rotavirus-associated diarrhoea, is well-established. Oral immunoglobulin therapy with egg yolk-derived antirotavirus immunoglobulins has previously been shown to achieve moderate therapeutic effect in diarrhoea due to rotavirus in a clinical trial. Here, data on the therapeutic potential of the same immunoglobulin preparation in an infant mouse model of rotavirus-induced diarrhoea is presented. The use of an animal model has allowed therapy to be evaluated with higher doses of immunoglobulins and has suggested that an improved therapeutic effect can be achieved by increasing the dose in the clinical setting. PMID:18402190

  13. Suspected idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation presenting as immunoglobulin G4-related disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Noriko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation is a rare and ill-defined heterogeneous entity, and a distinct subset of orbital inflammation. Recently, attention has been focused on immunoglobulin G4-related disease complicated with fibrotic changes in some other organs with high serum immunoglobulin G4 levels. This report presents a case of suspected idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation complicated with high serum immunoglobulin G4 levels. Case presentation An 82-year-old Japanese woman had a 30-year history of chronic thyroiditis. She experienced right ptosis and eyelid swelling. These symptoms gradually developed over five years. The clinical and radiographic findings suggested that our patient had idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation. We were unable to obtain our patient's consent to perform a biopsy. While the serum immunoglobulin G level was within the normal limits, the serum immunoglobulin G4 level was significantly elevated. The serum immunoglobulin G4 levels decreased after the administration of oral prednisolone at a daily dose of 20 mg. In addition, the swelling and ptosis of the right upper eyelid disappeared gradually after four weeks. Our patient was then suspected to have idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation complicated with immunoglobulin G4-related disease and chronic thyroiditis. Conclusion An orbital pseudotumor of this type is indicative of idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation immunoglobulin G4-related disease. Immunoglobulin G4 may thus be considered a subclass of immunoglobulin G when the serum immunoglobulin G level is within normal limits.

  14. The association between immunoglobulin concentrations and prediabetes prevalence in a large Chinese cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglei; Song, Yanqi; Sun, Shaomei; Gao, Li; Liu, Li; Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Xia, Yang; Bao, Xue; Gu, Yeqing; Shi, Hongbin; Su, Qian; Fang, Liyun; Yang, Huijun; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Ming; Jia, Qiyu; Song, Kun; Zhang, Qing; Niu, Kaijun

    2017-08-01

    Prediabetes has received public attention owing to the increasing prevalence worldwide. Mounting evidence has indicated that inflammation directly contributed to the etiology of glucose metabolism disorders. Although immunoglobulins play a crucial role in immune responses, little research has been done on the link between immunoglobulins and prediabetes in adults. Hence, the aim of the present study was to explore the associations between immunoglobulins levels and prevalence of prediabetes in a general adult population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 8856 adults (mean±standard deviation age: 48.4±10.7years) in Tianjin, China. The serum immunoglobulins concentrations were measured by the immunonephelometric technique. Prediabetes was diagnosed using the following parameters in accordance with the American Diabetes Association: fasting plasma glucose, postprandial glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin. The associations between concentrations of immunoglobulins and the prevalence of prediabetes were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Overall, the prevalence of prediabetes was 37.4% (3311/8856). After controlling for confounders, compared with the lowest quintile, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of prediabetes for the highest quintile of immunoglobulins (immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin E, immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A) were as follows: 1.06 (0.91-1.23), 1.31 (1.13-1.52), 0.86 (0.74-1.01), and 1.19 (1.03-1.38) (P for trend were 0.35, immunoglobulin E and immunoglobulin A levels were independently and positively associated with prediabetes prevalence. There was also a trending association between immunoglobulin M concentrations and prediabetes prevalence. Further studies are necessary to clarify if there is a causal association of immunoglobulins in prediabetes or if they reflect early immunologic disturbances in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation between electrical conductivity and somatic cell score for mastitis evaluation in dairy Gir cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Borges Valdevite

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland, caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi and yeasts. During the processes of inflammation, chloride (Cl and sodium (Na ions, immunoglobulins and other serum proteins present in blood, flow through capillaries direct to the alveoli lumen of the gland, thus increasing its concentration. This is due to the increase of vascular permeability, the destruction of tight junctions and the active ion-pumping system, while the concentration of casein, lactose, triglycerides and potassium (K decreases. This work aimed to study a method to evaluate mastitis in Gir dairy cattle, where the milk electric conductivity (EC was correlated to milk somatic cell count (SCC. This method will provide an early diagnosis, which can be used daily with conductivity meter in mechanical milking machine or weekly in properties with manual milking. The measurement of EC in milk was accomplished through the appliance of AK83 BENCHTOP PORTATIL. The experiment was conducted in two farms: Calciolândia, Arcos/MG and Bom Jardim da Serra, Mococa/SP, totaling 123 Gir cows. In Calciolândia farm, milking was manual and in Bom Jardim da Serra milking was manual and mechanical but both with the presence of the calf . The milk collection took place in 10 ml bottles at ambience temperature, and the samples were in duplicate, one to measure the EC and the other for SCC and components. The correlations were calculated using SAS software, through data collected from farms. The correlations found between EC and SCC were 40.9% and 42.7%, respectively to Bom Jardim da Serra and Calciolândia farms. Environmental factors that influences SCC and EC where not considered in the analysis, order of birth, lactation stage, age of cow, number of milk per day and jet of milk collected sample of complete collection of first milking or jets of milk. For now we can conclude that there is strong evidence of an analogy between electrical current (EC and the milk

  16. The Role of Somatic Symptoms in Sexual Medicine: Somatization as Important Contextual Factor in Male Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanni, Egidia; Castellini, Giovanni; Corona, Giovanni; Boddi, Valentina; Ricca, Valdo; Rastrelli, Giulia; Fisher, Alessandra Daphne; Cipriani, Sarah; Maggi, Mario

    2016-09-01

    An important feature of somatic symptom disorder is the subjective perception of the physical symptoms and its maladaptive interpretation. Considering that psychological distress is often expressed through somatic symptoms, it is possible that they underlie at least a part of the symptoms in subjects complaining of sexual dysfunction. Nevertheless, studies on the impact of somatoform disorders in sexual dysfunction are scanty. To define the psychological, relational, and organic correlates of somatic symptoms in a large sample of patients complaining of sexual problems. A consecutive series of 2833 men (mean age 50.2 ± 13.5 years) was retrospectively studied. Somatic symptoms were assessed using the "somatized anxiety symptoms" subscale of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire (MHQ-S). Several clinical, biochemical, psychological, and relational parameters were studied. Patients were interviewed with the previously validated Structured Interview on Erectile Dysfunction (SIEDY), and ANDROTEST (a structured interview for the screening of hypogonadism in patients with sexual dysfunction). Among the 2833 patients studied, subjects scoring higher on somatic symptoms were older, more obese, reporting unhealthy lifestyle (current smoking, alcohol consumption), and a lower education (all P sexuality more often, including erectile problems (spontaneous or sexual-related), low sexual desire, decreased frequency of intercourse, and perceived reduction of ejaculate volume (all P sexual dysfunction. High levels of somatic symptoms in subjects with sexual dysfunction can be related to the sexual symptom itself. The consequences of this pattern have great clinical relevance in a sexual medicine setting, considering their severe impact on sexuality. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cryopreservation of somatic embryos of paradise tree (Melia azedarach L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scocchi, Adriana; Vila, Silvia; Mroginski, Luis; Engelmann, Florent

    2007-01-01

    In paradise tree (Melia azedarach L.), immature zygotic embryos sampled from immature fruits are the starting material for the production of somatic embryos. These somatic embryos are employed for freezing experiments. Immature fruits could be stored at 25 degrees C for up to 80 days without impairing the embryogenic potential of zygotic embryos, which represents a four-fold increase in immature fruit storage duration, compared with previous studies. Among the three cryopreservation techniques tested for freezing paradise tree somatic embryos, namely desiccation, encapsulation-dehydration and pregrowth-dehydration, only encapsulation-dehydration and pregrowth-dehydration led to successful results. The optimal protocol was the following: i) somatic embryos (encapsulated or not) pretreated in liquid Murashige & Skoog medium with daily increasing sucrose concentration (0.5 M/0.75 M/1.0 M); ii) dehydrated with silica gel to 21 - 26% moisture content (fresh weight basis), for encapsulation-dehydration, or to 19% moisture content, for pregrowth-dehydration; iii) frozen at 1 degree C/min from 20 degrees C to -30 degrees C with a programmable freezing apparatus; iv) rapid immersion in liquid nitrogen. The highest recovery achieved was 36% with encapsulation-dehydration and 30% with pregrowth-dehydration. Regrowth of frozen embryos was direct in most cases, as secondary embryogenesis originating from the root pole was observed on only around 10% of cryopreserved somatic embryos. Plants recovered from cryopreserved embryos presented the same phenotypic traits as non-frozen control plants.

  18. Mouse cloning and somatic cell reprogramming using electrofused blastomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Amjad; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wan, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi

    2011-05-01

    Mouse cloning from fertilized eggs can assist development of approaches for the production of "genetically tailored" human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines that are not constrained by the limitations of oocyte availability. However, to date only zygotes have been successfully used as recipients of nuclei from terminally differentiated somatic cell donors leading to ES cell lines. In fertility clinics, embryos of advanced embryonic stages are usually stored for future use, but their ability to support the derivation of ES cell lines via somatic nuclear transfer has not yet been proved. Here, we report that two-cell stage electrofused mouse embryos, arrested in mitosis, can support developmental reprogramming of nuclei from donor cells ranging from blastomeres to somatic cells. Live, full-term cloned pups from embryonic donors, as well as pluripotent ES cell lines from embryonic or somatic donors, were successfully generated from these reconstructed embryos. Advanced stage pre-implantation embryos were unable to develop normally to term after electrofusion and transfer of a somatic cell nucleus, indicating that discarded pre-implantation human embryos could be an important resource for research that minimizes the ethical concerns for human therapeutic cloning. Our approach provides an attractive and practical alternative to therapeutic cloning using donated oocytes for the generation of patient-specific human ES cell lines.

  19. Immunoglobulins: Benefits and risks from the patient's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revol, Bruno; Bickert, Laura; Sarrot-Reynauld, Françoise; Allenet, Benoit

    2017-12-01

    Patients have to be informed about the risks and benefits of medicinal products derived from human plasma. No study has examined the patient's perspective yet. Our objective was to assess perceived benefits and risks of immunoglobulins administration from the patient's point of view. Thirty-four patients receiving subcutaneous or intravenous immunoglobulins for chronic disorders at a single university hospital were asked to complete a survey. Although the level of comfort was high, the results revealed variable and incomplete knowledge, in particular about the nature of the treatment. Greater efforts should be made by health professionals to provide information to patients about plasma-derived medicinal products. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in therapy-resistant epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, H; Wambacher-Gasser, B; Topar, G; Weinlich, G; Schuler, G; Hintner, H; Romani, N; Fritsch, P

    1997-02-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is an uncommon autoimmune bullous disease of the skin and mucous membranes. It is chronic, disabling, and difficult to treat. We describe a case of severe epidermolysis bullosa acquisita of 7 years' duration that had been treated with azathioprine, corticosteroids, chlorambucil, plasma exchanges, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and colchicine without any lasting effect. Seven cycles of treatment were administered with immunoglobulin given intravenously at a low dose, 40 mg/kg body weight daily for 5 days. The patient was free of disease for 10 months after the initiation of therapy. We suggest that low-dose regimens of immunoglobulins may be as effective in this disease as the high-dose regimens suggested in the literature, and at much lower cost.

  1. A database of immunoglobulins with integrated tools: DIGIT.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-11-10

    The DIGIT (Database of ImmunoGlobulins with Integrated Tools) database (http://biocomputing.it/digit) is an integrated resource storing sequences of annotated immunoglobulin variable domains and enriched with tools for searching and analyzing them. The annotations in the database include information on the type of antigen, the respective germline sequences and on pairing information between light and heavy chains. Other annotations, such as the identification of the complementarity determining regions, assignment of their structural class and identification of mutations with respect to the germline, are computed on the fly and can also be obtained for user-submitted sequences. The system allows customized BLAST searches and automatic building of 3D models of the domains to be performed.

  2. [Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolińska, Danuta

    2011-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of primary immunodeficiency disorders have been administrated for more than 25 years. However, the recognition of the anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory actions of IVIG resulted broader applications to autoimmunity and systemic inflammatory conditions. The major focus of this review is the usefulness of IVIG therapy in children kidney disease, particularly in severe, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, refractory to standard therapy, including plasmaferesis. The role of intravenous immunoglobulins in the treatment and prevention of infection, the most common complication in nephrotic syndrome is also discussed. Probably, in the future, similarly to adults, IVIG will be used for the therapy of some forms of glomerulopathies.

  3. Effect of fluoride on salivary immunoglobulins and sialic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Görkem Ulu Güzel

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride on salivary immunoglobulin and sialic acid levels in children with dental fluorosis and healthy teeth who live in places with high fluoride concentration in drinking water. Method: Fifty-one (51 healthy children between 6 and 12 years old with no caries were randomly selected from primary schools enrolled in the dental-care program operated by the Department of Pediatric Dentistry. The children were divided into two groups: group I comprised 26 children with dental fluorosis [Thylstrup-Fejerskov Dental Fluorosis Index (TFI = 4] who lived in Isparta (2.7-2.8 ppm, and group II consisted of 25 children without dental fluorosis who were born in low-fluoride areas and had lived in Isparta for only the previous two years. Stimulated and unstimulated saliva were collected and analyzed for fluoride, salivary immunoglobulins and sialic acid levels. Results: Sialic acid level was correlated negatively with age. Levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA and secretory immunoglobulin G (sIgG were higher in children with dental fluorosis compared with those in group II, although these differences were not significant. Conclusion: Increased sIgA and sIgG levels may arrest the progression of caries in subjects with dental fluorosis. Given the risks of dental fluorosis, further studies of the effects of different fluoride levels in drinking water on salivary composition of children with mixed dentition are needed to confirm the results of our study and to provide data for comparison.

  4. Serologic activity of G immunoglobulin of irradiated rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.A.; Nevinnaya, A.P.; Mozhajskij, A.M.; Snisar', N.A.

    1977-01-01

    Serologic immunochemical properties of immunoglobulins G (IgG) isolated from blood serum of normal rabbits and those given lethal and midlethal doses of radiation have been comparatively studied. A marked increase in the IgG level was detected in the recovery period of radiation sickness. The number of complement-binding antitissue antibodies in IgG grew in that period, and the anticomplementary activity and the catabolism rate of IgG increased in normal organism

  5. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  6. An immunoglobulin E assay using radiolabelled Fab' and ammonium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcsek, R.J.; Hamburger, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    An immunochemical assay is described in which a radiolabelled antibody fragment, Fab', is bound specifically to immunoglobulin E (IgE), and precipitated with ammonium sulfate. The radioactivity in the precipitate is a measure of the amount of IgE in the sample. Results for six serum samples are compared using the double antibody and ammonium sulfate methods as well as the papωr radioimmunosorbent test (PRIST)

  7. Immunoglobulin concentration in tears of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rajendra P; Bhushan, Prashant; Singh, Virendra P; Singh, Mahendra K; Kumar, Prakash; Bhatia, Ravindra P S; Singh, Usha

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate changes in the concentration of tear immunoglobulins in contact lens wearers. A total of 45 cases including 23 contact lens wearers (43 eyes) and 22 age and sex matched healthy controls having no ocular pathology were studied for immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM) in their tears by single radial immunodiffusion method. Most of the cases used soft (56.6%) and semi-soft gas permeable (30.4%) contact lenses. Tear IgM was detected in only 17.4% and tear IgG in 43.6% of contact lens wearers, while in controls IgG was detected in 9.1% but none of the controls had IgM. There was a significant rise in total tear IgA (13.17 ± 4.44 mg/dl) in contact lens wearer as compared to controls (8.93 ± 3.79 mg/dl). Rise of tear IgA was more in symptomatic patients (15.38 ± 5.28 mg/dl) and in those wearing hard (19.73 ± 5.43 mg/dl) and semi-soft contact lenses (13.31 ± 5.43 mg/dl). A significant increase in tear IgA was noticed in subjects wearing lenses for >3 years (15.69 ± 5.39 mg/dl). About 43.4% of lens wearers were symptomatic and 80% of their lenses showed deposits and/or haziness. All cases with IgM in tear were symptomatic. The relation of immunoglobulin concentration with increasing duration of wear and material of contact lens shows that tear immunoglobulin rise accrues due to mechanical stimulation, hence contact lenses should not be used for a long period and lenses of hard nature should be discouraged. The maintenance, cleaning and deproteinization of the lenses are of high importance to avoid immunostimulation.

  8. Diversity Analysis of the Immunoglobulin M Heavy Chain Gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A full-length cDNA encoding the immunoglobulin (IgM) heavy chain gene of Nile tilapia was successfully cloned using the 5' and 3' RACE techniques. The complete cDNA of the Nile tilapia IgM heavy chain gene is 1,921 bp in length and has an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,740 bp, which corresponds to 580 amino acid ...

  9. A Case of Immunoglobulin E Mediated Anaphylaxis to Levodropropizine

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung Hee; Yun, Il Seon; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Chein-Soo; Park, Jung-Won

    2012-01-01

    We experienced a case of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated anaphylaxis to levodropropizine. The patient was an 18-year old Korean woman. After taking the common cold medication including acetaminophen, domperidone, and levodropropizine, skin rash, angioedema and anaphylaxis were developed immediately. As she was tolerable to acetaminophen alone, we thought the culprit agent was maybe a levodropropizine tablet. To confirm the culprit, she underwent skin prick test and oral drug provocation test ...

  10. Immunoglobulin M-enriched intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulins reduce bacteremia following Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in an acute respiratory distress syndrome rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmann, R. A.; van Kaam, A. H. L. C.; Haitsma, J. J.; Verbrugge, S. J. C.; Delreu, F.; Lachmann, B.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is known to induce bacterial translocation from the lung into the systemic circulation. This study determined the effect of immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched polyclonal immunoglobulins on bacteremia due to ventilation-induced translocation in an acute respiratory distress

  11. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  12. Endogenous immunoglobulins and sepsis: New perspectives for guiding replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2015-12-01

    The recently emerging concept of immunosuppression developing in the field of severe sepsis generated the need to measure circulating immunoglobulins as part of the necessary tests to evaluate immunocompetence status in patients suffering from this condition. Serum concentrations can be used as a surrogate marker of the final outcome and as a biomarker to explore the need for supplementation of the host with intravenous immunoglobulin preparations. Available evidence from recent clinical studies pinpoints the main observations. The first is that circulating IgM is a phenomenon associated with progression from severe sepsis to septic shock. Deficient kinetics of circulating IgM during the first 7 days following the start of vasopressors is linked with unfavourable outcome. The second is the development of immunoscores using low levels of IgM, IgG1 and IgA. These immunoscores can predict 28-day mortality with an odds ratio ranging between 3 and 5. Novel techniques for evaluating patient's immune status are shedding new light on the development of modern therapeutics where immunoglobulin replacement may be part of a personalised therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Somatic comorbidity among migrants with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolk, Mette; Byberg, Stine; Carlsson, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a cohort of migrants in Denmark, we compared somatic disease incidence among migrants diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression with migrants without a diagnosed psychiatric disorder. METHODS: The study builds on a unique cohort of migrants who obtained...... for the implementation of the project (No 2012-41-0065). RESULTS: Our results showed that migrants diagnosed with PTSD and depression had significantly higher rates of somatic diseases compared with migrants without diagnosed psychiatric disorders - especially, infectious disease (IRR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.45-2.48; p ... with migrants without a diagnosed psychiatric disorder. The rates were especially high for infectious, neurological and pulmonary diseases. Our results further suggest difference in the rates of somatic comorbidity according to region of. Preventive and treatment services should pay special attention to improve...

  14. Buffalo milk: proteins electrophoretic profile and somatic cell count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mattii

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water buffalo milk differs from the cow’s milk for greater fat and protein content, very important features in cheese making. Proteins, casein and whey-proteins in particular, are the most important factors determining cheese yield. Several previous research discussed the rule of SCC in cow milk production (Varisco, 1999 and the close relationship existing between cow’s milk cheese yield and somatic cell count (Barbano, 2000. In particular the inverse correlation between cheese yields and somatic cells’content have been demonstrated. In Italy the regulation in force DPR 54/97 acknowledges what expressed in EEC 46/92 Directive (Tripodi, 1999 without fixing the limit threshold of somatic cells for buffalo’s milk....

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  16. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration of Capsicum baccatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddaboina Venkataiah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A plant regeneration protocol via somatic embryogenesis was achieved in cotyledon and leaf explants of Capsicum baccatum, when cultured on MS medium supplemented with various concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D, 0.5–5.0 mg l−1 in combination with Kinetin (Kn, 0.5 mg l−1 and 3% sucrose. Various stages were observed during the development of somatic embryos, including globular, heart, and torpedo-stages. Torpedo stage embryos were separated from the explants and subcultured on medium supplemented with various concentrations of different plant growth regulators for maturation. Maximum percentage (55% of somatic embryo germination and plantlet formation was found at 1.0 mg l−1 BA. Finally, about 68% of plantlets were successfully established under field conditions. The regenerated plants were morphologically normal, fertile and able to set viable seeds.

  17. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-Ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-09-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs.

  18. A step towards a new delimitation of functional somatic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Schröder, Andreas; Fink, Per

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The current delimitation of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population to contribute to a new, data-driven delimitation of FSS. METHODS: Information on 31 self-reported somatic symptoms used...... with sex, age, chronic disease, self-perceived health, symptom impact, self-reported FSS, and BDS case-status. RESULTS: Eight symptom profiles were identified. The largest profile had no symptoms (49% of the population). Three profiles were characterized by a few, specific symptoms: muscle and joint pain...... identified eight symptom profiles characterized by specific combinations of symptoms. Four of these had multiple symptoms from several bodily systems showing large overlap with BDS, possibly indicating subtypes of FSS. The profiles contribute to a new delimitation of FSS by illustrating the importance...

  19. Improving loblolly pine somatic embryo maturation: comparison of somatic and zygotic embryo morphology, germination, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, G S; Johnson, S; Peter, G; Cairney, J; Xu, N

    2003-04-01

    Clonal production of loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) through somatic embryogenesis has the potential to meet the increasing industrial demands for high-quality uniform raw materials. A major barrier to the commercialization of this technology is the low quality of the resulting embryos. Twenty-five newly initiated loblolly pine genotypes were followed through the process of liquid culture establishment, embryo maturation, germination, and retrieval from cryogenic storage. A maturation medium, capable of promoting the development of loblolly pine somatic embryos that can germinate, is presented that combines 1/2 P6 modified salts, 2% maltose, 13% polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG), 5 mg/l abscisic acid (ABA), and 2.5 g/l Gelrite. A procedure for converting and acclimating germinants to growth in soil and greenhouse conditions is also described. A set of somatic seedlings, produced from the maturation medium, showed 100% survival when planted in a field setting. Somatic seedlings showed normal yearly growth relative to standard seedlings from natural seed. The quality of the resulting embryos was examined and compared to that of zygotic embryos using such parameters as morphology, dry weight, germination performance, and gene expression. All of the observations that were made support the conclusion that even with the new maturation medium somatic embryos grow approximately only halfway through the normal sequence of development and then prematurely discontinue growth.

  20. In vitro regeneration of Irvingia gabonensis by somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso; Oumar; Nicolas, Niemenak; Néhémie, Donfagsiteli Tchinda; Denis, Omokolo Ndoumou

    2008-03-01

    A productive genotype of Irvingia gabonensis were cultured in vitro for induction embryogenic calli, somatic embryogenesis and regeneration of plantlets. Fragments of young leaves were used as primary explants. Callogenesis was initiated by culture of explants during 30 days on Murashige and Skoog medium half strength (MS/2) supplemented with 1-6 mg L(-1) of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The highest percentage of explants forming calli is 85.1% at 3 mg L(-1) of 2,4-D. Somatic embryos were obtained after a subculture of embryogenic calli during 60 days on MS/2 supplemented with 1-3 mg L(-1) of BAP. The highest percentage of embryogenic calli which differentiates somatic embryos is 63.8 +/- 2.3% at 1 mg L(-1) of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). The highest number of somatic embryos per callus which is 43.6 is obtained with 2 mg L(-1) of this phytohormone. When isolated from calli and sub-cultured during 30 days on MS/2 supplemented with 2 mg L(-1) of BAP, somatic embryos germinate with a highest percentage of 83%. The subculture of germinated somatic embryos on the same Basal Medium (BM) supplemented with 4 mg L(-1) of BAP and 2 mg L(-1) of Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA) during 80 days gives rise to the plantlets with 82.7 +/- 4.8% of success. With this combination, each plantlet has average length of 5.6 cm, bears 3.3 leaves and 7.2 roots with 1 or 2 pivoting roots. Plantlets acclimatized on a mixture sterilized soil/vermiculite at equal volume survive at 93%. Results of this study constitute a new way for a production of Irvingia gabonensis seedlings with pivoting root and they permit to arrest the difficulties of natural and horticultural reproduction.

  1. Pathological narcissism and somatic symptoms among men and women attending an outpatient mental health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealy, David; Tsai, Michelle; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2016-09-01

    To explore the relationship between types of pathological narcissism and somatic symptoms among psychiatric outpatients. Patients (N = 95) completed measures of somatic symptoms, narcissistic grandiosity and vulnerability, and psychiatric symptoms. Relationships among variables were analysed using t-tests and correlations, controlling for psychiatric distress. Somatic symptoms were positively associated with two types of narcissistic dysfunction. Among women there was a positive association between somatic symptoms and narcissistic vulnerability, but not grandiosity. Among men, somatic symptoms were positively associated with narcissistic grandiosity, but not vulnerability. The connection between narcissistic pathology and somatic symptom severity appears to differ based on gender. Further research is needed to confirm and extend this preliminary finding.

  2. Induction of somatic embryogenesis in soybean: physicochemical factors influencing the development of somatic embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Aparecida Bonacin

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The embryogenic capability of five soybean cultivars (Renascença, IAS-5, IAC-17, BR-16 and FT-Cometa was studied at different auxin concentrations (8, 10 and 12 mg/l naphthalene acetic acid, NAA, at different pHs (5.8 and 7.0 and at low (8-12 muEm-2 s-1 and high (27-33 mEm-2 s-1 light intensities. The experimental design was completely randomized with four replications. Immature cotyledons 4-6 mm in length were placed in the six induction mediums evaluated and submitted to two light intensities. Twenty immature cotyledons per cultivar were placed on each Petri dish, which was considered to be one replication. The number of somatic embryos per treatment per replication was counted. The results showed genotype influence on somatic embryogenic capability of each cultivar, with the most embryogenic cultivars being BR-16, FT-Cometa and IAS-5. Auxin concentration and pH value also influenced somatic embryo production, with 10 mg/l NAA being the best auxin concentration and 7.0 the best pH value. The interactions cultivar x auxin, auxin x pH and pH x light were significant, while other double interactions were not. All triple and quadruple interactions were significant, except cultivar x pH x light. No significant differences in somatic embryo production were observed in medium with different pHs or when the Petri dishes containing immature cotyledons were exposed to the two light intensities evaluated. However, a higher number of somatic embryos was produced when the medium pH was adjusted to 7.0.A capacidade embriogênica de cinco cultivares de soja (Renascença, IAS-5, IAC-17, BR-16 e FT-Cometa foi estudada em diferentes concentrações de auxina (8, 10 e 12 mg/l de NAA, em diferentes valores de pHs (5,8 e 7,0 e em baixa (8-12 miEm-2 s-1 e em alta (27-33 miEm-2 s-1 intensidade luminosa. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado com quatro repetições. Cotilédones imaturos com 4-6 mm de tamanho foram depositados nos seis meios

  3. To whom it may concern: Somatic Education in academic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Rosseto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a survey conducted in different bases of academic data such as journal articles, undergraduate final papers, theses, and dissertations, this paper presents a critical analysis of different fields of knowledge in the scientific production on Somatic Education, aiming to support future work. The research was quantitative and documentary and it had aspriority sources CAPES site and the Brazilian National Library of Dissertations and Theses (BDTD site. It was concluded that Somatic Education is multidisciplinary and it has the largest academic representation in the field of Arts, followed by the Health sector, possibly reflecting its origins and applications.

  4. Physio-somatic symptoms in schizophrenia: association with depression, anxiety, neurocognitive deficits and the tryptophan catabolite pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Thika, Supaksorn; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Carvalho, André F; Geffard, Michel; Anderson, George; Noto, Cristiano; Ivanova, Rada; Maes, Michael

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the frequency of physio-somatic symptoms (PS) symptoms in schizophrenia and their relation to positive, negative and affective symptoms; neurocognitive deficits and impairments in the tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway. Eighty four patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy controls were assessed using the 12 item Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Rating scale (FF) and scales for negative and positive symptoms, depression and anxiety. Cognitive functioning was tested using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). Other assessments included: immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgM responses to tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs), namely quinolinic (QA), 3-OH-kynurenine (3HK), picolinic (PA), xanthurenic (XA) and kynurenic acid (KA) and anthranilic acid (AA). More than 50% of the patients studied had elevated levels of physio-somatic (PS) symptoms, significantly co-occurring with depression and anxiety, but not with negative or positive symptoms. PS symptoms were significantly associated with IgA/IgM responses to TRYCATs, including increased IgA responses to 3 HK, PA and XA, and lowered IgA to QA and AA. Fatigue, muscle pain and tension, autonomic and cognitive symptoms and a flu-like malaise were strongly associated with cognitive impairments in spatial planning and working memory, paired associative learning, visual sustained attention and attention set shifting. PS symptoms in schizophrenia aggregate with depression and anxiety symptoms and may be driven by TRYCAT patterning of IgA/IgM-responses, with IgA indicating mucosal-mediated changes and IgM indicating regulatory functions. As such, the patterning of IgA/IgM responses to TRYCATs may indicate differential TRYCATs regulation of neuronal and glia activity that act to regulate PS signalling in schizophrenia.

  5. Quantification of human immunoglobulins by semiautomatic polyethylene glycol precipitation radioimmunoassays. Estimation of circulating immune complexes and immunoglobulin synthesized in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensenius, J.C.; Siersted, H.C.; Johnstone, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    Simple, reliable semiautomatic radioimmunoassays have been developed for the measurement of human immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM, Igsub(kappa) and Igsub(lambda)). The assays are based on the separation of free from antibody-bound radiolabelled fragments of immunoglobulin by precipitation with 13% polyethylene glycol. The precipitate is harvested and washed on glass fibre filters by means of a commercial cell harvester. Radiolabelled lambda chain from Bence Jones urine was used for lambda chain assay and Fab'γ from pooled IgG for the kappa assay. Labelled Fab or Fc fragments of IgG, IgA and IgM were used for the class specific assays. Selected commercial antisera were used throughout. The sensitivity limits of the assays performed according to the standard procedure were about 20 ng Ig per ml. The assays have been used for the quantification of circulating immune complexes and both cellular and secreted immunoglobulin produced in cell cultures. The results demonstrate the importance of the simultaneous quantification by L chain and H chain specific assays. (Auth.)

  6. Evaluation of the transfer of immunoglobulin from colostrum anaerobic fermentation (colostrum silage) to newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saalfeld, Mara H; Pereira, Daniela I B; Borchardt, Jessica L; Sturbelle, Regis T; Rosa, Matheus C; Guedes, Marcio C; Gularte, Marcia A; Leite, Fábio P Leivas

    2014-11-01

    Colostrum silage is an anaerobic fermentation methodology of excess farm colostrum used to conserve and provide as milk replacement for calves. The present study aimed to evaluate the levels of immunoglobulins present in bovine colostrum silage and its absorption by newborn calves. The concentration of immunoglobulins was determined in fresh colostrum and colostrum silage stored for 12 months. The absorption of immunoglobulins by calves was assessed immediately after birth and 24 h after colostrum silage intake. The immunoglobulin levels were evaluated by ELISA. The results highlighted that colostrum silage kept similar levels of immunoglobulins as the ones in colostrum in natura, and can be transferred to newborn calves with similar amounts to calves fed with colostrum in natura. It is concluded that colostrum silage keeps viable immunoglobulins, and is able to transfer passive immunity to newborn calves. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. High prevalence of immunoglobulin A deficiency in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus detected by ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loraine Farias Landgraf

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum levels of immunoglobulin A byimmunoenzymatic assay (ELISA in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1patients and to verify the prevalence of immunoglobulin A deficiency(IgAD in diabetic patients. Methods: The serum immunoglobulin Alevel was determined in 149 DM-1 patients by three methods. IgADwas defined as serum immunoglobulin A level lower than 5 mg/dl.If serum immunoglobulin A level was undetectable by turbidimetry,radial immunodiffusion was performed in low plate concentration.For patients with undetectable serum immunoglobulin A levelby the two previous methods, quantification was performed byELISA. In patients with IgAD, the levels of immunoglobulins Gand M were measured by turbidimetry to exclude other humoralimmunodeficiencies. Results: Out of 149 DM-1 patients evaluated,141 (94.6% had normal serum immunoglobulin A levels byturbidimetry. Eight patients (5.3% had undetectable serumimmunoglobulin A levels by turbidimetry and radial immunodiffusion.In these eight patients, the determination of serum immunoglobulinA was performed by ELISA, a more sensitive method. Very lowlevels of serum immunoglobulin A were detected in these diabeticpatients. In all diabetic patients, immunoglobulins G and M werenormal for age by turbidimetry. All 150 patients of the Control Grouphad normal serum immunoglobulin A levels by ELISA. Conclusions:There was a significantly higher prevalence of immunoglobulindeficiency among DM-1 patients (5.3%. Measurement of serumimmunoglobulin A is necessary in all DM-1 particularly before someimmunoglobulin A antibody screening. Patients with IgAD may havefalse-negative results for celiac disease screening tests involvingimmunoglobulin A antiendomysium and antigliadin antibodies.

  8. Unravelling Immunoglobulin G Fc N-Glycosylation: A Dynamic Marker Potentiating Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alyce Russell; Eric Adua; Ivo Ugrina; Simon Laws; Wei Wang

    2018-01-01

    Multiple factors influence immunoglobulin G glycosylation, which in turn affect the glycoproteins’ function on eliciting an anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory response. It is prudent to underscore these processes when considering the use of immunoglobulin G N-glycan moieties as an indication of disease presence, progress, or response to therapeutics. It has been demonstrated that the altered expression of genes that encode enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of immunoglobulin G N-glycans,...

  9. Failure to Identify Somatic Mutations in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Schizophrenia by Whole Exome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lyu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study is not alone in the failure to identify pathogenic somatic variations in MZ twins, suggesting that exonic somatic variations are extremely rare. Further efforts are warranted to explore the potential genetic mechanism of SCZ.

  10. Analysis of nuclear and organellar DNA in somatic hybrids between solanaceous species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, A.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes an analysis of the possibilities and limitations of somatic hybridization of solanaceous species. Emphasis was laid on the elucidation of the interactions between nuclei, chloroplasts and mitochondria in the obtained somatic hybrids. Hybridization experiments between

  11. Use of intravenous immunoglobulin in neonates with haemolytic disease and immune thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković-Sovtić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Intravenous immunoglobulin is a blood product made of human polyclonal immunoglobulin G. The mode of action of intravenous immunoglobulin is very complex. It is indicated in treatment of neonatal immune thrombocytopenia and haemolytic disease of the newborn. The aim of the study was to present our experience in the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in a group of term neonates. Methods. We analysed all relevant clinical and laboratory data of 23 neonates who recieved intravenous immunoglobulin during their hospitalization in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mother and Child Health Care Institute over a five year period, from 2006. to 2010. Results. There were 11 patients with haemolytic disease of the newborn and 12 neonates with immune thrombocytopenia. All of them recieved 1-2 g/kg intravenous immunoglobulin in the course of their treatment. There was no adverse effects of intravenous immunoglobulin use. The use of intravenous immunoglobulin led to an increase in platelet number in thrombocytopenic patients, whereas in those with haemolytic disease serum bilirubin level decreased significantly, so that some patients whose bilirubin level was very close to the exchange transfusion criterion, avoided this procedure. Conclusion. The use of intravenous immunoglobulin was shown to be an effective treatment in reducing the need for exchange transfusion, duration of phototherapy and the length of hospital stay in neonates with haemolytic disease. When used in treatment of neonatal immune thrombocytopenia, it leads to an increase in the platelet number, thus decreasing the risk of serious complications of thrombocytopenia.

  12. Production of non-stimulatory immunoglobulins that inhibit TSH binding in Graves' disease after radioiodine administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, K.; Bliddal, H.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Friis, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of single dose of 131 I upon thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins has been studied in twenty-two patients with Graves' disease. The thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins were assessed by parallel measurements of thyrotrophin receptor binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (TBII) and of thyroid adenylate cyclase stimulating immunoglobulins (TACSI) in serum by radioreceptor assay and stimulation of adenylate cyclase respectively. The present study thus confirms that radioiodine therapy is followed by an increase of TBII and TACSI in most patients with Graves' disease. The level of TBII can probably provide a marker for development of hypothyroidism following 131 I therapy and might be involved in its pathogenesis. (author)

  13. Unravelling Immunoglobulin G Fc N-Glycosylation: A Dynamic Marker Potentiating Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Alyce; Adua, Eric; Ugrina, Ivo; Laws, Simon; Wang, Wei

    2018-01-29

    Multiple factors influence immunoglobulin G glycosylation, which in turn affect the glycoproteins' function on eliciting an anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory response. It is prudent to underscore these processes when considering the use of immunoglobulin G N -glycan moieties as an indication of disease presence, progress, or response to therapeutics. It has been demonstrated that the altered expression of genes that encode enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of immunoglobulin G N -glycans, receptors, or complement factors may significantly modify immunoglobulin G effector response, which is important for regulating the immune system. The immunoglobulin G N -glycome is highly heterogenous; however, it is considered an interphenotype of disease (a link between genetic predisposition and environmental exposure) and so has the potential to be used as a dynamic biomarker from the perspective of predictive, preventive, and personalised medicine. Undoubtedly, a deeper understanding of how the multiple factors interact with each other to alter immunoglobulin G glycosylation is crucial. Herein we review the current literature on immunoglobulin G glycoprotein structure, immunoglobulin G Fc glycosylation, associated receptors, and complement factors, the downstream effector functions, and the factors associated with the heterogeneity of immunoglobulin G glycosylation.

  14. Unravelling Immunoglobulin G Fc N-Glycosylation: A Dynamic Marker Potentiating Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyce Russell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple factors influence immunoglobulin G glycosylation, which in turn affect the glycoproteins’ function on eliciting an anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory response. It is prudent to underscore these processes when considering the use of immunoglobulin G N-glycan moieties as an indication of disease presence, progress, or response to therapeutics. It has been demonstrated that the altered expression of genes that encode enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of immunoglobulin G N-glycans, receptors, or complement factors may significantly modify immunoglobulin G effector response, which is important for regulating the immune system. The immunoglobulin G N-glycome is highly heterogenous; however, it is considered an interphenotype of disease (a link between genetic predisposition and environmental exposure and so has the potential to be used as a dynamic biomarker from the perspective of predictive, preventive, and personalised medicine. Undoubtedly, a deeper understanding of how the multiple factors interact with each other to alter immunoglobulin G glycosylation is crucial. Herein we review the current literature on immunoglobulin G glycoprotein structure, immunoglobulin G Fc glycosylation, associated receptors, and complement factors, the downstream effector functions, and the factors associated with the heterogeneity of immunoglobulin G glycosylation.

  15. Improved purification of immunoglobulin G from plasma by mixed-mode chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Dong-Sheng; Sun, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Shi, Qing-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Efficient loading of immunoglobulin G in mixed-mode chromatography is often a serious bottleneck in the chromatographic purification of immunoglobulin G. In this work, a mixed-mode ligand, 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl) aniline, was coupled to Sepharose Fast Flow to fabricate AN SepFF adsorbents with ligand densities of 15-64 mmol/L, and the chromatographic performances of these adsorbents were thoroughly investigated to identify a feasible approach to improve immunoglobulin G purification. The results indicate that a critical ligand density exists for immunoglobulin G on the AN SepFF adsorbents. Above the critical ligand density, the adsorbents showed superior selectivity to immunoglobulin G at high salt concentrations, and also exhibited much higher dynamic binding capacities. For immunoglobulin G purification, both the yield and binding capacity increased with adsorbent ligand density along with a decrease in purity. It is difficult to improve the binding capacity, purity, and yield of immunoglobulin G simultaneously in AN SepFF chromatography. By using tandem AN SepFF chromatography, a threefold increase in binding capacity as well as high purity and yield of immunoglobulin G were achieved. Therefore, the tandem chromatography demonstrates that AN SepFF adsorbent is a practical and feasible alternative to MEP HyperCel adsorbents for immunoglobulin G purification. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The somatic mutation landscape of premalignant colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hong; Raju, Gottumukkala S; Huff, Chad; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Han; Menter, David G; Morris, Jeffery; Hawk, Ernest; Stroehlein, John R; Futreal, Andrew; Kopetz, Scott; Mishra, Lopa; Wu, Xifeng

    2017-06-12

    There are few studies which characterised the molecular alterations in premalignant colorectal adenomas. Our major goal was to establish colorectal adenoma genome atlas and identify molecular markers of progression from colorectal adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Whole-exome sequencing and targeted sequencing were carried out in 149 adenoma samples and paired blood from patients with conventional adenoma or sessile serrated adenoma to characterise the somatic mutation landscape for premalignant colorectal lesions. The identified somatic mutations were compared with those in colorectal cancer (CRC) samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. A supervised random forest model was employed to identify gene panels differentiating adenoma from CRC. Similar somatic mutation frequencies, but distinctive driver mutations, were observed in sessile serrated adenomas and conventional adenomas. The final model included 20 genes and was able to separate the somatic mutation profile of colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma with an area under the curve of 0.941. The findings of this project hold potential to better identify patients with adenoma who may be candidates for targeted surveillance programmes and preventive interventions to reduce the incidence of CRC. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Reprogramming to pluripotency can conceal somatic cell chromosomal instability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamada, M.; Malureanu, L.A.; Wijshake, T.; Zhou, W.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2012-01-01

    The discovery that somatic cells are reprogrammable to pluripotency by ectopic expression of a small subset of transcription factors has created great potential for the development of broadly applicable stem-cell-based therapies. One of the concerns regarding the safe use of induced pluripotent stem

  18. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  19. Effects of spermidine, proline and carbohydrate sources on somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of spermidine, proline and carbohydrate sources on somatic embryogenesis from main root transverse thin cell layers of Vietnamese ginseng ( Panax ... To further optimize a culture medium for induction of embryo formation of P. vietnamensis, three carbohydrate sources (sucrose, glucose and fructose) at 10 to 60 ...

  20. An efficient somatic embryogenesis based plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2010-03-05

    Mar 5, 2010 ... corroboration of morphology and histology, which make genetic transformation studies on C. roseus difficult. Somatic embryogenesis resulting in regeneration of whole plant is an important step in the plant transformation method. Successful and stable transformation requires that a single cell gives rise to a ...

  1. Immune-to-brain communication in functional somatic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacourt, T.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313935068

    2013-01-01

    When a person presents with somatic symptoms that cannot (fully) be explained by a known organic pathology, these symptoms will be labeled ‘medically unexplained’ or ‘functional’. Often, more than one symptom is present and certain constellations of symptoms give way to a diagnosis of a specific

  2. Somatic structural rearrangements in genetically engineered mouse mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varela, I.; Klijn, C.N.; Stephens, P.J.; Mudie, L.J.; Stebbings, L.; Galappaththige, D.; Van der Gulden, H.; Schut, E.; Klarenbeek, S.; Campbell, P.J.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Stratton, M.R.; Jonkers, J.; Futreal, P.A.; Adams, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Here we present the first paired-end sequencing of tumors from genetically engineered mouse models of cancer to determine how faithfully these models recapitulate the landscape of somatic rearrangements found in human tumors. These were models of Trp53-mutated breast cancer, Brca1- and

  3. Effects of somatic cell count on the gross composition, protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    higher lactose, casein, phosphorus, calcium and magnesium contents, LCC milk was more suitable for cheese making than HCC milk. Key words: Ewe milk, milk quality, chemical composition, somatic cell content. INTRODUCTION. The mammary gland inflammation process is characterised by an increased number of ...

  4. Psychiatric illness does not protect against a somatic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, T; De Reus, R

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric illness does not protect against a somatic disease. In four patients, two women aged 68 and 73 years and two men aged 65 and 57 years, serious diseases were not recognised because of more prominent psychiatric symptoms. Three of the patients had malignancies and one was suffering from

  5. Optimization of somatic embryogenesis and selection regimes for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... 3Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, PqEB W5 Norte, 70770-900, Brasilia, DF, Brazil. Accepted 26 June, 2008. Although a number of transformation systems and ... general strategy is to induce the formation of somatic embryos from explants on a Murashige and Skoog. (Murashige and Skoog ...

  6. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With regard to delusional disorder-somatic subtype there may be a relationship with body dysmorphic disorder. There are reports that some delusional disorders can evolve to become schizophrenia. Similarly, the treatment of such disorders with antipsychotics has been documented. This report describes a case of ...

  7. Overview of somatization-diagnosis and management | Salawu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acronym CARE-MD represents a comprehensive treatment regimen that can be used to decrease physician and patient frustration, dramatically minimise health care over utilization, and improve overall well-being for patients with somatoform disorders. Keywords: Somatoform disorders, somatization, hypochondriasis, ...

  8. Influence of genotype and plant growth regulator on somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... Zemdirbyste Agric. 94(4): 129-138. Burbulis N, Kupriene R, zilenaite L (2004). Embryogenesis, callogenesis and plant regeneration from anther cultures of spring rape (Brassica napus L.). Acta Universitatis Latviensis, Biol. 676: 153-158. Chen JT, Chang C, Chang WC (1999). Direct somatic embryogenesis.

  9. Synthesis and accumulation of free amino acids during somatic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In ZE, glutamine and asparagine appeared to be fundamental to the process of induction of zygotic embryos. On the other hand, the induction of somatic embryos that appeared require glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid. The results suggest the involvement of amino acids in the ontogenesis of ...

  10. Improvements of cyclic somatic embryogenesis of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Schavemaker, C.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.G.F.

    1993-01-01

    In cassava a cyclic system of somatic embryogenesis was developed. Primary (torpedo shaped or germinated) embryos, originating from leaf lobes, could only be obtained after culture on solid medium. Cyclic embryos, originating from embryos, could be obtained in both liquid and on solid medium. The

  11. Breeding value estimation for somatic cell score in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernice Mostert

    Two fixed regression testday models were applied for variance component estimation and prediction of breeding values for somatic ... Keywords : Fixed regressions, Holstein, Jersey, testday records, Wilmink curve ... financial losses, mainly due to reduced milk yield and quality, treatment expenses and replacement costs.

  12. PECTIMORF and BIOBRAS-16 utilization in the potato somatic embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime R. Hidrobo Luna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available With the application of PECTIMORF and BIOBRAS-16, somatic embryos were obtained in potato (Solanum tuberosum, L c.v. Desirèe, of 40 days old callus obtained from stem micropropagated plants. These were used as possible substitutes for crop regulators used in culture media for the induction of somatic embryos. The culture media was composed for 10ml.l-1 of Murashige and Skoog salt, 0.1mg.l-1 ANA, 0.1mg.l-1 kinetin, 0.5mg.l-1 thiamine, 2.5mg.l-1 cistein, 100mg.l-1 mioinositol, 20g.l-1 sucrose and 2.0g.l-1 agar. Four culture medias were tested in distinct combinations that contained different concentration of PECTIMOR and BIOBRAS-16 as substitute of auxins and cytokinins. After 90 days, the results obtained showed the possibility of substituting the auxins (0.5mg.l-1 ANA and the cytokinins (0.5mg.l-1 kinetin in the culture media, because the application of PECTIMORF at 3.2mg.l-1 and BIOBRAS-16 at 1.0mg.l-1, gave friable callus, high fresh weight (more than 1.4g and a brownish color at the end of the process, moment in which the somatic embryos of different phases, appeared at the surface of the callus. Keywords: brasinoesteroids, callus, oligopectate, somatic embryo

  13. Role of personal psychological profiles in somatic pathology development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorenko I.O.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to examine the correlation between psychological profile of patients of senior age groups, levels of stress hormones — adrenaline and noradrenaline — in blood serum and their pathology character. A psychological profile of 247 patients aged from 55 to 82 years has been established with the help of Kettle test, Tsung self-assessment scale and Spilberger-Khanin scale. The rate of adrenaline and noradrenaline in blood serum in the period of exacerbation of somatic pathology and in the period of relative well-being has been estimated by means of immune-enzyme analysis method. The survey has identified three psychological profiles. The first and third groups are less resistant to stress factors psychological types. They are more likely to develop somatic pathology and depression (37,8 and 53,2% respectively, in comparison with patients of the second group (12,5%. The significant increase of catecholamines has been established among patients of the third type of psychological profile both in the period of exacerbation of somatic pathology and in the period of relative well-being. The article concludes that correlations between psychological personality characteristics, rate of catecholamines and structure of somatic pathology have been worked out

  14. Efficient somatic embryo production of Limau madu ( Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) concentration, initial cell density and carbon sources and concentrations for producing cell suspension and somatic embryos of Limau madu (Citrus suhuiensis Hort. ex Tanaka) were investigated using cell suspension culture. Cells were first inoculated into Murashige and Skoog (MS) ...

  15. An efficient somatic embryogenesis based plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2010-03-05

    Mar 5, 2010 ... Embryogenic calluses (EC) with somatic embryos were induced from HPC on proliferation medium (MSCP2) within 2 weeks of culture. ... unstable regeneration from any type explant or lack the corroboration of morphology and ... to be important for plant regeneration (Choi et al., 2003;. Lee et al., 2003).

  16. Behavioral Variability and Somatic Mosaicism: A Cytogenomic Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Zelenova, Maria A; Yurov, Yuri B; Iourov, Ivan Y

    2018-04-01

    Behavioral sciences are inseparably related to genetics. A variety of neurobehavioral phenotypes are suggested to result from genomic variations. However, the contribution of genetic factors to common behavioral disorders (i.e. autism, schizophrenia, intellectual disability) remains to be understood when an attempt to link behavioral variability to a specific genomic change is made. Probably, the least appreciated genetic mechanism of debilitating neurobehavioral disorders is somatic mosaicism or the occurrence of genetically diverse (neuronal) cells in an individual's brain. Somatic mosaicism is assumed to affect directly the brain being associated with specific behavioral patterns. As shown in studies of chromosome abnormalities (syndromes), genetic mosaicism is able to change dynamically the phenotype due to inconsistency of abnormal cell proportions. Here, we hypothesize that brain-specific postzygotic changes of mosaicism levels are able to modulate variability of behavioral phenotypes. More precisely, behavioral phenotype variability in individuals exhibiting somatic mosaicism might correlate with changes in the amount of genetically abnormal cells throughout the lifespan. If proven, the hypothesis can be used as a basis for therapeutic interventions through regulating levels of somatic mosaicism to increase functioning and to improve overall condition of individuals with behavioral problems.

  17. Effect of the somatic cell count on physicochemical components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of somatic cell count on the composition of milk in individual samples from crossbred cows at the Rio Verde municipality. Data from 2,730 individual samples of milk from crossbred cows were used. The samples were collected between February and April 2012 and ...

  18. Tryptophan as a link between psychopathology and somatic states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, Sascha; Kema, Ido P; Fokkema, M Rebecca; Boon, Jim C; Willemse, Pax H B; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; den Boer, Johannes A; Korf, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several somatic illnesses are associated with psychiatric comorbidity. Evidence is provided that availability of the essential amino acid tryptophan, which is the precursor of serotonin, may cause this phenomenon. METHODS: We performed a database search to find relevant articles published

  19. Global Splicing Pattern Reversion during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Ohta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates multiple transcripts from a single gene, and cell-type-specific splicing profiles are important for the properties and functions of the cells. Recently, somatic cells have been shown to undergo dedifferentiation after the forced expression of transcription factors. However, it remains unclear whether somatic cell splicing is reorganized during reprogramming. Here, by combining deep sequencing with high-throughput absolute qRT-PCR, we show that somatic splicing profiles revert to pluripotent ones during reprogramming. Remarkably, the splicing pattern in pluripotent stem cells resembles that in testes, and the regulatory regions have specific characteristics in length and sequence. Furthermore, our siRNA screen has identified RNA-binding proteins that regulate splicing events in iPSCs. We have then demonstrated that two of the RNA-binding proteins, U2af1 and Srsf3, play a role in somatic cell reprogramming. Our results indicate that the drastic alteration in splicing represents part of the molecular network involved in the reprogramming process.

  20. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  1. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Somatic embryogenesis from zygotic embryos and thin cell layers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oil palm hybrid BRS Manicoré is important for plantations in the north of Brazil, as it is resistant to fatal yellowing and is compact. Seed germination is slow and reduced, so somatic embryogenesis is a promising alternative for its propagation. Two kinds of starting explants were used: Zygotic embryos (ZE) and thin cell layers ...

  3. Influence of plant growth regulators on somatic embryos induction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TANOH

    2013-04-17

    Theobroma cacao L.) using Thidiazuron. In vitro Cell Dev. Biol. 34:293-299. Michaux-Ferrière N, Carron MP (1989). Histology of early somatic embryogenesis in Hevea brasiliensis. The importance of timing of subculturing. Plant Cell Tiss ...

  4. Sexual abuse predicts functional somatic symptoms : An adolescent population study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonvanie, Irma J.; van Gils, Anne; Janssens, Karin A. M.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of childhood sexual abuse on medically not well explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSSs) in adolescents. We hypothesized that sexual abuse predicts higher levels of FSSs and that anxiety and depression contribute to this relationship.

  5. Somatization in traumatized refugees : A review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohlof, H.; Knipscheer, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126584591; Kleber, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069316929

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present a review of the literature concerning medically unexplained physical symptoms in refugees. Methods We outline a variety of definitions and explanations of somatization, as well as the role of culture in the concept of disease. In addition, we present a review of the

  6. Somatic Dance as a Means of Cultivating Ethically Embodied Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhiainen, Leena

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a phenomenological understanding of embodiment and discusses it in relation to a somatic approach to teaching dance. The nature of bodily knowledge is scrutinized especially through Maurice Merleau-Ponty's conceptions of perception, subjectivity, and intersubjectivity. The article offers insight into the relationship…

  7. Somatic chromosome counts and yield performance of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation in 20 accessions of Citrullus lanatus ('egusi' melon) revealed somatic chromosome counts ranging from 18 to 24 with 2n = 22 being the most frequent. Polyploid counts of 2n = 40 and 2n =44 were made for accessions DD98/4 and L6, respectively. Diploid chromosome counts varying from 2n = 22 suggest ...

  8. Regeneration of Algerian germplasm by stigma/style somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... days in most of the cultured genotypes. Formed embryos were cultured in a single tube before in vivo acclimatization. After sanitary assays, regenerated plants were shown to be free from the agents detected in the mother trees. Key words: Algeria, citrus germplasm, plant regeneration, sanitation, somatic embryogenesis.

  9. Central crosstalk for somatic tinnitus: abnormal vergence eye movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Frequent oulomotricity problems with orthoptic testing were reported in patients with tinnitus. This study examines with objective recordings vergence eye movements in patients with somatic tinnitus patients with ability to modify their subjective tinnitus percept by various movements, such as jaw, neck, eye movements or skin pressure. METHODS: Vergence eye movements were recorded with the Eyelink II video system in 15 (23-63 years control adults and 19 (36-62 years subjects with somatic tinnitus. FINDINGS: 1 Accuracy of divergence but not of convergence was lower in subjects with somatic tinnitus than in control subjects. 2 Vergence duration was longer and peak velocity was lower in subjects with somatic tinnitus than in control subjects. 3 The number of embedded saccades and the amplitude of saccades coinciding with the peak velocity of vergence were higher for tinnitus subjects. Yet, saccades did not increase peak velocity of vergence for tinnitus subjects, but they did so for controls. 4 In contrast, there was no significant difference of vergence latency between these two groups. INTERPRETATION: The results suggest dysfunction of vergence areas involving cortical-brainstem-cerebellar circuits. We hypothesize that central auditory dysfunction related to tinnitus percept could trigger mild cerebellar-brainstem dysfunction or that tinnitus and vergence dysfunction could both be manifestations of mild cortical-brainstem-cerebellar syndrome reflecting abnormal cross-modality interactions between vergence eye movements and auditory signals.

  10. Effect of explant age, hormones on somatic embryogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... The present study examines the effect of explant age and various concentrations of kinetin and BAP on somatic embryogenesis and organogenesis in Solanum trilobatum L. MS medium fortified with 11.1 µM. BAP + 13.95 µM KN produced highest frequency of embryogenesis (97.3%) and average number ...

  11. Effect of age on somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thereafter, the developing embryogenic calli were transferred to MS medium without 2,4-D to achieve embryogenesis under light intensity of 30 000 lux in 16 h light 8 h dark photoperiod at 24±2ºC for 2 weeks. The developing somatic embryos were then ... in the greenhouse on organic matter rich soil mix contained in pots.

  12. Plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis from root explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A system for induction of callus and plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis from root explants of Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg. clone Reyan 87-6-62 was evaluated. The influence of plant growth regulators (PGRs) including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) and kinetin (KT) on ...

  13. Somatic cell count distributions during lactation predict clinical mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M.J.; Green, L.E.; Schukken, Y.H.; Bradley, A.J.; Peeler, E.J.; Barkema, H.W.; Haas, de Y.; Collis, V.J.; Medley, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigated somatic cell count (SCC) records during lactation, with the purpose of identifying distribution characteristics (mean and measures of variation) that were most closely associated with clinical mastitis. Three separate data sets were used, one containing quarter SCC (n =

  14. Socioeconomic Status, Somatic Growth and Physical Fitness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SES differentiation in somatic growth and to a lesser extend in some physical fitness variables was noted in the of Ellisras rural children. Additional research to verify the relationships over time between lifestyle changes and health outcomes may be vital in this population. Keywords: Socio Economic Status, Physical fitness, ...

  15. Review of somatic cell nuclear transfer in pig | Muenthaisong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is now more than 8 years, since the first cloned pig from nuclear transfer was reported. Success of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pig is still low compared to that in bovine. Embryonic and neonatal abnormalities of cloned piglets are probably a result of incorrect or incomplete reprogramming of the transferred ...

  16. Induction of plant somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreuger, M.

    1996-01-01


    The large scale propagation of plants via somatic embryogenesis, has so far been difficult to achieve. In this thesis research is described leading to embryogenic cell lines that can be maintained for a long period, without loss of genetic stability. It is also described how embryogenic

  17. Optimization of somatic embryogenesis and selection regimes for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... kanamycin in CIM containing explants undergoing SSE led to a decrease in their embryogenic potential resulting in tissue death at 50 mg/L. The highest transient expression of uidA gene in FEC was observed combining plasmolysis, M5 particle and a helium pressure of 1,200 psi, while in somatic cotyledons, the highest ...

  18. Effect of textile factory effluent on otolith and somatic growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These constituents may elicit adverse environmental and public health effects if continued and unregulated discharge of effluents is not restricted. The relative sensitivity of otolith parameters over somatic parameters, and the relative sensitivity between otolith parameters were demonstrated. The suitability of otolith weight ...

  19. Plant regeneration of Michelia champaca L., through somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-03

    May 3, 2010 ... Michelia champaca L. is a woody ornamental tree species which has high commercial value to be used as a basic material for perfume, ... alba (white chempaka), M. champaca (orange chempaka) and Michelia figo (dwarf ..... of somatic embryos of oak (Quercus robur L.) did not improve the germination ...

  20. Immunoglobulin production induced in vitro by glucocorticoid hormones: T cell-dependent stimulation of immunoglobulin production without B cell proliferation in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, J.; Dooley, N.J.; Koski, I.R.; Blaese, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The direct effects of steroid hormones on the production of immunoglobulins and DNA synthesis by human T and B lymphocytes was evaluated in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As detected by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, the addition of 0.1 mM to 10 nM hydrocortisone to lymphocytes in culture in the absence of other stimulants or mitogens, resulted in the dramatic induction of immunoglobulin production with responses comparable to those seen in similar cultures stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. Steroid-stimulated immunoglobulin production was first seen after 48 h and peaked at 8-10 d of culture. The production of IgG, IgA, and IgM was induced following incubation with steroid. Glucocorticoids, but not estrogens or androgens, were capable of mediating this effect, and only compounds with affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor were active. The induction of immunoglobulin production was dependent on both T cells and monocytes; cultures depleted of either cell type did not produce immunoglobulin when stimulated with glucocorticoid hormones. Proliferation of B cells or T cells could not be detected by [/sup 3/H]thymidine incorporation or total cell recovery from steroid-stimulated cultures, even though such cultures demonstrated marked increases in immunoglobulin production. The mechanism responsible for this functional maturation of B cells to become high rate immunoglobulin producing cells is as yet undefined, although it appears to involve more than merely steroid mediated inactivation of suppressor T cells

  1. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics of Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus during Sugarcane Somatic Embryogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Heringer, Angelo Schuabb; Barroso, Tatiana; Macedo, Amanda Ferreira; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Floh, Eny Iochevet Segal; de Souza-Filho, Gon?alo Apolin?rio; Silveira, Vanildo

    2015-01-01

    The development of somatic cells in to embryogenic cells occurs in several stages and ends in somatic embryo formation, though most of these biochemical and molecular changes have yet to be elucidated. Somatic embryogenesis coupled with genetic transformation could be a biotechnological tool to improve potential crop yields potential in sugarcane cultivars. The objective of this study was to observe somatic embryo development and to identify differentially expressed proteins in embryogenic (E...

  2. Somatic embryos formation from immature cotyledons in Phaseolus vulgaris cv. CIAP 7247

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Collado; Lourdes R. García; Gerth Angenon; Damaris Torres; Carlos Romero; Idalmis Bermúdez-Caraballoso; Novisel Veitía

    2011-01-01

    Common bean, like most of legumes, is recalcitrant to in vitro culture, so the establishment of a regeneration procedure via somatic embryogenesis in this specie has not been possible. Therefore, determining the effect of factors that influencing on somatic embryos formation constitutes an essential step to develop a regeneration protocol via somatic embryogenesis in common bean. Cotyledons of immature seeds were used as initial plant material to achieve the somatic embryos formation in Phase...

  3. Epilepsy as a systemic condition: Link with somatic comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, J; Bell, G S; Peacock, J L; Sisodiya, S M; Sander, J W

    2017-10-01

    People with epilepsy have more concomitant medical conditions than the general population; these comorbidities play an important role in premature mortality. We sought to generate explanatory hypotheses about the co-occurrence of somatic comorbidities and epilepsy, avoiding causal and treatment-resultant biases. We collected clinical, demographic and somatic comorbidity data for 2016 consecutive adults with epilepsy undergoing assessment at a tertiary centre and in 1278 people with epilepsy in the community. Underlying causes of epilepsy were not classed as comorbidities. Somatic comorbidities were more frequent in the referral centre (49%) where people more frequently had active epilepsy than in the community (36%). Consistent risk factors for comorbidities were found in both cohorts. Using multivariable ordinal regression adjusted for age, longer epilepsy duration and an underlying brain lesion were independently associated with a smaller burden of somatic conditions. The treatment burden, measured by the number of drugs to which people were exposed, was not an independent predictor. Shorter epilepsy duration was a predictor for conditions that conceivably harbour significant mortality risks. Somatic comorbidities do not occur randomly in relation to epilepsy; having more severe epilepsy seems to be a risk factor. Independently from age, the early period after epilepsy onset appears to be at particular risk, although it is not clear whether this relates to an early mortality or to a later decrease in the burden of comorbidities. These results suggest that, for some people, epilepsy should be considered a systemic condition not limited to the CNS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy. PMID:25206275

  5. 548 Immunoglobulin a Deficiency, HPV and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jorge; Garip, Emilio; Benitez, Monica; Guzman, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background Selective IgA deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency. Serum IgA level lower than 7 mg/dL is considered selective IgA deficiency. Most people with selective IgA deficiency are asymptomatic, with incidental findings. Others may present recurrent respiratory infections, allergic symptoms, other infections and autoimmune diseases. It represents a genetically heterogeneous group of abnormalities. We report 2 cases of IgA-deficiency, HPV, and cancer, which required oral mucosa and tongue surgery. Methods Case I: Female patient, 30 years old. Medical history: vaginal HPV and Herpes. No promiscuous conduct. Complaint: recurrent infections. Physical exam: oral white lesions are observed. Laboratory findings: serum immunoglobulin A: lower than 7 mg%, secretory immunoglobulin A: lower than 1 mg%. Both exams were repeated and determinations showed low values. Cytology - Glucose - serum protein electrophoresis - Ig G - Ig M - CD3 - CD4 - CD8 - CD19 - CD56 all determinations showed normal values. HIV I /II: negative. Biopsy of oral mucosa with the following report: severe dysplasia and intraepithelial carcinoma. Signs of HPV. Surgery was performed on oral mucosa with the following pathology report: moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Microscopic, morphological changes related to cytopathogenic viral effects. The patient presented good evolution. Case II: Female patient 40 years of age. Medical history: HPV and genital herpes. No promiscuous conduct. Complaint: leukoplakia in tongue edges. Physical examination: oral white lesions. Laboratory serum immunoglobulin A: value obtained: lower than 7 mg%. Cytology - Glucose - serum protein electrophoresis - Ig G - Ig M - CD3 - CD4 - CD8 - CD19 - CD56 with normal values. HIV I/II: negative. Surgery was performed in tongue and regional lymph node. Tongue Pathology: moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with negative edges. HPV (+) PCR. Conclusion We report on the possible association

  6. Enhancement of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor transcytosis by biparatopic VHH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris D Emmerson

    Full Text Available The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR ensures the transport of dimeric immunoglobulin A (dIgA and pentameric immunoglobulin M (pIgM across epithelia to the mucosal layer of for example the intestines and the lungs via transcytosis. Per day the human pIgR mediates the excretion of 2 to 5 grams of dIgA into the mucosa of luminal organs. This system could prove useful for therapies aiming at excretion of compounds into the mucosa. Here we investigated the use of the variable domain of camelid derived heavy chain only antibodies, also known as VHHs or Nanobodies®, targeting the human pIgR, as a transport system across epithelial cells. We show that VHHs directed against the human pIgR are able to bind the receptor with high affinity (∼1 nM and that they compete with the natural ligand, dIgA. In a transcytosis assay both native and phage-bound VHH were only able to get across polarized MDCK cells that express the human pIgR gene in a basolateral to apical fashion. Indicating that the VHHs are able to translocate across epithelia and to take along large particles of cargo. Furthermore, by making multivalent VHHs we were able to enhance the transport of the compounds both in a MDCK-hpIgR and Caco-2 cell system, probably by inducing receptor clustering. These results show that VHHs can be used as a carrier system to exploit the human pIgR transcytotic system and that multivalent compounds are able to significantly enhance the transport across epithelial monolayers.

  7. File list: His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591728,SRX591729,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591729,SRX591728,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591728,SRX591729,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somatic... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  10. Somatic embryos formation from immature cotyledons in Phaseolus vulgaris cv. CIAP 7247

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Collado

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Common bean, like most of legumes, is recalcitrant to in vitro culture, so the establishment of a regeneration procedure via somatic embryogenesis in this specie has not been possible. Therefore, determining the effect of factors that influencing on somatic embryos formation constitutes an essential step to develop a regeneration protocol via somatic embryogenesis in common bean. Cotyledons of immature seeds were used as initial plant material to achieve the somatic embryos formation in Phaseolus vulgaris cv. CIAP 7247. Five 2,4-D concentrations (10, 20, 30, 40 y 50 mg l-1 and cotyledon orientation on culture medium were studied. After eight weeks on culture, the number of explants that formed somatic embryos and the number of somatic embryos per explant were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the major number of explants that formed somatic embryos and the number of somatic embryos formed per explant were obtained with 40 y 50 mg l-1 of 2,4-D. Somatic embryos were formed on abaxial side from the cotyledons when this side was placed opposite to the culture medium. Somatic embryos on cotyledons from immature seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. CIAP 7247 were formed. It was demonstrated that the addition of 2,4-D into culture medium, and the explant orientation had a determining effect on somatic embryogenesis in this important legume. Key words: common bean, regeneration, somatic embryogenesis

  11. Use of [75Se]selenomethionine in immunoglobulin biosynthetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, G.A.; Warner, N.L.; Harris, A.W.; Bowles, A.

    1978-01-01

    The gamma-emitting amino acid analog, [ 75 Se] selenomethionine, has been used as a biosynthetic label for immunoglobulins secreted by plasmacytomas in tissue culture. The secreted products are structurally intact with respect to their antibody combining sites and their class and allotype antigenic specificities. A component of [ 75 Se] selenomethionine preparations was found to bind to fetal calf serum proteins, in a manner releasable by mercaptoethanol, but not by sodium dodecyl sulfate and urea. Methods for circumventing the problems caused by this binding are described. (Auth.)

  12. Anti-Proteinuric Effect of Sulodexide in Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Kitae; Chin, Ho Jun; Chae, Dong Wan; Joo, Kwon Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Suhnggwon; Ju, Kyung Don; Kim, Hwajung; Ahn, Curie; Oh, Kook-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a multi-center randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of 6-month therapy with sulodexide on urinary protein excretion in patients with idiopathic Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy. Materials and Methods A total of seventy-seven patients participated in the study. They were randomly allocated to one of three groups: sulodexide 75 mg or 150 mg daily or the placebo for 6 months. The primary end point was the achievement, at 6 months, of at least 50% reductio...

  13. A case of immunoglobulin E mediated anaphylaxis to levodropropizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Hee; Yun, Il Seon; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Chein-Soo; Park, Jung-Won

    2013-01-01

    We experienced a case of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated anaphylaxis to levodropropizine. The patient was an 18-year old Korean woman. After taking the common cold medication including acetaminophen, domperidone, and levodropropizine, skin rash, angioedema and anaphylaxis were developed immediately. As she was tolerable to acetaminophen alone, we thought the culprit agent was maybe a levodropropizine tablet. To confirm the culprit, she underwent skin prick test and oral drug provocation test with the suspected one. Finally we detected levodropropizine specific IgE and confirmed the specificity by inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  14. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Thomassen, Mads; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high...

  15. Success of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody treatment for severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by warm-reactive immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, and immunoglobulin M autoantibodies in a child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmi, Houda; Mabrouk, Sameh; Hassayoun, Saida; Regaieg, Haifa; Tfifha, Minyar; Jalel, Chemli; Skouri, Hadef; Zouari, Noura; Abroug, Saoussan

    2017-11-14

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare in children. First-line therapies for this disease consist of corticosteroids and intravenously administered immunoglobulin that are effective in most patients. However, a small proportion of cases (5 to 10%) is refractory to these therapies and may represent a medical emergency, especially when hemolysis is due to warm immunoglobulin M. Recently, reports of the use of rituximab in adult autoimmune diseases have shown promising results. In children, there are few studies on the use of rituximab in the treatment for autoimmune hemolytic anemia, especially on its long-term efficacy and adverse effects. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old Tunisian girl with refractory acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by warm-reactive immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, and C3d autoantibodies. First-line treatments using corticosteroids and intravenously administered immunoglobulin were ineffective in controlling her severe disease. On the other hand, she was successfully treated with rituximab. In fact, her hemolytic anemia improved rapidly and no adverse effects were observed. The case that we report in this paper shows that rituximab could be an alternative therapeutic option in severe acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia with profound hemolysis refractory to conventional treatment. Moreover, it may preclude the use of plasmapheresis in such an urgent situation with a sustained remission.

  16. Optimized localization of bacterial infections with technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin after protein charge selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welling, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Feitsma, H.I.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Calame, W. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Ensing, G.J. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Petten (Netherlands)); Goedemans, W. (Mallinckrodt Medical, Petten (Netherlands)); Pauwels, E.K.J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-10-01

    To improve the scintigraphic detection of bacterial infections a protein charge-purified fraction of polyclonal human immunoglobulin was applied as a radiopharmaceutical. This purification was achieved by attaching the immunoglobulin to an anion-exchanger column and by obtaining the column-bound fraction with buffer. The binding to bacteria in vitro and the target to non-target ratios of an experimental thigh infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice were evaluated to compare the purified and the unpurified immunoglobulin. The percentage of binding to all gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria used in this study was significantly (P<0.03) higher for the purified than for the unpurified immunoglobulin. For the in vivo study, mice were infected in the thigh muscle with Staph. aureus or K. pneumoniae. After 18 h 0.1 mg of technetium-99m labelled polyclonal immunoglobulin or [sup 99m]Tc-labelled protein charge-purified polyclonal human immunoglobulin was administered intravenously. At all time intervals the target (infected thighs) to non-target (non-infected thighs) ratios for both infections were significantly higher (P<0.03) for protein charge-purified polyclonal immunoglobulin than for unpurified polyclonal human immunoglobulin. Already within 1 h the infected tissues could be detected by the purified immunoglobulin. It is concluded that [sup 99m]Tc-labelled protein charge-purified immunoglobulin localizes both a gram-positive and a gram-negative thigh infection more intensely and faster than [sup 99m]Tc-labelled unpurified immunoglobulin. (orig.)

  17. Differential protein analysis of serum exosomes post-intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Song, Qi-Fang; Jin, Jing-Jie; Huang, Ping; Wang, Zhou-Ping; Xie, Xiao-Fei; Gu, Xiao-Qiong; Gao, Xue-Juan; Jia, Hong-Ling

    2017-11-01

    Kawasaki disease, which is characterised by systemic vasculitides accompanied by acute fever, is regularly treated by intravenous immunoglobulin to avoid lesion formation in the coronary artery; however, the mechanism of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is unclear. Hence, we aimed to analyse the global expression profile of serum exosomal proteins before and after administering intravenous immunoglobulin. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the differentially expressed proteome of serum exosomes in patients with Kawasaki disease before and after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Our analysis revealed 69 differential protein spots in the Kawasaki disease group with changes larger than 1.5-fold and 59 differential ones in patients after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy compared with the control group. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the acute-phase response disappeared, the functions of the complement system and innate immune response were enhanced, and the antibacterial humoral response pathway of corticosteroids and cardioprotection emerged after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin. Further, we showed that complement C3 and apolipoprotein A-IV levels increased before and decreased after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and that the insulin-like growth factor-binding protein complex acid labile subunit displayed reverse alteration before and after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. These observations might be potential indicators of intravenous immunoglobulin function. Our results show the differential proteomic profile of serum exosomes of patients with Kawasaki disease before and after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, such as complement C3, apolipoprotein A-IV, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein complex acid labile subunit. These results may be useful in the identification of markers for monitoring intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  18. The Effect of ionizing radiation on different immunoglobulin classes, national immunoglobulins and serum proteins in industrial radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakeri, F.; Masoud, A.; Sohrabi M

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was To evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the humoral immunity of 51 industrial radiographers compared to 20 normal controls. The annual effective dose ranges due to gamma radiation at the latest year of exposure, were classified in 4 groups: 1-29 mSv, 30-59mSv, 60-89 mSv and a fourth group with dose range of 400-2000 mSv as the accidental exposed group, were also studied. The findings showed that the serum levels of different immunoglobulin classes, respond differently to irradiation. The serum concentrations of IgM and IgA decreased with increasing radiation doses in all four groups, compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant, according to student t-test and Tukey method. The significant decrease in serum IgG level was observed in the fourth group compared with first group and control (P<0.05). Iso hemagglutinins (natural immunoglobulins), which mostly are of IgM type, also decreased with increasing exposure doses in four groups, as occurring for serum IgM, with no statistical significance. On the contrary, the concentration of total IgE, as measured by the ELISA, was significantly increased in fourth group. Serum protein electrophoresis indicated a drop in the concentration of gamma-globulins, confirming the reduction in immunoglobulins caused by radiation exposure. The decrease in albumin and increase in alpha and beta globulins were also observed. The results of this study over ally showed that the change of humoral factors in those groups who have received annual effective doses of less than 90 mSv, were not significantly different from controls. However, the immunosuppressive effects of radiation exposure was remarkable in the fourth group, therefore, this group are expected to be at high risk of delayed effects of radiation exposure such as increased incidence of cancer and infectious diseases

  19. Evaluation of adsorption selectivity of immunoglobulins M, A and G and purification of immunoglobulin M with mixed-mode resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying-Di; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Yao, Shan-Jing; Lin, Dong-Qiang

    2018-01-19

    This study investigated adsorption selectivity of immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin (IgG) on four mixed-mode resins with the functional ligands of 4-mercatoethyl-pyridine (MEP), 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI), 5-aminobenzimidazole (ABI) and tryptophan-5-aminobenzimidazole (W-ABI), respectively. IgM purification processes with mixed-mode resins were also proposed. All resins showed typical pH-dependent adsorption, and high adsorption capacity was found at pH 5.0-8.0 with low adsorption capacity under acidic conditions. Meanwhile, high selectivity of IgM/IgA and IgM/IgG was obtained with ABI-4FF and MMI-4FF resins at pH 4.0-5.0, which was used to develop a method for IgM, IgA and IgG separation by controlling loading and elution pH. Capture of monoclonal IgM from cell culture supernatant with ABI-4FF resins was studied and high purity (∼99%) and good recovery (80.8%) were obtained. Moreover, IgM direct separation from human serum with combined two-step chromatography (ABI-4FF and MMI-4FF) was investigated, and IgM purity of 65.2% and a purification factor of 28.3 were obtained after optimization. The antibody activity of IgM was maintained after purification. The results demonstrated that mixed-mode chromatography with specially-designed ligands is a promising way to improve adsorption selectivity and process efficiency of IgM purification from complex feedstock. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Carter, R.L.; Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic-bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody, and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE) were measured among 2061 Adult Health Study participants in Hiroshima and Nagasaki from December 1987 to November 1989. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor increased in a statistically significant manner with increasing radiation dose. No radiation effect was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody. A statistically significant relationship was also found between radiation exposure and the IgA level in females and the IgM levels in both sexes-both levels increased as radiation dose increased. However, the effects of radiation exposure were not large and accounted for less than 10% of the total variation in each measurement. Levels of IgG and IgE were not affected by radiation exposure. (author)

  1. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, M; Branch, D R

    2014-12-01

    Although intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is widely used for replacement therapy in immunodeficiencies and to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Examination of immunoglobulin (Ig) receptors, including the Fc-gamma receptors (FCγRs) and the neonatal Fc receptor, have revealed genetic variations that are linked to autoimmune diseases and to the efficacy of IVIg treatment. However, the beneficial effect of IVIg encompasses multiple mechanisms of action. One of these is scavenging of activated complement fragments, such as C3a, C5a, C3b and C4b, by infused Ig molecules. This interaction prevents binding of complement fragments to their receptors on target cells, thus attenuating the immune damage. Additionally, anti-inflammatory effects may be facilitated by IgA via specific receptors and/or complement scavenging. Glycosylation of both the Fc- and Fab-fragments has also been implicated in the anti-inflammatory action of IVIg. Although there is evidence to support a role for sialylated IgG glycovariants in mediating the effect of IVIg, evidence from animal models of inflammatory disease suggest that sialylation may not be a critical factor. However, an increase in IgG glycosylation has been observed following IVIg treatment in Guillain-Barré syndrome patients, and this has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Structural characterization of anti-inflammatory Immunoglobulin G Fc proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Alysia A.; Giddens, John; Pincetic, Andrew; Lomino, Joseph V.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a central mediator of host defense due to its ability to recognize and eliminate pathogens. The recognition and effector responses are encoded on distinct regions of IgGs. The diversity of the antigen recognition Fab domains accounts for IgG's ability to bind with high specificity to essentially any antigen. Recent studies have indicated that the Fc effector domain also displays considerable heterogeneity, accounting for its complex effector functions of inflammation, modulation and immune suppression. Therapeutic anti-tumor antibodies, for example, require the pro-inflammatory properties of the IgG Fc to eliminate tumor cells, while the anti-inflammatory activity of Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) requires specific Fc glycans for activity. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG is ascribed to a small population of IgGs in which the Asn297-linked complex N-glycans attached to each Fc CH2 domain include terminal α2,6-linked sialic acids. We used chemoenzymatic glycoengineering to prepare fully di-sialylated IgG Fc and solved its crystal structure. Comparison of the structures of asialylated Fc, sialylated Fc, and F241A Fc, a mutant that displays increased glycan sialylation, suggests that increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain is associated with the switch from pro- to anti-inflammatory activity of the Fc. PMID:25036289

  3. Characterization of antibodies against ferret immunoglobulins, cytokines and CD markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Ferret IgG and IgM were purified from normal serum, while ferret IgA was purified from bile. The estimated molecular weights of the immunoglobulin gamma, alpha and mu heavy chains were found to be 54 kDa, 69 kDa and 83 kDa, respectively. For immunological (ELISA) quantification of ferret...... immunoglobulins, we identified and characterized polyclonal antibodies towards ferret IgG, IgM and IgA. We also identified 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised mostly against human CD markers which cross-reacted with ferret leukocytes. These antibodies were originally specific against human CD8, CD9, CD14, CD18......, CD25, CD29, CD32, CD44, CD61, CD71, CD79b, CD88, CD104, CD172a and mink CD3. Finally, we identified 4 cross-reacting mAbs with specificities against ferret interferon-gamma, TNF-alpha, interleukin-4 and interleukin-8....

  4. INFLUENCE OF HIGH CORTISOL DOSES UPON THE SERUM IMMUNOGLOBULIN LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlovic

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Cortisol upon the serum immunoglobulin concentration areexamined. The experiment involved male guinea pigs of the body weight from 300 to400 g that were nonnally fed and lived under the common laboratory conditions. Theguinea pigs were divided into an experimental and a control group. The experimentalgroup's guinea pigs were given every day (in a 6 days' period a subcutaneous dose of80 g of corti sol/kg/per day, while the control group ones were given only one ml ofthe physiological solution. Two weeks after the last received dose of Cortisol orphysiological solution the cordial puncture was applied to take a blood sample inwhich the level of the serum IgA, IgG and IgM was determined. In the experimentalgroup animals the serum IgG value was 11,2 mg/ml at the beginning and 8,7 mg/ml at the end of the experiment (reduction for 22,1%, while the TgA concentration at theend of the experiment was reduced for 5,8%, while the IgM concentration for 12,9%.The serum immunoglobulin concentration in the control group guinea pigs does notreveal any significant differences at the beginning and the end of the experiment.

  5. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and their Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajik N.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Natural killer (NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes comprising around 10% of total lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Due to their role in the innate response, NK cells provide a ‘first line of defense’ against infectious agents and cancer and are also thought to play a role in autoimmunity. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR are regulatory surface molecules, found on NK cells and on a subset of T lymphocytes. The genes for KIR are present on chromosome 19 in the leukocyte receptor complex and show a major difference for both the type and number of KIR genes present among different ethnic groups. They have been divided into two groups of 2D or 3D, depending on the number of external immunoglobulin domains. The presence of a long cytoplasmic tail with two immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIM allows the transduction of inhibitory signals and characterizes the inhibitory KIRs (2DL and 3DL, whereas the presence of short cytoplasmic tails corresponds to the activating KIR receptors (2DS and 3DS.These polymorphic receptors interact with specific motifs on human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules, modulate NK cytolytic activity. Some KIRs are known to interact with HLA-C molecules of target cells, HLA-Bw4 molecules and HLA-A3/11. For some KIRs the corresponding ligands are still unknown.

  6. Hepatocyte handling of immunoglobulin A in the rat: the role of microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, I.S.; Jones, A.L.; Hradek, G.T.; Huling, S.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-derived dimeric immunoglobulin A is transported through liver parenchymal cells into bile, in association with its glycoprotein receptor secretory component, by a vesicular transport system. This study was designed to determine the effects of colchicine, a microtubule-disrupting agent, and thus the role of microtubules on the uptake, intracellular transport, and subsequent biliary secretion of dimeric immunoglobulin A. In vivo studies in rats showed that colchicine treatment reduced the amount of intraportally injected 125 I-dimeric immunoglobulin A that appeared in the bile. It was also found that although the livers in colchicine-treated animals could sequester and internalize immunoglobulin A, it was not readily secreted into bile. In vitro studies using peroxidase-labeled antisecretory component and 125 I-dimeric immunoglobulin A autoradiography were both used to determine the site of this block in immunoglobulin A secretion. These studies demonstrate that colchicine disruption of microtubules (a) has little initial effect on the binding and internalization of dimeric immunoglobulin A; (b) has a major effect on the translocation of immunoglobulin A-containing vesicles within the hepatocyte, and (c) most likely prevents the translocation of newly synthesized secretory component to the plasma membrane

  7. Decreased immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to cashew allergens following sodium sulfite treatment and heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashew nut and other nut allergies can result in serious and sometimes life threatening reactions. Linear and conformational epitopes within food allergens are important for immunoglobulin E binding. Methods that disrupt allergen structure can reduce immunoglobulin E binding and lessen the likelih...

  8. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  9. Polyvalent immunoglobulin for intravenous use interferes with cell proliferation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, I. N.; Lundkvist, I.; Vermeulen, M.; Brand, A.

    1992-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin is used to an increasing extent in various immune-mediated diseases, but its mechanism(s) of action in vivo is incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that intravenous immunoglobulin may interfere with autoantibodies and their production by B cells and also

  10. Bringing immunoglobulin knowledge up to date: how should we treat today?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misbah, S.; Kuijpers, T.; van der Heijden, J.; Grimbacher, B.; Guzman, D.; Orange, J.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is constantly evolving. Advances in the basic and clinical science of immunoglobulins have provided new perspectives in using polyclonal IgG to treat patients with primary immunodeficiencies. Recent meta-analyses of patient data and outcomes, optimization of IgG

  11. Postpartum Treatment With Immunoglobulin Does Not Prevent Relapses of Multiple Sclerosis in the Mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Adoni, Tarso; Alves-Leon, Soniza Vieira; Azambuja, Nerio Dutra; Barreira, Amilton Antunes; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Carneiro, Denise Sisteroli Diniz; Carvalho, Margarete J; Claudino, Rinaldo; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Domingues, Renan Barros; Finkelsztejn, Alessandro; Gama, Paulo Diniz; Giacomo, Maria Cristina Brandao; Gomes, Sidney; Goncalves, Marcus Vinicius Magno; Grzesiuk, Anderson Kuntz; Kaimen-Maciel, Damacio Ramon; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Morales, Nivea Macedo Oliveira; Morales, Rogerio Rizo; Muniz, Andre; Papais-Alvarenga, Regina Maria; Parolin, Monica Koncke Fiuza; Ribeiro, Sonia Beatriz Felix; Ruocco, Heloisa Helena; Salgado, Pedro Rippel; Siquineli, Fabio; Souza, Doralina Brum; Tosta, Elza Dias; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina Ferreira; Almeida, Sandra Maria Garcia; Bernardes, Daniella Freire Ribeiro; Castro, Simone Nascimento; Gama, Rodrigo Assad Diniz; Gomide, Fabrizio Antonio Resende; Finkelzstejn, Juliana; Lopes, Josiane; Lourenco, Fabiani Honorato de Barros; Lourenco, Gisele A; Oliveira, Celso Luis Silva; Oliveira, Francisco Tomaz Meneses; Oliveira, Lucas Felix; Patroclo, Cristiane Borges; Pereira, Wildea Lice de Carvalho Jennings; Safanelli, Juliana; Sahdo, Alinne Martiniano; Saldanha, Patricia Correa de Oliveira; Shinzato, Yves Fumio; Souza, Jorge Murilo Barbosa; Zani, Denis Evandro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, neurological, immune-mediated disease that can worsen in the postpartum period. There is no consensus on the use of immunoglobulin for prevention of disease relapses after delivery. We have shown that the controversial beneficial effect of immunoglobulin given immediately after birth could not be observed in patients with MS.

  12. Mucosal immunoglobulins at respiratory surfaces mark an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Takizawa, Fumio; Parra, David; Gómez, Daniela; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; LaPatra, Scott E; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2016-02-12

    Gas-exchange structures are critical for acquiring oxygen, but they also represent portals for pathogen entry. Local mucosal immunoglobulin responses against pathogens in specialized respiratory organs have only been described in tetrapods. Since fish gills are considered a mucosal surface, we hypothesized that a dedicated mucosal immunoglobulin response would be generated within its mucosa on microbial exposure. Supporting this hypothesis, here we demonstrate that following pathogen exposure, IgT(+) B cells proliferate and generate pathogen-specific IgT within the gills of fish, thus providing the first example of locally induced immunoglobulin in the mucosa of a cold-blooded species. Moreover, we demonstrate that gill microbiota is predominantly coated with IgT, thus providing previously unappreciated evidence that the microbiota present at a respiratory surface of a vertebrate is recognized by a mucosal immunoglobulin. Our findings indicate that respiratory surfaces and mucosal immunoglobulins are part of an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods.

  13. IgT, a primitive immunoglobulin class specialized in mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-An; Salinas, Irene; Li, Jun; Parra, David; Bjork, Sarah; Xu, Zhen; LaPatra, Scott E; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-01-01

    Teleost fish are the most primitive bony vertebrates that contain immunoglobulins. In contrast to mammals and birds, these species are devoid of immunoglobulin A (IgA) or a functional equivalent. This observation suggests that specialization of immunoglobulin isotypes into mucosal and systemic responses took place during tetrapod evolution. Challenging that paradigm, here we show that IgT, an immunoglobulin isotype of unknown function, acts like a mucosal antibody. We detected responses of rainbow trout IgT to an intestinal parasite only in the gut, whereas IgM responses were confined to the serum. IgT coated most intestinal bacteria. As IgT and IgA are phylogenetically distant immunoglobulins, their specialization into mucosal responses probably occurred independently by a process of convergent evolution. PMID:20676094

  14. Swine plasma immunoglobulins for prevention and treatment of post-weaning diarrhoea: Safety and Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Bendix Hansen, Marie

    and minimize the on antibiotics and zinc usage. Swine immunoglobulins were isolated directly from slaughterhouse swine plasma-waste by expanded bed chromatography. It was shown that the isolated Immunoglobulin fraction bound enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Salmonella ssp. and inhibited...... their adhesion to porcine epithelial cells in vitro. As the immunoglobulin fraction is intended for oral use as a feed supplement, we also tested the safety of feeding 4 grams of natural immunoglobulins to 4-5 week old weaner piglets for 14 days and observed no adverse effects. In an experimental model of E....... coli F4+ induced PWD, we observed that piglets given IgG as a feed supplement cleared the E coli infection significantly faster than control weaner piglets not receiving an immunoglobulin feed supplement. Furthermore, deep sequencing of the ileal microbiota showed a significantly lowered colonization...

  15. [Management of adverse effects related to human immunoglobulin therapy: Recommendations for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, I; Chérin, P; Michallet, M; Pelus, E; Dantal, J; Crave, J-C; Delain, J-C; Viallard, J-F

    2017-05-01

    Both intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins are therapeutic modalities approved in various conditions, including primary and secondary immune deficiencies and autoimmune disorders. To date, immunoglobulins have more often been considered as a safe medication, with minor adverse effects such as hypertension, fever and chills, nausea, myalgia or headache. However, with the wider use of immunoglobulins in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, severe side effects have also been reported to occur in immunoglobulin-treated patients, especially anaphylaxis, aseptic meningitis, acute renal impairment, thrombotic events as well as haematological manifestations. This paper reviews all the potential adverse events related to immunoglobulin therapy and establishes a comprehensive guideline for the management of these events. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-06-21

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Exploring the psychological and somatic impact of identity theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Tracy; Shreve-Neiger, Andrea; Fremouw, William; Kane, John; Hutton, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    Identity theft is a new and growing form of white-collar crime. This exploratory study examined the psychological and somatic impact of identity theft and coping methods utilized by victims. Thirty-seven victims of identity theft participated in regional victim focus groups. Participants completed a victim impact questionnaire designed by the authors and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). The majority of participants expressed an increase in maladaptive psychological and somatic symptoms post victimization. Results on the BSI indicated that identity theft victims with unresolved cases, in contrast to those with resolved cases, were more likely to have clinically elevated scores when compared with a normative sample. Relatively similar coping mechanisms were utilized across victims. The results from this study suggest that victims of identity theft do have increased psychological and physical distress, and for those whose cases remain unresolved, distress is maintained over time.

  18. Severe Mental Illness, Somatic Delusions, and Attempted Mass Murder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarteschi, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    A case of an attempted mass shooting at a large psychiatric hospital in the United States by a 30-year-old male with severe mental illness, somatic delusions, and exceptional access to healthcare professionals is reported. Six persons were shot, one died at the scene, and the shooter was then killed by the police. Data were gathered from court documents and media accounts. An analysis of the shooter's psychiatric history, his interactions with healthcare professionals, and communications prior to the shooting suggest a rare form of mass murder, a random attack by a documented psychotic and delusional individual suffering with somatic delusions. Despite his being psychotic, the killer planned the attack and made a direct threat 1 month prior to the shootings. This case highlights problems with the healthcare system, indicating that it might be ill equipped to appropriately deal with severe mental illness. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Inference of Tumor Phylogenies with Improved Somatic Mutation Discovery

    KAUST Repository

    Salari, Raheleh

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies provide a powerful tool for studying genome evolution during progression of advanced diseases such as cancer. Although many recent studies have employed new sequencing technologies to detect mutations across multiple, genetically related tumors, current methods do not exploit available phylogenetic information to improve the accuracy of their variant calls. Here, we present a novel algorithm that uses somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in multiple, related tissue samples as lineage markers for phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Our method then leverages the inferred phylogeny to improve the accuracy of SNV discovery. Experimental analyses demonstrate that our method achieves up to 32% improvement for somatic SNV calling of multiple related samples over the accuracy of GATK\\'s Unified Genotyper, the state of the art multisample SNV caller. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Family intervention for children with functional somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgaard, Ditte Roth; Dehlholm-Lambertsen, Birgitte; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    lidelser, Århus; Århus universitet Aim & Background: Functional somatic symptoms (FSS) can be defined as physical symptoms that cannot be fully explained by organic pathology. FSS are prevalent in children worldwide and in all medical settings, and when severe, pose a major burden on those with FSS...... and on society. In clinical practice and current research in child mental health, focus on family factors is increasing. The aim of this systematic review was to explore and describe the current family based approaches used for youngsters with FSS, and to evaluate the quality of the existing research...... synthesis of the findings. Results: This review included sixteen papers based on fifteen studies that delivered family therapy to youngsters with FSS. The majority of the participants were diagnosed with functional somatic syndromes (pain and CFS) and the family based treatments were primarily based on CBT...