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Sample records for solvent metal cleaning

  1. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material

  2. Comparative study of aqueous and solvent methods for cleaning metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Goad, H.A.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the comparative effectiveness of solvent and aqueous detergent methods for cleaning various metals. The metals investigated included 304L stainless steel, beryllium, uranium-6.5 wt percent niobium alloy, and unalloyed uranium ( 238 U). The studies were initiated in response to governmental regulations restricting the use of some chlorinated solvents. Results showed that aqueous detergent cleaning was more effective than solvents, i.e. trichloroethylene and methyl chloroform, for the removal of light industrial soils. The subsequent adoption of aqueous cleaning at this plant has facilitated waste disposal, which contributed to recorded economic savings. The controlled use of aqueous detergents is environmentally acceptable and has decreased the hazards of fire and toxicity that are generally associated with solvents. 8 tables, 15 figures

  3. Canyon solvent cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, produce decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown the carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent by an alumina adsorption process removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale alumina adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  4. Canyon solvent cleaning with activated alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents recent work at SRL concerning the cleaning of solvent extraction solvent used at SRP. The paper explains why we undertook the work, and some laboratory studies on two approaches to solvent cleaning, namely extended carbonate washing and use of solid adsorbents. The paper then discusses scale-up of the preferred method and the results of the full-scale cleaning. 19 figs

  5. Canyon solvent cleaning with solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent with a solid adsorbent removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  6. Alternatives to Organic Solvents in Industrial Cleaning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    To control chemical hazards in work places, substitution of harmful substances with less harmful or non-toxic products is now a method used in many countries and in many companies. It has previously been demonstrated that it is desirable and possible to use non-volatile, low-toxic vegetable...... cleaning agents in offset printing companies instead of volatile, toxic organic solvents. The present study is based on a project with the aim of defining other industrial processes, where organic solvents used for cleaning or degreasing can be replaced by non-volatile, low-toxic products, which are based...... on esters from fatty acids of vegetable origin (vegetable esters - VE).The study indicates that industrial cleaning/degreasing with organic solvents may be substituted with VEs on metal surfaces and on some coated surfaces, in manufacture of paints and inks, use of paints, use of inks (printing), metal...

  7. Ultrasonic aqueous cleaning as a replacement for chlorinated solvent cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been involved in the replacement of chlorinated solvents since 1982. One of the most successful replacement efforts has been the substitution of vapor degreasers or soak tanks using chlorinated solvents with ultrasonic cleaning using aqueous detergents. Recently, funding was obtained from the Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Technology Development to demonstrate this technology. A unit has been procured and installed in the vacuum pump shop area to replace the use of a solvent soak tank. Initially, the solvents used in the shop were CFC-113 and a commercial brand cleaner which contained both perchloroethylene and methylene chloride. While the ultrasonic unit was being procured, a terpene-based solvent was used. Generally, parts were soaked overnight in order to soften baked-on vanish. Many times, wire brushing was used to help remove remaining contamination. Initial testing with the ultrasonic cleaner indicated cleaning times of 20 min were as effective as the overnight solvent soaks in removing contamination. Wire brushing was also not required following the ultrasonic cleaning as was sometimes required with the solvent soak

  8. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915.32 Labor... Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents are used, the employer shall employ one or more of the following measures to safeguard the health of employees exposed to these solvents. (1...

  9. Alternative Solvents and Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Hintze, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Precision cleaning solvents for aerospace components and oxygen fuel systems, including currently used Vertrel-MCA, have a negative environmental legacy, high global warming potential, and have polluted cleaning sites. Thus, alternative solvents and technologies are being investigated with the aim of achieving precision contamination levels of less than 1 mg/sq ft. The technologies being evaluated are ultrasonic bath cleaning, plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide cleaning.

  10. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  11. Clean Metal Casting; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components

  12. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  13. Cleaning of spent solvent and method of processing cleaning liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Masaki; Kawada, Tomio; Tamura, Nobuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    Spent solvents discharged from a solvent extracting step mainly comprise n-dodecane and TBP and contain nuclear fission products and solvent degradation products. The spent solvents are cleaned by using a sodium chloride free detergent comprising hydrazine oxalate and hydrazine carbonate in a solvent cleaning device. Nitric acid is added to the cleaning liquid wastes containing spent detergents extracted from the solvent cleaning device, to control an acid concentration. The detergent liquid wastes of controlled acid concentration are sent to an electrolysis oxidation bath as electrolytes and electrochemically decomposed in carbonic acid gas, nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas. The decomposed gases are processed as off gases. The decomposed liquid wastes are processed as a waste nitric acid solution. This can provide more effective cleaning. In addition, the spent detergent can be easily decomposed in a room temperature region. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  14. Decontamination of radioactive contaminated protective wear using dry cleaning solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthiah, Pushpa; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2013-01-01

    Liquid waste generated by conventional decontamination of radioactive contaminated cotton protective wear using detergent affects the chemical treatment of the plant. To reduce the generation of aqueous detergent waste, dry cleaning of cotton protective wear, highly soiled with oil and grease towards decontamination was tried with organic solvents. Mineral turpentine oil (MTO) among various other organic solvents was identified as a suitable organic solvent. As MTO leaves characteristic odour on the cloth, various commercial fragrances for the removal of the odour were tried. Application of the optimised dry cleaning solvent and commercial fragrance was adopted in plant scale operation. (author)

  15. Substitution of Organic Solvents in Selected Industrial Cleaning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Pia Brunn

    1997-01-01

    Volatile organic solvents (VOC)are becoming increasingly unwanted in industrial processes. Substitution of VOC with non-volatile, low-toxic compounds is a possibility to reduce VOC-use. It has been successfully demonstrated, that organic solvents used in cleaning processes in sheet offset printing...

  16. Determination of a cleaning and decontamination process using solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.

    1967-03-01

    This work has been carried out on samples of the white cotton serge material of which most of the working overalls of the Nuclear Research Centre are made. The aims are: - to determine,from the decontamination and cleaning points of view, the efficiency of various solvents (white-spirit, trichloroethylene, perchlorethylene and tri-chloro-trifluoroethane) and the role of additives likely to improve the treatment; - to control the textile from the wear and shrinkage points of view; - to try to develop a basic cleaning and decontamination process as a function of the possibilities of each solvent considered. (authors) [fr

  17. 40 CFR 52.246 - Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of dry cleaning solvent vapor... cleaning solvent vapor losses. (a) For the purpose of this section, “dry cleaning operation” means that process by which an organic solvent is used in the commercial cleaning of garments and other fabric...

  18. Update-processing steam generator cleaning solvent at Palo Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.

    1996-01-01

    Framatome Technologies Inc.(FTI) recently completed the steam generator chemical cleanings at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station Units 1, 2 and 3. Over 500,000 gallons of low-level radioactive solvents were generated during these cleanings and were processed on-site. Chemical cleaning solutions containing high concentrations of organic chelating wastes are difficult to reduce in volume using standard technologies. The process that was ultimately used at Palo Verde involved three distinct processing steps: The evaporation step was conducted using FTI's submerged combustion evaporator (SCE) that has also been successfully used at Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1, Three Mile Island - Unit 1, and Oconee on similar waste. The polishing step of the distillate used ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) technology that was also used extensively by Ontario Hydro to assist in their processing of chemical cleaning solvent. This technology, equipment, and operations personnel were provided by Zenon Environmental, Inc. The concentrate from the evaporator was absorbed with a special open-quotes peat mossclose quotes based media that allowed it to be shipped and buried at the Environcare of Utah facility. This is the first time that this absorption media or burial site has been used for chemical cleaning solvent

  19. Method of cleaning alkaline metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yukio; Naito, Kesahiro; Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Nakasuji, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of used sodium and aqueous alkaline solution when cleaning used sodium and metallic sodium adhering to equipment with an aqueous alkaline solution. Method: A sodium treating container is filled with an aqueous alkaline solution, and stainless steel gauze is sunk in the container. Equipment to be cleaned such as equipment with sodium adhering to it are retained under the gauze and are thus cleaned. On the other hand, the surface of the aqueous alkaline solution is covered with a fluid paraffin liquid covering material. Thus, the hydrogen produced by the reaction of the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution will float up, pass through the liquid covering material and be discharged. The sodium will pass through the gauze and float upwardly while reacting with the aqueous alkaline solution in a partic ulate state to the boundary between the aqueous alkaline solution and up to the covering material, and thus the theratment reaction will continue. Thus, the cover material prevents the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution from scattering. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoemaker, J.D.; Meltzer, M.; Miscovich, D.; Montoya, D.; Goodrich, P.; Blycker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL`s findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication, machine shops, optical lenses and hardware, and general cleaning. Most of the alternative cleaners are safer than the solvents previously used and many are nonhazardous, according to regulatory criteria.

  1. Cleaning up our act: Alternatives for hazardous solvents used in cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, J.D.; Meltzer, M.; Miscovich, D.; Montoya, D.; Goodrich, P.; Blycker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has studied more than 70 alternative cleaners as potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene and trichloroethane), hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene and Stoddard Solvent), and volatile organic compounds (e.g., acetone, alcohols). This report summarizes LLNL's findings after testing more than 45 proprietary formulations on bench-scale testing equipment and in more than 60 actual shops and laboratories. Cleaning applications included electronics fabrication, machine shops, optical lenses and hardware, and general cleaning. Most of the alternative cleaners are safer than the solvents previously used and many are nonhazardous, according to regulatory criteria

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T of... - Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures A... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning Pt. 63, Subpt. T, App. A Appendix A to Subpart T of Part 63—Test of Solvent Cleaning Procedures General Questions ___ 1. What is the...

  3. Cleaning of biomaterial surfaces: protein removal by different solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Fabian; Grass, Simone; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scheibe, Christian; Müller-Renno, Christine; Davoudi, Neda; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The removal of biofilms or protein films from biomaterials is still a challenging task. In particular, for research investigations on real (applied) surfaces the reuse of samples is of high importance, because reuse allows the comparison of the same sample in different experiments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of different solvents (SDS, water, acetone, isopropanol, RIPA-buffer and Tween-20) on five different biomaterials (titanium, gold, PMMA (no acetone used), ceramic, and PTFE) with different wettability which were covered by layers of two different adsorbed proteins (BSA and lysozyme). The presence of a protein film after adsorption was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment of the surfaces with the different solvents, the residual proteins on the surface were determined by BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid assay). Data of the present study indicate that SDS is an effective solvent, but for several protein-substrate combinations it does not show the cleaning efficiency often mentioned in literature. RIPA-buffer and Tween-20 were more effective. They showed very low residual protein amounts after cleaning on all examined material surfaces and for both proteins, however, with small differences for the respective substrate-protein combinations. RIPA-buffer in combination with ultrasonication completely removed the protein layer as confirmed by TEM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  5. Cleaning metal filters by pulse-jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, P.; Perry, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Cleanable metal filters have an established use in the Nuclear Industry. The filters that have been installed in the past have not proved to be sufficiently cleanable. A series of tests were undertaken to study the application of pulse-jet cleaning to metal fibre filter elements. The efficiency of dust removal was examined under various operating conditions. A very high degree of particulate removal was achieved, with a return to almost clean pressure drop. The effectiveness of cleaning was found to vary inversely with blowback pressure. The position of the blowback nozzle with respect to the filter element throat was also found to be important to cleaning efficiency. Under the test conditions the effect of re-entrainment when cleaning on line was found to be minimal. (author)

  6. Process for cleaning radioactively contaminated metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihram, R.G.; Snyder, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for removing radioactive scale from a ferrous metal surface, including the steps of initially preconditioning the surface by contacting it with an oxidizing solution (such as an aqueous solution of an alkali metal permanganate or hydrogen peroxide), then, after removal or decomposition of the oxidizing solution, the metallic surface is contacted with a cleaning solution which is a mixture of a mineral acid and a complexing agent (such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid), and which preferably contains a corrosion inhibitor. A final step in the process is the treatment of the spent cleaning solution containing radioactive waste materials in solution by adding a reagent selected from the group consisting of calcium hydroxide or potassium permanganate and an alkali metal hydroxide to thereby form easily recovered metallic compounds containing substantially all of the dissolved metals and radioactivity. (auth)

  7. Cleaning of dismantled metals by electropolishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, T.Y.; Chung, Z.J.; Lu, D.L.; Hsieh, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    A project of cleaning dismantled metals is going on at INER. The test work has been performed. Results showed that the activity decreased from 45 microSv/h to background level after 20 minutes electrolytic polishing. These cleaned metals could be reused through melting and fabricating. These metals could also be classified as BRC waste to facilitate the waste management if they can pass the identification and be admitted by the government authority. In order to achieve the planned target, some electro-decontamination facilities have been established. An automatic electropolishing facility with six cells was designed to clean the contaminated metals in plate type with dimensions less than 50 cm x 50 cm. Another automatic electropolishing facility was specially designed for treating the contaminated pipes. In addition, mobile electropolishing facilities were also established for large pieces of metal and some fixed equipment. In this cleaning project, a practical recycling and treatment method for electrolyte has been developed in order to comply with the requirement of secondary waste minimization

  8. Industrial rag cleaning process for the environmentally safe removal of petroleum-based solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fierro, J.V.

    1993-01-01

    A process for the cleaning of industrial rags contaminated with environmentally unsafe petroleum-based solvent is described, comprising the step of: (a) placing a load of the industrial rags in a mechanically driven rotary drum; (b) revolving the drum at a high speed sufficient to physically extract liquid petroleum-based solvent contaminate from the industrial rags; (c) routing the extracted petroleum-based solvent contaminate from the rotary drum to a waste solvent collection line for environmentally safe disposal; (d) revolving the rotary drum to cause a tumbling of the industrial rags while maintaining the temperature within the drum at below the flash point of the petroleum-based solvent; (e) intermittently forcing cold air and hot air through the rotary drum to vaporize solvent from the industrial rags; (f) routing the vaporized petroleum-based solvent contaminant from the rotary drum to a condenser wherein the petroleum-based solvent contaminate is condensed and thereafter further routing said condensed solvent to a waste collection line for environmentally safe disposal; and (g) cleaning the industrial rags in the presence of a dry cleaning solvent to remove residual petroleum-based solvents and soil

  9. Investigation of Alternative Approaches for Cleaning Mott Porous Metal Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy selected Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred cesium removal technology for Savannah River Site (SRS) waste. As a pretreatment step for the CSSX flowsheet, the incoming salt solution that contains entrained sludge is contacted with monosodium titanate (MST) to adsorb strontium and select actinides. The resulting slurry is filtered to remove the sludge and MST. Filter fouling occurs during this process. At times, personnel can increase the filtrate rate by backpulsing or scouring. At other times, the filtrate rate drops significantly and only chemical cleaning will restore filter performance. The current baseline technology for filter cleaning uses 0.5 M oxalic acid. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) at SRS, through the Tanks Focus Area, requested an evaluation of other cleaning agents to determine their effectiveness at removing trapped sludge and MST solids compared with the baseline oxalic acid method. A review of the technical literature identified compounds that appear effective at dissolving solid compounds. Consultation with the SPP management team, engineering personnel, and researchers led to a selection of oxalic acid, nitric acid, citric acid, and ascorbic acid for testing. Tests used simulated waste and actual waste as follows. Personnel placed simulated or actual SRS High Level Waste sludge and MST in a beaker. They added the selected cleaning agents, stirred the beakers, and collected supernate samples periodically analyzing for dissolved metals

  10. Solvent extraction of noble metals by formazans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, M.; Hueppe, U.; Kettrup, A.

    1984-01-01

    The extraction properties of ion-pairs composed of quaternary ammonium cations and a sulphonated formazan were compared with those of an unsulphonated formazan, for various solvent media. In dichloromethane the combined system behaves as a 'coloured anion-exchanger', with displacement of the sulphonated formazan, whereas in toluene Pd(II) and Ag(I) are extracted as the metal formazan chelates from aqueous medium. The rates of extraction are remarkably higher than with the simple extractants. Because of the higher stability only the simple chelating extraction systems afford satisfactory separation of Pd(II) from excess of Pt(IV) and of Ag(I) from Cu(II). The extracted metals can be stripped and the extractant regenerated. (author)

  11. Selective metal-vapor deposition on solvent evaporated polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsujioka@cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp

    2015-12-31

    We report a selective metal-vapor deposition phenomenon based on solvent printing and evaporation on polymer surfaces and propose a method to prepare fine metal patterns using maskless vacuum deposition. Evaporation of the solvent molecules from the surface caused large free volumes between surface polymer chains and resulted in high mobility of the chains, enhancing metal-vapor atom desorption from the surface. This phenomenon was applied to prepare metal patterns on the polymer surface using solvent printing and maskless metal vacuum deposition. Metal patterns with high resolution of micron scale were obtained for various metal species and semiconductor polymer substrates including poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl). - Highlights: • Selective metal-vapor deposition using solvent evaporation on polymer was attained. • Metal patterns with high resolution were obtained for various metal species. • This method can be applied to achieve fine metal-electrodes for polymer electronics.

  12. Prioritizing substitution of organic solvents in industrial cleaning processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Pia Brunn; Jacobsen, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A method for prioritizing the substitution of volatile organic compounds (VOC) used in industrial cleaning processes is developed. The result is a matrix, which, if all information can be obtained, gives a comprehensive description of the effects, exposure and emission of VOC, as well as the pros...

  13. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: solvent and process development. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Paasch, R.A.; Hall, T.M.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1979-01-01

    A program to demonstrate chemical cleaning methods for removing magnetite corrosion products from the annuli between steam generator tubes and the tube support plates in vertical U-tube steam generators is described. These corrosion products have caused steam generator tube ''denting'' and in some cases have caused tube failures and support plate cracking in several PWR generating plants. Laboratory studies were performed to develop a chemical cleaning solvent and application process for demonstration cleaning of the Indian Point Unit 2 steam generators. The chemical cleaning solvent and application process were successfully pilot-tested by cleaning the secondary side of one of the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Although the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators do not have a tube denting problem, the pilot test provided for testing of the solvent and process using much of the same equipment and facilities that would be used for the Indian Point Unit 2 demonstration cleaning. The chemical solvent selected for the pilot test was an inhibited 3% citric acid-3% ascorbic acid solution. The application process, injection into the steam generator through the boiler blowdown system and agitation by nitrogen sparging, was tested in a nuclear environment and with corrosion products formed during years of steam generator operation at power. The test demonstrated that the magnetite corrosion products in simulated tube-to-tube support plate annuli can be removed by chemical cleaning; that corrosion resulting from the cleaning is not excessive; and that steam generator cleaning can be accomplished with acceptable levels of radiation exposure to personnel

  14. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  15. Ultrasonic and immersion cleaning: a comparison using aqueous and fluorocarbon solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, R.D.; Kearsey, A.

    1984-11-01

    Decontamination is a necessary process in reducing radiation levels in the working environment in the nuclear industry. Components from active areas which require decontamination for re-use or maintenance operations. In this report, a typical chemical cleaning process using liquid pumping, airagitation and physical movement for agitation is compared with ultrasonic cleaning, now an established cleaning process in many industries. The chosen traditional method is immersion in an agitated solution of warm SDG.3 solution; an established decontaminating reagent. The decontamination effect of this process is compared with the effect of cleaning in an ultrasonic bath containing the same reagent at the same concentration and temperature. Fluorocarbon reagents are of particular interest to the nuclear industry for they offer the ability to clean electrical components without damage, and can clean product contaminated material without the risk of criticality. Such reagents are based on 1,1,2-trichloro, 1,2,2-trifluoroethane and azeotropic mixtures. This reagent and one mixture with 6% methanol were tested under agitation and ultrasonic immersion at the same temperature. Parallel control experiments were conducted using demineralised water as the cleaning media in an agitated bath. SGG3 is a good reagent for general purpose cleaning (it can remove 99% of particulate contamination) using scrubbing, immersion or spraying techniques. There is little evidence to show that ultrasonic cleaning increases its effectiveness. For special purpose fluorocarbon solvents will give satisfactory results when used in an ultrasonic system. (author)

  16. Solvent substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evanoff, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner

  17. Ion-induced electron emission from clean metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Alonso, E.V.; Ferron, J.; Oliva-Florio, A.; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche

    1979-01-01

    We report recent experimental work on electron emission from clean polycrystalline metal surfaces under ion bombardment. We critically discuss existing theories and point out the presently unsolved problems. (orig.)

  18. Compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsiao, Shin-Tien

    2008-03-01

    A novel process, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX), was developed to generate micro-sized solvent-coated air bubbles (MSAB) for metal extraction. Through pressurization of solvent with compressed air followed by releasing air-oversaturated solvent into metal-containing wastewater, MSAB were generated instantaneously. The enormous surface area of MSAB makes extraction process extremely fast and achieves very high aqueous/solvent weight ratio (A/S ratio). CASX process completely removed Cr(VI) from acidic electroplating wastewater under A/S ratio of 115 and extraction time of less than 10s. When synthetic wastewater containing Cd(II) of 50mgl(-1) was treated, A/S ratios of higher than 714 and 1190 could be achieved using solvent with extractant/diluent weight ratio of 1:1 and 5:1, respectively. Also, MSAB have very different physical properties, such as size and density, compared to the emulsified solvent droplets, making separation and recovery of solvent from treated effluent very easy.

  19. Carbothermic reduction of uranium oxides into solvent metallic baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guisard Restivo, Thomaz A.; Capocchi, Jose D.T.

    2004-01-01

    The carbothermic reduction of UO 2 and U 3 O 8 is studied employing tin and silicon solvent metallic baths in thermal analysis equipment, under Ar inert and N 2 reactive atmospheres. The metallic solvents are expected to lower the U activity by several orders of magnitude owing to strong interactions among the metals. The reduction products are composed of the solvent metal matrix and intermetallic U compounds. Silicon is more effective in driving the reduction since there is no residual UO 2 after the reaction. The gaseous product detected by mass spectrometer (MS) during the reduction is CO. A kinetic study for the Si case was accomplished by the stepwise isothermal analysis (SAI) method, leading to the identification of the controlling mechanisms as chemical reaction at the surface and nucleation, for UO 2 and U 3 O 8 charges, respectively. One example for another system containing Al 2 O 3 is also shown

  20. Synthesis of halide- and solvent free metal borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Møller, Kasper Trans; Richter, Bo

    have challenges due to their high desorption kinetics and limited reversibility at moderate conditions.[2],[3],[4] In this work, we present a new approach to synthesize halide- and solvent free metal borohydrides starting from the respective metal hydride. The synthetic strategy ensures that no metal...... to the metal. Hence, the powdered M(BH4)3∙DMS is heated to 140 °C for 4 hours to obtain pure M(BH4)3. The rare-earth metal borohydrides have been investigated by infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis (TGA-DSC-MS). Furthermore, the structural trends are investigated by synchrotron radiation powder X...

  1. Separation of rare earth metal using micro solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihama, S.; Tajiri, Y.; Yoshizuka, K.

    2005-01-01

    A micro solvent extraction system for the separation of rare earth metals has been investigated. The micro flow channel was fabricated on a PMMA plate. Extraction equilibrium was quickly achieved, without any mechanical mixing. The solvent extraction results obtained for the Pr/Sm binary solutions revealed that both rare earth metals are firstly extracted together. Following, the Pr is extracted in the organic solution and Sm remains in the aqueous phase. The phase separation can be successively achieved by contriving the cross section of the flow channel

  2. Accelerated solvent extraction method with one-step clean-up for hydrocarbons in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Huda Mamat Ghani; Norashikin Sain; Rozita Osman; Zuraidah Abdullah Munir

    2007-01-01

    The application of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) using hexane combined with neutral silica gel and sulfuric acid/ silica gel (SA/ SG) to remove impurities prior to analysis by gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) was studied. The efficiency of extraction was evaluated based on the three hydrocarbons; dodecane, tetradecane and pentadecane spiked to soil sample. The effect of ASE operating conditions (extraction temperature, extraction pressure, static time) was evaluated and the optimized condition obtained from the study was extraction temperature of 160 degree Celsius, extraction pressure of 2000 psi with 5 minutes static extraction time. The developed ASE with one-step clean-up method was applied in the extraction of hydrocarbons from spiked soil and the amount extracted was comparable to ASE extraction without clean-up step with the advantage of obtaining cleaner extract with reduced interferences. Therefore in the developed method, extraction and clean-up for hydrocarbons in soil can be achieved rapidly and efficiently with reduced solvent usage. (author)

  3. Microwave-assisted clean synthesis of amides via aza-wittig reaction under solvent-free condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathishkumar, Murugan; Nagarajan, Sangaraiah; Velan, Poovan Shanmuga; Dinesh, Murugan; Ponnuswamy, Alagusundaram [Department of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-09-15

    A solvent-free microwave-assisted coupling of phosphazenes with acyl chlorides or carboxylic anhydrides in presence of triethylphosphite has been accomplished resulting in a clean synthesis of amides in good yields. Unlike the prevailing time-consuming solution phase methodologies employing chlorinated solvents, benzene (carcinogenic), etc, the present protocol is an eco friendly, rapid and simple approach. (author)

  4. Cleaning Challenges of High-κ/Metal Gate Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Shamiryan, Denis G.; Paraschiv, Vasile; Sano, Kenichi; Reinhardt, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    High-κ/metal gates are used as transistors for advanced logic applications to improve speed and eliminate electrical issues associated with polySi and SiO2 gates. Various integration schemes are possible and will be discussed, such as dual gate, gate-first, and gate-last, both of which require specialized cleaning and etching steps. Specific areas of discussion will include cleaning and conditioning of the silicon surface, forming a high-quality chemical oxide, removal of the high-κ dielectric with selectivity to the SiO2 layer, cleaning and residue removal after etching, and prevention of galvanic corrosion during cleaning. © 2011 Scrivener Publishing LLC. All rights reserved.

  5. Cleaning Challenges of High-κ/Metal Gate Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2010-12-20

    High-κ/metal gates are used as transistors for advanced logic applications to improve speed and eliminate electrical issues associated with polySi and SiO2 gates. Various integration schemes are possible and will be discussed, such as dual gate, gate-first, and gate-last, both of which require specialized cleaning and etching steps. Specific areas of discussion will include cleaning and conditioning of the silicon surface, forming a high-quality chemical oxide, removal of the high-κ dielectric with selectivity to the SiO2 layer, cleaning and residue removal after etching, and prevention of galvanic corrosion during cleaning. © 2011 Scrivener Publishing LLC. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface cleaning of metal wire by atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Buttapeng, C.; Furuya, S.; Harada, N.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the possible application of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma for the annealing of metallic wire is examined and presented. The main purpose of the current study is to examine the surface cleaning effect for a cylindrical object by atmospheric pressure plasma. The experimental setup consists of a gas tank, plasma reactor, and power supply with control panel. The gas assists in the generation of plasma. Copper wire was used as an experimental cylindrical object. This copper wire was irradiated with the plasma, and the cleaning effect was confirmed. The result showed that it is possible to remove the tarnish which exists on the copper wire surface. The experiment reveals that atmospheric pressure plasma is usable for the surface cleaning of metal wire. However, it is necessary to examine the method for preventing oxidization of the copper wire.

  7. Plasma Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  8. Exposure to organic solvents used in dry cleaning reduces low and high level visual function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Astrid Jiménez Barbosa

    Full Text Available To investigate whether exposure to occupational levels of organic solvents in the dry cleaning industry is associated with neurotoxic symptoms and visual deficits in the perception of basic visual features such as luminance contrast and colour, higher level processing of global motion and form (Experiment 1, and cognitive function as measured in a visual search task (Experiment 2.The Q16 neurotoxic questionnaire, a commonly used measure of neurotoxicity (by the World Health Organization, was administered to assess the neurotoxic status of a group of 33 dry cleaners exposed to occupational levels of organic solvents (OS and 35 age-matched non dry-cleaners who had never worked in the dry cleaning industry. In Experiment 1, to assess visual function, contrast sensitivity, colour/hue discrimination (Munsell Hue 100 test, global motion and form thresholds were assessed using computerised psychophysical tests. Sensitivity to global motion or form structure was quantified by varying the pattern coherence of global dot motion (GDM and Glass pattern (oriented dot pairs respectively (i.e., the percentage of dots/dot pairs that contribute to the perception of global structure. In Experiment 2, a letter visual-search task was used to measure reaction times (as a function of the number of elements: 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 100 in both parallel and serial search conditions.Dry cleaners exposed to organic solvents had significantly higher scores on the Q16 compared to non dry-cleaners indicating that dry cleaners experienced more neurotoxic symptoms on average. The contrast sensitivity function for dry cleaners was significantly lower at all spatial frequencies relative to non dry-cleaners, which is consistent with previous studies. Poorer colour discrimination performance was also noted in dry cleaners than non dry-cleaners, particularly along the blue/yellow axis. In a new finding, we report that global form and motion thresholds for dry cleaners were also

  9. Solvent extraction of Zn and metals in Zn ores by nonphosphorous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, J.M.; Tostain, Jacqueline.

    1975-07-01

    This bibliography follows a first work on Zn solvent extraction by organo-phosphorous compounds. The other solvents used in Zn extraction, are studied: oxygenated nonphosphorous solvents (ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids, sulfonates), nitrogenous solvents and hydrocarbons [fr

  10. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jj of... - Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pollutants Excluded From Use in Cleaning and Washoff Solvents 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Pollutants Excluded From Use in...

  11. Plasma cleaning and the removal of carbon from metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    In an investigation of the plasma cleaning of metals and the plasma etching of carbon, a mass spectrometer was used as a sensitive process monitor. CO 2 produced by the plasma oxidation of carbon films or of organic contamination and occluded carbon at the surfaces of metals proved to be the most suitable gas to monitor. A good correlation was obtained between the measured etch rate of carbon and the resulting CO 2 partial pressure monitored continuously with the mass spectrometer. The rate of etching of carbon in an oxygen-argon plasma at 0.1 Torr was high when the carbon was at cathode potential and low when it was electrically isolated in the plasma, thus confirming the findings of previous workers and indicating the importance of ion bombardment in the etching process. Superficial organic contamination on the surfaces of the metals aluminium and copper and of the alloy Inconel 625 was quickly removed by the oxygen-argon plasma when the metal was electrically isolated and also when it was at cathode potential. Occluded carbon (or carbides) at or near the surfaces of the metals was removed slowly and only when the metal was at cathode potential, thus illustrating again the importance of ion bombardment. (Auth.)

  12. 75 FR 34647 - Approval of the Clean Air Act, Section 112(l), Authority for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... Solvent NESHAP for cleaning or drying parts, except any cold cleaning machine that uses a solvent which... cleaning machines in which parts such as film, coils, wire, and metal strips are cleaned at speeds... requires each cleaning machine to have [[Page 34650

  13. Recommended values of clean metal surface work functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, Gregory N.; Kern, Megan E.; Worth, Eli H.

    2015-01-01

    A critical review of the experimental literature for measurements of the work functions of clean metal surfaces of single-crystals is presented. The tables presented include all results found for low-index crystal faces except cases that were known to be contaminated surfaces. These results are used to construct a recommended value of the work function for each surface examined, along with an uncertainty estimate for that value. The uncertainties are based in part on the error distribution for all measured work functions in the literature, which is included here. The metals included in this review are silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iridium (Ir), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W)

  14. Recommended values of clean metal surface work functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derry, Gregory N., E-mail: gderry@loyola.edu; Kern, Megan E.; Worth, Eli H. [Department of Physics, Loyola University Maryland, 4501 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Maryland 21210 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A critical review of the experimental literature for measurements of the work functions of clean metal surfaces of single-crystals is presented. The tables presented include all results found for low-index crystal faces except cases that were known to be contaminated surfaces. These results are used to construct a recommended value of the work function for each surface examined, along with an uncertainty estimate for that value. The uncertainties are based in part on the error distribution for all measured work functions in the literature, which is included here. The metals included in this review are silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iridium (Ir), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W)

  15. Radiological pathways analysis for spent solvents from the boiler chemical cleaning at the Pickering Nuclear Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.; Eslami, Z.; Hodgins, S.; Beaman, T.; Von Svoboda, S.; Marczak, J.

    2006-01-01

    Spent solvents are generated as a result of Boiler Chemical Cleanings (BCC) at CANDU reactor sites. These solutions contain small amount of radioactivity from a number of different sources including: Cut tubes - short sections of boiler tubes are infrequently removed from the boilers for a detailed characterization. These tubes are typically only plugged at the tubesheet allowing the primary side deposits to be exposed to BCC solvents. Tube leaks - primary to secondary side leaks also occur infrequently as a result of tube degradation. Radioactivity from the leaking fluid can consequently be deposited in the sludge on the secondary side of the tubes. Diffusion of tritium - during normal operation of the reactor units, tritium slowly diffuses from the heavy water in the primary heat-transfer system to the light-water coolant on the secondary side. Some of this tritium is retained in the secondary side deposits. The Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) would like the flexibility to have several options for handling the spent solvent waste and associated rinse water from BCC. To this end, a radiological pathways analysis was undertaken to determine dose consequences associated with each option. Sample results from this study are included in this paper. The pathways analysis is used in this study to calculate dose to hypothetical receptors including individuals such as truck drivers, incinerator workers, residue (ash) handlers, residents who live near the landfill, inadvertent intruders into the landfill after closure and residents who live near the outfall. This dose is compared to a de minimis dose. A de minimis dose or dose rate represents a level of risk, which is generally accepted as being of no significance. Shipments of spent solvents and rinse water with corresponding doses below de minimis can be sent to conventional (i.e., non-radioactive) landfills for incineration and disposal as the radioactive dose associated with them is much less than natural

  16. Substitution of chlorinated and fluorinated solvents by biodegradable detergent solution in components cleaning of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Andre Luiz Pinto da Silva

    2000-01-01

    As the auxiliary oils used in machining evolved from integral into aqueous emulsion, and later on into aqueous-solution synthetic oils, the components cleaning process with organic solvents, originally adopted at the Fuel Element Factory (FEC), Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB) began to present problems in removing oil residues from machined components, due to the incompatibility between aqueous and organic media. In order to eliminate such incompatibility and adapt the process to the environmental laws restricting production and use of chlorinated or fluorinated solvents as a measure for preserving the atmosphere's ozone layer, in 1995 INB initiated the development of a components cleaning process using biodegradable aqueous detergent. The effort was completed in 2000 with the construction of a machine in keeping with the specific geometry of the fuel-assembly components and the operating conditions required for working with the new process. (author)

  17. Solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general ''Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated

  18. Solvent substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  19. SAGE SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS FOR SELECTING INDUSTRIAL SURFACE CLEANING ALTERNATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes computer software, called SAGE, that can provide not only cleaning recommendations but also general information on various surface cleaning options. In short, it is an advisory system which can provide users with vital information on the cleaning process optio...

  20. Investigation of the remaining major and trace elements in clean coal generated by organic solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Wang; Chunqi Li; Kinya Sakanishi; Tetsuya Nakazato; Hiroaki Tao; Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takayuki Takarada; Ikuo Saito [National Institute Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

    2005-09-01

    A sub-bituminous Wyodak coal (WD coal) and a bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal (IL coal) were thermally extracted with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) to produce clean extract. A mild pretreatment with acetic acid was also carried out. Major and trace inorganic elements in the raw coals and resultant extracts were determined by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS), and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). It was found that the extraction with 1-MN resulted in 73-100% reductions in the concentration of Li, Be, V, Ga, As, Se, Sr, Cd, Ba, Hg, and Pb. The extraction with NMP yielded more extract than that with 1-MN, but it retained more organically associated major and trace metals in the extracts. In the extraction of WD coal with NMP, the acid pretreatment not only significantly enhanced the extraction yield but also significantly reduced the concentrations of alkaline earth elements such as Be, Ca, Mg, Sr, and Ba in the extract. In addition, the modes of occurrence of trace elements in the coals were discussed according to their extraction behaviors. 30 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Validation of Alternatives to High Volatile Organic Compound Solvents Used in Aeronautical Antifriction Bearing Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-17

    982-4832 (fax) tom.torres@navy.mil Quality Assurance Officer Gene Griffin NFESC 1100 23rd Avenue Port Hueneme, CA 93043-4370 (805) 982-2267...solvent replenishment system. The waste solvent shall be captured in a sealed container that is easily acces· sible for periodic disposal. (2) HFE ...Co-Solvent Vapor Degreaser. This method features the use of a hydrocarbon (HC) solvating agent and a Hydrofluoroether ( HFE ) liquid rinse and vapor

  2. The solvent extraction of alkali metal ions with β-diketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Megumu; Niina, Syozo; Shimoji, Noboru

    1974-01-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate effects of solvent and chelating-agent on the solvent extraction of alkali metal ions by seven β-diketones, acetylacetone (Acac), benzoylacetone (BzA), dipivaloylmethane (DPM), dibenzoylmethane (DBM), thenoyltrifluoloacetone (TTA), benzoyltrifluoroacetone (BFA) and hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA), and to separate lithium from alkali metals. The extraction of alkali metals increase with increasing donor power of the solvent: i.e., benzene Na>K>Rb>Cs, which is also the order in which the adduct formation of these β-diketone chelates with donor solvents increase. The adduct formations between β-diketone chelates of alkali metals and donor solvents markedly enhance the solubilities of the chelates in solvents and, consequently, the extractabilities of alkali metals with β-diketones. Lithium was extracted with TTA in ether at such a low base concentration that sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium were hardly extracted, and this enabled to separate lithium from other metals by the use of rubidium hydroxide (0.02 M). An attempt has been made to isolate alkali metal β-diketone chelates and some chelates have been obtained as crystals. The infrared absorption bands arising from C=O and C.=C of TTA shift to lower frequencies in the alkali metal chelates with TTA, and consequently, β-diketones is suggested to coordinate to alkali metal as a bidentate ligand. (JPN)

  3. Application of method of organizational congruences to substitution of organic solvents with vegetable agents for cleaning offset printing machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, S [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute; Tartaglia, R [Unita Sanitaria Locale 10/D, Firenze (Italy); Garzi, S; Biagioni, A [Istituto tecnico Leonardo da Vinci, Firenze (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this research is the application of the method of organizational congruences before and after the substitution of organic solvents with vegetable agents for the cleaning offset printing machine in order to assess the organizational changes. A solvent free process is the goal of the SUBSPRINT project (Technology Transfer Program of the European Community). In this study it is shown how human and environmental health is improved by using vegetable agents through this change may lead to some other organizational constraints such as the time needed, the monotony and repetitiveness of the technical actions involved. The authors underline that the knowledge of the new technology impact of health help for a better understanding of the resistance to the change and help for a further amelioration of it.

  4. Clean Air Act Guidelines and Standards for Solvent Use and Surface Coating Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the solvent use and surface coating industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  5. Structural and vibrational studies of clean and chemisorbed metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qing-Tang.

    1992-01-01

    Using Medium Energy Ion Scattering, we have studied the structural and vibrational properties of a number of clean and chemisorbed metal surfaces. The work presented in this thesis is mainly of a fundamental nature. However, it is believed that an atomistic understanding of the forces that affect surface structural and vibrational properties can have a beneficial impact on a large number of areas of applied nature. We find that the surface structure of Cu(001) follows the common trend for metal surfaces, where a small oscillatory relaxation exists beginning with a slight contraction in the top layer. In addition, the surface vibrational amplitude is enhanced (as s usually the case) by ∼80%. A detailed analysis of our data shows an unexpected anisotropy of the vibrational amplitude, such that the out-of-plane vibrational amplitude is 30% smaller than the in-plane vibrational amplitude. The unexpected results may imply a large tensile stress on Cu(001). Upon adsorption of 1/4 of a monolayer of S, a p(2 x 2)-S/Cu(001) surface is created. This submonolayer amount of S atoms makes the surface bulk-like, in which the anisotropy of the surface vibrations is removed and the first interlayer contraction is lifted. By comparing our model to earlier contradictory results on this controversial system. We find excellent agreement with a recent LEED study. The presence of 0.1 monolayer of Ca atoms on the Au(113) surface induces a drastic atomic rearrangements, in which half of the top layer Au atoms are missing and a (1 x 2) symmetry results. In addition, the first interlayer spacing of Au(113) is significantly reduced. Our results are discussed in terms of the energy balance between competing surface electronic charge densities

  6. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon the solvent AsahiKlin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  7. Surface Analysis of the Laser Cleaned Metal Threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhan, M.; Hartog, F.; McPhail, D.

    The laser cleaning of the tarnished silver threads was carried out using Nd:YAG laser radiation at IR (1064 nm) and visible wavelengths (532 nm). The preliminary tests were made on the piece of silk with the silver embroidery with the clean and tarnished areas. FIBS and SIMS analysis were used for analysing the condition of the surface before and after laser irradiation. It was found that irradiation below 0.4 J/cm-2 and higher than 1.0 J/cm-2 fluences aggravates the process of tarnishing and leads to the yellowing effect. The results of preliminary tests were used for finding the optimum cleaning regime for the laser cleaning of the real museum artefact: "Women Riding Jacket" dated to the beginning of 18th century.

  8. Basis of the detection, assessment and cleaning up of sites contaminated with heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmano, W.; Foerstner, U.

    1993-01-01

    The cleaning up of sites contaminated with heavy metals is still in its infancy. Depending on the type and extent of the contamination, new methods of treatment must be developed and matched to each situation. A survey is given of the groundwater contamination of soil heavy metals; the binding, availability and mobilisation of heavy metals; geo-chemical concepts for sites contaminated by heavy metals; judging the potential danger; safety measures; cleaning up processes and the reinstatement and renaturing of the soil. (orig.) [de

  9. Solvent isotope effects upon the thermodynamics of some transition-metal redox couples in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, M.J.; Nettles, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of substituting D 2 O for H 2 O as solvent upon the formal potentials of a number of transition-metal redox couples containing aquo, ammine, and simple chelating ligands have been investigated with the intention of evaluating the importance of specific solvation factors in the thermodynamics of such couples. The solvent liquid junction formed between H 2 O and D 2 O was shown to have a negligible effect on the measured formal potentials. Substantial solvent isotope effects were observed for a number of these systems, particularly for couples containing aquo ligands. The effects of separately deuterating the ligands and the surrounding solvent were investigated for some ammine couples. Possible origins of the solvent isotope effects are discussed in terms of changes in metal-ligand and ligand-solvent interactions. It is tentatively concluded that the latter influence provides the predominant contribution to the observed effects for aquo couples arising from increases in the extent of hydrogen bonding between the aquo ligands and surrounding solvent when D 2 O replaces H 2 O. The implications of these results in unraveling the solvent isotope effects upon the kinetics of simple redox reactions are also considered

  10. Laser decontamination and cleaning of metal surfaces: modelling and experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leontyev, A.

    2011-01-01

    Metal surface cleaning is highly required in different fields of modern industry. Nuclear industry seeks for new methods for oxidized surface decontamination, and thermonuclear installations require the cleaning of plasma facing components from tritium-containing deposited layer. The laser ablation is proposed as an effective and safe method for metal surface cleaning and decontamination. The important factor influencing the laser heating and ablation is the in-depth distribution of laser radiation. The model of light propagation in a scattering layer on a metal substrate is developed and applied to analyse the features of light distribution. To simulate the contaminated surfaces, the stainless steel AISI 304L was oxidized by laser and in a furnace. Radioactive contamination of the oxide layer was simulated by introducing europium and/or sodium. The decontamination factor of more than 300 was demonstrated with found optimal cleaning regime. The decreasing of the corrosion resistance was found after laser cleaning. The ablation thresholds of ITER-like surfaces were measured. The cleaning productivity of 0.07 m 2 /hour.W was found. For mirror surfaces, the damage thresholds were determined to avoid damage during laser cleaning. The possibility to restore reflectivity after thin carbon layer deposition was demonstrated. The perspectives of further development of laser cleaning are discussed. (author) [fr

  11. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex matched controls was used. Occupational histories and lifestyle information of cases and controls were collected in a structured telephone interview. Exposures to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents and metals were estimated by linking the ALOHA+ job-exposure matrix to the occupational histories. Exposure to welding fumes was estimated using self-reported information on welding activities. No statistically significant associations with any of the studied metal and solvent exposures were found. However, for self-reported welding activities we observed non-statistically significant reduced risk estimates (third tertile cumulative exposure: OR = 0.51 (95% CI: 0.21-1.24)). The results of our study did not provide support for an increased chance on developing PD after occupational exposure to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents or exposure to metals. The results showed reduced risk estimates for welding, which is in line with previous research, but no clear explanation for these findings is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A new cleaning process for the metallic contaminants on a post-CMP wafer's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Baohong; Liu Yuling; Wang Chenwei; Wang Shengli; Zhou Qiang; Tan Baimei; Zhu Yadong

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new cleaning process using boron-doped diamond (BDD) film anode electrochemical oxidation for metallic contaminants on polished silicon wafer surfaces. The BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can efficiently prepare pyrophosphate peroxide, pyrophosphate peroxide can oxidize organic contaminants, and pyrophosphate peroxide is deoxidized into pyrophosphate. Pyrophosphate, a good complexing agent, can form a metal complex, which is a structure consisting of a copper ion, bonded to a surrounding array of two pyrophosphate anions. Three polished wafers were immersed in the 0.01 mol/L CuSO 4 solution for 2 h in order to make comparative experiments. The first one was cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide, the second by RCA (Radio Corporation of America) cleaning, and the third by deionized (DI) water. The XPS measurement result shows that the metallic contaminants on wafers cleaned by the RCA method and by pyrophosphate peroxide is less than the XPS detection limits of 1 ppm. And the wafer's surface cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide is more efficient in removing organic carbon residues than RCA cleaning. Therefore, BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can be used for microelectronics cleaning, and it can effectively remove organic contaminants and metallic contaminants in one step. It also achieves energy saving and environmental protection. (semiconductor technology)

  13. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  14. Distribution of six heavy metals in contaminated clay soils before and after extractive cleaning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, B.J.W.; Tels, M.

    1990-01-01

    A sequential extraction procedure according to Tessier et al. is carried out to compare the distribution of six metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in contaminated clay soils before and after extractive cleaning. Extraction of metals from the ‘soil fractions’ with 0.1 N HC1 or 0.1 M EDTA becomes more

  15. On solvent extraction of metals by macrocyclic polyethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionov, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The Ksub(γ) parameter characterizing effective ion charges in ionic associates of metal salts is suggested; these charges parallel with other factors determine the metals extraction by macrocyclic polyethers (crown-ethers). The dependence of metal extraction constant on the Ksub(γ) parameter is discussed. It is shown that the less effective cation charge of alkali metal ionic associates, the more probable its entering the crown-ether cavity. The synergetic crown-ethers extraction is bound as well with Ksub(γ) of metal salts. The differences in the cation extraction constants having the same ionic radius are explained with account of different values of Ksub(γ) parameters of these salts

  16. Solvent properties of hydrazine in the preparation of metal chalcogenide bulk materials and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Min; Mitzi, David B

    2009-08-21

    A combination of unique solvent properties of hydrazine enables the direct dissolution of a range of metal chalcogenides at ambient temperature, rendering this an extraordinarily simple and soft synthetic approach to prepare new metal chalcogenide-based materials. The extended metal chalcogenide parent framework is broken up during this process, and the resulting metal chalcogenide building units are re-organized into network structures (from 0D to 3D) based upon their interactions with the hydrazine/hydrazinium moieties. This Perspective will review recent crystal and materials chemistry developments within this family of compounds and will briefly discuss the utility of this approach in metal chalcogenide thin-film deposition.

  17. The estimation of heavy metal concentration in FBR reprocessing solvent streams by density measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Savage, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    The application of density measurement to heavy metal monitoring in the solvent phase is described, including practical experience gained during three fast reactor fuel reprocessing campaigns. An experimental algorithm relating heavy metal concentration and sample density was generated from laboratory-measured density data, for uranyl nitrate dissolved in nitric acid loaded tri-butyl phosphate in odourless kerosene. Differences in odourless kerosene batch densities are mathematically interpolated, and the algorithm can be used to estimate heavy metal concentrations from the density to within +1.5 g/l. An Anton Paar calculating digital densimeter with remote cell operation was used for all density measurements, but the algorithm will give similar accuracy with any density measuring device capable of a precision of better than 0.0005 g/cm 3 . For plant control purposes, the algorithm was simplified using a density referencing system, whereby the density of solvent not yet loaded with heavy metal is subtracted from the sample density. This simplified algorithm compares very favourably with empirical algorithms, derived from numerical analysis of density data and chemically measured uranium and plutonium data obtained during fuel reprocessing campaigns, particularly when differences in the acidity of the solvent are considered before and after loading with heavy metal. This simplified algorithm had been successfully used for plant control of heavy metal loaded solvent during four fast reactor fuel reprocessing campaigns. (author)

  18. Calculations in solvent extraction of rare earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadanandam, R.; Sharma, A.K.; Fonseca, M.F.; Hubli, R.C.; Suri, A.K.; Singh, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with calculation of number of countercurrent stages in solvent extraction of rare earths both under total reflux and partial reflux conditions to achieve a given degree of purification and recovery. The use of Fenske's equation normally used for separation by distillation is proposed to calculate the number of stages required under total reflux, replacing relative volatility by separation factor. Kremser's equations for extraction and scrubbing are used to calculate the number of stages in extraction and scrubbing modules under partial reflux conditions. McCabe-Thiele's approach is also adopted to arrive at the number of scrubbing stages. (author)

  19. Clean synthesis of biolubricant range esters using novel liquid lipase enzyme in solvent free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Jayati; Aila, Mounika; Sharma, Chandra Dutt; Gupta, Piyush; Kaul, Savita

    2015-01-01

    In view of the rising global problems of environment pollution and degradation, the present process provides a 'green solution' to the synthesis of higher esters of lubricant range, more specifically in the range C12-C36, using different combinations of acids and alcohols, in a single step reaction. The esters produced are biodegradable in nature and have a plethora of uses, such as in additives, as lubricating oils and other hydraulic fluids. The enzymatic esterification was performed using liquid (non-immobilized or free) lipase enzyme, without any additional organic solvent. Soluble lipase proves to be superior to immobilized enzymes as it is more cost effective and provides a faster process for the production of higher esters of lubricant range. An interesting finding was, that the lipase enzyme showed higher conversion rates with increasing carbon number of straight chain alcohols and acids. Reactions were carried out for the optimization of initial water concentration, temperature, pH of the substrate mixture and the chain length of the substrates. Under optimized conditions, the method was suitable to achieve ~ 99% conversion. Thus, the process provides an environment friendly, enzymatic alternative to the chemical route which is currently used in the industrial synthesis of lubricant components.

  20. Plasma cleaning for waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, P.P.

    1993-07-01

    Although plasma cleaning is a recognized substitute for solvent cleaning in removing organic contaminants, some universal problems in plasma cleaning processes prevent wider use of plasma techniques. Lack of understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of the process, unreliable endpoint detection techniques, and slow process times make plasma cleaning processes less than desirable. Our approach to address these plasma cleaning problems is described. A comparison of plasma cleaning rates of oxygen and oxygen/sulfur hexafluoride gases shows that fluorine-containing plasmas can enhance etch rates by 400% over oxygen alone. A discussion of various endpoint indication techniques is discussed and compared for application suitability. Work toward a plasma cleaning database is discussed. In addition to the global problems of plasma cleaning, an experiment where the specific mixed-waste problem of removal of machine oils from radioactive scrap metal is discussed.

  1. Electronic properties of adsorbates and clean surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecante, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper surveys recent progress in experimental studies on electronic properties of adsorbates and clean metal surfaces. Electron spectroscopy and particularly angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy appears to be a very powerful tool to get informations on electronic levels of adsorbates or clean surfaces. Moreover this technique may also give informations about the atomic geometry of the surface. Experimental investigation about surface plasmons, surface states, core level shifts are presented for clean surfaces. As examples of adsorbate covered surfaces two typical cases are chosen: two dimensional band structure and oriented molecules. Finally the photoelectron diffraction may be used for surface structure determination either in the case of an adsorbate or a clean metal surface [fr

  2. Metals separation using solvent extractants on magnetic microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, L.; Pourfarzaneh, M.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation program was initially funded by DOE EM-50 to develop processes for the efficient separation of radionuclides and other hazardous metals. This process has simulated the partnership between industry and ANL for many applications related to hazardous metal problems in industry. In-tank or near-tank hazardous metals separation using magnetic particles promises simple, compact processing at very low costs and employs mature chemical separations technologies to remove and recover hazardous metals from aqueous solutions. The selective chemical extractants are attached to inexpensive magnetic carrier particles. Surfaces of small particles composed of rare earths or ferromagnetic materials are treated to retain chemical extractants (e.g., TBP, CMPO, quaternary amines, carboxylic acid). After selective partitioning of contaminants to the surface layer, magnets are used to collect the loaded particles from the tank. The particles can be regenerated by stripping the contaminants and the selective metals can be recovered and recycled from the strip solution. This process and its related equipment are simple enough to be used for recovery/recycling and waste minimization activities at many industrial sites. Both the development of the process for hazardous and radioactive waste and the transfer of the technology will be discussed

  3. Synthesis of Halide- and Solvent free metal borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Møller, Kasper Trans; Jensen, Torben René

    chloride or LiBH4 is present in the sample. The synthesis pathway has been shown to work for most of the already known metal borohydrides, M = Na, Ca, Sr, Ba, Y, La, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb, but also new borohydrides are formed, M = Pr, Nd and Lu. Besides new compounds, new polymorphs...

  4. Effects of different cleaning treatments on heavy metal removal of Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahui, Liu; Na, Xu; Li, Wang; Xiuming, Cui; Lanping, Guo; Zhihui, Zhang; Jiajin, Wang; Ye, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The quality and safety of Panax notoginseng products has become a focus of concern in recent years. Contamination with heavy metals is one of the important factors as to P. notoginseng safety. Cleaning treatments can remove dust, soil, impurities or even heavy metals and pesticide residues on agricultural products. But effects of cleaning treatments on the heavy metal content of P. notoginseng roots have still not been studied. In order to elucidate this issue, the effects of five different cleaning treatments (CK, no treatment; T1, warm water (50°C) washing; T2, tap water (10°C) washing; T3, drying followed by polishing; and T4, drying followed by tap water (10°C) washing) on P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contents were studied. The results showed that heavy metal (all five) content in the three parts all followed the order of hair root > rhizome > root tuber under the same treatment. Heavy metal removals were in the order of Hg > As > Pb > Cu > Cd. Removal efficiencies of the four treatments were in the order of T2 > T1 > T3 > T4. Treatments (T1-T4) could decrease the contents of heavy metal in P. notoginseng root significantly. Compared with the requirements of WM/T2-2004, P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal contents of Cu, Pb, As and Hg were safe under treatments T1 and T2. In conclusion, the cleaning process after production was necessary and could reduce the content of heavy metals significantly. Fresh P. notoginseng root washed with warm water (T2) was the most efficient treatment to remove heavy metal and should be applied in production.

  5. Characterization of microwave-induced electric discharge phenomena in metal-solvent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Gutmann, Bernhard; Kappe, C Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Electric discharge phenomena in metal-solvent mixtures are investigated utilizing a high field density, sealed-vessel, single-mode 2.45 GHz microwave reactor with a built-in camera. Particular emphasis is placed on studying the discharges exhibited by different metals (Mg, Zn, Cu, Fe, Ni) of varying particle sizes and morphologies in organic solvents (e.g., benzene) at different electric field strengths. Discharge phenomena for diamagnetic and paramagnetic metals (Mg, Zn, Cu) depend strongly on the size of the used particles. With small particles, short-lived corona discharges are observed that do not lead to a complete breakdown. Under high microwave power conditions or with large particles, however, bright sparks and arcs are experienced, often accompanied by solvent decomposition and formation of considerable amounts of graphitized material. Small ferromagnetic Fe and Ni powders (discharges. Electric discharges were also observed when Cu metal or other conductive materials such as silicon carbide were exposed to the microwave field in the absence of a solvent in an argon or nitrogen atmosphere.

  6. Occupational exposures to solvents and metals are associated with fixed airflow obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alif, Sheikh M; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Benke, Geza; Dennekamp, Martine; Burgess, John A; Perret, Jennifer L; Lodge, Caroline J; Morrison, Stephen; Johns, David P; Giles, Graham G.; Gurrin, Lyle C; Thomas, Paul S; Hopper, John L; Wood-Baker, Richard; Thompson, Bruce R; Feather, Iain H; Vermeulen, Roel; Kromhout, Hans; Walters, E Haydn; Abramson, Michael J; Matheson, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the associations between occupational exposures to solvents and metals and fixed airflow obstruction (AO) using post-bronchodilator spirometry. Methods We included 1335 participants from the 2002-2008 follow-up of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study.

  7. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex

  8. Integration of ceramic membrane and compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chiu, Chun-Hao; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lee, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In our previous publications, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction process (CASX) was developed and proved to be kinetically efficient process for metal removal. In the current study, CASX with a ceramic MF membrane integrated for separation of spent solvent was employed to remove and recover metal from wastewater. MF was operated either in crossflow mode or dead-end with intermittent flushing mode. Under crossflow mode, three distinct stages of flux vs. TMP (trans-membrane pressure) relationship were observed. In the first stage, flux increases with increasing TMP which is followed by the stage of stable flux with increasing TMP. After reaching a threshold TMP which is dependent of crossflow velocity, flux increases again with increasing TMP. At the last stage, solvent was pushed through membrane pores as indicated by increasing permeate COD. In dead-end with intermittent flushing mode, an intermittent flushing flow (2 min after a 10-min or a 30-min dead-end filtration) was incorporated to reduce membrane fouling by flush out MSAB accumulated on membrane surface. Effects of solvent concentration and composition were also investigated. Solvent concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1% (w/w) have no adverse effect in terms of membrane fouling. However, solvent composition, i.e. D(2)EHPA/kerosene ratio, shows impact on membrane fouling. The type of metal extractants employed in CASX has significant impact on both membrane fouling and the quality of filtrate due to the differences in their viscosity and water solubility. Separation of MSAB was the limiting process controlling metal removal efficiency, and the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) followed the same trend as that for COD.

  9. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200-400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  10. Surface chemistry and fundamental limitations on the plasma cleaning of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Bin, E-mail: bindong@my.unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX, 76203 (United States); Driver, M. Sky, E-mail: Marcus.Driver@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX, 76203 (United States); Emesh, Ismail, E-mail: Ismail_Emesh@amat.com [Applied Materials Inc., 3050 Bowers Ave, Santa Clara, CA, 95054 (United States); Shaviv, Roey, E-mail: Roey_Shaviv@amat.com [Applied Materials Inc., 3050 Bowers Ave, Santa Clara, CA, 95054 (United States); Kelber, Jeffry A., E-mail: Jeffry.Kelber@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 305070, Denton, TX, 76203 (United States)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • O{sub 2}-free plasma treatment of air-exposed Co or Cu surfaces yields remnant C layers inert to further plasma cleaning. • The formation of the remnant C layer is graphitic (Cu) or carbidic (Co). • The formation of a remnant C layer is linked to plasma cleaning of a metal surface. - Abstract: In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies reveal that plasma cleaning of air-exposed Co or Cu transition metal surfaces results in the formation of a remnant C film 1–3 monolayers thick, which is not reduced upon extensive further plasma exposure. This effect is observed for H{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} plasma cleaning of Co, and He or NH{sub 3} plasma cleaning of Cu, and is observed with both inductively coupled (ICP) and capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP). Changes in C 1 s XPS spectra indicate that this remnant film formation is accompanied by the formation of carbidic C on Co and of graphitic C on Cu. This is in contrast to published work showing no such remnant carbidic/carbon layer after similar treatments of Si oxynitride surfaces. The observation of the remnant carbidic C film on Co and graphitic film on Cu, but not on silicon oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}), regardless of plasma chemistry or type, indicates that this effect is due to plasma induced secondary electron emission from the metal surface, resulting in transformation of sp{sup 3} adventitious C to either a metal carbide or graphite. These results suggest fundamental limitations to plasma-based surface cleaning procedures on metal surfaces.

  11. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  12. Comparison of trace metals in intake and discharge waters of power plants using clean techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvito, D.T.; Allen, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the impact to receiving waters of trace metals potentially discharged from a once-through, non-contact cooling water system from a power plant, a study was conducted utilizing clean sampling and analytical techniques for a series of metals. Once-through, non-contact cooling water at power plants is frequently discharged back to the fresh or saline waterbody utilized for its intake water. This water is used to cool plant condensers. Intake and discharge data were collected and evaluated using paired t-tests. Study results indicate that there is no measurable contribution of metals from non-contact cooling water from this power plant

  13. Differences in metal sequestration between zebra mussels from clean and polluted field locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voets, Judith; Redeker, Erik Steen; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2009-06-04

    Organisms are able to detoxify accumulated metals by, e.g. binding them to metallothionein (MT) and/or sequestering them in metal-rich granules (MRG). The different factors involved in determining the capacity or efficiency with which metals are detoxified are not yet known. In this work we studied how the sub-cellular distribution pattern of cadmium, copper and zinc in whole tissue of zebra mussels from clean and polluted surface waters is influenced by the total accumulated metal concentration and by its physiological condition. Additionally we measured the metallothionein concentration in the mussel tissue. Metal concentration increased gradually in the metal-sensitive and detoxified sub-cellular fractions with increasing whole tissue concentrations. However, metal concentrations in the sensitive fractions did not increase to the same extent as metal concentrations in whole tissues. In more polluted mussels the contribution of MRG and MT became more important. Nevertheless, metal detoxification was not sufficient to prevent metal binding to heat-sensitive low molecular weight proteins (HDP fraction). Finally we found an indication that metal detoxification was influenced by the condition of the zebra mussels. MT content could be explained for up to 83% by variations in Zn concentration and physiological condition of the mussels.

  14. Differences in metal sequestration between zebra mussels from clean and polluted field locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voets, Judith; Redeker, Erik Steen; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2009-01-01

    Organisms are able to detoxify accumulated metals by, e.g. binding them to metallothionein (MT) and/or sequestering them in metal-rich granules (MRG). The different factors involved in determining the capacity or efficiency with which metals are detoxified are not yet known. In this work we studied how the sub-cellular distribution pattern of cadmium, copper and zinc in whole tissue of zebra mussels from clean and polluted surface waters is influenced by the total accumulated metal concentration and by its physiological condition. Additionally we measured the metallothionein concentration in the mussel tissue. Metal concentration increased gradually in the metal-sensitive and detoxified sub-cellular fractions with increasing whole tissue concentrations. However, metal concentrations in the sensitive fractions did not increase to the same extent as metal concentrations in whole tissues. In more polluted mussels the contribution of MRG and MT became more important. Nevertheless, metal detoxification was not sufficient to prevent metal binding to heat-sensitive low molecular weight proteins (HDP fraction). Finally we found an indication that metal detoxification was influenced by the condition of the zebra mussels. MT content could be explained for up to 83% by variations in Zn concentration and physiological condition of the mussels.

  15. Differences in metal sequestration between zebra mussels from clean and polluted field locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voets, Judith [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Redeker, Erik Steen [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Institute for Materials Research, Chemistry Division, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Building D G1-36, B 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bervoets, Lieven, E-mail: Lieven.bervoets@ua.ac.be [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-06-04

    Organisms are able to detoxify accumulated metals by, e.g. binding them to metallothionein (MT) and/or sequestering them in metal-rich granules (MRG). The different factors involved in determining the capacity or efficiency with which metals are detoxified are not yet known. In this work we studied how the sub-cellular distribution pattern of cadmium, copper and zinc in whole tissue of zebra mussels from clean and polluted surface waters is influenced by the total accumulated metal concentration and by its physiological condition. Additionally we measured the metallothionein concentration in the mussel tissue. Metal concentration increased gradually in the metal-sensitive and detoxified sub-cellular fractions with increasing whole tissue concentrations. However, metal concentrations in the sensitive fractions did not increase to the same extent as metal concentrations in whole tissues. In more polluted mussels the contribution of MRG and MT became more important. Nevertheless, metal detoxification was not sufficient to prevent metal binding to heat-sensitive low molecular weight proteins (HDP fraction). Finally we found an indication that metal detoxification was influenced by the condition of the zebra mussels. MT content could be explained for up to 83% by variations in Zn concentration and physiological condition of the mussels.

  16. Green chemistry: solvent- and metal-free Prins cyclization. Application to sequential reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarisse, Damien; Pelotier, Béatrice; Piva, Olivier; Fache, Fabienne

    2012-01-04

    Prins cyclization between a homoallylic alcohol and an aldehyde, promoted by trimethylsilyl halide, afforded 4-halo-tetrahydropyrans with good to excellent yields. Thanks to the absence of the solvent and metal, the THP thus obtained have been implicated without purification in several other reactions, in a sequential way, affording in particular new indole derivatives. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  17. Gas storage in porous metal-organic frameworks for clean energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengqian; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-01-07

    Depletion of fossil oil deposits and the escalating threat of global warming have put clean energy research, which includes the search for clean energy carriers such as hydrogen and methane as well as the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions, on the urgent agenda. A significant technical challenge has been recognized as the development of a viable method to efficiently trap hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gas molecules in a confined space for various applications. This issue can be addressed by employing highly porous materials as storage media, and porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) which have exceptionally high surface areas as well as chemically-tunable structures are playing an unusual role in this respect. In this feature article we provide an overview of the current status of clean energy applications of porous MOFs, including hydrogen storage, methane storage and carbon dioxide capture.

  18. Stabilization of Rocky Flats combustible residues contaminated with plutonium metal and organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S.M.; Cisneros, M.R.; Jacobson, L.L.; Schroeder, N.C.; Ames, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes tests on a proposed flowsheet designed to stabilize combustible residues that were generated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during the machining of plutonium metal. Combustible residues are essentially laboratory trash contaminated with halogenated organic solvents and plutonium metal. The proposed flowsheet, designed by RFETS, follows a glovebox procedure that includes (1) the sorting and shredding of materials, (2) a low temperature thermal desorption of solvents from the combustible materials, (3) an oxidation of plutonium metal with steam, and (4) packaging of the stabilized residues. The role of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in this study was to determine parameters for the low temperature thermal desorption and steam oxidation steps. Thermal desorption of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) was examined using a heated air stream on a Rocky Flats combustible residue surrogate contaminated with CCl 4 . Three types of plutonium metal were oxidized with steam in a LANL glovebox to determine the effectiveness of this procedure for residue stabilization. The results from these LANL experiments are used to recommend parameters for the proposed RFETS stabilization flowsheet

  19. Deep cleaning of a metallurgical zinc leaching residue and recovery of valuable metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Peng; Ma, Bao-zhong; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Cheng-yan; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-lu; Chen, Yong-qiang; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Qiu-yin

    2017-11-01

    Huge quantities of zinc leaching residues (ZLRs) generated from zinc production are dumped continuously around the world and pose a potential environmental threat because of their considerable amounts of entrained heavy metals (mainly lead). Most ZLRs have not been properly treated and the valuable metals in them have not yet been effectively recovered. Herein, the deep cleaning of a ZLR and recovery of valuable metals via a hydrometallurgical route were investigated. The cleaning process consists of two essential stages: acid leaching followed by calcium chloride leaching. The optimum conditions for extracting zinc, copper, and indium by acid leaching were a sulfuric acid concentration of 200 g·L-1, a liquid/solid ratio of 4:1 (mL/g), a leaching time of 2 h, and a temperature of 90°C. For lead and silver extractions, the optimum conditions were a calcium chloride concentration of 400 g·L-1, a pH value of 1.0, a leaching time of 1 h, and a temperature of 30°C. After calcium chloride leaching, silver and lead were extracted out and the lead was finally recovered as electrolytic lead by electrowinning. The anglesite phase, which poses the greatest potential environmental hazard, was removed from the ZLR after deep cleaning, thus reducing the cost of environmental management of ZLRs. The treatment of chlorine and spent electrolyte generated in the process was discussed.

  20. Solvent extraction of some metal ions by dithiocarbamate types of chemically modified lipophilic chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Nakagawa, H.; Naganawa, H.; Tachimori, S.

    2001-01-01

    Chitosan is a basic polysaccharide containing primary amino groups with high reactivity. we prepared O,O'-decanoyl chitosan and dithiocarbamate O,O'-decanoyl chitosan; the former was soluble in chloroform and toluene, while latter was soluble not only these diluents but also in some aliphatic diluents such as hexane and kerosene which are employed in commercial scale solvent extraction. Solvent extraction by dithiocarbamate O,O'-decanoyl chitosan in kerosene was tested for some base metal ions from sulfuric acid solution. The sequence of selectivity for these metal ions was found to be as follows: Cu(II) >> Ni(II) > Cd(II) ∼ Fe(III) > Co(II) ∼ Zn(II). Copper(II) was quantitatively extracted at pH > 1 and quantitatively stripped with 2 M sulfuric acid solution. Solvent extraction of silver(I) and gold(III) from hydrochloric acid as well as lanthanides and americium(III) from nitrate solution were also tested. Americium was selectively extracted over trivalent lanthanides, suggesting a high possibility for the final treatment of high level radioactive wastes. (authors)

  1. Association of solvent extraction and liquid-liquid flotation processes for metal recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Flavia P.; Mendonca, Luciano A. de; Massarani, Giulio

    2000-01-01

    From the batch solvent extraction process, in this work it has been carried out a preliminary study aiming the determination of the optimal operating conditions for zirconium recovery (10 ppm) using alamine 336 (tricaprylylamine) as extractor. The results have shown that the extraction takes place instantaneously (5s of manual agitation) and that at pH around 2.0 the extraction efficiency is up to 98-99% for an aqueous/organic phase volumetric ratio of 10. Based on these results, it is proposed to evaluate the possibility of using of a pioneering technology for metal recovery at low concentrations, using a experimental set-up that associates standard solvent extraction process with liquid-liquid flotation process. (author)

  2. Solubility and solvation of alkali metal perchlorates, tetramethyl and tetraethylammonium in aqua-ketone solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireev, A.A.; Pak, T.G.; Bezuglyj, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    The KClO 4 , RbClO 4 , CsClO 4 , (CH 3 ) 4 NClO 4 , (C 2 H 5 ) 4 NClO 4 solubility in water and water-acetone, water-methylethylketone mixtures is determined through the method of isothermal saturation at 298.15 K. Dissociation constants of alkali metals perchlorates in acetone and its 90% mixtures (by volume) are determined conductometrically. Solubility products and standard energies of the Gibbs transfer of the studied electrolytes from water into water-acetone and water-methylethylketone solvents. It is established that the Gibbs standard energies of Na + , K + , Rb + and Cs + cations transfer from water to water-ketone solvents are close to each other. It is shown that the effect of acetone and methylethylketone on solvation of the studied electrolytes is practically similar

  3. Next steps in the development of ecological soil clean-up values for metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentsel, Randall; Fairbrother, Anne

    2014-07-01

    This special series in Integrated Environmental Assessment Management presents the results from 6 workgroups that were formed at the workshop on Ecological Soil Levels-Next Steps in the Development of Metal Clean-Up Values (17-21 September 2012, Sundance, Utah). This introductory article presents an overview of the issues assessors face when conducting risk assessments for metals in soils, key US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) documents on metals risk assessment, and discusses the importance of leveraging from recent major terrestrial research projects, primarily to address Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical Substances (REACH) requirements in Europe, that have significantly advanced our understanding of the behavior and toxicity of metals in soils. These projects developed large data sets that are useful for the risk assessment of metals in soil environments. The workshop attendees met to work toward developing a process for establishing ecological soil clean-up values (Eco-SCVs). The goal of the workshop was to progress from ecological soil screening values (Eco-SSLs) to final clean-up values by providing regulators with the methods and processes to incorporate bioavailability, normalize toxicity thresholds, address food-web issues, and incorporate background concentrations. The REACH data sets were used by workshop participants as case studies in the development of the ecological standards for soils. The workshop attendees discussed scientific advancements in bioavailability, soil biota and wildlife case studies, soil processes, and food-chain modeling. In addition, one of the workgroups discussed the processes needed to frame the topics to gain regulatory acceptance as a directive or guidance by Canada, the USEPA, or the United States. © 2013 SETAC.

  4. Solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, D.M.; Latimer, E.G.

    1988-01-05

    It is an object of this invention to provide for the demetallization and general upgrading of heavy oil via a solvent extracton process, and to improve the efficiency of solvent extraction operations. The yield and demetallization of product oil form heavy high-metal content oil is maximized by solvent extractions which employ either or all of the following techniques: premixing of a minor amount of the solvent with feed and using countercurrent flow for the remaining solvent; use of certain solvent/free ratios; use of segmental baffle tray extraction column internals and the proper extraction column residence time. The solvent premix/countercurrent flow feature of the invention substantially improves extractions where temperatures and pressures above the critical point of the solvent are used. By using this technique, a greater yield of extract oil can be obtained at the same metals content or a lower metals-containing extract oil product can be obtained at the same yield. Furthermore, the premixing of part of the solvent with the feed before countercurrent extraction gives high extract oil yields and high quality demetallization. The solvent/feed ratio features of the invention substanially lower the captial and operating costs for such processes while not suffering a loss in selectivity for metals rejection. The column internals and rsidence time features of the invention further improve the extractor metals rejection at a constant yield or allow for an increase in extract oil yield at a constant extract oil metals content. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. RECYCLING A NONIONIC AQUEOUS-BASED METAL-CLEANING SOLUTION WITH A CERAMIC MEMBRANE: PILOT SCALE EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of a zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) membrane filter was evaluated for recycling a nonionic aqueous metal cleaning bath under real-world conditions. The pilot-scale study consisted of four 7- to 16-day filtration runs, each processed a portion of the cleaning bath duri...

  6. Metal retention in human transferrin: consequences of solvent composition in analytical sample preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Randunu, K Manoj; Brumaghim, Julia L; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of metal-binding proteins requires careful sample manipulation to ensure that the metal-protein complex remains in its native state and the metal retention is preserved during sample preparation or analysis. Chemical analysis for the metal content in proteins typically involves some type of liquid chromatography/electrophoresis separation step coupled with an atomic (i.e., inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy or -mass spectrometry) or molecular (i.e., electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) analysis step that requires altered-solvent introduction techniques. UV-VIS absorbance is employed here to monitor the iron content in human holo-transferrin (Tf) under various solvent conditions, changing polarity, pH, ionic strength, and the ionic and hydrophobic environment of the protein. Iron loading percentages (i.e. 100% loading equates to 2 Fe(3+):1 Tf) were quantitatively determined to evaluate the effect of solvent composition on the retention of Fe(3+) in Tf. Maximum retention of Fe(3+) was found in buffered (20 mM Tris) solutions (96 ± 1%). Exposure to organic solvents and deionized H(2)O caused release of ~23-36% of the Fe(3+) from the binding pocket(s) at physiological pH (7.4). Salt concentrations similar to separation conditions used for ion exchange had little to no effect on Fe(3+) retention in holo-Tf. Unsurprisingly, changes in ionic strength caused by additions of guanidine HCl (0-10 M) to holo-Tf resulted in unfolding of the protein and loss of Fe(3+) from Tf; however, denaturing and metal loss was found not to be an instantaneous process for additions of 1-5 M guanidinium to Tf. In contrast, complete denaturing and loss of Fe(3+) was instantaneous with ≥6 M additions of guanidinium, and denaturing and loss of iron from Tf occurred in parallel proportions. Changes to the hydrophobicity of Tf (via addition of 0-14 M urea) had less effect on denaturing and release of Fe(3+) from the Tf binding pocket compared to changes

  7. Thermodynamics of solvent interaction with the metal-organic framework MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimbekov, Zamirbek; Wu, Di; Brozek, Carl K; Dincă, Mircea; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-01-14

    The inclusion of solvent in metal-organic framework (MOF) materials is a highly specific form of guest-host interaction. In this work, the energetics of solvent MOF-5 interactions has been investigated by solution calorimetry in 5 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at room temperature. Solution calorimetric measurement of enthalpy of formation (ΔH(f)) of Zn4O(C8H4O4)3·C3H7NO (MOF-5·DMF) and Zn4O(C8H4O4)3·0.60C5H11NO (MOF-5·0.60DEF) from the dense components zinc oxide (ZnO), 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H2BDC), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-diethylformamide (DEF) gives values of 16.69 ± 1.21 and 45.90 ± 1.46 kJ (mol Zn4O)(-1), respectively. The enthalpies of interaction (ΔH(int)) for DMF and DEF with MOF-5 are -82.78 ± 4.84 kJ (mol DMF)(-1) and -89.28 ± 3.05 kJ (mol DEF)(-1), respectively. These exothermic interaction energies suggest that, at low guest loading, Lewis base solvents interact more strongly with electron accepting Zn4O clusters in the MOF than at high solvent loading. These data provide a quantitative thermodynamic basis to investigate transmetallation and solvent assisted linker exchange (SALE) methods and to synthesize new MOFs.

  8. Solvent Handbook Database System user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Industrial solvents and cleaners are used in maintenance facilities to remove wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold release, and various other contaminants from parts, and to prepare the surface of various metals. However, because of growing environmental and worker-safety concerns, government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals and have restricted the use of halogenated hydrocarbons because they affect the ozone layer and may cause cancer. The Solvent Handbook Database System lets you view information on solvents and cleaners, including test results on cleaning performance, air emissions, recycling and recovery, corrosion, and non-metals compatibility. Company and product safety information is also available

  9. Contamination spike simulation and measurement in a clean metal vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.E.; Yang, C.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the generation of contamination-induced voltage spikes in a clean metal vapor laser. The method facilitates the study of the characteristics of this troublesome phenomenon in laser systems. Analysis of these artificially generated dirt spikes shows that the breakdown time of the laser tube is increased when these spike appear. The concept of a Townsend discharge is used to identify the parameter which changes the breakdown time of the discharges. The residual ionization control method is proposed to generate dirt spikes in a clean laser. Experimental results show that a wide range of dirt spike magnitudes can be obtained by using the proposed method. The method provides easy and accurate control of the magnitude of the dirt spike, and the laser tube does not become polluted. Results based on the measurements can be used in actual laser systems to monitor the appearance of dirt spikes and thus avoid the danger of thyratron failure

  10. Tunable solvation effects on the size-selective fractionation of metal nanoparticles in CO2 gas-expanded solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Madhu; McLeod, M Chandler; Bell, Philip W; Roberts, Christopher B

    2005-12-08

    This paper presents an environmentally friendly, inexpensive, rapid, and efficient process for size-selective fractionation of polydisperse metal nanoparticle dispersions into multiple narrow size populations. The dispersibility of ligand-stabilized silver and gold nanoparticles is controlled by altering the ligand tails-solvent interaction (solvation) by the addition of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as an antisolvent, thereby tailoring the bulk solvent strength. This is accomplished by adjusting the CO2 pressure over the liquid, resulting in a simple means to tune the nanoparticle precipitation by size. This study also details the influence of various factors on the size-separation process, such as the types of metal, ligand, and solvent, as well as the use of recursive fractionation and the time allowed for settling during each fractionation step. The pressure range required for the precipitation process is the same for both the silver and gold particles capped with dodecanethiol ligands. A change in ligand or solvent length has an effect on the interaction between the solvent and the ligand tails and therefore the pressure range required for precipitation. Stronger interactions between solvent and ligand tails require greater CO2 pressure to precipitate the particles. Temperature is another variable that impacts the dispersibility of the nanoparticles through changes in the density and the mole fraction of CO2 in the gas-expanded liquids. Recursive fractionation for a given system within a particular pressure range (solvent strength) further reduces the polydispersity of the fraction obtained within that pressure range. Specifically, this work utilizes the highly tunable solvent properties of organic/CO2 solvent mixtures to selectively size-separate dispersions of polydisperse nanoparticles (2 to 12 nm) into more monodisperse fractions (+/-2 nm). In addition to providing efficient separation of the particles, this process also allows all of the solvent and

  11. Separation and Recovery of Precious Metals from Leach Liquors of Spent Electronic Wastes by Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thi Hong; Wang, Lingyun; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Solvent extraction was employed to recover precious metals (Au (III), Pd (II) and Pt (IV)) from the leach solution of spent electronic wastes containing Cu (II), Cr (III) and Fe (III). First, pure Fe (III) and Au (III) were recovered by simultaneous extraction with Cyanex 923 followed by selective stripping with HCl and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Second, Pt (IV), Pd (II) and Cu (II) were extracted by Alamine 336 from the raffinate. After the removal of Cu (II) by stripping with weak HCl, Pd (II) and Pt (IV) were separately stripped by controlling the concentration of thiourea in the mixture with HCl. A process flow sheet for the separation of precious metals was proposed.

  12. Refining of crude uranium by solvent extraction for production of nuclear pure uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Manna, S.; Singha, M.; Hareendran, K.N.; Chowdhury, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Kumar, K.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium is the primary fuel material for any nuclear fission energy program. Natural uranium contains only 0.712% of 235 U as fissile constituent. This low concentration of fissile isotope in natural uranium calls for a very high level of purity, especially with respect to neutron poisons like B, Cd, Gd etc. before it can be used as nuclear fuel. Solvent extraction is a widely used technique by which crude uranium is purified for reactor use. Uranium metal plant (UMP), BARC, Trombay is engaged in refining of uranium concentrate for production of nuclear pure uranium metal for fabrication of fuel for research reactors. This paper reviews some of the fundamental aspects of this refining process with some special references to UMP, BARC. (author)

  13. Determination of a cleaning and decontamination process using solvents; Determination d'une methode de nettoyage et de decontamination par solvant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutot, P; Schipfer, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1967-03-15

    This work has been carried out on samples of the white cotton serge material of which most of the working overalls of the Nuclear Research Centre are made. The aims are: - to determine,from the decontamination and cleaning points of view, the efficiency of various solvents (white-spirit, trichloroethylene, perchlorethylene and tri-chloro-trifluoroethane) and the role of additives likely to improve the treatment; - to control the textile from the wear and shrinkage points of view; - to try to develop a basic cleaning and decontamination process as a function of the possibilities of each solvent considered. (authors) [French] Cette experimentation pratiquee sur des echantillons de tissu en serge de coton blanc, tissu dans lequel est confectionnee la majorite des tenues de travail du Centre, a pour but: - de determiner, sous l'angle decontamination et nettoyage, l'efficacite de differents solvants (white-spirit, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene et trichlorotrifluoroethane) ainsi que le role des adjuvants susceptibles d'ameliorer le traitement; - de controler le textile du point de vue usure et retrecissement; - d'essayer de mettre au point un procede de nettoyage et de decontamination type en fonction des possibilites d'emploi de chacun des solvants consideres. (auteurs)

  14. Paraffin wax removal from metal injection moulded cocrmo alloy compact by solvent debinding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandang, N. A. N.; Harun, W. S. W.; Khalil, N. Z.; Ahmad, A. H.; Romlay, F. R. M.; Johari, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    One of the most crucial and time consuming phase in metal injection moulding (MIM) process is “debinding”. These days, in metal injection moulding process, they had recounted that first debinding practice was depend on thermal binder degradation, which demanding more than 200 hours for complete removal of binder. Fortunately, these days world had introduced multi-stage debinding techniques to simplified the debinding time process. This research study variables for solvent debinding which are temperature and soaking time for samples made by MIM CoCrMo powder. Since wax as the key principal in the binder origination, paraffin wax will be removed together with stearic acid from the green bodies. Then, debinding process is conducted at 50, 60 and 70°C for 30-240 minutes. It is carried out in n-heptane solution. Percentage weight loss of the binder were measured. Lastly, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and visual inspection were observed for the surface of brown compact. From the results, samples debound at 70°C exhibited a significant amount of binder loss; nevertheless, sample collapse, brittle surface and cracks were detected. But, at 60°C temperature and time of 4 hours proven finest results as it shows sufficient binder loss, nonappearance of surface cracks and easy to handle. Overall, binder loss is directly related to solvent debinding temperature and time.

  15. Post-CMP cleaning for metallic contaminant removal by using a remote plasma and UV/ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jong Min; Jeon, Bu Yong; Lee, Chong Mu

    2000-01-01

    For the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process to be successful, it is important to establish a good post-CMP cleaning process that will remove not only slurry and particles but also metallic impurities from the polished surface. The common metallic contaminants found after oxide CMP and Cu CMP include Cu, K, and Fe. Scrubbing, a popular method for post-CMP cleaning, is effective in removing particles, but removal of metallic contaminants using this method is not so effective. In this study, the removal of Fe metallic contaminants like Fe, which are commonly found on the wafer surface after CMP processes, was investigated using remote-hydrogen-plasma and UV/O 3 cleaning techniques. Our results show that metal contaminants, including Fe, can be effectively removed by using a hydrogen-plasma or UV/O 3 cleaning technique performed under optimal process conditions. In remote plasma H 2 cleaning, contaminant removal is enhanced with decreasing plasma exposure time and increasing rf-power. The optimal process condition for the removal of the Fe impurities existing on the wafer surface is an rf-power of 100 W. Plasma cleaning for 5 min or less is effective in removing Fe contaminants, but a plasma exposure time of 1 min is more appropriate than 5 min in view of the process time, The surface roughness decreased by 30∼50 % after remote-H 2 -plasma cleaning. On the other hand, the highest efficiency of Fe-impurity removal was achieved for an UV exposure time of 30 s. The removal mechanism for the Fe contaminants in the remote-H 2 -plasma and the UV/O 3 cleaning processes is considered to be the liftoff of Fe atoms when the SiO is removed by evaporation after the chemical or native SiO 2 formed underneath the metal atoms reacts with H + and e - to form SiO

  16. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-01-01

    This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

  17. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-11

    This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  18. Fiber laser cleaning of metal mirror surfaces for optical diagnostic systems of the ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, A. P., E-mail: APKuznetsov@mephi.ru; Alexandrova, A. S. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Buzhinsky, O. I. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Gubskiy, K. L.; Kazieva, T. V.; Savchenkov, A. V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Tugarinov, S. N. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of experimental studies into efficiency of removal of films with a complex composition from metal mirrors by pulsed fiber laser irradiation are presented. It is shown that the initial reflectivity of optical elements can be restored by the selection of modes of irradiation impacting the surface with the sputtered film. Effective cleaning is performed by radiation with a power density lower than 10{sup 7} W/cm{sup 2}. The removal of contaminations at such a relatively low power density occurs in a solid phase, owing to which the thermal effect on the mirror is insignificant.

  19. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-04-12

    This twelfth quarterly report describes work done during the twelfth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to a number of outside contacts.

  20. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-06-01

    This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  1. Fiber laser cleaning of metal mirror surfaces for optical diagnostic systems of the ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A. P.; Alexandrova, A. S.; Buzhinsky, O. I.; Gubskiy, K. L.; Kazieva, T. V.; Savchenkov, A. V.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    The results of experimental studies into efficiency of removal of films with a complex composition from metal mirrors by pulsed fiber laser irradiation are presented. It is shown that the initial reflectivity of optical elements can be restored by the selection of modes of irradiation impacting the surface with the sputtered film. Effective cleaning is performed by radiation with a power density lower than 10 7 W/cm 2 . The removal of contaminations at such a relatively low power density occurs in a solid phase, owing to which the thermal effect on the mirror is insignificant

  2. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-10

    This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss in Korean workers: co-exposure to organic solvents and heavy metals in nationwide industries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Hyeong Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noise exposure is a well-known contributor to work-related hearing loss. Recent biological evidence suggests that exposure to ototoxic chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals may be additional contributors to hearing loss. However, in industrial settings, it is difficult to determine the risks of hearing loss due to these chemicals in workplaces accompanied by excessive noise exposure. A few studies suggest that the effect of noise may be enhanced by ototoxic chemicals. Therefore, this study investigated whether co-exposure to organic solvents and/or heavy metals in the workplace modifies the risk of noise exposure on hearing loss in a background of excessive noise. METHODS: We examined 30,072 workers nationwide in a wide range of industries from the Korea National Occupational Health Surveillance 2009. Data on industry-based exposure (e.g., occupational noise, heavy metals, and organic solvents and subject-specific health outcomes (e.g., audiometric examination were collected. Noise was measured as the daily 8-h time-weighted average level. Air conduction hearing thresholds were measured from 0.5 to 6 kHz, and pure-tone averages (PTA (i.e., means of 2, 3, and 4 kHz were computed. RESULTS: In the multivariate linear model, PTA increment with occupational noise were 1.64-fold and 2.15-fold higher in individuals exposed to heavy metals and organic solvents than in unexposed individuals, respectively. CONCLUSION: This study provides nationwide evidence that co-exposure to heavy metals and/or organic solvents may exacerbate the effect of noise exposure on hearing loss in workplaces. These findings suggest that workers in industries dealing with heavy metals or organic solvents are susceptible to such risks.

  4. Noise-induced hearing loss in Korean workers: co-exposure to organic solvents and heavy metals in nationwide industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Kim, KyooSang

    2014-01-01

    Noise exposure is a well-known contributor to work-related hearing loss. Recent biological evidence suggests that exposure to ototoxic chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals may be additional contributors to hearing loss. However, in industrial settings, it is difficult to determine the risks of hearing loss due to these chemicals in workplaces accompanied by excessive noise exposure. A few studies suggest that the effect of noise may be enhanced by ototoxic chemicals. Therefore, this study investigated whether co-exposure to organic solvents and/or heavy metals in the workplace modifies the risk of noise exposure on hearing loss in a background of excessive noise. We examined 30,072 workers nationwide in a wide range of industries from the Korea National Occupational Health Surveillance 2009. Data on industry-based exposure (e.g., occupational noise, heavy metals, and organic solvents) and subject-specific health outcomes (e.g., audiometric examination) were collected. Noise was measured as the daily 8-h time-weighted average level. Air conduction hearing thresholds were measured from 0.5 to 6 kHz, and pure-tone averages (PTA) (i.e., means of 2, 3, and 4 kHz) were computed. In the multivariate linear model, PTA increment with occupational noise were 1.64-fold and 2.15-fold higher in individuals exposed to heavy metals and organic solvents than in unexposed individuals, respectively. This study provides nationwide evidence that co-exposure to heavy metals and/or organic solvents may exacerbate the effect of noise exposure on hearing loss in workplaces. These findings suggest that workers in industries dealing with heavy metals or organic solvents are susceptible to such risks.

  5. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Korean Workers: Co-Exposure to Organic Solvents and Heavy Metals in Nationwide Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Kim, KyooSang

    2014-01-01

    Background Noise exposure is a well-known contributor to work-related hearing loss. Recent biological evidence suggests that exposure to ototoxic chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals may be additional contributors to hearing loss. However, in industrial settings, it is difficult to determine the risks of hearing loss due to these chemicals in workplaces accompanied by excessive noise exposure. A few studies suggest that the effect of noise may be enhanced by ototoxic chemicals. Therefore, this study investigated whether co-exposure to organic solvents and/or heavy metals in the workplace modifies the risk of noise exposure on hearing loss in a background of excessive noise. Methods We examined 30,072 workers nationwide in a wide range of industries from the Korea National Occupational Health Surveillance 2009. Data on industry-based exposure (e.g., occupational noise, heavy metals, and organic solvents) and subject-specific health outcomes (e.g., audiometric examination) were collected. Noise was measured as the daily 8-h time-weighted average level. Air conduction hearing thresholds were measured from 0.5 to 6 kHz, and pure-tone averages (PTA) (i.e., means of 2, 3, and 4 kHz) were computed. Results In the multivariate linear model, PTA increment with occupational noise were 1.64-fold and 2.15-fold higher in individuals exposed to heavy metals and organic solvents than in unexposed individuals, respectively. Conclusion This study provides nationwide evidence that co-exposure to heavy metals and/or organic solvents may exacerbate the effect of noise exposure on hearing loss in workplaces. These findings suggest that workers in industries dealing with heavy metals or organic solvents are susceptible to such risks. PMID:24870407

  6. A low viscosity, low boiling point, clean solvent system for the rapid crystallisation of highly specular perovskite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Nakita K.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Wenger, Bernard; Klug, Matthew T.; Hörantner, Maximilian T.; Johnston, Michael B.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Moore, David T.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite-based photovoltaics have, in recent years, become poised to revolutionise the solar industry. While there have been many approaches taken to the deposition of this material, one-step spin-coating remains the simplest and most widely used method in research laboratories. Although spin-coating is not recognised as the ideal manufacturing methodology, it represents a starting point from which more scalable deposition methods, such as slot-dye coating or ink-jet printing can be developed. Here, we introduce a new, low-boiling point, low viscosity solvent system that enables rapid, room temperature crystallisation of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite films, without the use of strongly coordinating aprotic solvents. Through the use of this solvent, we produce dense, pinhole free films with uniform coverage, high specularity, and enhanced optoelectronic properties. We fabricate devices and achieve stabilised power conversion efficiencies of over 18% for films which have been annealed at 100 degrees C, and over 17% for films which have been dried under vacuum and have undergone no thermal processing. This deposition technique allows uniform coating on substrate areas of up to 125 cm2, showing tremendous promise for the fabrication of large area, high efficiency, solution processed devices, and represents a critical step towards industrial upscaling and large area printing of perovskite solar cells.

  7. General Solvent-dependent Strategy toward Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Graphene/Metal Oxide Nanohybrids: Effects of Nitrogen-containing Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wei-Yao; Chen, Wei-Quan; Chiu, Yu-Hsiang; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Hu

    2016-11-01

    A general solvent-dependent protocol directly influencing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in metal oxide/graphene nanohybrids has been demonstrated. We conducted the two-step synthesis of cobalt oxide/N-doped graphene nanohybrids (CNG) with solvents of water, ethanol, and dimethylformamide (DMF), representing tree typical categories of aqueous, polar organic, and organic N-containing solvents commonly adopted for graphene nanocomposites preparation. The superior ORR performance of the DMF-hybrids can be attributed to the high nitrogen-doping, aggregation-free hybridization, and unique graphene porous structures. As DMF is the more effective N-source, the spectroscopic results support a catalytic nitrogenation potentially mediated by cobalt-DMF coordination complexes. The wide-distribution of porosity (covering micro-, meso-, to macro-pore) and micron-void assembly of graphene may further enhance the diffusion kinetics for ORR. As the results, CNG by DMF-synthesis exhibits the high ORR activities close to Pt/C (i.e. only 8 mV difference of half-wave potential with electron transfer number of 3.96) with the better durability in the alkaline condition. Additional graphene hybrids comprised of iron and manganese oxides also show the superior ORR activities by DMF-synthesis, confirming the general solvent-dependent protocol to achieve enhanced ORR activities.

  8. Bioremediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with stoddard solvent and mop oil using the PetroClean bioremediation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, E.K.; Lieberman, M.T.; Caplan, J.A.; Blaes, D.; Keating, P.; Richards, W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Environmental Science and Engineering Inc. (ESE) was contracted by a confidential industrial client to perform a three-phased project. Phase I involved characterizing the site and delineating the extent of subsurface contamination. Phase II included biofeasibility and pilot-scale evaluations, determining remedial requirements, and designing the full-scale treatment system. Phase III involved implementing and operating the designed in situ bioremediation system (i.e., PetroClean 4000) to achieve site closure

  9. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  10. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  11. Metal ion extractant in microemulsions: where solvent extraction and surfactant science meet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, C.

    2011-01-01

    The presented work describes the supramolecular structure of mixtures of a hydrophilic surfactant n-octyl-beta-glucoside (C8G1), and the hydrophobic metal ion extractant tributylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane/water as well as in the presence of salts. In the first part, basic solvent extraction system, composed of water, oil and extractant, will be introduced. The focus, however, lies on the extraction of multivalent metal ions from the aqueous phase. During this extraction process and in the following thermodynamic equilibrium, aggregation and phase transition in supramolecular assemblies occur, which are already described in literature. Notably, these reports rest on individual studies and specific conclusions, while a general concept is still missing. We therefore suggest the use of generalized phase diagrams to present the physico-chemical behaviour of (amphiphilic) extractant systems. These phase diagrams facilitated the development of a thermodynamic model based on molecular geometry and packing of the extractant molecules in the oil phase. As a result, we are now in the position to predict size and water content of extractant aggregates and, thus, verify the experimental results by calculation.Consequently, the second part presents a systematic study of the aqueous and organic phase of water/C8G1 and water/oil/TBP mixtures. The focus lies on understanding the interaction between metal ions and both amphiphilic molecules by means of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. We confirmed the assumption that extraction of metal ions is driven by TBP, while C8G1 remains passive. In the third and last part, microemulsions of C8G1, TBP, water (and salt) and n-dodecane are characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and chemical analytics (Karl Fischer, total organic carbon, ICP-OES,...). The co-surfactant behaviour of TBP was highlighted by comparison to the classical n-alcohol (4≤n≤8) co

  12. Effect of temperature, solvent and nature of metal cations on the potentiometric titration S of iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasleem, S.; Ishrat, B.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the potentiometric titrations of iron oxide in the presence of CU/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2/ were under taken under different experimental conditions of temperature and concentration of metal ions in aqueous and aqueous/organic mixed solvent. The adsorption of both the metal ions were observed to increase with the increase in pH and temperature of the system. The adsorbent iron oxide preferentially adsorbs transition metal as compared to alkaline earth metal ion. (author)

  13. Carbon dioxide cleaning pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, L.; Blackman, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    In 1989, radioactive-contaminated metal at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) was cleaned using a solvent paint stripper (Methylene chloride). One-third of the radioactive material was able to be recycled; two-thirds went to the scrap pile as low-level mixed waste. In addition, waste solvent solutions also required disposal. Not only was this an inefficient process, it was later prohibited by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 268. A better way of doing business was needed. In the search for a solution to this situation, it was decided to study the advantages of using a new technology - pelletized carbon dioxide cleaning. A proof of principle demonstration occurred in December 1990 to test whether such a system could clean radioactive-contaminated metal. The proof of principle demonstration was expanded in June 1992 with a pilot project. The purpose of the pilot project was three fold: (1) to clean metal so that it can satisfy free release criteria for residual radioactive contamination at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP); (2) to compare two different carbon dioxide cleaning systems; and (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of decontamination process in a production situation and compare the cost of shipping the metal off site for waste disposal. The pilot project was completed in August 1993. The results of the pilot project were: (1) 90% of those items which were decontaminated, successfully met the free release criteria , (2) the Alpheus Model 250 was selected to be used on plantsite and (3) the break even cost of decontaminating the metal vs shipping the contaminated material offsite for disposal was a cleaning rate of 90 pounds per hour, which was easily achieved

  14. Physical-chemical purification of power metal optics for increasing its service life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filin, S. A.; Rogalin, V. E.; Kaplunov, I. A.; Zingerman, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    In order to increase the resource of power metal optics, the features of the choice of solvents for its physical and chemical cleaning are investigated. During cleaning, on the contaminated surface there remain visually observed white film of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, insoluble by this class of solvents, and iridescent bands from the interaction of hydrocarbons with metal, and this degrades optical properties and reduces the life of mirrors. It is demonstrated that, with the use of solvents, it is necessary to inhibit the interaction of hydrocarbons with mirrors by the stabilization of solvents or by selection of cleaning regimes.

  15. Development of an emergency air-cleaning system for liquid-metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    A novel air cleaning concept has been developed for potential use in venting future commercial liquid metal fast breeder reactor containment buildings in the unlikely event of postulated core disruptive accidents. The passive concept consists of a submerged gravel bed to collect the bulk of particulate contaminates carried by the vented gas. A fibrous scrubber could be combined with the submerged gravel scrubber to enhance collection efficiencies for the smaller sized particles. The submerged gravel scrubber is unique in that water flow through the packed bed is induced by the gas flow, eliminating the need for an active liquid pump. In addition, design gas velocities through the packed bed are 10 to 20 times higher than for a conventional sand bed filter

  16. A clean method for solvent-free nitration of toluene over sulfated titania promoted by ceria catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Ma, Hongzhu; Wang, Bo

    2009-08-15

    A mild simple method for nitration of aromatic compounds, various solid acids as catalysts, the air treated with the corona discharge generator as nitrating agent, the liquid-phase nitration of toluene, at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure without solvent has been investigated. The results show that SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) (ST) and SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) doped with CeO(2) (STC) catalysts displayed good nitration activity in the experiments. It is an attractive method for the environmentally friendly synthesis of nitroaromatic compounds. Moreover, only mononitrotoluenes were detected in the products, and the ratio of para-nitrotoluene and ortho-nitrotoluene was approximately 1:1 with various catalysts. A maximum yield of about 11.4% was achieved for mononitrotoluenes in STC reaction system in 3h.

  17. Genesis Solar Wind Sample 61422: Experiment in Variation of Sequence of Cleaning Solvent for Removing Carbon-Bearing Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Allums, K. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The recovered Genesis collector fragments are heavily contaminated with crash-derived particulate debris. However, megasonic treatment with ultra-pure-water (UPW; resistivity (is) greater than18 meg-ohm-cm) removes essentially all particulate contamination greater than 5 microns in size [e.g.1] and is thus of considerable importance. Optical imaging of Si sample 60336 revealed the presence of a large C-rich particle after UPW treatment that was not present prior to UPW. Such handling contamination is occasionally observed, but such contaminants are normally easily removed by UPW cleaning. The 60336 particle was exceptional in that, surprisingly, it was not removed by additional UPW or by hot xylene or by aqua regia treatment. It was eventually removed by treatment with NH3-H2O2. Our best interpretation of the origin of the 60336 particle was that it was adhesive from the Post-It notes used to stabilize samples for transport from Utah after the hard landing. It is possible that the insoluble nature of the 60336 particle comes from interaction of the Post-It adhesive with UPW. An occasional bit of Post-It adhesive is not a major concern, but C particulate contamination also occurs from the heat shield of the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) and this is mixed with inorganic contamination from the SRC and the Utah landing site. If UPW exposure also produced an insoluble residue from SRC C, this would be a major problem in chemical treatments to produce clean surfaces for analysis. This paper reports experiments to test whether particulate contamination was removed more easily if UPW treatment was not used.

  18. AN ELECTROLYTIC CIP-CLEANING PROCESS FOR REMOVING IMPURITIES FROM THE INNER SURFACE OF A METALLIC CONTAINER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a novel electrolytic process for removing impurities from the inner surface of a metallic container. The process is particularly useful for cleaning process reactors used for culturing microorganisms, and storage tanks used for storing metabolites formed in the process...... reactor, as well as containers for dairy products....

  19. Photoemission studies of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces using synchrotron and uv radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apai, G.R. II.

    1977-09-01

    Photoemission energy distribution experiments on clean metal and adsorbate-covered surfaces were performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by using x-ray and ultraviolet photon sources in the laboratory as well as continuously-tunable, highly polarized synchrotron radiation obtainable at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Studies focused on two general areas: cross-section modulation in the photoemission process was studied as a function of photon energy and orbital composition. Sharp decreases in intensity of the valence bands of several transition metals (i.e., Ag, Au, and Pt) are attributed to the radial nodes in the respective wave functions. Adsorbate photoemission studies of CO adsorbed on platinum single crystals have demonstrated a very high spectral sensitivity to the 4sigma and (1π + 5sigma) peaks of CO at photon energies of 150 eV. Angle-resolved photoemission allowed determination of the orientation of CO chemisorbed on a Pt (111) or Ni(111) surface. Prelinimary results at high photon energies (approximately 150 eV) indicated scattering from the substrate which could yield chemisorption site geometries

  20. Solvent/oxidant-switchable synthesis of multisubstituted quinazolines and benzimidazoles via metal-free selective oxidative annulation of arylamidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-06-06

    A fast and simple divergent synthesis of multisubstituted quinazolines and benzimidazoles was developed from readily available amidines, via iodine(III)-promoted oxidative C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) and C(sp(2))-N bond formation in nonpolar and polar solvents, respectively. Further selective synthesis of quinazolines in polar solvent was realized by TEMPO-catalyzed sp(3)C-H/sp(2)C-H direct coupling of the amidine with K2S2O8 as the oxidant. No metal, base, or other additives were needed.

  1. Solvent Effect, Photochemical and Photophysical Properties of Phthalocyanines with Different Metallic Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Biral Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photophysical and photochemical properties of lithium phthalocyanine (1, gallium(III phthalocyanine chloride (2, titanium(IV phthalocyanine dichloride (3 and iron(II phthalocyanine (4 were investigated in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, tetrahydrofuran (THF and DMSO-THF mixtures. The influence of the central metal on these properties was analyzed according to solvent type, axial ligands and their paramagnetic and diamagnetic effect. Fluorescence lifetimes were recorded using a time correlated single photon counting setup (TCSPC technique. In order to demonstrate the generation of reactive oxygen species under light irradiation, the indirect method (applying 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF as chemical suppressor and the direct method (analyzing the phosphorescence decay curves of singlete oxygen at 1270 nm were employed. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 showed a monomeric behavior in all media while compound 4 presented low aggregation in DMSO, but a very pronounced aggregation behavior in THF. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy was compared with emission spectra and complex 4 presented values beyond the expected limits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i5.1047 

  2. Pickering Unit 1 chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, J.L.; Fiola, R.J.; Brennenstuhl, K.R.; Zerkee, D.D.; Daniel, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    The secondary sides of all 12 boilers at Pickering Unit 1 were chemically cleaned in 1994 by the team of Ontario Hydro, B and W International (Cambridge, Ontario) and B and W Nuclear Technologies (Lynchburg, Virginia). A multi-step EPRI/SGOG process was employed in a similar manner to previous clearings at Units 5 and 6 in 1992 and 1993, respectively. A major innovation with the Unit 1 cleaning was the incorporation of a crevice cleaning step, the first time this had been done on Ontario Hydro plants. In addition, six boilers were cleaned in parallel compared to three at a time in previous Pickering cleanings. This significantly reduced cleaning time. A total of 6,770 kg of sludge was removed through direct chemical dissolution. It consisted of 66% iron/nickel oxides and 28% copper metal. A total of 1,600,000 L (420,000 US gallons) of liquid waste was produced. It was processed through the spent solvent treatment facility located at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site. Visual inspection performed after the cleaning indicated that the crevices between the boiler tubes and the tube support structure were completely clear of deposit and the general condition of the tubing and lattice bars appeared to be in 'as new' condition. (author)

  3. Solubility of metallic mercury in organic solvents; Solubilite du mercure metallique dans les solvants organiques; Rastvorimost' metallicheskoj rtuti v organicheskikh rastvoritelyakh; Solubilidad del mercurio metalico en solventes organicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klehr, E H; Voigt, A F [Institute for Atomic Research and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    1962-03-15

    The solubilities of metallic mercury at 25{sup o}C in the solvents carbon tetrachloride, 2, 2, 4-trimethylpentane, n-decane, benzene, toluene, nitrobenzene, chlorobenzene and bromobenzene have been determined by the use of Hg{sup 203} tracer. Measurements were made either by shaking mercury metal of known specific activity with the solvent, or by measuring the distribution coefficient of the metal between the solvent and water and combining this measurement with the solubility of mercury in water, or by both methods. Radioactivity was measured by counting precipitated samples with a GM counter or liquid aliquots with a well-type scintillator counter. All solubilities were in the range (4.6 to 16) x 10{sup -6} g atoms/l. For n-decane, toluene and chlorobenzene, the temperature dependence of the solubility was determined over the range 0 to 45{sup o}C. The Hildebrand-Scott theory of solubility has been applied to these systems for comparison. For the aliphatic hydrocarbons, the solubilities predicted by theory are within 35% of those observed, but for the other solvents, the predicted values are 4 to 18 times larger than those observed. Modification of the theory gives better agreement for some solvents but poorer agreement for others. Curves of log G (solubility) vs. 1/T were straight lines with slopes similar to those obtained from the Hildebrand-Scott theory but displaced from those curves. The slopes of the curves were used for the calculation of heats and entropies of solution. Entropies were also calculated from curves of log G vs. log T. The two sets of entropy values were in agreement with each other and were within one to four entropy units of the ideal entropies of mixing. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont determine la solubilite du mercure metallique a 25{sup o}C dans les solvants suivants: tetrachlorure de carbone, trimethylpentane 2, 2, 4, n-decane, benzene, toluene, nitrobenzene, chlorobenzene et bromobenzene en utilisant le mercure-203 comme

  4. Ion association thermodynamics of alkali metal tetraphenylborates in the mixed solvent propylenecarbonate-1,2-dimethoxyethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, Yu.Ya.; Gorbachev, V.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Polythermal dependences of constants of ion association of (Li + -Cs + )BPh 4 salts in mixed solvent differ significantly in permittivity. Thermodynamic characteristics of this process are calculated and their relation with solvation processes is analyzed. (author)

  5. Aluminum metal surface cleaning and activation by atmospheric-pressure remote plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, J., E-mail: jmespadero@uco.es; Bravo, J.A.; Calzada, M.D.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric-pressure postdischarges have been applied on aluminium surfaces. • The outer hydrocarbon layer is reduced by the action of the postdischarge. • The treatment promotes the appearance of hydrophilic OH radicals in the surface. • Effectivity for distances up to 5 cm allows for treating irregular surfaces. • Ageing in air due to the disappearance of OH radicals has been reported. - Abstract: The use of the remote plasma (postdischarge) of argon and argon-nitrogen microwave plasmas for cleaning and activating the surface of metallic commercial aluminum samples has been studied. The influence of the nitrogen content and the distance between the treated samples and the end of the discharge on the hydrophilicity and the surface energy has been analyzed by means of the sessile drop technique and the Owens-Wendt method. A significant increase in the hydrophilicity has been noted in the treated samples, together with an increase in the surface energy from values around 37 mJ/m{sup 2} to 77 mJ/m{sup 2}. Such increase weakly depends on the nitrogen content of the discharge, and the effectivity of the treatment extends to distances up to 5 cm from the end of the discharge, much longer than those reported in other plasma-based treatments. The analysis of the treated samples using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that such increase in the surface energy takes place due to a reduction of the carbon content and an increase in the amount of OH radicals in the surface. These radicals tend to disappear within 24–48 h after the treatment when the samples are stored in contact with ambient air, resulting in the ageing of the treated surface and a partial retrieval of the hydrophobicity of the surface.

  6. Evaluation of methods for cleaning low carbon uranium metal and alloy samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, K.; Dixon, M.

    1979-01-01

    Several methods for cleaning uranium samples prior to carbon analysis, using a Leco Carbon Analyzer, were evaluated. Use of Oakite Aluminum NST Cleaner followed by water and acetone rinse was found to be the best overall technique

  7. Critical cleaning agents for Di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Mya; Archuleta, Kim M.

    2013-08-01

    It is required that Di-2-ethylhexyl Sebacate oil, also commonly known as Dioctyl Sebacate oil, be thoroughly removed from certain metals, in this case stainless steel parts with narrow, enclosed spaces. Dioctyl Sebacate oil is a synthetic oil with a low compressibility. As such, it is ideally used for high pressure calibrations. The current method to remove the Dioctyl Sebacate from stainless steel parts with narrow, enclosed spaces is a labor-intensive, multi-step process, including a detergent clean, a deionized (DI) water rinse, and several solvent rinses, to achieve a nonvolatile residue of 0.04 mg per 50 mL rinse effluent. This study was undertaken to determine a superior detergent/solvent cleaning method for the oil to reduce cleaning time and/or the amount of detergent/solvent used. It was determined that while some detergent clean the oil off the metal better than the current procedure, using only solvents obtained the best result. In addition, it can be inferred, based on elevated temperature test results, that raising the temperature of the oil-contaminated stainless steel parts to approximately 50ÀC will provide for improved cleaning efficacy.

  8. Some regularities in formation and solvent extraction of complexes in metal-salicylic acid or its derivative- organic base systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimarin, I.P.; Fadeeva, V.I.; Tikhomirova, T.I.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of concentrations of the reagents, pH and solvent on the conditions for the formation and extraction of Sc, Ti, Zr, Hf, Th complexes has been examined in salicylic acid (H 2 Sal)-heterocyclic amine systems. The extraction chemism and factors, which affect the reactions between the metal ions and the ligands, are discussed. It has been shown that Zr, Hf, Ti form species of ion associate type, Sc and Th form different-ligand complexes under conditions for interphase equilibrium in a Me-H 2 Sal-heterocyclic amine system

  9. From conceptual model to remediation: bioavailability, a key to clean up heavy metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2013-04-01

    Processes of metal bioavailability in the soil To know the bioavailability processes at site specific levels is essential to understand in detail the risks associated with pollution, and to support the decision-making process, i.e. description of the conceptual model and choice of clean up technologies. It is particularly important to assess how chemical, physical and biological processes in the soil affect the reactions leading to adsorption, precipitation or release of contaminants. The measurement of bioavailability One of the main difficulties in the practical application of the bioavailability concept in soil remediation is the lack of consensus on the method to be used to measure bioavailability. The best strategy is to apply a series of tests to assess bioavailability, since no applicable method is universally valid under all conditions. As an example, bioavailability tests for phytotechnology application should consider two distinct aspects: a physico-chemical driven solubilization process and a physiologically driven uptake process. Soil and plant characteristics strongly influence bioavailability. Bioavailability as a tool in remediation strategies Bioavailability can be used at all stages in remediation strategies: development of the conceptual model, evaluation of risk assessment, and selection of the best technology, considering different scenarios and including different environmental objectives. Two different strategies can be followed: the reduction and the increase of bioavailability. Procedures that reduce bioavailability aim to prevent the movement of pollutants from the soil to the living organisms, essentially by: i) removal of the labile phase of the contaminant, i.e. the fraction which is intrinsic to the processes of bioavailability (phytostabilization); ii) conversion of the labile fraction into a stable fraction (precipitation or adsorption); iii) increase of the resistance to mass transfer of the contaminants (inertization). Procedures

  10. Calculation of aerodynamics of aerosol filter designs for cleaning of heavy liquid metal cooler reactor gas loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valery P Melnikov; Pyotr N Martynov; Albert K Papovyants; Ivan V Yagodkin

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: One of the basic performances of aerosol filters is the aerodynamic resistance to the flow of gaseous medium to be cleaned. Calculation of the aerodynamics of aerosol filters in reference to the gas loops of reactor installations with heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) allows the design of the structural components of filters to be optimized to provide minimum initial resistance values. It is established that owing to various factors aerosol particles of different concentration and disperse composition are present always in the gas spaces of heavy liquid metal cooled reactor gas loops. To prevent the negative effect of aerosols on the equipment of the gas loops, it is reasonable to use filters of multistep design with sections of preliminary and fine cleaning to catch micron and submicron particles, respectively. A computer program and technique have been developed to evaluate the aerodynamics of folded aerosol filters for different parameters of their structural components, taking account of the aerosol spectrum and concentration. The algorithm of the calculation is presented by the example of a two-step design assembled in single vessel; the filter dimensions and pattern of the air flow to be cleaned are determined under the given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the aerodynamic resistance of filters was performed with consideration for local resistances and resistances of all the structural components of the filter (sudden constriction, expansion, the flow in air channels, filtering material and so on). Correlations have been derived for the resistance of air channels, filtering materials of preliminary and fine cleaning sections as a function of such parameters as the section depth (50-500 mm), the height of separators (3,5-20 mm), the filtering surface area (1,5-30 m 2 ). Based on the calculation results, the auto-similarity domain was brought out for the minimal values of filter resistances as a function of the ratio of

  11. Highly stable ni-m f6-nh2o/onpyrazine2(solvent)x metal organic frameworks and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks comprising metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands. Methods for capturing chemical species from fluid compositions comprise contacting a metal organic framework characterized by the formula [MaMbF6-n(O/H2O)w(Ligand)x(solvent)y]z with a fluid composition and capturing one or more chemical species from the fluid composition.

  12. Arrays of hollow out-of-plane microneedles made by metal electrodeposition onto solvent cast conductive polymer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, I; Liu, Y; Stoeber, B; Häfeli, U O

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery using microneedles is a technique to potentially replace hypodermic needles for injection of many vaccines and drugs. Fabrication of hollow metallic microneedles so far has been associated with time-consuming steps that restrict batch production of these devices. Here, we are presenting a novel method for making metallic microneedles with any desired height, spacing, and lumen size. In our process, we use solvent casting to coat a mold, which contains an array of pillars, with a conductive polymer composite layer. The conductive layer is then used as a seed layer in a metal electrodeposition process. To characterize the process, the conductivity of the polymer composite with respect to different filler concentrations was investigated. In addition, plasma etching of the polymer was characterized. The electroplating process was also studied further to control the thickness of the microneedle array plate. The strength of the microneedle devices was evaluated through a series of compression tests, while their performance for transdermal drug delivery was tested by injection of 2.28 µm fluorescent microspheres into animal skin. The fabricated metallic microneedles seem appropriate for subcutaneous delivery of drugs and microspheres. (paper)

  13. Molecular effects in ion-electron emission from clean metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Alonso, E.V.; Auciello, O.; Ferron, J.; Lantschner, G.; Oliva Florio, A.

    1978-01-01

    The authors have measured electron emission yields from clean Al, Cu and Ag under 2-50 keV H + , D + , H 2 + impact. It is found that molecular ion yields are lower than twice the yield of atomic ions. No isotope effects are observed for equal-velocity ions. (Auth.)

  14. USING CERAMIC MEMBRANES TO RECYCLE TWO NONIONIC ALKALINE METAL-CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    One ZrO2 ultrafilter (0.05 um pore size) and two a-Al2O3 microfilters (0.2 and 0.8 um) were used to remove one synthetic ester oil and two polyalphaolefin-based and two petroleum hydrocarbon-based oils and greases from two nonionic alkaline cleaning solutions (e.g., Turco 4215-NC...

  15. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations

  16. Cleaning of a copper matte smelting slag from a water-jacket furnace by direct reduction of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maweja, Kasonde; Mukongo, Tshikele; Mutombo, Ilunga

    2009-05-30

    Cleaning experiments of a copper matte smelting slag from the water-jacket furnace was undertaken by direct reduction in a laboratory-scale electric furnace. The effects of coal-to-slag ratio, w, and the reduction time, t, were considered for two different coal/slag mixing procedures. In the first procedure, metallurgical coal was added to the molten slag, whereas in the second procedure, coal was premixed with the solid slag before charging into the furnace. The recovery of heavy metals (Cu, Co), and the fuming of Pb and Zn were investigated. Contamination of the metal phase by iron and the acidity index of the final slag were analysed as these may impede the economical viability of the process. The lower w value of 2.56% yielded a recovery rate of less than 60% for copper and less than 50% for cobalt, and around 70% for zinc. However, increasing w to 5% allowed the recovery of 70-90% for Cu, Co and Zn simultaneously after 30-60 min reduction of the molten slag. After reduction, the cleaned slags contained only small amounts of copper and cobalt (zinc was efficient as the %Pb of the residual slag dropped to levels lower than 0.04% after 30 min of reduction. Ninety percent of the lead was removed from the initial slag and collected in the dusts. The zinc content of the cleaned slags quickly dropped to between 1 and 3 wt% from the initial 8.2% after 30 min reduction for w value of 5 and after 60 min reduction for w value of 2.56. The dusts contained about 60% Zn and 10% Pb. Recovery of lead from fuming of the slag was higher than 90% in all the experimental conditions considered in this study.

  17. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Quaternary Metal Sulfide Nanoparticles Derived from Thiourea

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Gurinov, Andrei; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of metal sulfide (MS) materials with sizes in the sub-10 nm regime often requires capping agents with long hydrocarbon chains that affect their structures and properties. Herein, this study presents a molten-state synthesis method

  18. In situ fabrication of electrochemically grown mesoporous metallic thin films by anodic dissolution in deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renjith, Anu; Roy, Arun; Lakshminarayanan, V

    2014-07-15

    We describe here a simple electrodeposition process of forming thin films of noble metallic nanoparticles such as Au, Ag and Pd in deep eutectic solvents (DES). The method consists of anodic dissolution of the corresponding metal in DES followed by the deposition on the cathodic surface. The anodic dissolution process in DES overcomes the problems associated with copious hydrogen and oxygen evolution on the electrode surface when carried out in aqueous medium. The proposed method utilizes the inherent abilities of DES to act as a reducing medium while simultaneously stabilizing the nanoparticles that are formed. The mesoporous metal films were characterized by SEM, XRD and electrochemical techniques. Potential applications of these substrates in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electrocatalysis have been investigated. A large enhancement of Raman signal of analyte was achieved on the mesoporous silver substrate after removing all the stabilizer molecules from the surface by calcination. The highly porous texture of the electrodeposited film provides superior electro catalytic performance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The mechanisms of HER on the fabricated substrates were studied by Tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilization of plants for stabilization and cleaning up of metal contaminated soil and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Štofko

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation has been defined as the use of green plants and their associated rhizospheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain contaminants located in soisl, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and even the atmosphere. Categories of phytoremediation include - phytoextraction or phytoaccumulation, phytotransformation, phytostimulation or plant-assisted bioremediation, phytovolatilization, rhizofiltration, pump and tree, phytostabilization, and hydraulic control. Phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils basically includes phytostabilization, phytoextraction, rhizofiltration and phytovolatilization. Selection of plants for phytoremediation of metals depends on a particular application.

  20. Analysis of sulphur, phosphorus and silica in metals, alloys, inorganic compounds and solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, J.C.; Naik, S.S.; Khedikar, W.K.; Sudersanan, M.; Mathur, P.K

    1999-10-01

    Procedures for the analysis of sulphur, phosphorus and silica in various metals and alloys like mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel as well as nickel base alloys are described. Procedures were also developed for the analysis of sulphur in thoria pellets and in other materials like crack check fluids, coal etc. Typical results obtained are summarised. (author)

  1. Is dry cleaning all wet?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical solvents from dry cleaning, particularly perchloroethylene (perc), have contributed to groundwater contamination, significant levels of air pollution in and around cleaners, and chemical accumulation in food. Questions are being raised about the process of cleaning clothes with chemical, and other less toxic cleaning methods are being explored. The EPA has focused attention on the 50 year old Friedburg method of cleaning, Ecoclean, which uses no dangerous chemicals and achieves comparable results. Unfortunately, the cleaning industry is resistant to change, so cutting back on amount of clothes that need dry cleaning and making sure labels aren't exaggerating when they say dry clean only, is frequently the only consumer option now

  2. Metal phosphonate hybrid mesostructures: environmentally friendly multifunctional materials for clean energy and other applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian-Yi; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2011-10-17

    The synthesis of porous hybrid materials has been extended to mesoporous non-silica-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials, in which mesoporous metal phosphonates represent an important family. By using organically bridged polyphosphonic acids as coupling molecules, the homogeneous incorporation of a considerable number of organic functional groups into the metal phosphonate hybrid framework has been realized. Small amounts of organic additives and the pH value of the reaction solution have a large impact on the morphology and textural properties of the resultant hybrid mesoporous metal phosphonate solids. Cationic and nonionic surfactants can be used as templates for the synthesis of ordered mesoporous metal phosphonates. The materials are used as efficient adsorbents for heavy metal ions, CO₂, and aldehydes, as well as in the separation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. They are also useful photocatalysts under UV and simulated solar light irradiation for organic dye degradation. Further functionalization of the synthesized mesoporous hybrids makes them oxidation and acid catalysts, both with impressive performances in the fields of sustainable energy and environment. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Stabilization of Li Metal Anode in DMSO-Based Electrolytes via Optimization of Salt-Solvent Coordination for Li-O 2 Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Wu [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kim, Sun Tai [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Department of Energy Engineering, School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 South Korea; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Sun, Xiuliang [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Mei, Donghai [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Cho, Jaephil [Department of Energy Engineering, School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 South Korea; Wang, Chong-Min [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-08

    The conventional DMSO-based electrolyte (1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in DMSO) is unstable against the Li metal anode and therefore cannot be used directly in practical Li-O2 batteries. Here, we demonstrate that a highly concentrated electrolyte based on LiTFSI in DMSO (with a molar ratio of 1:3) can greatly improve the stability of the Li metal anode against DMSO and significantly improve the cycling stability of Li-O2 batteries. This highly concentrated electrolyte contains no free DMSO solvent molecules, but only complexes of (TFSI–)a-Li+-(DMSO)b (where a + b = 4), and thus enhances their stability with Li metal anodes. In addition, such salt-solvent complexes have higher Gibbs activation energy barriers than the free DMSO solvent molecules, indicating improved stability of the electrolyte against the attack of superoxide radical anions. Therefore, the stability of this highly concentrated electrolyte at both Li metal anodes and carbon-based air electrodes has been greatly enhanced, resulting in improved cyclic stability of Li-O2 batteries. The fundamental stability of the electrolyte with free-solvent against the chemical and electrochemical reactions can also be used to enhance the stability of other electrochemical systems.

  4. Thin-layer chromatography of 49 metal ions on stannic antimonate in aqueous and mixed solvent systems containing dimethylsulfoxide: quantitative separation of uranium from numerous metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.; Varshney, K.G.; Rajput, R.P.S.

    1976-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography of 40 metal ions in 31 aqueous and mixed solvent systems has been performed on stannic antimonate ion-exchange material. Dimethylsulfoxide has been utilized to resolve such binary mixtures as La 3+ and Ce 3+ from Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , and Sm 3+ ; VO 2+ from Ti 4+ , Nb 5+ , and Ta 5+ ; Ga 3+ from In 3+ , Tl + , and Y 3+ ; Fe 3+ from VO 2+ ; and Mg 2+ from Al 3+ . Quantitative separation of 200 to 800 μg U from its binary mixtures and from the synthetic mixtures containing Mg 2+ , Bi 3+ , Fe 3+ , Th 4+ , Ce 4+ , Cr 3+ , Zr 4+ , Hf 4+ , Ti 4+ Mn 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ce 3+ , In 3+ , Y 3+ , Ca 2+ , Co 2+ , Tl + , Nb 5+ , and Ag + has been obtained

  5. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Quaternary Metal Sulfide Nanoparticles Derived from Thiourea

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2017-08-09

    The synthesis of metal sulfide (MS) materials with sizes in the sub-10 nm regime often requires capping agents with long hydrocarbon chains that affect their structures and properties. Herein, this study presents a molten-state synthesis method for a series of transition-MS nanoparticles using thiourea as a reactive precursor without capping agents. This study also reports the synthesis of MS with single metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) and quaternary CuGa2In3S8 using the same synthesis protocol. Thiourea first melts to form a molten-state condition to serve as the reaction medium at a relatively low temperature (<200 °C), followed by its thermal decomposition to induce a reaction with the metal precursor to form different MS. This synthesis protocol, owing to its dynamic characteristics, involves the formation of a variety of organic carbon nitride polymeric complexes around the MS particles. Dynamic nuclear polarization surface-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is effective to identify the polymeric compositions and structures as well as their interactions with the MS. These results provided thorough structural descriptions of the MS nanoparticles surrounded by the carbon nitride species derived from thiourea, which may find various applications, including photocatalytic water splitting.

  6. Solvent and stabilizer free growth of Ag and Pd nanoparticles using metallic salts/cyclotriphosphazenes mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz Valenzuela, C. [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Chile, La Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Casilla 653, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Valenzuela, M.L., E-mail: mlvalenzuela@unab.cl [Universidad Andres Bello, Departamento de Ciencias Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Av. Republica 275, Santiago (Chile); Caceres, S.; Diaz, R. [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Chile, La Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Casilla 653, Santiago de Chile (Chile); O' Dwyer, C. [Applied Nanoscience Group, Department of Chemistry, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Micro and Nanoelectronics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

    2013-12-16

    Cyclotriphosphazene is used as a sacrificial solid-state template to synthesize a range of Ag and Pd nanoparticles with diverse geometries by thermal treatment using MLn/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} mixtures. The Pd and Ag nanoparticles are synthesized by solid-state pyrolysis of AgPPh{sub 3}[CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}]/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} and PdCl{sub 2}/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} mixtures with molar relationships of 1:1, 1:5 and 1:10 respectively, in air and at 800 °C. The morphology of the as-prepared nanoparticles is found to depend on the molar ratio of the precursor mixture, the preparation method and of the nature of the metal. Ag and Pd, microcrystals were thermally grown on Si from the respective 1:1 precursors while that metal foams were grown from 1:5 ratios precursors on SiO{sub 2} wafers. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigations reveal in most cases small crystals of Pd. HRSTEM measurements indicate that the formation of the Pd and Ag nanoparticles occurs through a phase demixing and dewetting mechanism. This approach has potential to be a useful and facile method to prepare metallic nanoparticles without requiring solutions or surfactants for application in electronic, catalytic and sensor materials and devices. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis MLn/N{sub 3}P{sub 3}(O{sub 2}C{sub 12}H{sub 8}){sub 3} mixtures under air, give Pd and Ag nanoparticles. • AgPPh{sub 3}[CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] and PdCl{sub 2} in molar ratios 1:1 and 1:5 were used. • Metal foams were obtained from 1:5 ratios when deposited on SiO{sub 2.} • Using crucible supporting in 1:1 metal/trimer <2 nm Pd nanoparticles were obtained. • The probable mechanism involves a dewetting, nucleation and ripening crystallization.

  7. Dependence of ion-electron emission from clean metals on the incidence angle of the projectile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, J.; Alonso, E.V.; Baragiola, R.A.; Oliva-Florio, A.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied the dependence of electron yields γ from clean Cu and Au surfaces on the incidence angle theta of 5--50-keV He + , Ar + , and Xe + projectiles, in the angular range 0--80 0 , and under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. We have found that, at small angles, γproportionalsec/sup f/theta, with f generally different from unity. For Xe + on Cu, γ(theta) presents an energy-dependence maximum, similar to that obtained for sputtering. The results are explained in terms of the anisotropy of the electron cascade in the solid, the depth distribution of the inelastic energy deposited by the projectile and by rapidly recoiling target atoms in the near-surface region of the solid

  8. Dependence of ion-electron emission from clean metals on the incidence angle of the projectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferron, J.; Alonso, E.V.; Baragiola, R.A.; Oliva-Florio, A.

    1981-10-15

    We have studied the dependence of electron yields ..gamma.. from clean Cu and Au surfaces on the incidence angle theta of 5--50-keV He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and Xe/sup +/ projectiles, in the angular range 0--80 /sup 0/, and under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. We have found that, at small angles, ..gamma..proportionalsec/sup f/theta, with f generally different from unity. For Xe/sup +/ on Cu, ..gamma..(theta) presents an energy-dependence maximum, similar to that obtained for sputtering. The results are explained in terms of the anisotropy of the electron cascade in the solid, the depth distribution of the inelastic energy deposited by the projectile and by rapidly recoiling target atoms in the near-surface region of the solid.

  9. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of a nitric acid/argon ion cleaned uranium metal surface at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.J.; Sherwood, P.M.A.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study the surface of uranium metal cleaned by nitric acid treatment and argon ion etching, followed by heating in a high vacuum. The surface is shown to contain UOsub(2-x) species over the entire temperature range studied. Heating to temperatures in the range 400-600 0 C generates a mixture of this oxide, the metal and a carbide and/or oxycarbide species. (author)

  10. Evaluation of boiler chemical cleaning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The EPRI/SGOG process, which has been selected by Ontario Hydro for use at the Bruce A station, is described. This process consists of alternating iron removal and copper removal steps, the two metals which comprise the bulk of the deposit in the Bruce A SGs. The iron removal solvent consists of ethylenediameinetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydrazine, ammonium hydroxide and a proprietary corrosion inhibitor CCI-801. The copper removal solvent consists of EDTA, ethylene diamine and hydrogen peroxide. Ontario Hydro proposes to clean a bank of four SGs in parallel employing a total of six copper removal steps and four iron removal steps. Cleaning all eight SGs in a single Bruce A unit will generate 2,200 m 3 of liquid waste which will be treated by a wet air oxidation process. The iron and copper sludges will be buried in a landfill site while the liquid waste will be further treated by the Bruce sewage treatment plant. Some ammonia vapour will be generated through the wet air oxidation process and will be vented through a stack on top of the high bay of the spent solvent treatment plant. With the exception of the proprietary corrosion inhibitor, all chemicals that will be employed in the cleaning and waste treatment operations are standard industrial chemicals which are well characterized. No extraordinary hazards are anticipated with their use as long as adequate safety precautions are taken

  11. Demonstration/Validation of a Surface Cleaning Control to Mitigate Storm Water Metal Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    added to a pre- weighed 125-ml low density polyethylene (LDPE) bottle. The particles were digested with 1.0 ml of concentrated trace metal grade (TMG...Sorenson. 2005. “ Residential Street-Dirt Accumulation Rates and Chemical Composition, and Removal Efficiencies by Mechanical- and Vacuum-Type...Bay, and M. Kayhanian. 2003. “A Review of the Contaminants and Toxicity Associated with Particles in Stormwater Runoff.” Caltrans CTSW-RT-03-059.73.15

  12. Demonstration/Validation of a Surface Cleaning Control Practice to Mitigate Storm Water Metal Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    added to a pre- weighed 125-ml low density polyethylene (LDPE) bottle. The particles were digested with 1.0 ml of concentrated trace metal grade (TMG...consideration to ensure completion of operations.   33 9. REFERENCES Breault, R. F., K. P. Smith, and J. R. Sorenson. 2005. “ Residential Street...of the Contaminants and Toxicity Associated with Particles in Stormwater Runoff.” Caltrans CTSW-RT-03-059.73.15. California Department of

  13. Determination of the clean 4f peak shape in XPS for plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrall, P. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.morrall@awe.co.uk; Roussel, P. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Jolly, L.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-03-15

    Many of the interesting properties observed with plutonium are ascribed to the influence of 5f electrons, and to the degree of localisation observed within these electrons. Indeed, changes in 5f localisation are sensitively reflected in the final states observed in core-level photoemission measurements. However, when analysing the 4f manifold of elemental plutonium, it is essential to obtain spectra without the influence of oxidation, which can easily be misinterpreted as 5f localisation. The ideal method to extract elemental plutonium 4f spectra is to remove any influence of oxidation from the 'clean' plutonium data by careful measurement of the oxygen 1s region, and the subsequent subtraction of the unwanted oxide features. However, in order to achieve this objective it is essential to determine the relative sensitivity factor (RSF) for plutonium 4f and the precise shape of the 4f features from plutonium sesqui-oxide. In this paper, we report an experimental determination of the RSF for the plutonium 4f manifold using experimental data captured from two different Vacuum Generators spectrometers; an ESCALAB Mk II and an ESCALAB 220i.

  14. Contributions to anionexchange separation of metal ions in mixed aqueous-organic solvent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha-Campos, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the first chapter of the thesis a method is described for the determination of iron, copper, manganese, nickel, cobalt and uranium in samples of manganese nodules. After dissolution of the sample in a mixture of concentrated hydrochloric-nitric acids, the elements are adsorbed on a column of the strongly basic anion-exchange resin Dowex 1 from a medium consisting of 80% cyclohexanone 10% methanol and 10% 1M hydrochloric acid. Following removal of iron by washing the resin bed with a mixture of the same composition, 90% methanol-10% 1M hydrochloric containing ascorbic acid is passed through the column to eluate manganese, nickel and cobalt. Subsequently, 4M hydrochloric acid-1% hydrogen peroxid solution and 1M hydrochloric acid are used to elute copper and uranium, respectively. The elements were determined quantitatively by ICP-OES, except for uranium which was determined by fluorimetry. The method was used successfully for the determination of mg and p.p.m. quantities of these elements in samples of manganese nodules. In the second chapter of the thesis a procedure is described for the determination of cadmium, lead, zinc and uranium in samples of Austrian mineral waters. After acidification, the sample was heated to expell CO 2 and the elements in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline are extracted into chloroform at pH-7. Then the metals are adsorbed on a column of the strongly basic anion-exchange resin Dowex 1 from a medium consisting of 55% chloroform, 36% methanol and 9% 12M hydrochloric acid. After simultaneous elution of the elements with 1M nitric acid, a portion of the eluate was passed through another column containing the same resin to separate uranium from the other elements. The uranium was determined fluorimetrically and cadmium, lead and zinc by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method was successfully used for the quantitative determination of these elements in mineral water samples. (Author)

  15. Solvent-Controlled Assembly of ionic Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Indium and Tetracarboxylate Ligand: Topology Variety and Gas Sorption Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Bing

    2016-07-15

    Four Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based on Indium and tetracarboxylate ligand have been synthesized through regulation of the solvent conditions, the resulted compounds not only exhibited rich structural topologies (pts, soc and unique topologies), but also interesting charge reversal framework features. By regulating the solvent, different building units (indium monomer, trimer) have been generated in situ, and they are connected with the ligand to form ionic frameworks 1-4, respectively. Among the synthesized four ionic frameworks, compounds 3 and 4 could keep their crystallinity upon heating temperature up to 300oC after fully removal of solvent guest molecules, they also exhibit the charge reversal framework features (3 adopts an overall cationic framework, while 4 has an anionic framework). Both compounds 3 and 4 exhibit significant uptake capacity for CO2 and H2, besides that, compounds 3 and 4 also present excellent selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 and CH4.

  16. Solvent-Controlled Assembly of ionic Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Indium and Tetracarboxylate Ligand: Topology Variety and Gas Sorption Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Bing; Sun, Xiaodong; Li, Guanghua; Cairns, Amy; Kravtsov, Victor; Huo, Qisheng; Liu, Yunling; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Four Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based on Indium and tetracarboxylate ligand have been synthesized through regulation of the solvent conditions, the resulted compounds not only exhibited rich structural topologies (pts, soc and unique topologies), but also interesting charge reversal framework features. By regulating the solvent, different building units (indium monomer, trimer) have been generated in situ, and they are connected with the ligand to form ionic frameworks 1-4, respectively. Among the synthesized four ionic frameworks, compounds 3 and 4 could keep their crystallinity upon heating temperature up to 300oC after fully removal of solvent guest molecules, they also exhibit the charge reversal framework features (3 adopts an overall cationic framework, while 4 has an anionic framework). Both compounds 3 and 4 exhibit significant uptake capacity for CO2 and H2, besides that, compounds 3 and 4 also present excellent selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 and CH4.

  17. Field emission and high voltage cleaning of particulate contaminants on extended metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The vacuum insulation properties of extended metallic surfaces depends strongly on their cleanliness. The usual technique to reduce electronic field emission from such surfaces consists in exposing them to very high electric fields during limited periods of time. This kind of processing also reduces the occurrence of vacuum breakdown. The processing of the surface is generally believed to be due to a thermomechanical destruction of the emitting sites, initiated by the emission itself. Comparison of the electric forces vs adherence forces which act on dust particles lying on the surface shows that the processing could also be due simply to the mechanical removal of the dust particles, with a subsequent reduction of field emission from the contaminated surface. (author)

  18. Development of Chemosorbent Based on Metallic Waste for Cleaning Mine Water From Molybdenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Evgenyevich Isakov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of hydrochemical studies of water objects, located in the impact zone of one of the largest mining enterprises in the Russian Federation – JSC “Apatite”. According to the monitoring studies, the source of surface water pollution with molybdenum was determined, geochemical assessment of the molybdenum transformation in the system “ore-bearing rocks – mine water – surface water” was performed. In order to reduce the technogenic load on the surface water located in the considered area, the way of large-tonnage mine waters purificationfrom molybdenum was proposed. The method involves using the chemical sorbent based on waste metals. The method of sewage purificationwill allow solving one of the key environmental problems of the considered enterprise and, in addition, to improve the environmental situation in the considered area as well as the quality of the local population life.

  19. Cleaning and electrochemistry restoration of archaeological metalic objects | Limpieza y restauración electroquímica de objetos arqueológicos metálicos

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás España Guisolphe; Vicente Montiel Leguey; Marcelo López Segura; Antonio Aldaz Riera

    1985-01-01

    This paper shows how electrochemical methods can be applied to the cleaning and restoration of coins and metallic objects proceeding from archaeological finds. A description is given of the electrochemical methods used and a comparison with the usual cleaning methods is also made. | El presente estudio pone de manifiesto la aplicabilidad de los métodos electroquímicos a la limpieza y restauración de monedas y piezas metálicas que proceden de yacimientos arqueológicos. Se hace una descripción ...

  20. Theoretical Studies of the Structure and the Dynamics on Clean and Chemisorbed Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liqiu

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and lattice dynamics (LD) techniques are employed to investigate several phenomena related to the structure and vibrations at metal surfaces. The MD simulations are performed with the many-body interaction potentials obtained using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). As specific examples, we present the results for Ag(100) at 300 K and Cu(100) at 150 K, 300 K, and 600 K. The calculated frequencies and polarizations of all surface modes and resonances at the high-symmetry points in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone are in good agreement with available data, as well as, existing lattice dynamics results with force constants obtained from first-principles calculations. Our calculated surface relaxation is also in reasonable agreement with the data. We also test a much simpler lattice dynamics model with nearest neighbor central force interactions, and conclude that it can reproduce the main features of the phonon modes, but only when adjustable surface parameters are used. Additionally, the temperature dependent studies of the phonon line-widths and the mean-square displacement (MSD) of surface atoms are indicative of enhanced surface anharmonicity. On several chemisorbed metal surfaces, for which force constants are not available from first-principles calculations or the EAM, we perform lattice dynamics studies of phonon dispersion curves using simple force-constant models. These studies provide reliable mean-square displacement of surface atoms and can distinguish between possible reconstruction patterns, the results being insensitive to the exact values of the surface parameters. On c(2 times 2)S-Ni(100), it is found that the parallel component of the mean-square displacement for sulfur is around 50% larger than the vertical component, but for the mean-square displacement of oxygen atoms in the system c(2 times 2)O-Ni(100), the opposite is the case. As regards surface reconstruction, for both p(2 times 1)O-Ag(110) and p(2 times 1)O-Ni(110

  1. Solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of microextraction solvent bars used for metal ultra-trace pre-concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Álvarez, Rafael Jesús; Pinto, Juan J.; Bellido-Milla, Dolores; Moreno, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    The potential applicability of the continuum source solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (CS SS-GF AAS) technique has been studied to carry out the direct analysis of microextraction solvent bars used for metal ultra-trace pre-concentration in natural waters. An optimisation of the temperature program was developed for this purpose. Preliminary chamber furnace studies were performed in order to understand the behaviour of the bars with the increasing temperature. Solvent bars were filled with an acceptor solution, impregnated with an organic extractant and placed into the chamber furnace to carry out several temperature programs. Results led to perform a correct optimisation of the drying and pyrolysis steps of the furnace temperature program, which was tested with silver once completed. Blank solvent bars as well as standards containing silver were measured, obtaining a calibration curve with a correlation coefficient of 0.991. The results exhibited good repeatability and reproducibility, with relative standard deviations below 10% in both cases, indicating a promising applicability of the CS SS-GF AAS technique to directly determine metallic species in microextraction solvent bars.

  2. Effect of organic solvents on desorption and atomic absorption determination of heavy metal ions after ion exchange concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Safronova, V.G.; Zakrevskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of organic solvents (acetone, methylethylketone, dioxane, ethanol) on desorption of Cu, Mn, Co, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni from cationite KU-23 ion exchange resin and on the detection limits of their atomic absorption determination has been examined. Cobalt and cadmium can be separated quantitatively using desorption by a mixture of HCl and acetone. Addition of an organic solvent results in a higher absorbance, mainly due to a high rate and efficiency of atomization. Acetone has proved to be the best solvent: addition of 60 vol. % of this solvent to the concentrate provides 2 times lower detection limits for the heavy metas in water

  3. Emerging 0D Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides for Sensors, Biomedicine, and Clean Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bang Lin; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Zou, Hao Lin; Dong, Jiang Xue; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing; Leong, David Tai

    2017-08-01

    Following research on two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), zero-dimensional (0D) TMDs nanostructures have also garnered some attention due to their unique properties; exploitable for new applications. The 0D TMDs nanostructures stand distinct from their larger 2D TMDs cousins in terms of their general structure and properties. 0D TMDs possess higher bandgaps, ultra-small sizes, high surface-to-volume ratios with more active edge sites per unit mass. So far, reported 0D TMDs can be mainly classified as quantum dots, nanodots, nanoparticles, and small nanoflakes. All exhibited diverse applications in various fields due to their unique and excellent properties. Of significance, through exploiting inherent characteristics of 0D TMDs materials, enhanced catalytic, biomedical, and photoluminescence applications can be realized through this exciting sub-class of TMDs. Herein, we comprehensively review the properties and synthesis methods of 0D TMDs nanostructures and focus on their potential applications in sensor, biomedicine, and energy fields. This article aims to educate potential adopters of these excitingly new nanomaterials as well as to inspire and promote the development of more impactful applications. Especially in this rapidly evolving field, this review may be a good resource of critical insights and in-depth comparisons between the 0D and 2D TMDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chemical cleaning of Dresden Unit 1: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The introduction of NS-1 solvent into the full primary system of Dresden Unit-1 nuclear power reactor on September 12, 1984, represented the culmination of several years of development, testing, planning, and construction. The requirement was to dissolve the highly radioactive deposits of primarily nickel ferrite without any corrosion which might compromise the reactor systems. During the actual cleaning with the NS-1 solvent, the chemical condition of the circulating solvent was measured. Iron, nickel, and radioactive cobalt all dissolved smoothly. The amount of copper in solution decreased in concentration, verifying expectations that metallic copper would plate on to clean metal surfaces. A special rinse formulation was employed after the primary cleaning steps and the ''lost'' copper was thus redissolved and removed from the system. After the cleaning was complete and the reactor had been refilled with pure water, radiation levels were measured. The most accurate of these measurements gave decontamination factors ranging well above 100, which indicated a significant removal of the radioactive deposits, and demonstrated the success of this project. Treatment of the radioactive liquid wastes from this operation required volume reduction and water purification. The primary method of processing the spent cleaning solvent and rinse water was evaporation. The resulting concentrate has been stored as a liquid, awaiting solidification to allow burial at a designated site. Water which was separated during evaporation, along with the dilute rinses, was processed by various chemical means, reevaporated, treated with activated carbon, and/or demineralized before its radionuclide and chemical content was low enough to allow it to be returned to Dresden Station for treatment or disposal. 60 figs., 31 tabs

  5. Activity coefficients of plutonium and cerium in liquid gallium at 1073 K: Application to a molten salt/solvent metal separation concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, David; Ched'homme, Severine; Bourges, Gilles; Sanchez, Sylvie; Picard, Gerard S.

    2005-01-01

    Activity coefficients in liquid metal and salt phases are important parameters for predicting the separation efficiency of reductive extraction or electrochemical pyrochemical processes. The electrochemical properties of Ce and Pu in gallium metal and chlorides media - CaCl 2 and equimolar NaCl-KCl - have been studied at 1073 K. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry show the thermodynamic feasibility of using gallium as solvent metal for pyrochemical processes involving Pu and Ce. The activity coefficient of Pu in liquid Ga (log(γ Pu,Ga ) = -7.3 ± 0.5) is deduced from the results and is a basis of assessing the potential for using liquid metals in pyrochemical separation of actinides and lanthanides. Evaluation of literature data for Al, Bi and Cd suggests that Ga is most favorable for selective separation of Pu from Ce near 1073 K

  6. Tuning glass formation and brittle behaviors by similar solvent element substitution in (Mn,Fe)-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Ran, E-mail: liran@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiao, Ruijuan [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Gang [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Jianfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang, Tao, E-mail: zhangtao@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-02-25

    A family of Mn-rich bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was developed through the similar solvent elements (SSE) substitution of Mn for Fe in (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 80−x})P{sub 10}B{sub 7}C{sub 3} alloys. The effect of the SSE substitution on glass formation, thermal stability, elastic constants, mechanical properties, fracture morphologies, Weibull modulus and indentation fracture toughness was discussed. A thermodynamics analysis provided by Battezzati et al. (L. Battezzati, E. Garrone, Z. Metallkd. 75 (1984) 305–310) was adopted to explain the compositional dependence of the glass-forming ability (GFA). The elastic moduli follow roughly linear correlations with the substitution concentration of Mn in (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 80−x})P{sub 10}B{sub 7}C{sub 3} BMGs. The introduction of Mn to replace Fe significantly decreases the plasticity of the resulting BMGs and the Weibull modulus of the fracture strength. A super-brittle Mn-based BMGs of (Mn{sub 55}Fe{sub 25})P{sub 10}B{sub 7}C{sub 3} BMGs were found with the indentation fracture toughness (K{sub c}) of 1.91±0.04 MPa m{sup 1/2}, the lowest value among all kinds of BMGs so far. The atomic and electronic structure of the selected BMGs were simulated by the first principles molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory, which provided a possible understanding of the brittleness caused by the similar chemical element replacement of Mn for Fe.

  7. A Comprehensive Study for the Laser Cleaning of Corrosion Layers due to Environmental Pollution for Metal Objects of Cultural Value: Preliminary Studies on Artificially Corroded Coupons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siatou, A.; Charalambous, D.; Argyropoulos, V.; Pouli, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is focused on the systematic investigation of the layer-by-layer removal of corrosion products on artificially corroded metal coupons aiming to introduce a methodology for the optimum laser cleaning approach of historical metal objects. Thus, it is very important to determine the chemical composition of the studied surfaces before and after irradiation. A series of laser cleaning studies has been performed on test coupons (reference and artificially corroded). Wavelength and pulse duration effects are investigated. Initial studies were focused on the use of infrared (1064 nm) and ultraviolet (355 nm and 248 nm) radiations of nanosecond (ns) pulse duration. Damage and removal threshold values were determined for the substrates and the corrosion layers, respectively. The irradiated surfaces are evaluated microscopically under the optical and the scanning electron microscope, while the mineralogical and chemical composition of the various layers is determined with X-ray diffraction and SEM-EDAX analyses, respectively. The results obtained are providing a comprehensive approach for understanding the main mechanisms that are significant in the different laser cleaning regimes, while the optimum cleaning methodologies for the studied materials are being established.

  8. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  9. The effect of specific solvent-solute interactions on complexation of alkali-metal cations by a lower-rim calix[4]arene amide derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Gordan; Stilinović, Vladimir; Kaitner, Branko; Frkanec, Leo; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2013-11-04

    Complexation of alkali-metal cations with calix[4]arene secondary-amide derivative, 5,11,17,23-tetra(tert-butyl)-25,26,27,28-tetra(N-hexylcarbamoylmethoxy)calix[4]arene (L), in benzonitrile (PhCN) and methanol (MeOH) was studied by means of microcalorimetry, UV and NMR spectroscopies, and in the solid state by X-ray crystallography. The inclusion of solvent molecules (including acetonitrile, MeCN) in the calixarene hydrophobic cavity was also investigated. The classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the systems studied were carried out. By combining the results obtained using the mentioned experimental and computational techniques, an attempt was made to get an as detailed insight into the complexation reactions as possible. The thermodynamic parameters, that is, equilibrium constants, reaction Gibbs energies, enthalpies, and entropies, of the investigated processes were determined and discussed. The stability constants of the 1:1 (metal:ligand) complexes measured by different methods were in very good agreement. Solution Gibbs energies of the ligand and its complexes with Na(+) and K(+) in methanol and acetonitrile were determined. It was established that from the thermodynamic point of view, apart from cation solvation, the most important reason for the huge difference in the stability of these complexes in the two solvents lay in the fact that the transfer of complex species from MeOH to MeCN was quite favorable. That could be at least partly explained by a more exergonic inclusion of the solvent molecule in the complexed calixarene cone in MeCN as compared to MeOH, which was supported by MD simulations. Molecular and crystal structures of the lithium cation complex of L with the benzonitrile molecule bound in the hydrophobic calixarene cavity were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. As far as we are aware, for the first time the alkali-metal cation was found to be coordinated by the solvent nitrile group in a calixarene adduct. According to

  10. Reticular Chemistry and Metal-Organic Frameworks: Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials for Clean Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal A.

    2017-06-01

    Gaining control over the assembly of crystalline solid-state materials has been significantly advanced through the field of reticular chemistry and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs have emerged as a unique modular class of porous materials amenable to a rational design with targeted properties for given applications. Several design approaches have been deployed to construct targeted functional MOFs, where desired structural and geometrical attributes are incorporated in preselected building units prior to the assembly process. This dissertation illustrates the merit of the molecular building block approach (MBB) for the rational construction and discovery of stable and highly porous MOFs, and their exploration as potential gas storage medium for sustainable and clean energy applications. Specifically, emphasis was placed on gaining insights into the structure-property relationships that impact the methane (CH4) storage in MOFs and its subsequent delivery. The foreseen gained understanding is essential for the design of new adsorbent materials or adjusting existing MOF platforms to encompass the desired features that subsequently afford meeting the challenging targets for methane storage in mobile and stationary applications.In this context, we report the successful use of the MBB approach for the design and deliberate construction of a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum based MOFs with the square-octahedral (soc) underlying net topology. From this platform, Al-soc-MOF-1, with more than 6000 m2/g apparent Langmuir specific surface area, exhibits outstanding gravimetric CH4 uptake (total and working capacities). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) challenging gravimetric and volumetric targets for the CH4 working capacity for on-board CH4 storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon

  11. Evaluation of Various Cleaning Methods to Remove Bacillus Spores from Spacecraft Hardware Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm × 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 × 103 cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  12. Restoring solvent for nuclear separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction separation processes are used to recover usable nuclear materials from spent fuels. These processes involve the use of an extractant/diluent (solvent) for separation of the reusable actinides from unwanted fission products. The most widely used processes employ tributyl phosphate as an extractant diluted with a normal-paraffin hydrocarbon. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. In most processes, the solvent is recycled after cleaning. Solvent cleaning generally involves scrubbing with a sodium carbonate solution. Studies at the Savannah River Laboratory have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove more solvent-soluble binding ligands (formed by solvent degradation), which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of the solvent with a solid adsorbent after carbonate washing removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycled solvent performance. Laboratory work to establish the advantage of adsorbent cleaning and the development of a full-scale adsorption process is described. The application of this process for cleaning the first cycle solvent of a Savannah River Plant production process is discussed

  13. Solubility and Standard Gibb's energies of transfer of alkali metal perchlorates, tetramethyl- and tetraethylammonium from water to aqua-acetone solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireev, A.A.; Pak, T.G.; Bezuglyj, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Solubilities of KClO 4 , RbClO 4 , CsClO 4 , (CH 3 ) 4 NClO 4 , (C 2 M 5 ) 4 NClO 4 in water and water-acetone mixtures are determined by the method of isothermal saturation at 298.15 K. Dissociation constants of alkali metal perchlorates are found by conductometric method. Solubility products and standard Gibbs energies of transfer of corresponding electrolytes from water into water-acetone solvents are calculated. The character of transfer Gibbs energy dependence on solvent composition is explained by preferred solvation of cations by acetone molecules and anions-by water molecules. Features of tetraalkyl ammonium ions are explained by large changes in energy of cavity formation for these ions

  14. Determination of 21 antibiotics in sea cucumber using accelerated solvent extraction with in-cell clean-up coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minghua; Zhao, Hongxia; Xia, Deming; Du, Juan; Xie, Huaijun; Chen, Jingwen

    2018-08-30

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with in-cell clean-up method coupled to ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed to determine 21 antibiotics in sea cucumber. The analytes include 10 sulfonamides, 4 fluoroquinolones, 3 amphenicols, 2 beta-lactams, 1 lincosamide and trimethoprim. Optimal parameters of ASE method were obtained at 80 °C, 1 static cycle of 5 min with methanol/acetonitrile (1/1, v/v) using 2 g of C18 as adsorbent. Recoveries at 50.1-129.2% were achieved with RSD under 20%. Method detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 2.9 μg kg -1 . Compared to the reported ultrasound-assisted extraction method, the proposed method offered comparable extraction efficiency for sulfonamides from sea cucumber, but higher for other categories of antibiotics. This validated method was then successfully applied to sea cucumber samples and 9 antibiotics were detected with the highest concentration up to 57.7 μg kg -1 for norfloxacin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding and Modelling the Effect of Dissolved Metals on Solvent Degradation in Post Combustion CO2 Capture Based on Pilot Plant Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dhingra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant. Besides, most of the models fail to recognize the catalytic effect of metals. The objective of this work is to develop a representative kinetic model based on an apparent auto-catalytic reaction mechanism between solvent degradation, corrosion and ammonia emissions. Measurements from four different pilot plants: (i EnBW’s plant at Heilbronn, Germany (ii TNO’s plant at Maasvlakte, The Netherlands; (iii CSIRO’s plants at Loy Yang and Tarong, Australia and (iv DONG Energy’s plant at Esbjerg, Denmark are utilized to propose a degradation kinetic model for 30 wt % ethanolamine (MEA as the capture solvent. The kinetic parameters of the model were regressed based on the pilot plant campaign at EnBW. The kinetic model was validated by comparing it with the measurements at the remaining pilot campaigns. The model predicted the trends of ammonia emissions and metal concentration within the same order of magnitude. This study provides a methodology to establish a quantitative approach for predicting the onset of unacceptable degradation levels which can be further used to devise counter-measure strategies such as reclaiming and metal removal.

  16. Enhancement in extraction rates by addition of organic acids to aqueous phase in solvent extraction of rare earth metals in presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Azis, A.; Fujita, Mamoru; Teramoto, Masaaki.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the selectivity of rare earth metals by solvent extraction is increased by the addition of a chelating agent such as diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) in the aqueous phase. One of the disadvantages of this method is the decrease in extraction rates due to complexation in the aqueous phase. In this paper, further addition of organic acids to the aqueous phase was examined for the purpose of enhancing the extraction rates in solvent extraction with DTPA. The addition of several kind of organic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid, lactic acid and citric acid was investigated for a Er/Y separation system. A remarkable enhancement in extraction rates was observed with a slight decrease in the selectivity by the addition of citric acid or lactic acid. Extraction rates in the presence of both DTPA and citric acid increased with the increase in citric acid concentration and with the increase in proton concentration. A 150 times enhancement in extraction rates was found in the low proton concentration condition. In order to analyze the extraction rates and selectivities obtained, mass transfer equations were presented by considering both the dissociation reaction of rare earth metal-DTPA complexes and the complex formation between rare earth metal and organic acid in the aqueous phase. The experimental data were analyzed by these equations. (author)

  17. Fabrication of superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic self-cleaning metal surfaces using picosecond laser pulses and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-05-01

    Bioinspired superhydrophilic/phobic self-cleaning surfaces have recently drawn a lot of interest in both fundamental and applied research. A hybrid method to produce the self-cleaning property of micro/nanostructured surface using ultra-fast laser pulses followed by chemical fluorination is proposed. The typical micro/nanocomposite structures that form from microporous arrays and microgroove groups have been processed by picosecond laser on titanium alloy surface. The surface hydrophilic/phobic and self-cleaning properties of micro/nanostructures before and after fluorination with fluoroalkyl-silane were investigated using surface contact angle measurements. The results indicate that surface properties change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic after fluorination, and the micro/nanostructured surface with increased roughness contributes to the improvement of surface hydrophobicity. The micro/nanomodification can make the original hydrophilic titanium alloy surface more hydrophilic or superhydrophilic. It also can make an originally hydrophobic fluorinated titanium alloy surface more hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. The produced micro/nanostructured titanium alloy surfaces show excellent self-cleaning properties regardless of the fluorination treatment, although the fluorinated surfaces have slightly better self-cleaning properties. It is found that surface treatment using ultra-fast laser pulses and subsequent chemical fluorination is an effective way to manipulate surface wettability and obtain self-cleaning properties.

  18. Cleaning and electrochemistry restoration of archaeological metalic objects | Limpieza y restauración electroquímica de objetos arqueológicos metálicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás España Guisolphe

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how electrochemical methods can be applied to the cleaning and restoration of coins and metallic objects proceeding from archaeological finds. A description is given of the electrochemical methods used and a comparison with the usual cleaning methods is also made. | El presente estudio pone de manifiesto la aplicabilidad de los métodos electroquímicos a la limpieza y restauración de monedas y piezas metálicas que proceden de yacimientos arqueológicos. Se hace una descripción de los métodos electroquímicos utilizados y una comparación con los métodos habituales de limpieza.

  19. Byproduct metal requirements for U.S. wind and solar photovoltaic electricity generation up to the year 2040 under various Clean Power Plan scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Nedal T.; Wilburn, David R.; Goonan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has and will likely continue to obtain an increasing share of its electricity from solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind power, especially under the Clean Power Plan (CPP). The need for additional solar PV modules and wind turbines will, among other things, result in greater demand for a number of minor metals that are produced mainly or only as byproducts. In this analysis, the quantities of 11 byproduct metals (Ag, Cd, Te, In, Ga, Se, Ge, Nd, Pr, Dy, and Tb) required for wind turbines with rare-earth permanent magnets and four solar PV technologies are assessed through the year 2040. Three key uncertainties (electricity generation capacities, technology market shares, and material intensities) are varied to develop 42 scenarios for each byproduct metal. The results indicate that byproduct metal requirements vary significantly across technologies, scenarios, and over time. In certain scenarios, the requirements are projected to become a significant portion of current primary production. This is especially the case for Te, Ge, Dy, In, and Tb under the more aggressive scenarios of increasing market share and conservative material intensities. Te and Dy are, perhaps, of most concern given their substitution limitations. In certain years, the differences in byproduct metal requirements between the technology market share and material intensity scenarios are greater than those between the various CPP and No CPP scenarios. Cumulatively across years 2016–2040, the various CPP scenarios are estimated to require 15–43% more byproduct metals than the No CPP scenario depending on the specific byproduct metal and scenario. Increasing primary production via enhanced recovery rates of the byproduct metals during the beneficiation and enrichment operations, improving end-of-life recycling rates, and developing substitutes are important strategies that may help meet the increased demand for these byproduct metals.

  20. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  1. IBA analysis of a laser cleaned archaeological metal object: The San Esteban de Gormaz cross (Soria-Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Gutiérrez Neira, P.C.; Climent-Font, A.; Escudero, C.; Barrera, M.

    2011-01-01

    The object under study, a 12th century gilded copper cross with a wooden core, now almost disappeared, shows the typical features produced by a long burial time: the entire surface of the copper alloys is covered by several layers of degradation products, which hinder the “legibility” of the cross in terms of the original materials and manufacturing techniques employed. In its cleaning several techniques have been applied and compared (dry and wet laser ablation, mechanical ablation, ultrasound brush). In the intermediate cleaning phase the cross has been extensively analysed with the external proton micro-beam of the Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM) of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used in parallel, to asses both the chemical composition and the layered structure of cleaned and original parts with the aim of verifying that none of the object structural features are being modified by the cleaning process leaving intact the possibility of artistic interpretation of the object (e.g. small series production of the cross elements). The recovery of this exceptional ornamental object is made possible by the coordinated work of several professionals coming from various disciplines and aimed at establishing the importance of this cross in terms of its physical appearance and in terms of the manufacturing techniques.

  2. IBA analysis of a laser cleaned archaeological metal object: The San Esteban de Gormaz cross (Soria-Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Gutiérrez Neira, P. C.; Climent-Font, A.; Escudero, C.; Barrera, M.

    2011-12-01

    The object under study, a 12th century gilded copper cross with a wooden core, now almost disappeared, shows the typical features produced by a long burial time: the entire surface of the copper alloys is covered by several layers of degradation products, which hinder the "legibility" of the cross in terms of the original materials and manufacturing techniques employed. In its cleaning several techniques have been applied and compared (dry and wet laser ablation, mechanical ablation, ultrasound brush). In the intermediate cleaning phase the cross has been extensively analysed with the external proton micro-beam of the Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM) of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used in parallel, to asses both the chemical composition and the layered structure of cleaned and original parts with the aim of verifying that none of the object structural features are being modified by the cleaning process leaving intact the possibility of artistic interpretation of the object (e.g. small series production of the cross elements). The recovery of this exceptional ornamental object is made possible by the coordinated work of several professionals coming from various disciplines and aimed at establishing the importance of this cross in terms of its physical appearance and in terms of the manufacturing techniques.

  3. IBA analysis of a laser cleaned archaeological metal object: The San Esteban de Gormaz cross (Soria-Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchiatti, A., E-mail: alessandro.zucchiatti@uam.es [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Farady 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez Neira, P.C., E-mail: carolina.gutierrez@uam.es [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Farady 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A., E-mail: acf@uam.es [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/Farady 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Escudero, C., E-mail: escremcr@jcyl.es [Centro de Conservacion y Restauracion de Bienes Culturales (CCRBC) de la Junta de Castilla y Leon, C/Carretera No. 2, 47130 Valladolid (Spain); Barrera, M., E-mail: barbarmr@jcyl.es [Centro de Conservacion y Restauracion de Bienes Culturales (CCRBC) de la Junta de Castilla y Leon, C/Carretera No. 2, 47130 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    The object under study, a 12th century gilded copper cross with a wooden core, now almost disappeared, shows the typical features produced by a long burial time: the entire surface of the copper alloys is covered by several layers of degradation products, which hinder the 'legibility' of the cross in terms of the original materials and manufacturing techniques employed. In its cleaning several techniques have been applied and compared (dry and wet laser ablation, mechanical ablation, ultrasound brush). In the intermediate cleaning phase the cross has been extensively analysed with the external proton micro-beam of the Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used in parallel, to asses both the chemical composition and the layered structure of cleaned and original parts with the aim of verifying that none of the object structural features are being modified by the cleaning process leaving intact the possibility of artistic interpretation of the object (e.g. small series production of the cross elements). The recovery of this exceptional ornamental object is made possible by the coordinated work of several professionals coming from various disciplines and aimed at establishing the importance of this cross in terms of its physical appearance and in terms of the manufacturing techniques.

  4. Hydrolysis of N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid by the Haemophilus influenzae dapE-encoded desuccinylase: metal activation, solvent isotope effects, and kinetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Zheng, R; Blanchard, J S

    1998-07-21

    Hydrolysis of N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid by the dapE-encoded desuccinylase is required for the bacterial synthesis of lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid. We have investigated the catalytic mechanism of the recombinant enzyme from Haemophilus influenzae. The desuccinylase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Steady-state kinetic experiments verified that the enzyme is metal-dependent, with a Km for N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid of 1.3 mM and a turnover number of 200 s-1 in the presence of zinc. The maximal velocity was independent of pH above 7 but decreased with a slope of 1 below pH 7. The pH dependence of V/K was bell-shaped with apparent pKs of 6.5 and 8.3. Both L,L- and D,L-diaminopimelic acid were competitive inhibitors of the substrate, but d,d-diaminopimelic acid was not. Solvent kinetic isotope effect studies yielded inverse isotope effects, with values for D2OV/K of 0.62 and D2OV of 0.78. Determination of metal stoichiometry by ICP-AES indicated one tightly bound metal ion, while sequence homologies suggest the presence of two metal binding sites. On the basis of these observations, we propose a chemical mechanism for this metalloenzyme, which has a number of important structurally defined homologues.

  5. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with the... cleaning machine complying with paragraph (a)(2) or (b) of this section shall comply with the work and...

  6. Disposal and handling of nuclear steam generator chemical cleaning wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1978-01-01

    A large number of pressurized water nuclear reactor electrical generating plants have experienced a corrosion-related problem with their steam generators known as denting. Denting is a mechanical deformation of the steam generator tubes that occurs at the tube support plates. Corrosion of the tube support plates occurs within the annuli through which the tubes pass and the resulting corrosion oxides, which are larger in volume than the original metal, compress and deform the tubes. In some cases, the induced stresses have been severe enough to cause tube and/or support cracking. The problem was so severe at the Turkey Point and Surrey plants that the tubing is being replaced. For less severe cases, chemical cleaning of the oxides, and other materials which deposit in the annuli from the water, is being considered. A Department of Energy-sponsored program was conducted by Consolidated Edison Co. of New York which identified several suitable cleaning solvents and led to in-plant chemical cleaning pilot demonstrations in the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Current programs to improve the technology are being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the three PWR NSSS vendors with the assistance of numerous consultants, vendors, and laboratories. These programs are expected to result in more effective, less corrosive solvents. However, after a chemical cleaning is conducted, a large problem still remains- that of disposing of the spent wastes. The paper summarizes some of the methods currently available for handling and disposal of the wastes

  7. Solvent effects in the synergistic solvent extraction of Co2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, A.T.; Ramadan, A.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of Co 2+ from a 0.1M ionic strength aqueous phase (Na + , CH 3 COOH) of pH = 5.1 was studied using thenoyltrifluoroacetone, HTTA, in eight different solvents and HTTA + trioctylphosphine oxide, TOPO, in the same solvents. A comparison of the effect of solvent dielectric constant on the equilibrium constant shows a synergism as a result of the increased hydrophobic character imparted to the metal complex due to the formation of the TOPO adduct. (author)

  8. Clean data

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, Megan

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data scientist of any level, beginners included, and interested in cleaning up your data, this is the book for you! Experience with Python or PHP is assumed, but no previous knowledge of data cleaning is needed.

  9. Electroless formation of conductive polymer-metal nanostructured composites at boundary of two immiscible solvents. Morphology and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gniadek, Marianna; Donten, Mikolaj; Stojek, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Formation of polypyrrole (PPy) with metallic inclusions was carried out at the interface between the aqueous phase containing an oxidizer and an organic solution of the monomer. A variety of the polymer-metal composites were obtained in the system. When the oxidizers were silver- and gold salts the obtained material contained from 4 to 9 at.% of metal. In the case of Ag + oxidant the structure of the metallic silver objects varied and included beads and ultra thin wires covered by polymer film, nanocrystals, micrometer cuboid monocrystals and microplates. Metallic gold practically appeared only in one structure-granules. The granules of Au incorporated into PPy were porous and made of very fine flat crystals of thickness in the nanometer range. The use of copper salts never led to the formation of metallic species in the composite. The influence of selected process parameters such as temperature and concentration of the reactants on the polymerization reaction was investigated. The composites with metallic nanoobjects were found to be better catalysts for the electrooxidation of ascorbic acids compared to pure polypyrrole. SEM, X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry were used in the investigation.

  10. Electroless formation of conductive polymer-metal nanostructured composites at boundary of two immiscible solvents. Morphology and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gniadek, Marianna [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Donten, Mikolaj, E-mail: donten@chem.uw.edu.p [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Stojek, Zbigniew, E-mail: stojek@chem.uw.edu.p [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-11-01

    Formation of polypyrrole (PPy) with metallic inclusions was carried out at the interface between the aqueous phase containing an oxidizer and an organic solution of the monomer. A variety of the polymer-metal composites were obtained in the system. When the oxidizers were silver- and gold salts the obtained material contained from 4 to 9 at.% of metal. In the case of Ag{sup +} oxidant the structure of the metallic silver objects varied and included beads and ultra thin wires covered by polymer film, nanocrystals, micrometer cuboid monocrystals and microplates. Metallic gold practically appeared only in one structure-granules. The granules of Au incorporated into PPy were porous and made of very fine flat crystals of thickness in the nanometer range. The use of copper salts never led to the formation of metallic species in the composite. The influence of selected process parameters such as temperature and concentration of the reactants on the polymerization reaction was investigated. The composites with metallic nanoobjects were found to be better catalysts for the electrooxidation of ascorbic acids compared to pure polypyrrole. SEM, X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry were used in the investigation.

  11. Cleanup of 7.5% tributyl phosphate/n-paraffin solvent-extraction solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    The HM process at the Savannah River Plant uses 7.5% tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials which influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove binding ligands which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent by an alumina adsorption process removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale alumina adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM process first cycle solvent is discussed

  12. Hot Gas Particulate Cleaning Technology Applied for PFBC/IGFC -The Ceramic Tube Filter (CTF) and Metal Filter-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasatsu, H; Misawa, N; Kobori, K; Iritani, J

    2002-09-18

    Coal is a fossil fuel abundant and widespread all over world. It is a vital resource for energy security, because the supply is stable. However, its CO2 emission per unit calorific value is greater than that of other fossil fuels. It is necessary to develop more efficient coal utilization technologies to expand the coal utilization that meets the social demand for better environment. The Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined cycle has become a subject of world attention in terms of better plant operation, improved plant efficiency, lower flue gas emission and fuel flexibility. The gas turbine, one of the most important components in the PFBC, is eager for a hot gas (approximately 650-850C) cleaning system in order to eliminate the severe erosion problem with the less thermal loss. The cyclone is most popular system for a hot gas cleaning, however, the severe damage for gas turbine blades by highly concentrated fine fly ash from PFBC boiler is reported.

  13. Laser surface cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is a laboratory demonstration that red-lead primer and two-part epoxy paints can be stripped from concrete and metal surfaces using surface cleaning systems based on pulsed-repetition CO 2 lasers. The three goals are to: (1) demonstrate coatings removal, including surface pore cleaning; (2) demonstrate that there is negligible release of ablated contaminants to the environment; and (3) demonstrate that the process will generate negligible amounts of additional waste compared to competing technologies. Phase 1 involved site visits to RMI and Fernald to assess the cleaning issues for buildings and parts. In addition, Phase 1 included detailed designs of a more powerful system for industrial cleaning rates, including laser, articulating optics, ablated-material capture suction nozzle attached to a horizontal raster scanner for floor cleaning, and filtration system. Some concept development is also being done for using robots, and for parts cleaning. In Phase 2 a transportable 6 kW system will be built and tested, with a horizontal surface scanner for cleaning paint from floors. The laboratory tests will again be instrumented. Some concept development will continue for using robots, and for parts cleaning. This report describes Phase 1 results

  14. Solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  15. Determination of several trace metals in biological materials by PIXE analysis after solvent extraction and polystyrene-film collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Korenaga, Tatsumi; Suzuki, Nobuo

    1991-01-01

    Traces of vanadium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc were quantitatively extracted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) in benzene from a digested solution of biological materials and the metal-DDTC complexes were collected into a small amount of polystyrene foam produced by lyophilization of the benzene extract after addition of polystyrene. The polystyrene foam was dissolved in benzene and spread on Mylar film. After drying, a polystyrene film containing metal-DDTC complexes was produced on Mylar film, and then the polystyrene film was peeled from the Mylar film. This film was subjected to PIXE analysis. This method was applied to NBS SRM 1572 citrus leaves and a marine macroalgal sample, and 6 trace metals were simultaneously and accurately determined. (author)

  16. Deasphalting solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, J. A; Caceres, J; Vela, G; Bueno, H

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes how the deasphalted oil (DMO) or demetalized oil (DMO) quality (CCR, Ni, V end asphaltenes contents) changes with: DAO or DMO yield, solvent/feed ratio, type of vacuum reside (from paraffinic to blends with vis breaking bottoms), extraction temperature and extraction solvent (propane, propylene, n-butane and I butane)

  17. Reticular Chemistry and Metal-Organic Frameworks: Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials for Clean Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2017-01-01

    Gaining control over the assembly of crystalline solid-state materials has been significantly advanced through the field of reticular chemistry and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs have emerged as a unique modular class of porous materials

  18. Ab Initio Calculations of the Electronic Properties of Polypyridine Transition Metal Complexes and Their Adsorption on Metal Surfaces in the Presence of Solvent and Counterions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, E. Ö.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Os(II)/(III) and Co(II)/(III) polypyridine complexes in aqueous solution are robust molecular entities both in freely solute state and adsorbed on Au(111)- and Pt(111)-electrode surfaces. This class of robust coordination chemical compounds have recently been characterized by electrochemical...... of the complexes in the presence of the solvent, are conserved upon adsorption, whereas the structural features of the different oxidation states are completely lost upon adsorption under vacuum conditions. Detailed microscopic insight such as offered by the present study will be important in molecular...

  19. Brushless Cleaning of Solar Panels and Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1982-01-01

    Machine proposed for cleaning solar panels and reflectors uses multiple vortexes of air, solvent, and water to remove dust and dirt. Uses no brushes that might abrade solar surfaces and thereby reduce efficiency. Machine can be readily automated and can be used on curved surfaces such as aparbolic reflectors as well as on flat ones. Cleaning fluids are recycled, so that large quantities of water and solvent are not needed.

  20. Solvent-induced controllable synthesis, single-crystal to single-crystal transformation and encapsulation of Alq3 for modulated luminescence in (4,8)-connected metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ya-Qian; Jiang, Hai-Long; Li, Shun-Li; Xu, Qiang

    2012-07-16

    In this work, for the first time, we have systematically demonstrated that solvent plays crucial roles in both controllable synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and their structural transformation process. With solvent as the only variable, five new MOFs with different structures have been constructed, in which one MOF undergoes solvent-induced single-crystal to single-crystal (SCSC) transformation that involves not only solvent exchange but also the cleavage and formation of coordination bonds. Particularly, a significant crystallographic change has been realized through an unprecedented three-step SCSC transformation process. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the obtained MOF could be an excellent host for chromophores such as Alq3 for modulated luminescent properties.

  1. Surface cleaning in thin film technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    A ''clean surface'' is one that contains no significant amounts of undesirable material. This paper discusses the types and origin of various contaminants. Since cleaning is often equated with adhesion, the mechanisms of adhesion to oxide, metal, and organic surfaces are reviewed and cleaning processes for these surfaces are outlined. Techniques for monitoring surface cleaning are presented, and the importance of storage of clean surfaces is discussed. An extensive bibliography is given. 4 figs., 89 references

  2. Solvent-Free Selective Oxidation of Toluene with O2 Catalyzed by Metal Cation Modified LDHs and Mixed Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of metal cation modified layered-double hydroxides (LDHs and mixed oxides were prepared and used to be the selective oxidation of toluene with O2. The results revealed that the modified LDHs exhibited much higher catalytic performance than their parent LDH and the modified mixed oxides. Moreover, the metal cations were also found to play important roles in the catalytic performance and stabilities of modified catalysts. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the highest toluene conversion reached 8.7% with 97.5% of the selectivity to benzyldehyde; moreover, the catalytic performance remained after nine catalytic runs. In addition, the reaction probably involved a free-radical mechanism.

  3. A FUNDAMENTAL STUDY ON SOLUBILITY OF HEAVY METAL OXIDES IN AMMONIUM AND PHOSPHONIUM BASED DEEP EUTECTIC SOLVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHANGGARY RAJENDRAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution has become increasingly prevalent in our daily lives and has caused a serious threat at a global level. Among the various pollutants that exist,heavy metal pollution has become an issue of great concern due to their high toxicity, greater bioaccumulation in human body and food chain, nonbiodegradability nature, and carcinogenic effects to humans. This study aims to address the heavy metal ion contamination in wastewater by providing a low cost and efficient removal technique using DESs. In this investigation, the solubility of CuO and ZnO heavy metal oxide ions with concentration of 20g/L was studied in ammonium and phosphonium based DESs. The samples were left to stir at 250 rpm at 28, 45 and 65°C respectively for four hours in an incubator orbital shaker and the solubility of the heavy metal ions were analysed using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS using serial dilution technique. Phosphonium based DES which contain Methyl Triphenyl Phosphonium Bromide (MTPB showed higher solubility of CuO and ZnO ions. Based on the results obtained, DES 6 (MTPB: Glycerol has the highest solubility of CuO, 0.197 mg/L at 65°C and the solubility of ZnO was found to be the highest in DES 7 (MTPB: Glycerol, 1.225 mg/L at 65°C. Higher solubility was observed in samples containing ZnO as they are more ionic compared to CuO.

  4. Laser-assisted cleaning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experiments conducted with loose contamination on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces proved conclusively the dominant role played by the absorption of the incident radiation by the surface towards the generation of the cleaning force as against the absorption in the particulates alone. Further, the presence of ...

  5. First-Row-Transition Ion Metals(II-EDTA Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Solvent-Free Microwave-Induced Oxidation of Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. R. Martins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of first-row transition-metals combined with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, as metal-based N,O-chelating ligands, at the surface of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs was prepared by a co-precipitation method. Those EDTA functionalized MNPs with general formula Fe3O4@EDTA-M2+ [M = Mn2+ (1, Fe2+ (2, Co2+ (3, Ni2+ (4, Cu2+ (5 or Zn2+ (6] were characterized by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, powder XRD (X-ray Diffraction, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope, EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectrometer, VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer and TGA (Thermal Gravity Analysis. The application of the magnetic NPs towards the microwave-assisted oxidation of several alcohol substrates in a solvent-free medium was evaluated. The influence of reaction parameters such as temperature, time, type of oxidant, and presence of organic radicals was investigated. This study demonstrates that these MNPs can act as efficient catalysts for the conversion of alcohols to the corresponding ketones or aldehydes with high selectivity and yields up to 99% after 2 h of reaction at 110 °C using t-BuOOH as oxidant. Moreover, they have the advantage of being magnetically recoverable catalysts that can be easily recycled in following runs.

  6. Bright metal coatings from sustainable electrolytes: the effect of molecular additives on electrodeposition of nickel from a deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Andrew P; Ballantyne, Andrew; Harris, Robert C; Juma, Jamil A; Ryder, Karl S

    2017-01-25

    Organic and inorganic additives are often added to nickel electroplating solutions to improve surface finish, reduce roughness and promote uniform surface morphology of the coatings. Such additives are usually small molecules and often referred to as brighteners or levellers. However, there have been limited investigations into the effect of such additives on electrodeposition from ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Here we study the effect of four additives on electrolytic nickel plating from an ethyleneglycol based DES; these are nicotinic acid (NA), methylnicotinate (MN), 5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMH) and boric acid (BA). The additives show limited influence on the bulk Ni(ii) speciation but have significant influence on the electrochemical behaviour of Ni deposition. Small concentrations (ca. 15 mM) of NA and MN show inhibition of Ni(ii) reduction whereas high concentrations of DMH and BA are required for a modest difference in behaviour from the additive free system. NA and MN also show that they significantly alter the nucleation and growth mechanism when compared to the additive free system and those with DMH and BA. Each of the additive systems had the effect of producing brighter and flatter bulk electrodeposits with increased coating hardness but XRD shows that NA and MN direct crystal growth to the [111] orientation whereas DMH and BA direct crystal growth to the [220] orientation.

  7. Dry-cleaning with high-pressure carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roosmalen, M.J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Dry-cleaning is a process for removing soils and stains from fabrics and garments which uses a non-aqueous solvent with detergent added. The currently most used dry-cleaning solvent is perchloroethylene (PER), which is toxic, environmentally harmful and suspected to be carcinogenic. Carbon dioxide

  8. Recovery of uranium from 30 vol % tributyl phosphate solvents containing dibutyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1986-01-01

    A number of solid sorbents were tested for the removal of uranium and dibutyl phosphate (DBP) from 30% tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent. The desired clean uranium product can be obtained either by removing the DBP, leaving the uranium in the solvent for subsequent stripping, or by removing the uranium, leaving the DBP in the solvent for subsequent treatment. The tests performed show that it is relatively easy to preferentially remove uranium from solvents containing uranium and DBP, but quite difficult to remove DBP preferentially. The current methods could be used by removing the uranium (as by a cation exchange resin) and then using either an anion exchange resin in the hydroxyl form or a conventional treatment with a basic solution to remove the DBP. Treatment of a solvent with a cation exchange resin could be useful for recovery of valuable metals from solvents containing DBP and might be used to remove cations before scrubbing a solvent with a basic solution to minimize emulsion formation. 6 refs., 9 figs

  9. Efficacy of Chicken Litter and Wood Biochars and Their Activated Counterparts in Heavy Metal Clean up from Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Lima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that properties of activated biochars are tightly associated with those of the original feedstock as well as pyrolysis and activation conditions. This study examined two feedstock types, pine wood shavings and chicken litter, to produce biochars at two different pyrolysis temperatures and subsequently activated by steam, acid or base. In order to measure activation efficiency, all materials were characterized for their properties and ability to remediate two well-known heavy metals of concern: copper and arsenic. Base activated biochars were superior in arsenic adsorption, to acid or steam activated samples, but increase in adsorption was not significant to warrant use. For wood biochars, significant increases of surface functionality as related to oxygen bearing groups and surface charge were observed upon acid activation which led to increased copper ion adsorption. However, oxygen bearing functionalities were not sufficient to explain why chicken litter biochars and steam activated biochars appeared to be significantly superior to wood shavings in positively charged metal ion adsorption. For chicken litter, functionality of respective biochars could be related to phosphate containing groups inherited from feedstock composition, favorably positioning this feedstock in metal ion remediation applications.

  10. Use of complexones solutions in liquid carbon dioxide for cleaning of materials contaminated with heavy and radioactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadrin, A.Yu.; Kamachev, V.A.; Kiseleva, R.N.; Murzin, A.A.; Shafikov, D.N.; Bondin, V.V.; Efremov, I.V.; Kovalev, D.N.; Podoinitsyn, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    I n this paper liquid carbon dioxide (pressure 50-70 atm) was used for decontamination. The performed experiments on removal of cobalt, nickel, uranium and americium nitrates and carbonates by different solutions have shown that the solutions of such complexing agents as hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA), tributylphosphate (TBP), di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) in liquid CO 2 can be used for purification of pulps, metals, paper and fabrics. Liquid CO 2 is high viscosity of the medium and hence low diffusion coefficients and long duration of the processes. It is known that 20 minutes are sufficient to attain equilibrium in supercritical CO 2 medium on metal removal by HFA solutions. During the experiments it was established that with the use of liquid CO 2 the keeping time should be increased to 40 min, which is acceptable from the standpoint of technical feasibility of decontamination processes in these solutions. Experiments on really contaminated samples of pulps, metals and fabrics have confirmed that the decontamination coefficients of 30-100 can be easily obtained by 2-3 fold material treatment operations. The secondary waste volume therewith is less by a factor of 20-200 than that of traditional techniques. (authors)

  11. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An ICP-AES method for the determination of trace metals in uranium by solvent extraction using KSM-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Mary; Radhakrishnan, K.; Dhami, P.S.; Kulkarni, V.T.; Joshi, M.V.; Patwardhan, A.B.; Ramanujam, A.; Mathur, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the studies carried out for the determination of trace metallic impurities in uranium solutions. Uranium matrix is separated from the impurity elements by its selective extraction using 2-ethylhexyl hydrogen 2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (KSM-17, equivalent to PC88A). The aqueous phase is analysed for trace impurities by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The studies also include recovery of impurities at various acidities and spectral interferences of uranium over the analyte element channels. Based on the above studies, a method has been standardised for the analysis of nineteen elements in uranium solutions. The relative standard deviation of the method for various elements is in the range of +- 1-5%. (author). 7 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ting Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc solid-solution, metal hydride (MH alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures. This finding confirms the presence of crystallographically sharp interfaces between neighboring phases, which is a basic assumption for synergetic effects in a multi-phase MH system.

  14. Systematically extracting metal- and solvent-related occupational information from free-text responses to lifetime occupational history questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Melissa C; Locke, Sarah J; Tornow, Carina; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Koh, Dong-Hee; Stewart, Patricia A; Purdue, Mark; Colt, Joanne S

    2014-06-01

    Lifetime occupational history (OH) questionnaires often use open-ended questions to capture detailed information about study participants' jobs. Exposure assessors use this information, along with responses to job- and industry-specific questionnaires, to assign exposure estimates on a job-by-job basis. An alternative approach is to use information from the OH responses and the job- and industry-specific questionnaires to develop programmable decision rules for assigning exposures. As a first step in this process, we developed a systematic approach to extract the free-text OH responses and convert them into standardized variables that represented exposure scenarios. Our study population comprised 2408 subjects, reporting 11991 jobs, from a case-control study of renal cell carcinoma. Each subject completed a lifetime OH questionnaire that included verbatim responses, for each job, to open-ended questions including job title, main tasks and activities (task), tools and equipment used (tools), and chemicals and materials handled (chemicals). Based on a review of the literature, we identified exposure scenarios (occupations, industries, tasks/tools/chemicals) expected to involve possible exposure to chlorinated solvents, trichloroethylene (TCE) in particular, lead, and cadmium. We then used a SAS macro to review the information reported by study participants to identify jobs associated with each exposure scenario; this was done using previously coded standardized occupation and industry classification codes, and a priori lists of associated key words and phrases related to possibly exposed tasks, tools, and chemicals. Exposure variables representing the occupation, industry, and task/tool/chemicals exposure scenarios were added to the work history records of the study respondents. Our identification of possibly TCE-exposed scenarios in the OH responses was compared to an expert's independently assigned probability ratings to evaluate whether we missed identifying

  15. Overview of shoreline cleaning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, J.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical cleaning agents may be used to promote release of stranded oil from shorelines for reasons including biological sensitivity of indigenous fauna and flora to the oil, amenity considerations of the shoreline, or concern about refloating of the oil and subsequent stranding on adjacent shorelines. While use of chemical cleaning agents may be appropriate under proper toxic responses in circumstances, certain limitations should be recognized. The potential for toxic responses in indigenous fauna and flora to the cleaning agents must be considered. Enhanced penetration of oil into permeable shorelines following treatment with chemical cleaning agents also is not desirable. However, if conditions related to toxicity and substrate permeability are determined to be acceptable, the use of chemical cleaning agents for treatment of stranded oil can be considered. Chemical agents for cleaning oiled shorelines can be grouped into three categories: (1) non-surfactant-based solvents, (2) chemical dispersants, and (3) formulations especially designed to release stranded oil from shoreline substrates (i.e., shoreline-cleaning-agents). Depending on the specific circumstances present on an oiled shoreline, it is generally desirable that chemical agents used for cleaning will release oil from shoreline substrate(s) to surface waters. Recovery of the oil can then be accomplished by mechanical procedures such as booming and skimming operations

  16. Novel synergism by complex ligands in solvent extraction of rare earth metals(III) with β-diketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, H.; Ebisawa, M.; Kato, M.; Ohashi, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extraction of rare earth metals(III) (RE) with hexafluoroacetylacetone (Hhfa) and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) was studied in the presence of some cobalt(III) chelates such as tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt(III), tris(4-isopropyltropolonato)cobalt(III), tris(8-quinolinolato)cobalt(III), tris(8-quinolinethiolato)cobalt(III), and tris(diethyldithiocarbamato)cobalt(III) in benzene or toluene. The synergistic enhancement of the extraction of RE, especially of lanthanum(III) was found in all the systems. Therefore, those cobalt(III) chelates act as synergists or complex ligands. The equilibrium analysis and IR spectroscopic study were performed to evaluate the present synergistic mechanism. It was found that the RE-β-diketone chelates form 1:1 adducts, i.e., binuclear complexes, with the cobalt(III) chelates in the organic phase. The formation constants (β s,1 ) were determined and compared with those reported previously. The spectroscopic studies demonstrated that adducts have two different structures with inner- and outer-sphere coordination. In the former the cobalt(III) chelate directly coordinated to the RE ion and displaced the coordinated water molecules. In the latter the hydrogen-bonding was formed between the coordinating oxygen or sulfur atoms of cobalt(III) chelate and hydrogen atoms of the coordinated water molecules in the RE-β-diketone chelate. The types of the adducts are mainly due to the steric factors of the RE-β-diketone chelates and the cobalt(III) chelates

  17. Solvent-Directed Sol-Gel Assembly of 3-Dimensional Graphene-Tented Metal Oxides and Strong Synergistic Disparities in Lithium Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Jianchao; An, Yonghao; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Tran, Ich C.; Liu, Yuanyue; Wood, Brandon C.; Biener, Juergen; Jiang, Hanqing; Tang, Ming; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-03-21

    Graphene/metal oxide (GMO) nanocomposites promise a broad range of utilities for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), pseudocapacitors, catalysts, and sensors. When applied as anodes for LIBs, GMOs often exhibit high capacity, improved rate capability and cycling performance. Numerous studies have attributed these favorable properties to a passive role played by the exceptional electronic and mechanical properties of graphene in enabling metal oxides (MOs) to achieve near-theoretical capacities. In contrast, the effects of MOs on the active lithium storage mechanisms of graphene remain enigmatic. Via a unique two-step solvent-directed sol-gel process, we have synthesized and directly compared the electrochemical performance of several representative GMOs, namely Fe2O3/graphene, SnO2/graphene, and TiO2/graphene. We observe that MOs can play an equally important role in empowering graphene to achieve large reversible lithium storage capacity. The magnitude of capacity improvement is found to scale roughly with the surface coverage of MOs, and depend sensitively on the type of MOs. We define a synergistic factor based on the capacity contributions. Our quantitative assessments indicate that the synergistic effect is most achievable in conversion-reaction GMOs (Fe2O3/graphene and SnO2/graphene) but not in intercalation-based TiO2/graphene. However, a long cycle stability up to 2000 cycles was observed in TiO2/graphene nanocomposites. We propose a surface coverage model to qualitatively rationalize the beneficial roles of MOs to graphene. Our first-principles calculations further suggest that the extra lithium storage sites could result from the formation of Li2O at the interface with graphene during the conversion-reaction. These results suggest an effective pathway for reversible lithium storage in graphene and shift design paradigms for graphene-based electrodes.

  18. Potency of Centrocema pubescence, Calopogonium mucunoides, and Micania cordata for cleaning metal contaminants of gold mines waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NURIL HIDAYATI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on some findings that some plants are tolerant to contaminated media, this research was conducted to study more thoroughly about characters and potencies of some of them as hyperaccumulators. Three of the most tolerant plants were studied in this research i.e Centrocema pubescence, Calopogonium mucunoides,and Micania cordata. The plants were grown in different waste media, i.e. tailing from PT. Aneka Tambang (ANTAM and people mine waste. Both waste have different characters, physically and chemically. Waste of PT ANTAM major contaminant was cianide (Cn whereas people mine waste major contaminant was mercury (Hg. This different characters resulted in different plant responses. The plants grown under PT ANTAM waste media gave better performance than that grown under people mine waste media. The most tolerant species was C. pubescence followed by M. cordata and C. mucunoides. Ability in metal accumulation of C. mucunoides was the highest, followed by M. cordata and C. pubescence.The results raised some-prospects for phytoremediation technology for rehabilitating contaminated mined lands.

  19. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Roman G; Siciliano, Steven D; Römbke, Jörg; Oorts, Koen

    2014-07-01

    Although it is widely recognized that microorganisms are essential for sustaining soil fertility, structure, nutrient cycling, groundwater purification, and other soil functions, soil microbial toxicity data were excluded from the derivation of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States. Among the reasons for such exclusion were claims that microbial toxicity tests were too difficult to interpret because of the high variability of microbial responses, uncertainty regarding the relevance of the various endpoints, and functional redundancy. Since the release of the first draft of the Eco-SSL Guidance document by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, soil microbial toxicity testing and its use in ecological risk assessments have substantially improved. A wide range of standardized and nonstandardized methods became available for testing chemical toxicity to microbial functions in soil. Regulatory frameworks in the European Union and Australia have successfully incorporated microbial toxicity data into the derivation of soil threshold concentrations for ecological risk assessments. This article provides the 3-part rationale for including soil microbial processes in the development of soil clean-up values (SCVs): 1) presenting a brief overview of relevant test methods for assessing microbial functions in soil, 2) examining data sets for Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mo that incorporated soil microbial toxicity data into regulatory frameworks, and 3) offering recommendations on how to integrate the best available science into the method development for deriving site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil. Although the primary focus of this article is on the development of the approach for deriving SCVs for metals and metalloids in the United States, the recommendations provided in this article may also be applicable in other jurisdictions that aim at developing ecological soil threshold values for protection of

  20. Dealing with the chlorinated solvent situation at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Recent events regarding health and environmental problems associated with the use of chlorinated solvents have prompted the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to investigate substitutes for these materials. Since 1987, the purchase of chlorinated solvents at the Y-12 Plant has been reduced by 92%. This has been accomplished by substituting chlorinated solvent degreasing with ultrasonic aqueous detergent cleaning and by substituting chlorinated solvents with less toxic, environmentally friendly solvents for hand-wiping applications. Extensive studies of cleaning ability, compabitility, and effects on welding, bonding, and painting have been conducted to gain approval for use of these solvents. Toxicity and waste disposal were also assessed for the solvents

  1. Efficient methods of nanoimprint stamp cleaning based on imprint self-cleaning effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Fantao; Chu Jinkui [Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 Dalian (China); Luo Gang; Zhou Ye; Carlberg, Patrick; Heidari, Babak [Obducat AB, SE-20125 Malmoe (Sweden); Maximov, Ivan; Montelius, Lars; Xu, H Q [Division of Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Lars, E-mail: ivan.maximov@ftf.lth.se [Department of Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University, Box 117, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-05-06

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a nonconventional lithographic technique that promises low-cost, high-throughput patterning of structures with sub-10 nm resolution. Contamination of nanoimprint stamps is one of the key obstacles to industrialize the NIL technology. Here, we report two efficient approaches for removal of typical contamination of particles and residual resist from stamps: thermal and ultraviolet (UV) imprinting cleaning-both based on the self-cleaning effect of imprinting process. The contaminated stamps were imprinted onto polymer substrates and after demolding, they were treated with an organic solvent. The images of the stamp before and after the cleaning processes show that the two cleaning approaches can effectively remove contamination from stamps without destroying the stamp structures. The contact angles of the stamp before and after the cleaning processes indicate that the cleaning methods do not significantly degrade the anti-sticking layer. The cleaning processes reported in this work could also be used for substrate cleaning.

  2. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  3. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed

  4. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  5. 40 CFR 446.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash paint subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash paint subcategory. 446.10 Section 446.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-Base Solvent Wash Paint Subcategory § 446.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash... production of oil-base paint where the tank cleaning is performed using solvents. When a plant is subject to...

  6. Cleaning Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, James L.

    This curriculum guide provides cleaning services instructional materials for a ninth- and tenth-grade Coordinated Vocational Education and Training: Home and Community Services program. It includes 2 sections and 11 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities,…

  7. The influence of in situ argon cleaning of GaAs on Schottky diodes and metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassel, van J.G.; Heyker, H.C.; Kwaspen, J.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of in situ argon cleaning of GaAs on the electrical characteristics of Schottky diodes and metal–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) is investigated. The beam energy was varied from 50 to 500 eV and the characteristics were compared to wet chemically cleaned devices. The

  8. Exposure to tetrachloroethylene in dry cleaning shops in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Rylander, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene is the dominant solvent used in dry cleaning worldwide and many workers are potentially exposed. We report here on results of 1296 measurements of tetrachloroethylene undertaken in Nordic dry cleaning shops 1947-2001.......Tetrachloroethylene is the dominant solvent used in dry cleaning worldwide and many workers are potentially exposed. We report here on results of 1296 measurements of tetrachloroethylene undertaken in Nordic dry cleaning shops 1947-2001....

  9. Clean cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piffaretti, M.

    2008-07-01

    This well-illustrated presentation made at the Swiss 2008 research conference on traffic by the Protoscar company takes a look at research, design, engineering and communication topics in the area of 'clean cars'. The present situation with electrically driven and hybrid-drive cars is reviewed and the chances and problems of the present-day vehicles are examined. New developments and a number of vehicles that should be on the market in the period from 2012 to 2015 are presented. Also, 'clean' specialist vehicles such as trucks and buses are reviewed. Battery systems and associated problems and new developments are looked at. The promotion scheme in Mendrisio, Switzerland is reviewed. Bottom-up and top-down approaches are discussed and future market developments are looked at, as are promotional activities in various countries.

  10. Influences of Restaurant Waste Fats and Oils (RWFO from Grease Trap as Binder on Rheological and Solvent Extraction Behavior in SS316L Metal Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Halim Irwan Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with rheological and solvent extraction behavior of stainless steel 316L feedstocks using Restaurant Waste Fats and Oils (RWFO from grease traps as binder components along with Polypropylene (PP copolymer as a backbone binder. Optimal binder formulation and effect of solvent extraction variables on green compacts are being analyzed. Four binder formulations based on volumetric ratio/weight fraction between PP and RWFO being mixed with 60% volumetric powder loading of SS316L powder each as feedstock. The rheological analysis are based on viscosity, shear rate, temperature, activation energy, flow behavior index, and moldability index. The optimal feedstock formulation will be injected to form green compact to undergo the solvent extraction process. Solvent extraction variables are based on solvent temperature which are 40 °C, 50 °C, and 60 °C with different organic solvents of n-hexane and n-heptane. Analysis of the weight loss percentage and diffusion coefficient is done on the green compact during the solvent extraction process. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC is used to confirm the extraction of the RWFO in green compacts. It is found that all binder fractions exhibit pseudoplastic behavior or shear thinning where the viscosity decreases with increasing shear rate. After considering the factors that affect the rheological characteristic of the binder formulation, feedstock with binder formulation of 20/20 volumetric ratio between PP and RWFO rise as the optimal binder. It is found that the n-hexane solvent requires less time for extracting the RWFO at the temperature of 60 °C as proved by its diffusion coefficient.

  11. Developing clean fuels: Novel techniques for desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlsen, James P.

    The removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum is crucial to producing clean burning fuels. Sulfur compounds poison emission control catalysts and are the source of acid rain. New federal regulations require the removal of sulfur in both gasoline and diesel to very low levels, forcing existing technologies to be pushed into inefficient operating regimes. New technology is required to efficiently produce low sulfur fuels. Two processes for the removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum have been developed: the removal of alkanethiols by heterogeneous reaction with metal oxides; and oxidative desulfurization of sulfides and thiophene by reaction with sulfuric acid. Alkanethiols, common in hydrotreated gasoline, can be selectively removed and recovered from a hydrocarbon stream by heterogeneous reaction with oxides of Pb, Hg(II), and Ba. The choice of reactive metal oxides may be predicted from simple thermodynamic considerations. The reaction is found to be autocatalytic, first order in water, and zero order in thiol in the presence of excess oxide. The thiols are recovered by reactive extraction with dilute oxidizing acid. The potential for using polymer membrane hydrogenation reactors (PEMHRs) to perform hydrogenation reactions such as hydrodesulfurization is explored by hydrogenating ketones and olefins over Pt and Au group metals. The dependence of reaction rate on current density suggests that the first hydrogen addition to the olefin is the rate limiting step, rather than the adsorption of hydrogen, for all of the metals tested. PEMHRs proved unsuccessful in hydrogenating sulfur compounds to perform HDS. For the removal of sulfides, a two-phase reactor is used in which concentrated sulfuric acid oxidizes aromatic and aliphatic sulfides present in a hydrocarbon solvent, generating sulfoxides and other sulfonated species. The polar oxidized species are extracted into the acid phase, effectively desulfurizing the hydrocarbon. A reaction scheme is proposed for this

  12. Highly stable [mambf6-n(o/h2o)n(ligand)2(solvent)x]n metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks having high selectivity and stability in the present of gases and vapors including H2S, H2O, and CO2. Metal organic frameworks can comprise metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands. Further provided are methods of making metal organic frameworks.

  13. Computational, electrochemical, and spectroscopic studies of two mononuclear cobaloximes: the influence of an axial pyridine and solvent on the redox behaviour and evidence for pyridine coordination to cobalt(I) and cobalt(II) metal centres†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Mark A. W.; Celestine, Michael J.; Artis, Edward T.; Joseph, Lorne S.; Esquivel, Deisy L.; Ledbetter, Abram J.; Cropek, Donald M.; Jarrett, William L.; Bayse, Craig A.; Brewer, Matthew I.; Holder, Alvin A.

    2018-01-01

    [Co(dmgBF2)2(H2O)2] 1 (where dmgBF2 = difluoroboryldimethylglyoximato) was used to synthesize [Co(dmgBF2)2(H2O)(py)]·0.5(CH3)2CO 2 (where py = pyridine) in acetone. The formulation of complex 2 was confirmed by elemental analysis, high resolution MS, and various spectroscopic techniques. The complex [Co(dmgBF2)2(solv)(py)] (where solv = solvent) was readily formed in situ upon the addition of pyridine to complex 1. A spectrophotometric titration involving complex 1 and pyridine proved the formation of such a species, with formation constants, log K = 5.5, 5.1, 5.0, 4.4, and 3.1 in 2-butanone, dichloromethane, acetone, 1,2-difluorobenzene/acetone (4 : 1, v/v), and acetonitrile, respectively, at 20 °C. In strongly coordinating solvents, such as acetonitrile, the lower magnitude of K along with cyclic voltammetry, NMR, and UV-visible spectroscopic measurements indicated extensive dissociation of the axial pyridine. In strongly coordinating solvents, [Co(dmgBF2)2(solv)(py)] can only be distinguished from [Co(dmgBF2)2(solv)2] upon addition of an excess of pyridine, however, in weakly coordinating solvents the distinctions were apparent without the need for excess pyridine. The coordination of pyridine to the cobalt(II) centre diminished the peak current at the Epc value of the CoI/0 redox couple, which was indicative of the relative position of the reaction equilibrium. Herein we report the first experimental and theoretical 59Co NMR spectroscopic data for the formation of Co(I) species of reduced cobaloximes in the presence and absence of py (and its derivatives) in CD3CN. From spectroelectrochemical studies, it was found that pyridine coordination to a cobalt(I) metal centre is more favourable than coordination to a cobalt(II) metal centre as evident by the larger formation constant, log K = 4.6 versus 3.1, respectively, in acetonitrile at 20 °C. The electrosynthesis of hydrogen by complexes 1 and 2 in various solvents demonstrated the dramatic effects of the axial

  14. Fluid dynamic effects on precision cleaning with supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Silva, L.J.

    1994-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff have assembled a small supercritical fluids parts cleaning test stand to characterize how system dynamics affect the efficacy of precision cleaning with supercritical carbon dioxide. A soiled stainless steel coupon, loaded into a ``Berty`` autoclave, was used to investigate how changes in system turbulence and solvent temperature influenced the removal of test dopants. A pulsed laser beam through a fiber optic was used to investigate real-time contaminant removal. Test data show that cleaning efficiency is a function of system agitation, solvent density, and temperature. These data also show that high levels of cleaning efficiency can generally be achieved with high levels of system agitation at relatively low solvent densities and temperatures. Agitation levels, temperatures, and densities needed for optimal cleaning are largely contaminant dependent. Using proper system conditions, the levels of cleanliness achieved with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with conventional precision cleaning methods. Additional research is currently being conducted to generalize the relationship between cleaning performance and parameters such as contaminant solubilities, mass transfer rates, and solvent agitation. These correlations can be used to optimize cleaning performance, system design, and time and energy consumption for particular parts cleaning applications.

  15. SAGE 2.1: SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives GuidE) software system, version 2.1. SAGE recommends solvent replacements in cleaning and degreasing operations. It leads the user through a question-and-answer session. The user's responses allow the system ...

  16. Highly stable ni-m f6-nh2o/onpyrazine2(solvent)x metal organic frameworks and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cadiau, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks comprising metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands. Methods for capturing chemical species from fluid compositions comprise contacting a metal organic framework characterized by the formula [MaMbF6-n(O/H2

  17. Highly stable [mambf6-n(o/h2o)n(ligand)2(solvent)x]n metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Bhatt, Prashant M.; Cadiau, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks having high selectivity and stability in the present of gases and vapors including H2S, H2O, and CO2. Metal organic frameworks can comprise metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands. Further provided

  18. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Fisher, P.W.; Nelson, W.D.; Schechter, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Centrifuge-based cryogenic pellet accelerator technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the purpose of refueling fusion reactors with high-speed pellets of frozen deuterium/tritium,is now being developed as a method of cleaning without the use of conventional solvents. In these applications large quantities of pellets made of frozen CO 2 or argon are accelerated in a high-speed rotor. The accelerated pellet stream is used to clean or etch surfaces. The advantage of this system is that the spent pellets and debris resulting from the cleaning process can be filtered leaving only the debris for disposal. This paper discusses the centrifuge CO 2 pellet cleaning system, the physics model of the pellet impacting the surface, the centrifuge apparatus, and some initial cleaning and etching tests

  19. Portable sandblaster cleans small areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, H. J.

    1966-01-01

    Portable sandblasting unit rapidly and effectively cleans localized areas on a metal surface. The unit incorporates a bellows enclosure, masking plate, sand container, and used sand accummulator connected to a vacuum system. The bellows is equipped with an inspection window and light for observation of the sanding operation.

  20. One-electron reduction of 1,2-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone and some of its transition metal complexes in aqueous solution and in aqueous isopropanol-acetone-mixed solvent: a steady-state and pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Mandal, P.C.; Rath, M.C.; Mukherjee, T.

    2002-01-01

    One-electron reduction of 1,2-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHA) and its complexes with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Fe(III), by acetone ketyl radical, (CH 3 ) 2 C·OH, was carried out in aqueous solution and in aqueous isopropanol acetone mixed solvent using both steady-state gamma radiolysis and pulse radiolysis techniques. The rate constants for the reduction of DHA at different pH values by the ketyl radical are in the order of ∼10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , whereas those for the metal complexes are comparatively less. These rate constants are, however, in conformity with the one-electron reduction potentials of the ligand in free DHA and in its metal complexes. Decay kinetics of the one-electron reduced semiquinones of the free ligand and its metal complexes suggest disproportionation of the semiquinone in the case of the free ligand and intermolecular electron transfer from the co-ordinated semiquinone radical to the metal centre in the case of the metal complexes

  1. Textile Dry Cleaning Using Carbon Dioxide : Process, Apparatus and Mechanical Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanto, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fabrics that are sensitive to water, may wrinkle or shrink when washed in regular washing machines and are usually cleaned by professional dry cleaners. Dry cleaning is a process of removing soils from substrate, in this case textile, using a non-aqueous solvent. The most common solvent in

  2. Indium recovery by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, Marilia Camargos Botelho

    1999-04-01

    Indium has been recovered as a byproduct from residues generated from the sulfuric acid leaching circuits in mineral plants for zinc recovery. Once its recovery comes from the slags of other metals recovery, it is necessary to separate it from the other elements which usually are present in high concentrations. Many works have been approaching this separation and indicate the solvent extraction process as the main technique used. In Brazilian case, indium recovery depends on the knowledge of this technique and its development. This paper describes the solvent extraction knowledge for the indium recovery from aqueous solutions generated in mineral plants. The results for determination of the best experimental conditions to obtain a high indium concentration solution and minimum iron poisoning by solvent extraction with di (2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) solubilized in isoparafin and exxsol has been presented. (author)

  3. Calculation of a vacuum system of the installation for cleaning the surface of metal rolling by a cathode spot of a vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.; Kurbanov, T. A.; Kostrin, D. K.

    2017-07-01

    In this work are presented the installations for cleaning the surface of rolled products (wire and ribbon) from scale and technological lubricant with gateway systems of open type. The calculation of gateway devices and the optimal selection of pumping systems are shown.

  4. A facile solvent-free Synthesis Route for the Assembly of Highly CO2 Selective and H2S tolerant NiSIFSIX Metal-Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J.; Bhatt, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    The development of materials for CO2 capture with high selectivity and high tolerance to H2S is of prime importance for various industrially relevant gas streams (e.g. natural gas and biogas upgrading as well as pre-combustion capture). Here, we report the successful fabrication of a MOF with combined exceptional CO2 capture properties and H2S tolerance, namely Ni SIFSIX based-MOF using both solvothermal and solvent-free methodologies.

  5. A facile solvent-free Synthesis Route for the Assembly of Highly CO2 Selective and H2S tolerant NiSIFSIX Metal-Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-07-06

    The development of materials for CO2 capture with high selectivity and high tolerance to H2S is of prime importance for various industrially relevant gas streams (e.g. natural gas and biogas upgrading as well as pre-combustion capture). Here, we report the successful fabrication of a MOF with combined exceptional CO2 capture properties and H2S tolerance, namely Ni SIFSIX based-MOF using both solvothermal and solvent-free methodologies.

  6. Solvents interactions with thermochromic print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Rožić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactions between different solvents (benzene, acetone, cyclohexanone, various alcohols and water and thermochromic printing ink were investigated. Thermochromic printing ink was printed on metal surface. Components of thermochromic printing inks are polymeric microcapsules and classic yellow offset printing ink. Below its activation temperature, dye and developer within the microcapsules form a blue coloured complex. Therefore, thermochromic print is green. By heating above the activation temperature, blue colour of the complex turns into the leuco dye colourless state and the green colour of the prints turns into the yellow colour of the classic offset pigment. The results of the interaction with various solvents show that the thermochromic print is stable in all tested solvents except in ethanol, acetone and cyclohexanone. In ethanol, the green colour of the print becomes yellow. SEM analysis shows that microcapsules are dissolved. In acetone and cyclohexanone, the green colour of the print turns into blue, and the microcapsules become significantly more visible. Thus, the yellow pigment interacts with examined ketones. Based on the obtained interactions it can be concluded that the microcapsules have more polar nature than the classical pigment particles. Solvent-thermocromic print interactions were analysed using Hansen solubility parameters that rank the solvents based on their estimated interaction capabilities.

  7. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  8. CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluids as environmentally-friendly processing solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Pierce, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Physical Organic Chemistry Group; Tiefert, K. [Hewlett-Packard Co., Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1999-03-01

    The production of integrated circuits involves a number of discrete steps that utilize hazardous or regulated solvents. Environmental, safety and health considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign, solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}) is an excellent choice for IC manufacturing processes since it is non-toxic, non-flammable, inexpensive, and is compatible with all substrate and metallizations systems. Also, conditions of temperature and pressure needed to achieve the supercritical state are easily achievable with existing process equipment. The authors first describe the general properties of supercritical fluids, with particular emphasis on their application as alternative solvents. Next, they review some of the work which has been published involving the use of supercritical fluids, and particularly CO{sub 2}, as they may be applied to the various steps of IC manufacture, including wafer cleaning, thin film deposition, etching, photoresist stripping, and waste treatment. Next, they describe the research work conducted at Los Alamos, on behalf of Hewlett-Packard, on the use of SCCO{sub 2} in a specific step of the IC manufacturing process: the stripping of hard-baked photoresist.

  9. Solvent extraction with thiothenoyltrifluoroacetone and fluorined β-diketones for the determination of metal traces in waters by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauniaux, M.; Meyer, M. de; Lejeune, W.; Levert, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of metal elements: aluminium, cadmium, copper, iron, lead and zinc as traces in water. The elements are extracted as metal chelates of fluorinated (β-ketones (trifluoracetyl-acetone, thenoyl trifluoroacetone) or thiothenoyl trifluoroacetone with ethyle propionate. They are measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy of the organic extraction. The calibration curves are linear between 0 and 100 μg/l at least. Sensitivities vary from 1 PPB to about 10 PPB according to the metals. The method can be applied for other elements. (author)

  10. Rudimentary Cleaning Compared to Level 300A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, Christina Y. Pina; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A study was done to characterize the cleanliness level achievable when using a rudimentary cleaning process, and results were compared to JPR 5322.1G Level 300A. While it is not ideal to clean in a shop environment, some situations (e.g., field combat operations) require oxygen system hardware to be maintained and cleaned to prevent a fire hazard, even though it cannot be sent back to a precision cleaning facility. This study measured the effectiveness of basic shop cleaning. Initially, three items representing parts of an oxygen system were contaminated: a metal plate, valve body, and metal oxygen bottle. The contaminants chosen were those most likely to be introduced to the system during normal use: oil, lubricant, metal shavings/powder, sand, fingerprints, tape, lip balm, and hand lotion. The cleaning process used hot water, soap, various brushes, gaseous nitrogen, water nozzle, plastic trays, scouring pads, and a controlled shop environment. Test subjects were classified into three groups: technical professionals having an appreciation for oxygen hazards; professional precision cleaners; and a group with no previous professional knowledge of oxygen or precision cleaning. Three test subjects were in each group, and each was provided with standard cleaning equipment, a cleaning procedure, and one of each of the three test items to clean. The results indicated that the achievable cleanliness level was independent of the technical knowledge or proficiency of the personnel cleaning the items. Results also showed that achieving a Level 300 particle count was more difficult than achieving a Level A nonvolatile residue amount.

  11. Improvement of solvents for chemical decontamination: nickel ferrites removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, Carlos A.; Morando, Pedro J.; Blesa, Miguel A.

    1999-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are usually included in commercial solvents for the chemical cleaning and decontamination of metal surfaces from the oxide layers grown and/or deposited from high temperature water by corrosive process. In particular oxalic acid is included in second path of AP-Citrox method. However, in some cases, their use shows low efficiency. This fact is attributed to the special passivity of the mixed oxides as nickel ferrites. This work reports a kinetic study of dissolution of a synthetic nickel ferrite (NiFe 2 O 4 ) confronted with simple oxides (NiO and Fe 2 O 3 ) in mineral acids and oxalic acid. The dissolution factor and reaction rate were determined in several conditions (reactive concentrations, pH and added ferrous ions). Experimental data of dissolution (with and without Fe(II) added) show a congruent kinetic regime. Pure nickel oxide (NiO) is rather resistant to the attack by oxalic acid solutions, and ferrous ions do not accelerate dissolution. In fact, nickel oxide dissolves better by oxidative attack that takes advantage of the higher lability of Ni 3+ . It may be concluded that oxalic acid operates to dissolve iron, and the ensuing disruption of the solid framework accelerates the release of nickel. Our results point to use more reactive solvents in iron from mixed oxides and to the possibility of using one stage decontamination method. (author)

  12. Alternative, Green Processes for the Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Phillip R.; Grandelli, Heather Eilenfield; Devor, Robert; Hintze, Paul E.; Loftin, Kathleen B.; Tomlin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Precision cleaning is necessary to ensure the proper functioning of aerospace hardware, particularly those systems that come in contact with liquid oxygen or hypergolic fuels. Components that have not been cleaned to the appropriate levels may experience problems ranging from impaired performance to catastrophic failure. Traditionally, this has been achieved using various halogenated solvents. However, as information on the toxicological and/or environmental impacts of each came to light, they were subsequently regulated out of use. The solvent currently used in Kennedy Space Center (KSC) precision cleaning operations is Vertrel MCA. Environmental sampling at KSC indicates that continued use of this or similar solvents may lead to high remediation costs that must be borne by the Program for years to come. In response to this problem, the Green Solvents Project seeks to develop state-of-the-art, green technologies designed to meet KSCs precision cleaning needs.Initially, 23 solvents were identified as potential replacements for the current Vertrel MCA-based process. Highly halogenated solvents were deliberately omitted since historical precedents indicate that as the long-term consequences of these solvents become known, they will eventually be regulated out of practical use, often with significant financial burdens for the user. Three solvent-less cleaning processes (plasma, supercritical carbon dioxide, and carbon dioxide snow) were also chosen since they produce essentially no waste stream. Next, experimental and analytical procedures were developed to compare the relative effectiveness of these solvents and technologies to the current KSC standard of Vertrel MCA. Individually numbered Swagelok fittings were used to represent the hardware in the cleaning process. First, the fittings were cleaned using Vertrel MCA in order to determine their true cleaned mass. Next, the fittings were dipped into stock solutions of five commonly encountered contaminants and were

  13. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  14. Branchial cadmium and copper binding and intestinal cadmium uptake in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from clean and metal-contaminated lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinck, J.S.; Green, W.W.; Mirza, R.S.; Nadella, S.R.; Chowdhury, M.J.; Wood, C.M.; Pyle, G.G.

    2007-01-01

    Branchial binding kinetics and gastro-intestinal uptake of copper and cadmium where examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a metal-contaminated lake (Hannah Lake, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada) and an uncontaminated lake (James Lake, North Bay, Ontario, Canada). An in vivo approach was taken for gill binding comparisons while an in vitro gut binding assay was employed for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) uptake analysis. By investigating metal uptake at the gill and the gut we cover the two main routes of metal entry into fish. Comparisons of water and sediment chemistries, metal burdens in benthic invertebrate, and metal burdens in the livers of perch from the two study lakes clearly show that yellow perch from Hannah L. are chronically exposed to a highly metal-contaminated environment compared to a reference lake. We found that metal-contaminated yellow perch showed no significant difference in gill Cd binding compared to reference fish, but they did show significant decreases in new Cd binding and absorption in their GITs. The results show that gill Cd binding may involve low-capacity, high-affinity binding sites, while gastro-intestinal Cd uptake involves binding sites that are high-capacity, low-affinity. From this we infer that Cd may be more critically controlled at the gut rather than gills. Significant differences in branchial Cu binding (increased binding) were observed in metal-contaminated yellow perch. We suggest that chronic waterborne exposure to Cu (and/or other metals) may be the dominant influence in gill Cu binding rather than chronic exposure to high Cu diets. We give supporting evidence that Cd is taken up in the GIT, at least in part, by a similar pathway as Ca 2+ , principally that elevated dietary Ca 2+ reduces Cd binding and uptake. Overall our study reveals that metal pre-exposure via water and diet can alter uptake kinetics of Cu and Cd at the gill and/or the gut

  15. Branchial cadmium and copper binding and intestinal cadmium uptake in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from clean and metal-contaminated lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinck, J.S. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: klinckjs@mcmaster.ca; Green, W.W.; Mirza, R.S. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Biology, Nipissing University, North Bay, Ont. P1B 8L7 (Canada); Nadella, S.R.; Chowdhury, M.J.; Wood, C.M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. L8S 4K1 (Canada); Pyle, G.G. [Department of Biology, Nipissing University, North Bay, Ont. P1B 8L7 (Canada)

    2007-08-30

    Branchial binding kinetics and gastro-intestinal uptake of copper and cadmium where examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a metal-contaminated lake (Hannah Lake, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada) and an uncontaminated lake (James Lake, North Bay, Ontario, Canada). An in vivo approach was taken for gill binding comparisons while an in vitro gut binding assay was employed for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) uptake analysis. By investigating metal uptake at the gill and the gut we cover the two main routes of metal entry into fish. Comparisons of water and sediment chemistries, metal burdens in benthic invertebrate, and metal burdens in the livers of perch from the two study lakes clearly show that yellow perch from Hannah L. are chronically exposed to a highly metal-contaminated environment compared to a reference lake. We found that metal-contaminated yellow perch showed no significant difference in gill Cd binding compared to reference fish, but they did show significant decreases in new Cd binding and absorption in their GITs. The results show that gill Cd binding may involve low-capacity, high-affinity binding sites, while gastro-intestinal Cd uptake involves binding sites that are high-capacity, low-affinity. From this we infer that Cd may be more critically controlled at the gut rather than gills. Significant differences in branchial Cu binding (increased binding) were observed in metal-contaminated yellow perch. We suggest that chronic waterborne exposure to Cu (and/or other metals) may be the dominant influence in gill Cu binding rather than chronic exposure to high Cu diets. We give supporting evidence that Cd is taken up in the GIT, at least in part, by a similar pathway as Ca{sup 2+}, principally that elevated dietary Ca{sup 2+} reduces Cd binding and uptake. Overall our study reveals that metal pre-exposure via water and diet can alter uptake kinetics of Cu and Cd at the gill and/or the gut.

  16. Solvent anode for plutonium purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Fife, K.W.; Christensen, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to allow complete oxidation of plutonium from the anode during plutonium electrorefining. This will eliminate the generation of a ''spent'' anode heel which requires further treatment for recovery. Our approach is to employ a solvent metal in the anode to provide a liquid anode pool throughout electrorefining. We use molten salts and metals in ceramic crucibles at 700 0 C. Our goal is to produce plutonium metal at 99.9% purity with oxidation and transfer of more than 98% of the impure plutonium feed metal from the anode into the salt and product phases. We have met these criteria in experiments on the 100 to 1000 g scale. We plan to scale our operations to 4 kg of feed plutonium and to optimize the process parameters

  17. An Efficient and Clean One-Pot Synthesis of 3,4-Dihydropyrimidine-2-(1H)-ones Catalyzed by SrCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O-HCl in Solvent or Solvent-Free Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr-Esfahani, Masoud [Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khosropour, Ahmad Reza [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    We have found an efficient, inexpensive and straightforward procedure for one-pot synthesis of dihydropyrimidinones using SrCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O-HCl catalyst system. Also found was the performance of the catalyst system is greatly facilitated when used without solvents, important from the view point of industry or green chemistry. Moreover, nonhygroscopic, inexpensive and non-toxic nature of the catalyst for this transformation is other noteworthy merit of this procedure. In recent years, 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one derivatives have gained much interest for their biological and pharmaceutical properties, such as HIV gp-120-CD4 inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, α-adrenergic and neuropeptide Y antagonists, as well as antihypertensive, antitumor, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agents. The scope of this pharmacophore has been further increased by the identification of monastrol as a novel cell-permeable lead compound for the development of new anticancer drugs bearing the dihydropyrimidinone core. Thus the development of facile and environmentally friendly synthetic methods towards dihydropyrimidinones constitutes an active area of investigation in organic synthesis.

  18. Method of decomposing radioactive organic solvent wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Kazuo; Ichihashi, Toshio; Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decompose radioactive organic solvent wastes or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom into organic materials under moderate conditions, as well as greatly decrease the amount of secondary wastes generated. Method: Radioactive organic solvent wastes comprising an organic phosphoric acid ester ingredient and a hydrocarbon ingredient as a diluent therefor, or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom are oxidatively decomposed by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution of phosphoric acid metal salts finally into organic materials to perform decomposing treatment for the radioactive organic solvent wastes. The decomposing reaction is carried out under relatively moderate conditions and cause less burden to facilities or the likes. Further, since the decomposed liquid after the treatment can be reused for the decomposing reaction as a catalyst solution secondary wastes can significantly be decreased. (Yoshihara, H.)

  19. Solvents and solvent effects in organic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reichardt, C; Welton, T

    2011-01-01

    .../guest complexation equilibria and reactions in biphasic solvent systems and neoteric solvents, respectively. More than 900 new references have been added, giving preference to review articles, and many older ones have been deleted. New references either replace older ones or are added to the end of the respective reference list of each chapter. Th...

  20. Solvent-mediated secondary building units (SBUs) diversification in a series of Mn{sup II}-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Yan-Fei; Cui, Li-Ting [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Chemical Processes, Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Han, Jie, E-mail: chan@ouhk.edu.hk [School of Science & Technology, The Open University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Zhao, Xiao-Li, E-mail: xlzhao@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Green Chemistry and Chemical Processes, Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The role of auxiliary solvents in the formation of MOFs has been investigated for a series of Mn{sup II}-based framework systems. Reactions of 4,4′,4″-nitrilotribenzoic acid (H{sub 3}L) with Mn{sup II} through varying auxiliary solvents of the medium resulted in the formation of diversified multinuclear Mn{sup II} subunits in four new coordination polymers: [Mn{sub 3}(L)(HCOO){sub 3}(DEF){sub 3}] (1), [Mn{sub 3}(L){sub 2}(EtOH){sub 2}]·DMF (2), [Mn{sub 5}(L){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2(H{sub 2}NMe{sub 2}){sup +}·4DMF·2H{sub 2}O (3), and [Mn{sub 3}(L){sub 2}(py){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O)]·H{sub 2}O (4) (H{sub 3}L=4,4′,4′-nitrilotribenzoic acid, DMF=dimethylformamide, DEF=N,N-diethylformamide, py=pyridine). These four compounds were fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, showing interesting SBUs variations. For compound 1, it displays a (3,6)-connected kgd net with wheel [Mn{sub 6}] cluster serving as SBU, whereas in 2, the sequence of Mn{sub 3}(COO){sub 9}(EtOH){sub 2} is repeated by inversion centers located between Mn1 and Mn3 to form an infinite Mn-carboxylate chain, which are further interlinked by L{sup 3−} ligands to form a 3D architecture. In 3, the pentanuclear Mn{sub 5}(CO{sub 2}){sub 12} clusters are interlinked to form a layer, which are further pillared by L{sup 3−} to generate a 3D network. Compound 4 has a (3,6)-connected network in which the SBU is a linear trimeric Mn{sub 3}(COO){sub 6}(py){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O) cluster. In addition, the thermal stabilities, X-ray powder diffraction of all the compounds were studied, photoluminescence behaviors of compounds 1, 3 and 4 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Supramolecular assembly of C{sub 3}-symmetric ligand 4,4′,4″-nitrilotribenzoic acid (H{sub 3}L) with Mn{sup II} through varying auxiliary solvents of the medium resulted in the formation of diversified multinuclear Mn{sup II} subunits in four new coordination polymers. The results exhibit the structures of Mn-SBUs in these

  1. Solvent extraction in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, H.; Naylor, A.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction techniques have been used in the uranium nuclear fuel cycle in three main areas; concentration of uranium from ore leach liquor, purification of ore concentrates and fuel reprocessing. Solvent extraction has been extended to the removal of transuranic elements from active waste liquor, the recovery of uranium from natural sources and the recovery of noble metals from active waste liquor. Schemes are presented for solvent extraction of uranium using the Amex or Dapex process; spent fuel reprocessing and the Purex process. Recent and future developments of the techniques are outlined. (UK)

  2. Solvent-mediated secondary building units (SBUs) diversification in a series of MnII-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yan-Fei; Cui, Li-Ting; Han, Jie; Zhao, Xiao-Li

    2016-09-01

    The role of auxiliary solvents in the formation of MOFs has been investigated for a series of MnII-based framework systems. Reactions of 4,4‧,4″-nitrilotribenzoic acid (H3L) with MnII through varying auxiliary solvents of the medium resulted in the formation of diversified multinuclear MnII subunits in four new coordination polymers: [Mn3(L)(HCOO)3(DEF)3] (1), [Mn3(L)2(EtOH)2]·DMF (2), [Mn5(L)4(H2O)2]·2(H2NMe2)+·4DMF·2H2O (3), and [Mn3(L)2(py)4(H2O)]·H2O (4) (H3L=4,4‧,4‧-nitrilotribenzoic acid, DMF=dimethylformamide, DEF=N,N-diethylformamide, py=pyridine). These four compounds were fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, showing interesting SBUs variations. For compound 1, it displays a (3,6)-connected kgd net with wheel [Mn6] cluster serving as SBU, whereas in 2, the sequence of Mn3(COO)9(EtOH)2 is repeated by inversion centers located between Mn1 and Mn3 to form an infinite Mn-carboxylate chain, which are further interlinked by L3- ligands to form a 3D architecture. In 3, the pentanuclear Mn5(CO2)12 clusters are interlinked to form a layer, which are further pillared by L3- to generate a 3D network. Compound 4 has a (3,6)-connected network in which the SBU is a linear trimeric Mn3(COO)6(py)4(H2O) cluster. In addition, the thermal stabilities, X-ray powder diffraction of all the compounds were studied, photoluminescence behaviors of compounds 1, 3 and 4 are discussed.

  3. Double Solvent Sensing Method for Improving Sensitivity and Accuracy of Hg(II) Detection Based on Different Signal Transduction of a Tetrazine-Functionalized Pillared Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Sayed Ali Akbar; Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Morsali, Ali

    2017-08-21

    To design a robust, π-conjugated, low-cost, and easy to synthesize metal-organic framework (MOF) for cation sensing by the photoluminescence (PL) method, 4,4'-oxybis(benzoic acid) (H 2 OBA) has been used in combination with 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DPT) as a tetrazine-functionalized spacer to construct [Zn(OBA)(DPT) 0.5 ]·DMF (TMU-34(-2H)). The tetrazine motif is a π-conjugated, water-soluble/stable fluorophore with relatively weak σ-donating Lewis basic sites. These characteristics of tetrazine make TMU-34(-2H) a good candidate for cation sensing. Because of hydrogen bonding between tetrazine moieties and water molecules, TMU-34(-2H) shows different PL emissions in water and acetonitrile. Cation sensing in these two solvents revealed that TMU-34(-2H) can selectively detect Hg 2+ in water (by 243% enhancement) and in acetonitrile (by 90% quenching). The contribution of electron-donating/accepting characteristics along with solvation effects on secondary interactions of the tetrazine motifs inside the TMU-34(-2H) framework results in different signal transductions. Improved sensitivity and accuracy of detection were obtained using the double solvent sensing method (DSSM), in which different signal transductions of TMU-34(-2H) in water and acetonitrile were combined simultaneously to construct a double solvent sensing curve and formulate a sensitivity factor. Calculation of sensitivity factors for all of the tested cations demonstrated that it is possible to detect Hg 2+ by DSSM with ultrahigh sensitivity. Such a tremendous distinction in the Hg 2+ sensitivity factor is visualizable in the double solvent sensing curve. Thus, by application of DSSM instead of one-dimensional sensing, the interfering effects of other cations are completely eliminated and the sensitivity toward Hg(II) is highly improved. Strong interactions between Hg 2+ and the nitrogen atoms of the tetrazine groups along with easy accessibility of Hg 2+ to the tetrazine groups lead

  4. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  5. Organic Solvent Tropical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines

  6. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  7. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branham-Haar, K.A.; Twitchell, K.E.

    1993-07-01

    Concern for the environment, in addition to Federal regulation, mandate the replacement of hazardous solvents with safer cleaning agents. Manufacturers are working to produce these replacement solvents. As these products are developed, potential users need to be informed of their availability. To promote the use of these new products instead of traditional solvents, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS). The HSSDS provides a comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects, and it makes that information available to solvent users, industrial hygienists, and process engineers. The HSSDS uses TOPIC reg-sign, a text retrieval system produced by Verity, Inc., to allow a user to search for information on a particular subject. TOPIC reg-sign produces a listing of the retrieved documents and allows the use to examine the documents individually and to use the information contained in them. This reference manual does not replace the comprehensive TOPIC reg-sign user documentation (available from Verity, Inc.), or the HSSDS Tutorial (available from the INEL). The purpose of this reference manual is to provide enough instruction on TOPIC reg-sign so the user may begin accessing the data contained in the HSSDS

  8. What is safe and clean water in rural Bolivian communities? A preliminary investigation of heavy metal contamination in rural community water systems in the Bolivian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, M.; Guido, Z.; Borella, P.; Ketron, T.

    2009-12-01

    A proliferation of potable water systems utilizing groundwater is currently underway in the Lake Titicaca region of the Bolivian Altiplano. With the aid of national and international organizations, rural communities are developing groundwater sources because the region’s surface water is highly contaminated with waterborne pathogens—the primary factor contributing to high child mortality rates in developing nations. According to UNICEF, 86 percent of Bolivian families have access to “improved” water systems, which predominantly take the form of deep groundwater wells or contained natural springs. While the water systems have worked well to reduce pathogens in drinking water systems that cause illnesses such as dysentery, the water is rarely tested for heavy metal contamination, such as arsenic and lead. While bacteria analysis is essential, it is not the only component of healthy drinking water. Testing for heavy metals is especially important in the Bolivian Altiplano because abundant volcanic deposits and massive sulfide deposits suggest that in some areas it is likely that the water contains elevated concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, Terra Resource Development International, A California-based 502(c)3 nonprofit organization, partnered with Stanford University, the Technical University of Bolivia, and the Bolivian Geologic and Mining Survey to collect water samples in 36 rural community situated in four watersheds feeding into Lake Titicaca. Water was collected from shallow, hand dug wells, deep groundwater wells, springs, and small rivers in the Tiwanku, Laja, Batallas, Achacachi watersheds and were analyzed for inorganic contaminants. Samples were analyzed at Stanford’s Environmental Measurements Facility using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometer for major ions and heavy metals. Results will help determine which, if any, community water systems are at risk of heavy metal contamination, where more comprehensive sampling is

  9. Effects of thermal desorption on the composition of two coking plant soils: Impact on solvent extractable organic compounds and metal bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biache, Coralie [G2R UMR 7566, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LIMOS UMR 7137, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)], E-mail: coralie.biache@g2r.uhp-nancy.fr; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Faure, Pierre [G2R UMR 7566, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Munier-Lamy, Colette; Leyval, Corinne [LIMOS UMR 7137, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate the efficiency and the influence of thermal desorption on the soil organic compartment, contaminated soils from coking plant sites (NM and H) were compared to their counterparts treated with thermodesorption. The extractable organic matter, and the metal content and distribution with soil compartments were studied. In both thermodesorbed soils, PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) degradation exceeded 90%. However, the thermal desorption led not only to a volatilization of the organic compounds but also to the condensation of extractable organic matter. The treatments only affected the Fe and Zn distribution within the more stable fractions, whereas the organic compound degradation did not affect their mobility and availability. - Thermal desorption does not induce a metal mobilization but condensation seems to occur during the treatment.

  10. Vapor solvent decontamination of PCB [polychlorinated biphenyls] transformer components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.R.; Green, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    A process is provided to recover reclaimable material from discarded transformers containing PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) insulating oils and to minimize the volume of materials which are subject to environmental regulation upon disposal. According to the invention, the transformer is drained and given an initial cleaning. The internal parts are removed and cleaned a second time as is the empty transformer casing. Recoverable materials such as aluminum and copper are cleaned to less than 10 μg of PCB per 100 cm 2 , allowing these materials to be recycled rather than buried. Almost all of the remaining nonmetallic materials are combustible solids or liquids which can be destroyed by incineration. The cleaning is accomplished using trichloroethylene solvent, chosen for its low boiling point which makes it easy to recycle using an isothermal separator. The removed transformer parts are cleaned in a secondary cleaning station consisting of 3 separate sections including tumbling baskets. 2 figs

  11. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1978. [Advanced solvent extraction; accidents; pyrochemical; radwaste in metal matrix; waste migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M. J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R. E.

    1979-12-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported include development of centrifugal contactors for Purex processes. Tricaprylmethyl-ammonium nitrate and di-n-amyl-n-amylphosphonate are being evaluated as Thorex extractants. Dispersion of uranium and plutonium by fires, and mechanisms for subdividing and dispersing liquids and solids were reviewed. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program, a facility for testing containment materials is under construction; a flowsheet for carbide fuel processing has been designed and studies of carbide reactions in bismuth are underway; salt transport processes are being studied; process-size refractory metal vessels are being fabricated; the feasibility of AIROX reprocessing is being determined; the solubility of UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 2/ + fission products, and PuO/sub 2/ in molten alkali metal nitrates, has been investigated; a flowsheet was developed for reprocessing actinide oxides in molten salts; preparation of Th-U carbide from the oxide is being studied; new flowsheets based on the Dow Aluminum Pyrometallurgical process for reprocessing of spent uranium metal fuel have been prepared; the chloride volitility processing of thorium-based fuels is being studied; the reprocessing of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in KCl-LiCl-ThCl/sub 4/-Th is being studied; and a flowsheet for processing spent nuclear fuel in molten tin has been constructed. Leach rates of simulated encapsulated waste forms in a metal matrix were studied. Nine criteria for handling waste cladding hulls were established. Strontium and tin migration in glauconite columns was measured. Radioactive Sr in a stream of water moved through oolitic limestone as rapidly as water, but in a stream of water equilibrated with the limestone, Sr moved through the limestone one-tenth as fast. Migration of trace quantities of Cs and I through kaolinite was studied. 88 figures, 53 tables.

  12. Structure, solvent, and relativistic effects on the NMR chemical shifts in square-planar transition-metal complexes: assessment of DFT approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Novotný, J.; Straka, Michal; Repisky, M.; Ruud, K.; Komorovsky, S.; Marek, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 38 (2015), s. 24944-24955 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR chemical shifts * transition metal complexes * relativistic effects * method calibration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04214c

  13. Late washing filter cleaning cycle demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.L.; McCabe, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The DWPF Late Washing Facility will filter cesium and potassium tetraphenyl borate (TPB) solids using a Mott sintered metal filter, identical to the filter now used in the In-tank Precipitation Facility. The purpose of the late wash step is primarily to remove the nitrite salts from the slurry prior to delivery to DWPF. Periodic chemical cleaning of the filter will be required, presumably after each batch although the actual required frequency could not be determined on the lab-scale. Minimization of chemical cleaning solution volumes is key to maximizing the attainment of the Late Wash facility. This report summarizes work completed in experiments designed to identify minimum cleaning solution requirements

  14. Plasma cleaning of ITER first mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Reichle, R.; Leipold, F.; Vorpahl, C.; Le Guern, F.; Walach, U.; Alberti, S.; Furno, I.; Yan, R.; Peng, J.; Ben Yaala, M.; Meyer, E.

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear fusion is an extremely attractive option for future generations to compete with the strong increase in energy consumption. Proper control of the fusion plasma is mandatory to reach the ambitious objectives set while preserving the machine’s integrity, which requests a large number of plasma diagnostic systems. Due to the large neutron flux expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), regular windows or fibre optics are unusable and were replaced by so-called metallic first mirrors (FMs) embedded in the neutron shielding, forming an optical labyrinth. Materials eroded from the first wall reactor through physical or chemical sputtering will migrate and will be deposited onto mirrors. Mirrors subject to net deposition will suffer from reflectivity losses due to the deposition of impurities. Cleaning systems of metallic FMs are required in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems in ITER. Plasma cleaning using radio frequency (RF) generated plasmas is currently being considered the most promising in situ cleaning technique. An update of recent results obtained with this technique will be presented. These include the demonstration of cleaning of several deposit types (beryllium, tungsten and beryllium proxy, i.e. aluminium) at 13.56 or 60 MHz as well as large scale cleaning (mirror size: 200 × 300 mm2). Tests under a strong magnetic field up to 3.5 T in laboratory and first experiments of RF plasma cleaning in EAST tokamak will also be discussed. A specific focus will be given on repetitive cleaning experiments performed on several FM material candidates.

  15. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of β-diketones, halogenated β-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on May ... 34 How The Clean Hands - Safe Hands System Works - Duration: 3:38. Clean Hands-Safe Hands 5, ...

  17. Chemical cleaning review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, B.L.; Thomas, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Three main chemical processes for cleaning steam generators have evolved from the early work of the industry. Of the more than 50 chemical cleanings carried out to date most have been considered a success by the utilities performing them. (author)

  18. Cleaning fluid emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikryl, J; Kotyza, R; Krulikovsky, J; Mjartan, V; Valisova, I

    1981-09-15

    Composition of cleaning fluid emulsion are presented for drilling small diameter wells in clay soils, at high drill bit rotation velocity. The emulsions have lubricating properties and the abilty to improve stability of the drilled soil. The given fluids have a high fatty acid content with 12-24 carbon atoms in a single molecule, with a predominance of resinous acids 1-5% in mass, and having been emulsified in water or clay suspension without additives, or in a clay suspension with high-molecular polymer additives (glycobate cellulose compounds and/or polysaccharides, and/or their derivatives) in an amount of 0.1-3% per mass; thinning agents - huminite or lignite compounds in the amount of 0.01 to 0.5% in mass; weighting material - barite or lime 0.01 to 50% per mass; medium stabilizers - organic poly-electrolyte with polyacrylate in the amount of 0.05 to 2% in mass, or alkaline chloride/alkaline-ground metals 1-10% per mass. A cleaning emulsion fluid was prepared in the laboratory according to the given method. Add 3 kg tall oil to a solution of 1 kg K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ per 100 l of water. Dynamic viscosity was equal to 1.4 x 10-/sup 3/ Pa/s. When drilling in compacted clay soils, when the emulsions require improved stability, it is necessary to add the maximum amount of tall oil whose molecules are absorbed by the clay soil and increase its durability.

  19. 19F NMR spectroscopy in monitoring fluorinated-solvent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikov, V.D.; Bordunov, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive use is made of solvents such as trichloroethylene, freon-133, and perchloroethylene because they are good solvents for inorganic, plant, and animal greases, while the solvents can be recovered and there is no fire hazard. In this paper, the authors examined methods to monitor spent solution regeneration rapidly and with high accuracy. The authors tested perfluorinated telomeric alcohols as solvents for cleaning engineering components which have melting points of 60-120 degrees celsius. The higher working temperatures and the increased energy consumption are disadvantages of these solvents, but these are compensated for by the scope for using them virtually in the solid, liquid, and vapor states. The authors' proposed technology is based on solvents with melting points over 40 degrees celsius which produce virtually no wastes. The telomeric alcohols are recovered after cooling to normal conditions by separation from the oil by filtration and centrifugation, and they can be used in the next purification cycle. When the solvents have been regenerated, the petroleum products such as industrial oils can be reused for their original purpose. However, quantitative data are required on the solvent contents in the oil and the oil contents in the solvent in order to determine the degree of regeneration and the modes to be used. The authors have also proposed a quantitative method of determining traces of these alcohols in oils and residual oils in the solvent by fluorine NMR. All measurements were made with a BS497 NMR spectrometer

  20. Effect of nanoparticle metal composition: mono- and bimetallic gold/copper dendrimer stabilized nanoparticles as solvent-free styrene oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanckenberg, A.; Kotze, G.; Swarts, A. J.; Malgas-Enus, R.

    2018-02-01

    A range of mono- and bimetallic AumCun nanoparticles (NPs), with varying metal compositions, was prepared by using a third-generation diaminobutane poly(propylene imine) (G3 DAB-PPI) dendrimer, modified with alkyl chains, as a stabilizer. It was found that the length of the peripheral alkyl chain, ( M1 (C15), M2 (C11), and M3 (C5)), had a direct influence on the average nanoparticle size obtained, confirming the importance of the nanoparticle stabilizer during synthesis. The Au NPs showed the highest degree of agglomeration and polydispersity, whereas the Cu NPs were the smallest and most monodisperse of the NPs. The bimetallic NPs sizes were found to vary between those of the monometallic NPs, depending on the metal composition. Interestingly, the bimetallic NPs were found to be the most stable, showing very little variation in size over time, even up to 9 months. The DSNs were evaluated in the catalytic oxidation of styrene, using either H2O2 or TBHP as oxidant. Here, we show that the bimetallic DSNs are indeed the superior catalysts when compared to their monometallic analogues, under the same reaction conditions, since a good compromise between stability and activity can be achieved where the Au provides catalytic activity and the Cu serves as a stabilizer. These AumCun bimetallic DSNs present a less expensive and more stable catalyst with negligible loss of activity, opening the door to green catalysis.

  1. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.

  2. Solvent-Induced Cadmium(II) Metal-Organic Frameworks with Adjustable Guest-Evacuated Porosity: Application in the Controllable Assembly of MOF-Derived Porous Carbon Materials for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Man-Li; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Cheng-Yan; Zou, Kang-Yu; Li, Zuo-Xi

    2017-11-07

    In this work, five new cadmium metal-organic frameworks (Cd-MOFs 1-5) have been synthesized from solvothermal reactions of Cd(NO 3 ) 2 ⋅4 H 2 O with isophthalic acid and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-benzene under different solvent systems of CH 3 OH, C 2 H 5 OH, (CH 3 ) 2 CHOH, DMF, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), respectively. Cd-MOF 1 shows a 3D diamondoid framework with 1D rhombic and hexagonal channels, and the porosity is 12.9 %. Cd-MOF 2 exhibits a 2D (4,4) layer with a 1D parallelogram channel and porosity of 23.6 %. Cd-MOF 3 has an 8-connected dense network with the Schäfli symbol of [4 24 ⋅6 4 ] based on the Cd 6 cluster. Cd-MOFs 4-5 are isomorphous, and display an absolutely double-bridging 2D (4,4) layer with 1D tetragonal channels and porosities of 29.2 and 28.2 %, which are occupied by DMF and NMP molecules, respectively. Followed by the calcination-thermolysis procedure, Cd-MOFs 1-5 are employed as precursors to prepare MOF-derived porous carbon materials (labeled as PC-me, PC-eth, PC-ipr, PC-dmf and PC-nmp), which have the BET specific surface area of 23, 51, 10, 122, and 96 m 2  g -1 , respectively. The results demonstrate that the specific surface area of PCs is tuned by the porosity of Cd-MOFs, where the later is highly dependent on the solvent. Thereby, the specific surface area of PCs could be adjusted by the solvent used in the synthese of MOF precusors. Significantly, PCs have been further activated by KOH to obtain activated carbon materials (APCs), which possess even higher specific surface area and larger porosity. After a series of characterization and electrochemical investigations, the APC-dmf electrode exhibits the best porous properties and largest specific capacitances (153 F g -1 at 5 mV s -1 and 156 F g -1 at 0.5 Ag -1 ). Meanwhile, the APC-dmf electrode shows excellent cycling stability (ca. 84.2 % after 5000 cycles at 1 Ag -1 ), which can be applied as a suitable electrode material for

  3. Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Das Chintamani; Gaonkar, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  4. TCV mirrors cleaned by plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Marot

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic mirrors exposed in TCV tokamak were cleaned by plasma in laboratory. A gold (Au mirror was deposited with 185–285nm of amorphous carbon (aC:D film coming from the carbon tiles of TCV. Another molybdenum (Mo mirror had a thicker deposit due to a different location within the tokamak. The thickness measurements were carried out using ellipsometry and the reflectivity measurements performed by spectrophotometry revealed a decrease of the specular reflectivity in the entire range (250–2500nm for the Mo mirror and specifically in the visible spectrum for the Au. Comparison of the simulated reflectivity using a refractive index of 1.5 and a Cauchy model for the aC:D gives good confidence on the estimated film thickness. Plasma cleaning using radio frequency directly applied to a metallic plate where the mirrors were fixed demonstrated the ability to remove the carbon deposits. A mixture of 50% hydrogen and 50% helium was used with a −200V self-bias. Due to the low sputtering yield of He and the low chemical erosion of hydrogen leading to volatile molecules, 20h of cleaning were needed for Au mirror and more than 60h for Mo mirror. Recovery of the reflectivity was not complete for the Au mirror most likely due to damage of the surface during tokamak exposure (breakdown phenomena.

  5. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  6. Cleaning of Sodium in the Cold Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Choi, Byung Hae; Nam, Ho Yun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of a cleaning process is to remove the residual sodium adhering to the component walls once it has been properly drained. It is necessary to clean and decontaminate a component, especially the large components of the primary coolant system; such as the intermediate heat exchangers and the primary pump. Improper and inadequate cleaning has in a number of cases resulted in problems in the storage, handling, and reuse of components. Several types of failures due to improper cleaning procedures have been defined in the past. Inadequate and incomplete removal of sodium results in residues which may contain metallic sodium and alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide, sodium carbonate, and various types of alcoholates. Reinsertion of components containing these compounds into a high-temperature sodium system can result in either the intergranular penetration characteristic of a high- oxygen sodium or an accelerated corrosion due to oxygen. The methods used for cleaning sodium equipment depend on the condition and types of equipment to be cleaned and whether the equipment is to be reused. Cleaning methods are needed that will avoid a deleterious local overheating, material surface degradation or deposits, chemical, physical, or mechanical damage, and external effects. This paper discusses a steam-nitrogen gas cleaning method for the routine applications that permits the reuse of the cold trap in sodium

  7. Should you get your heating ducts cleaned?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation conducted research into duct cleaning during which time several houses were tested for hot air furnace duct performance before and after cleaning. Duct cleaning is a major industry which claims that cleaning of ducts will provide you with better indoor air quality, reduce household molds and allergens, get rid of house dust, result in more airflow and better delivery of warm air and reduce energy costs. This report does not substantiate those claims. Researchers found little or no discernible differences in the concentrations of house airborne particles or in duct airflows due to duct cleaning. This is because ducts are metal passages that cannot create dust. Most household dusts come from outdoors that has been tracked in or blows through windows and other openings. While duct cleaning may be justifiable personally, it does not change the quality of the air you breathe, nor will it significantly affect airflow or heating costs. Some filters effectively clean the air in the ducts but they do not create a dust-free environment because of the above-mentioned dust sources. The only time that duct cleaning may make sense is if you have water in your ducts that can result in mold growth, if you are moving into a newly constructed house to remove drywall dust, if your are having trouble with furnace airflow, or if you see an accumulation of debris in the return air ducts. It was emphasized that broadcast spraying of biocides within the duct system should not be performed.

  8. An assessment of alternatives for replacing Freon 113 in bench type electrical circuit board cleaning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isakson, K.; Vessell, A.L.

    1994-07-01

    Fermilab is presently phasing out all solvents containing Freon-113 (CFC-113) as part of the continuing Waste Minimization Program. These solvents are used primarily in cleaning the flux off of electronic circuit boards after soldering, specifically in bench type work. Title VI of the Clean Air Act mandates a production phase-out for ozone depleting substances, like CFC-113, by the year 2000. Our study addresses this issue by evaluating and choosing alternative non-CFC solvents to replace the CFC-1 13 solvents at Fermilab. Several potential non-CFC cleaning solvents were tested. The evaluation took place in three parts: controlled experimental evaluation, chemical composition evaluation, and employee performed evaluation. First, we performed a controlled nine-step procedure with the potential solvents where each was evaluated in categories such as cleaning effectiveness, odor, residue, type of output and drying time. Next, we listed the chemical composition of each solvent. We noted which solvents contained hydrochlorofluorocarbons because they are targeted for phase-out in the future and will be recognized as interim solutions only. Finally, after preliminary testing, five solvents were chosen as the best options. These solvents were sent to be tested by Fermilab employees who use such materials. Their opinions are valuable not only because they are knowledgeable in this field, but also because they will be using the solvents chosen to replace the CFC-113 solvents. The results favored two ''best alternatives'': Safezone Solvent Flux Remover by Miller-Stephenson and E-Series CFC Free Flux-Off 2000 by Chemtech. Another possible solution also pursued is the no-clean solder option. In our study, we were not able to thoroughly investigate the many types of no-clean solders because of time and financial constraints. The testing that was done, however, showed that no-clean solder was a viable alternative in many cases

  9. Terpenes as Green Solvents for Extraction of Oil from Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Dejoye Tanzi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein is described a green and original alternative procedure for the extraction of oil from microalgae. Extractions were carried out using terpenes obtained from renewable feedstocks as alternative solvents instead of hazardous petroleum solvents such as n-hexane. The described method is achieved in two steps using Soxhlet extraction followed by the elimination of the solvent from the medium using Clevenger distillation in the second step. Oils extracted from microalgae were compared in terms of qualitative and quantitative determination. No significant difference was obtained between each extract, allowing us to conclude that the proposed method is green, clean and efficient.

  10. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  11. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scherman, Carl [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Martin, David [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Suggs, Patricia [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  12. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar; Harith, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles

  13. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar [Conservation Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, El-Gamaa Street, El-Giza (Egypt)], E-mail: Omaa67@yahoo.com; Harith, M.A. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: mharithm@niles.edu.eg

    2008-07-15

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  14. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar; Harith, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  15. Investigation of the Use of a Bio-Derived Solvent for Non-Solvent-Induced Phase Separation (NIPS Fabrication of Polysulfone Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Dong

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP and dimethylacetamide (DMAc, have been traditionally used to fabricate polymeric membranes. These solvents may have a negative impact on the environment and human health; therefore, using renewable solvents derived from biomass is of great interest to make membrane fabrication sustainable. Methyl-5-(dimethylamino-2-methyl-5-oxopentanoate (Rhodiasolv PolarClean is a bio-derived, biodegradable, nonflammable and nonvolatile solvent. Polysulfone is a commonly used polymer to fabricate membranes due to its thermal stability, strong mechanical strength and good chemical resistance. From cloud point curves, PolarClean showed potential to be a solvent for polysulfone. Membranes prepared with PolarClean were investigated in terms of their morphology, porosity, water permeability and protein rejection, and were compared to membranes prepared with traditional solvents. The pores of polysulfone/PolarClean membranes were sponge-like, and the membranes displayed higher water flux values (176.0 ± 8.8 LMH along with slightly higher solute rejection (99.0 ± 0.51%. On the other hand, PSf/DMAc membrane pores were finger-like with lower water flux (63.1 ± 12.4 LMH and slightly lower solute rejection (96 ± 2.00% when compared to PSf/PolarClean membranes.

  16. Fluorometric determination of aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) by solvent extraction of the ternary complex composed of metal ion, 8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid, and methyltrioctylammonium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Yukihiro; Kataoka, Masamitsu; Kambara, Tomihito

    1982-01-01

    A fluorometric micro determination of aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) using the formation of metal-8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid-capriquat (methyltrioctylammonium) ternary complex is described. These complexes are easily extracted into chloroform phase and the extract emits a strong fluorescence. Spectra of aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) ternary complexes have the excitation maximum at 396 nm and 400 nm, and emission maximum at 501 nm and 524 nm, respectively. Fluorescence intensity of the aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) ternary complexes extracted into chloroform showed the constant and maximum values in the pH range of aqueous phase from 5.3 to 8.5 and 8.1 to 8.5, respectively. The calibration curves for aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) show good proportionality int the concentration range from 0.5 to 5.0 and 1.0 to 50.0 μg, respectively. The relative standard deviation observed with four measurements was found to be 1.8% for 0.5 μg of aluminium (III) and 1.1% for 10.0 μg of cadmium (II). The effect of diverse ions is studied and a 25-fold amount of Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Fe(III) in weight gave errors, however, the interferences were easily eliminated by the addition of appropriate masking agent. In the determination of cadmium (II), an equal amount of Co(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and twice amount of Al(III) gave negative errors, however, the interference of Fe(III) and Al(III) were also eliminated as above. (author)

  17. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This article is an overview of efforts at INEL to reduce the generation of hazardous wastes through the elimination of hazardous solvents. To aid in their efforts, a number of databases have been developed and will become a part of an Integrated Solvent Substitution Data System. This latter data system will be accessible through Internet

  18. Exhaust gas clean up process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  19. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  20. New Approaches to Cleaning Liquid Radioactive Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabulonov, Yu.L.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The industrial cleaning methods of liquid radioactive waste and technologically contaminated solutions, which contain heavy metals and radionuclides, are considered. It is shown that in the case when heavy metal ions exclusively exist in ionic form, the cleaning method with highest efficiency is electrodialysis. In the case when components, which must be removed, are in ionic and colloidal forms at the same time, the previous destruction of colloidal and organic matter (method of hydrodynamic cavitation, lowtemperature plasma etc is necessary. The developed «PTANK» method enables an effective purification of multicomponent metalcontaining man-made solutions, which contain additionally organic substances and complexes. Development of advanced membrane technologies, creation of complex recycling schemes and their synergistic combination will provide an opportunity to achieve deep cleaning of technologically contaminated solutions and minimize the amount of secondary wastes.

  1. Clean Energy Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For the past several years, the IEA and others have been calling for a clean energy revolution to achieve global energy security, economic growth and climate change goals. This report analyses for the first time progress in global clean energy technology deployment against the pathways that are needed to achieve these goals. It provides an overview of technology deployment status, key policy developments and public spending on RDD&D of clean energy technologies.

  2. Ultra-clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergenroether, K.

    1987-01-01

    No other method guarantees such a thorough cleaning of contaminated materials' surfaces. Only ultrasound can reach those cavities crevices and corners where any manual cleaning fails. Furthermore there is no cumbersome and time-consuming manual decontamination which often has to be carried out in glove boxes and hot cells. Depending on the design the cleaning effect can reach from removing adhering dirt particles to removing complete surface layers. (orig./PW) [de

  3. Used Solvent Testing and Reclamation. Volume 2. Vapor Degreasing and Precision Cleaning Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    relative intensity as the ordinate. This plot is referred to as a "mass spectrum." The mass spectrum of a compound can be considered its " fingerprint ...several designs, including roll-type plastic covers, canvas curtains, and guillotine covers. Automatic covers are designed to open for the time it takes

  4. 78 FR 46447 - Conditional Exclusions From Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste for Solvent-Contaminated Wipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... section 307 of the Clean Water Act (CWA)); A municipal solid waste landfill that is regulated under 40 CFR... laundries and dry cleaners could dispose of sludge from cleaning solvent-contaminated wipes in solid waste landfills if the sludge does not exhibit a hazardous waste characteristic. \\8\\ The Agency stated in the...

  5. Oak Ridge K-25 Site chlorinated solvent pollution prevention opportunity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was conducted at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to identify opportunities to reduce and better manage the use of chlorinated solvents. At the K-25 Site, 67 control areas were examined for their potential use of chlorinated solvents. Of these areas, 27 were found to be using (1) chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubricating; (2) laboratory standards and solvents; and (3) test medium. Current management practices encourage the identification and use of nonhazardous chemicals, including the use of chlorinated solvents. The main pollution prevention principles are source reduction and recycling, and a number of pollution prevention options based on these principles were identified and evaluated as part of this chlorinated solvent PPOA. Source reduction options evaluated for the K-25 Site include the substitution of chlorinated solvents with nonchlorinated solvents. Recycling was identified for those areas that would benefit most from the reuse of the chlorinated solvents in use. The pollution prevention options that offer the greatest opportunity for success at the K-25 Site are the implementation of substitutes at the 10 control areas using chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubrication. A change in the process may be all that is needed to eliminate the use of a chlorinated solvent. Once a decision is made to implement a substitution, the information should be communicated to all shops and laboratories. Another option to consider is the installation of recycling units to recycle the large amounts of methylene chloride used in the analytical sampling procedure

  6. Oak Ridge K-25 Site chlorinated solvent pollution prevention opportunity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was conducted at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to identify opportunities to reduce and better manage the use of chlorinated solvents. At the K-25 Site, 67 control areas were examined for their potential use of chlorinated solvents. Of these areas, 27 were found to be using (1) chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubricating; (2) laboratory standards and solvents; and (3) test medium. Current management practices encourage the identification and use of nonhazardous chemicals, including the use of chlorinated solvents. The main pollution prevention principles are source reduction and recycling, and a number of pollution prevention options based on these principles were identified and evaluated as part of this chlorinated solvent PPOA. Source reduction options evaluated for the K-25 Site include the substitution of chlorinated solvents with nonchlorinated solvents. Recycling was identified for those areas that would benefit most from the reuse of the chlorinated solvents in use. The pollution prevention options that offer the greatest opportunity for success at the K-25 Site are the implementation of substitutes at the 10 control areas using chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubrication. A change in the process may be all that is needed to eliminate the use of a chlorinated solvent. Once a decision is made to implement a substitution, the information should be communicated to all shops and laboratories. Another option to consider is the installation of recycling units to recycle the large amounts of methylene chloride used in the analytical sampling procedure.

  7. How clean is clean?---How clean is needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, A.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of cleaning qualifications used in a variety of industries: from small-scale manufacturer's of precision-machined products to large-scale manufacturer's of electronics (printed wiring boards and surface mount technology) and microelectronics. Cleanliness testing techniques used in the production of precision-machined products, will be described. The on-going DOD program to obtain high-reliability electronics, through the use of military specifications for cleaning and cleanliness levels, will be reviewed. In addition, the continually changing cleanroom/materials standards of the microelectronics industry will be discussed. Finally, we will speculate on the role that new and improved analytical techniques and sensor technologies will play in the factories of the future. 4 refs., 1 tab

  8. Cleaning of small components of complex geometry by means of the sodium-alcohol reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, B.; Grasso, C.; Spadoni, M.

    1978-01-01

    The results of some experiments on the vacuum reaction between butylcellosolve and sodium, contained in small diameter capillaries, are reported. The effects on the cleaning rate of the temperature, amount of solvent, diameter and position of the capillaries are analyzed. The facility, used for the cleaning of small components of complex geometry, is described. (author)

  9. CO2 dry cleaning: Acoustic cavitation and other mechanisms to induce mechanical action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanto, S.; Dutschk, Victoria; Mankiewicz, J.; van Roosmaalen, M.; Warmoeskerken, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    High pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) is a potential solvent for textile dry cleaning. However, the particulate soil (e.g. clay, sand) removal in CO2 is generally insufficient. Since cavitation has been proven to be beneficial in other CO2 cleaning applications, this study aims to investigate the

  10. Anodic Oxidation of Furans in Aprotic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-06

    dissolved in 70 mL acetonitrile (0.003% water , K.F. titration) containing 0.1 M tetra-n-butyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (TBAF). The solution was...solvent evaporated on a rotary evaporator at 25°C ( water bath temperature). The residue was extracted with 3 x 20 mL portions of diethylether, and the...results for a clean electrode in the same solution after presaturation with oxygen. To make the film conductive for the electrolyses , the voltage was

  11. Solvent - solute interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczyk, A.; Kalinowski, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate has been studied in 15 organic solvents. It has been found that wavenumbers and molar absorptivities of the long-wavelength bands (d-d transitions) can be well described by a complementary Lewis acid-base model including Gutmann's donor number [Gutmann V., Wychera E., Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters 2, 257 (1966)] and acceptor number [Mayer U., Gutmann V., Gerger W., Monatsh. Chem. 106, 1235 (1975)] of a solvent. This model describes also the solvent effect of the hyperfine splitting constant, Asub(iso)( 51 V), from e.s.r. spectra of VOacac 2 . These observations are discussed in terms of the donor-acceptor concept for solvent-solute interactions. (Author)

  12. Carbon pricing comes clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wit, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Together with the Clean Energy Bill, the implications of the Australian Federal Government's climate change legislative package are far reaching. Norton Rose gives business a heads-up in this breakdown of the draft legislation underpinning the carbon pricing and clean energy scheme. It is a summary of Norton Rose's full analysis.

  13. Mechanical cleaning of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, A.M.; Calado, V.E.; Barreiro, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of graphene due to residues from nanofabrication often introduces background doping and reduces electron mobility. For samples of high electronic quality, post-lithography cleaning treatments are therefore needed. We report that mechanical cleaning based on contact mode atomic force

  14. Green Cleaning Label Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balek, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Green cleaning plays a significant and supportive role in helping education institutions meet their sustainability goals. However, identifying cleaning products, supplies and equipment that truly are environmentally preferable can be daunting. The marketplace is inundated with products and services purporting to be "green" or environmentally…

  15. Trace elements retained in washed nuclear fuel reprocessing solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; MacMurdo, K.W.

    1979-09-01

    Analysis of purified TBP extractant from solvent extraction processes at Savannah River Plant showed several stable elements and several long-lived radioisotopes. Stable elements Al, Na, Br, Ce, Hg, and Sm are found in trace quantities in the solvent. The only stable metallic element consistently found in the solvent was Al, with a concentration which varies from about 30 ppM to about 10 ppM. The halogens Br and Cl appear to be found in the solvent systems as organo halides. Radionuclides found were principally 106 Ru, 129 I, 3 H, 235 U, and 239 Pu. The 129 I concentration was about 1 ppM in the first solvent extraction cycle of each facility. In the other cycles, 129 I concentration varied from about 0.1 to 0.5 ppM. Both 129 I and 3 H appear to be in the organic solvent as a result of exchange with hydrogen

  16. Correlating Cleaning Thoroughness with Effectiveness and Briefly Intervening to Affect Cleaning Outcomes: How Clean Is Cleaned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Clifford

    Full Text Available The most efficient approach to monitoring and improving cleaning outcomes remains unresolved. We sought to extend the findings of a previous study by determining whether cleaning thoroughness (dye removal correlates with cleaning efficacy (absence of molecular or cultivable biomaterial and whether one brief educational intervention improves cleaning outcomes.Before-after trial.Newly built community hospital.90 minute training refresher with surface-specific performance results.Dye removal, measured by fluorescence, and biomaterial removal and acquisition, measured with culture and culture-independent PCR-based assays, were clandestinely assessed for eight consecutive months. At this midpoint, results were presented to the cleaning staff (intervention and assessments continued for another eight consecutive months.1273 surfaces were sampled before and after terminal room cleaning. In the short-term, dye removal increased from 40.3% to 50.0% (not significant. For the entire study period, dye removal also improved but not significantly. After the intervention, the number of rooms testing positive for specific pathogenic species by culturing decreased from 55.6% to 36.6% (not significant, and those testing positive by PCR fell from 80.6% to 53.7% (P = 0.016. For nonspecific biomaterial on surfaces: a removal of cultivable Gram-negatives (GN trended toward improvement (P = 0.056; b removal of any cultivable growth was unchanged but acquisition (detection of biomaterial on post-cleaned surfaces that were contaminant-free before cleaning worsened (P = 0.017; c removal of PCR-based detection of bacterial DNA improved (P = 0.046, but acquisition worsened (P = 0.003; d cleaning thoroughness and efficacy were not correlated.At this facility, a minor intervention or minimally more aggressive cleaning may reduce pathogen-specific contamination, but not without unintended consequences.

  17. Photoresist removal using gaseous sulfur trioxide cleaning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puppo, Helene; Bocian, Paul B.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1999-06-01

    A novel cleaning method for removing photoresists and organic polymers from semiconductor wafers is described. This non-plasma method uses anhydrous sulfur trioxide gas in a two-step process, during which, the substrate is first exposed to SO3 vapor at relatively low temperatures and then is rinsed with de-ionized water. The process is radically different from conventional plasma-ashing methods in that the photoresist is not etched or removed during the exposure to SO3. Rather, the removal of the modified photoresist takes place during the subsequent DI-water rinse step. The SO3 process completely removes photoresist and polymer residues in many post-etch applications. Additional advantages of the process are absence of halogen gases and elimination of the need for other solvents and wet chemicals. The process also enjoys a very low cost of ownership and has minimal environmental impact. The SEM and SIMS surface analysis results are presented to show the effectiveness of gaseous SO3 process after polysilicon, metal an oxide etch applications. The effects of both chlorine- and fluorine-based plasma chemistries on resist removal are described.

  18. Waste cleaning using CO2-acid microemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwangheon; Sung, Jinhyun; Koh, Moonsung; Ju, Minsu

    2011-01-01

    Frequently we need to decontaminate radioactive wastes for volume reduction purposes. Metallic contaminants in wastes can be removed by dissolution to acid; however, this process produces a large amount of liquid acid waste. To reduce this 2ndary liquid waste, we suggest CO 2 -acid emulsion in removing metallic contaminants. Micro- and macro-emulsion of acid in liquid/supercritical CO 2 were successfully made. The formation region of microemulsion (water or acid in CO 2 ) was measured, and stability of the microemulsion was analyzed with respect to surfactant types. We applied micro- and macro-emulsion containing acid to the decontamination of radioactive metallic parts contaminated on the surface. The cleaning methods of micro- and macro-emulsion seemed better compared to the conventional acid cleaning. Moreover, these methods produce very small amount of secondary wastes. (author)

  19. ANALYSIS ON TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES CLEANING OIL PIPELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana PǍTRAŞCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the researches are presented concerning the technological processes of oil pipelines.We know several technologies and materials used for cleaning the sludge deposits, iron and manganese oxides, dross, stone, etc.de on the inner walls of drinking water pipes or industries.For the oil industry, methods of removal of waste materials and waste pipes and liquid and gas transport networks are operations known long, tedious and expensive. The main methods and associated problems can be summarized as follows: 1 Blowing with compressed air.2 manual or mechanical brushing, sanding with water or dry.3 Wash with water jet of high pressure, solvent or chemical solution to remove the stone and hard deposits.4 The combined methods of cleaning machines that use water jets, cutters, chains, rotary heads cutters, etc.

  20. Clean coal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    According to the World Energy Council (WEC), at the beginning of the next century three main energy sources - coal, nuclear power and oil will have equal share in the world's total energy supply. This forecast is also valid for the USSR which possesses more than 40% of the world's coal resources and continuously increases its coal production (more than 700 million tons of coal are processed annually in the USSR). The stringent environmental regulations, coupled with the tendency to increase the use of coal are the reasons for developing different concepts for clean coal utilization. In this paper, the potential efficiency and environmental performance of different clean coal production cycles are considered, including technologies for coal clean-up at the pre-combustion stage, advanced clean combustion methods and flue gas cleaning systems. Integrated systems, such as combined gas-steam cycle and the pressurized fluidized bed boiler combined cycle, are also discussed. The Soviet National R and D program is studying new methods for coal utilization with high environmental performance. In this context, some basic research activities in the field of clean coal technology in the USSR are considered. Development of an efficient vortex combustor, a pressurized fluidized bed gasifier, advanced gas cleaning methods based on E-beam irradiation and plasma discharge, as well as new catalytic system, are are presented. In addition, implementation of technological innovations for retrofitting and re powering of existing power plants is discussed. (author)

  1. Metal sponge for cryosorption pumping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, G.R.; Kneisel, P.

    1995-01-01

    A system has been developed for adsorbing gases at high vacuum in a closed area. The system utilizes large surface clean anodized metal surfaces at low temperatures to adsorb the gases. The large surface clean anodized metal is referred to as a metal sponge. The metal sponge generates or maintains the high vacuum by increasing the available active cryosorbing surface area. 4 figs

  2. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables.

  3. Purex process solvent: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  4. Diamond-cleaning investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    Four parcels of diamonds which either had or had not been cleaned using the usual techniques, chiefly involving etch in molten potassium nitrate were supplied by De Beers Diamond Research Laboratories. Each parcel contained about 40 stones, amounting to about 10 carats. Half the diamonds in each parcel were cleaned by a standard procedure involving half an hours ultrasonic agitation in a 20% solution of the commercial detergent 'Contrad' which is effectively a surfactant and chelating agent. Visual comparisons by a number of observers who were not told the stones' histories, established that these diamonds generally had a more sparkling appearance after the cleaning procedure had been applied

  5. Investigation of aluminum surface cleaning using cavitating fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralys, Aurimas; Striška, Vytautas; Mokšin, Vadim [Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Faculty of Mechanics, Department of Machine Engineering, J. Basanavičiaus str.28, 03224, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2013-12-16

    This paper investigates efficiency of specially designed atomizer used to spray water and cavitate microbubbles in water flow. Surface cleaning system was used to clean machined (grinded) aluminum surface from abrasive particles. It is established that cleaning efficiency depends on diameter of the diffuser, water pressure and distance between nozzle and metal surface. It is obtained that the best cleaning efficiency (100%) is achieved at pressure 36 bar, when diameter of diffuser is 0.4 mm and distance between nozzle and surface is 1 mm. It is also established that satisfactory cleaning efficiency (80%) is achieved not only when atomizer is placed closer to metal surface, but also at larger (120 mm) distances.

  6. Controlling the clean room atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    Several types of clean rooms are commonly in use. They include the conventional clean room, the horizontal laminar flow clean room, the vertical laminar flow clean room and a fourth type that incorporates ideas from the previous types and is known as a clean air bench or hood. These clean rooms are briefly described. The origin of contamination and methods for controlling the contamination are discussed

  7. Deriving site-specific clean-up criteria to protect ecological receptors (plants and soil invertebrates) exposed to metal or metalloid soil contaminants via the direct contact exposure pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkai, Ron; Van Genderen, Eric; Sousa, José Paulo; Stephenson, Gladys; Smolders, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Soil contaminant concentration limits for the protection of terrestrial plants and soil invertebrates are commonly based on thresholds derived using data from laboratory ecotoxicity tests. A comprehensive assessment has been made for the derivation of ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States; however, these limits are conservative because of their focus on high bioavailability scenarios. Here, we explain and evaluate approaches to soil limit derivation taken by 4 jurisdictions, 2 of which allow for correction of data for factors affecting bioavailability among soils, and between spiked and field-contaminated soils (Registration Evaluation Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals [REACH] Regulation, European Union [EU], and the National Environment Protection Council [NEPC], Australia). Scientifically advanced features from these methods have been integrated into a newly developed method for deriving soil clean-up values (SCVs) within the context of site-specific baseline ecological risk assessment. Resulting site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability may permit a greater residual concentration in soil when compared to generic screening limit concentrations (e.g., Eco-SSL), while still affording acceptable protection. Two choices for selecting the level of protection are compared (i.e., allowing higher effect levels per species, or allowing a higher percentile of species that are potentially unprotected). Implementation of this new method is presented for the jurisdiction of the United States, with a focus on metal and metalloid contaminants; however, the new method can be used in any jurisdiction. A case study for molybdate shows the large effect of bioavailability corrections and smaller effects of protection level choices when deriving SCVs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:346–357. PMID:24470189

  8. Measurement and prediction of aromatic solute distribution coefficients for aqueous-organic solvent systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental and modeling activities were performed to assess techniques for measurement and prediction of distribution coefficients for aromatic solutes between water and immiscible organic solvents. Experiments were performed to measure distribution coefficients in both clean water and wastewater systems, and to assess treatment of a wastewater by solvent extraction. The theoretical portions of this investigation were directed towards development of techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Experiments were performed to assess treatment of a phenolic-laden coal conversion wastewater by solvent extraction. The results showed that solvent extraction for recovery of phenolic material offered several wastewater processing advantages. Distribution coefficients were measured in clean water and wastewater systems for aromatic solutes of varying functionality with different solvent types. It was found that distribution coefficients for these compounds in clean water systems were not statistically different from distribution coefficients determined in a complex coal conversion process wastewater. These and other aromatic solute distribution coefficient data were employed for evaluation of modeling techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Eight solvents were selected in order to represent various chemical classes: toluene and benzene (aromatics), hexane and heptane (alkanes), n-octanol (alcohols), n-butyl acetate (esters), diisopropyl ether (ethers), and methylisobutyl ketone (ketones). The aromatic solutes included: nonpolar compounds such as benzene, toluene and naphthalene, phenolic compounds such as phenol, cresol and catechol, nitrogenous aromatics such as aniline, pyridine and aminonaphthalene, and other aromatic solutes such as naphthol, quinolinol and halogenated compounds. 100 references, 20 figures, 34 tables.

  9. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 65K ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 66K ...

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  12. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... also aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  13. Clean Hands Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... also aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  14. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/campa... . Comments on this ... are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/... This video can ...

  15. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent geographic terms used within the Clean Water Act (CWA). The CWA establishes the basic structure for regulating the addition of pollutants...

  16. 6 Home Cleaning Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aluminum, brass, ceramics, chrome, copper, fiberglass, glass/quartz, plastic, and steel. GLASS CLEANER 1 cup vinegar 1 ... originally filled with commercial cleaning products. Instead, reuse plastic water bottles.  Always place a label on the ...

  17. Nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    This report briefly describes the history of the use of high- efficiency particulate air filters for air cleaning at nuclear installations in the United States and discusses future uses of such filters

  18. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean ... It's in your hands - prevent sepsis in health care' A 5 May 2018 advocacy message from WHO - ...

  19. Clean Energy Finance Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    State and local governments interested in developing a financing program can use this Excel tool to support energy efficiency and clean energy improvements for large numbers of buildings within their jurisdiction.

  20. Steam cleaning device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaki, Mikio; Muraoka, Shoichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To clean complicated and long objects to be cleaned having a structure like that of nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Constitution: Steams are blown from the bottom of a fuel assembly and soon condensated initially at the bottom of a vertical water tank due to water filled therein. Then, since water in the tank is warmed nearly to the saturation temperature, purified water is supplied from a injection device below to the injection device above the water tank on every device. In this way, since purified water is sprayed successively from below to above and steams are condensated in each of the places, the entire fuel assembly elongated in the vertical direction can be cleaned completely. Water in the reservoir goes upward like the steam flow and is drained together with the eliminated contaminations through an overflow pipe. After the cleaning has been completed, a main steam valve is closed and the drain valve is opened to drain water. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on May 5, 2017 This video for healthcare providers is intended to promote or encourage adherence ... role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www. ...

  3. Separation by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, C.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In a process for separating fission product values from U and Pu values contained in an aqueous solution, an oxidizing agent is added to the solution to secure U and Pu in their hexavalent state. The aqueous solution is contacted with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent with agitation while the temperature is maintained at from -1 to -2 0 C until the major part of the water present is frozen. The solid ice phase is continuously separated as it is formed and a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing Pu and U values are separated from each other. The last obtained part of the ice phase is melted and added to the separated liquid phase. The resulting liquid is treated with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of U and Pu

  4. Processing method for cleaning water waste from cement kneader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Kenzo; Fujita, Hisao; Nakajima, Tadashi.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of processing cleaning water wastes from a cement kneader in a case of processing liquid wastes containing radioactive wastes or deleterious materials such as heavy metals by means of cement solidification. Cleaning waste wastes from the kneader are sent to a cleaning water waste tank, in which gentle stirring is applied near the bottom and sludges are retained so as not to be coagulated. Sludges retained at the bottom of the cleaning water waste tank are sent after elapse of a predetermined time and then kneaded with cements. Thus, since the sludges in the cleaning water are solidified with cement, inhomogenous solidification products consisting only of cleaning sludges with low strength are not formed. The resultant solidification product is homogenous and the compression strength thereof reaches such a level as capable of satisfying marine disposal standards required for the solidification products of radioactive wastes. (I.N.)

  5. Heat exchanger cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatewood, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey covers the various types of heat-exchange equipment that is cleaned routinely in fossil-fired generating plants, the hydrocarbon-processing industry, pulp and paper mills, and other industries; the various types, sources, and adverse effects of deposits in heat-exchange equipment; some details of the actual procedures for high-pressure water jetting and chemical cleaning of some specific pieces of equipment, including nuclear steam generators. (DN)

  6. Comprehensive Report to Congress Clean Coal Technology Program: Clean power from integrated coal/ore reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report describes a clean coal program in which an iron making technology is paired with combined cycle power generation to produce 3300 tons per day of hot metal and 195 MWe of electricity. The COREX technology consists of a metal-pyrolyzer connected to a reduction shaft, in which the reducing gas comes directly from coal pyrolysis. The offgas is utilized to fuel a combined cycle power plant.

  7. Valence band photoemission studies of clean metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, P.S.

    1978-04-01

    The application of Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) to crystalline solids and the utilization of such studies to illuminate several questions concerning the detailed electronic structure of such materials, are discussed. Specifically, by construction of a Direct Transition (DT) model and the utilization of energy-dependent angle-resolved normal photoemission in the photon energy range 32 eV < or = hν < or = 200 eV, the bulk band structure of copper is experimentally mapped out along three different directions in the Brillouin Zone; GAMMA to K, GAMMA to L, and GAMMA to X. In addition, various effects which influence the obtainable resolution in vector k-space, namely, thermal disorder, momentum broadening, and band mixing, are discussed and are shown to place severe limitations on the applicability of the DT model. Finally, a model for Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) based on the symmetry of the initial-state wavefunctions is presented and compared to experimental results obtained from copper single crystals

  8. Solvent extraction studies on cadmium Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; El-Kot, A.

    1976-01-01

    An extraction study was performed on various concentrations of cadmium, zinc and cobalt halides in the presence of sulphuric acid. A long chain amine (Amberlite LA-2) and an organophosphorus solvent (TBP) were used. In most cases the value of the distribution ratio decreases with the increase of metal concentration in the aqueous phase. The various possibilities of chemical and radiochemical separations of cadmium from accompanying metal species are reported: separation of (sup109m)Ag from irradiated Cd targets, separation of (sup115m)In using HDEHP, separation of Cd and Zn from their mixtures. (T.G.)

  9. National Ignition Facility Incorporates P2/E2 in Aqueous Parts Cleaning of Optics Hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, K

    2001-01-01

    When completed, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest laser with experimental capabilities applicable to stockpile stewardship, energy research, science and astrophysics. As construction of the conventional facilities nears completion, operations supporting the installation of specialized laser equipment have come online. Playing a critical role in the precision cleaning of mechanical parts from the NIF beamline are three pieces of aqueous cleaning equipment. Housed in the Optics Assembly Building (OAB), adjacent to NIF's laser bay, are the large mechanical parts gross cleaner (LMPGC), the large mechanical parts precision cleaner (LMPPC), and the small mechanical parts gross and precision cleaner (SMPGPC). These aqueous units, designed and built by Sonic Systems, Inc., of Newtown, Pennsylvania, not only accommodate parts that vary greatly in size, weight, geometry, surface finish and material, but also produce cleaned parts that meet the stringent NIF cleanliness standards (MIL-STD-1246C Level 83 for particles and A/10 for non-volatile residue). Each unit was designed with extensive water- and energy-conserving features, and the technology used minimizes hazardous waste generation associated with solvent wipe cleaning, the traditional method for cleaning laser mechanical components. The LMPGC provides preliminary gross cleaning for large mechanical parts. Collection, filtration and reuse of the wash and primary rinse water in the LMPGC limit its routine discharge to the volume of the low-pressure, deionized secondary rinse. After an initial gross cleaning in the LMPGC, a large mechanical part goes to the LMPPC. This piece of equipment, unique because of its size, consists of four 2700-gallon tanks. Parts held securely on specialized metal pallets (jointly weighing up to 1500 pounds) move through the tanks on an automated system. Operators program all movement, speeds and process times to

  10. Continuing challenges in nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The safe operation of nuclear facilities is heavily dependent upon the adequate performance of air cleaning systems. Although many problems have been solved, new questions and new challenges continue to arise. These are well illustrated by weaknesses in air cleaning and ventilating systems revealed by the Browns Ferry fire, and the need to develop additional data on the reliability of such systems, particularly under emergency conditions, as revealed by the Reactor Safety Study. Assessments of the degree to which engineered safety features can compensate for deficiencies in nuclear power plant sites continue to challenge those involved in risk/benefit evaluations. Additional challenges are being generated by the air cleaning requirements associated with the commercial development of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor

  11. Corrosion monitoring during a chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delepine, J.; Feron, D.; Roy, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to estimate the possible corrosion induced by the chemical cleaning, a corrosion monitoring has been realized during the cleaning of the secondary circuit (including the model boiler) of ORION loop. It included coupons and electrodes and has required a preliminary setting in laboratory. The electrochemical device which was used during the chemical cleaning included two reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) and eight metallic electrodes (carbon steel, stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 690) for free corrosion potential monitoring, three other carbon steel electrodes for instantaneous corrosion rate measurements by polarization resistance and three coupling devices with different surface ratios between carbon steel and Alloy 600. The results showed a good agreement between corrosion rates measured by weight losses on coupons or by electrochemistry (polarization resistance), and an increase of the carbon steel corrosion rate when it was coupled with Alloy 600. (authors). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  12. Ecological effectiveness of oil spill countermeasures: how clean is clean?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper with 94 references examines background levels of hydrocarbons and the difficulty of defining clean. Processes and timescales for natural cleaning, and factors affecting natural cleaning timescales are considered. Ecological advantages and disadvantages of clean-up methods are highlighted, and five case histories of oil spills are summarised. The relationships between ecological and socio-economic considerations, and the need for a net environmental benefit analysis which takes into account the advantages and disadvantages of clean-up responses and natural clean-up are discussed. A decision tree for evaluating the requirement for shore clean-up is illustrated. (UK)

  13. TiO 2 Thin Films Prepared via Adsorptive Self-Assembly for Self-Cleaning Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Xi, Baojuan; Verma, Lalit Kumar; Li, Jing; Bhatia, Charanjit Singh; Danner, Aaron James; Yang, Hyunsoo; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2012-01-01

    oxidation processes for wastewater and bactericidal treatments, self-cleaning window glass for green intelligent buildings, dye-sensitized solar cells, solid-state semiconductor metal-oxide solar cells, self-cleaning glass for photovoltaic devices

  14. Solvent extraction of gold using ionic liquid based process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, Megawati; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    In decades, many research and mineral processing industries are using solvent extraction technology for metal ions separation. Solvent extraction technique has been used for the purification of precious metals such as Au and Pd, and base metals such as Cu, Zn and Cd. This process uses organic compounds as solvent. Organic solvents have some undesired properties i.e. toxic, volatile, excessive used, flammable, difficult to recycle, low reusability, low Au recovery, together with the problems related to the disposal of spent extractants and diluents, even the costs associated with these processes are relatively expensive. Therefore, a lot of research have boosted into the development of safe and environmentally friendly process for Au separation. Ionic liquids (ILs) are the potential alternative for gold extraction because they possess several desirable properties, such as a the ability to expanse temperature process up to 300°C, good solvent properties for a wide range of metal ions, high selectivity, low vapor pressures, stability up to 200°C, easy preparation, environmentally friendly (commonly called as "green solvent"), and relatively low cost. This review paper is focused in investigate of some ILs that have the potentials as solvent in extraction of Au from mineral/metal alloy at various conditions (pH, temperature, and pressure). Performances of ILs extraction of Au are studied in depth, i.e. structural relationship of ILs with capability to separate Au from metal ions aggregate. Optimal extraction conditon in order to gain high percent of Au in mineral processing is also investigated.

  15. Ionic liquids used in extraction and separation of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinghai; Xu Chao; Liu Xinqi; Chu Taiwei

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids as green solvents now have become a research hotspot in the field of separation of metal ions by solvent extraction. Experimental results of extraction of various metal ions with ionic liquids as solvents, including that of alkali metals, alkaline earths, transition metals rare earths and actinides are introduced. The extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products that are involved in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is also reviewed. The possible extraction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the prospect of replacement of volatile and/or toxic organic solvents with environmentally benign ionic liquids for solvent extraction and the potency of applications of ionic liquids in solvent extraction are also commented. (authors)

  16. Compound forming extractants, solvating solvents and inert solvents IUPAC chemical data series

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y; Kertes, A S

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium Constants of Liquid-Liquid Distribution Reactions, Part III: Compound Forming Extractants, Solvating Solvents, and Inert Solvents focuses on the compilation of equilibrium constants of various compounds, such as acids, ions, salts, and aqueous solutions. The manuscript presents tables that show the distribution reactions of carboxylic and sulfonic acid extractants and their dimerization and other reactions in the organic phase and extraction reactions of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The book also states that the inorganic anions in these solutions are irrelevant, since they d

  17. Solvent extraction: the coordination chemistry behind extractive metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A Matthew; Bailey, Phillip J; Tasker, Peter A; Turkington, Jennifer R; Grant, Richard A; Love, Jason B

    2014-01-07

    The modes of action of the commercial solvent extractants used in extractive hydrometallurgy are classified according to whether the recovery process involves the transport of metal cations, M(n+), metalate anions, MXx(n-), or metal salts, MXx into a water-immiscible solvent. Well-established principles of coordination chemistry provide an explanation for the remarkable strengths and selectivities shown by most of these extractants. Reagents which achieve high selectivity when transporting metal cations or metal salts into a water-immiscible solvent usually operate in the inner coordination sphere of the metal and provide donor atom types or dispositions which favour the formation of particularly stable neutral complexes that have high solubility in the hydrocarbons commonly used in recovery processes. In the extraction of metalates, the structures of the neutral assemblies formed in the water-immiscible phase are usually not well defined and the cationic reagents can be assumed to operate in the outer coordination spheres. The formation of secondary bonds in the outer sphere using, for example, electrostatic or H-bonding interactions are favoured by the low polarity of the water-immiscible solvents.

  18. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  19. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel

  20. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  1. Carbothermic reduction of refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.N.; Parlee, N.A.D.

    1976-01-01

    The reduction of stable refractory metal oxides by carbon is generally unacceptable since the product is usually contaminated with carbides. The carbide formation may be avoided by selecting a solvent metal to dissolve the reactive metal as it is produced and reduce its chemical activity below that required for carbide formation. This approach has been successfully applied to the oxides of Si, Zr, Ti, Al, Mg, and U. In the case where a volatile suboxide, a carbonyl reaction, or a volatile metal occur, the use of the solvent metal appears satisfactory to limit the loss of material at low pressures. In several solute--solvent systems, vacuum evaporation is used to strip the solvent metal from the alloy to give the pure metal

  2. Phytoremediation of heavy metals: Recent techniques | Jadia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    microorganisms/biomass or live plants to clean polluted areas. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology for cleaning up contaminated sites, which is ... A brief review on phytoremediation of heavy metals and its effect on plants have been ...

  3. Clean technologies: methods for minimizing the releases and choice of the effluents valorization processes. Application to metal workshops; Technologies propres: methodes de minimisation des rejets et de choix des procedes de valorisation des effluents. Application aux ateliers de traitement de surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laforest, V.

    1999-12-10

    Currently, the essential part of the money invested by the industrialist is for the water treatment. In France, most of the 20 billions francs per year devoted to the water treatment is used for the industrial activity. The global management of effluents favour the integration of clean technologies (optimization, change and modification of the production process) in order to reduce the pollution problem at its source. Our study aims at the introduction of clean technologies in the metal workshops (consumer and generator of water and chemicals) by the development of two data management methods, which lead to two decision support systems. The aim of the first one is to minimize both the water consumption and the wastewater disposal by optimizing the production process (optimum yield and efficiency of the rinsing baths). The second one concerns the choice of valorization techniques considering the valorization objectives, the effluents characteristics and the parameters limiting the use of the techniques. Our approach fits into a global management method for the metal finishing industry wastewater. Its aim is to limit the quantity of wastewater generated, to valorize effluents and by this way to develop the clean technologies.

  4. Preliminary assessment and analysis of CO2 cleaning for an inertial fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of cleaning with carbon dioxide ice (CO 2 ) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) application are discussed and analyzed. The compatibility between this cleaning process and the materials proposed for energy-relevant liquid-interaction experiments is examined. The cleaning mechanisms include kinetic shear stress, sublimation followed by thermophoresis, and solvent action. The study shows that the debris size could determine the efficiency of this cleaning technique. Furthermore, if the condensed vapor particulate becomes flattened and embedded inside the abscissa while hitting the surface, a large kinetic shear would be needed for debris removal which might damage the surface. 20 refs., 5 figs

  5. Chemical cleaning the service water system at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, T.O.; Glover, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical cleaning a large cooling water system in a nuclear power plant presented many unique problems. The selection, qualification, and performance of the cleaning process were done using a phased approach. The piping was inspected to determine the extent of the problem. Deposit samples were removed from the service water system pipe and tested in the laboratory to determine the most effective cleaning solvent for deposit removal. An engineering study was performed to define the design parameters required to implement the system-wide chemical cleaning

  6. Clean utilization of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueruem, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains 23 lectures presented at the Advanced Study Institute on 'Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Catalytic Solid Fuel Conversion for the Production of Clean Synthetic Fuels', which was held at Akcay, Edremit, Turkey, between 21 July and August 3, 1991. Three main subjects: structure and reactivity of coal; cleaning of coal and its products, and factors affecting the environmental balance of energy usage and solutions for the future, were discussed in the Institute and these are presented under six groups in the book: Part 1. Structure and reactivity of coal; Part 2. Factors affecting environmental balance; Part 3. Pre-usage cleaning operations and processes; Part 4. Upgrading of coal liquids and gases; Part 5. Oxygen enriched processes; and Part 6. Probable future solution for energy and pollution problems. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all the lectures

  7. Clean room actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Toshiro

    1987-06-01

    This report explains on the present status of the clean room actuators including the author's research results. In a clean room, there exists a possibility of dust generation, even when a direct human work is eliminated by the use of robots or automatic machines, from the machines themselves. For this, it is important to develop such clean robots and transfer/positioning mechanism that do not generate dusts, and to develop an actuator and its control technique. Topics described in the report are as follows: 1. Prevention of dust diffusion by means of sealing. 2. Elimination of mechanical contact (Linear induction motor and pneumatic float, linear motor and magnetic attraction float, linear motor and air bearing, and magnetic bearing). 3. Contactless actuator having a positioning mechanism (Use of linear step motor and rotary contactless actuator). (15 figs, 11 refs)

  8. The Clean Air Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coburn, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Clean Air Act amendments alter the complex laws affecting atmospheric pollution and at the same time have broad implications for energy. Specifically, the Clean Air Act amendments for the first time deal with the environmental problem of acid deposition in a way that minimizes energy and economic impacts. By relying upon a market-based system of emission trading, a least cost solution will be used to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions by almost 40 percent. The emission trading system is the centerpiece of the Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments effort to resolve energy and environmental interactions in a manner that will maximize environmental solutions while minimizing energy impacts. This paper will explore how the present CAA amendments deal with the emission trading system and the likely impact of the emission trading system and the CAA amendments upon the electric power industry

  9. Pool water cleaning facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Asano, Takashi

    1998-05-29

    Only one system comprising a suppression poor water cleaning system (SPCU) and a filtration desalting tower (F/D) is connected for a plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting the one system of the SPCU pump, the F/D and the plurality of nuclear power plants are disposed, and the system is used in common with the plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting a pipeline for passing SP water to the commonly used SPCU pump and a skimmer surge tank are disposed, and fuel pool water is cooled and cleaned by the commonly used SPCU pump and the commonly used F/D. The number of SPCU pumps and the F/D facilities can be reduced, and a fuel pool water cooling operation mode and a fuel pool water cleaning operation mode which were conducted by an FPC pump so far are conducted by the SPCU pump. (N.H.)

  10. Keeping condensers clean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  11. CLEANING OF FRENCH SITES

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauro Nonis

    2002-01-01

    In the last two weeks some cleaning problems have been remarked in several CERN buildings on the French part of CERN sites. This is mainly due to the start up of the new cleaning contract from the 1st July. These problems are not related to a budgetary reduction of the activity. We excuse for the malfunctions that have been created to CERN community and we assure you that we have taken all the needed measures to solve the problem in the shortest delay. Mauro Nonis (ST/FM)

  12. Environmental cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverse, Michelle; Aceto, Helen

    2015-03-01

    The guidelines in this article provide veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and veterinary health care workers with an overview of evidence-based recommendations for the best practices associated with environmental cleaning and disinfection of a veterinary clinic that deals with small animals. Hospital-associated infections and the control and prevention programs necessary to alleviate them are addressed from an environmental perspective. Measures of hospital cleaning and disinfection include understanding mechanisms and types of contamination in veterinary settings, recognizing areas of potential concern, addressing appropriate decontamination techniques and selection of disinfectants, the management of potentially contaminated equipment, laundry, and waste management, and environmental surveillance strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  14. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Sankichi; Takashima, Yoshie.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently eliminate radioactive materials such as iron oxide and cobalt ions with less heat loss by the use of an electrode assembly applied with a direct current. Constitution: In a reactor water clean-up device adapted to pass reactor water through an electrode assembly comprising at least a pair of anode and cathode applied with a direct current to eliminate various types of ions contained in the reactor water by way of the electrolysis or charge neutralization at the anode, the cathode is constituted with a corrosion resistant grid-like or porous metal plate and a layer to the upper portion of the metal plate filled with a plurality of metal spheres of about 1 - 5 mm diameter, and the anode is made of insoluble porous or spirally wound metal material. (Seki, T.)

  15. Method of and apparatus for cleaning garments and soft goods contaminated with nuclear, chemical and/or biological contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for decontaminating garments, soft good or mixtures thereof contaminated with radioactive particulates, toxin, chemical, and biological contaminants comprising the steps of: (a) depositing contaminated garments, soft goods or mixtures thereof in a cleaning drum; (b) charging the drum with a cleaning solvent in which the chemical contaminants are soluble; (c) agitating the drum during a wash cycle to separate radioactive, toxin, biological particulate matter of mixtures thereof from the garments; (d) draining the drum of the dry cleaning solvent which contains suspended particulate contaminants and dissolved chemical contaminants; (e) contacting the drained solvent with both a neutralizing agent and an oxidizing agent, the neutralizing agent being selected from the group consisting of sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and mixtures thereof and having a concentration greater than one (1.0) normal; (f) rinsing the garments, soft goods or mixtures thereof by circulating clean solvent from a solvent tank through the drum thereby effecting additional removal and flushing of particulate and chemical contaminants; (g) filtering the circulated solvent to remove the particulate material suspended in the solvent prior to addition to the drum; and (h) preferentially adsorbing the chemical contaminants dissolved in the circulated solvent prior to addition to the drum

  16. Solvent selection methodology for pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    A method for the selection of appropriate solvents for the solvent swap task in pharmaceutical processes has been developed. This solvent swap method is based on the solvent selection method of Gani et al. (2006) and considers additional selection criteria such as boiling point difference...... in pharmaceutical processes as well as new solvent swap alternatives. The method takes into account process considerations such as batch distillation and crystallization to achieve the swap task. Rigorous model based simulations of the swap operation are performed to evaluate and compare the performance...

  17. Improvements in solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aughwane, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction columns are used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. For an effective reprocessing operation a solvent extraction column is required which is capable of distributing the feed over most of the column. The patent describes improvements in solvent extractions columns which allows the feed to be distributed over an increased length of column than was previously possible. (U.K.)

  18. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is 'What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?'You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product's constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace

  19. Engineered Natural Geosorbents for In Situ Immobilization of DNAPLs and Heavy Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter J. Weber; Gordon M. Fair; Earnest Boyce

    2006-12-01

    Extensive subsurface contamination by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) organic solvents and heavy metals is common place at many DOE facilities. Poor performances and excessive costs have made traditional technologies and approaches less than satisfactory for remediation of such sites. It is increasingly apparent that marginal improvements in conventional methods and approaches will not suffice for clean up of many contaminated DOE sites. Innovative approaches using new and/or existing technologies in more efficient and cost-effective ways are thus urgently required.

  20. Metallization and photolithographic processes and procedures for MC2730 RTG thermopile intraconnections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, E.E.; Wright, R.E.; Knauss, G.L.

    1974-03-01

    Processes and procedures were developed for applying the thin film tungsten electrical intraconnections to the MC2730 RTG ''one-dimensional'' thermopile. After polishing, the surface to be metallized was cleaned with a detergent/organic solvent procedure and then etched with hydrofluoric acid to minimize the oxide. Tungsten contacts were sputtered onto the thermopile and the individual contacts photolithographically defined using a negative acting photoresist in conjunction with a potassium ferricyanide etchant. The processes were used to process 89 thermopiles with an 80 percent effective yield

  1. Engineered Natural Geosorbents for In Situ Immobilization of DNAPLs and Heavy Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter J. Weber; Gordon M. Fair; Earnest Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Extensive subsurface contamination by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) organic solvents and heavy metals is common place at many DOE facilities. Poor performances and excessive costs have made traditional technologies and approaches less than satisfactory for remediation of such sites. It is increasingly apparent that marginal improvements in conventional methods and approaches will not suffice for clean up of many contaminated DOE sites. Innovative approaches using new and/or existing technologies in more efficient and cost-effective ways are thus urgently required

  2. Road-Cleaning Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Roadways are literally soaked with petrochemical byproducts, oils, gasoline, and other volatile substances that eventually run off into sewers and end up in rivers, waterways, and other undesirable places. Can the roads be cleaned of these wastes, with their proper disposal? Can vehicles, robots, or other devices be designed that could be driven…

  3. Clean energy microgrids

    CERN Document Server

    Obara, Shin'ya

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the latest technology in microgrids and economic, environmental and policy aspects of their implementation, including microgrids for cold regions, and future trends. The aim of this work is to give this complete overview of the latest technology around the world, and the interrelation with clean energy systems.

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with ... ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close Clean Hands Count ...

  5. WINDOW-CLEANING

    CERN Multimedia

    Environmental Section / ST-TFM

    2001-01-01

    The two-month window-cleaning session on the Meyrin, Prévessin and LEP sites will soon begin. The cleaning contractors will work from Monday to Saturday, every week from 4.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. The work will be organised so as to disturb users as little as possible. In any event, a work notice will be left in each office 24 hours beforehand. To prevent any damage to documents or items which could occur despite the precautions taken, please clear completely the window-sills and the area immediately around them. If, however, for valid reasons, the work cannot be done on the scheduled day, please inform the Environmental Section by telephoning: 73753 / 74233 / 72242 If you are going to be absent during this two-month period, we should be grateful if you would clear the above mentioned areas before your departure. REMINDER To allow more thorough cleaning of the entrance doors to buildings and also facilitate the weekly work of the cleaning contractors, we ask you to make use of the notice boards at the...

  6. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  7. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos ... empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean ...

  8. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  9. Clean Energy Solutions Center: Assisting Countries with Clean Energy Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    advice on financing instruments. In a recent keynote to the Climate and Clean Energy Investment Forum renewable energy technologies in the country. Informing Energy Access and Clean Energy Project Finance understanding and knowledge of how to design policies that enable financing and encourage investment in clean

  10. Substitution of Organic Solvents - a Way to improve Working Environment and reduce Emissions to the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    solvents as cleaning agents has been reached. However, some barriers to this substitution process, are found outside the printing companies. In designing of machines and auxiliary equipment, the manufacturers must take into account, that cleaning with non-volatile agents should be possible. Even a rather...... the process in order to omit the solvents or to use water-based products. In cases, where a change to water-based is not evident, improvements can be reached by using non-volatile, low-toxic products, typically esters of fatty acids from vegetable oils. In offset printing a drastic reduction of use of organic...

  11. Comparison between polluted and clean air masses over Lake Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkezweeny, A.J.; Laulainen, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    Clean and polluted air masses, advected over Lake Michigan, were studied using instrumental aircraft during the summers of 1976 and 1978. The results show that regardless of the degree of pollution, the particle size distribution is bimodal. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate and trace metals in a clean air mass are more than an order of magnitude lower than those in polluted air masses. Furthermore, these concentrations are comparable with those measured in remote areas of the world. In clean air the ratio of the total light scattering to Rayleigh scattering is very close to one, indicating very low concentrations of particulates in the optically active size classes

  12. Bioremediation potential of a newly isolate solvent tolerant strain Bacillus thermophilus PS11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAYEL SARKAR

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased generation of solvent waste has been stated as one of the most critical environmental problems. Though microbial bioremediation has been widely used for waste treatment but their application in solvent waste treatment is limited since the solvents have toxic effects on the microbial cells. A solvent tolerant strain of Bacillus thermophilus PS11 was isolated from soil by cyclohexane enrichment. Transmission electron micrograph of PS11 showed convoluted cell membrane and accumulation of solvents in the cytoplasm, indicating the adaptation of the bacterial strain to the solvent after 48h of incubation. The strain was also capable of growing in presence of wide range of other hydrophobic solvents with log P-values below 3.5. The isolate could uptake 50 ng/ml of uranium in its initial 12h of growth, exhibiting both solvent tolerance and metal resistance property. This combination of solvent tolerance and metal resistance will make the isolated Bacillus thermophilus PS11 a potential tool for metal bioremediation in solvent rich wastewaters.

  13. Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianwen Niu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC, 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC, 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC, 5% Na2CO3 SRC (SCASRC, NaCl SRC (SCSRC, CaCl2 SRC (CCSRC, FeCl3 SRC (FCSRC, sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC, NaOH (pH 10 SRC (SHSRC, Na2CO3 (pH 10 SRC (SCABSRC and SDS (pH 10 SRC (SDSSRC values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl to acidic (5% lactic acid or alkaline (5% Na2CO3, CaCl2, FeCl3, NaOH and pH 10 Na2CO3, and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3 increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**, CCSRC (0.82**, SCHSRC (0.80** and FCSRC (0.78*. SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64* but not related with protein and starch. CaCl2 could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay.

  14. Work ability score of solvent-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furu, Heidi; Sainio, Markku; Hyvärinen, Hanna-Kaisa; Kaukiainen, Ari

    2018-03-28

    Occupational chronic solvent encephalopathy (CSE), characterized by neurocognitive dysfunction, often leads to early retirement. However, only the more severe cases are diagnosed with CSE, and little is known about the work ability of solvent-exposed workers in general. The aim was to study memory and concentration symptoms, work ability and the effect of both solvent-related and non-occupational factors on work ability, in an actively working solvent-exposed population. A questionnaire on exposure and health was sent to 3640 workers in four solvent-exposed fields, i.e. painters and floor-layers, boat builders, printers, and metal workers. The total number of responses was 1730. We determined the work ability score (WAS), a single question item of the Work Ability Index, and studied solvent exposure, demographic factors, Euroquest memory and concentration symptoms, chronic diseases, and employment status using univariate and multivariate analyses. The findings were compared to those of a corresponding national blue-collar reference population (n = 221), and a small cohort of workers with CSE (n = 18). The proportion of workers with memory and concentration symptoms was significantly associated with solvent exposure. The WAS of solvent-exposed workers was lower than that of the national blue-collar reference group, and the difference was significant in the oldest age group (those aged over 60). Solvent-exposed worker's WAS were higher than those of workers diagnosed with CSE. The WAS were lowest among painters and floor-layers, followed by metal workers and printers, and highest among boat builders. The strongest explanatory factors for poor work ability were the number of chronic diseases, age and employment status. Solvent exposure was a weak independent risk factor for reduced WAS, comparable to a level of high alcohol consumption. Even if memory and concentration symptoms were associated with higher solvent exposure, the effect of solvents on self

  15. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  16. Clean Transfer of Wafer-Scale Graphene via Liquid Phase Removal of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ho; Kang, Boseok; Suk, Ji Won; Li, Nannan; Kim, Kwang S; Ruoff, Rodney S; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-05-26

    Pentacene (C22H14), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, was used as both supporting and sacrificing layers for the clean and doping-free graphene transfer. After successful transfer of graphene to a target substrate, the pentacene layer was physically removed from the graphene surface by using intercalating organic solvent. This solvent-mediated removal of pentacene from graphene surface was investigated by both theoretical calculation and experimental studies with various solvents. The uses of pentacene and appropriate intercalation solvent enabled graphene transfer without forming a residue from the supporting layer. Such residues tend to cause charged impurity scattering and unintentional graphene doping effects. As a result, this clean graphene exhibited extremely homogeneous surface potential profiles over a large area. A field-effect transistor fabricated using this graphene displayed a high hole (electron) mobility of 8050 cm(2)/V·s (9940 cm(2)/V·s) with a nearly zero Dirac point voltage.

  17. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  18. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning, Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, S.

    1978-07-01

    United Nuclear Industries (UNI) entered into a subcontract with Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Ed) on August 8, 1977, for the purpose of developing methods to chemically clean the secondary side tube to tube support crevices of the steam generators of Indian Point Nos. 1 and 2 PWR plants. This document represents the first reporting on activities performed for Phase I of this effort. Specifically, this report contains the results of a literature search performed by UNI for the purpose of determining state-of-the-art chemical solvents and methods for decontaminating nuclear reactor steam generators. The results of the search sought to accomplish two objectives: (1) identify solvents beyond those proposed at present by UNI and Con Ed for the test program, and (2) confirm the appropriateness of solvents and methods of decontamination currently in use by UNI

  19. Sustainable development with clean coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses the opportunities available with clean coal technologies. Applications include new power plants, retrofitting and repowering of existing power plants, steelmaking, cement making, paper manufacturing, cogeneration facilities, and district heating plants. An appendix describes the clean coal technologies. These include coal preparation (physical cleaning, low-rank upgrading, bituminous coal preparation); combustion technologies (fluidized-bed combustion and NOx control); post-combustion cleaning (particulate control, sulfur dioxide control, nitrogen oxide control); and conversion with the integrated gasification combined cycle.

  20. Solar panel cleaning robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalladhimmu, Pavan Kumar Reddy; Priyadarshini, S.

    2018-04-01

    As the demand of electricity is increasing, there is need to using the renewable sources to produce the energy at present of power shortage, the use of solar energy could be beneficial to great extent and easy to get the maximum efficiency. There is an urgent in improving the efficiency of solar power generation. Current solar panels setups take a major power loss when unwanted obstructions cover the surface of the panels. To make solar energy more efficiency of solar array systems must be maximized efficiency evaluation of PV panels, that has been discussed with particular attention to the presence of dust on the efficiency of the PV panels have been highlighted. This paper gives the how the solar panel cleaning system works and designing of the cleaning system.

  1. Chemical-Cleaning Demonstration Test No. 2 in a mock-up steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevec, J.M.; Leedy, W.S.

    1983-04-01

    This report describes the results of the mockup demonstration test of the first modified baseline process under Contract S-127, Chemical Cleaning of Nuclear Steam Generators. The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of cleaning the secondary side of nuclear steam generators with state-of-the-art chemical cleaning technology. The first step was to benchmark a baseline process. This process was then modified to attempt to eliminate the causes of unacceptable cleaning performance. The modified baseline process consists of an EDTA/H 2 O 2 -based copper solvent and a near-neutral, EDTA/N 2 H 4 -based magnetite and crevice solvent. This report also presents the results of three inhibitor evaluation mockup runs used in the evaluation of the modified baseline process

  2. Evaporator Cleaning Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Operation of the 242-16H High Level Waste Evaporator proves crucial to liquid waste management in the H-Area Tank Farm. Recent operational history of the Evaporator showed significant solid formation in secondary lines and in the evaporator pot. Additional samples remain necessary to ensure material identity in the evaporator pot. Analysis of these future samples will provide actinide partitioning information and dissolution characteristics of the solid material from the pot to ensure safe chemical cleaning

  3. Cleanly: trashducation urban system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reif, Inbal; Alt, Florian; Ramos, Juan David Hincapie

    Half the world's population is expected to live in urban areas by 2020. The high human density and changes in peoples' consumption habits result in an ever-increasing amount of trash that must be handled by governing bodies. Problems created by inefficient or dysfunctional cleaning services are e......, which not only motivates our research but also provides useful information on reasons and possible solutions for trash problems....

  4. Laser cleaning of Rakowicze sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Wijffels, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Decisions about the cleaning of natural stone should always be made within the awareness of direct and indirect damage that may be the result of cleaning. During the last decade, laser cleaning of objects and monuments of natural stone has become increasingly popular. Whereas a considerable amount

  5. Clean energy utilization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Takuya

    1992-01-01

    The technical development of clean energy including the utilization of solar energy was begun in 1973 at the time of the oil crisis, and about 20 years elapsed. Also in Japan, the electric power buying system by electric power companies for solar light electric power and wind electric power has been started in 1992, namely their value as a merchandise was recognized. As for these two technologies, the works of making the international standards and JIS were begun. The range of clean energy or natural energy is wide, and its kinds are many. The utilization of solar heat and the electric power generation utilizing waves, tide and geotherm already reached the stage of practical use. Generally in order to practically use new energy, the problem of price must be solved, but the price is largely dependent on the degree of spread. Also the reliability, durability and safety must be ensured, and the easiness of use, effectiveness and trouble-saving maintenance and operation are required. For the purpose, it is important to packaging those skillfully in a system. The cases of intelligent natural energy systems are shown. Solar light and wind electric power generation systems and the technology of transporting clean energy are described. (K.I.)

  6. Clean steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels

  7. Solvent extraction of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Yoon, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(VI) from an aqueous solution of constant ionic strength with versatic acid-10 dissolved in benzen was studied as a function of pH and the concentration of zirconium(VI) and organic acid. The effects of sulphate and chlorine ions on the extraction of the zirconium(VI) were briefly examined. It was revealed that (ZrOR 2 .2RH) is the predominant species of extracted zirconium(VI) in the versatic acid-10. The chemical equation and the apparent equilibrium constants thereof have been determined as follows. (ZrOsup(2+))aq+ 2(R 2 H 2 )sub(org) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)+2(H + )aq Ksub(Zr) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)(H + ) 2 /(ZrOsup(2+))sub(aq)(R 2 H 2 )sup(2)sub(org) = 3.3 x 10 -7 . The synergistic effects of TBP and D2EHPA were also studied. In the mixed solvent with 0.1M TBP, the synergistic effect was observed, while the mixed solvent with D2EHPA showed the antisynergistic effect. (Author)

  8. Study of chemical cleaning technique for removing sludge in secondary side of PWR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Zhang Shufeng; Pan Qingchun; Yu Jinghua; Hou Shufeng

    1993-12-01

    The effect of components, concentration, pH, temperature, cleaning time and flowrate of chemical cleaning solvent made from EDTA mainly on Fe 3 O 4 solubility and corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel, S271 low alloy steel and 800 alloy are introduced. A small chemical cleaning test loop (30L) was built to study the cleaning technique. The effect of residue of chemical cleaning solvent on anti-corrosion performance of materials has been studied under the simulation condition of PWR (pressure water reactor) SG (steam generator) secondary side. The results show that the chemical solvent (pH = 7, 10% EDTA, 1% assistance solvent and 0.25% inhibitor A) can dissolve Fe 3 O 4 18 ∼23 g/L under the conditions of 93 +- 5 degree C, 8 hours and 112 r/min (1.8 ∼ 2.0 t/h). The corrosion rate of material is low. When the residue of EDTA is less than 0.01% there is no impact on the anti-corrosion performance of materials in PWR SG secondary side at normal operation condition (260 +- 5 degree C)

  9. One electron reduction of 1,2 dihydroxy 9,10 anthraquinone and its transition metal complexes in aqueous-isopropanol-acetone mixed solvent: a steady state-state and pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Saurabh; Mandal, Parikshit C.; Rath, Madhab C.; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    1998-01-01

    One electron reduction of 1,2 dihydroxy 9,10 anthraquinone and its Cu(II) and Ni(II) and Fe(III) complexes have been studied in aqueous-isopropanol-acetone solvent. Results indicate that the reducing ketyl radical generated reacts with the ligand forming semiquinones which undergoes a disproportionation reaction. Formation and decay rates of semiquinones was calculated using pulse radiolysis. (author)

  10. Measurement of dielectric constant of organic solvents by indigenously developed dielectric probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Ajay Kumar; Rao, J. Prabhakar; Rao, C. V. S. Brahmmananda; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramanarayanan, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    The extraction, separation and purification of actinides (uranium and plutonium) from various matrices are an important step in nuclear fuel cycle. One of the separation process adopted in an industrial scale is the liquid-liquid extraction or solvent extraction. Liquid-liquid extraction uses a specific ligand/extractant in conjunction with suitable diluent. Solvent extraction or liquid-liquid extraction, involves the partitioning of the solute between two immiscible phases. In most cases, one of the phases is aqueous, and the other one is an organic solvent. The solvent used in solvent extraction should be selective for the metal of interest, it should have optimum distribution ratio, and the loaded metal from the organic phase should be easily stripped under suitable experimental conditions. Some of the important physical properties which are important for the solvent are density, viscosity, phase separation time, interfacial surface tension and the polarity of the extractant.

  11. Steam generator secondary side chemical cleaning at Gentilly-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plante, S.

    2006-01-01

    After more than 20 years of operation, the secondary side of the four steam generators at Gentilly-2 were chemically cleaned during the 2005 annual outage. The FRAMATOME ANP high temperature cleaning process used to remove magnetite loading involved stepwise injection of solvent with PHT temperature in the range 160 o C to 175 o C. The heat required to maintain the PHT temperature was provided by the operation of the main PHT pumps and the reactor core residual heat. The temperature control was accomplished by the shutdown cooling system heat exchangers. A total of 1280 kg of magnetite was removed from the four steam generators. A copper-cleaning step was applied after the iron step. The PHT has been cooled down and the steam generators drained to temporary tanks and dried in preparation of the copper step. The process has been applied at room temperature, two boilers at a time. The solvent removed a total of 116 kg of copper. During the iron step, steam flow to the feedwater tank chemically contaminate the Balance Of Plant (BOP) systems. The isolation of this path should have been part of the G2 procedures. Around 700 m3 of water had to be drained to interim storage tanks for subsequent resin treatment before disposal. Visual inspection of BO1 tubesheet and first support plate showed clean surfaces without measurable sludge pile. Upper support plates visual inspection of BO4 revealed that broach holes blockage reported in 2000 is still present in peripheral area. Following the plant restart, the medium range level measurement instability observed since several years for BO3 was no more present. As anticipated, it also has been observed that the medium and wide range level measurements have shifted down as a result of downcomer flow increase after the cleaning. The cleaning objectives were achieved regarding the fouling reduction on the steam generators secondary side but broach holes blockage of the upper support plate is still present in periphery. (author)

  12. 300 area solvent evaporator interim status closure plan: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a hazardous waste tank treatment facility operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This treatment facility was a solvent evaporator located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, from 1975 to 1985 on behalf of DOE-RL. The 300 Area Solvent Evaporator (300 ASE) was a modified load lugger (dumpster) in which solvent wastes were evaporated. Some of the solvents were radioactively contaminated because they came from a degreaser which processed bare uranium metal billets from the N Reactor Fuel Manufacturing Facility. The waste was composed of perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, ethyl acetate/bromine solution, paint shop solvents and possibly some used oil. Also, small amounts of uranium, copper, zirconium and possibly beryllium were present in the degreaser solvents as particulates. Radioactive and non-radioactive solvents were not segregated in the 300 ASE, and the entire mixture was regarded as mixed waste

  13. Clean Coal Day '94 Hokkaido International Seminar; Clean coal day '94 Hokkaido kokusai seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    The lectures given at the seminar were 1) Coal energy be friendly toward the earth, 2) Clean coal technology in the United Kingdom, and 3) How clean coal should be in Australia. In lecture 1), remarks are made on the importance of coal and its future, coal that protects forest, whether coal is a dirty fuel, coal combustion tests started relative to environmental pollution, acid rain in China and coal combustion, briquets effective in energy conservation, etc. In lecture 2), remarks are made on the importance of coal utilization in the United Kingdom, current state of coal utilization in power generation, problems related to gasification furnaces, problems related to combustors, problems related to high-temperature gas cleaning, function of cleaning filters, advantages of high-temperature gas treatment, actualities of gas combustors, studies of gas combustors, etc. In lecture 3), remarks are made on Australia's coal situation, problems related to clean coal technology, problems related to coal preparation technology, potentialities of Australian brown coal, coal utilization in power generation, need of new technology development, current state of coal utilization in Australia, coal utilization in metal-making industry, international cooperation on technology, etc. (NEDO)

  14. Clean Coal Day '94 Hokkaido International Seminar; Clean coal day '94 Hokkaido kokusai seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    The lectures given at the seminar were 1) Coal energy be friendly toward the earth, 2) Clean coal technology in the United Kingdom, and 3) How clean coal should be in Australia. In lecture 1), remarks are made on the importance of coal and its future, coal that protects forest, whether coal is a dirty fuel, coal combustion tests started relative to environmental pollution, acid rain in China and coal combustion, briquets effective in energy conservation, etc. In lecture 2), remarks are made on the importance of coal utilization in the United Kingdom, current state of coal utilization in power generation, problems related to gasification furnaces, problems related to combustors, problems related to high-temperature gas cleaning, function of cleaning filters, advantages of high-temperature gas treatment, actualities of gas combustors, studies of gas combustors, etc. In lecture 3), remarks are made on Australia's coal situation, problems related to clean coal technology, problems related to coal preparation technology, potentialities of Australian brown coal, coal utilization in power generation, need of new technology development, current state of coal utilization in Australia, coal utilization in metal-making industry, international cooperation on technology, etc. (NEDO)

  15. Some solvent extraction studies of trivalent metal halides; Quelques etudes sur l'extraction par solvant d'halogenures de metaux trivalents; Izuchenie ehkstraktsii nekotorykh rastvoritelej iz trekhvalentnykh metallicheskikh galoidov; Algunos estudios de la extraccion mediante disolventes de haluros de metales trivalentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Jr, R J; Mendez, J; Irvine, Jr, J W [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1962-03-15

    Radiotracer techniques have made possible physical-chemical studies of the distribution of Ga (III) and In (III) between aqueous HCl and HBr solutions and the organic solvents, bis (2-chloroethyl) ether and nitrobenzene. From measurements of the extraction coefficients over a metal concentration range of greater than 10{sup 10} and under conditions where the coefficient varies by a factor of 10{sup 5}, the empirical behaviour of these systems has been thoroughly explored. The data have been explained in terms of ionization of the complex acid, HMX{sub 4}, in these relatively high dielectric solvents. From the variation of the extraction coefficient with metal concentration the ionization constant has been calculated of the supporting electrolyte, HCl or HBr, in the non-aqueous phase using a method developed by Poskanzer. Variation of the extraction coefficient with HX concentration has been used to calculate stability constants for the complex species MX{sub 3} and MX{sub 4}{sup -}. Since these are aqueous-phase reactions they are independent of the organic solvent used and excellent agreement is obtained for In (III)-HCl, using both bis (2-chloroethyl) ether and nitrobenzene. Attempts to evaluate the formation constants for gallium chloride and bromide complexes failed since the complex formation occurs over a very narrow range of acid concentration. Calculation from extraction data of the fraction, (GaCl{sub 4}{sup -})/{Sigma} Ga (III), as a function of HCl concentration gave a quantitative agreement with the data obtained from ion-exchange measurement by Kraus and Nelson. (author) [French] Les techniques utilisant des indicateurs radioactifs ont permis l'etude physico-chimique de la distribution du gallium (II) et de l'indium (III) entre les solutions aqueuses d'HCl et d'HBr et les solvants organiques ether bis (chloro-2-ethylique) et nitrobenzene. On etudie d'une facon empirique et approfondie le comportement de ces systemes, en se fondant sur les mesures des

  16. Chemical cleaning of nuclear (PWR) steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.S. Jr.; Mundis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant research program sponsored by a group of utilities (the Steam Generator Owners Group), which was undertaken to develop a process to chemically remove corrosion product deposits from the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant steam generators. Results of this work have defined a process (solvent system and application methods) that is capable of removing sludge and tube-to-tube support plate crevice corrosion products generated during operation with all-volatile treatment (AVT) water chemistry. Considers a plant-specific test program that includes all materials in the steam generator to be cleaned and accounts for the physical locations (proximity and contact) of those materials. Points out that prior to applying the process in an operational unit, the utility, with the participation of the NSSR vendor, must define allowable total corrosion to the materials of construction of the unit

  17. Proceedings of ISEC 2008, International Solvent Extraction Conference - Solvent Extraction: Fundamentals to Industrial Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    The North American industry has employed major solvent-extraction processes to support a wide range of separations including but not limited to chemical, metallurgical, nuclear, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and petroleum applications. The knowledge enabling these separations has been obtained through fundamental studies in academe, government and industry. The International Solvent Extraction Conferences have been and continue to be a major gathering of scientists, engineers, operators, and vendors from around the world, who present new findings since the last meeting, exchange ideas, make business contacts, and conduct collegial discussions. The ISEC 2008 program emphasizes fundamentals to industrial applications of solvent extraction, particularly how this broad spectrum of activities is interconnected and has led to the implementation of novel processes. The oral and poster sessions have been organized into seven topics: Fundamentals; Novel Reagents, Materials and Techniques; Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing; Hydrometallurgy and Metals Extraction; Analytical and Preparative Applications; Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, Life-Science Products, and Organic Products; and Process Chemistry and Engineering. Over 350 abstracts were received, resulting in more than 260 manuscripts published in these proceedings. Five outstanding plenary presentations have been identified, with five parallel sessions for oral presentations and posters. In recognition of the major role solvent extraction (SX) plays in the hydrometallurgical and nuclear industries, these proceedings begin with sections focusing on hydrometallurgy, process chemistry, and engineering. More fundamental topics follow, including sections on novel reagents, materials, and techniques, featuring novel applications in analytical and biotechnology areas. Despite the diversity of topics and ideas represented, however, the primary focus of the ISEC community continues to be metals extraction. Four papers from these

  18. Replacement Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware for Propellant Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-l13- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. Replacement technologies are being investigated for aerospace hardware and for gauges and instrumentation. This paper includes the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification of aerospace hardware using known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils. The results correlate nonvolatile residue with CFC 113. The studies also include enhancements to aqueous sampling for organic and particulate contamination. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon 225 (HCFC 225), HCFC 141b, HFE 7100(R), and Vertrel MCA(R) was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC 113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autogenous ignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  19. Method of making alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pruski, Marek; Hlova, Ihor; Castle, Andra

    2017-05-30

    A method is provided for making alkali metal hydrides by mechanochemically reacting alkali metal and hydrogen gas under mild temperature (e.g room temperature) and hydrogen pressure conditions without the need for catalyst, solvent, and intentional heating or cooling.

  20. SOLVENT FREE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING IRON (III) NITRATE NONAHYDRATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of alcohols have been conducted with metal nitrate reagents on various mineral supports such as clay, silica and zeolite etc. To circumvent the limitations of these supported reagents namely their preparation using solvents and short shelf-life, we explored the use of i...

  1. Cleaning and decontamination: Experimental feedback from PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, F.; Rodriguez, G.

    1997-01-01

    After the first few years of operation of PHENIX, it proved necessary to clean, then decontaminate sodium-polluted components, particularly large components such as the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) and the primary pumps (PP). Ibis document presents the evolution of the cleaning and decontamination processes used, and specifies the reasons for this evolution. As regards the cleaning, experimental feedback and a greater rigour with respect to the hydrogen hazard have resulted in a modification of the process. The new cleaning process used at present (since 1994) is described in greater detail in this document. The main steps are: cold CO 2 bubbling in water, followed by hot CO 2 bubbling, spraying phase, then drying for inspection before immersion. In order to optimize and validate the process, the cleaning and decontamination plant has been highly instrumented, which, in particular, has allowed confirmation of the contention that the major part of the sodium is eliminated during the bubbling phases. With respect to decontamination, the objective is to perfect an efficient process that allows both human intervention with no particular biological shield for repair or maintenance of the components, and requalification of the materials after the decontamination operation. Owing to the high operating temperature of Fast Breeder Reactor components (400 to 550 deg. C), the activated corrosion products deposited on the components melt into the metal. The decontamination process therefore consists in either dissolving the deposits on the surface, or dissolving a thickness of about less than ten micrometers of the base metal. The reference process for austenitic-type steels is the SPm process, which consists in immersing the component in a sulphuric-phosphoric bath (sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid) at a temperature of 60 deg. C for 6 hours. The problem linked to this process is the treatment of the effluents that are produced, particularly phosphate releases. A

  2. Clean electricity from photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    The second edition of Clean Electricity from Photovoltaics , first published in 2001, provides an updated account of the underlying science, technology and market prospects for photovoltaics. All areas have advanced considerably in the decade since the first edition was published, which include: multi-crystalline silicon cell efficiencies having made impressive advances, thin-film CdTe cells having established a decisive market presence, and organic photovoltaics holding out the prospect of economical large-scale power production. Contents: The Past and Present (M D Archer); Limits to Photovol

  3. Final status report in preparation for the chemical cleaning of Dresden-1, DNS-D1-034

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report discusses the status of all of the activities conducted in preparation for the chemical cleaning of the Dresden-1 Nuclear Power Plant of Commonwealth Edison of Illinois. The metallurgical testing of a solvent and its ability to remove radioactivity are reviewed. Included are all engineering details relating to the modifications to the primary system to be able to perform the chemical cleaning and to rinse the cleaning solvent out of the equipment. A facility to store and process spent cleaning solutions is described in detail. Construction activities and preoperational activities are recounted. Licensing activities, quality assurance, safety, and radiation protection are discussed. The report includes recommendations for future actions for restarting the project when approval is received. All of the efforts discussed in this Final Status Report led to the conclusion that the chemical cleaning, as planned, was feasible. All of the necessary modifications and new equipment are in place and are operational

  4. Cleaning Up Our Drinking Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manke, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    Imagine drinking water that you wring out of the sponge you've just used to wash your car. This is what is happening around the world. Rain and snow pass through soil polluted with pesticides, poisonous metals and radionuclides into the underground lakes and streams that supply our drinking water. 'We need to understand this natural system better to protect our groundwater and, by extension, our drinking water,' said Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Applied Geology and Geochemistry Group Manager, Wayne Martin. Biologists, statisticians, hydrologists, geochemists, geologists and computer scientists at PNNL work together to clean up contaminated soils and groundwater. The teams begin by looking at the complexities of the whole environment, not just the soil or just the groundwater. PNNL researchers also perform work for private industries under a unique use agreement between the Department of Energy and Battelle, which operates the laboratory for DOE. This research leads to new remediation methods and technologies to tackle problems ranging from arsenic at old fertilizer plants to uranium at former nuclear sites. Our results help regulators, policy makers and the public make critical decisions on complex environmental issues

  5. Solvent-free porous framework resulted from 3D entanglement of 1D zigzag coordination polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Kole, Goutam Kumar Umar

    2010-01-01

    A solvent-free porous metal organic framework is constructed by the 3D entanglement of 1D zigzag coordination polymeric chains. The role of solvents and the effect of reaction conditions on such unique entanglement are addressed. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.

  6. Solvent-free porous framework resulted from 3D entanglement of 1D zigzag coordination polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Kole, Goutam Kumar Umar; Cairns, Amy J.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Vittal, Jagadese J.

    2010-01-01

    A solvent-free porous metal organic framework is constructed by the 3D entanglement of 1D zigzag coordination polymeric chains. The role of solvents and the effect of reaction conditions on such unique entanglement are addressed. © 2010 The Royal

  7. Adsorbents for radioactive organic solvent wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Shigeo; Kiribayashi, Takehiko.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to settle radioactive solvents such as tributyl phosphate (TBP) and n-dodecane as they are without using hydrophobicizing agent such as quaternary ammonium salts. Constitution: The adsorbents are prepared by replacing interlaminer ions of swelling-type synthetic mica with alkaline earth metals or metal ions. For instance, synthetic micas introduced with Zr 4+ or Ca 2+ between the layers provide quite different functions from those of starting materials due to the properties of ions introduced between the layers. That is, they provide an intense affinity to organic phosphates such as TBP and transform into material showing a property of adsorbing and absorbing them. Particularly, the fixing nature to the phosphor content constituting TBP is significantly increased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Selective solvent extraction of oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-04-09

    In the selective solvent extraction of naphthenic base oils, the solvent used consists of the extract obtained by treating a paraffinic base oil with a selective solvent. The extract, or partially spent solvent is less selective than the solvent itself. Selective solvents specified for the extraction of the paraffinic base oil are phenol, sulphur dioxide, cresylic acid, nitrobenzene, B:B/sup 1/-dichlorethyl ether, furfural, nitroaniline and benzaldehyde. Oils treated are Coastal lubricating oils, or naphthenic oils from the cracking, or destructive hydrogenation of coal, tar, lignite, peat, shale, bitumen, or petroleum. The extraction may be effected by a batch or counter-current method, and in the presence of (1) liquefied propane, or butane, or naphtha, or (2) agents which modify the solvent power such as, water, ammonia, acetonitrile, glycerine, glycol, caustic soda or potash. Treatment (2) may form a post-treatment effected on the extract phase. In counter-current treatment in a tower some pure selective solvent may be introduced near the raffinate outlet to wash out any extract therefrom.

  9. International Clean Energy Coalition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  10. Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Aage; Rylander, Lars

    2006-01-01

    -cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval...... not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level...

  11. Cleaning and Restoration of an Oil Painting with a Polymer Gel in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Siyamak Alizadeh

    2018-01-01

    One of the major stages in the conservation and restoration of a painting is to clean its colored surface of unwanted stains, and old and darkened varnishes. Various solvents have been used to date for this purpose; however, new cleaning materials have also come onto the market in the past decade that are still unknown and may never have been employed in Iran. The present study aims to introduce a polymer gel and use an in vitro sample of the substance for cleaning and to then present the res...

  12. Steam generator chemical cleaning demonstration test No. 1 in a pot boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, G.L.; Helyer, M.H.

    1981-04-01

    The effectiveness of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI Mark I) chemical cleaning solvent process was tested utilizing a 12 tube pot boiler that had previously been fouled and dented under 30 days of high chloride fault chemistry operation. Specifically, the intent of this chemical cleaning test was to: (1) dissolve sludge from the tubesheet, (2) remove non-protective magnetite from dented tube/support crevice regions, and (3) quantify the extent of corrosion of steam generator material during the test. Two laboratory cleaning demonstrations of 191 and 142 hours were performed

  13. Selection and design of solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    and design of solvents will be presented together with application examples. The selection problem is defined as finding known chemicals that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. The design problem is defined as finding the molecular structure (or mixture of molecules....... With increasing interest on issues such as waste, sustainability, environmental impact and green chemistry, the selection and design of solvents have become important problems that need to be addressed during chemical product-process design and development. Systematic methods and tools suitable for selection......) that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. Use of organic chemicals and ionic liquids as solvents will be covered....

  14. Laser cleaning of 19th century Congo rattan mats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, N.; Oujja, M.; Roemich, H.; Castillejo, M.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest by art conservators for laser cleaning of organic materials, such as wooden artworks, paper and textiles, since traditional cleaning with solvents can be a source of further decay and mechanical cleaning may be too abrasive for sensitive fibers. In this work we present a successful laser cleaning approach for 19th century rattan mats from the Brooklyn Museum collection of African Art, now part of the study collection at the Conservation Center in New York. Tests were carried out using the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelength of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to measure threshold values both for surface damage and color changes for different types of rattan samples. The irradiated substrates were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and by UV-vis spectroscopy in order to determine the efficiency of laser cleaning and to assess possible deterioration effects that may have occurred as a result of laser irradiation. The study showed that by using the laser emission at 532 nm, a wavelength for which photon energy is below the bond dissociation level of the main cellulosic compounds and the water absorption is negligible, it is possible to select a range of laser fluences to remove the black dust layer without damaging the rattan material.

  15. Bringing Catalysis with Gold Nanoparticles in Green Solvents to Graduate Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Wendt, Robert; O'Neill, Maeve; Ochmann, Miguel; Som, Tirtha; Fenger, Robert; Mohrmann, Marie; Hoell, Armin; Rademann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate here a novel laboratory experiment for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by using a low energy gold-sputtering method together with a modern, green, and biofriendly deep eutectic solvent (DES). The strategy is straightforward, economical, ecofriendly, rapid, and clean. It yields uniform AuNPs of 5 nm in diameter with high…

  16. Demonstration of advanced APBS solvent at TNO's CO2 capture pilot plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bumb, P.; Kumar, R.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    The company Carbon Clean Solutions (CCS) has developed a variety of energy efficient solvents and processes such as PCCMax, which aim to reduce the overall operating and capital cost of CO2 capture. Highly successful R&D in collaboration with TNO, considering aspects from fundamental properties such

  17. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME II: PROCESS OVERVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume presents initial results of a study to identify the issues and barriers associated with retrofitting existing solvent-based equipment to accept waterbased adhesives as part of an EPA effort to improve equipment cleaning in the coated and laminated substrate manufactur...

  18. Trajectories towards clean technology. Example of volatile organic compound emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belis-Bergouignan, Marie-Claude; Oltra, Vanessa; Saint Jean, Maider [IFREDE-E3i, University Montesquieu-Bordeaux IV, Avenue Leon Duguit, Pessac 33608 (France)

    2004-02-20

    This article is based on the observation that, up until now, corporate investment has been limited in clean technologies despite the will of governmental authorities to stimulate them in order to cope with the demands of sustainable development. The paper deals with the issue of the development of clean technologies and the role of regulations as clean technology promoters. It tries to apprehend the characteristics and specificity of clean technology from both an empirical and a theoretical point of view, so as to understand which are the most favourable (or inversely, the most detrimental) conditions for their development. We use case studies concerning the reduction of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in the chemical and metallurgical industries. These two examples highlight the problems created by the shift from a 'with-solvent paradigm' to a 'solvent-free paradigm' and the way clean technology trajectories may spread within such paradigms. We show that the problem of clean technology development primarily resides in some factors that impede technological adoption, although a strong and mixed incentives framework prevails. Such impediments are sector-specific, leading to different clean technology trajectories among sectors and indicating areas of sectoral intervention that could become the cornerstones of complementary technology policy.

  19. Cleaning and Restoration of an Oil Painting with a Polymer Gel in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyamak Alizadeh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major stages in the conservation and restoration of a painting is to clean its colored surface of unwanted stains, and old and darkened varnishes. Various solvents have been used to date for this purpose; however, new cleaning materials have also come onto the market in the past decade that are still unknown and may never have been employed in Iran. The present study aims to introduce a polymer gel and use an in vitro sample of the substance for cleaning and to then present the results of the tests carried out. Applying a polymer gel in the cleaning of paintings yielded better results and greater advantages over the solvents previously used to clean artworks. The advantages include, performing on the surface without penetrating the lower layers, the absence of residues after application, flexibility, solubility and the gentle removal of old stains and varnishes, maintaining clarity and cleaning the surface by simple removal of the thin dried layer, which requires no mechanical pressure. Microscopic examinations and pH testing showed that this new alternative technique can be of use in cleaning the color layers of oil paintings.

  20. Green Michael addition of thiols to electron deficient alkenes using KF/alumina and recyclable solvent or solvent-free conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenardao, Eder J.; Trecha, Danusia O.; Ferreira, Patricia da C.; Jacob, Raquel G.; Perin, Gelson [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPEL), Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica e Geociencias. Lab. de Sintese Organica Limpa (LASOL)]. E-mail: lenardao@ufpel.edu.br

    2009-07-01

    A general, clean and easy method for the conjugated addition of thiols to citral promoted by KF/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under solvent-free or using glycerin as recyclable solvent at room temperature is described. It was found that the solvent-free protocol is applicable to the direct reaction of thiophenol with the essential oil of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) to afford directly 3,7-dimethyl-3-(phenylthio)oct-6-enal, a potential bactericide agent. The method was extended to other electron-poor alkenes with excellent results. For the solvent-free protocol, the use of microwave irradiation facilitated the procedure and accelerates the reaction. The catalytic system and glycerin can be reused up to three times without previous treatment with comparable activity. (author)

  1. Impurity studies and discharge cleaning in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1979-10-01

    The goal of present and next generation tokamak experiments is to produce high-density, high-purity plasmas during high-power, extended-duration discharges. Plasma discharges with Z/sub eff/ values near unity and low concentrations of medium and high-Z metallic impurities have been obtained in Doublet III using a combination of low-power hydrogen discharge cleaning, gas puffing, precise plasma shape and position control, and high-Z limiters. Analysis of the first wall surface and residual gas impurities confirmed that clean conditions have been achieved. The high-Z limiters showed very limited amounts of melting or arcing. The progress of the wall cleaning process was monitored by three diagnostic techniques: Auger electron spectroscopy of metallic samples at the vessel wall, residual gas analysis, and the resistivity of full power discharges

  2. Impurity studies and discharge cleaning in Doublet III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1979-10-01

    The goal of present and next generation tokamak experiments is to produce high-density, high-purity plasmas during high-power, extended-duration discharges. Plasma discharges with Z/sub eff/ values near unity and low concentrations of medium and high-Z metallic impurities have been obtained in Doublet III using a combination of low-power hydrogen discharge cleaning, gas puffing, precise plasma shape and position control, and high-Z limiters. Analysis of the first wall surface and residual gas impurities confirmed that clean conditions have been achieved. The high-Z limiters showed very limited amounts of melting or arcing. The progress of the wall cleaning process was monitored by three diagnostic techniques: Auger electron spectroscopy of metallic samples at the vessel wall, residual gas analysis, and the resistivity of full power discharges.

  3. Cleaning of boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautio, T.; Alaverronen, M.; Lohva, K.; Teivaala, V.

    2004-09-01

    In terms of long-term safety it is a risk that the boreholes can eventually function as short-circuits between the repository and ground surface. Therefore sealing of investigation boreholes is an important issue for the long- term safety of high-level nuclear waste repositories. In order to seal a borehole properly, the conditions of the borehole have to meet certain predetermined requirements. One of the requirements is that no instruments or materials endangering the plugging operation or the long-term function of the sealing materials, are allowed to be left in the borehole. Sometimes drilling equipment will be left in the hole or it cannot be recovered from the hole with the given constraints of time, cost and resources in spite of attempts. Additionally various measurements may be carried out in the holes after the drilling has been completed and measuring devices may get stuck in holes. Consequently cleaning of the borehole is carried out as an essential activity before sealing can be implemented. There are two common reasons identified for the drill strings to get stuck in holes. First the drill string may get stuck due to acute drilling problems. The second case is where rods are left as casing in a hole either based on the structure of the upper part of the hole or in order to support the hole. To remove the drilling or measuring equipment lost in a borehole, special techniques and professional skill must be applied. Removing measuring equipment from a hole is often demanding and time consuming work. A vital part of the cleaning operation is planning the work in advance. In order to make the plan and to select the suitable methods it is important to know the condition of the stuck material. It is also important to know the exact depth where the equipment are stuck and to have an estimate of the reasons why they have got stuck. It is also very important to know the correct dimensions of the equipment or drill string before commencing the cleaning work

  4. Combustion and environmental performance of clean coal end products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G.; Sakellaropoulos, G. [Centre for Research and Technology, Hellas, Ptolemaidas-Kozanis, Ptolemaida (Greece). Inst. for Solid Fuel Technolgy and Applications]|[Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering Lab]|[Chemical Process Engineering Research Inst., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Solid Fuels and Environment; Someus, E. [Thermal Desorption Technology Group (Greece); Grammelis, P.; Amarantos, P.S. [Centre for Research and Technology, Hellas, Ptolemaidas-Kozanis, Ptolemaida (Greece). Inst. for Solid Fuel Technolgy and Applications; Palladas, A.; Basinas, P.; Natas, P.; Prokopidou, M.; Diamantopoulou, I.; Sakellaropoulos, G. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering Lab

    2006-07-01

    Clean and affordable power production is needed in order to achieve sustainable economic development. This paper focused on clean coal technologies in which coal-fired power plants are used in conjunction with large amounts of renewable energy sources to offer a high level of process safety and long term management of all residual operation streams. Thermal Desorption Recycle-Reduce-Reuse Technology (TDT-3R) was described as being a promising solid fuel pretreatment process for clean energy production up to 300 MWe capacities. TDT-3R is based on low temperature carbonisation fuel pre-treatment principles, which produce cleansed anthracite type fuels from coal and other carbonaceous material such as biomass and organic wastes. The combustion efficiency of such clean coals and the environmental performance of the TDT-3R process were investigated in this study via pilot scale tests of clean fuel production. Tests included flue gas emissions monitoring, raw fuel and product characterisation and thermogravimetric tests, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-furans, and heavy metals analyses, and toxicity tests. Raw material included coal and biomass, such as willow, straw and demolition wood. The fuels were heated in a rotary kiln operating at 550 degrees C under slightly vacuum conditions. Clean coals were tested either alone or in conjunction with biomass fuels in a pilot scale combustion facility at Dresden, Germany. The clean coal samples were shown to have higher fixed carbon and ash content and lower volatiles compared to the respective raw coal samples. The major advantage of the TDT-3R process is the production of fuels with much lower pollutants content. Low nitrogen, sulphur, chlorine and heavy metal contents result in produced fuels that have excellent environmental performance, allow boiler operation in higher temperatures and overall better efficiency. Moreover, the use of clean fuels reduces deposition problems in the combustion chamber due to the

  5. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D

    2006-01-01

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing ∼4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to ∼2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain ∼23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a ∼70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional

  6. How the nuclear industry keeps it gases clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The paper surveys briefly the papers presented at a conference on gas filtration in the nuclear industry. The theory, development, design, use (under various conditions of temperature, humidity, corrosion), performance, cleaning and testing of fibrous, HEPA, metal, packed bed and magnetic filters are included, and the problems, advantages and disadvantages of the various types of filter are discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Fouling and cleaning of seawater reverse osmosis membranes in Kalpakkam Nuclear Desalination Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murugan, V.; Rajanbabu, K.; Tiwari, S.A.; Balasubramanian, C.; Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Dangore, A.Y.; Prabhakar, S.; Tewari, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis plant of 1800 m 3 /day capacity is a part of 6300 m 3 /day capacity Nuclear Desalination Demonstration Project, at Kalpakkam. The plant was commissioned in October 2002 and is in continuous operation. This paper deals with types of foulants, membrane cleaning procedures and the improvement in the reverse osmosis system after cleaning. This paper also describes analysis of foulants which may consist of adsorbed organic compounds, particulate matter, microorganisms, metallic oxides and chemical cleaning procedure to be adopted, which is characteristics of sea water used as the membrane foulant is very much specific with respect to the sea water constituents. The cleaning of the membranes in Kalpakkam Nuclear Desalination plant were taken up as the quality of permeate deteriorated and differential pressure across membrane had gone-up. This paper essentially deals with selection of cleaning chemicals, the experience gained in cleaning procedure adopted and effects of cleaning for the membrane system. (author)

  8. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterman, Dean R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Lonnie G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDowell, Rocklan G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  9. Cleaning the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegmann, R.

    1993-01-01

    Volume 6 of the Hamburg Reports contains contributions from scientists from the Special Research Field 188 'Cleaning up Contaminated Soils' of the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg and the University of Hamburg and of experts from science and from the practical field. The soil science and analytical aspects of the biological and chemical/physical treatment processes are shown and open questions specific to processes are dealt with. Scientific results are compared with practical experience here. The evaluation of treated soils for reuse in the environment is a very important question, which is explained in the first articles here. Examples of case studies are shown in the last part of the volume. (orig.) [de

  10. Flue gas cleaning chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutberlet, H [VEBA Kraftwerke Ruhr AG, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The introduction of modern flue gas cleaning technology into fossil-fueled power stations has repeatedly confronted the power station chemists with new and interesting problems over the last 15 - 20 years. Both flue gas desulphurization by lime washing and catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides are based on simple basic chemical reactions. Owing to the use of readily available starting materials, the production of safe, useful end products and, last but not least, the possibility of implementing all this on an industrial scale by means of efficient process engineering, limestone desulphurization and catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides dominate the world market and, little by little, are becoming still more widespread. The origin and thus the quality of fuels and starting materials, the firing method, the mode of operation and engineering peculiarities in each plant interact in a complex manner. Simple cause/effect relationships are frequently incapable of explaining phenomena; thinking in complex interrelationships is needed. (EG)

  11. Ultrasound cleaning of microfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Jens; Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop, design, and manufacture a high-power ultrasound transducer module to be used for preventing the blocking of plastic-based microfilters by organic materials, and possibly to prolong the lifetime of the filters in industry using the cavitation on the surface...... suitable for cleaning of microfilters without damaging the filter structure. The filter surface was studied using an optical microscope before and after the experiment. When high-power ultrasound (max. 75 W/cm2) was applied to the surface of some microfilters, no visible damage was found, while others...... of the filter. A numerical, FE- and BE-based model for calculation of the response of ultrasonic transducers of various geometries formed the basis for the design of such transducers. During laboratory experiments frequency and output power have been varied in order to find the optimal transducer design...

  12. Processing of polymers using reactive solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemstra, P.J.; Kurja, J.; Meijer, H.E.H.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    1997-01-01

    A review with many refs. on processing of polymers using reactive solvents including classification of synthetic polymers, guidelines for the selection of reactive solvents, basic aspects of processing, examples of intractable and tractable polymer/reactive solvent system

  13. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1996-05-07

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene or terpineol cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  14. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfurly alcohol cleaning agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  15. Handbook of organic solvent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The properties of 72 of the most commonly used solvents are given, tabulated in the most convenient way, making this book a joy for industrial chemists to use as a desk reference. The properties covered are those which answer the basic questions of: Will it do the job? Will it harm the user? Will it pollute the air? Is it easy to handle? Will it pollute the water? Can it be recovered or incinerated? These are all factors that need to be considered at the early stages of choosing a solvent for a new product or process.A collection of the physical properties of most commonly used solvents, their

  16. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  18. Programmed Cleaning and Environmental Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John C., Ed.

    Maintenance of sanitation in buildings, plants, offices, and institutions; the selection of cleaning materials for these purposes; and the organization and supervision of the cleaning program are becoming increasingly complex and needful of a higher cost of handling. This book describes these problems and gives helpful information and guidance for…

  19. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: Final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Two chemical cleaning solvent systems and two application methods were developed to remove the sludge in nuclear steam generators and to remove the corrosion products in the annuli between the steam generator tubes and the support plates. Laboratory testing plus subsequent pilot testing has demonstrated that, in a reasonable length of time, both solvents are capable of dissolving significant amounts of sludge, and of dissolving tightly packed magnetite in tube/support plate crevices. Further, tests have demonstrated that surface losses of the materials of construction in steam generators can be controlled to acceptable limits for the duration of the required cleaning period. Areas requiring further study and test have been identified, and a preliminary procedure for chemical cleaning nuclear steam generators has been chosen subject to quantification based on additional tests prior to actual in-plant demonstration

  20. Fire protection for clean rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirson, D.

    1990-01-01

    The fire protection engineer often must decide what size fire can be tolerated before automatic fire suppression systems actuate. Is it a wastepaper basket fire, a bushel basket fire...? In the case of state-of-the-art clean rooms, the answer clearly is not even an incipient fire. Minor fires in clean rooms can cause major losses. This paper discusses what a clean room is and gives a brief overview of the unique fire protection challenges encountered. The two major causes of fire related to clean rooms in the semiconductor industry are flammable/pyrophoric gas fires in plastic ducts and polypropylene wet bench fires. This paper concentrates on plastic ductwork in clean rooms, sprinkler protection in ductwork, and protection for wet benches

  1. Ionic Liquids as Extraction Media for Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Naoki

    In solvent extraction separation of metal ions, recently, many researchers have investigated possible use of hydrophobic ionic liquids as extraction media instead of organic solvents. Ionic liquids are salts of liquid state around room temperature and can act not only as solvents but also as ion-exchangers. Therefore, the extraction mechanism of metal ions into ionic liquids is complicated. This review presents current overview and perspective on evaluation of nature of hydrophobic ionic liquids as extraction media for metal ions.

  2. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraikaew, J.

    1996-01-01

    The yellow cake refining was studied in both laboratory and semi-pilot scales. The process units mainly consist of dissolution and filtration, solvent extraction, and precipitation and filtration. Effect of flow ratio (organic flow rate/ aqueous flow rate) on working efficiencies of solvent extraction process was studied. Detailed studies were carried out on extraction, scrubbing and stripping processes. Purity of yellow cake product obtained is high as 90.32% U 3 O 8

  3. Clean graphene electrodes on organic thin-film devices via orthogonal fluorinated chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jonathan H; Barton, Robert A; Cox, Marshall P; Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Petrone, Nicholas; Olivieri, Giorgia; Yang, Shyuan; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2015-04-08

    Graphene is a promising flexible, highly transparent, and elementally abundant electrode for organic electronics. Typical methods utilized to transfer large-area films of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on metal catalysts are not compatible with organic thin-films, limiting the integration of graphene into organic optoelectronic devices. This article describes a graphene transfer process onto chemically sensitive organic semiconductor thin-films. The process incorporates an elastomeric stamp with a fluorinated polymer release layer that can be removed, post-transfer, via a fluorinated solvent; neither fluorinated material adversely affects the organic semiconductor materials. We used Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to show that chemical vapor deposition graphene can be successfully transferred without inducing defects in the graphene film. To demonstrate our transfer method's compatibility with organic semiconductors, we fabricate three classes of organic thin-film devices: graphene field effect transistors without additional cleaning processes, transparent organic light-emitting diodes, and transparent small-molecule organic photovoltaic devices. These experiments demonstrate the potential of hybrid graphene/organic devices in which graphene is deposited directly onto underlying organic thin-film structures.

  4. Air-cleaning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    An air-cleaning, heat-exchange apparatus includes a main housing portion connected by means of an air inlet fan to the kitchen exhaust stack of a restaurant. The apparatus includes a plurality of heat exchangers through which a heat-absorptive fluid is circulated, simultaneously, by means of a suitable fluid pump. These heat exchangers absorb heat from the hot exhaust gas, out of the exhaust stack of the restaurant, which flows over and through these heat exchangers and transfers this heat to the circulating fluid which communicates with remote heat exchangers. These remote heat exchangers further transfer this heat to a stream of air, such as that from a cold-air return duct for supplementing the conventional heating system of the restaurant. Due to the fact that such hot exhaust gas is heavily grease laden , grease will be deposited on virtually all internal surfaces of the apparatus which this exhaust gas contacts. Consequently, means are provided for spraying these contacted internal surfaces , as well as the hot exhaust gas itself, with a detergent solution in which the grease is soluble, thereby removing grease buildup from these internal surfaces

  5. Clean coal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelson, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    One of the major technology challenges in the next decade will be to develop means of using coal imaginatively as a source of chemicals and in a more energy-efficient manner. The Clean Air Act will help to diminish the acid rain but will not reduce CO 2 emissions. The Department of Energy (DOE) is fostering many innovations that are likely to have a positive effect on coal usage. Of the different innovations in the use of coal fostered by DOE, two are of particular interest. One is the new pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle demonstration. The PFBC plant now becoming operational can reduce SO 2 emissions by more than 90% and NO x emissions by 50-70%. A second new technology co-sponsored by DOE is the Encoal mild coal gasification project that will convert a sub-bituminous low-BTU coal into a useful higher BTU solid while producing significant amounts of a liquid fuel

  6. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  7. Canada's Clean Air Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This paper provided an outline of Canada's Clean Air Act and examined some of the regulatory changes that will occur as a result of its implementation. The Act is being introduced to strengthen the legislative basis for taking action on reducing air pollution and GHGs, and will allow the government to regulate both indoor and outdoor air pollutants and GHGs. The Act will require the Ministers of the Environment and Health to establish national air quality objectives, as well as to monitor and report on their attainment. The Canadian Environmental Protection Act will be amended to enable the government to regulate the blending of fuels and their components. The Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act will also be amended to enhance the government's authority to regulate vehicle fuel efficiency. The Energy Efficiency Act will also be expanded to allow the government to set energy efficiency standards and labelling requirements for a wider range of consumer and commercial products. The Act will commit to short, medium and long-term industrial air pollution targets. Regulations will be proposed for emissions from industry; on-road and off-road vehicles and engines; and consumer and commercial products. It was concluded that the Government of Canada will continue to consult with provinces, territories, industries and Canadians to set and reach targets for the reduction of both indoor and outdoor air pollutants and GHG emissions. 6 figs

  8. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  9. Plasma cleaning and analysis of archeological artefacts from Sipan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saettone, E A O [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Matta, J A S da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Alva, W [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Chubaci, J F O [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Fantini, M C A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Galvao, R M O [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Kiyohara, P [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil); Tabacniks, M H [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2003-04-07

    A novel procedure using plasma sputtering in an electron-cyclotron-resonance device has been applied to clean archeological MOCHE artefacts, unearthed at the Royal Tombs of Sipan. After successful cleaning, the pieces were analysed by a variety of complementary techniques, namely proton-induced x-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With these techniques, it has been possible to not only determine the profiles of the gold and silver surface layers, but also to detect elements that may be relevant to explain the gilding techniques skillfully developed by the metal smiths of the MOCHE culture.

  10. Chemical cleaning of steam generators: application to Nogent 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiquet, J.M.; Veysset, J.P.; Esteban, L.; Saurin, P.

    1991-01-01

    EDF has patented a chemical cleaning process for PWR steam generators, based on the use of a mixture or organic acids in order to dissolve iron oxides and copper with a single solution and clean dented crevices. Qualification tests have permitted to demonstrate effectiveness of the solution and its innocuousness related to steam generator materials. The process, the licence of which belongs to SOMAFER RA and Framatome has been implemented in France at Nogent. The goal was to dissolve iron oxides allowing metallic particles, aggregated on the tubesheet, to be released and mechanically removed. The effectiveness was satisfactory and this treatment is to be extended to other units. (author)

  11. Chemical cleaning of PWR steam generators: application at Nogent 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiquet, J.M.; Veysset, J.P.; Esteban, L.; Saurin, P.

    1990-01-01

    EDF has developed and patented a chemical cleaning process for PWR steam generators, based on the use of a mixture of organic acids in order to: - dissolve iron oxides and copper with a single solution; - clean dented crevices. Qualification tests have permitted to demonstrate effectiveness of the solution and its inocuousness related to steam generator materials. The process, the license of which belongs to SOMAFER R.A. and FRAMATOME, has been implemented in France at Nogent. The goal was to dissolve iron oxides allowing metallic particles, aggregated on the tubesheet, to be released and mechanically removed. The effectiveness was satisfactory and this treatment is to be extended to other units [fr

  12. Modern Procedures Used in Cleaning Old, Illegibly and Blackened Icons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruteanu Silvea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to restore the original aesthetic aspect, to improve the state of the age patina and of the gold halo, similar processes are required. The cleaning process is one of the most important aspects for an artwork and is considering a series of deteriorations and degradations, like dirt deposits (clogged or unclogged opalescent varnish, colors blackening, burns, blisters, gaps (missing ground, painting layer or varnish. This step in the restoration process includes physical and mechanical proceedings like dusting (with a vacuum, brushing (with a brush, scraping (with a scalpel, removal or polishing etc. The scalpel and the milling process are rough unconventional means that are used only in exceptional cases. The wet cleaning of dirt includes classic washing processes, with water or other complex systems of organic solvents (emollients, surface additives or surfactants, mixtures of solvents. Cleaning the clogged dirt deposits with unconventional methods can be done by means of electronic laser, ion and thermal exchange or ultrasounds. Laser cleaning is often used in removing unwanted dirt deposits from different layers of the art piece. A lot of attention goes towards the controlled elimination of the exterior protection layer (varnish, which can be photo- degraded and oxidized by atmospheric exposure. Visual analysis, with enlargers (OM, SEM, AFM etc. combined with transmission or penetration techniques (radiography, endoscopy, X-ray diffraction etc. provides information on the superficial structures of the art work. In order to determine the modifications of the desiccant oils, SEM was used to observed the changes in the morphology of the oil painting layers. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS can be used to detrmine detergent residues on the painting layer.

  13. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute; Turchanin, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy

  14. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Technical University Ilmenau, Weimarer Strasse 25, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute, E-mail: ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Turchanin, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Universitätsstr. 25, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2014-04-14

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  15. Gold recovery from organic solvents using galvanic stripping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, C.; O`Keefe, T.J. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    1995-08-01

    A novel process using solid metals for the direct reduction of more noble metal ions from solvent extraction organics has been developed. Base metals recovery has been the principal focus of investigations to date but feasibility tests have now also been made on galvanically stripping selected precious metals. In this study gold (III) was loaded from an aqueous HAuCl{sub 4}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O solution into a mixed organic 40 vol.% TBP, 10 vol.% D2EHPA in kerosene. The direct precipitation of metallic gold from the loaded organic phase using zinc powder and iron, aluminum and copper slabs at 70 C was successfully demonstrated. The gold reduction rates were relatively fast even though the conductivity of the organic solutions is very low. The reaction rates were studied as a function of the variables zinc particulate size, oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere, water content in the organic phase, organic ratios and temperature. The gold morphology was usually powdery or dendritic in nature but continuous films were obtained in some instances. Activation energies were calculated and possible reaction mechanisms are discussed. In general, the results obtained were very promising and showed that gold can be successfully cemented from selected organic solvents by galvanic stripping using less noble solid metal reductants.

  16. The impact of metallic filter media on HEPA filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Chris; Kaufman, Seth

    2006-01-01

    Traditional HEPA filter systems have limitations that often prevent them from solving many of the filtration problems in the nuclear industry; particularly in applications where long service or storage life, high levels of radioactivity, dangerous decomposition products, chemical aggression, organic solvents, elevated operating temperatures, fire resistance and resistance to moisture are issues. This paper addresses several of these matters of concern by considering the use of metallic filter media to solve HEPA filtration problems ranging from the long term storage of transuranic waste at the WIPP site, spent and damaged fuel assemblies, in glove box ventilation and tank venting to the venting of fumes at elevated temperatures from incinerators, vitrification processes and conversion and sintering furnaces as well as downstream of iodine absorbers in gas cooled reactors in the UK. The paper reviews the basic technology, development, performance characteristics and filtration efficiency, flow versus differential pressure, cleanability and costs of sintered metal fiber in comparison with traditional resin bonded glass fiber filter media and sintered metal powder filter media. Examples of typical filter element and system configurations and applications will be presented The paper will also address the economic case for installing self cleaning pre-filtration, using metallic media, to recover the small volumes of dust that would otherwise blind large volumes of final disposable HEPA filters, thus presenting a route to reduce ultimate disposal volumes and secondary waste streams. (authors)

  17. Bilayer lift-off process for aluminum metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas E.; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Crow, Nathaniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently published reports in the literature for bilayer lift-off processes have described recipes for the patterning of metals that have recommended metal-ion-free developers, which do etch aluminum. We report the first measurement of the dissolution rate of a commercial lift-off resist (LOR) in a sodium-based buffered commercial developer that does not etch aluminum. We describe a reliable lift-off recipe that is safe for multiple process steps in patterning thin (recipe consists of an acid cleaning of the substrate, the bilayer (positive photoresist/LOR) deposition and development, the sputtering of the aluminum film along with a palladium capping layer and finally, the lift-off of the metal film by immersion in the LOR solvent. The insertion into the recipe of postexposure and sequential develop-bake-develop process steps are necessary for an acceptable undercut. Our recipe also eliminates any need for accompanying sonication during lift-off that could lead to delamination of the metal pattern from the substrate. Fine patterns were achieved for both 100-nm-thick granular aluminum/palladium bilayer bolometers and 500-nm-thick aluminum gratings with 6-μm lines and 4-μm spaces.

  18. Cleaning of the first mirrors and diagnostic windows by YAG laser on HL-2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y; Zheng, L; Li, Y G; Li, L C; Jiao, Y M; Gao, H; Zhao, G

    2009-01-01

    A laser cleaning system for HL-2A tokamak first mirrors and diagnostic windows has been developed recently. A detailed description of the laser cleaning procedure is presented. The optical transmission performance measured before and after the laser cleaning of the impurity film deposited on the optical elements is investigated. HL-2A deposited layers on metal mirrors and glass windows with thicknesses of about 1 and 4 μm, respectively, are clearly removed by irradiation with a single pulse of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with energy density of 0.4 and 2.8 J cm -2 , respectively. The feasibility of cleaning ECE windows is demonstrated. A cleaning time of about 5 min is suitable for application in fusion devices. The comparison of results obtained at different laser wavelengths shows that there is a greater probability of damage to the metallic mirror surface with a short laser wavelength than with longer wavelength.

  19. Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2013 (TCEP 2013) examines progress in the development and deployment of key clean energy technologies. Each technology and sector is tracked against interim 2020 targets in the IEA Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 2°C scenario, which lays out pathways to a sustainable energy system in 2050. Stark message emerge: progress has not been fast enough; large market failures are preventing clean energy solutions from being taken up; considerable energy efficiency remains untapped; policies need to better address the energy system as a whole; and energy-related research, development and demonstration need to accelerate. Alongside these grim conclusions there is positive news. In 2012, hybrid-electric vehicle sales passed the 1 million mark. Solar photovoltaic systems were being installed at a record pace. The costs of most clean energy technologies fell more rapidly than anticipated.

  20. Uniquely Strongly Clean Group Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIU-LAN

    2012-01-01

    A ring R is called clean if every element is the sum of an idempotent and a unit,and R is called uniquely strongly clean (USC for short) if every element is uniquely the sum of an idempotent and a unit that commute.In this article,some conditions on a ring R and a group G such that RG is clean are given.It is also shown that if G is a locally finite group,then the group ring RG is USC if and only if R is USC,and G is a 2-group.The left uniquely exchange group ring,as a middle ring of the uniquely clean ring and the USC ring,does not possess this property,and so does the uniquely exchange group ring.