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Sample records for soluble matrix protein

  1. Exactly soluble matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju Viswanathan, R.

    1991-09-01

    We study examples of one dimensional matrix models whose potentials possess an energy spectrum that can be explicitly determined. This allows for an exact solution in the continuum limit. Specifically, step-like potentials and the Morse potential are considered. The step-like potentials show no scaling behaviour and the Morse potential (which corresponds to a γ = -1 model) has the interesting feature that there are no quantum corrections to the scaling behaviour in the continuum limit. (author). 5 refs

  2. Identification of Proteins with Potential Osteogenic Activity Present in the Water-Soluble Matrix Proteins from Crassostrea gigas Nacre Using a Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel V. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nacre, when implanted in vivo in bones of dogs, sheep, mice, and humans, induces a biological response that includes integration and osteogenic activity on the host tissue that seems to be activated by a set of proteins present in the nacre water-soluble matrix (WSM. We describe here an experimental approach that can accurately identify the proteins present in the WSM of shell mollusk nacre. Four proteins (three gigasin-2 isoforms and a cystatin A2 were for the first time identified in WSM of Crassostrea gigas nacre using 2DE and LC-MS/MS for protein identification. These proteins are thought to be involved in bone remodeling processes and could be responsible for the biocompatibility shown between bone and nacre grafts. These results represent a contribution to the study of shell biomineralization process and opens new perspectives for the development of new nacre biomaterials for orthopedic applications.

  3. Extracellular matrix proteins matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) and correlations with clinical staging in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininghaus, Eva Z; Lackner, Nina; Birner, Armin; Bengesser, Susanne; Fellendorf, Frederike T; Platzer, Martina; Rieger, Alexandra; Queissner, Robert; Kainzbauer, Nora; Reininghaus, Bernd; McIntyre, Roger S; Mangge, Harald; Zelzer, Sieglinde; Fuchs, Dietmar; Dejonge, Silvia; Müller, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) are both involved in the restructuring of connective tissues. Evidence also implicates MMP9 and sICAM in cardiovascular and neoplastic diseases, where blood levels may be a marker of disease severity or prognosis. In individuals with bipolar disorder (BD), higher risk for cardiovascular illness has been extensively reported. The aim of this investigation was to measure and compare peripheral levels of serum MMP9 and sICAM in adults with euthymic BD and healthy controls (HC). Furthermore, we focussed on correlations with illness severity and metabolic parameters. MMP9 levels among the BD sample (n = 112) were significantly higher than among the HC (n = 80) (MMP9: F = 9.885, p = 0.002, η(2)  = 0.058) after controlling for confounding factors. Patients with BD in a later, progressive stage of disease showed significantly higher MMP9 as well as sICAM-1 levels compared to patients with BD in an earlier stage of disease (MMP9: F = 5.8, p = 0.018, η(2)  = 0.054; sICAM-1: F = 5.6, p = 0.020, η(2)  = 0.052). Correlation analyses of cognitive measures revealed a negative association between performance on the d2 Test of Attention and MMP9 (r = -0.287, p = 0.018) in the BD sample. Despite the sample being euthymic (i.e., according to conventional criteria) at the time of analysis, we found significant correlations between MMP9 as well as sICAM-1 and subthreshold depressive/hypomanic symptoms. A collection of disparate findings herein point to a role of MMP9 and cICAM-1 in the patho-progressive process of BD: the increased levels of serum MMP9 and sICAM-1, the correlation between higher levels of these parameters, progressive stage, and cognitive dysfunction in BD, and the positive correlation with subthreshold symptoms. As sICAM-1 and MMP9 are reliable biomarkers of inflammatory and early atherosclerotic disease, these markers may provide indications of the

  4. Determination of soluble protein contents from RVNRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Manshol Wan Zin; Nurulhuda Othman

    1996-01-01

    This project was carried out to determine the soluble protein contents on RVNRL film vulcanisates, with respect to the RVNRL storage time, gamma irradiation dose absorbed by the latex and the effect of different leaching time and leaching conditions. These three factors are important in the hope to determine the best possible mean of minimizing the soluble protein contents in products made from RVNRL. Within the nine months storage period employed in the study, the results show that, the longer the storage period the less the soluble protein extracted from the film samples. Gamma irradiation dose absorbed by the samples, between 5.3 kGy to 25.2 kGy seems to influence the soluble protein contents of the RVNRL films vulcanisates. The higher the dose the more was the soluble protein extracted from the film samples. At an absorbed dose of 5.3 kGy and 25.2 kGy, the soluble contents were 0. 198 mg/ml and 0.247 mg/ml respectively. At a fixed leaching temperature, the soluble proteins increases with leaching time and at a fixed leaching time, the soluble proteins increases with leaching temperature. ne highest extractable protein contents was determined at a leaching time of 10 minutes and leaching temperature of 90'C The protein analysis were done by using Modified Lowry Method

  5. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G.; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  6. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Gilad [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ziv, Tamar [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Braten, Ori [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Admon, Arie [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Udasin, Ronald G. [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ciechanover, Aaron, E-mail: aaroncie@tx.technion.ac.il [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel)

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  7. Abalone water-soluble matrix for self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Zhenliang [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Chen, Jingdi, E-mail: ibptcjd@fzu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wang, Hailiang [The Affiliated Stomatological Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhong, Shengnan; Hu, Yimin; Wang, Zhili [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Enamel cannot heal by itself if damaged. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is main component of human enamel. Formation of enamel-like materials for healing enamel defects remains a challenge. In this paper, we successfully isolated the abalone water-soluble matrix (AWSM) with 1.53 wt% the abalone water-soluble protein (AWSPro) and 2.04 wt% the abalone water-soluble polysaccharide (AWSPs) from abandoned abalone shell, and self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects was successfully achieved in vitro. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), hot field emission scanning electron microscopy (HFESEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis, the results showed that the AWSM can efficiently induce remineralization of HAP. The enamel-like HAP was successfully achieved onto etched enamel's surface due to the presence of the AWSM. Moreover, the remineralized effect of eroded enamel was growing with the increase of the AWSM. This study provides a solution to the resource waste and environmental pollution caused by abandoned abalone shell, and we provides a new method for self-healing remineralization of enamel defects by AWSM and develops a novel dental material for potential clinical dentistry application. - Graphical abstract: In this paper, we successfully isolated the abalone water-soluble matrix (AWSM) with 1.53 wt% abalone water-soluble protein (AWSPro) and 2.04 wt% abalone water-soluble polysaccharide (AWSPs) from abandoned abalone shell, and self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects was successfully achieved in vitro by self-organized. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Provides a solution to the resource waste and environmental pollution caused by abandoned abalone shell. • The abalone shell water-soluble matrix contains protein and polysaccharide. • The abalone water-soluble matrix can efficiently induce remineralization of HAP by self-organized. • Achieved self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects in

  8. Abalone water-soluble matrix for self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Zhenliang; Chen, Jingdi; Wang, Hailiang; Zhong, Shengnan; Hu, Yimin; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-01-01

    Enamel cannot heal by itself if damaged. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is main component of human enamel. Formation of enamel-like materials for healing enamel defects remains a challenge. In this paper, we successfully isolated the abalone water-soluble matrix (AWSM) with 1.53 wt% the abalone water-soluble protein (AWSPro) and 2.04 wt% the abalone water-soluble polysaccharide (AWSPs) from abandoned abalone shell, and self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects was successfully achieved in vitro. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), hot field emission scanning electron microscopy (HFESEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis, the results showed that the AWSM can efficiently induce remineralization of HAP. The enamel-like HAP was successfully achieved onto etched enamel's surface due to the presence of the AWSM. Moreover, the remineralized effect of eroded enamel was growing with the increase of the AWSM. This study provides a solution to the resource waste and environmental pollution caused by abandoned abalone shell, and we provides a new method for self-healing remineralization of enamel defects by AWSM and develops a novel dental material for potential clinical dentistry application. - Graphical abstract: In this paper, we successfully isolated the abalone water-soluble matrix (AWSM) with 1.53 wt% abalone water-soluble protein (AWSPro) and 2.04 wt% abalone water-soluble polysaccharide (AWSPs) from abandoned abalone shell, and self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects was successfully achieved in vitro by self-organized. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Provides a solution to the resource waste and environmental pollution caused by abandoned abalone shell. • The abalone shell water-soluble matrix contains protein and polysaccharide. • The abalone water-soluble matrix can efficiently induce remineralization of HAP by self-organized. • Achieved self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects in vitro.

  9. Changes in protein solubility, fermentative capacity, viscoelasticity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frozen dough should be stored for fewer than 21 days; time in which the loaf volume of bread made from frozen dough was approximately 40.84% smaller than that of fresh bread dough formulation. Keywords: French type bread, frozen dough, protein solubility, baking quality, viscoelasticity. African Journal of Biotechnology ...

  10. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: Impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  11. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  12. X-radiation effect on soluble proteins of gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhomlinov, B.F.; Chajka, Ya.P.; Fedorovich, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Using the method of electrophoresis in agar gel soluble proteins of gastric mucosa of rats were separated into 11 fractions. Proteins posessing a proteolytic (pH 1.8) and lipase (pH 7.4) activity were localized within the second and third prealbumin fractions. Soluble proteins of gastric mucosa contain glyco- and lipoproteid complexes. Exposure of rats to 1000 R of X-rays induces quantitative redistribution within the electrophoretic spectrum of soluble proteins and a considerable disturbance of the proteolytic activity of total soluble proteins throughout the entire period of observation (from 10 min to 72h)

  13. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-05-01

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Soluble protein isolated from low cost fish and fish wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Lekshmy Nair, A.; Gopakumar, K.

    1982-01-01

    The method of preparation, composition, amino acid content, protein efficiency ratio and areas of possible application of water soluble protein isolates from low cost fish and fish wastes are discussed in detail in this communication.

  15. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  16. Characterization of soluble protein BCP 11/24 from bovine corneal epithelium, different from the principal soluble protein BCP 54

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, C.; Pasmans, S.; Verhagen, C.; van Haren, M.; van der Gaag, R.; Hoekzema, R.

    1992-01-01

    The water-soluble fraction of bovine corneal epithelium was analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS (SDS-PAGE). Next to the principal soluble protein BCP 54, which has recently been identified as a corneal aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), another abundant protein was

  17. Abalone water-soluble matrix for self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenliang; Chen, Jingdi; Wang, Hailiang; Zhong, Shengnan; Hu, Yimin; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-10-01

    Enamel cannot heal by itself if damaged. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is main component of human enamel. Formation of enamel-like materials for healing enamel defects remains a challenge. In this paper, we successfully isolated the abalone water-soluble matrix (AWSM) with 1.53wt% the abalone water-soluble protein (AWSPro) and 2.04wt% the abalone water-soluble polysaccharide (AWSPs) from abandoned abalone shell, and self-healing biomineralization of tooth defects was successfully achieved in vitro. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), hot field emission scanning electron microscopy (HFESEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis, the results showed that the AWSM can efficiently induce remineralization of HAP. The enamel-like HAP was successfully achieved onto etched enamel's surface due to the presence of the AWSM. Moreover, the remineralized effect of eroded enamel was growing with the increase of the AWSM. This study provides a solution to the resource waste and environmental pollution caused by abandoned abalone shell, and we provides a new method for self-healing remineralization of enamel defects by AWSM and develops a novel dental material for potential clinical dentistry application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Soluble, Folded Protein without Charged Amino Acid Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Casper; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall

    2016-01-01

    Charges are considered an integral part of protein structure and function, enhancing solubility and providing specificity in molecular interactions. We wished to investigate whether charged amino acids are indeed required for protein biogenesis and whether a protein completely free of titratable...... side chains can maintain solubility, stability, and function. As a model, we used a cellulose-binding domain from Cellulomonas fimi, which, among proteins of more than 100 amino acids, presently is the least charged in the Protein Data Bank, with a total of only four titratable residues. We find...

  19. Immunochemical analyses of soluble lens proteins in some marine fishes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens proteins of 10 fishes, belonging to the families Clupeidae, Hemirhamphidae, Lactaridae, Scombridae, Stromatidae, Psettodidae, Bothidae and Soleidae were studied by immunoelectrophoresis using the lens antiserum of Sardinella...

  20. THE EFFECT OF THE PROTEIN SOLUBILITY OF FISH MEAL AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    utilization of fish meal proteins was determined by a relationship between their solubility or apparent digestibility and the ... Data obtained from these trials should indicate what re- ..... 4 in mind it is thus obvious that the big variation which oc-.

  1. Improving recombinant protein solubility in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-11-22

    Nov 22, 2010 ... protein (Baneyx and Mujacic, 2004). Although ... both time-consuming and expensive (Tsumoto et al.,. 2003). Thus ... proteins (Schlieker et al., 2002). ..... Alibolandi M, Mirzahoseini H, Abedi Khalil Abad M, Azami Movahed M.

  2. Determination of insoluble avian eggshell matrix proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšík, Ivan; Sedláková, Pavla; Lacinová, Kateřina; Pataridis, Statis; Eckhardt, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 397, č. 1 (2010), s. 205-214 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : eggshell proteins * insoluble proteins * matrix proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenberg, René [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Delmas, Olivier [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J. [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Bourhy, Hervé [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Grimes, Jonathan M., E-mail: jonathan@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  4. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6 1 22 or P6 5 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress

  5. EFFECT OF HEAT TREATMENT ON SOYBEAN PROTEIN SOLUBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA CĂPRIŢĂ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of soybean products in animal feeds is limited due to the presence of antinutritional factors (ANF. Proper heat processing is required to destroy ANF naturally present in raw soybeans and to remove solvent remaining from the oil extraction process. Over and under toasting of soybean causes lower nutritional value. Excessive heat treatment causes Maillard reaction which affects the availability of lysine in particular and produces changes to the chemical structure of proteins resulting in a decrease of the nutritive value. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of heating time on the protein solubility. The investigation of the heating time on protein solubility in soybean meal (SBM revealed a negative correlation (r = -0.9596. Since the urease index is suitable only for detecting under processed SBM, the protein solubility is an important index for monitoring SBM quality.

  6. A Soluble, Folded Protein without Charged Amino Acid Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Casper; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall

    2016-01-01

    side chains can maintain solubility, stability, and function. As a model, we used a cellulose-binding domain from Cellulomonas fimi, which, among proteins of more than 100 amino acids, presently is the least charged in the Protein Data Bank, with a total of only four titratable residues. We find......Charges are considered an integral part of protein structure and function, enhancing solubility and providing specificity in molecular interactions. We wished to investigate whether charged amino acids are indeed required for protein biogenesis and whether a protein completely free of titratable...... that the protein shows a surprising resilience toward extremes of pH, demonstrating stability and function (cellulose binding) in the pH range from 2 to 11. To ask whether the four charged residues present were required for these properties of this protein, we altered them to nontitratable ones. Remarkably...

  7. Protein solubility and folding enhancement by interaction with RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Il Choi

    Full Text Available While basic mechanisms of several major molecular chaperones are well understood, this machinery has been known to be involved in folding of only limited number of proteins inside the cells. Here, we report a chaperone type of protein folding facilitated by interaction with RNA. When an RNA-binding module is placed at the N-terminus of aggregation-prone target proteins, this module, upon binding with RNA, further promotes the solubility of passenger proteins, potentially leading to enhancement of proper protein folding. Studies on in vitro refolding in the presence of RNA, coexpression of RNA molecules in vivo and the mutants with impaired RNA binding ability suggests that RNA can exert chaperoning effect on their bound proteins. The results suggest that RNA binding could affect the overall kinetic network of protein folding pathway in favor of productive folding over off-pathway aggregation. In addition, the RNA binding-mediated solubility enhancement is extremely robust for increasing soluble yield of passenger proteins and could be usefully implemented for high-throughput protein expression for functional and structural genomic research initiatives. The RNA-mediated chaperone type presented here would give new insights into de novo folding in vivo.

  8. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Hess

    Full Text Available mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  9. Fluorescent Water Soluble Polymers for Isozyme-Selective Interactions with Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rinku; Scott, Michael D.; Haldar, Manas K.; Ganguly, Bratati; Srivastava, D. K.; Friesner, Daniel L.; Mallik, Sanku

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are overexpressed in various pathological conditions, including various cancers. Although these isozymes have similar active sites, the patterns of exposed amino acids on their surfaces are different. Herein, we report the synthesis and molecular interactions of two water-soluble, fluorescent polymers which demonstrate selective interactions with MMP-9 compared to MMP-7 and -10. PMID:21367603

  10. Lysine Rich Proteins in the Salt-Soluble Protein Fraction of Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    Fractionation of the protein complex from Emir barley showed that the salt-soluble fraction accounts for 44% of the total lysine content but only for 2.......Fractionation of the protein complex from Emir barley showed that the salt-soluble fraction accounts for 44% of the total lysine content but only for 2....

  11. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6122 or P6522, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress. PMID:18391421

  12. Protein Solubility as Quality Index for Processed Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Căpriţă

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein quality of soybean meal (SBM is linked to both the reduction of antinutritional factors (ANFs, and the optimization of protein digestibility. Both insufficient- and over-heating result in poor quality SBM. Inadequate heating fails to completely destroy the ANFs, which may have a detrimental impact on animal performance, while excessive heating reduces the availability of lysine via the Maillard reaction and possibly, to a lesser extent, of other amino acids. The objective of our study was to compare some biochemical laboratory procedures for assessing quality of SBM: urease index (UI, protein dispersibility index (PDI, KOH protein solubility (PS, and nitrogen solubility index (NSI. The experimental data reveal that UI is not useful to determine excessive heat treatment since additional heating has no effect on the urease index. KOH protein solubility remains high, during initial heat treatment. In marked contrast, the PDI and NSI decreased incrementally from 78% to 20% and from 97% to 60%, respectively, when heating 0 to 30 minutes. Combing the PDI test with the urease test could be useful to monitor soybean quality. SBM containing low UI (0.3 or below and high PDI (40 to 45% may indicate that the sample is definitely high quality because it has been adequately heat processed, but not overprocessed.

  13. Membrane Proteins Are Dramatically Less Conserved than Water-Soluble Proteins across the Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, Victor; Dessimoz, Christophe; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial in transport, signaling, bioenergetics, catalysis, and as drug targets. Here, we show that membrane proteins have dramatically fewer detectable orthologs than water-soluble proteins, less than half in most species analyzed. This sparse distribution could reflect rapid divergence or gene loss. We find that both mechanisms operate. First, membrane proteins evolve faster than water-soluble proteins, particularly in their exterior-facing portions. Second, we demonstrate that predicted ancestral membrane proteins are preferentially lost compared with water-soluble proteins in closely related species of archaea and bacteria. These patterns are consistent across the whole tree of life, and in each of the three domains of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Our findings point to a fundamental evolutionary principle: membrane proteins evolve faster due to stronger adaptive selection in changing environments, whereas cytosolic proteins are under more stringent purifying selection in the homeostatic interior of the cell. This effect should be strongest in prokaryotes, weaker in unicellular eukaryotes (with intracellular membranes), and weakest in multicellular eukaryotes (with extracellular homeostasis). We demonstrate that this is indeed the case. Similarly, we show that extracellular water-soluble proteins exhibit an even stronger pattern of low homology than membrane proteins. These striking differences in conservation of membrane proteins versus water-soluble proteins have important implications for evolution and medicine. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Relationship between Molecular Structure Characteristics of Feed Proteins and Protein In vitro Digestibility and Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mingmei; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Long, Guohui

    2016-08-01

    The nutritional value of feed proteins and their utilization by livestock are related not only to the chemical composition but also to the structure of feed proteins, but few studies thus far have investigated the relationship between the structure of feed proteins and their solubility as well as digestibility in monogastric animals. To address this question we analyzed soybean meal, fish meal, corn distiller's dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and feather meal by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to determine the protein molecular spectral band characteristics for amides I and II as well as α-helices and β-sheets and their ratios. Protein solubility and in vitro digestibility were measured with the Kjeldahl method using 0.2% KOH solution and the pepsin-pancreatin two-step enzymatic method, respectively. We found that all measured spectral band intensities (height and area) of feed proteins were correlated with their the in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.003); moreover, the relatively quantitative amounts of α-helices, random coils, and α-helix to β-sheet ratio in protein secondary structures were positively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.004). On the other hand, the percentage of β-sheet structures was negatively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility (pdigestibility at 28 h and solubility. Furthermore, the α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio can be used to predict the nutritional value of feed proteins.

  15. Relationship between Molecular Structure Characteristics of Feed Proteins and Protein Digestibility and Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingmei Bai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional value of feed proteins and their utilization by livestock are related not only to the chemical composition but also to the structure of feed proteins, but few studies thus far have investigated the relationship between the structure of feed proteins and their solubility as well as digestibility in monogastric animals. To address this question we analyzed soybean meal, fish meal, corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and feather meal by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy to determine the protein molecular spectral band characteristics for amides I and II as well as α-helices and β-sheets and their ratios. Protein solubility and in vitro digestibility were measured with the Kjeldahl method using 0.2% KOH solution and the pepsin-pancreatin two-step enzymatic method, respectively. We found that all measured spectral band intensities (height and area of feed proteins were correlated with their the in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.003; moreover, the relatively quantitative amounts of α-helices, random coils, and α-helix to β-sheet ratio in protein secondary structures were positively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.004. On the other hand, the percentage of β-sheet structures was negatively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility (p<0.001 and solubility (p = 0.002. These results demonstrate that the molecular structure characteristics of feed proteins are closely related to their in vitro digestibility at 28 h and solubility. Furthermore, the α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio can be used to predict the nutritional value of feed proteins.

  16. Synthesis of acid-soluble spore proteins by Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Leventhal, J M; Chambliss, G H

    1982-01-01

    The major acid-soluble spore proteins (ASSPs) of Bacillus subtilis were detected by immunoprecipitation of radioactively labeled in vitro- and in vivo-synthesized proteins. ASSP synthesis in vivo began 2 h after the initiation of sporulation (t2) and reached its maximum rate at t7. This corresponded to the time of synthesis of mRNA that stimulated the maximum rate of ASSP synthesis in vitro. Under the set of conditions used in these experiments, protease synthesis began near t0, alkaline phos...

  17. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  18. Self assembling nanocomposites for protein delivery: supramolecular interactions of soluble polymers with protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Stefano; Caliceti, Paolo

    2013-01-02

    Translation of therapeutic proteins to pharmaceutical products is often encumbered by their inadequate physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, namely low stability and poor bioavailability. Over the last decades, several academic and industrial research programs have been focused on development of biocompatible polymers to produce appropriate formulations that provide for enhanced therapeutic performance. According to their physicochemical properties, polymers have been exploited to obtain a variety of formulations including biodegradable microparticles, 3-dimensional hydrogels, bioconjugates and soluble nanocomposites. Several soluble polymers bearing charges or hydrophobic moieties along the macromolecular backbone have been found to physically associate with proteins to form soluble nanocomplexes. Physical complexation is deemed a valuable alternative tool to the chemical bioconjugation. Soluble protein/polymer nanocomplexes formed by physical specific or unspecific interactions have been found in fact to possess peculiar physicochemical, and biopharmaceutical properties. Accordingly, soluble polymeric systems have been developed to increase the protein stability, enhance the bioavailability, promote the absorption across the biological barriers, and prolong the protein residence in the bloodstream. Furthermore, a few polymers have been found to favour the protein internalisation into cells or boost their immunogenic potential by acting as immunoadjuvant in vaccination protocols. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Elucidation of release characteristics of highly soluble drug trimetazidine hydrochloride from chitosan-carrageenan matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Linlin; Shao, Yang; Tian, Ye; Li, Conghao; Li, Ying; Mao, Shirui

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand the underlying drug release characteristics from matrix tablets based on the combination of chitosan (CS) and different types of carrageenans [kappa (κ)-CG, iota (ι)-CG, and lambda (λ)-CG]. Highly soluble trimetazidine hydrochloride (TH) was used as a model drug. First, characteristics of drug release from different formulations were investigated, and then in situ complexation capacity of CG with TH and CS was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Erosion and swelling of matrix were also characterized to better understand the drug-release mechanisms. Effects of pH and ionic strength on drug release were also studied. It was found that not only ι-CG and λ-CG could reduce the burst release of TH by the effect of TH-CG interaction, CS-ι-CG- and CS-λ-CG-based polyelectrolyte film could further modify the controlled-release behavior, but not CS-κ-CG. High pH and high ionic strength resulted in faster drug release from CS-κ-CG- and CS-ι-CG-based matrix, but drug release from CS-λ-CG-based matrix was less sensitive to pH and ionic strength. In conclusion, CS-λ-CG-based matrix tablets are quite promising as controlled-release drug carrier based on multiple mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  1. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  2. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kokoro [Fujifilm Corporation, Analysis Technology Center (Japan); Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima@protein.osaka-u.ac.j [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  3. Short-time leaching behaviour of a cement-matrix incorporating soluble radioactive aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, H.; Kalitz, C.; Kuhne, L.; Steinhardt, T.; Caspary, G.; Printz, R.; Scherer, U.W.

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical characterisations of certain cement-based radioactive waste-forms produced by the Nuclear-Services of Juelich Research Centre were not yet fully available, a related study was conducted. In this work the interaction of a specific cement-matrix with incorporated radioactive aggregates, so-called drum-dryer product, was investigated. Therefore, representative cement-samples containing the radioactive waste were taken. The main focus was laid on these samples' behaviour under leaching conditions to quantify soluble and insoluble compounds. Additionally, possible chemical interactions of cement components with drum-dryer product were evaluated. For these purposes, chemical analytics as well as physical methods for characterisation and structural evaluation of the waste-form' s behaviour were used. The leaching experiments lasted for up to 39 days. A comparison of the results of the elementary and ion-chromatographic analysis before and after leaching of the samples was carried out. This lead to the deduction that the majority of the drum-dryer product is not incorporated in the cement matrix in the form of insoluble compounds like a solid solution. Although structural examinations showed the formation of an Apatite-phase that is not characteristic for portland cement, they also supported the measured overall high leachability of the cemented drum-dryer products. It can be concluded that the chemical interaction between the cement matrix and drum-dryer product during and after cementation plays a subordinate, yet not negligible, role with respect to solubility of the drum dryer product under aqueous leaching conditions. Additionally, it can be postulated that the drum-dryer product did not undergo substantial chemical alteration in the environment created by the cement-matrix and the respective leaching experiments. (authors)

  4. Characterization of membrane association of Rinderpest virus matrix protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhashri, R.; Shaila, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Paramyxovirus matrix protein is believed to play a crucial role in the assembly and maturation of the virus particle by bringing the major viral components together at the budding site in the host cell. The membrane association capability of many enveloped virus matrix proteins has been characterized to be their intrinsic property. In this work, we have characterized the membrane association of Rinderpest virus matrix (M) protein. The M protein of Rinderpest virus when expressed in the absence of other viral proteins is present both in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When expressed as GFP fusion protein, the M protein gets localized into plasma membrane protrusions. High salt and alkaline conditions resulted in partial dissociation of M protein from cell membrane. Thus, M protein behaves like an integral membrane protein although its primary structure suggests it to be a peripheral membrane protein

  5. Limitations of polyethylene glycol-induced precipitation as predictive tool for protein solubility during formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Melanie; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2018-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced protein precipitation is often used to extrapolate apparent protein solubility at specific formulation compositions. The procedure was used for several fields of application such as protein crystal growth but also protein formulation development. Nevertheless, most studies focused on applicability in protein crystal growth. In contrast, this study focuses on applicability of PEG-induced precipitation during high-concentration protein formulation development. In this study, solubility of three different model proteins was investigated over a broad range of pH. Solubility values predicted by PEG-induced precipitation were compared to real solubility behaviour determined by either turbidity or content measurements. Predicted solubility by PEG-induced precipitation was confirmed for an Fc fusion protein and a monoclonal antibody. In contrast, PEG-induced precipitation failed to predict solubility of a single-domain antibody construct. Applicability of PEG-induced precipitation as indicator of protein solubility during formulation development was found to be not valid for one of three model molecules. Under certain conditions, PEG-induced protein precipitation is not valid for prediction of real protein solubility behaviour. The procedure should be used carefully as tool for formulation development, and the results obtained should be validated by additional investigations. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  7. Synthesis of acid-soluble spore proteins by Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, J M; Chambliss, G H

    1982-12-01

    The major acid-soluble spore proteins (ASSPs) of Bacillus subtilis were detected by immunoprecipitation of radioactively labeled in vitro- and in vivo-synthesized proteins. ASSP synthesis in vivo began 2 h after the initiation of sporulation (t2) and reached its maximum rate at t7. This corresponded to the time of synthesis of mRNA that stimulated the maximum rate of ASSP synthesis in vitro. Under the set of conditions used in these experiments, protease synthesis began near t0, alkaline phosphatase synthesis began at about t2, and refractile spores were first observed between t7 and t8. In vivo- and in vitro-synthesized ASSPs comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Their molecular weights were 4,600 (alpha and beta) and 11,000 (gamma). The average half-life of the ASSP messages was 11 min when either rifampin (10 micrograms/ml) or actinomycin D (1 microgram/ml) was used to inhibit RNA synthesis.

  8. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  9. Anatomical region-dependent enhancement of 3-dimensional chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells by soluble meniscus extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Shimomura, Kazunori; Gottardi, Riccardo; Alexander, Peter G; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from decellularized tissues has been found to promote tissue neogenesis, most likely mediated by specific biochemical and physical signaling motifs that promote tissue-specific differentiation of progenitor cells. Decellularized ECM has been suggested to be efficacious for the repair of tissue injuries. However, decellularized meniscus contains a dense collagenous structure, which impedes cell seeding and infiltration and is not readily applicable for meniscus repair. In addition, the meniscus consists of two distinct anatomical regions that differ in vascularity and cellular phenotype. The purpose of this study was to explore the region-specific bioactivity of solubilized ECM derived from the inner and outer meniscal regions as determined in 2D and 3D cultures of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). When added as a medium supplement to 2D cultures of MSCs, urea-extracted fractions of the inner (imECM) and outer meniscal ECM (omECM) enhanced cell proliferation while imECM most strongly upregulated fibrochondrogenic differentiation on the basis of gene expression profiles. When added to 3D cultures of MSCs seeded in photocrosslinked methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels, both ECM fractions upregulated chondrogenic differentiation as determined by gene expression and protein analyses, as well as elevated sulfated glycosaminoglycan sGAG content, compared to ECM-free controls. The chondrogenic effect at day 21 was most pronounced with imECM supplementation, but equivalent between ECM groups by day 42. Despite increased cartilage matrix, imECM and omECM constructs possessed compressive moduli similar to controls. In conclusion, soluble meniscal ECM may be considered for use as a tissue-specific reagent to enhance chondrogenesis for MSC-based 3D cartilage tissue engineering. The inner region of the knee meniscus is frequently injured and possesses a poor intrinsic healing capacity. Solubilized extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from

  10. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients...

  11. In vivo extracellular matrix protein expression by human periodontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... Extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) are described as molecular regulators of these events. ..... zation and adhesive interaction of cells (Yamada, 1983). .... periodontal ligament fibroblasts after simulation of orthodontic force.

  12. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  13. An Overview of the Medical Applications of Marine Skeletal Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Azizur Rahman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the medicinal potential of marine organisms has attracted increasing attention. This is due to their immense diversity and adaptation to unique ecological niches that has led to vast physiological and biochemical diversification. Among these organisms, marine calcifiers are an abundant source of novel proteins and chemical entities that can be used for drug discovery. Studies of the skeletal organic matrix proteins of marine calcifiers have focused on biomedical applications such as the identification of growth inducing proteins that can be used for bone regeneration, for example, 2/4 bone morphogenic proteins (BMP. Although a few reports on the functions of proteins derived from marine calcifiers can be found in the literature, marine calcifiers themselves remain an untapped source of proteins for the development of innovative pharmaceuticals. Following an overview of the current knowledge of skeletal organic matrix proteins from marine calcifiers, this review will focus on various aspects of marine skeletal protein research including sources, biosynthesis, structures, and possible strategies for chemical or physical modification. Special attention will be given to potential medical applications and recent discoveries of skeletal proteins and polysaccharides with biologically appealing characteristics. In addition, I will introduce an effective protocol for sample preparation and protein purification that includes isolation technology for biopolymers (of both soluble and insoluble organic matrices from coralline algae. These algae are a widespread but poorly studied group of shallow marine calcifiers that have great potential for marine drug discovery.

  14. Polyether sulfone/hydroxyapatite mixed matrix membranes for protein purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junfen, E-mail: junfensun@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, North People Road 2999, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wu, Lishun [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Heze University, Daxue Road 2269, Heze, Shandong Province 274015 (China)

    2014-07-01

    This work proposes a novel approach for protein purification from solution using mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprising of hydroxyapatite (HAP) inside polyether sulfone (PES) matrix. The influence of HAP particle loading on membrane morphology is studied. The MMMs are further characterized concerning permeability and adsorption capacity. The MMMs show purification of protein via both diffusion as well as adsorption, and show the potential of using MMMs for improvements in protein purification techniques. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein. The properties and structures of MMMs prepared by immersion phase separation process were characterized by pure water flux, BSA adsorption and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Soluble Non-ammonia Nitrogen in Ruminal and Omasal Digesta of Korean Native Steers Supplemented with Soluble Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the effect of soluble protein supplements on concentration of soluble non-ammonia nitrogen (SNAN in the liquid phase of ruminal (RD and omasal digesta (OD of Korean native steers, and to investigate diurnal pattern in SNAN concentration in RD and OD. Three ruminally cannulated Korean native steers in a 3×3 Latin square design consumed a basal diet of rice straw and corn-based concentrate (control, and that supplemented (kg/d DM basis with intact casein (0.24; IC or acid hydrolyzed casein (0.46; AHC. Ruminal digesta was sampled using a vacuum pump, whereas OD was collected using an omasal sampling system at 2.0 h intervals after a morning feeding. The SNAN fractions (free amino acid (AA, peptide and soluble protein in RD and OD were assessed using the ninhydrin assay. Concentrations of free AA and total SNAN in RD were significantly (p<0.05 lower than those in OD. Although free AA concentration was relatively high, mean peptide was quantitatively the most important fraction of total SNAN in both RD and OD, indicating that degradation of peptide to AA rather than hydrolysis of soluble protein to peptide or deamination may be the most limiting step in rumen proteolysis of Korean native steers. Diurnal variation in peptide concentration in OD for the soluble protein supplemented diets during the feeding cycle peaked 2 h post-feeding and decreased thereafter whereas that for the control was relatively constant during the entire feeding cycle. Diurnal variation in peptide concentration was rather similar between RD and OD.

  16. Soluble Mesothelin-Related Protein in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AZIM, H.A.; GAAFAR, R.; KHORSHID, O.; ABDEL SALAM, I.; ASHMAWY, A.; EL-GUINDY, S.; ELATTAR, I.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Building-up evidence suggests that soluble mesothelinrelated protein (SMRP) carries a diagnostic and a prognostic value in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Egypt suffers endemic asbestosis and thus this study was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of SMRP in patients with MPM and to correlate this marker with known clinico pathological prognostic factors. Material and Methods: During the period from January 2006 till March 2008, Serum samples were obtained from MPM patients presenting to the Egyptian National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Serum samples were provided from patients with breast cancer and from healthy individuals to function as controls. The SMRP was assayed using the ELISA technique and correlations were made with different clinico-pathological prognostic parameters. Results: 83 patients (50 MPM and 33 breast cancer) as well as 22 healthy individuals were enrolled in this study. Serum SMRP levels were not different between patients with breast cancer and healthy controls (p>0.05). However, there was a significant difference between MPM patients and the other two groups (p<0.0001). ROC analysis showed an AUC=0.765 for differentiating between the controls and MPM with a best statistical cut-off of 7.22 nM/L (sensitivity=66%, specificity=70.9%). The mean SMRP concentrations were significantly higher in patients with advanced disease (p=0.038), poor performance status (p=0.017) and high alkaline phosphatase (p=0.015). The mean SMRP concentrations were also higher in males, elderly patients, asbestos-exposed patients, epithelioid subtypes and patients with high platelet and leucocytic counts. However, these differences did not reach statistical significance. 224 Conclusions: This study confirms that SMRP is of considerable sensitivity and specificity in Egyptian patients with MPM. Higher levels are frequently seen in patients with high tumor burden, which could be helpful in monitoring response to

  17. The requirement of matrix ATP for the import of precursor proteins into the mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuart, Rosemary A.; Gruhler, Albrecht; Klei, Ida van der; Guiard, Bernard; Koll, Hans; Neupert, Walter

    1994-01-01

    The role of ATP in the matrix for the import of precursor proteins into the various mitochondrial subcompartments was investigated by studying protein translocation at experimentally defined ATP levels. Proteins targeted to the matrix were neither imported or processed when matrix ATP was depleted.

  18. In vivo extracellular matrix protein expression by human periodontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that the orthodontic force applied to teeth generates a series of events that remodel the periodontal ligament (PDL). Extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) are described as molecular regulators of these events. However, the exact contribution of these proteins in human PDL modeling by orthodontic force ...

  19. Protein structure estimation from NMR data by matrix completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhicheng; Li, Yang; Lei, Qiang; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge of protein structures is very important to understand their corresponding physical and chemical properties. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the main methods to measure protein structure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage approach to calculate the structure of a protein from a highly incomplete distance matrix, where most data are obtained from NMR. We first randomly "guess" a small part of unobservable distances by utilizing the triangle inequality, which is crucial for the second stage. Then we use matrix completion to calculate the protein structure from the obtained incomplete distance matrix. We apply the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Furthermore, the recovery error of our method is analyzed, and its efficiency is demonstrated by several practical examples.

  20. Synergistic enhancement in the co-gelation of salt-soluble pea proteins and whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas; Vasanthan, Thava; Ozimek, Lech

    2013-12-15

    This paper investigated the enhancement of thermal gelation properties when salt-soluble pea proteins were co-gelated with whey proteins in NaCl solutions, using different blend ratios, total protein concentrations, pH, and salt concentrations. Results showed that the thermal co-gelation of pea/whey proteins blended in ratio of 2:8 in NaCl solutions showed synergistic enhancement in storage modulus, gel hardness, paste viscosity and minimum gelation concentrations. The highest synergistic enhancement was observed at pH 6.0 as compared with pH 4.0 and 8.0, and at the lower total protein concentration of 10% as compared with 16% and 22% (w/v), as well as in lower NaCl concentrations of 0.5% and 1.0% as compared with 1.5%, 2.0%, 2.5%, and 3.0% (w/v). The least gelation concentrations were also lower in the different pea/whey protein blend ratios than in pure pea or whey proteins, when dissolved in 1.0% or 2.5% (w/v) NaCl aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and Fit-for-Purpose Validation of a Soluble Human Programmed Death-1 Protein Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yan G; Yuan, Xiling; Newitt, John A; Peterson, Jon E; Gleason, Carol R; Haulenbeek, Jonathan; Santockyte, Rasa; Lafont, Virginie; Marsilio, Frank; Neely, Robert J; DeSilva, Binodh; Piccoli, Steven P

    2015-07-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) protein is a co-inhibitory receptor which negatively regulates immune cell activation and permits tumors to evade normal immune defense. Anti-PD-1 antibodies have been shown to restore immune cell activation and effector function-an exciting breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. Recent reports have documented a soluble form of PD-1 (sPD-1) in the circulation of normal and disease state individuals. A clinical assay to quantify sPD-1 would contribute to the understanding of sPD-1-function and facilitate the development of anti-PD-1 drugs. Here, we report the development and validation of a sPD-1 protein assay. The assay validation followed the framework for full validation of a biotherapeutic pharmacokinetic assay. A purified recombinant human PD-1 protein was characterized extensively and was identified as the assay reference material which mimics the endogenous analyte in structure and function. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 100 pg/mL, with a dynamic range spanning three logs to 10,000 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision were ≤15%, and the assay bias (percent deviation) was ≤10%. Potential matrix effects were investigated in sera from both normal healthy volunteers and selected cancer patients. Bulk-prepared frozen standards and pre-coated Streptavidin plates were used in the assay to ensure consistency in assay performance over time. This assay appears to specifically measure total sPD-1 protein since the human anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, and the endogenous ligands of PD-1 protein, PDL-1 and PDL-2, do not interfere with the assay.

  2. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  3. An electrophoretic study of the soluble lens proteins from the Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuv)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta were studied by cellogel electrophoresis, to see whether there are any intra species variations. A distinct pattern characterised by the number of bands, mobility...

  4. Soluble lens protein polymorphism in flying fishes from the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of flying-fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Three distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  5. The Influence of Tissue Lyophilization and Gamma Irradiation on the Solubility of Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komender, J.; Jendyk, J.; Leibschang, J.

    1967-01-01

    Most recent methods of tissue preservation are based on lyophilization and sterilization with gamma rays. Unfortunately the tissues preserved by this method lose their viability, this being connected with protein denaturation. The denaturing influence either of lyophilization or sterilization with gamma rays on different materials has been described. However, no observations on denaturation of proteins in prepared grafts are known. The work aimed at establishing the influence of individual stages of the procedure used in a tissue bank on the solubility of proteins. An experiment was performed using rat liver as a model tissue. Solubility of protein was determined in five groups of material, as follows: (1) fresh tissue, used as a control, (2) frozen tissue, (3) frozen and lyophilized tissue, (4) frozen, lyophilized and irradiated tissue, and (5) fresh irradiated tissue. Folin's method was used for determination of protein in water extracts of tissues. It was found that: (1) the whole procedure considerably diminished the protein solubility, (2) freezing diminishes the protein solubility by 35% on average, (3) lyophilization causes no further protein denaturation, (4) protein solubility is reduced most (by about 65%) by sterilization with gamma rays. (author)

  6. Photodamaging mechanism of the eye structure: UV effect on soluble proteins of the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkhmazyan, M.M.; Fedorovich, I.B.; Ostrovskij, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Damaging effect of UV-radiation on soluble proteins of bull lens has been studied. Irradiation results in lens proteins growing yellow, new absorption bands with the maxima 245 and 305 nm appear. It is shown that during photodamage oxidation of SH-groups takes place and protein aggregates are formed

  7. Enhancing the productivity of soluble green fluorescent protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein sequences might have been evolved against different environmental pressures, which results in non-optimum properties in their stability, activity and folding efficiency. Directed evolution and consensus-based engineering of proteins are the protein engineering principles for the re-evolution of such natural proteins ...

  8. PON-Sol: prediction of effects of amino acid substitutions on protein solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Niroula, Abhishek; Shen, Bairong; Vihinen, Mauno

    2016-07-01

    Solubility is one of the fundamental protein properties. It is of great interest because of its relevance to protein expression. Reduced solubility and protein aggregation are also associated with many diseases. We collected from literature the largest experimentally verified solubility affecting amino acid substitution (AAS) dataset and used it to train a predictor called PON-Sol. The predictor can distinguish both solubility decreasing and increasing variants from those not affecting solubility. PON-Sol has normalized correct prediction ratio of 0.491 on cross-validation and 0.432 for independent test set. The performance of the method was compared both to solubility and aggregation predictors and found to be superior. PON-Sol can be used for the prediction of effects of disease-related substitutions, effects on heterologous recombinant protein expression and enhanced crystallizability. One application is to investigate effects of all possible AASs in a protein to aid protein engineering. PON-Sol is freely available at http://structure.bmc.lu.se/PON-Sol The training and test data are available at http://structure.bmc.lu.se/VariBench/ponsol.php mauno.vihinen@med.lu.se Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Production and characterization of cowpea protein hydrolysate with optimum nitrogen solubility by enzymatic hydrolysis using pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune Mune, Martin Alain; Minka, Samuel René

    2017-06-01

    Cowpea is a source of low-cost and good nutritional quality protein for utilization in food formulations in replacement of animal proteins. Therefore it is necessary that cowpea protein exhibits good functionality, particularly protein solubility which affects the other functional properties. The objective of this study was to produce cowpea protein hydrolysate exhibiting optimum solubility by the adequate combination of hydrolysis parameters, namely time, solid/liquid ratio (SLR) and enzyme/substrate ratio (ESR), and to determine its functional properties and molecular characteristics. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used for the experiments, and a second-order polynomial to model the effects of hydrolysis time, SLR and ESR on the degree of hydrolysis and nitrogen solubility index. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of time 208.61 min, SLR 1/15 (w/w) and ESR 2.25% (w/w) yielded a nitrogen solubility of 75.71%. Protein breakdown and the peptide profile following enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography. Cowpea protein hydrolysate showed higher oil absorption capacity, emulsifying activity and foaming ability compared with the concentrate. The solubility of cowpea protein hydrolysate was adequately optimized by response surface methodology, and the hydrolysate showed adequate functionality for use in food. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Production of soluble mammalian proteins in Escherichia coli: identification of protein features that correlate with successful expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perera Rajika L

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the search for generic expression strategies for mammalian protein families several bacterial expression vectors were examined for their ability to promote high yields of soluble protein. Proteins studied included cell surface receptors (Ephrins and Eph receptors, CD44, kinases (EGFR-cytoplasmic domain, CDK2 and 4, proteases (MMP1, CASP2, signal transduction proteins (GRB2, RAF1, HRAS and transcription factors (GATA2, Fli1, Trp53, Mdm2, JUN, FOS, MAD, MAX. Over 400 experiments were performed where expression of 30 full-length proteins and protein domains were evaluated with 6 different N-terminal and 8 C-terminal fusion partners. Expression of an additional set of 95 mammalian proteins was also performed to test the conclusions of this study. Results Several protein features correlated with soluble protein expression yield including molecular weight and the number of contiguous hydrophobic residues and low complexity regions. There was no relationship between successful expression and protein pI, grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY, or sub-cellular location. Only small globular cytoplasmic proteins with an average molecular weight of 23 kDa did not require a solubility enhancing tag for high level soluble expression. Thioredoxin (Trx and maltose binding protein (MBP were the best N-terminal protein fusions to promote soluble expression, but MBP was most effective as a C-terminal fusion. 63 of 95 mammalian proteins expressed at soluble levels of greater than 1 mg/l as N-terminal H10-MBP fusions and those that failed possessed, on average, a higher molecular weight and greater number of contiguous hydrophobic amino acids and low complexity regions. Conclusions By analysis of the protein features identified here, this study will help predict which mammalian proteins and domains can be successfully expressed in E. coli as soluble product and also which are best targeted for a eukaryotic expression system. In some cases

  11. High-level expression of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using an HE-maltotriose-binding protein fusion tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingqian; Guo, Wanying; Su, Bingqian; Guo, Yujie; Wang, Jiang; Chu, Beibei; Yang, Guoyu

    2018-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in prokaryotic expression systems for large-scale production. The use of genetically engineered affinity and solubility enhancing fusion proteins has increased greatly in recent years, and there now exists a considerable repertoire of these that can be used to enhance the expression, stability, solubility, folding, and purification of their fusion partner. Here, a modified histidine tag (HE) used as an affinity tag was employed together with a truncated maltotriose-binding protein (MBP; consisting of residues 59-433) from Pyrococcus furiosus as a solubility enhancing tag accompanying a tobacco etch virus protease-recognition site for protein expression and purification in Escherichia coli. Various proteins tagged at the N-terminus with HE-MBP(Pyr) were expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells to determine expression and solubility relative to those tagged with His6-MBP or His6-MBP(Pyr). Furthermore, four HE-MBP(Pyr)-fused proteins were purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography to assess the affinity of HE with immobilized Ni 2+ . Our results showed that HE-MBP(Pyr) represents an attractive fusion protein allowing high levels of soluble expression and purification of recombinant protein in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing the productivity of soluble green fluorescent protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea. 2School ... protein sequences for consensus approach from whole sequence ..... stable proteins, especially if applied in buried or more.

  13. Influence of water-soluble channeling agents on the release of diclofenac sodium from Irvingia malayana wax matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsawimonwat, Songwut; Charumanee, Suporn; Kaewvichit, Sayam; Sirithunyalug, Jakkapan; Sirisa-Ard, Panee; Piyamongkol, Sirivipa; Siangwong, Kulthawat

    2017-05-01

    Irvingia malayana wax (IW) is majorly composed of esters of medium chain fatty acids. Its melting point is low and closed to the body temperature. This study aimed at investigating the potential of IW as a matrix-forming agent and evaluate the effect of soluble channeling agents on the release of diclofenac sodium (DS) from IW matrix tablets. The preformulation study by infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry showed no incompatibility between IW and DS or soluble channeling agents, namely PEG 4000, PEG 6000 and lactose. IW retarded the release of DS from the matrix tablets more efficiently than carnauba wax due to its greater hydrophobicity and its ability to become partial molten wax at 37° C. Factors affecting the release of DS from IW matrix were drug concentrations, and types and concentrations of channeling agents. The release of DS significantly improved when DS concentration reached approximately 33%. The fast dissolving channeling agent, lactose, could enhance the drug release rate more effectively than PEG 4000 and PEG 6000, respectively. The linear relationship between the DS release rate and the concentration of the chosen channeling agent, PEG 6000, was found (r 2 =0.9866).

  14. A major protein component of the Bacillus subtilis biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branda, Steven S; Chu, Frances; Kearns, Daniel B; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    Microbes construct structurally complex multicellular communities (biofilms) through production of an extracellular matrix. Here we present evidence from scanning electron microscopy showing that a wild strain of the Gram positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis builds such a matrix. Genetic, biochemical and cytological evidence indicates that the matrix is composed predominantly of a protein component, TasA, and an exopolysaccharide component. The absence of TasA or the exopolysaccharide resulted in a residual matrix, while the absence of both components led to complete failure to form complex multicellular communities. Extracellular complementation experiments revealed that a functional matrix can be assembled even when TasA and the exopolysaccharide are produced by different cells, reinforcing the view that the components contribute to matrix formation in an extracellular manner. Having defined the major components of the biofilm matrix and the control of their synthesis by the global regulator SinR, we present a working model for how B. subtilis switches between nomadic and sedentary lifestyles.

  15. Mixed-matrix membrane adsorbers for protein separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramescu, M.E.; Borneman, Z.; Wessling, M.

    2003-01-01

    The separation of two similarly sized proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine hemoglobin (Hb) was carried out using a new type of ion-exchange mixed-matrix adsorber membranes. The adsorber membranes were prepared by incorporation of various types of Lewatit ion-exchange resins into an

  16. Maximizing recovery of water-soluble proteins through acetone precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Andrew M J; Wall, Mark J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-09-24

    Solvent precipitation is commonly used to purify protein samples, as seen with the removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate through acetone precipitation. However, in its current practice, protein loss is believed to be an inevitable consequence of acetone precipitation. We herein provide an in depth characterization of protein recovery through acetone precipitation. In 80% acetone, the precipitation efficiency for six of 10 protein standards was poor (ca. ≤15%). Poor recovery was also observed for proteome extracts, including bacterial and mammalian cells. As shown in this work, increasing the ionic strength of the solution dramatically improves the precipitation efficiency of individual proteins, and proteome mixtures (ca. 80-100% yield). This is obtained by including 1-30 mM NaCl, together with acetone (50-80%) which maximizes protein precipitation efficiency. The amount of salt required to restore the recovery correlates with the amount of protein in the sample, as well as the intrinsic protein charge, and the dielectric strength of the solution. This synergistic approach to protein precipitation in acetone with salt is consistent with a model of ion pairing in organic solvent, and establishes an improved method to recover proteins and proteome mixtures in high yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Conformational plasticity of the Ebola virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Effantin, Gregory; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2014-11-01

    Filoviruses are the causative agents of a severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever with repeated outbreaks in Africa. They are negative sense single stranded enveloped viruses that can cross species barriers from its natural host bats to primates including humans. The small size of the genome poses limits to viral adaption, which may be partially overcome by conformational plasticity. Here we review the different conformational states of the Ebola virus (EBOV) matrix protein VP40 that range from monomers, to dimers, hexamers, and RNA-bound octamers. This conformational plasticity that is required for the viral life cycle poses a unique opportunity for development of VP40 specific drugs. Furthermore, we compare the structure to homologous matrix protein structures from Paramyxoviruses and Bornaviruses and we predict that they do not only share the fold but also the conformational flexibility of EBOV VP40. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  18. Soluble extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, EMN) regulates cancer-related cellular functions by homotypic interactions with surface CD147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutti, Nadine; Kuepper, Michael; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer) is a widely expressed glycoprotein and a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which exists in both a membrane-spanning and a soluble form. Homotypic interactions of EMMPRIN underlie its multiple roles in normal development and pathological situations such as viral infections, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. This study employed a recombinant soluble, fully glycosylated EMMPRIN domain (rhsEMN) as a tool to characterize the structural basis of EMMPRIN-EMMPRIN receptor (EMNR) contacts and their functional effects on MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. rhsEMN did not form dimers in solution but bound to surface EMMPRIN (EMN) on MCF-7 cells with high affinity and was readily internalized. The interaction interface for the homotypic contact was localized to the N-terminal Ig domain. rhsEMN exerted a stimulatory effect on proliferation of MCF-7 cells whereas it reduced cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were accompanied by an upregulation of endogenous EMMPRIN as well as of matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), a membrane-bound protease involved in the extracellular release of soluble EMMPRIN, indicating a regulatory feedback mechanism. The proliferation-promoting activity of rhsEMN was mimicked by a novel functional antibody directed to EMMPRIN, underscoring that crosslinking of cell surface EMMPRIN (EMNR) is crucial for eliciting intracellular signalling. Addressing malignancy-related signal transduction in HEK-293 cells, we could show that rhsEMN triggers the oncogenic Wnt pathway. © 2015 FEBS.

  19. Semen quality and concentration of soluble proteins in the seminal plasma of Alpine bucks Semen quality and concentration of soluble proteins in the seminal plasma of Alpine bucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Eliza Facione Guimarães

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It was aimed to study the in vitro seminal quality analyzed by complementary tests and to compare them with physical, morphological and biochemical aspects of male goat semen of the Alpine breed. This experiment took place at the Federal University of Viçosa, situated at 20º45’ S latitude and 42º51’ W longitude, Southwest of Brazil. It was done during the summer months of January and February, and three adult male goats of the Alpine breed were used in intensive conditions. The semen was collected by artificial vagina method. In all semen samples (45 ejaculates, after the physical and morphological analysis, the hiposmotic test was done. In 24 ejaculates, it were done thermo-resistance test, and in 21 ejaculates it were determined the concentration of total soluble proteins in seminal plasma. The male goats presented difference in the semen physical and morphological aspects, in the hiposmotic test and thermo-resistance test, but they did not presented difference in total soluble proteins concentration in seminal plasma. Results of the slow thermo-resistance test and hiposmotic test were positively correlated (r = 0.60. It was concluded, according to our results, that the concentration of total soluble proteins in seminal plasma can not be used as a parameter to predict the seminal quality of Alpine bucks.It was aimed to study the in vitro seminal quality analyzed by complementary tests and to compare them with physical, morphological and biochemical aspects of male goat semen of the Alpine breed. This experiment took place at the Federal University of Viçosa, situated at 20º45’ S latitude and 42º51’ W longitude, Southwest of Brazil. It was done during the summer months of January and February, and three adult male goats of the Alpine breed were used in intensive conditions. The semen was collected by artificial vagina method. In all semen samples (45 ejaculates, after the physical and morphological analysis, the hiposmotic test

  20. Domain organizations of modular extracellular matrix proteins and their evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, J

    1996-11-01

    Multidomain proteins which are composed of modular units are a rather recent invention of evolution. Domains are defined as autonomously folding regions of a protein, and many of them are similar in sequence and structure, indicating common ancestry. Their modular nature is emphasized by frequent repetitions in identical or in different proteins and by a large number of different combinations with other domains. The extracellular matrix is perhaps the largest biological system composed of modular mosaic proteins, and its astonishing complexity and diversity are based on them. A cluster of minireviews on modular proteins is being published in Matrix Biology. These deal with the evolution of modular proteins, the three-dimensional structure of domains and the ways in which these interact in a multidomain protein. They discuss structure-function relationships in calcium binding domains, collagen helices, alpha-helical coiled-coil domains and C-lectins. The present minireview is focused on some general aspects and serves as an introduction to the cluster.

  1. Effects of Toasting Time on Digestive Hydrolysis of Soluble and Insoluble 00-Rapeseed Meal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salazar-Villanea, Sergio; Bruininx, Erik M.A.M.; Gruppen, Harry; Carré, Patrick; Quinsac, Alain; Poel, van der Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Thermal damage to proteins can reduce their nutritional value. The effects of toasting time on the kinetics of hydrolysis, the resulting molecular weight distribution of 00-rapeseed meal (RSM) and the soluble and insoluble protein fractions separated from the RSM were studied. Hydrolysis was

  2. Soluble Milk Protein Supplementation with Moderate Physical Activity Improves Locomotion Function in Aging Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Lafoux

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional capacity. Present study was designed to compare the impact of specific dairy proteins on muscular function with or without a low-intensity physical activity program on a treadmill in an aged rat model. We investigated the effects of nutritional supplementation, five days a week over a 2-month period with a slow digestible protein, casein or fast digestible proteins, whey or soluble milk protein, on strength and locomotor parameters in sedentary or active aged Wistar RjHan rats (17-19 months of age. An extensive gait analysis was performed before and after protein supplementation. After two months of protein administration and activity program, muscle force was evaluated using a grip test, spontaneous activity using an open-field and muscular mass by specific muscle sampling. When aged rats were supplemented with proteins without exercise, only minor effects of different diets on muscle mass and locomotion were observed: higher muscle mass in the casein group and improvement of stride frequencies with soluble milk protein. By contrast, supplementation with soluble milk protein just after physical activity was more effective at improving overall skeletal muscle function in old rats compared to casein. For active old rats supplemented with soluble milk protein, an increase in locomotor activity in the open field and an enhancement of static and dynamic gait parameters compared to active groups supplemented with casein or whey were observed without any differences in muscle mass and forelimb strength. These results suggest that consumption of soluble milk protein as a bolus immediately after a low intensity physical activity may be a suitable nutritional intervention to prevent decline in locomotion in aged rats and strengthen the interest to analyze the longitudinal aspect of locomotion in aged rodents.

  3. Soluble Milk Protein Supplementation with Moderate Physical Activity Improves Locomotion Function in Aging Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafoux, Aude; Baudry, Charlotte; Bonhomme, Cécile; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Huchet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional capacity. Present study was designed to compare the impact of specific dairy proteins on muscular function with or without a low-intensity physical activity program on a treadmill in an aged rat model. We investigated the effects of nutritional supplementation, five days a week over a 2-month period with a slow digestible protein, casein or fast digestible proteins, whey or soluble milk protein, on strength and locomotor parameters in sedentary or active aged Wistar RjHan rats (17-19 months of age). An extensive gait analysis was performed before and after protein supplementation. After two months of protein administration and activity program, muscle force was evaluated using a grip test, spontaneous activity using an open-field and muscular mass by specific muscle sampling. When aged rats were supplemented with proteins without exercise, only minor effects of different diets on muscle mass and locomotion were observed: higher muscle mass in the casein group and improvement of stride frequencies with soluble milk protein. By contrast, supplementation with soluble milk protein just after physical activity was more effective at improving overall skeletal muscle function in old rats compared to casein. For active old rats supplemented with soluble milk protein, an increase in locomotor activity in the open field and an enhancement of static and dynamic gait parameters compared to active groups supplemented with casein or whey were observed without any differences in muscle mass and forelimb strength. These results suggest that consumption of soluble milk protein as a bolus immediately after a low intensity physical activity may be a suitable nutritional intervention to prevent decline in locomotion in aged rats and strengthen the interest to analyze the longitudinal aspect of locomotion in aged rodents.

  4. Binding of triiodothyronine to rat liver nuclear matrix. influence of thyroid hormones on the phosphorylation of nuclear matrix proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adylova, A.T.; Atakhanova, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of thyroid hormones with rat liver nuclear matrix proteins was investigated. It was shown that the nuclear matrix contains sites that bind triiodothyronine with high affinity (K = 1.07.10 9 M -1 ) and limited capacity (the maximum binding capacity is equal to 28 /SUP a/ .5 fmoles of triiodothyronine per 100 ug protein). Electrophoretic identification of the matrix proteins that bind triiodothyronine was performed. The molecular weight of the main triiodothyronine-binding fraction is 50,000-52,000. It was shown that the administration of triiodothyronine to thyroidectomized rats stimulates the phosphorylation of all the protein fractions of the nuclear matrix

  5. Effects of gamma irradiation on physicochemical properties of heat-induced gel prepared with chicken salt-soluble proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Seo, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The technological effects of gamma irradiation (0, 3, 7, and 10 kGy) on chicken salt-soluble meat proteins in a model system were investigated. There were no significant differences in protein, fat, and ash content, and sarcoplasmic protein solubility among all samples. The samples with increasing gamma irradiation levels had higher pH, lightness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity, whereas moisture content, water holding capacity, redness, myofibrillar protein solubility, total protein solubility, hardness, springiness, cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness were the highest in the unirradiated control. The result from meat products using gamma irradiation was intended to provide a basic resource processing technology. - Highlights: • The effect of gamma irradiation on salt-soluble meat proteins was investigated. • Gelling properties of salt-soluble protein affected by gamma irradiation. • Gamma irradiation of meat products provides a basic resource processing technology

  6. Pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate matrix tablets for in vitro controlled release of water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Pseidy Luz; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Veiga, María Dolores

    2015-10-15

    Different pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (ADCP) matrix tablets have been developed in order to obtain controlled release of a water-soluble drug (theophylline). Swelling, buoyancy and dissolution studies have been carried out in different aqueous media (demineralized water, progressive pH medium, simulated gastric fluid, simulated intestinal fluid and simulated colonic fluid), to characterize the matrix tablets. When the pectin/ADCP ratio was ≥0.26 (P1, P2, P3 and P4 tablets) a continuous swelling and low theophylline dissolution rate from the matrices were observed. So, pectin gel forming feature predominated over the ADCP properties, yielding pH-independent drug release behavior from these matrices. On the contrary, pectin/ADCP ratios ≤0.11 (P5 and P6 tablets) allowed to achieve drug dissolution pH dependent. Consequently, the suitable selection of the pectin/ADCP ratio will allow to tailor matrix tablets for controlled release of water-soluble drugs in a specific manner in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional properties and Solubility of date seed proteins as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Med ali

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... Key words: Phoenix dactylifera L, date palm seed, fibre, protein, functional properties. INTRODUCTION. The date .... was employed to perform dynamic measurements. ... are likely to be composed of high-molecular weight.

  8. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  10. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  11. Improved gel electrophoresis matrix for hydrophobic protein separation and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarski, Caroline; Fillet, Marianne; Rolando, Christian

    2011-03-01

    We propose an improved acrylamide gel for the separation of hydrophobic proteins. The separation strategy is based on the incorporation of N-alkylated and N,N'-dialkylated acrylamide monomers in the gel composition in order to increase hydrophobic interactions between the gel matrix and the membrane proteins. Focusing on the most efficient monomer, N,N'-dimethylacrylamide, the potentiality of the new matrix was evaluated on membrane proteins of the human colon HCT-116 cell line. Protein analysis was performed using an adapted analytical strategy based on FT-ICR tandem mass spectrometry. As a result of this comparative study, including advanced reproducibility experiments, more hydrophobic proteins were identified in the new gel (average GRAVY: -0.085) than in the classical gel (average GRAVY: -0.411). Highly hydrophobic peptides were identified reaching a GRAVY value up to 1.450, therefore indicating their probable locations in the membrane. Focusing on predicted transmembrane domains, it can be pointed out that 27 proteins were identified in the hydrophobic gel containing up to 11 transmembrane domains; in the classical gel, only 5 proteins containing 1 transmembrane domain were successfully identified. For example, multiple ionic channels and receptors were characterized in the hydrophobic gel such as the sodium/potassium channel and the glutamate or the transferrin receptors whereas they are traditionally detected using specific enrichment techniques such as immunoprecipitation. In total, membrane proteins identified in the classical gel are well documented in the literature, while most of the membrane proteins only identified on the hydrophobic gel have rarely or never been described using a proteomic-based approach. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A family of E. coli expression vectors for laboratory scale and high throughput soluble protein production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottomley Stephen P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, both automated and manual high-throughput protein expression and purification has become an accessible means to rapidly screen and produce soluble proteins for structural and functional studies. However, many of the commercial vectors encoding different solubility tags require different cloning and purification steps for each vector, considerably slowing down expression screening. We have developed a set of E. coli expression vectors with different solubility tags that allow for parallel cloning from a single PCR product and can be purified using the same protocol. Results The set of E. coli expression vectors, encode for either a hexa-histidine tag or the three most commonly used solubility tags (GST, MBP, NusA and all with an N-terminal hexa-histidine sequence. The result is two-fold: the His-tag facilitates purification by immobilised metal affinity chromatography, whilst the fusion domains act primarily as solubility aids during expression, in addition to providing an optional purification step. We have also incorporated a TEV recognition sequence following the solubility tag domain, which allows for highly specific cleavage (using TEV protease of the fusion protein to yield native protein. These vectors are also designed for ligation-independent cloning and they possess a high-level expressing T7 promoter, which is suitable for auto-induction. To validate our vector system, we have cloned four different genes and also one gene into all four vectors and used small-scale expression and purification techniques. We demonstrate that the vectors are capable of high levels of expression and that efficient screening of new proteins can be readily achieved at the laboratory level. Conclusion The result is a set of four rationally designed vectors, which can be used for streamlined cloning, expression and purification of target proteins in the laboratory and have the potential for being adaptable to a high

  13. Interaction between the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin and ameloblastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindranath, Hanumanth H.; Chen, Li-Sha; Zeichner-David, Margaret; Ishima, Rieko; Ravindranath, Rajeswari M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Enamel matrix consists of amelogenin and non-amelogenins. Though amelogenin is not involved in nucleation of minerals, the enamel mineralization is impaired when amelogenin or other matrix protein (ameloblastin/enamelin) genes are mutated. We hypothesize that amelogenin may promote enamel mineralization by interacting with the calcium-binding matrix proteins. Specific binding of amelogenin to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), GlcNAc-mimicking peptides (GMps), and their carrier proteins and the identification of amelogenin-trityrosyl-motif-peptide (ATMP) as a GlcNAc/GMp-binding domain in amelogenin favor the hypothesis. This study tested the interaction of amelogenin with ameloblastin, a carrier of GMp sequence at intermittent sites. Neither GlcNAc nor sialic acids were identified in the recombinant-ameloblastin. Amelogenin bound to recombinant-ameloblastin in both Western blots and in ELISA. More specifically, [ 3 H]ATMP bound to both recombinant and native ameloblastins. Dosimetry and Scatchard analyses showed the specific interaction between ATMP and ameloblastin, suggesting that amelogenin may interact with ameloblastin to form a heteromolecular assembly

  14. Interaction between the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin and ameloblastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Hanumanth H; Chen, Li-Sha; Zeichner-David, Margaret; Ishima, Rieko; Ravindranath, Rajeswari M H

    2004-10-22

    Enamel matrix consists of amelogenin and non-amelogenins. Though amelogenin is not involved in nucleation of minerals, the enamel mineralization is impaired when amelogenin or other matrix protein (ameloblastin/enamelin) genes are mutated. We hypothesize that amelogenin may promote enamel mineralization by interacting with the calcium-binding matrix proteins. Specific binding of amelogenin to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), GlcNAc-mimicking peptides (GMps), and their carrier proteins and the identification of amelogenin-trityrosyl-motif-peptide (ATMP) as a GlcNAc/GMp-binding domain in amelogenin favor the hypothesis. This study tested the interaction of amelogenin with ameloblastin, a carrier of GMp sequence at intermittent sites. Neither GlcNAc nor sialic acids were identified in the recombinant-ameloblastin. Amelogenin bound to recombinant-ameloblastin in both Western blots and in ELISA. More specifically, [(3)H]ATMP bound to both recombinant and native ameloblastins. Dosimetry and Scatchard analyses showed the specific interaction between ATMP and ameloblastin, suggesting that amelogenin may interact with ameloblastin to form a heteromolecular assembly.

  15. Pooled-matrix protein interaction screens using Barcode Fusion Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachie, Nozomu; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Mellor, Joseph C; Weile, Jochen; Jacob, Yves; Verby, Marta; Ozturk, Sedide B; Li, Siyang; Cote, Atina G; Mosca, Roberto; Knapp, Jennifer J; Ko, Minjeong; Yu, Analyn; Gebbia, Marinella; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Tyagi, Tanya; Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Roth, Jonathan F; Wong, Cassandra; Musa, Louai; Snider, Jamie; Liu, Yi-Chun; Yu, Haiyuan; Braun, Pascal; Stagljar, Igor; Hao, Tong; Calderwood, Michael A; Pelletier, Laurence; Aloy, Patrick; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput binary protein interaction mapping is continuing to extend our understanding of cellular function and disease mechanisms. However, we remain one or two orders of magnitude away from a complete interaction map for humans and other major model organisms. Completion will require screening at substantially larger scales with many complementary assays, requiring further efficiency gains in proteome-scale interaction mapping. Here, we report Barcode Fusion Genetics-Yeast Two-Hybrid (BFG-Y2H), by which a full matrix of protein pairs can be screened in a single multiplexed strain pool. BFG-Y2H uses Cre recombination to fuse DNA barcodes from distinct plasmids, generating chimeric protein-pair barcodes that can be quantified via next-generation sequencing. We applied BFG-Y2H to four different matrices ranging in scale from ~25 K to 2.5 M protein pairs. The results show that BFG-Y2H increases the efficiency of protein matrix screening, with quality that is on par with state-of-the-art Y2H methods. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Soluble proteins from fowl feather keratin. II. Isolation of some proteins from barbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, K; Akahane, K; Murozono, S

    1977-01-01

    Four fractions, GF-1, 2, 3, and 4, which had been separated from S-carboxymethylated (SCM-) proteins of fowl feathers by gel filtration, were each chromatographed on a DEAE-cellulose column in 0.05 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.5) containing 8 M urea. The major fraction, GF-3, was further separated into seven peaks; the first four were shown to be single components by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. Chromatograms of GF-1 and 2 showed broad peaks which appeared at nearly the same volume as in GF-3. The components from GF-3 had very similar amino acid compositions except that the SCM-cysteine content showed a tendency to increase in the order of elution from the column. SCM-extract prepared from barbs of the wing feathers of a fowl was more heterogeneous than that taken from the body feathers. A combination of gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose was found to be more effective for the isolation of soluble SCM-proteins.

  17. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  18. Expression and Purification of Soluble STAT5b/STAT3 Proteins for SH2 Domain Binding Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Akira; Takakuma, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    When a large hydrophobic full-length protein is expressed in bacteria, it is often challenging to obtain recombinant proteins in the soluble fraction. One way to overcome this challenge is expression of deletion mutants that have improved solubility while maintaining biological activity. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for expression of truncated forms of STAT5b and STAT3 proteins that are soluble and retain SH2-mediated activity for phospho-Tyr peptide recognition.

  19. Properties of spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which lack the major small, acid-soluble protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, R.H.; Setlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains containing a deletion in the gene coding for the major small, acid-soluble, spore protein (SASP-gamma) grew and sporulated, and their spores initiated germination normally, but outgrowth of SASP-gamma- spores was significantly slower than that of wild-type spores. The absence of SASP-gamma had no effect on spore protoplast density or spore resistance to heat or radiation. Consequently, SASP-gamma has a different function in spores than do the other major small, acid-soluble proteins

  20. An autoclave treatment reduces the solubility and antigenicity of an allergenic protein found in buckwheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Rikio; Yamato, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    The effects of an autoclave treatment of buckwheat flour on a 24-kDa allergenic protein were investigated by measuring reduction in solubility and antibody binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed that the intensity of the major bands, including that of the 24-kDa allergen, was reduced by the autoclave treatment. The protein solubility in buckwheat flour was variably decreased by the autoclave treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for buckwheat 24-kDa protein showed that the reactivity of protein extracts (10 μg/ml) from buckwheat flour was lowered by the autoclave treatment. The autoclave treatment may reduce the major allergen content of buckwheat. Future studies will determine if autoclaving treatments affect the allergenicity of the 24-kDa buckwheat protein.

  1. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A Comyn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations.

  2. Profiling and relationship of water-soluble sugar and protein compositions in soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Fengjie; Fu, Xujun; Zhu, Danhua

    2016-04-01

    Sugar and protein are important quality traits in soybean seeds for making soy-based food products. However, the investigations on both compositions and their relationship have rarely been reported. In this study, a total of 35 soybean germplasms collected from Zhejiang province of China, were evaluated for both water-soluble sugar and protein. The total water-soluble sugar (TWSS) content of the germplasms studied ranged from 84.70 to 140.91 mg/g and the water-soluble protein (WSP) content varied from 26.5% to 36.0%. The WSP content showed positive correlations with the TWSS and sucrose contents but negative correlations with the fructose and glucose contents. The clustering showed the 35 germplasms could be divided into four groups with specific contents of sugar and protein. The combination of water-soluble sugar and protein profiles provides useful information for future breeding and genetic research. This investigation will facilitate future work for seed quality improvement. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Molecular events in matrix protein metabolism in the aging kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Feliers, Denis; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.; Lee, Hak Joo; Lee, Myung Ja; Day, Robert T.; Yalamanchili, Hima Bindu; Choudhury, Goutam G.; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2018-01-01

    Summary We explored molecular events associated with aging-induced matrix changes in the kidney. C57BL6 mice were studied in youth, middle age, and old age. Albuminuria and serum cystatin C level (an index of glomerular filtration) increased with aging. Renal hypertrophy was evident in middle-aged and old mice and was associated with glomerulomegaly and increase in mesangial fraction occupied by extracellular matrix. Content of collagen types I and III and fibronectin was increased with aging; increment in their mRNA varied with the phase of aging. The content of ZEB1 and ZEB2, collagen type I transcription inhibitors, and their binding to the collagen type Iα2 promoter by ChIP assay also showed age-phase-specific changes. Lack of increase in mRNA and data from polysome assay suggested decreased degradation as a potential mechanism for kidney collagen type I accumulation in the middle-aged mice. These changes occurred with increment in TGFβ mRNA and protein and activation of its SMAD3 pathway; SMAD3 binding to the collagen type Iα2 promoter was also increased. TGFβ-regulated microRNAs (miRs) exhibited selective regulation. The renal cortical content of miR-21 and miR-200c, but not miR-192, miR-200a, or miR-200b, was increased with aging. Increased miR-21 and miR-200c contents were associated with reduced expression of their targets, Sprouty-1 and ZEB2, respectively. These data show that aging is associated with complex molecular events in the kidney that are already evident in the middle age and progress to old age. Agephase-specific regulation of matrix protein synthesis occurs and involves matrix protein-specific transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:23020145

  4. Distance matrix-based approach to protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L; Wu, Zhijun; Song, Guang; Yang, Lei; Kolinski, Andrzej; Pokarowski, Piotr

    2009-03-01

    Much structural information is encoded in the internal distances; a distance matrix-based approach can be used to predict protein structure and dynamics, and for structural refinement. Our approach is based on the square distance matrix D = [r(ij)(2)] containing all square distances between residues in proteins. This distance matrix contains more information than the contact matrix C, that has elements of either 0 or 1 depending on whether the distance r (ij) is greater or less than a cutoff value r (cutoff). We have performed spectral decomposition of the distance matrices D = sigma lambda(k)V(k)V(kT), in terms of eigenvalues lambda kappa and the corresponding eigenvectors v kappa and found that it contains at most five nonzero terms. A dominant eigenvector is proportional to r (2)--the square distance of points from the center of mass, with the next three being the principal components of the system of points. By predicting r (2) from the sequence we can approximate a distance matrix of a protein with an expected RMSD value of about 7.3 A, and by combining it with the prediction of the first principal component we can improve this approximation to 4.0 A. We can also explain the role of hydrophobic interactions for the protein structure, because r is highly correlated with the hydrophobic profile of the sequence. Moreover, r is highly correlated with several sequence profiles which are useful in protein structure prediction, such as contact number, the residue-wise contact order (RWCO) or mean square fluctuations (i.e. crystallographic temperature factors). We have also shown that the next three components are related to spatial directionality of the secondary structure elements, and they may be also predicted from the sequence, improving overall structure prediction. We have also shown that the large number of available HIV-1 protease structures provides a remarkable sampling of conformations, which can be viewed as direct structural information about the

  5. Predicting protein-protein interactions from multimodal biological data sources via nonnegative matrix tri-factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris; Nie, Feiping

    2013-04-01

    Protein interactions are central to all the biological processes and structural scaffolds in living organisms, because they orchestrate a number of cellular processes such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. Several high-throughput methods, for example, yeast two-hybrid system and mass spectrometry method, can help determine protein interactions, which, however, suffer from high false-positive rates. Moreover, many protein interactions predicted by one method are not supported by another. Therefore, computational methods are necessary and crucial to complete the interactome expeditiously. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting protein interactions from a new mathematical perspective--sparse matrix completion, and propose a novel nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based matrix completion approach to predict new protein interactions from existing protein interaction networks. Through using manifold regularization, we further develop our method to integrate different biological data sources, such as protein sequences, gene expressions, protein structure information, etc. Extensive experimental results on four species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, and Caenorhabditis elegans, have shown that our new methods outperform related state-of-the-art protein interaction prediction methods.

  6. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of LAW Phase 1 Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-02-24

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low-activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass. A procedure developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study.

  7. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of Hanford LAW Phase 2, Inner Layer Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Caldwell, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-27

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass.

  8. Collagen and related extracellular matrix proteins in atherosclerotic plaque development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shami, Annelie; Gonçalves, Isabel; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna

    2014-10-01

    The structure, composition and turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as cell-matrix interactions are crucial in the developing atherosclerotic plaque. There is a need for further insight into specific proteins in the ECM and their functions in the developing plaque, and during the last few years a number of publications have highlighted this very important field of research. These novel findings will be addressed in the present review. This review covers literature focused on collagen and ECM proteins interacting with collagen, and what their roles may be in plaque development. Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are common diseases that cause disability and mortality, and the underlying mechanism is often the rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. The vascular ECM and the tissue repair in the atherosclerotic lesion are important players in plaque progression. Understanding how specific proteins in the ECM interact with cells in the plaque and affect the fate of the plaque can lead to new treatments for cardiovascular disease.

  9. Photoimages and the release characteristics of lipophilic matrix tablets containing highly water-soluble potassium citrate with high drug loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Ri; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2007-07-18

    Two types of the carnauba wax-based lipophilic matrix tablet using spray-dried granules (SDT) or directly compressible powdered mixtures (DCT) were prepared for sustained release. The model drug was a highly water-soluble potassium citrate and loaded about 74% of the total tablet weight. The SDT slowly eroded and disintegrated during the release study without showing sustained release when the hydrophilic excipients were added. In contrast, the DCT was more efficient for sustained release. The release rate decreased with increasing carnauba wax concentration. In particular, the sustained release rate was markedly pronounced when the lipophilic stearyl alcohol and stearic acid were combined with the carnauba wax. The surface of the intact DCT appeared to be smooth and rusty. The DCT rose to the surface from the bottom of the vessel during the release test, and numerous pores and cracks with no signs of disintegration were also observed after the release test. The release profile was dependent on the formulation composition and preparation method of the matrix tablet. Diffusion-controlled leaching through the channels of the pores and cracks of the lipophilic matrix tablet (DCT) is a key to the sustained release.

  10. Modulating bacterial and gut mucosal interactions with engineered biofilm matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraj-Thatte, Anna M; Praveschotinunt, Pichet; Nash, Trevor R; Ward, Frederick R; Joshi, Neel S

    2018-02-22

    Extracellular appendages play a significant role in mediating communication between bacteria and their host. Curli fibers are a class of bacterial fimbria that is highly amenable to engineering. We demonstrate the use of engineered curli fibers to rationally program interactions between bacteria and components of the mucosal epithelium. Commensal E. coli strains were engineered to produce recombinant curli fibers fused to the trefoil family of human cytokines. Biofilms formed from these strains bound more mucins than those producing wild-type curli fibers, and modulated mucin rheology as well. When treated with bacteria producing the curli-trefoil fusions mammalian cells behaved identically in terms of their migration behavior as when they were treated with the corresponding soluble trefoil factors. Overall, this demonstrates the potential utility of curli fibers as a scaffold for the display of bioactive domains and an untapped approach to rationally modulating host-microbe interactions using bacterial matrix proteins.

  11. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    -specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). METHODS: B cell immunodominant regions on the COMP molecule were measured with a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using mammalian expressed full-length mouse COMP as well as a panel of recombinant mouse COMP fragments. 18 mAbs specific to COMP were generated......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...

  12. Thermodynamics of protein folding: a random matrix formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pragya

    2010-10-20

    The process of protein folding from an unfolded state to a biologically active, folded conformation is governed by many parameters, e.g. the sequence of amino acids, intermolecular interactions, the solvent, temperature and chaperon molecules. Our study, based on random matrix modeling of the interactions, shows, however, that the evolution of the statistical measures, e.g. Gibbs free energy, heat capacity, and entropy, is single parametric. The information can explain the selection of specific folding pathways from an infinite number of possible ways as well as other folding characteristics observed in computer simulation studies. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  13. Effective non-denaturing purification method for improving the solubility of recombinant actin-binding proteins produced by bacterial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeong Min; Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial expression is commonly used to produce recombinant and truncated mutant eukaryotic proteins. However, heterologous protein expression may render synthesized proteins insoluble. The conventional method used to express a poorly soluble protein, which involves denaturation and refolding, is time-consuming and inefficient. There are several non-denaturing approaches that can increase the solubility of recombinant proteins that include using different bacterial cell strains, altering the time of induction, lowering the incubation temperature, and employing different detergents for purification. In this study, we compared several non-denaturing protocols to express and purify two insoluble 34 kDa actin-bundling protein mutants. The solubility of the mutant proteins was not affected by any of the approaches except for treatment with the detergent sarkosyl. These results indicate that sarkosyl can effectively improve the solubility of insoluble proteins during bacterial expression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  15. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP C ) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP C in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP C protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP C protein was generated by fusion of human PrP C with the Fc portion of human IgG 1 (PrP C -Fc). PrP C -Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56 dim NK cells. PrP C -Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP C -Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP C -Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP C -Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP C -Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP C (PrP C -Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP C with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP C -Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP C -Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP C -Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways

  16. Soluble cysteine-rich tick saliva proteins Salp15 and Iric-1 from E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Philipp; Vorreiter, Jolanta; Habicht, Jüri; Bentrop, Detlef; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks transmit numerous pathogens, including borreliae, which cause Lyme disease. Tick saliva contains a complex mix of anti-host defense factors, including the immunosuppressive cysteine-rich secretory glycoprotein Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis ticks and orthologs like Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus. All tick-borne microbes benefit from the immunosuppression at the tick bite site; in addition, borreliae exploit the binding of Salp15 to their outer surface protein C (OspC) for enhanced transmission. Hence, Salp15 proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that also target borreliae. However, recombinant Salp proteins are not accessible in sufficient quantity for either vaccine manufacturing or for structural characterization. As an alternative to low-yield eukaryotic systems, we investigated cytoplasmic expression in Escherichia coli, even though this would not result in glycosylation. His-tagged Salp15 was efficiently expressed but insoluble. Among the various solubility-enhancing protein tags tested, DsbA was superior, yielding milligram amounts of soluble, monomeric Salp15 and Iric-1 fusions. Easily accessible mutants enabled epitope mapping of two monoclonal antibodies that, importantly, cross-react with glycosylated Salp15, and revealed interaction sites with OspC. Free Salp15 and Iric-1 from protease-cleavable fusions, despite limited solubility, allowed the recording of (1)H-(15)N 2D NMR spectra, suggesting partial folding of the wild-type proteins but not of Cys-free variants. Fusion to the NMR-compatible GB1 domain sufficiently enhanced solubility to reveal first secondary structure elements in (13)C/(15)N double-labeled Iric-1. Together, E. coli expression of appropriately fused Salp15 proteins may be highly valuable for the molecular characterization of the function and eventually the 3D structure of these medically relevant tick proteins.

  17. Common structural features of cholesterol binding sites in crystallized soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alejandro M

    2017-06-01

    Cholesterol-protein interactions are essential for the architectural organization of cell membranes and for lipid metabolism. While cholesterol-sensing motifs in transmembrane proteins have been identified, little is known about cholesterol recognition by soluble proteins. We reviewed the structural characteristics of binding sites for cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate from crystallographic structures available in the Protein Data Bank. This analysis unveiled key features of cholesterol-binding sites that are present in either all or the majority of sites: i ) the cholesterol molecule is generally positioned between protein domains that have an organized secondary structure; ii ) the cholesterol hydroxyl/sulfo group is often partnered by Asn, Gln, and/or Tyr, while the hydrophobic part of cholesterol interacts with Leu, Ile, Val, and/or Phe; iii ) cholesterol hydrogen-bonding partners are often found on α-helices, while amino acids that interact with cholesterol's hydrophobic core have a slight preference for β-strands and secondary structure-lacking protein areas; iv ) the steroid's C21 and C26 constitute the "hot spots" most often seen for steroid-protein hydrophobic interactions; v ) common "cold spots" are C8-C10, C13, and C17, at which contacts with the proteins were not detected. Several common features we identified for soluble protein-steroid interaction appear evolutionarily conserved. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Membrane and inclusion body targeting of lyssavirus matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollin, Reiko; Granzow, Harald; Köllner, Bernd; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Finke, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Lyssavirus matrix proteins (M) support virus budding and have accessory functions that may contribute to host cell manipulation and adaptation to specific hosts. Here, we show that rabies virus (RABV) and European Bat Lyssavirus Type 1 (EBLV-1) M proteins differ in targeting and accumulation at cellular membranes. In contrast to RABV M, EBLV-1 M expressed from authentic EBLV-1 or chimeric RABV accumulated at the Golgi apparatus. Chimeric M proteins revealed that Golgi association depends on the integrity of the entire EBLV-1 M protein. Since RABV and EBLV-1 M differ in the use of cellular membranes for particle formation, differential membrane targeting and transport of M might determine the site of virus production. Moreover, both RABV and EBLV-1 M were for the first time detected within the nucleus and in Negri body-like inclusions bodies. Whereas nuclear M may imply hitherto unknown functions of lyssavirus M in host cell manipulation, the presence of M in inclusion bodies may correlate with regulatory functions of M in virus RNA synthesis. The data strongly support a model in which targeting of lyssavirus M proteins to distinctintracellular sites is a key determinant of diverse features in lyssavirus replication, host adaptation and pathogenesis. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A new crystallization strategy: the presence of cleaved thioredoxin fusion is critical for crystallization of the estrogen nuclear receptor ligand binding domain in complex with synthetic ligands. This novel technique should be regarded as an interesting alternative for crystallization of difficult proteins. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins

  20. Screening of genetic parameters for soluble protein expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernet, Erik; Kotzsch, Alexander; Voldborg, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Soluble expression of proteins in a relevant form for functional and structural investigations still often remains a challenge. Although many biochemical factors are known to affect solubility, a thorough investigation of yield-limiting factors is normally not feasible in high-throughput efforts....... Here we present a screening strategy for expression of biomedically relevant proteins in Escherichia coli using a panel of six different genetic variations. These include engineered strains for rare codon supplementation, increased disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm and novel vectors...... for secretion to the periplasm or culture medium. Combining these variants with expression construct truncations design, we report on parallel cloning and expression of more than 300 constructs representing 24 selected proteins; including full-length variants of human growth factors, interleukins and growth...

  1. Transport of soluble proteins through the Golgi occurs by diffusion via continuities across cisternae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznoussenko, Galina V; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Rizzo, Riccardo; Polishchuk, Roman; Martella, Oliviano; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Fusella, Aurora; Spaar, Alexander; Sallese, Michele; Capestrano, Maria Grazia; Pavelka, Margit; Vos, Matthijn R; Rikers, Yuri GM; Helms, Volkhard; Mironov, Alexandre A; Luini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of transport through the Golgi complex is not completely understood, insofar as no single transport mechanism appears to account for all of the observations. Here, we compare the transport of soluble secretory proteins (albumin and α1-antitrypsin) with that of supramolecular cargoes (e.g., procollagen) that are proposed to traverse the Golgi by compartment progression–maturation. We show that these soluble proteins traverse the Golgi much faster than procollagen while moving through the same stack. Moreover, we present kinetic and morphological observations that indicate that albumin transport occurs by diffusion via intercisternal continuities. These data provide evidence for a transport mechanism that applies to a major class of secretory proteins and indicate the co-existence of multiple intra-Golgi trafficking modes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02009.001 PMID:24867214

  2. Characterization of the proteins comprising the integral matrix of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryonic spicules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, C. E.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we enumerate and characterize the proteins that comprise the integral spicule matrix of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins reveals that there are 12 strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins and approximately three dozen less strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins. The majority of the proteins have acidic isoelectric points; however, there are several spicule matrix proteins that have more alkaline isoelectric points. Western blotting analysis indicates that SM50 is the spicule matrix protein with the most alkaline isoelectric point. In addition, two distinct SM30 proteins are identified in embryonic spicules, and they have apparent molecular masses of approximately 43 and 46 kDa. Comparisons between embryonic spicule matrix proteins and adult spine integral matrix proteins suggest that the embryonic 43-kDa SM30 protein is an embryonic isoform of SM30. An adult 49-kDa spine matrix protein is also identified as a possible adult isoform of SM30. Analysis of the SM30 amino acid sequences indicates that a portion of SM30 proteins is very similar to the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin proteins.

  3. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola A. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2 is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S. These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  4. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  5. Soluble expression of recombinant proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans; Mortensen, Kim

    2005-01-01

    Pure, soluble and functional proteins are of high demand in modern biotechnology. Natural protein sources rarely meet the requirements for quantity, ease of isolation or price and hence recombinant technology is often the method of choice. Recombinant cell factories are constantly employed...... molecular tools available. In spite of all these qualities, expression of recombinant proteins with E. coli as the host often results in insoluble and/or nonfunctional proteins. Here we review new approaches to overcome these obstacles by strategies that focus on either controlled expression of target...... for the production of protein preparations bound for downstream purification and processing. Eschericia coli is a frequently used host, since it facilitates protein expression by its relative simplicity, its inexpensive and fast high density cultivation, the well known genetics and the large number of compatible...

  6. Soluble arabinoxylan alters digesta flow and protein digestion of red meat-containing diets in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dagong; Williams, Barbara A; Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Li, Xiuhua; Keates, Helen L; Lisle, Allan T; Collins, Helen M; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Bird, Anthony R; Topping, David L; Gidley, Michael J; Bryden, Wayne L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how a moderate increase in dietary meat content combined (or not) with soluble fibre would influence protein digestion as well as digesta characteristics and flow. Four groups of pigs were fed Western-style diets (high-protein/high-fat) containing two types of barbecued red meat, one with and one without a wheat arabinoxylan-rich fraction. After 4 wk, digesta samples were collected from small and large intestinal sites and analyzed for protein, amino acids, dry matter, and acid-insoluble ash. Tissue samples were also collected from each site. Arabinoxylan consumption led to somewhat lower apparent protein digestibility within the small and large intestines as well as shorter mean retention times. This suggests that the lowered protein digestibility is due, at least partly, to shorter access time to digestive proteases and absorptive surfaces. Additionally, digesta mass was higher in pigs fed arabinoxylan while dry matter (%) was lower, indicating an increased digesta water-holding capacity due to the presence of a soluble dietary fiber. Data showed that solubilized wheat arabinoxylan provides potential health benefits through decreased protein digestibility, increased digesta mass, and reduced mean retention time, even for diets with a moderately higher protein content. These factors are associated with efficiency of digestion and satiety, both of which have implications for prevention of obesity and other health disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of enzymatic treatment of extracted sunflower proteins on solubility, amino acid composition, and surface activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, José Miñones; Escobar, María del Mar Yust; Pedroche Jiménez, Justo J; Rodríguez, Francisco Millán; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2005-10-05

    Industrial proteins from agriculture of either animal or vegetable origin, including their peptide derivatives, are of great importance, from the qualitative and quantitative point of view, in food formulations (emulsions and foams). A fundamental understanding of the physical, chemical, and functional properties of these proteins is essential if the performance of proteins in foods is to be improved and if underutilized proteins, such as plant proteins (and their hydrolysates and peptides derivatives), are to be increasingly used in traditional and new processed food products (safe, high-quality, health foods with good nutritional value). In this contribution we have determined the main physicochemical characteristics (solubility, composition, and analysis of amino acids) of a sunflower protein isolate (SPI) and its hydrolysates with low (5.62%), medium (23.5%), and high (46.3%) degrees of hydrolysis. The hydrolysates were obtained by enzymatic treatment with Alcalase 2.4 L for DH 5.62 and 23.5% and with Alcalase 2.4 L and Flavorzyme 1000 MG sequentially for DH 46.3%. The protein concentration dependence on surface pressure (surface pressure isotherm), a measure of the surface activity of the products (SPI and its hydrolysates), was obtained by tensiometry. We have observed that the degree of hydrolysis has an effect on solubility, composition, and content of the amino acids of the SPI and its hydrolysates. The superficial activity and the adsorption efficiency were also affected by the degree of hydrolysis.

  8. Benzoate-mediated changes on expression profile of soluble proteins in Serratia sp. DS001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeeti, E V P; Chinnaboina, M R; Siddavattam, D

    2009-05-01

    To assess differences in protein expression profile associated with shift in carbon source from succinate to benzoate in Serratia sp. DS001 using a proteomics approach. A basic proteome map was generated for the soluble proteins extracted from Serratia sp. DS001 grown in succinate and benzoate. The differently and differentially expressed proteins were identified using ImageMaster 2D Platinum software (GE Healthcare). The identity of the proteins was determined by employing MS or MS/MS. Important enzymes such as Catechol 1,2 dioxygenase and transcriptional regulators that belong to the LysR superfamily were identified. Nearly 70 proteins were found to be differentially expressed when benzoate was used as carbon source. Based on the protein identity and degradation products generated from benzoate it is found that ortho pathway is operational in Serratia sp. DS001. Expression profile of the soluble proteins associated with shift in carbon source was mapped. The study also elucidates degradation pathway of benzoate in Serratia sp. DS001 by correlating the proteomics data with the catabolites of benzoate.

  9. Rapid Determination of Protein Solubility and Stability Conditions for NMR Studies Using Incomplete Factorial Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducat, Thierry; Declerck, Nathalie; Gostan, Thierry; Kochoyan, Michel; Demene, Helene

    2006-01-01

    Sample preparation constitutes a crucial and limiting step in structural studies of proteins by NMR. The determination of the solubility and stability (SAS) conditions of biomolecules at millimolar concentrations stays today empirical and hence time- and material-consuming. Only few studies have been recently done in this field and they have highlighted the interest of using crystallogenesis tools to optimise sample conditions. In this study, we have adapted a method based on incomplete factorial design and making use of crystallisation plates to quantify the influence of physico-chemical parameters such as buffer pH and salts on protein SAS. A description of the experimental set up and an evaluation of the method are given by case studies on two functional domains from the bacterial regulatory protein LicT as well as two other proteins. Using this method, we could rapidly determine optimised conditions for extracting soluble proteins from bacterial cells and for preparing purified protein samples sufficiently concentrated and stable for NMR characterisation. The drastic reduction in the time and number of experiments required for searching protein SAS conditions makes this method particularly well-adapted for a systematic investigation on a large range of physico-chemical parameters

  10. Production of a soluble recombinant prion protein fused to blue fluorescent protein without refolding or detergents in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi

    2007-10-01

    The physiological function of prion proteins (PrP) remains unclear. To investigate the physiological relevance of PrP, we constructed a fusion protein of PrP with enhanced blue fluorescent protein (PrP-EBFP) to quantify the interaction of PrP with other molecules. Production of soluble PrP-EBFP was achieved by lowering the expression temperature in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells to 15 degrees C. Soluble PrP-EBFP was purified on cation exchange and heparin-affinity columns to yield high purity protein. This is the first report of the preparation of soluble recombinant PrP without refolding following solubilization using denaturants or disruption using detergents. To confirm the integrity of PrP-EBFP, anisotropy was estimated under physiological conditions in the presence of heparin, which interacts with PrP. The dissociation constant was determined to be 0.88+/-0.07 microM. PrP-EBFP should be useful in the quantification of PrP interactions with other molecules.

  11. Optimized sample preparation for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of soluble proteins from chicken bursa of Fabricius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xiaojuan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE is a powerful method to study protein expression and function in living organisms and diseases. This technique, however, has not been applied to avian bursa of Fabricius (BF, a central immune organ. Here, optimized 2-DE sample preparation methodologies were constructed for the chicken BF tissue. Using the optimized protocol, we performed further 2-DE analysis on a soluble protein extract from the BF of chickens infected with virulent avibirnavirus. To demonstrate the quality of the extracted proteins, several differentially expressed protein spots selected were cut from 2-DE gels and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Results An extraction buffer containing 7 M urea, 2 M thiourea, 2% (w/v 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS, 50 mM dithiothreitol (DTT, 0.2% Bio-Lyte 3/10, 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF, 20 U/ml Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I, and 0.25 mg/ml Ribonuclease A (RNase A, combined with sonication and vortex, yielded the best 2-DE data. Relative to non-frozen immobilized pH gradient (IPG strips, frozen IPG strips did not result in significant changes in the 2-DE patterns after isoelectric focusing (IEF. When the optimized protocol was used to analyze the spleen and thymus, as well as avibirnavirus-infected bursa, high quality 2-DE protein expression profiles were obtained. 2-DE maps of BF of chickens infected with virulent avibirnavirus were visibly different and many differentially expressed proteins were found. Conclusion These results showed that method C, in concert extraction buffer IV, was the most favorable for preparing samples for IEF and subsequent protein separation and yielded the best quality 2-DE patterns. The optimized protocol is a useful sample preparation method for comparative proteomics analysis of chicken BF tissues.

  12. Biochemical characterization of soluble proteins in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2008-09-10

    Pecans (cv. Desirable) contained approximately 10% protein on a dry weight basis. The minimum nitrogen solubility (5.9-7.5%) at 0.25-0.75 M trichloroacetic acid represented the nonprotein nitrogen. Among the solvents assessed for protein solubilization, 0.1 M NaOH was the most effective, while borate saline buffer (pH 8.45) was judged to be optimal for protein solubilization. The protein solubility was minimal in the pH range of 3-7 and significantly increased on either side of this pH range. Increasing the NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M significantly improved ( approximately 8-fold increase) protein solubilization. Following Osborne protein fractionation, the alkali-soluble glutelin fraction (60.1%) accounted for a major portion of pecan proteins followed by globulin (31.5%), prolamin (3.4%), and albumin (1.5%), respectively. The majority of pecan polypeptides were in the molecular mass range of 12-66 kDa and in the pI range of 4.0-8.3. The pecan globulin fraction was characterized by the presence of several glycoprotein polypeptides. Lysine was the first limiting essential amino acid in the defatted flour, globulin, prolamin, and alkaline glutelin fractions. Leucine and tryptophan were the first limiting essential amino acids in albumin and acid glutelin fractions, respectively. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies detected a range of pecan polypeptides in the 12-60 kDa range, of which the globulin fraction contained the most reactive polypeptides.

  13. Soluble Protein Analysis using a Compact Bench-top Flow Cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri; Kao, Shib-Hsin; Cyr, Johnathan

    2004-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require analytical technology capable of providing both autonomous medical care to the crew and investigative capabilities to researchers. While several promising candidate technologies exist for further development, flow cytometry is an attractive technology as it offers both crew health (blood cell count, leukocyte differential, etc.) and a wide array of biochemistry and immunology assays. research settings, the application of this technique to soluble protein analysis is also possible. Proteomic beads using fluorescent dyes for optical encoding were used to monitor six cytokines simultaneously in cell medium of cell cultures in stationary and rotating cell culture systems. The results of this work demonstrate that a compact flow cytometer, such as a system proposed for space flight, can detect a variety of soluble proteins for crew health and biotechnology experiments during long-term missions.

  14. Graphene oxide as a protein matrix: influence on protein biophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cancel, Griselle; Suazo-Dávila, Dámaris; Ojeda-Cruzado, Axel J; García-Torres, Desiree; Cabrera, Carlos R; Griebenow, Kai

    2015-10-19

    This study provides fundamental information on the influence of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and glycans on protein catalytic activity, dynamics, and thermal stability. We provide evidence of protein stabilization by glycans and how this strategy could be implemented when GO nanosheets is used as protein immobilization matrix. A series of bioconjugates was constructed using two different strategies: adsorbing or covalently attaching native and glycosylated bilirubin oxidase (BOD) to GO. Bioconjugate formation was followed by FT-IR, zeta-potential, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Enzyme kinetic parameters (k(m) and k(cat)) revealed that the substrate binding affinity was not affected by glycosylation and immobilization on GO, but the rate of enzyme catalysis was reduced. Structural analysis by circular dichroism showed that glycosylation did not affect the tertiary or the secondary structure of BOD. However, GO produced slight changes in the secondary structure. To shed light into the biophysical consequence of protein glycosylation and protein immobilization on GO nanosheets, we studied structural protein dynamical changes by FT-IR H/D exchange and thermal inactivation. It was found that glycosylation caused a reduction in structural dynamics that resulted in an increase in thermostability and a decrease in the catalytic activity for both, glycoconjugate and immobilized enzyme. These results establish the usefulness of chemical glycosylation to modulate protein structural dynamics and stability to develop a more stable GO-protein matrix.

  15. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhat, Walid A [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, University of Toronto and Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8 (Canada); Chen Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Yeger, Herman [Department of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8 (Canada); Sherman, Christopher [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Derwin, Kathleen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute and Orthopaedic Research Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)], E-mail: walid.farhat@sickkids.ca

    2008-06-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization.

  16. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhat, Walid A; Chen Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Yeger, Herman; Sherman, Christopher; Derwin, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization

  17. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Walid A; Chen, Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Sherman, Christopher; Derwin, Kathleen; Yeger, Herman

    2008-06-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization.

  18. The human metapneumovirus matrix protein stimulates the inflammatory immune response in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Bagnaud-Baule

    Full Text Available Each year, during winter months, human Metapneumovirus (hMPV is associated with epidemics of bronchiolitis resulting in the hospitalization of many infants. Bronchiolitis is an acute illness of the lower respiratory tract with a consequent inflammation of the bronchioles. The rapid onset of inflammation suggests the innate immune response may have a role to play in the pathogenesis of this hMPV infection. Since, the matrix protein is one of the most abundant proteins in the Paramyxoviridae family virion, we hypothesized that the inflammatory modulation observed in hMPV infected patients may be partly associated with the matrix protein (M-hMPV response. By western blot analysis, we detected a soluble form of M-hMPV released from hMPV infected cell as well as from M-hMPV transfected HEK 293T cells suggesting that M-hMPV may be directly in contact with antigen presenting cells (APCs during the course of infection. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy allowed determining that M-hMPV was taken up by dendritic cells (moDCs and macrophages inducing their activation. Furthermore, these moDCs enter into a maturation process inducing the secretion of a broad range of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to M-hMPV. Additionally, M-hMPV activated DCs were shown to stimulate IL-2 and IFN-γ production by allogeneic T lymphocytes. This M-hMPV-mediated activation and antigen presentation of APCs may in part explain the marked inflammatory immune response observed in pathology induced by hMPV in patients.

  19. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  20. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Pham

    Full Text Available Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  1. Design and characterisation of matrix tablets of highly water soluble drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Prakya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Tramadol HCL is a centrally acting opioid analgesic. Although the drug has a higher plasma half life, the steady state plasma concentration is not achieved with frequent dosing of q.i.d at 6 hour intervals. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to formulate a 100mg strength Tramadol matrix tablets to extend the drug release and thus decrease the dosing frequency and achieve steady state plasma concentration. Initially, preformulation studies were carried out to rule out any incompatibility between the drug and the chosen polymer(s after exposing physical mixtures of the drug and the polymer(s to 40 and deg;C/75% RH for three months. A suitable method was developed for drug estimation at 271nm by a UV double beam spectrophotometer. Next, various batches of tablets were designed using different polymers such as Ethylcellulose, Carnauba wax, HPMC-K100M, Carbopol-974P and Kollidon-SR. Direct compression technique was used except for the formulation containing carnauba wax for which melt granulation was done followed by compression. Formulations F-1 to F-15 contained single polymers in increasing concentrations in drug:polymer ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 where it was observed that the drug release extended with increasing polymer concentrations. Carbopol-974P extended drug release better followed by HPMC-K100M and Carnauba wax compared to other polymers. A combination of these polymers was also used at various ratios to get formulations F-16 to F-20 and observed that the polymer combinations controlled drug release better. The type of fillers like lactose and microcrystalline cellulose had no effect on the physiochemical characters as well as on the drug release profiles. The in vitro release data from the best formulation fitted well in Higuchi as well as Peppas model, the and #8216;n and #8217; value, which confirmed that the release mechanism shifted from initial dissolution to later extended diffusion in which both diffusion and erosion

  2. Effect of pore size of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous chitosan-silica matrix on solubility, drug release, and oral bioavailability of loaded-nimodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yikun; Xie, Yuling; Sun, Hongrui; Zhao, Qinfu; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of the pore size of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous chitosan-silica (3D-CS) matrix on the solubility, drug release, and oral bioavailability of the loaded drug. 3D-CS matrices with pore sizes of 180 nm, 470 nm, and 930 nm were prepared. Nimodipine (NMDP) was used as the drug model. The morphology, specific surface area, and chitosan mass ratio of the 3D-CS matrices were characterized before the effect of the pore size on drug crystallinity, solubility, release, and in vivo pharmacokinetics were investigated. With the pore size of 3D-CS matrix decreasing, the drug crystallinity decreased and the aqueous solubility increased. The drug release was synthetically controlled by the pore size and chitosan content of 3D-CS matrix in a pH 6.8 medium, while in a pH 1.2 medium the erosion of the 3D-CS matrix played an important role in the decreased drug release rate. The area under the curve of the drug-loaded 3D-CS matrices with pore sizes of 930 nm, 470 nm, and 180 nm was 7.46-fold, 5.85-fold, and 3.75-fold larger than that of raw NMDP respectively. Our findings suggest that the oral bioavailability decreased with a decrease in the pore size of the matrix.

  3. Protein shedding in urothelial bladder cancer: prognostic implications of soluble urinary EGFR and EpCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, R T; Regan, H L; Pirrie, S J; Devall, A J; Cheng, K K; Zeegers, M P; James, N D; Knowles, M A; Ward, D G

    2015-03-17

    Better biomarkers must be found to develop clinically useful urine tests for bladder cancer. Proteomics can be used to identify the proteins released by cancer cell lines and generate candidate markers for developing such tests. We used shotgun proteomics to identify proteins released into culture media by eight bladder cancer cell lines. These data were compared with protein expression data from the Human Protein Atlas. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was identified as a candidate biomarker and measured by ELISA in urine from 60 noncancer control subjects and from 436 patients with bladder cancer and long-term clinical follow-up. Bladder cancer cell lines shed soluble EGFR ectodomain. Soluble EGFR is also detectable in urine and is highly elevated in some patients with high-grade bladder cancer. Urinary EGFR is an independent indicator of poor bladder cancer-specific survival with a hazard ratio of 2.89 (95% CI 1.81-4.62, Pbladder cancer-specific survival and have prognostic value over and above that provided by standard clinical observations. Measuring urinary EGFR and EpCAM may represent a simple and useful approach for fast-tracking the investigation and treatment of patients with the most aggressive bladder cancers.

  4. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of nuclear matrix proteins in human colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumpanaki, A; Baltatzis, G E; Gaitanarou, E; Seretis, E; Toumpanakis, C; Aroni, K; Kittas, Christos; Voloudakis-Baltatzis, I E

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe possible qualitative and quantitative expression differences between nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs) of human colon adenocarcinoma and their mirror biopsies, using the technique of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, in order to identify the existence of specific NMP fingerprints for colon cancer. Colon tissues were examined ultrastructurally and NMPs were isolated biochemically, by serial extraction of lipids, soluble proteins, DNA, RNA, and intermediate filaments and were separated according to their isoelectric point (pI) and their molecular weight (MW) by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D). By comparing the 2D electropherograms of colon cancer tissues and mirror biopsy tissues we observed qualitative and quantitative expression differences between their NMPs but also a differentiation of NMP composition between the stages of malignancy. Moreover, despite the similarities between mirror biopsy samples, a highlight percentage of exception was observed. Electrophoretic results provided in this study demonstrated that the examined NMPs could be further investigated as potential markers for detection of colorectal cancer in an early stage, for the assessment of the disease progression, as well as useful tools for individual therapy and for preventing a possible recurrence of cancer and metastasis.

  5. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chia-Ying; Olieric, Vincent; Ma, Pikyee; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Diederichs, Kay; Wang, Meitian; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A method for performing high-throughput in situ serial X-ray crystallography with soluble and membrane proteins in the lipid cubic phase is described. It works with microgram quantities of protein and lipid (and ligand when present) and is compatible with the most demanding sulfur SAD phasing. The lipid cubic phase (LCP) continues to grow in popularity as a medium in which to generate crystals of membrane (and soluble) proteins for high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure determination. To date, the PDB includes 227 records attributed to the LCP or in meso method. Among the listings are some of the highest profile membrane proteins, including the β 2 -adrenoreceptor–G s protein complex that figured in the award of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Lefkowitz and Kobilka. The most successful in meso protocol to date uses glass sandwich crystallization plates. Despite their many advantages, glass plates are challenging to harvest crystals from. However, performing in situ X-ray diffraction measurements with these plates is not practical. Here, an alternative approach is described that provides many of the advantages of glass plates and is compatible with high-throughput in situ measurements. The novel in meso in situ serial crystallography (IMISX) method introduced here has been demonstrated with AlgE and PepT (alginate and peptide transporters, respectively) as model integral membrane proteins and with lysozyme as a test soluble protein. Structures were solved by molecular replacement and by experimental phasing using bromine SAD and native sulfur SAD methods to resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 Å using single-digit microgram quantities of protein. That sulfur SAD phasing worked is testament to the exceptional quality of the IMISX diffraction data. The IMISX method is compatible with readily available, inexpensive materials and equipment, is simple to implement and is compatible with high-throughput in situ serial data collection at macromolecular

  6. Protein-anchoring therapy to target extracellular matrix proteins to their physiological destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mikako; Ohno, Kinji

    2018-02-20

    Endplate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency is a form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) caused by mutations in COLQ, which encodes collagen Q (ColQ). ColQ is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that anchors AChE to the synaptic basal lamina. Biglycan, encoded by BGN, is another ECM protein that binds to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) on skeletal muscle, which links the actin cytoskeleton and ECM proteins to stabilize the sarcolemma during repeated muscle contractions. Upregulation of biglycan stabilizes the DPAC. Gene therapy can potentially ameliorate any disease that can be recapitulated in cultured cells. However, the difficulty of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific regulated expression of transgenes, as well as the difficulty of introducing a transgene into all cells in a specific tissue, prevents us from successfully applying gene therapy to many human diseases. In contrast to intracellular proteins, an ECM protein is anchored to the target tissue via its specific binding affinity for protein(s) expressed on the cell surface within the target tissue. Exploiting this unique feature of ECM proteins, we developed protein-anchoring therapy in which a transgene product expressed even in remote tissues can be delivered and anchored to a target tissue using specific binding signals. We demonstrate the application of protein-anchoring therapy to two disease models. First, intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8-COLQ to Colq-deficient mice, resulting in specific anchoring of ectopically expressed ColQ-AChE at the NMJ, markedly improved motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In the second example, Mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, were intravenously injected with AAV8-BGN. The treatment ameliorated motor deficits, mitigated muscle histopathologies, decreased plasma creatine kinase activities, and upregulated expression

  7. Oligomerization and polymerization of the filovirus matrix protein VP40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Joanna; Schoehn, Guy; Kohlhaas, Christine; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    The matrix protein VP40 from Ebola virus plays an important role in the assembly process of virus particles by interacting with cellular factors, cellular membranes, and the ribonuclearprotein particle complex. Here we show that the N-terminal domain of VP40 folds into a mixture of two different oligomeric states in vitro, namely hexameric and octameric ringlike structures, as detected by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy. Octamer formation depends largely on the interaction with nucleic acids, which in turn confers in vitro SDS resistance. Refolding experiments with a nucleic acid free N-terminal domain preparation reveal a mostly dimeric form of VP40, which is transformed into an SDS resistant octamer upon incubation with E. coli nucleic acids. In addition, we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of Marburg virus VP40 also folds into ringlike structures, similar to Ebola virus VP40. Interestingly, Marburg virus VP40 rings reveal a high tendency to polymerize into rods composed of stacked rings. These results may suggest distinct roles for different oligomeric forms of VP40 in the filovirus life cycle

  8. Identification of the hemoglobin scavenger receptor/CD163 as a natural soluble protein in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Peterslund, Niels Anker; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2002-01-01

    enabled identification of a soluble plasma form of HbSR (sHbSR) having an electrophoretic mobility equal to that of recombinant HbSR consisting of the extracellular domain (scavenger receptor cysteine-rich 1-9). A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established and used to measure the s...... a level of sHbSR above the range of healthy persons. Patients with myelomonocytic leukemias and pneumonia/sepsis exhibited the highest levels (up to 67.3 mg/L). In conclusion, sHbSR is an abundant plasma protein potentially valuable in monitoring patients with infections and myelomonocytic leukemia....

  9. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of a water-soluble cationic porphyrin with proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Min; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Nuo; Han, Yan-Yan; Wu, Dan; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2009-04-01

    The interaction of a water-soluble cationic porphyrin, meso-tetrakis (4- N, N, N-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP), with two proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA), was studied by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy at neutral aqueous solutions. Free base TMAP bound to proteins as monomers and no aggregation was observed. The binding of TMAP quenched the fluorescence of the protein. On the contrary, the fluorescence of TMAP was enhanced and the fluorescence anisotropy increased due to the binding. The direct static binding mechanism could account for the quenching by TMAP and the binding constants were calculated. TMAP showed a higher quenching efficiency and binding constant of HSA than BSA. The binding of TMAP had no obvious effect on the molecular conformation of the protein. There was only one binding site for TMAP and it was located on the surface of the protein molecule. Electrostatic force played an important role in the binding due to the opposite charges on porphyrin and the proteins.

  10. How to find soluble proteins: a comprehensive analysis of alpha/beta hydrolases for recombinant expression in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Sandra

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In screening of libraries derived by expression cloning, expression of active proteins in E. coli can be limited by formation of inclusion bodies. In these cases it would be desirable to enrich gene libraries for coding sequences with soluble gene products in E. coli and thus to improve the efficiency of screening. Previously Wilkinson and Harrison showed that solubility can be predicted from amino acid composition (Biotechnology 1991, 9(5:443–448. We have applied this analysis to members of the alpha/beta hydrolase fold family to predict their solubility in E. coli. alpha/beta hydrolases are a highly diverse family with more than 1800 proteins which have been grouped into homologous families and superfamilies. Results The predicted solubility in E. coli depends on hydrolase size, phylogenetic origin of the host organism, the homologous family and the superfamily, to which the hydrolase belongs. In general small hydrolases are predicted to be more soluble than large hydrolases, and eukaryotic hydrolases are predicted to be less soluble in E. coli than prokaryotic ones. However, combining phylogenetic origin and size leads to more complex conclusions. Hydrolases from prokaryotic, fungal and metazoan origin are predicted to be most soluble if they are of small, medium and large size, respectively. We observed large variations of predicted solubility between hydrolases from different homologous families and from different taxa. Conclusion A comprehensive analysis of all alpha/beta hydrolase sequences allows more efficient screenings for new soluble alpha/beta hydrolases by the use of libraries which contain more soluble gene products. Screening of hydrolases from families whose members are hard to express as soluble proteins in E. coli should first be done in coding sequences of organisms from phylogenetic groups with the highest average of predicted solubility for proteins of this family. The tools developed here can be used

  11. Coregulation of Soybean Vegetative Storage Protein Gene Expression by Methyl Jasmonate and Soluble Sugars 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Hugh S.; DeWald, Daryll B.; Creelman, Robert A.; Mullet, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The soybean vegetative storage protein genes vspA and vspB are highly expressed in developing leaves, stems, flowers, and pods as compared with roots, seeds, and mature leaves and stems. In this paper, we report that physiological levels of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and soluble sugars synergistically stimulate accumulation of vsp mRNAs. Treatment of excised mature soybean (Glycine max Merr. cv Williams) leaves with 0.2 molar sucrose and 10 micromolar MeJA caused a large accumulation of vsp mRNAs, whereas little accumulation occurred when these compounds were supplied separately. In soybean cell suspension cultures, the synergistic effect of sucrose and MeJA on the accumulation of vspB mRNA was maximal at 58 millimolar sucrose and was observed with fructose or glucose substituted for sucrose. In dark-grown soybean seedlings, the highest levels of vsp mRNAs occurred in the hypocotyl hook, which also contained high levels of MeJA and soluble sugars. Lower levels of vsp mRNAs, MeJA, and soluble sugars were found in the cotyledons, roots, and nongrowing regions of the stem. Wounding of mature soybean leaves induced a large accumulation of vsp mRNAs when wounded plants were incubated in the light. Wounded plants kept in the dark or illuminated plants sprayed with dichlorophenyldimethylurea, an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, showed a greatly reduced accumulation of vsp mRNAs. The time courses for the accumulation of vsp mRNAs induced by wounding or sucrose/MeJA treatment were similar. These results strongly suggest that vsp expression is coregulated by endogenous levels of MeJA (or jasmonic acid) and soluble carbohydrate during normal vegetative development and in wounded leaves. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668757

  12. Coregulation of soybean vegetative storage protein gene expression by methyl jasmonate and soluble sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H S; Dewald, D B; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1992-03-01

    The soybean vegetative storage protein genes vspA and vspB are highly expressed in developing leaves, stems, flowers, and pods as compared with roots, seeds, and mature leaves and stems. In this paper, we report that physiological levels of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and soluble sugars synergistically stimulate accumulation of vsp mRNAs. Treatment of excised mature soybean (Glycine max Merr. cv Williams) leaves with 0.2 molar sucrose and 10 micromolar MeJA caused a large accumulation of vsp mRNAs, whereas little accumulation occurred when these compounds were supplied separately. In soybean cell suspension cultures, the synergistic effect of sucrose and MeJA on the accumulation of vspB mRNA was maximal at 58 millimolar sucrose and was observed with fructose or glucose substituted for sucrose. In dark-grown soybean seedlings, the highest levels of vsp mRNAs occurred in the hypocotyl hook, which also contained high levels of MeJA and soluble sugars. Lower levels of vsp mRNAs, MeJA, and soluble sugars were found in the cotyledons, roots, and nongrowing regions of the stem. Wounding of mature soybean leaves induced a large accumulation of vsp mRNAs when wounded plants were incubated in the light. Wounded plants kept in the dark or illuminated plants sprayed with dichlorophenyldimethylurea, an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, showed a greatly reduced accumulation of vsp mRNAs. The time courses for the accumulation of vsp mRNAs induced by wounding or sucrose/MeJA treatment were similar. These results strongly suggest that vsp expression is coregulated by endogenous levels of MeJA (or jasmonic acid) and soluble carbohydrate during normal vegetative development and in wounded leaves.

  13. A review of machine learning methods to predict the solubility of overexpressed recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Narjeskhatoon; Mohd Hashim, Siti Z; Norouzi, Alireza; Samian, Mohammed Razip

    2014-05-08

    Over the last 20 years in biotechnology, the production of recombinant proteins has been a crucial bioprocess in both biopharmaceutical and research arena in terms of human health, scientific impact and economic volume. Although logical strategies of genetic engineering have been established, protein overexpression is still an art. In particular, heterologous expression is often hindered by low level of production and frequent fail due to opaque reasons. The problem is accentuated because there is no generic solution available to enhance heterologous overexpression. For a given protein, the extent of its solubility can indicate the quality of its function. Over 30% of synthesized proteins are not soluble. In certain experimental circumstances, including temperature, expression host, etc., protein solubility is a feature eventually defined by its sequence. Until now, numerous methods based on machine learning are proposed to predict the solubility of protein merely from its amino acid sequence. In spite of the 20 years of research on the matter, no comprehensive review is available on the published methods. This paper presents an extensive review of the existing models to predict protein solubility in Escherichia coli recombinant protein overexpression system. The models are investigated and compared regarding the datasets used, features, feature selection methods, machine learning techniques and accuracy of prediction. A discussion on the models is provided at the end. This study aims to investigate extensively the machine learning based methods to predict recombinant protein solubility, so as to offer a general as well as a detailed understanding for researches in the field. Some of the models present acceptable prediction performances and convenient user interfaces. These models can be considered as valuable tools to predict recombinant protein overexpression results before performing real laboratory experiments, thus saving labour, time and cost.

  14. Surface properties of heat-induced soluble soy protein aggregates of different molecular masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengxian; Xiong, Youling L; Qin, Fang; Jian, Huajun; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Jie

    2015-02-01

    Suspensions (2% and 5%, w/v) of soy protein isolate (SPI) were heated at 80, 90, or 100 °C for different time periods to produce soluble aggregates of different molecular sizes to investigate the relationship between particle size and surface properties (emulsions and foams). Soluble aggregates generated in these model systems were characterized by gel permeation chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat treatment increased surface hydrophobicity, induced SPI aggregation via hydrophobic interaction and disulfide bonds, and formed soluble aggregates of different sizes. Heating of 5% SPI always promoted large-size aggregate (LA; >1000 kDa) formation irrespective of temperature, whereas the aggregate size distribution in 2% SPI was temperature dependent: the LA fraction progressively rose with temperature (80→90→100 °C), corresponding to the attenuation of medium-size aggregates (MA; 670 to 1000 kDa) initially abundant at 80 °C. Heated SPI with abundant LA (>50%) promoted foam stability. LA also exhibited excellent emulsifying activity and stabilized emulsions by promoting the formation of small oil droplets covered with a thick interfacial protein layer. However, despite a similar influence on emulsion stability, MA enhanced foaming capacity but were less capable of stabilizing emulsions than LA. The functionality variation between heated SPI samples is clearly related to the distribution of aggregates that differ in molecular size and surface activity. The findings may encourage further research to develop functional SPI aggregates for various commercial applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Synthesis of Salt Soluble Proteins in Barley. Pulse-Labeling Study of Grain Filling in Liquid-Cultured Detached Spikes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Hejgaard, Jørn

    1984-01-01

    The accumulation of salt-soluble proteins in the endosperm of developing barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grains was examined. Detached spikes of barley were cultured at different levels of nitrogen nutrition and pulse-labeled with [14C] sucrose at specific times after anthesis. Proteins were extracted...... to increased nitrogen nutrition. Two major components, β-amylase and protein Z in particular, had a synthesis profile almost identical to that of the endosperm storage protein, hordein....

  16. Enhanced Soluble Protein and Biochemical Methane Potential of Apple Biowaste by Different Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulun, Şevket; Bilgin, Melayib

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anaerobic digestion of apple pomace waste in terms of pretreatment. In this study, the main pretreatment strategies for apple pomace include: ultrasound (35 and 53 kHz), thermal and chemical (pH 5 and 10). For each pretreatment method four different temperatures are selected as 25, 40, 50, and 60 °C, and operation times are selected as 5th, 15th, 30th, and 45th minutes. The effects on pretreatment were investigated by measuring changes in the soluble protein concentrations of pretreated wastes and the enhanced anaerobic digestion was investigated by using the biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay. The soluble proteins of ultrasonic (35 kHz at 60 °C, 45th min), ultrasonic (53 kHz at 60 °C, 45th min), chemical (pH 5 at 60 °C, 5th min), chemical (pH 10 at 60 °C, 30th min) and thermal chemical (40 °C, 15th min) pretreatment apple pomace were 74.3, 75.6, 48.7, 85.5 and 58.6% higher, respectively. The results indicated that apple pomace treated with 53 kHz at 60 °C, 45th min had the highest biogas yield of 1519 mL CH4/g VSS.day after anaerobic digestion, which was on average 40.9% higher than raw pomace.

  17. Enhanced Soluble Protein and Biochemical Methane Potential of Apple Biowaste by Different Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulun, Şevket; Bilgin, Melayib

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anaerobic digestion of apple pomace waste in terms of pretreatment. In this study, the main pretreatment strategies for apple pomace include: ultrasound (35 and 53 kHz), thermal and chemical (pH 5 and 10). For each pretreatment method four different temperatures are selected as 25, 40, 50, and 60 °C, and operation times are selected as 5th, 15th, 30th, and 45th minutes. The effects on pretreatment were investigated by measuring changes in the soluble protein concentrations of pretreated wastes and the enhanced anaerobic digestion was investigated by using the biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay. The soluble proteins of ultrasonic (35 kHz at 60 °C, 45th min), ultrasonic (53 kHz at 60 °C, 45th min), chemical (pH 5 at 60 °C, 5th min), chemical (pH 10 at 60 °C, 30th min) and thermal chemical (40 °C, 15th min) pretreatment apple pomace were 74.3, 75.6, 48.7, 85.5 and 58.6% higher, respectively. The results indicated that apple pomace treated with 53 kHz at 60 °C, 45th min had the highest biogas yield of 1519 mL CH4/g VSS.day after anaerobic digestion, which was on average 40.9% higher than raw pomace.

  18. Effect of electrical stunning frequency on meat quality, plasma parameters, and protein solubility of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J C; Yang, J; Zhang, B H; Huang, M; Chen, K J; Xu, X L; Zhou, G H

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of different stunning frequencies of pulsed direct current on meat quality of broilers. This was achieved by investigating plasma parameters, blood loss, carcass damage, meat water-holding capacity, meat color, meat shear value, muscle pH, and protein solubility. A total of 400 broilers was divided into 5 treatment groups and stunned with 500, 600, 700, 800, and 900 Hz at 15 V for 10 seconds. Blood samples were collected immediately after cutting the neck. Pectoralis major muscles were removed from the carcass after chilling and placed in ice. Breast muscle pH and meat color were determined at both 2 and 24 h postmortem. Drip loss, cooking loss, pressing loss, and cooked breast meat-shear values were determined at 24 h postmortem. Treatment at 500 and 900 Hz significantly increased (P meat color were not affected by stunning frequency. In the 500 and 900 Hz groups, the protein solubility and shear force values were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and drip loss was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in the 700 Hz group. This study indicates that the waveform of the pulsed direct current is acceptable for stunning broilers at a stunning frequency of 700 Hz. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Water-Soluble Dried Blood Spot in Protein Analysis: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosting, Cecilie; Gjelstad, Astrid; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug

    2015-08-04

    In the present work human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was used as a model protein in a proof-of-concept study combining water-soluble dried blood spot (DBS) material in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based protein analysis. A water-soluble material consisting of commercially available carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was evaluated as sampling material for this purpose. The material dissolved readily at physiological pH. Different sample preparation methods were evaluated, and in the final method, 15 μL of whole blood was deposited and dried on CMC before the whole spot was dissolved prior to cleanup by immunoaffinity extraction, tryptic digest, and preconcentration by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The results indicated complete dissolution of hCG from the spots, acceptable limit of detection (LOD) (0.1 IU/mL), linearity (R(2) = 0.959), accuracy (16%), and precision (≤22%). Long-term stability (45 days) of hCG in dried spots at reduced temperatures (≤8 °C) was also demonstrated. The analyte recovery was comparable to the commercially available nonsolvable cellulose material (FTA DMPK-C card).

  20. Preparation of mixed matrix adsorber membranes for protein recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramescu, M.E.; Girones nogue, Miriam; Borneman, Zandrie; Wessling, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a generic technology allowing the incorporation of functional entities into a porous substrate. Various ion exchange particles were incorporated into an ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVAL) copolymer porous matrix by an immersion phase separation process and a heterogeneous matrix,

  1. Heat-Induced Soluble Protein Aggregates from Mixed Pea Globulins and β-Lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihi, Mohamed-Lazhar; Mession, Jean-luc; Sok, Nicolas; Saurel, Rémi

    2016-04-06

    The present work investigates the formation of protein aggregates (85 °C, 60 min incubation) upon heat treatment of β-lactoglobulin (βlg)-pea globulins (Glob) mixtures at pH 7.2 and 5 mM NaCl from laboratory-prepared protein isolates. Various βlg/Glob weight ratios were applied, for a total protein concentration of 2 wt % in admixture. Different analytical methods were used to determine the aggregation behavior of "mixed" aggregates, that is, surface hydrophobicity and also sulfhydryl content, protein interactions by means of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and molecule size distribution by DLS and gel filtration. The production of "mixed" thermal aggregates would involve both the formation of new disulfide bonds and noncovalent interactions between the denatured βlg and Glob subunits. The majority of "mixed" soluble aggregates displayed higher molecular weight and smaller diameter than those for Glob heated in isolation. The development of pea-whey protein "mixed" aggregates may help to design new ingredients for the control of innovative food textures.

  2. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  3. Salt-soluble proteins from wheat-derived foodstuffs show lower allergenic potency than those from raw flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gregorio, Marta; Armentia, Alicia; Díaz-Perales, Araceli; Palacín, Arantxa; Dueñas-Laita, Antonio; Martín, Blanca; Salcedo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa

    2009-04-22

    Salt-soluble proteins from wheat flour have been described as main allergens associated with both baker's asthma and food allergy. However, most studies have used raw flour as starting material, thus not considering potential changes in allergenic properties induced by the heat treatment and other industrial processing to produce wheat-derived foodstuffs. Salt extracts from different commercial wheat-derived products were obtained and their allergenic properties investigated by IgE-immunodetection, ELISA assays, and skin prick test. The IgE-binding capacity of salt-soluble proteins from commercial breads and cooked pastas was reduced around 50% compared with that of raw flour, the reduction being less dramatic in noncooked pastas and biscuits. Several wheat-derived foodstuffs showed major IgE-binding components of 20 and 35 kDa, identified as avenin-like and globulin proteins, respectively. These proteins, as well as most flour and bread salt-soluble proteins, were hydrolyzed when subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion. However, the digested products still exhibited a residual IgE-binding capacity. Therefore, processing of wheat flour to obtain derived foodstuffs decreases the IgE binding-capacity of the major salt-soluble wheat proteins. Moreover, simulated gastric fluid digestion further inactivates some heat-resistant IgE-binding proteins.

  4. Interactions of rat repetitive sequence MspI8 with nuclear matrix proteins during spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogolinski, J.; Widlak, P.; Rzeszowska-Wolny, J.

    1996-01-01

    Using the Southwestern blot analysis we have studied the interactions between rat repetitive sequence MspI8 and the nuclear matrix proteins of rats testis cells. Starting from 2 weeks the young to adult animal showed differences in type of testis nuclear matrix proteins recognizing the MspI8 sequence. The same sets of nuclear matrix proteins were detected in some enriched in spermatocytes and spermatids and obtained after fractionation of cells of adult animal by the velocity sedimentation technique. (author). 21 refs, 5 figs

  5. Effect of plaster cast immobilization on the turnover rates of soluble proteins and lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes of rabbit M. soleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edes, I.; Dosa, E.; Sohar, I.; Guba, F. (Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Szeged (Hungary). Biokemiai Tanszek)

    1982-01-01

    In atrophized muscle the decreases of the activity of LDH isoenzymes can be explained partly by a 15 per cent decrease of the enzyme synthesis and partly by a 25 per cent increase in catabolism. The quantities of the soluble proteins and LDH were measured after intravenously administered /sup 3/H-leucin incorporation, from the musculus soleus. LDH was isolated by means of affinity chromatography. Radioactivity was determined in a Packard Tri-Carb scintillation counter. The synthesis rate of soluble proteins barely changed during immobilization. In the atrophized muscle the decrease of the amount of soluble proteins could be almost exclusively interpreted in terms of a 25 per cent enchancement of degradative process. The accelerated catabolism is most probably due to the proteolytic enzymes activated by immobilization.

  6. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  7. alpha isoforms of soluble and membrane-linked folate-binding protein in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoier-Madsen, M.; Holm, J.; Hansen, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    supported the hypothesis that serum FBP (29 kDa) mainly originates from neutrophils. The presence of FBP/FR alpha isoforms were established for the first time in human blood using antibodies specifically directed against human milk FBP alpha. The alpha isoforms identified on erythrocyte membranes......, and in granulocytes and serum, only constituted an almost undetectable fraction of the functional FBP The FBP alpha in neutrophil granulocytes was identified as a cytoplasmic component by indirect immunofluorescence. Gel filtration of serum revealed a peak of FBP alpha (>120 kDa), which could represent receptor...... fragments from decomposed erythrocytes and granulocytes. The soluble FBPs may exert bacteriostatic effects and protect folates in plasma from biological degradation, whereas FRs on the surface of blood cells could be involved in intracellular folate uptake or serve as signal proteins. The latter receptors...

  8. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...... was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine...... acts on an early event in the antigen handling by accessory cells. Chloroquine is a well known inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis, and it is likely that its effect on antigen presentation is caused by an inhibition of antigen degradation....

  9. ESPRIT: an automated, library-based method for mapping and soluble expression of protein domains from challenging targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Tarendeau, Franck; Mas, Philippe J; Hart, Darren J

    2010-10-01

    Expression of sufficient quantities of soluble protein for structural biology and other applications is often a very difficult task, especially when multimilligram quantities are required. In order to improve yield, solubility or crystallisability of a protein, it is common to subclone shorter genetic constructs corresponding to single- or multi-domain fragments. However, it is not always clear where domain boundaries are located, especially when working on novel targets with little or no sequence similarity to other proteins. Several methods have been described employing aspects of directed evolution to the recombinant expression of challenging proteins. These combine the construction of a random library of genetic constructs of a target with a screening or selection process to identify solubly expressing protein fragments. Here we review several datasets from the ESPRIT (Expression of Soluble Proteins by Random Incremental Truncation) technology to provide a view on its capabilities. Firstly, we demonstrate how it functions using the well-characterised NF-kappaB p50 transcription factor as a model system. Secondly, application of ESPRIT to the challenging PB2 subunit of influenza polymerase has led to several novel atomic resolution structures; here we present an overview of the screening phase of that project. Thirdly, analysis of the human kinase TBK1 is presented to show how the ESPRIT technology rapidly addresses the compatibility of challenging targets with the Escherichia coli expression system.

  10. Prokaryotic Soluble Overexpression and Purification of Human VEGF165 by Fusion to a Maltose Binding Protein Tag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Tan Nguyen

    Full Text Available Human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a key regulator of angiogenesis and plays a central role in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Escherichia coli is one of the most common expression systems used for the production of recombinant proteins; however, expression of human VEGF in E. coli has proven difficult because the E. coli-expressed VEGF tends to be misfolded and forms inclusion bodies, resulting in poor solubility. In this study, we successfully produced semi-preparative amounts of soluble bioactive human VEGF165 (hVEGF. We created seven N-terminal fusion tag constructs with hexahistidine (His6, thioredoxin (Trx, glutathione S-transferase (GST, maltose-binding protein (MBP, N-utilization substance protein A (NusA, human protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a', and tested each construct for soluble overexpression in E. coli. We found that at 18°C, 92.8% of the MBP-tagged hVEGF to be soluble and that this tag significantly increased the protein's solubility. We successfully purified 0.8 mg of pure hVEGF per 500 mL cell culture. The purified hVEGF is stable after tag cleavage, contains very low levels of endotoxin, and is 97.6% pure. Using an Flk1+ mesodermal precursor cell (MPC differentiation assay, we show that the purified hVEGF is not only bioactive but has similar bioactivity to hVEGF produced in mammalian cells. Previous reports on producing hVEGF in E. coli have all been based on refolding of the protein from inclusion bodies. To our knowledge, this is the first report on successfully expressing and purifying soluble hVEGF in E. coli.

  11. Small surfactant-like peptides can drive soluble proteins into active aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactive protein inclusion bodies occur commonly in Escherichia coli (E. coli cells expressing heterologous proteins. Previously several independent groups have found that active protein aggregates or pseudo inclusion bodies can be induced by a fusion partner such as a cellulose binding domain from Clostridium cellulovorans (CBDclos when expressed in E. coli. More recently we further showed that a short amphipathic helical octadecapeptide 18A (EWLKAFYEKVLEKLKELF and a short beta structure peptide ELK16 (LELELKLKLELELKLK have a similar property. Results In this work, we explored a third type of peptides, surfactant-like peptides, for performing such a "pulling-down" function. One or more of three such peptides (L6KD, L6K2, DKL6 were fused to the carboxyl termini of model proteins including Aspergillus fumigatus amadoriase II (AMA, all three peptides were used, Bacillus subtilis lipase A (LipA, only L6KD was used, hereinafter the same, Bacillus pumilus xylosidase (XynB, and green fluorescent protein (GFP, and expressed in E. coli. All fusions were found to predominantly accumulate in the insoluble fractions, with specific activities ranging from 25% to 92% of the native counterparts. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses confirmed the formation of protein aggregates in the cell. Furthermore, binding assays with amyloid-specific dyes (thioflavin T and Cong red to the AMA-L6KD aggregate and the TEM analysis of the aggregate following digestion with protease K suggested that the AMA-L6KD aggregate may contain structures reminiscent of amyloids, including a fibril-like structure core. Conclusions This study shows that the surfactant-like peptides L6KD and it derivatives can act as a pull-down handler for converting soluble proteins into active aggregates, much like 18A and ELK16. These peptide-mediated protein aggregations might have important implications for protein aggregation in

  12. Water-Soluble Chlorophyll Protein (WSCP) Stably Binds Two or Four Chlorophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Daniel M; Agostini, Alessandro; Tenzer, Stefan; Gloeckle, Barbara M; Werwie, Mara; Carbonera, Donatella; Paulsen, Harald

    2017-03-28

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) of class IIa from Brassicaceae form tetrameric complexes containing one chlorophyll (Chl) per apoprotein but no carotenoids. The complexes are remarkably stable toward dissociation and protein denaturation even at 100 °C and extreme pH values, and the Chls are partially protected against photooxidation. There are several hypotheses that explain the biological role of WSCPs, one of them proposing that they function as a scavenger of Chls set free upon plant senescence or pathogen attack. The biochemical properties of WSCP described in this paper are consistent with the protein acting as an efficient and flexible Chl scavenger. At limiting Chl concentrations, the recombinant WSCP apoprotein binds substoichiometric amounts of Chl (two Chls per tetramer) to form complexes that are as stable toward thermal dissociation, denaturation, and photodamage as the fully pigmented ones. If more Chl is added, these two-Chl complexes can bind another two Chls to reach the fully pigmented state. The protection of WSCP Chls against photodamage has been attributed to the apoprotein serving as a diffusion barrier for oxygen, preventing its access to triplet excited Chls and, thus, the formation of singlet oxygen. By contrast, the sequential binding of Chls by WSCP suggests a partially open or at least flexible structure, raising the question of how WSCP photoprotects its Chls without the help of carotenoids.

  13. Delayed Toxicity Associated with Soluble Anthrax Toxin Receptor Decoy-Ig Fusion Protein Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Christopher; Welkos, Susan; Manchester, Marianne; Young, John A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Soluble receptor decoy inhibitors, including receptor-immunogloubulin (Ig) fusion proteins, have shown promise as candidate anthrax toxin therapeutics. These agents act by binding to the receptor-interaction site on the protective antigen (PA) toxin subunit, thereby blocking toxin binding to cell surface receptors. Here we have made the surprising observation that co-administration of receptor decoy-Ig fusion proteins significantly delayed, but did not protect, rats challenged with anthrax lethal toxin. The delayed toxicity was associated with the in vivo assembly of a long-lived complex comprised of anthrax lethal toxin and the receptor decoy-Ig inhibitor. Intoxication in this system presumably results from the slow dissociation of the toxin complex from the inhibitor following their prolonged circulation. We conclude that while receptor decoy-Ig proteins represent promising candidates for the early treatment of B. anthracis infection, they may not be suitable for therapeutic use at later stages when fatal levels of toxin have already accumulated in the bloodstream. PMID:22511955

  14. Action of mercurials on activity of partially purified soluble protein kinase C from mice brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Saijoh, K.; Sumino, K.

    1988-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of soluble protein kinase C from mice brain was inhibited by mercuric chloride (II) (HgCl 2 ) and organic mercurials, i.e. methyl mercury, phenyl mercury and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB). The IC50 was 0.08 μM for HgCl 2 and about 1 μM for organic mercurials. Sulfhydryl blocking reagents such as 5.5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) were less potent but nevertheless inhibited the enzymic activity of protein kinase C. The Hill coefficients of HgCl 2 , DTNB and NEM were close to unity whereas the values for organic mercurials were 1.3 to 1.5. The inhibition was of a non-competitive type with respect to Hl histone. 3 H-PDBu binding activity was also inhibited by all of the reagents in a non-competitive manner. Mercurials apparently bind to sulfhydryl groups of protein kinase C to inhibit the enzymatic activity. (author)

  15. Matrix proteins as centralized organizers of negative-sense RNA virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Butcher, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    Matrix proteins are essential components of most negative-sense RNA, enveloped viruses. They serve a wide range of duties ranging from self-driven membrane budding and coordination of other viral components to modulation of viral transcription. The functional similarity between these proteins is striking, despite major differences in their structures. Whereas biochemical and structural studies have partly been hindered by the inherent aggregation properties of these proteins, their cellular functions are beginning to be understood. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on negative-sense RNA virus matrix proteins and their interactions with other viral and cellular proteins. We also discuss the similarities and differences in matrix protein functions between the different families within the negative-sense RNA viruses.

  16. Novel serological neo-epitope markers of extracellular matrix proteins for the detection of portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana Julie; Karsdal, M A; Byrjalsen, I

    2013-01-01

    The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an invasive, but important diagnostic and prognostic marker in cirrhosis with portal hypertension (PHT). During cirrhosis, remodelling of fibrotic tissue by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a permanent process generating small fragments of degrade...... extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins known as neoepitopes, which are then released into the circulation....

  17. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  18. Fermentation of rapeseed meal, sunflower meal and faba beans in combination with wheat bran increases solubility of protein and phosphorus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard; Blaabjerg, Karoline

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND To increase self-supply of protein and phosphorus (P) in European pig and poultry diets and reduce nitrogen (N) and P excretion, attention is directed to approaches increasing protein and P digestibility of rapeseed, sunflower and faba beans. Wheat bran is rich in enzymes degrading...... and solubilizing protein and phytate. Herein, solubilization of protein, N and P was investigated when increasing ratios of wheat bran were fermented with rapeseed meal (RSM), sunflower meal (SFM), faba beans (FB) or a combination of these (RSM/SFM/FB). RESULTS Protein, N and P solubility was greater, for all...

  19. Extracellular matrix proteins: a positive feedback loop in lung fibrosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.E.; van Boeijen, F.R.; Emson, C.L.; Turner, S.M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Smit, T.H.; Stoop, R.; Everts, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix. This not only affects tissue architecture and function, but it also influences fibroblast behavior and thus disease progression. Here we describe the expression of elastin, type V collagen and tenascin C during the

  20. Extracellular matrix proteins: A positive feedback loop in lung fibrosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.E.; Boeijen, F.R.; Emson, C.L.; Turner, S.M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Smit, T.H.; Stoop, R.; Everts, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix. This not only affects tissue architecture and function, but it also influences fibroblast behavior and thus disease progression. Here we describe the expression of elastin, type V collagen and tenascin C during the

  1. Growth of thin films of low molecular weight proteins by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matei, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Constantinescu, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of lysozyme and myoglobin grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from a water ice matrix have been investigated. The deposition rate of these two low molecular weight proteins (lysozyme: 14307 amu and myoglobin: 17083 amu) exhibits a maximum of about 1–2 ng/cm2 per....... The results for lysozyme demonstrate that the fragmentation rate of the proteins during the MAPLE process is not influenced by the pH of the water solution prior to freezing....

  2. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Swapna, G. V. T.; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-01-01

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS 2 ) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS 2 -tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS 2 -tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS 2 -tag in isotope-filtered 1 H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS 2 -tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS 2 (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS 2 -tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS 2 -tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone 1 H, 15 N and 13 C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear 1 H– 15 N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct.

  3. Formation of soluble amyloid oligomers and amyloid fibrils by the multifunctional protein vitronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langen Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein vitronectin is present within the deposits associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, atherosclerosis, systemic amyloidoses, and glomerulonephritis. The extent to which vitronectin contributes to amyloid formation within these plaques, which contain misfolded, amyloidogenic proteins, and the role of vitronectin in the pathophysiology of the aforementioned diseases is currently unknown. The investigation of vitronectin aggregation is significant since the formation of oligomeric and fibrillar structures are common features of amyloid proteins. Results We observed vitronectin immunoreactivity in senile plaques of AD brain, which exhibited overlap with the amyloid fibril-specific OC antibody, suggesting that vitronectin is deposited at sites of amyloid formation. Of particular interest is the growing body of evidence indicating that soluble nonfibrillar oligomers may be responsible for the development and progression of amyloid diseases. In this study we demonstrate that both plasma-purified and recombinant human vitronectin readily form spherical oligomers and typical amyloid fibrils. Vitronectin oligomers are toxic to cultured neuroblastoma and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, possibly via a membrane-dependent mechanism, as they cause leakage of synthetic vesicles. Oligomer toxicity was attenuated in RPE cells by the anti-oligomer A11 antibody. Vitronectin fibrils contain a C-terminal protease-resistant fragment, which may approximate the core region of residues essential to amyloid formation. Conclusion These data reveal the propensity of vitronectin to behave as an amyloid protein and put forth the possibilities that accumulation of misfolded vitronectin may contribute to aggregate formation seen in age-related amyloid diseases.

  4. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required during Trypanosoma cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Juan Agustín; Vanrell, María Cristina; Salassa, Betiana Nebaí; Nola, Sébastien; Galli, Thierry; Colombo, María Isabel; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2017-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is an obligate intracellular parasite that exploits different host vesicular pathways to invade the target cells. Vesicular and target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are key proteins of the intracellular membrane fusion machinery. During the early times of T. cruzi infection, several vesicles are attracted to the parasite contact sites in the plasma membrane. Fusion of these vesicles promotes the formation of the parasitic vacuole and parasite entry. In this work, we study the requirement and the nature of SNAREs involved in the fusion events that take place during T. cruzi infection. Our results show that inhibition of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein, a protein required for SNARE complex disassembly, impairs T. cruzi infection. Both TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and cellubrevin/VAMP3, two v-SNAREs of the endocytic and exocytic pathways, are specifically recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane in a synchronized manner but, although VAMP3 is acquired earlier than VAMP7, impairment of VAMP3 by tetanus neurotoxin fails to reduce T. cruzi infection. In contrast, reduction of VAMP7 activity by expression of VAMP7's longin domain, depletion by small interfering RNA or knockout, significantly decreases T. cruzi infection susceptibility as a result of a minor acquisition of lysosomal components to the parasitic vacuole. In addition, overexpression of the VAMP7 partner Vti1b increases the infection, whereas expression of a KIF5 kinesin mutant reduces VAMP7 recruitment to vacuole and, concomitantly, T. cruzi infection. Altogether, these data support a key role of TI-VAMP/VAMP7 in the fusion events that culminate in the T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mapping Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Protein Disulfide Isomerase Regions of Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Heckler

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC is a heterodimeric nitric oxide (NO receptor that produces cyclic GMP. This signaling mechanism is a key component in the cardiovascular system. NO binds to heme in the β subunit and stimulates the catalytic conversion of GTP to cGMP several hundred fold. Several endogenous factors have been identified that modulate sGC function in vitro and in vivo. In previous work, we determined that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI interacts with sGC in a redox-dependent manner in vitro and that PDI inhibited NO-stimulated activity in cells. To our knowledge, this was the first report of a physical interaction between sGC and a thiol-redox protein. To characterize this interaction between sGC and PDI, we first identified peptide linkages between sGC and PDI, using a lysine cross-linking reagent and recently developed mass spectrometry analysis. Together with Flag-immunoprecipitation using sGC domain deletions, wild-type (WT and mutated PDI, regions of sGC involved in this interaction were identified. The observed data were further explored with computational modeling to gain insight into the interaction mechanism between sGC and oxidized PDI. Our results indicate that PDI interacts preferentially with the catalytic domain of sGC, thus providing a mechanism for PDI inhibition of sGC. A model in which PDI interacts with either the α or the β catalytic domain is proposed.

  6. Source identification of water-soluble organic aerosols at a roadway site using a positive matrix factorization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungshik; Cho, Sung Yong; Bae, Min-Suk

    2015-11-15

    Daily PM2.5 measurements were carried out at a local roadway every sixth day from May 2011 to August 2013 to obtain seasonal quantitative information on the primary and secondary sources of two water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) fractions. Filter samples were analyzed for OC, elemental carbon (EC), WSOC, hydrophilic and hydrophobic WSOC fractions (WSOC(HPI) and WSOC(HPO)), and ionic species. An XAD solid phase extraction method and a total organic carbon analyzer were used to isolate the two WSOC fractions and determine their amounts, respectively. The WSOC/OC and WSOC(HPI)/WSOC ratios were 0.62±0.13 and 0.47±0.14, respectively. Similar seasonal profiles in EC, OC, and WSOC concentrations were observed, with higher concentrations occurring in the cold season and lower concentrations in the warm season. However, opposite results were obtained in WSOC/OC and WSOC(HPI)/WSOC ratios, with the higher in the warm season and the lower in the cold season. Correlation analyses indicated that two WSOC fractions in winter were likely attributed to secondary formation processes, biomass burning (BB), and traffic emissions, while WSOC(HPI) observed in other seasons were associated with secondary formation processes similar to those of oxalate and secondary inorganic species. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was employed to investigate the sources of two WSOC fractions. PMF indicated that concentrations of WSOC fractions were affected by five sources: secondary NO3(-) related, secondary SO4(2-) and oxalate related, traffic emissions, BB emissions, and sea-salt. Throughout the study period, secondary organic aerosols were estimated to be the most dominant contributor of WSOC fractions, with higher contributions occurring in the warm seasons. The contribution of secondary aerosol formation processes (NO3(-) related+SO4(2-) and oxalate related) to WSOC(HPI) and WSOC(HPO) was on an average 56.2% (45.0-73.8%) and 47.7% (39.6-52.1%), respectively. The seasonal average

  7. A statistically designed matrix to evaluate solubility, impurity tolerance, and thermal stability of plutonium-bearing glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.K.; Meaker, T.F.; Edwards, T.B.; McIntyre, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    In support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFDM) Program, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is evaluating a unique lanthanide borosilicate glass to immobilize excess plutonium and other heavy metals. The lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass system met all FY96 programmatic planning objectives. Those objectives were focused on (1) demonstrating 10 wt% Pu solubility, and (2) meeting preliminary product performance criteria. Although 10 wt% Pu solubility was demonstrated with product performance exceeding high level waste glasses based on PCT results, the LaBS system was not optimized

  8. Co-expression of sulphydryl oxidase and protein disulphide isomerase in Escherichia coli allows for production of soluble CRM197

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roth, Robyn L

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the production of soluble cross-reacting material 197 (CRM(sub197)) in Escherichia coli, a safe and effective T-cell-dependent protein carrier for polysaccharides used in the manufacture and application...

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases and soluble Fas/FasL system as novel regulators of apoptosis in children and young adults on chronic dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Musiał, Kinga; Zwolińska, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    The system of membrane receptor Fas and its ligand FasL compose one of the main pathways triggering apoptosis. However, the role of their soluble forms has not been clarified yet. Although sFasL can be converted from the membrane-bound form by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), there are no data on relations between sFas/sFasL, MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in patients on chronic dialysis—neither children nor adults. The aim of our study was to evaluate serum concentrations of sFas,...

  10. Mixed matrix membrane adsorbers for protein and blood purification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saiful, S.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology and bio-manufacturing markets are continuously growing, generating new sources of many valuable healthcare and life science products including therapeutic proteins and polysaccharides, monoclonals, vaccines, diagnostics, pharmaceutical chemicals and enzymes. These bioproducts have to

  11. Application of a PEG precipitation method for solubility screening: A tool for developing high protein concentration formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Kantor, Angela; Warne, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Previous publications demonstrated that the extrapolated solubility by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation method (Middaugh et al., J Biol Chem 1979; 254:367–370; Juckes, Biochim Biophys Acta 1971; 229:535–546; Foster et al., Biochim Biophys Acta 1973; 317:505; Mahadevan and Hall, AIChE J 1990; 36:1517–1528; Stevenson and Hageman, Pharm Res 1995; 12:1671–1676) has a strong correlation to experimentally measured solubility of proteins. Here, we explored the utility of extrapolated solubili...

  12. Collagen XII and XIV, New Partners of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Skin Extracellular Matrix Suprastructure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R.; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone. PMID:22573329

  13. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  14. Rhabdovirus matrix protein structures reveal a novel mode of self-association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The matrix (M proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus, revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins.

  15. Suppression of matrix protein synthesis in endothelial cells by herpes simplex virus is not dependent on viral protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kefalides, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of matrix proteins by human endothelial cells (EC) in vitro was studied before and at various times after infection with Herpes Simplex virus Type 1 (HSV-1) or 2 (HSV-2). Monolayers of EC were either mock-infected or infected with virus for 1 hr at a multiplicity infection (MOI) of 5 to 20 at 37 0 C. Control and infected cultures were pulse-labeled for 1 or 2 hrs with either [ 14 C]proline or [ 35 S]methionine. Synthesis of labeled matrix proteins was determined by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Suppression of synthesis of fibronectin, Type IV collagen and thrombospondin began as early as 2 hrs and became almost complete by 10 hrs post-infection. The degree of suppression varied with the protein and the virus dose. Suppression of Type IV collagen occurred first followed by that of fibronectin and then thrombospondin. Infection of EC with UV irradiated HSV-1 or HSV-2 resulted in suppression of host-cell protein synthesis as well as viral protein synthesis. Infection with intact virus in the presence of actinomycin-D resulted in suppression of both host-cell and viral protein synthesis. The data indicate that infection of EC with HSV leads to suppression of matrix protein synthesis which does not depend on viral protein synthesis

  16. Import of peroxisomal matrix proteins in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Archaea, prokaryotes and eukaryotes form the three kingdoms of life. The smallest unit of life, which can exist independently, is a cell. Archaea and prokaryotes have a relatively very simple architecture. The cytoplasm (cellulars pace), containing all metabolites, proteins and genetic material

  17. Protective effect of soluble eggshell membrane protein hydrolysate on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP has been proved to hold the antioxidant activity. The functional role of SEP on cardioprotection was investigated in vivo and in vitro. Methods: Rats and cardiomyocytes were pretreated with SP2, a hydrolysate attained from SEP, and then subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R or hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The measurement of myocardial infarct size, cell apoptosis assay, cell viability assay, and caspase activity assay were performed on rats and cardiomyocytes. Results: The results showed that the treatment of SP2 induced the resistance to I/R or H/R injury on rats and cardiomyocytes as indicated by decreased infarct size and decreased cellular apoptosis. The cardioprotective roles of SP2 were partly resulted from the downregulated expression and activity of caspase-3 in which the effect was similar to the caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, and could be rescued by caspase activator, PAC-1. Conclusions: This investigation has demonstrated that SP2 attenuated the damage of I/R and H/R on rats and cardiomyocytes by the caspase-dependent pathway. This cardioprotective effect of SP2 suggested a novel therapeutic agent of SEP for ischemic-related heart diseases.

  18. Enzymeaticial analysis and soluble proteins assays on radioprotective effects of cordyceps militaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joon Chul [Ansan 1 College, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    Effect of single pre-administration of Cordyceps militaries (Cm) extract on the survival ratio, body weight and organ weight changes and blood cell counts after whole-body {gamma}-irradiation were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cm extract at 24 hrs before {gamma}-irradiation increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 60.1% to 71/4%. The administration of Cm extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by {gamma}-irradiation (P<0.01, P<0.05). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cm treated mice. The administration of Cm extract retarded the reduction of both leukocyte and lymphocyte counts occured during the first 7 days and accelerated the recovery of the counts thereafter. The extract also accelerated the recovery of the erythrocyte counts occurred after the day 21th. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the soluble proteins extracted from various organs did not reveal differences to any extent in all groups except in the levers of the irradiated and extract treated groups, in which some proteins were missing or less present. Also, the result of general intra and extra mycelial enzyme assays with Cm, extramycelial enzyme activity was relatively higher than the intramycelial enzyme. Cm appeared to indicate that {alpha}-amylase was the highest among the enzymes and gluosidase and chitinase were followed. Since the spleen, thymus and testis have been well known as radiosensitive organs, the protective action of Cm extract on irradiated mice may be responsible for its enhancing recovery of these organs. Although the exact mechanism in protective effect of Cm extract on irradiated mice is not clear yet, the present study is the first report regarding the Cm which was tested and found to be a potential radioprotective agent.

  19. Enzymeaticial analysis and soluble proteins assays on radioprotective effects of cordyceps militaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Park, Joon Chul

    2001-01-01

    Effect of single pre-administration of Cordyceps militaries (Cm) extract on the survival ratio, body weight and organ weight changes and blood cell counts after whole-body γ-irradiation were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cm extract at 24 hrs before γ-irradiation increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 60.1% to 71/4%. The administration of Cm extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by γ-irradiation (P<0.01, P<0.05). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cm treated mice. The administration of Cm extract retarded the reduction of both leukocyte and lymphocyte counts occured during the first 7 days and accelerated the recovery of the counts thereafter. The extract also accelerated the recovery of the erythrocyte counts occurred after the day 21th. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the soluble proteins extracted from various organs did not reveal differences to any extent in all groups except in the levers of the irradiated and extract treated groups, in which some proteins were missing or less present. Also, the result of general intra and extra mycelial enzyme assays with Cm, extramycelial enzyme activity was relatively higher than the intramycelial enzyme. Cm appeared to indicate that α-amylase was the highest among the enzymes and gluosidase and chitinase were followed. Since the spleen, thymus and testis have been well known as radiosensitive organs, the protective action of Cm extract on irradiated mice may be responsible for its enhancing recovery of these organs. Although the exact mechanism in protective effect of Cm extract on irradiated mice is not clear yet, the present study is the first report regarding the Cm which was tested and found to be a potential radioprotective agent

  20. Enhancing production and cytotoxic activity of polymeric soluble FasL-based chimeric proteins by concomitant expression of soluble FasL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Morello

    Full Text Available Membrane FasL is the natural trigger of Fas-mediated apoptosis. A soluble homotrimeric counterpart (sFasL also exists which is very weakly active, and needs oligomerization beyond its trimeric state to induce apoptosis. We recently generated a soluble FasL chimera by fusing the immunoglobulin-like domain of the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gp190 to the extracellular region of human FasL, which enabled spontaneous dodecameric homotypic polymerization of FasL. This polymeric soluble human FasL (pFasL displayed anti-tumoral activity in vitro and in vivo without systemic cytotoxicity in mouse. In the present work, we focused on the improvement of pFasL, with two complementary objectives. First, we developed more complex pFasL-based chimeras that contained a cell-targeting module. Secondly, we attempted to improve the production and/or the specific activity of pFasL and of the cell-targeting chimeras. We designed two chimeras by fusing to pFasL the extracellular portions of the HLA-A2 molecule or of a human gamma-delta TCR, and analyzed the consequences of co-expressing these molecules or pFasL together with sFasL on their heterotopic cell production. This strategy significantly enhanced the production of pFasL and of the two chimeras, as well as the cytotoxic activity of the two chimeras but not of pFasL. These results provide the proof of concept for an optimization of FasL-based chimeric proteins for a therapeutic use.

  1. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Capossela

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  2. Serum protein fractionation using supported molecular matrix electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2013-08-01

    Supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), in which a hydrophilic polymer such as PVA serves as a support within a porous PVDF membrane, was recently developed. This method is similar to cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis but differs in the compatibility to glycan analysis of the separated bands. In this report, we describe the first instance of the application of SMME to human serum fractionation, and demonstrate the differences with serum fractionation by cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis. The SMME membrane exhibited almost no EOF during electrophoresis, unlike the cellulose acetate membrane, but afforded comparative results for serum fractionation. The visualization of each fraction was achieved by conventional staining with dye such as Direct Blue-71, and objective quantification was obtained by densitometry after inducing membrane transparency with 1-nonene. Immunostaining was also achieved. Moreover, mass spectrometric analysis of both N-linked and O-linked glycans from the separated bands was demonstrated. Serum fractionation and glycan profiling of each fraction using SMME will enable novel insights into the relationships between various glycosylation profiles and disease states. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis : a possible role for the vitamin K-dependent protein matrix Gla protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Summeren, M. J. H.; Spliet, W. G. M.; Van Royen-Kerkhof, A.; Vermeer, C.; Lilien, M.; Kuis, W.; Schurgers, L. J.

    Objectives. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether the calcification inhibitor matrix Gla protein (MGP) is expressed in muscle biopsies of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), and whether different forms of MGP are differentially expressed in JDM patients with and without

  4. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte

  5. Soluble beta-amyloid precursor protein is related to disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Steinacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68 with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20, and age-matched controls (N = 40, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfH(SMI35 were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02 and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively. CSF NfH(SMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01. High CSF NfH(SMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively. The ratios CSF NfH(SMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each. CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfH(SMI35 and to progression of disease.

  6. A soluble fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, D M; Holmes, C G

    1990-01-01

    An enzyme catalyzing the ligation of long chain fatty acids to bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been detected and partially characterized in cell extracts of the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Acyl-ACP synthetase activity (optimal pH 7.5-8.0) required millimolar concentrations of ATP and Mg2+ and was slightly activated by Ca2+, but was inhibited at high ionic strength and by Triton X-100. ACP from either Escherichia coli (apparent Km = 20 microM) or V. harveyi was used as a substrate. Of the [14C]fatty acids tested as substrates (8-18 carbons), a preference for fatty acids less than or equal to 14 carbons in length was observed. Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase appears to be a soluble hydrophilic enzyme on the basis of subcellular fractionation and Triton X-114 phase partition assay. The enzyme was not coinduced with luciferase activity or light emission in vivo during the late exponential growth phase in liquid culture. Acyl-ACP synthetase activity was also detected in extracts from the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, but not Photobacterium phosphoreum. The cytosolic nature and enzymatic properties of V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase indicate that it may have a different physiological role than the membrane-bound activity of E. coli, which has been implicated in phosphatidylethanolamine turnover. Acyl-ACP synthetase activity in V. harveyi could be involved in the intracellular activation and elongation of exogenous fatty acids that occurs in this species or in the reactivation of free myristic acid generated by luciferase.

  7. Bee venom phospholipase A2 as a membrane-binding vector for cell surface display or internalization of soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babon, Aurélie; Wurceldorf, Thibault; Almunia, Christine; Pichard, Sylvain; Chenal, Alexandre; Buhot, Cécile; Beaumelle, Bruno; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-06-15

    We showed that bee venom phospholipase A2 can be used as a membrane-binding vector to anchor to the surface of cells a soluble protein fused to its C-terminus. ZZ, a two-domain derivative of staphylococcal protein A capable of binding constant regions of antibodies was fused to the C-terminus of the phospholipase or to a mutant devoid of enzymatic activity. The fusion proteins bound to the surface of cells and could themselves bind IgGs. Their fate depended on the cell type to which they bound. On the A431 carcinoma cell line the proteins remained exposed on the cell surface. In contrast, on human dendritic cells the proteins were internalized into early endosomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fermentable soluble fibres spare amino acids in healthy dogs fed a low-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambacq, Wendy; Rybachuk, Galena; Jeusette, Isabelle; Rochus, Kristel; Wuyts, Brigitte; Fievez, Veerle; Nguyen, Patrick; Hesta, Myriam

    2016-06-28

    Research in cats has shown that increased fermentation-derived propionic acid and its metabolites can be used as alternative substrates for gluconeogenesis, thus sparing amino acids for other purposes. This amino acid sparing effect could be of particular interest in patients with kidney or liver disease, where this could reduce the kidneys'/liver's burden of N-waste removal. Since dogs are known to have a different metabolism than the obligatory carnivorous cat, the main objective of this study was to assess the possibility of altering amino acid metabolism through intestinal fermentation in healthy dogs. This was studied by supplementing a low-protein diet with fermentable fibres, hereby providing an initial model for future studies in dogs suffering from renal/liver disease. Eight healthy dogs were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: sugar beet pulp and guar gum mix (SF: soluble fibre, estimated to mainly stimulate propionic acid production) or cellulose (IF: insoluble fibre). Treatments were incorporated into a low-protein (17 %) extruded dry diet in amounts to obtain similar total dietary fibre (TDF) contents for both diets (9.4 % and 8.2 % for the SF and IF diet, respectively) and were tested in a 4-week crossover feeding trial. Apparent faecal nitrogen digestibility and post-prandial fermentation metabolites in faeces and plasma were evaluated. Dogs fed the SF diet showed significantly higher faecal excretion of acetic and propionic acid, resulting in a higher total SCFA excretion compared to IF. SF affected the three to six-hour postprandial plasma acylcarnitine profile by significantly increasing AUC of acetyl-, propionyl-, butyryl- + isobutyryl-, 3-OH-butyryl-, 3-OH-isovaleryl- and malonyl-L-carnitine. Moreover, the amino acid plasma profile at that time was modified as leucine + isoleucine concentrations were significantly increased by SF, and a similar trend for phenylalanine and tyrosine's AUC was found. These results indicate

  9. Reduction in lipophilicity improved the solubility, plasma–protein binding, and permeability of tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauber, Benjamin P.; René, Olivier; de Leon Boenig, Gladys; Burton, Brenda; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Gobbi, Alberto; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Johnson, Adam R.; La, Hank; Liimatta, Marya; Lockey, Peter; Norman, Maxine; Ouyang, Wenjun; Wang, Weiru; Wong, Harvey (Genentech); (Argenta)

    2014-08-01

    Using structure-based drug design principles, we identified opportunities to reduce the lipophilicity of our tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists. The new analogs possessed improved RORc cellular potencies with >77-fold selectivity for RORc over other nuclear receptors in our cell assay suite. The reduction in lipophilicity also led to an increased plasma–protein unbound fraction and improvements in cellular permeability and aqueous solubility.

  10. LRPPRC is a mitochondrial matrix protein that is conserved in metazoans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterky, Fredrik H.; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Samuelsson, Tore; Larsson, Nils-Goeran

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → LRPPRC orthologs are restricted to metazoans. → LRPPRC is imported to the mitochondrial matrix. → No evidence of nuclear isoform. -- Abstract: LRPPRC (also called LRP130) is an RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat protein. LRPPRC has been recognized as a mitochondrial protein, but has also been shown to regulate nuclear gene transcription and to bind specific RNA molecules in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We here present a bioinformatic analysis of the LRPPRC primary sequence, which reveals that orthologs to the LRPPRC gene are restricted to metazoan cells and that all of the corresponding proteins contain mitochondrial targeting signals. To address the subcellular localization further, we have carefully analyzed LRPPRC in mammalian cells and identified a single isoform that is exclusively localized to mitochondria. The LRPPRC protein is imported to the mitochondrial matrix and its mitochondrial targeting sequence is cleaved upon entry.

  11. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gannagé, Monique; Dormann, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here, we...... demonstrate that influenza A virus inhibits macroautophagy, a cellular process known to be manipulated by diverse pathogens. Influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes, and one viral protein, matrix protein 2, is necessary and sufficient...... for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition by matrix protein 2 compromises survival of influenza virus-infected cells but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes proapoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell...

  12. Prokaryotic soluble overexpression and purification of bioactive human growth hormone by fusion to thioredoxin, maltose binding protein, and protein disulfide isomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Tan Nguyen

    Full Text Available Human growth hormone (hGH is synthesized by somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland and induces cell proliferation and growth. This protein has been approved for the treatment of various conditions, including hGH deficiency, chronic renal failure, and Turner syndrome. Efficient production of hGH in Escherichia coli (E. coli has proven difficult because the E. coli-expressed hormone tends to aggregate and form inclusion bodies, resulting in poor solubility. In this study, seven N-terminal fusion partners, hexahistidine (His6, thioredoxin (Trx, glutathione S-transferase (GST, maltose-binding protein (MBP, N-utilization substance protein A (NusA, protein disulfide bond isomerase (PDI, and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a', were tested for soluble overexpression of codon-optimized hGH in E. coli. We found that MBP and hPDI tags significantly increased the solubility of the hormone. In addition, lowering the expression temperature to 18°C also dramatically increased the solubility of all the fusion proteins. We purified hGH from MBP-, PDIb'a'-, or Trx-tagged hGH expressed at 18°C in E. coli using simple chromatographic techniques and compared the final purity, yield, and activity of hGH to assess the impact of each partner protein. Purified hGH was highly pure on silver-stained gel and contained very low levels of endotoxin. On average, ∼37 mg, ∼12 mg, and ∼7 mg of hGH were obtained from 500 mL-cell cultures of Trx-hGH, MBP-hGH, and PDIb'a'-hGH, respectively. Subsequently, hGH was analyzed using mass spectroscopy to confirm the presence of two intra-molecular disulfide bonds. The bioactivity of purified hGHs was demonstrated using Nb2-11 cell.

  13. Prediction of crude protein digestibility of animal by-product meals for dogs by the protein solubility in pepsin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Iris M; Sakomura, Nilva K; Pontieri, Cristiana F F; Rebelato, Aline; Putarov, Thaila C; Malheiros, Euclides B; Gomes, Márcia de O S; Castrillo, Carlos; Carciofi, Aulus C

    2014-01-01

    Animal by-product meals have large variability in crude protein (CP) content and digestibility. In vivo digestibility procedures are precise but laborious, and in vitro methods could be an alternative to evaluate and classify these ingredients. The present study reports prediction equations to estimate the CP digestibility of meat and bone meal (MBM) and poultry by-product meal (PM) using the protein solubility in pepsin method (PSP). Total tract CP digestibility of eight MBM and eight PM samples was determined in dogs by the substitution method. A basal diet was formulated for dog maintenance, and sixteen diets were produced by mixing 70 % of the basal diet and 30 % of each tested meal. Six dogs per diet were used to determine ingredient digestibility. In addition, PSP of the MBM and PM samples was determined using three pepsin concentrations: 0·02, 0·002 and 0·0002 %. The CP content of MBM and PM ranged from 39 to 46 % and 57 to 69 %, respectively, and their mean CP digestibility by dogs was 76 (2·4) and 85 (2·6) %, respectively. The pepsin concentration with higher Pearson correlation coefficients with the in vivo results were 0·0002 % for MBM (r 0·380; P = 0·008) and 0·02 % for PM (r 0·482; P = 0·005). The relationship between the in vivo and in vitro results was better explained by the following equations: CP digestibility of MBM = 61·7 + 0·2644 × PSP at 0·0002 % (P = 0·008; R (2) 0·126); and CP digestibility of PM = 54·1 + 0·3833 × PSP at 0·02 % (P = 0·005; R (2) 0·216). Although significant, the coefficients of determination were low, indicating that the models were weak and need to be used with caution.

  14. Preparation of bioconjugates by solid-phase conjugation to ion exchange matrix-adsorbed carrier proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houen, G.; Olsen, D.T.; Hansen, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    A solid-phase conjugation method utilizing carrier protein bound to an ion exchange matrix was developed. Ovalbumin was adsorbed to an anion exchange matrix using a batch procedure, and the immobilized protein was then derivatized with iodoacetic acid N-hydroxysuccinimid ester. The activated......, and immunization experiments with the eluted conjugates showed that the more substituted conjugates gave rise to the highest titers of glutathione antibodies. Direct immunization with the conjugates adsorbed to the ion exchange matrix was possible and gave rise to high titers of glutathione antibodies. Conjugates...... of ovalbumin and various peptides were prepared in a similar manner and used for production of peptide antisera by direct immunization with the conjugates bound to the ion exchanger. Advantages of the method are its solid-phase nature, allowing fast and efficient reactions and intermediate washings...

  15. One-step separation of myristoylated and nonmyristoylated retroviral matrix proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Michal; Zábranský, Aleš; Hrabal, R.; Ruml, T.; Pichová, Iva; Rumlová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 1 (2013), s. 94-99 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1388 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : matrix protein * mouse mammary tumor virus * murine leukemia virus * myristoylation * N-myristoyltransferase * retrovirus Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.508, year: 2013

  16. β-TCP/HA with or without enamel matrix proteins for maxillary sinus floor augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nery, James Carlos; Pereira, Luís Antônio Violin Dias; Guimarães, George Furtado

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is still unclear whether enamel matrix proteins (EMD) as adjunct to bone grafting enhance bone healing. This study compared histomorphometrically maxillary sinus floor augmentation (MSFA) with β-TCP/HA in combination with or without EMD in humans. METHODS: In ten systemically healthy...

  17. Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in non-healing venous ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçin Abud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Treatment of chronic venous ulcers of the lower extremity is still an important difficulty. The principal treatment of these ulcers includes compression therapy, local wound care and surgery. Unresponsiveness to these standard treatments is a frequent situation with negative effects on life quality and reductions in personal productivity. Therefore, there is a need for new applications to increase the effectiveness of treatment in treatment-resistant cases. In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the results of topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in resistant venous ulcers. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the records of patients with treatment-resistant venous ulceration who were treated with amelogenin extracellular matrix protein between June 2011 and December 2012.. Results: 26 patients (21 male and 5 female with a total number of 28 ulcers (24 patients with 1 ulcer, 2 patients with two ulcers were evaluated. The patients were treated with topically applied amelogenin extracellular matrix protein and regional four bandage compression. Bandages were changed weekly. Each cure continued for six weeks. In fourteen patients (15 ulcers, we observed a complete healing by the end of the first cure. In another twelve cases (13 ulcers, the same period resulted with a reduction in wound diameter. We continued to the second cure for these patients. By the end of the second cure, complete healing was achieved in five cases (6 ulcers. Conclusion: Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein may be considered as an effective therapeutic choice for refractory venous ulcers.

  18. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing.

  19. Beyond the Protein Matrix : Probing Cofactor Variants in a Baeyer-Villiger Oxygenation Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinoli, Christian; Dudek, Hanna M.; Orru, Roberto; Edmondson, Dale E.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    A general question in biochemistry is the interplay between the chemical properties of cofactors and the surrounding protein matrix. Here, the functions of NADP(+) and FAD are explored by investigation of a representative monooxygenase reconstituted with chemically modified cofactor analogues. Like

  20. Kidney stone matrix proteins ameliorate calcium oxalate monohydrate induced apoptotic injury to renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Shifa; Tandon, Simran; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2016-11-01

    Kidney stone formation is a highly prevalent disease, affecting 8-10% of the human population worldwide. Proteins are the major constituents of human kidney stone's organic matrix and considered to play critical role in the pathogenesis of disease but their mechanism of modulation still needs to be explicated. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of human kidney stone matrix proteins on the calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) mediated cellular injury. The renal epithelial cells (MDCK) were exposed to 200μg/ml COM crystals to induce injury. The effect of proteins isolated from human kidney stone was studied on COM injured cells. The alterations in cell-crystal interactions were examined by phase contrast, polarizing, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, its effect on the extent of COM induced cell injury, was quantified by flow cytometric analysis. Our study indicated the antilithiatic potential of human kidney stone proteins on COM injured MDCK cells. Flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence imaging ascertained that matrix proteins decreased the extent of apoptotic injury caused by COM crystals on MDCK cells. Moreover, the electron microscopic studies of MDCK cells revealed that matrix proteins caused significant dissolution of COM crystals, indicating cytoprotection against the impact of calcium oxalate injury. The present study gives insights into the mechanism implied by urinary proteins to restrain the pathogenesis of kidney stone disease. This will provide a better understanding of the formation of kidney stones which can be useful for the proper management of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Serial millisecond crystallography of membrane and soluble protein microcrystals using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Conrad, Chelsie E; Nelson, Garrett; Stander, Natasha; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Zook, James; Zhu, Lan; Geiger, James; Chun, Eugene; Kissick, David; Hilgart, Mark C; Ogata, Craig; Ishchenko, Andrii; Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Subramanian, Ganesh; Schaffer, Alexander; James, Daniel; Ketwala, Gihan; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Xu, Shenglan; Corcoran, Stephen; Ferguson, Dale; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C H; Cherezov, Vadim; Fromme, Petra; Fischetti, Robert F; Liu, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Crystal structure determination of biological macromolecules using the novel technique of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) is severely limited by the scarcity of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources. However, recent and future upgrades render microfocus beamlines at synchrotron-radiation sources suitable for room-temperature serial crystallography data collection also. Owing to the longer exposure times that are needed at synchrotrons, serial data collection is termed serial millisecond crystallography (SMX). As a result, the number of SMX experiments is growing rapidly, with a dozen experiments reported so far. Here, the first high-viscosity injector-based SMX experiments carried out at a US synchrotron source, the Advanced Photon Source (APS), are reported. Microcrystals (5-20 µm) of a wide variety of proteins, including lysozyme, thaumatin, phycocyanin, the human A 2A adenosine receptor (A 2A AR), the soluble fragment of the membrane lipoprotein Flpp3 and proteinase K, were screened. Crystals suspended in lipidic cubic phase (LCP) or a high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO; molecular weight 8 000 000) were delivered to the beam using a high-viscosity injector. In-house data-reduction (hit-finding) software developed at APS as well as the SFX data-reduction and analysis software suites Cheetah and CrystFEL enabled efficient on-site SMX data monitoring, reduction and processing. Complete data sets were collected for A 2A AR, phycocyanin, Flpp3, proteinase K and lysozyme, and the structures of A 2A AR, phycocyanin, proteinase K and lysozyme were determined at 3.2, 3.1, 2.65 and 2.05 Å resolution, respectively. The data demonstrate the feasibility of serial millisecond crystallography from 5-20 µm crystals using a high-viscosity injector at APS. The resolution of the crystal structures obtained in this study was dictated by the current flux density and crystal size, but upcoming developments in beamline optics and the planned APS

  2. Serial millisecond crystallography of membrane and soluble protein microcrystals using synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Martin-Garcia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Crystal structure determination of biological macromolecules using the novel technique of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX is severely limited by the scarcity of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL sources. However, recent and future upgrades render microfocus beamlines at synchrotron-radiation sources suitable for room-temperature serial crystallography data collection also. Owing to the longer exposure times that are needed at synchrotrons, serial data collection is termed serial millisecond crystallography (SMX. As a result, the number of SMX experiments is growing rapidly, with a dozen experiments reported so far. Here, the first high-viscosity injector-based SMX experiments carried out at a US synchrotron source, the Advanced Photon Source (APS, are reported. Microcrystals (5–20 µm of a wide variety of proteins, including lysozyme, thaumatin, phycocyanin, the human A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR, the soluble fragment of the membrane lipoprotein Flpp3 and proteinase K, were screened. Crystals suspended in lipidic cubic phase (LCP or a high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene oxide (PEO; molecular weight 8 000 000 were delivered to the beam using a high-viscosity injector. In-house data-reduction (hit-finding software developed at APS as well as the SFX data-reduction and analysis software suites Cheetah and CrystFEL enabled efficient on-site SMX data monitoring, reduction and processing. Complete data sets were collected for A2AAR, phycocyanin, Flpp3, proteinase K and lysozyme, and the structures of A2AAR, phycocyanin, proteinase K and lysozyme were determined at 3.2, 3.1, 2.65 and 2.05 Å resolution, respectively. The data demonstrate the feasibility of serial millisecond crystallography from 5–20 µm crystals using a high-viscosity injector at APS. The resolution of the crystal structures obtained in this study was dictated by the current flux density and crystal size, but upcoming developments in beamline optics and the

  3. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  4. Design of Fusion Proteins for Efficient and Soluble Production of Immunogenic Ebola Virus Glycoprotein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yang; Lu, Yuan; Yan, Yishu; Liu, Xinxin; Su, Nan; Zhang, Chong; Bi, Shengli; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2018-03-03

    The Ebola hemorrhagic fever caused by Ebola virus is an extremely dangerous disease, and effective therapeutic agents are still lacking. Platforms for the efficient production of vaccines are crucial to ensure quick response against an Ebola virus outbreak. Ebola virus glycoprotein (EbolaGP) on the virion surface is responsible for membrane binding and virus entry, thus becoming the key target for vaccine development. However, heterologous expression of this protein still faces engineering challenges such as low production levels and insoluble aggregation. Here, the authors design and compare various fusion strategies, attaching great importance to the solubility-enhancing effect, and tag removal process. It is found that a C-terminal intein-based tag greatly enhances the solubility of EbolaGP and allows one-step chromatographic purification of the untagged EbolaGP through thiol-catalyzed self-cleavage. The purified untagged EbolaGP alone or with Freund's adjuvant are highly immunogenic, as confirmed in a mouse model. Consequently, the present study puts forward a new strategy for the efficient and soluble expression of untagged immunogenic EbolaGP. The intein-based protein fusion approach may be of importance for the large-scale production of Ebola virus subunit vaccine. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cytokine-like factor-1, a novel soluble protein, shares homology with members of the cytokine type I receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, G C; Graber, P; Losberger, C; Herren, S; Gretener, D; Menoud, L N; Wells, T N; Kosco-Vilbois, M H; Gauchat, J F

    1998-08-01

    In this report we describe the identification, cloning, and expression pattern of human cytokine-like factor 1 (hCLF-1) and the identification and cloning of its murine homologue. They were identified from expressed sequence tags using amino acid sequences from conserved regions of the cytokine type I receptor family. Human CLF-1 and murine CLF-1 shared 96% amino acid identity and significant homology with many cytokine type I receptors. CLF-1 is a secreted protein, suggesting that it is either a soluble subunit within a cytokine receptor complex, like the soluble form of the IL-6R alpha-chain, or a subunit of a multimeric cytokine, e.g., IL-12 p40. The highest levels of hCLF-1 mRNA were observed in lymph node, spleen, thymus, appendix, placenta, stomach, bone marrow, and fetal lung, with constitutive expression of CLF-1 mRNA detected in a human kidney fibroblastic cell line. In fibroblast primary cell cultures, CLF-1 mRNA was up-regulated by TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma. Western blot analysis of recombinant forms of hCLF-1 showed that the protein has the tendency to form covalently linked di- and tetramers. These results suggest that CLF-1 is a novel soluble cytokine receptor subunit or part of a novel cytokine complex, possibly playing a regulatory role in the immune system and during fetal development.

  6. A biotin-drug extraction and acid dissociation (BEAD) procedure to eliminate matrix and drug interference in a protein complex anti-drug antibody (ADA) isotype specific assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongmei; Klem, Thomas; Yang, Jinsong; Qiu, Yongchang; Pan, Luying

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring anti-drug antibody (ADA) responses in patients receiving protein therapeutics treatment is an important safety assessment for regulatory agencies, drug manufacturers, clinicians and patients. Recombinant human IGF-1/IGFBP-3 (rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3) is a 1:1 formulation of naturally occurring protein complex. The individual IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 proteins have multiple binding partners in serum matrix with high binding affinity to each other, which presents challenges in ADA assay development. We have developed a biotin-drug extraction with acid dissociation (BEAD) procedure followed by an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) direct assay to overcome matrix and drug interference. The method utilizes two step acid dissociation and excess biotin-drug to extract total ADA, which are further captured by soluble biotin-drug and detected in an ECL semi-homogeneous direct assay format. The pre-treatment method effectively eliminates interference by serum matrix and free drug, and enhances assay sensitivity. The assays passed acceptance criteria for all validation parameters, and have been used for clinical sample Ab testing. This method principle exemplifies a new approach for anti-isotype ADA assays, and could be an effective strategy for neutralizing antibody (NAb), pharmacokinetic (PK) and biomarker analysis in need of overcoming interference factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A single peroxisomal targeting signal mediates matrix protein import in diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola H Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are single membrane bound compartments. They are thought to be present in almost all eukaryotic cells, although the bulk of our knowledge about peroxisomes has been generated from only a handful of model organisms. Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized cytosolically and posttranslationally imported into the peroxisomal matrix. The import is generally thought to be mediated by two different targeting signals. These are respectively recognized by the two import receptor proteins Pex5 and Pex7, which facilitate transport across the peroxisomal membrane. Here, we show the first in vivo localization studies of peroxisomes in a representative organism of the ecologically relevant group of diatoms using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. By expression of various homologous and heterologous fusion proteins we demonstrate that targeting of Phaeodactylum tricornutum peroxisomal matrix proteins is mediated only by PTS1 targeting signals, also for proteins that are in other systems imported via a PTS2 mode of action. Additional in silico analyses suggest this surprising finding may also apply to further diatoms. Our data suggest that loss of the PTS2 peroxisomal import signal is not reserved to Caenorhabditis elegans as a single exception, but has also occurred in evolutionary divergent organisms. Obviously, targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1 across different major eukaryotic groups might have occurred for different reasons. Thus, our findings question the widespread assumption that import of peroxisomal matrix proteins is generally mediated by two different targeting signals. Our results implicate that there apparently must have been an event causing the loss of one targeting signal even in the group of diatoms. Different possibilities are discussed that indicate multiple reasons for the detected targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1.

  8. ORF-selector ESPRIT: a second generation library screen for soluble protein expression employing precise open reading frame selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yingfeng; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Mas, Philippe J; Chesneau, Alban; Hart, Darren J

    2011-08-01

    Here we present ORF-selector ESPRIT, a 9-fold enhanced version of our technology for screening incremental truncation libraries to identify soluble high yielding constructs of challenging proteins. Gene fragments are truncated at both termini to access internal domains and the resulting reading frame problem is addressed by an unbiased, intein-based open reading frame selection yielding only in-frame DNA inserts. This enriched library is then subcloned into a standard high-level expression plasmid where tens of thousands of constructs can be assayed in a two-step process using colony- and liquid-handling robots to isolate rare highly expressing clones useful for production of multi milligram quantities of purifiable proteins. The p85α protein was used to benchmark the system resulting in isolation of all known domains, either alone or in tandem. The human kinase IKK1 was then screened resulting in purification of a predicted internal domain. This strategy provides an integrated, facile route to produce soluble proteins from challenging and poorly understood target genes at quantities compatible with structural biology, screening applications and immunisation studies. The high genetic diversity that can be sampled opens the way to study more diverse systems including multisubunit complexes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii: Biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant soluble dense granule proteins GRA2 and GRA6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittame, Amina; Effantin, Grégory; Pètre, Graciane; Ruffiot, Pauline; Travier, Laetitia; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    The most prominent structural feature of the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in which the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii proliferates is a membranous nanotubular network (MNN), which interconnects the parasites and the PV membrane. The MNN function remains unclear. The GRA2 and GRA6 proteins secreted from the parasite dense granules into the PV have been implicated in the MNN biogenesis. Amphipathic alpha-helices (AAHs) predicted in GRA2 and an alpha-helical hydrophobic domain predicted in GRA6 have been proposed to be responsible for their membrane association, thereby potentially molding the MMN in its structure. Here we report an analysis of the recombinant proteins (expressed in detergent-free conditions) by circular dichroism, which showed that full length GRA2 displays an alpha-helical secondary structure while recombinant GRA6 and GRA2 truncated of its AAHs are mainly random coiled. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that recombinant GRA6 and truncated GRA2 constitute a homogenous population of small particles (6–8 nm in diameter) while recombinant GRA2 corresponds to 2 populations of particles (∼8–15 nm and up to 40 nm in diameter, respectively). The unusual properties of GRA2 due to its AAHs are discussed. - Highlights: • Toxoplasma gondii: soluble GRA2 forms 2 populations of particles. • T. gondii: the dense granule protein GRA2 folds intrinsically as an alpha-helix. • T. gondii: monomeric soluble GRA6 forms particles of 6–8 nm in diameter. • T. gondii: monomeric soluble GRA6 is random coiled. • Unusual biophysical properties of the dense granule protein GRA2 from T. gondii

  10. Toxoplasma gondii: Biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant soluble dense granule proteins GRA2 and GRA6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittame, Amina [CNRS, UMR 5163, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes, 38042 Grenoble (France); Effantin, Grégory [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS), 38044 Grenoble (France); CNRS, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); CEA, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); Unit for Virus Host-Cell Interactions (UVHCI), UMI 3265 (UJF-EMBL-CNRS), 38027 Grenoble (France); Pètre, Graciane; Ruffiot, Pauline; Travier, Laetitia [CNRS, UMR 5163, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes, 38042 Grenoble (France); Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS), 38044 Grenoble (France); CNRS, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); CEA, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); Unit for Virus Host-Cell Interactions (UVHCI), UMI 3265 (UJF-EMBL-CNRS), 38027 Grenoble (France); Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Gagnon, Jean [CNRS, UMR 5163, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes, 38042 Grenoble (France); Mercier, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.mercier@ujf-grenoble.fr [CNRS, UMR 5163, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2015-03-27

    The most prominent structural feature of the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in which the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii proliferates is a membranous nanotubular network (MNN), which interconnects the parasites and the PV membrane. The MNN function remains unclear. The GRA2 and GRA6 proteins secreted from the parasite dense granules into the PV have been implicated in the MNN biogenesis. Amphipathic alpha-helices (AAHs) predicted in GRA2 and an alpha-helical hydrophobic domain predicted in GRA6 have been proposed to be responsible for their membrane association, thereby potentially molding the MMN in its structure. Here we report an analysis of the recombinant proteins (expressed in detergent-free conditions) by circular dichroism, which showed that full length GRA2 displays an alpha-helical secondary structure while recombinant GRA6 and GRA2 truncated of its AAHs are mainly random coiled. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that recombinant GRA6 and truncated GRA2 constitute a homogenous population of small particles (6–8 nm in diameter) while recombinant GRA2 corresponds to 2 populations of particles (∼8–15 nm and up to 40 nm in diameter, respectively). The unusual properties of GRA2 due to its AAHs are discussed. - Highlights: • Toxoplasma gondii: soluble GRA2 forms 2 populations of particles. • T. gondii: the dense granule protein GRA2 folds intrinsically as an alpha-helix. • T. gondii: monomeric soluble GRA6 forms particles of 6–8 nm in diameter. • T. gondii: monomeric soluble GRA6 is random coiled. • Unusual biophysical properties of the dense granule protein GRA2 from T. gondii.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiah, M A; Starich, M R; Paschall, C; Summers, M F; Christensen, A M; Sundquist, W I

    1994-11-25

    The HIV-1 matrix protein forms an icosahedral shell associated with the inner membrane of the mature virus. Genetic analyses have indicated that the protein performs important functions throughout the viral life-cycle, including anchoring the transmembrane envelope protein on the surface of the virus, assisting in viral penetration, transporting the proviral integration complex across the nuclear envelope, and localizing the assembling virion to the cell membrane. We now report the three-dimensional structure of recombinant HIV-1 matrix protein, determined at high resolution by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The HIV-1 matrix protein is the first retroviral matrix protein to be characterized structurally and only the fourth HIV-1 protein of known structure. NMR signal assignments required recently developed triple-resonance (1H, 13C, 15N) NMR methodologies because signals for 91% of 132 assigned H alpha protons and 74% of the 129 assignable backbone amide protons resonate within chemical shift ranges of 0.8 p.p.m. and 1 p.p.m., respectively. A total of 636 nuclear Overhauser effect-derived distance restraints were employed for distance geometry-based structure calculations, affording an average of 13.0 NMR-derived distance restraints per residue for the experimentally constrained amino acids. An ensemble of 25 refined distance geometry structures with penalties (sum of the squares of the distance violations) of 0.32 A2 or less and individual distance violations under 0.06 A was generated; best-fit superposition of ordered backbone heavy atoms relative to mean atom positions afforded root-mean-square deviations of 0.50 (+/- 0.08) A. The folded HIV-1 matrix protein structure is composed of five alpha-helices, a short 3(10) helical stretch, and a three-strand mixed beta-sheet. Helices I to III and the 3(10) helix pack about a central helix (IV) to form a compact globular domain that is capped by the beta-sheet. The C-terminal helix (helix V) projects away

  12. Molecular interactions between chondroitin-dermatan sulfate and growth factors/receptors/matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Recent functional studies on chondroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate (CS-DS) demonstrated its indispensable roles in various biological events including brain development and cancer. CS-DS proteoglycans exert their physiological activity through interactions with specific proteins including growth factors, cell surface receptors, and matrix proteins. The characterization of these interactions is essential for regulating the biological functions of CS-DS proteoglycans. Although amino acid sequences on the bioactive proteins required for these interactions have already been elucidated, the specific saccharide sequences involved in the binding of CS-DS to target proteins have not yet been sufficiently identified. In this review, recent findings are described on the interaction between CS-DS and some proteins which are especially involved in the central nervous system and cancer development/metastasis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effect of the combinations between pea proteins and soluble fibres on cholesterolaemia and cholesterol metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Cinzia; Manzini, Stefano; Busnelli, Marco; Rigamonti, Elena; Marchesi, Marta; Diani, Erika; Sirtori, Cesare R; Chiesa, Giulia

    2013-10-01

    Many functional foods and dietary supplements have been reported to be beneficial for the management of dyslipidaemia, one of the major risk factors for CVD. Soluble fibres and legume proteins are known to be a safe and practical approach for cholesterol reduction. The present study aimed at investigating the hypocholesterolaemic effect of the combinations of these bioactive vegetable ingredients and their possible effects on the expression of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis. A total of six groups of twelve rats each were fed, for 28 d, Nath's hypercholesterolaemic diets, differing in protein and fibre sources, being, respectively, casein and cellulose (control), pea proteins and cellulose (pea), casein and oat fibres (oat), casein and apple pectin (pectin), pea proteins and oat fibres (pea+oat) and pea proteins and apple pectin (pea+pectin). Administration of each vegetable-containing diet was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations compared with the control. The combinations (pea+oat and pea+pectin) were more efficacious than fibres alone in modulating cholesterolaemia ( - 53 and - 54%, respectively, at 28 d; Ppea proteins, a lower hepatic cholesterol content (Ppea proteins and oat fibres or apple pectin are extremely effective in lowering plasma cholesterol concentrations in rats and affect cellular cholesterol homeostasis by up-regulating genes involved in hepatic cholesterol turnover.

  14. Distinct profile of vascular progenitor attachment to extracellular matrix proteins in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Laura; Li, Yuhua; Addison, Christina L; Brand, Marjorie; Javidnia, Hedyeh; Corsten, Martin; Burns, Kevin; Allan, David S

    2012-04-01

    Vascular progenitor cells (VPCs) facilitate angiogenesis and initiate vascular repair by homing in on sites of damage and adhering to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. VPCs also contribute to tumor angiogenesis and induce angiogenic switching in sites of metastatic cancer. In this study, the binding of attaching cells in VPC clusters that form in vitro on specific ECM proteins was investigated. VPC cluster assays were performed in vitro on ECM proteins enriched in cancer cells and in remodelling tissue. Profiles of VPC clusters from patients with cancer were compared to healthy controls. The role of VEGF and integrin-specific binding of angiogenic attaching cells was addressed. VPC clusters from cancer patients were markedly increased on fibronectin relative to other ECM proteins tested, in contrast to VPC clusters from control subjects, which formed preferentially on laminin. Specific integrin-mediated binding of attaching cells in VPC clusters was matrix protein-dependent. Furthermore, cancer patients had elevated plasma VEGF levels compared to healthy controls and VEGF facilitated preferential VPC cluster formation on fibronectin. Incubating cells from healthy controls with VEGF induced a switch from the 'healthy' VPC binding profile to the profile observed in cancer patients with a marked increase in VPC cluster formation on fibronectin. The ECM proteins laminin and fibronectin support VPC cluster formation via specific integrins on attaching cells and can facilitate patterns of VPC cluster formation that are distinct in cancer patients. Larger studies, however, are needed to gain insight on how tumor angiogenesis may differ from normal repair processes.

  15. Centrosome proteins form an insoluble perinuclear matrix during muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srsen Vlastimil

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle fibres are formed by elongation and fusion of myoblasts into myotubes. During this differentiation process, the cytoskeleton is reorganized, and proteins of the centrosome re-localize to the surface of the nucleus. The exact timing of this event, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Results We performed studies on mouse myoblast cell lines that were induced to differentiate in culture, to characterize the early events of centrosome protein re-localization. We demonstrate that this re-localization occurs already at the single cell stage, prior to fusion into myotubes. Centrosome proteins that accumulate at the nuclear surface form an insoluble matrix that can be reversibly disassembled if isolated nuclei are exposed to mitotic cytoplasm from Xenopus egg extract. Our microscopy data suggest that this perinuclear matrix of centrosome proteins consists of a system of interconnected fibrils. Conclusion Our data provide new insights into the reorganization of centrosome proteins during muscular differentiation, at the structural and biochemical level. Because we observe that centrosome protein re-localization occurs early during differentiation, we believe that it is of functional importance for the reorganization of the cytoskeleton in the differentiation process.

  16. Lipid-soluble cigarette smoking particles induce expression of inflammatory and extracellular-matrix-related genes in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikman, Petter; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    /JNK) and their downstream transcription factors (ATF-2, Elk-1 and c-Jun) were examined. RESULTS: We observed that compared with control (DMSO-treated cerebral arteries), the cerebral arteries treated by DSP exhibited enhanced expression of MMP13 and AT(1) receptors, but not of AT(2) receptors, at both mRNA and protein...... factor ATF-2 and Elk-1. However, ERK 1/2 and SAPK/JNK activities were markedly expressed in the control (organ culture per se with DMSO), and DSP failed to further enhance the activation of ERK 1/2 and SAPK/JNK in the cerebral arteries. CONCLUSIONS: DSP induces cerebral vessel inflammation...

  17. Phrase Mining of Textual Data to Analyze Extracellular Matrix Protein Patterns Across Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, David Alexandre; Murali, Sanjana; Sigdel, Dibakar; Shi, Yu; Wang, Xuan; Shen, Jiaming; Choi, Howard; Caufield, J Harry; Wang, Wei; Ping, Peipei; Han, Jiawei

    2018-05-18

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to play important roles regulating multiple biological processes in an array of organ systems, including the cardiovascular system. By using a novel bioinformatics text-mining tool, we studied six categories of cardiovascular disease (CVD), namely ischemic heart disease (IHD), cardiomyopathies (CM), cerebrovascular accident (CVA), congenital heart disease (CHD), arrhythmias (ARR), and valve disease (VD), anticipating novel ECM protein-disease and protein-protein relationships hidden within vast quantities of textual data. We conducted a phrase-mining analysis, delineating the relationships of 709 ECM proteins with the six groups of CVDs reported in 1,099,254 abstracts. The technology pipeline known as Context-aware Semantic Online Analytical Processing (CaseOLAP) was applied to semantically rank the association of proteins to each and all six CVDs, performing analyses to quantify each protein-disease relationship. We performed principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering of the data, where each protein is visualized as a six dimensional vector. We found that ECM proteins display variable degrees of association with the six CVDs; certain CVDs share groups of associated proteins whereas others have divergent protein associations. We identified 82 ECM proteins sharing associations with all six CVDs. Our bioinformatics analysis ascribed distinct ECM pathways (via Reactome) from this subset of proteins, namely insulin-like growth factor regulation and interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 signaling, suggesting their contribution to the pathogenesis of all six CVDs. Finally, we performed hierarchical clustering analysis and identified protein clusters associated with a targeted CVD; analyses revealed unexpected insights underlying ECM-pathogenesis of CVDs.

  18. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    2006-05-01

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including adherence and immunomodulation, thus contributing to S. aureus pathogenesis. Eap binding to host macromolecules is unusually promiscuous and includes matrix or matricellular proteins as well as plasma proteins. The structural basis of this promiscuity is poorly understood. Here, we show that in spite of the preferential location of the binding epitopes within triple helical regions in some collagens there is a striking specificity of Eap binding to different collagen types. Collagen I, but not collagen II, is a binding substrate in monomolecular form. However, collagen I is virtually unrecognized by Eap when incorporated into banded fibrils. By contrast, microfibrils containing collagen VI as well as basement membrane-associated networks containing collagen IV, or aggregates containing fibronectin bound Eap as effectively as the monomeric proteins. Therefore, Eap-binding to extracellular matrix ligands is promiscuous at the molecular level but not indiscriminate with respect to supramolecular structures containing the same macromolecules. In addition, Eap bound to banded fibrils after their partial disintegration by matrix-degrading proteinases, including matrix metalloproteinase 1. Therefore, adherence to matrix suprastructures by S. aureus can be supported by inflammatory reactions.

  19. Postsynaptic density protein 95 in the striosome and matrix compartments of the human neostriatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma eMorigaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The human neostriatum consists of two functional subdivisions referred to as the striosome (patch and matrix compartments. The striosome-matrix dopamine systems play a central role in cortico-thalamo-basal ganglia circuits, and their involvement is thought to underlie the genesis of multiple movement and behavioral disorders, and of drug addiction. Human neuropathology also has shown that striosomes and matrix have differential vulnerability patterns in several striatal neurodegenerative diseases. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, also known as DLG4, is a major scaffolding protein in the postsynaptic densities of dendritic spines. PSD-95 is now known to negatively regulate not only N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate signaling, but also dopamine D1 signals at sites of postsynaptic transmission. Accordingly, a neuroprotective role for PSD-95 against dopamine D1 receptor (D1R-mediated neurotoxicity in striatal neurodegeneration also has been suggested. Here, we used a highly sensitive immunohistochemistry technique to show that in the human neostriatum, PSD-95 is differentially concentrated in the striosome and matrix compartments, with a higher density of PSD-95 labeling in the matrix compartment than in the striosomes. This compartment-specific distribution of PSD-95 was strikingly complementary to that of D1R. In addition to the possible involvement of PSD-95-mediated synaptic function in compartment-specific dopamine signals, we suggest that the striosomes might be more susceptible to D1R-mediated neurotoxicity than the matrix compartment. This notion may provide new insight into the compartment-specific vulnerability of MSNs in striatal neurodegeneration.

  20. Tissue specificity of the hormonal response in sex accessory tissues is associated with nuclear matrix protein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzenberg, R H; Coffey, D S

    1990-09-01

    The DNA of interphase nuclei have very specific three-dimensional organizations that are different in different cell types, and it is possible that this varying DNA organization is responsible for the tissue specificity of gene expression. The nuclear matrix organizes the three-dimensional structure of the DNA and is believed to be involved in the control of gene expression. This study compares the nuclear structural proteins between two sex accessory tissues in the same animal responding to the same androgen stimulation by the differential expression of major tissue-specific secretory proteins. We demonstrate here that the nuclear matrix is tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, and undergoes characteristic alterations in its protein composition upon androgen withdrawal. Three types of nuclear matrix proteins were observed: 1) nuclear matrix proteins that are different and tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, 2) a set of nuclear matrix proteins that either appear or disappear upon androgen withdrawal, and 3) a set of proteins that are common to both the ventral prostate and seminal vesicle and do not change with the hormonal state of the animal. Since the nuclear matrix is known to bind androgen receptors in a tissue- and steroid-specific manner, we propose that the tissue specificity of the nuclear matrix arranges the DNA in a unique conformation, which may be involved in the specific interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences, resulting in tissue-specific patterns of secretory protein expression.

  1. Functional properties of dioscorin, a soluble viscous protein from Japanese yam (Dioscorea opposita thunb.) tuber mucilage Tororo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takeshi; Nagashima, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    A soluble viscous protein was purified from yam (Dioscorea opposita Thunb.) tuber mucilage tororo by chromatographic steps, and its functional properties were estimated. The purified dioscorin having the molecular weight of about 200 kDa exhibited high scavenging activities against hydroxyl radicals (IC50 = 195.1 microg/ml) and superoxide anion radicals (IC50 = 92.7 microg/ml). Moreover, it showed extremely high angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity (IC50 = 41.1 microg/ml). The results suggested that yam D. opposita tuber has a wide spectrum of strong antioxidative and antihypertensive activities and it could be utilized as a source of natural antioxidant.

  2. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  3. Extremely stable soluble high molecular mass multi-protein complex with DNase activity in human placental tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya E Burkova

    Full Text Available Human placenta is an organ which protects, feeds, and regulates the grooving of the embryo. Therefore, identification and characterization of placental components including proteins and their multi-protein complexes is an important step to understanding the placenta function. We have obtained and analyzed for the first time an extremely stable multi-protein complex (SPC, ∼ 1000 kDa from the soluble fraction of three human placentas. By gel filtration on Sepharose-4B, the SPC was well separated from other proteins of the placenta extract. Light scattering measurements and gel filtration showed that the SPC is stable in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2, acetonitrile, guanidinium chloride, and Triton in high concentrations, but dissociates efficiently in the presence of 8 M urea, 50 mM EDTA, and 0.5 M NaCl. Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. According to SDS-PAGE and MALDI mass spectrometry data, this complex contains many major glycosylated proteins with low and moderate molecular masses (MMs 4-14 kDa and several moderately abundant (79.3, 68.5, 52.8, and 27.2 kDa as well as minor proteins with higher MMs. The SPC treatment with dithiothreitol led to a disappearance of some protein bands and revealed proteins with lower MMs. The SPCs from three placentas efficiently hydrolyzed plasmid supercoiled DNA with comparable rates and possess at least two DNA-binding sites with different affinities for a 12-mer oligonucleotide. Progress in study of placental protein complexes can promote understanding of their biological functions.

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of soluble red rooster laforin as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, M Kathryn; Husodo, Satrio; Dukhande, Vikas V; Johnson, Mary Beth; Gentry, Matthew S

    2014-04-02

    The gene that encodes laforin, a dual-specificity phosphatase with a carbohydrate-binding module, is mutated in Lafora disease (LD). LD is an autosomal recessive, fatal progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized by the intracellular buildup of insoluble, hyperphosphorylated glycogen-like particles, called Lafora bodies. Laforin dephosphorylates glycogen and other glucans in vitro, but the structural basis of its activity remains unknown. Recombinant human laforin when expressed in and purified from E. coli is largely insoluble and prone to aggregation and precipitation. Identification of a laforin ortholog that is more soluble and stable in vitro would circumvent this issue. In this study, we cloned multiple laforin orthologs, established a purification scheme for each, and tested their solubility and stability. Gallus gallus (Gg) laforin is more stable in vitro than human laforin, Gg-laforin is largely monomeric, and it possesses carbohydrate binding and phosphatase activity similar to human laforin. Gg-laforin is more soluble and stable than human laforin in vitro, and possesses similar activity as a glucan phosphatase. Therefore, it can be used to model human laforin in structure-function studies. We have established a protocol for purifying recombinant Gg-laforin in sufficient quantity for crystallographic and other biophysical analyses, in order to better understand the function of laforin and define the molecular mechanisms of Lafora disease.

  5. Crystal structure of an orthomyxovirus matrix protein reveals mechanisms for self-polymerization and membrane association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenting; Zheng, Wenjie; Toh, Yukimatsu; Betancourt-Solis, Miguel A; Tu, Jiagang; Fan, Yanlin; Vakharia, Vikram N; Liu, Jun; McNew, James A; Jin, Meilin; Tao, Yizhi J

    2017-08-08

    Many enveloped viruses encode a matrix protein. In the influenza A virus, the matrix protein M1 polymerizes into a rigid protein layer underneath the viral envelope to help enforce the shape and structural integrity of intact viruses. The influenza virus M1 is also known to mediate virus budding as well as the nuclear export of the viral nucleocapsids and their subsequent packaging into nascent viral particles. Despite extensive studies on the influenza A virus M1 (FLUA-M1), only crystal structures of its N-terminal domain are available. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length M1 from another orthomyxovirus that infects fish, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). The structure of ISAV-M1 assumes the shape of an elbow, with its N domain closely resembling that of the FLUA-M1. The C domain, which is connected to the N domain through a flexible linker, is made of four α-helices packed as a tight bundle. In the crystal, ISAV-M1 monomers form infinite 2D arrays with a network of interactions involving both the N and C domains. Results from liposome flotation assays indicated that ISAV-M1 binds membrane via electrostatic interactions that are primarily mediated by a positively charged surface loop from the N domain. Cryoelectron tomography reconstruction of intact ISA virions identified a matrix protein layer adjacent to the inner leaflet of the viral membrane. The physical dimensions of the virion-associated matrix layer are consistent with the 2D ISAV-M1 crystal lattice, suggesting that the crystal lattice is a valid model for studying M1-M1, M1-membrane, and M1-RNP interactions in the virion.

  6. Determination of selected water-soluble vitamins using hydrophilic chromatography: a comparison of photodiode array, fluorescence, and coulometric detection, and validation in a breakfast cereal matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Swen; Lodge, John K

    2014-06-01

    Water-soluble vitamins are an important class of compounds that require quantification from food sources to monitor nutritional value. In this study we have analysed six water-soluble B vitamins ([thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), nicotinic acid (B3, NAc), nicotinamide (B3, NAm), pyridoxal (B6), folic acid (B9)], and ascorbic acid (vit C) with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), and compared UV, fluorescent (FLD) and coulometric detection to optimise a method to quantitate the vitamins from food sources. Employing UV/diode array (DAD) and fluorimetric detection, six B vitamins were detected in a single run using gradient elution from 100% to 60% solvent B [10mM ammonium acetate, pH 5.0, in acetonitrile and water 95:5 (v:v)] over 18 min. UV detection was performed at 268 nm for B1, 260 nm for both B3 species and 284 nm for B9. FLD was employed for B2 at excitation wavelength of 268 nm, emission of 513 nm, and 284 nm/317 nm for B6. Coulometric detection can be used to detect B6 and B9, and vit C, and was performed isocratically at 75% and 85% of solvent B, respectively. B6 was analysed at a potential of 720 mV, while B9 was analysed at 600 mV, and vit C at 30 mV. Retention times (0.96 to 11.81 min), intra-day repeatability (CV 1.6 to 3.6), inter-day variability (CV 1.8 to 11.1), and linearity (R 0.9877 to 0.9995) remained good under these conditions with limits of detection varying from 6.6 to 164.6 ng mL(-1), limits of quantification between 16.8 and 548.7 ng mL(-1). The method was successfully applied for quantification of six B vitamins from a fortified food product and is, to our knowledge, the first to simultaneously determine multiple water-soluble vitamins extracted from a food matrix using HILIC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Annexin A2 Mediates the Localization of Measles Virus Matrix Protein at the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Ritsuko; Kubota, Marie; Hashiguchi, Takao; Yanagi, Yusuke; Ohno, Shinji

    2018-02-28

    Annexins are a family of structurally related proteins that bind negatively charged membrane phospholipids in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a member of the family, has been implicated in a variety of cellular functions including the organization of membrane domains, vesicular trafficking and cell-cell adhesion. AnxA2 generally forms the heterotetrameric complex with a small Ca 2+ -binding protein S100A10. Measles virus (MV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae , is an enveloped virus with a nonsegmented negative strand RNA genome. Knockdown of AnxA2 greatly reduced MV growth in cells, without affecting its entry and viral RNA production. In MV-infected, AnxA2-knockdown cells, the expression level of the matrix (M) protein, but not other viral proteins, was reduced compared with that in control cells, and the distribution of the M protein at the plasma membrane was decreased. The M protein lines the inner surface of the envelope and plays an important role in virus assembly by connecting the nucleocapsid to the envelope proteins. The M protein bound to AnxA2 independently of AnxA2's phosphorylation or its association with S100A10, and was co-localized with AnxA2 within cells. Truncation of the N-terminal 10 amino acid residues, but not the N-terminal 5 residues, compromised the ability of the M protein to interact with AnxA2 and localize at the plasma membrane. These results indicate that AnxA2 mediates the localization of the MV M protein at the plasma membrane by interacting with its N-terminal region (especially residues at positions 6-10), thereby aiding in MV assembly. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV) is an important human pathogen, still claiming ∼ 100,000 lives per year despite the presence of effective vaccines, and causes occasional outbreaks even in developed countries. Replication of viruses largely relies on the functions of host cells. Our study revealed that the reduction of the host protein annexin A2 compromises the replication of

  8. Alterations in proteins of bone marrow extracellular matrix in undernourished mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Vituri

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of protein malnutrition on the glycoprotein content of bone marrow extracellular matrix (ECM. Two-month-old male Swiss mice were submitted to protein malnutrition with a low-protein diet containing 4% casein as compared to 20% casein in the control diet. When the experimental group had attained a 20% loss of their original body weight, we extracted the ECM proteins from bone marrow with PBS buffer, and analyzed ECM samples by SDS-PAGE (7.5% and ECL Western blotting. Quantitative differences were observed between control and experimental groups. Bone marrow ECM from undernourished mice had greater amounts of extractable fibronectin (1.6-fold increase and laminin (4.8-fold increase when compared to the control group. These results suggest an association between fluctuations in the composition of the hematopoietic microenvironment and altered hematopoiesis observed in undernourished mice.

  9. Detection of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation products in the extracellular matrix of human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Linton, Stuart M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation is believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. Oxidized lipids, sterols and proteins have been detected in early, intermediate and advanced human lesions at elevated levels. The spectrum of oxidized side-chain products detected on proteins from homogenates of advanced human lesions has...... been interpreted in terms of the occurrence of two oxidative mechanisms, one involving oxygen-derived radicals catalysed by trace transition metal ions, and a second involving chlorinating species (HOCl or Cl2), generated by the haem enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). As MPO is released extracellularly...... for 83-96% of the total oxidized protein side-chain products detected in these plaques. Oxidation of matrix components extracted from healthy artery tissue, and model proteins, with reagent HOCl is shown to give rise to a similar pattern of products to those detected in advanced human lesions...

  10. Methods for the visualization and analysis of extracellular matrix protein structure and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Annemarie K; Loughran, Elizabeth A; Klymenko, Yuliya; Liu, Yueying; Kim, Oleg; Asem, Marwa; McAbee, Kevin; Ravosa, Matthew J; Stack, M Sharon

    2018-01-01

    This chapter highlights methods for visualization and analysis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, with particular emphasis on collagen type I, the most abundant protein in mammals. Protocols described range from advanced imaging of complex in vivo matrices to simple biochemical analysis of individual ECM proteins. The first section of this chapter describes common methods to image ECM components and includes protocols for second harmonic generation, scanning electron microscopy, and several histological methods of ECM localization and degradation analysis, including immunohistochemistry, Trichrome staining, and in situ zymography. The second section of this chapter details both a common transwell invasion assay and a novel live imaging method to investigate cellular behavior with respect to collagen and other ECM proteins of interest. The final section consists of common electrophoresis-based biochemical methods that are used in analysis of ECM proteins. Use of the methods described herein will enable researchers to gain a greater understanding of the role of ECM structure and degradation in development and matrix-related diseases such as cancer and connective tissue disorders. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shao-Min; Wu, Guang

    2009-12-01

    The global warming is an important factor affecting the biological evolution, and the influenza is an important disease that threatens humans with possible epidemics or pandemics. In this study, we attempted to analyze the trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus, because this protein is a target of anti-flu drug, and its mutation would have significant effect on the resistance to anti-flu drugs. The evolution of matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus from 1959 to 2008 was defined using the unpredictable portion of amino-acid pair predictability. Then the trend in this evolution was compared with the trend in the global temperature, the temperature in north and south hemispheres, and the temperature in influenza A virus sampling site, and species carrying influenza A virus. The results showed the similar trends in global warming and in evolution of M2 proteins although we could not correlate them at this stage of study. The study suggested the potential impact of global warming on the evolution of proteins from influenza A virus.

  12. Microscale Solubility Measurements of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization (MALDI) Matrices Using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) Coupled with Partial Least Squares (PLS) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorre, Elsa; Owens, Kevin G

    2016-11-01

    In this work an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption based method is used to measure the solubility of two matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) matrices in a few pure solvents and mixtures of acetonitrile and water using low microliter amounts of solution. Results from a method that averages the values obtained from multiple calibration curves created by manual peak picking are compared to those predicted using a partial least squares (PLS) chemometrics approach. The PLS method provided solubility values that were in good agreement with the manual method with significantly greater ease of analysis. As a test, the solubility of adipic acid in acetone was measured using the two methods of analysis, and the values are in good agreement with solubility values reported in literature. The solubilities of the MALDI matrices α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHCA) and sinapinic acid (SA) were measured in a series of mixtures made from acetonitrile (ACN) and water; surprisingly, the results show a highly nonlinear trend. While both CHCA and SA show solubility values of less than 10 mg/mL in the pure solvents, the solubility value for SA increases to 56.3 mg/mL in a 75:25 v/v ACN:water mixture. This can have a significant effect on the matrix-to-analyte ratios in the MALDI experiment when sample protocols call for preparation of a saturated solution of the matrix in the chosen solvent system. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Soluble scute proteins of healthy and ill desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, B.L.; Li, C.; Berry, K.H.; Denslow, N.D.; Jacobson, E.R.; Sawyer, R.H.; Williams, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives - To characterize protein composition of shell scute of desert tortoises and to determine whether detectable differences could be used to identify healthy tortoises from tortoises with certain illnesses. Animals - 20 desert tortoises. Procedures - Complete postmortem examinations were performed on all tortoises. Plastron scute proteins were solubilized, scute proteins were separated by use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and proteins were analyzed, using densitometry. Two-dimensional immobilized pH gradient-PAGE (2D IPG-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis, using polyclonal antisera to chicken-feather ?? keratin and to alligator-scale ?? keratin, were conducted on representative samples. The 14-kd proteins were analyzed for amino acid composition. Results - The SDS-PAGE and densitometry revealed 7 distinct bands, each with a mean relative protein concentration of > 1 %, ranging from 8 to 47 kd, and a major protein component of approximately 14 kd that constituted up to 75% of the scute protein. The 2D IPG-PAGE revealed additional distinct 62-and 68-kd protein bands. On immunoblot analysis, the 14-, 32-, and 45-kd proteins reacted with both antisera. The 14-kd proteins had an amino acid composition similar to that of chicken ?? keratins. There was a substantial difference in the percentage of the major 14-kd proteins from scute of ill tortoises with normal appearing shells, compared with 14-kd proteins of healthy tortoises. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - The major protein components of shell scute of desert tortoises have amino acid composition and antigenic features of ?? keratins. Scute protein composition may be altered in tortoises with certain systemic illnesses.

  14. Characterization of organic matrix extracted from fresh water pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yufei; Gao Yonghua; Feng Qingling

    2011-01-01

    Aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl from cultured Hyriopsis cumingii in Zhuji (Zhejiang province, China) were chosen for the study. The matrix proteins were extracted using water and weak acid, and classified as water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM). The proteins from both pearls were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformation infrared spectra (FTIR). The results showed that, AIM of aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl had an ordered structure of α-helix. ASM conformations of these two pearls were different from each other. WSM differed the most between these two pearls. - Research Highlights: → We use a specific method for extracting matrix proteins from aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl respectively. → The matrix proteins are extracted by water and weak acid, and classified as water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM). → AIM of aragonite pearl and vaterite pearl have an ordered structure. ASM conformations of the two pearls are different from each other. WSM differ the most between these two pearls.

  15. Effect of soluble calcium and lactose on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    The tendency of calcium to promote microfiltration (MF) membrane fouling is well documented, but the role of lactose has not been studied. Milk protein concentrate that is 85% protein on a dry basis (MPC85) contains less calcium and lactose than skim milk. Our objectives were to determine the effects of skim milk soluble calcium and lactose concentrations on the limiting fluxes (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal factors of 0.1-µm ceramic graded permeability membranes. The MF was fed with 3 different milks: skim milk, liquid MPC85 that had been standardized to the protein content of skim milk with reverse osmosis water (MPC), and liquid MPC85 that had been standardized to the protein and lactose contents of skim milk with reverse osmosis water and lactose monohydrate (MPC+L). Retentate and permeate were continuously recycled to the feed tank. The LF for each feed was determined by increasing flux once per hour from 55 kg·m(-2)·h(-1) until flux did not increase with increasing transmembrane pressure. Temperature, pressure drop across the membrane length, and protein concentration in the retentate recirculation loop were maintained at 50°C, 220 kPa, and 8.77 ± 0.2%, respectively. Experiments were replicated 3 times and the Proc GLM procedure of SAS was used for statistical analysis. An increase in LF between skim milk (91 kg·m(-2)·h(-1)) and MPC+L (124 kg·m(-2)·h(-1)) was associated with a reduction in soluble calcium. The LF of MPC+L was lower than the LF of MPC (137 kg·m(-2)·h(-1)) due to the higher viscosity contributed by lactose. Permeates produced from the MPC and MPC+L contained more protein than the skim milk permeate due to the transfer of caseins from the micelles into the reduced-calcium sera of the MPC and MPC+L. A SP removal factor was calculated by dividing true protein in the permeate by SP in the permeate portion of the feed to describe the ease of SP passage through the membrane. No differences in SP removal factors were detected among the

  16. Superoxide activates mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 from the matrix side. Studies using targeted antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtay, Karim S; Murphy, Michael P; Smith, Robin A J; Talbot, Darren A; Brand, Martin D

    2002-12-06

    Superoxide activates nucleotide-sensitive mitochondrial proton transport through the uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2, and UCP3 (Echtay, K. S., et al. (2002) Nature 415, 1482-1486). Two possible mechanisms were proposed: direct activation of the UCP proton transport mechanism by superoxide or its products and a cycle of hydroperoxyl radical entry coupled to UCP-catalyzed superoxide anion export. Here we provide evidence for the first mechanism and show that superoxide activates UCP2 in rat kidney mitochondria from the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane: (i) Exogenous superoxide inhibited matrix aconitase, showing that external superoxide entered the matrix. (ii) Superoxide-induced uncoupling was abolished by low concentrations of the mitochondrially targeted antioxidants 10-(6'-ubiquinonyl)decyltriphenylphosphonium (mitoQ) or 2-[2-(triphenylphosphonio)ethyl]-3,4-dihydro-2,5,7,8-tetramethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-6-ol bromide (mitoVit E), which are ubiquinone (Q) or tocopherol derivatives targeted to the matrix by covalent attachment to triphenylphosphonium cation. However, superoxide-induced uncoupling was not affected by similar concentrations of the nontargeted antioxidants Q(o), Q(1), decylubiquinone, vitamin E, or 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman 2-carboxylic acid (TROLOX) or of the mitochondrially targeted but redox-inactive analogs decyltriphenylphosphonium or 4-chlorobutyltriphenylphosphonium. Thus matrix superoxide appears to be necessary for activation of UCP2 by exogenous superoxide. (iii) When the reduced to oxidized ratio of mitoQ accumulated by mitochondria was increased by inhibiting cytochrome oxidase, it induced nucleotide-sensitive uncoupling that was not inhibited by external superoxide dismutase. Under these conditions quinols are known to produce superoxide, and because mitoQ is localized within the mitochondrial matrix this suggests that production of superoxide in the matrix was sufficient to activate UCP2. Furthermore, the superoxide

  17. Lipid-protein nanodiscs for cell-free production of integral membrane proteins in a soluble and folded state: comparison with detergent micelles, bicelles and liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shenkarev, Z O; Khabibullina, N F; Kopeina, G S; Shulepko, M A; Paramonov, A S; Mineev, K S; Tikhonov, R V; Shingarova, L N; Petrovskaya, L E; Dolgikh, D A; Arseniev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-03-01

    Production of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in a folded state is a key prerequisite for their functional and structural studies. In cell-free (CF) expression systems membrane mimicking components could be added to the reaction mixture that promotes IMP production in a soluble form. Here lipid-protein nanodiscs (LPNs) of different lipid compositions (DMPC, DMPG, POPC, POPC/DOPG) have been compared with classical membrane mimicking media such as detergent micelles, lipid/detergent bicelles and liposomes by their ability to support CF synthesis of IMPs in a folded and soluble state. Three model membrane proteins of different topology were used: homodimeric transmembrane (TM) domain of human receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB3 (TM-ErbB3, 1TM); voltage-sensing domain of K(+) channel KvAP (VSD, 4TM); and bacteriorhodopsin from Exiguobacterium sibiricum (ESR, 7TM). Structural and/or functional properties of the synthesized proteins were analyzed. LPNs significantly enhanced synthesis of the IMPs in a soluble form regardless of the lipid composition. A partial disintegration of LPNs composed of unsaturated lipids was observed upon co-translational IMP incorporation. Contrary to detergents the nanodiscs resulted in the synthesis of ~80% active ESR and promoted correct folding of the TM-ErbB3. None of the tested membrane mimetics supported CF synthesis of correctly folded VSD, and the protocol of the domain refolding was developed. The use of LPNs appears to be the most promising approach to CF production of IMPs in a folded state. NMR analysis of (15)N-Ile-TM-ErbB3 co-translationally incorporated into LPNs shows the great prospects of this membrane mimetics for structural studies of IMPs produced by CF systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-12-29

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins.

  19. Matrix proteins of Nipah and Hendra viruses interact with beta subunits of AP-3 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weina; McCrory, Thomas S; Khaw, Wei Young; Petzing, Stephanie; Myers, Terrell; Schmitt, Anthony P

    2014-11-01

    Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for the M proteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hinge-derived polypeptide was sufficient for M protein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding and M protein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus, M protein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections. Henipaviruses cause deadly infections in humans, with a mortality rate of about 40%. Hendra virus outbreaks in Australia, all involving horses and some involving transmission to humans, have been a continuing problem. Nipah virus caused a large outbreak in Malaysia in 1998, killing 109 people

  20. Complement activating soluble pattern recognition molecules with collagen-like regions, mannan-binding lectin, ficolins and associated proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), L-ficolin, M-ficolin and H-ficolin are all complement activating soluble pattern recognition molecules with recognition domains linked to collagen-like regions. All four may form complexes with four structurally related proteins, the three MBL-associated serine...... proteases (MASPs), MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and a smaller MBL-associated protein (MAp19). The four recognition molecules recognize patterns of carbohydrate or acetyl-group containing ligands. After binding to the relevant targets all four are able to activate the complement system. We thus have a system...... where four different and/or overlapping patterns of microbial origin or patterns of altered-self may be recognized, but in all cases the signalling molecules, the MASPs, are shared. MASP-1 and MASP-3 are formed from one gene, MASP1/3, by alternative splicing generating two different mRNAs from a single...

  1. Palatability of water-soluble extracts of protein sources and replacement of fishmeal by a selected mixture of protein sources for juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Poor palatability is a limiting factor for replacing fishmeal with other protein sources in aquaculture. The water-soluble molecules with low molecular weights are the major determinants of the palatability of diets. The present study was conducted to investigate the palatability of water-soluble extracts from single protein source (single extract pellets) and the mixture of these extracts with different proportions (blended extract pellets) in juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus). Then according to the palatability of blended extract pellets, an optimal mixture proportion was selected, and a new protein source made from raw protein materials with the selected proportion was formulated to replace fishmeal. Summarily, the palatability of single extract pellets for turbot was descendent from fishmeal to pet-food grade poultry by-product meal, wheat gluten meal, soybean meal, peanut meal, meat and bone meal, and corn gluten meal. Subsequently, according to the palatability of single extract pellets, 52 kinds of blended extract pellets were designed to test their palatability. The results showed that the pellets presented remarkably different palatability, and the optimal one was diet 52 (wheat gluten meal: pet-food grade poultry by-product meal: meat and bone meal: corn gluten meal = 1:6:1:2). The highest ingestion ratio (the number of pellets ingested/the number of pellets fed) was 0.73 ± 0.03, which was observed in Diet 52. Then five isonitrogenous (52% crude protein) and isocaloric (20 kJ g-1 gross energy) diets were formulated by replacing 0 (control), 35%, 50%, 65% and 80% of fishmeal with No.52 blending proportion. After a 10-weeks feeding trial, a consistent feed intake was found among all replacement treatments. Replacement level of fishmeal up to 35% did not significantly influence final body weight, specific growth rate, feed efficiency ratio, and protein efficiency ratio of turbot. Therefore, the water-soluble extracts of protein sources play an

  2. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  3. An overview on molecular chaperones enhancing solubility of expressed recombinant proteins with correct folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamipour, Mina; Yousefi, Mohammadreza; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The majority of research topics declared that most of the recombinant proteins have been expressed by Escherichia coli in basic investigations. But the majority of high expressed proteins formed as inactive recombinant proteins that are called inclusion body. To overcome this problem, several methods have been used including suitable promoter, environmental factors, ladder tag to secretion of proteins into the periplasm, gene protein optimization, chemical chaperones and molecular chaperones sets. Co-expression of the interest protein with molecular chaperones is one of the common methods The chaperones are a group of proteins, which are involved in making correct folding of recombinant proteins. Chaperones are divided two groups including; cytoplasmic and periplasmic chaperones. Moreover, periplasmic chaperones and proteases can be manipulated to increase the yields of secreted proteins. In this article, we attempted to review cytoplasmic chaperones such as Hsp families and periplasmic chaperones including; generic chaperones, specialized chaperones, PPIases, and proteins involved in disulfide bond formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biophysical characterization and crystal structure of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus p15 matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrière, Jennifer; Robert, Xavier; Perez, Magali; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2013-06-24

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a viral pathogen that infects domestic cats and wild felids. During the viral replication cycle, the FIV p15 matrix protein oligomerizes to form a closed matrix that underlies the lipidic envelope of the virion. Because of its crucial role in the early and late stages of viral morphogenesis, especially in viral assembly, FIV p15 is an interesting target in the development of potential new therapeutic strategies. Our biochemical study of FIV p15 revealed that it forms a stable dimer in solution under acidic conditions and at high concentration, unlike other retroviral matrix proteins. We determined the crystal structure of full-length FIV p15 to 2 Å resolution and observed a helical organization of the protein, typical for retroviral matrix proteins. A hydrophobic pocket that could accommodate a myristoyl group was identified, and the C-terminal end of FIV p15, which is mainly unstructured, was visible in electron density maps. As FIV p15 crystallizes in acidic conditions but with one monomer in the asymmetric unit, we searched for the presence of a biological dimer in the crystal. No biological assembly was detected by the PISA server, but the three most buried crystallographic interfaces have interesting features: the first one displays a highly conserved tryptophan acting as a binding platform, the second one is located along a 2-fold symmetry axis and the third one resembles the dimeric interface of EIAV p15. Because the C-terminal end of p15 is involved in two of these three interfaces, we investigated the structure and assembly of a C-terminal-truncated form of p15 lacking 14 residues. The truncated FIV p15 dimerizes in solution at a lower concentration and crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The EIAV-like dimeric interface is the only one to be retained in the new crystal form. The dimeric form of FIV p15 in solution and its extended C-terminal end are characteristic among lentiviral matrix proteins

  5. Effect of urdbean leaf crinkle virus infection on total soluble protein and antioxidant enzymes in blackgram plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashfaq, M.; Mughal, S.M.; Khan, A.; Javed, N.; Sahi, S.T.; Shahid, M.

    2010-01-01

    Urdbean leaf crinkle virus (ULCV) is a common, wide spread, destructive and economically important disease causing systemic infection in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), resulting in extreme crinkling, curling, puckering and rugosity of leaves, and yield reductions. Effect of viral infection was investigated on total soluble proteins and antioxidant enzymes activity in two genotypes viz., Mash-88-susceptible and CM-2002-resistant, at different growth stages under both the inoculated and un-inoculated conditions. ULCV infection resulted in significant increase in total soluble protein contents of the leaves in both genotypes. In healthy plant, super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (PO) showed similar activity levels. In inoculated plants of Mash-88, SOD and PO activities decreased and increased non-significantly at all growth stages, respectively. The activities of PO and SOD increased and decreased significantly after 15 and 30 days of inoculation in resistant genotype, respectively. No significant changes in catalase (CAT) activity were detected in ULCV-infected leaves over the control. It was concluded that the super oxide dismutase and peroxidases might be associated with resistance/susceptibility to ULCV infection. (author)

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble protein and augmentation of lectin induced mitogenesis by DMSO in human T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedner, H.J.; Bass, G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that induction of mitogenesis in human T lymphocytes is associated with the tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble substrate-TPP 66. Since DMSO has been shown to be a non-specific stimulator of tyrosine protein kinases they have examined the effect of DMSO on both activation and tyrosine phosphorylation in human T cells. Human peripheral blood T lymphocytes were isolated by dextran sedimentation, Ficol/Paque centrifugation and nylon wool filtration. Phosphorylation was performed in cells incubated with [ 32 P] orthophosphate followed by DMSO for 30 min. TPP 66 was identified by 2-D PAGE, autoradiography, and HV electrophoresis of the hydrolyzed protein. Concentrations of DMSO from 1% to 50% induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 with maximal stimulation seen at 20%. DMSO alone did not activate the T cells (measured by [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation) when tested at high concentrations for 30 sec to 10 min. (longer incubations were markedly toxic) or low concentrations for 12 to 48 hrs. Low concentrations of DMSO 0.1%-0.5% did however, markedly augment [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation induced by PHA or Con A. These data suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 alone may not constitute sufficient signal for the activation sequence to begin but the phosphorylation of this soluble substrate may be a critical factor in the propagation of the activation sequence

  7. Prediction of residue-residue contact matrix for protein-protein interaction with Fisher score features and deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H; Sun, Bilin

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play essential roles in many biological processes. Acquiring knowledge of the residue-residue contact information of two interacting proteins is not only helpful in annotating functions for proteins, but also critical for structure-based drug design. The prediction of the protein residue-residue contact matrix of the interfacial regions is challenging. In this work, we introduced deep learning techniques (specifically, stacked autoencoders) to build deep neural network models to tackled the residue-residue contact prediction problem. In tandem with interaction profile Hidden Markov Models, which was used first to extract Fisher score features from protein sequences, stacked autoencoders were deployed to extract and learn hidden abstract features. The deep learning model showed significant improvement over the traditional machine learning model, Support Vector Machines (SVM), with the overall accuracy increased by 15% from 65.40% to 80.82%. We showed that the stacked autoencoders could extract novel features, which can be utilized by deep neural networks and other classifiers to enhance learning, out of the Fisher score features. It is further shown that deep neural networks have significant advantages over SVM in making use of the newly extracted features. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Jun; Nakayama, Hidekazu; Horiike, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Garcia, Andres J

    2011-01-01

    The development of methods for the off-on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three disulfide compounds containing (i) a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), (ii) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and (iii) hepta(ethylene glycol) (EG 7 ). Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag) sequences in its Ni 2+ -ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG 7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII 7-10 ) to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin-a major serum protein-was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII 7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  9. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Jun; Nakayama, Hidekazu; Horiike, Yasuhiro [World Premier International (WPI) Research Center Initiative, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science - NIMS (Japan); Yamaguchi, Kazuo [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Research Institute for Photofunctionalized Materials, Kanagawa University (Japan); Garcia, Andres J, E-mail: NAKANISHI.Jun@nims.go.jp [Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The development of methods for the off-on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three disulfide compounds containing (i) a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), (ii) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and (iii) hepta(ethylene glycol) (EG{sub 7}). Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag) sequences in its Ni{sup 2+}-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG{sub 7} underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII{sub 7-10}) to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin-a major serum protein-was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII{sub 7-10} was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  10. THE EFFECT OF SOME RHIZOBACTERIAN STRAINS ON SOLUBLE PROTEINS CONTENT IN SOYBEANS (GLYCINE MAX L. MERR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stefan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Now it is an accepted fact that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR can increase the productivity of several crops. The main objective of the present study was to find if there are any differences in protein content in the seeds of soybean (Glycine max L. MERR.. Using spectrophotometric methods for analyzing the protein contents and electrophoretic methods for qualitative analysis it was observed that no major modifications occur in protein spectrum. Looking at the quantitative side there was a small improvement in protein quantity.

  11. Crosslinking of a Peritrophic Matrix Protein Protects Gut Epithelia from Bacterial Exotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Toshio; Maki, Kouki; Hadano, Jinki; Fujikawa, Takumi; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyzes protein-protein crosslinking, which has important and diverse roles in vertebrates and invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila TG crosslinks drosocrystallin, a peritrophic matrix protein, to form a stable fiber structure on the gut peritrophic matrix. RNA interference (RNAi) of the TG gene was highly lethal in flies and induced apoptosis of gut epithelial cells after oral infection with Pseudomonas entomophila. Moreover, AprA, a metalloprotease secreted by P. entomophila, digested non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, but not drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG. In vitro experiments using recombinant drosocrystallin and monalysin proteins demonstrated that monalysin, a pore-forming exotoxin of P. entomophila, was adsorbed on the crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers in the presence of P. entomophila culture supernatant. In addition, gut-specific TG-RNAi flies had a shorter lifespan than control flies after ingesting P. entomophila, whereas the lifespan after ingesting AprA-knockout P. entomophila was at control levels. We conclude that drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG, but not non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, form an important physical barrier against exotoxins of invading pathogenic microbes. PMID:26506243

  12. Crosslinking of a Peritrophic Matrix Protein Protects Gut Epithelia from Bacterial Exotoxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Shibata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminase (TG catalyzes protein-protein crosslinking, which has important and diverse roles in vertebrates and invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila TG crosslinks drosocrystallin, a peritrophic matrix protein, to form a stable fiber structure on the gut peritrophic matrix. RNA interference (RNAi of the TG gene was highly lethal in flies and induced apoptosis of gut epithelial cells after oral infection with Pseudomonas entomophila. Moreover, AprA, a metalloprotease secreted by P. entomophila, digested non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, but not drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG. In vitro experiments using recombinant drosocrystallin and monalysin proteins demonstrated that monalysin, a pore-forming exotoxin of P. entomophila, was adsorbed on the crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers in the presence of P. entomophila culture supernatant. In addition, gut-specific TG-RNAi flies had a shorter lifespan than control flies after ingesting P. entomophila, whereas the lifespan after ingesting AprA-knockout P. entomophila was at control levels. We conclude that drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG, but not non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, form an important physical barrier against exotoxins of invading pathogenic microbes.

  13. Enhance and Maintain Chondrogenesis of Synovial Fibroblasts by Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Protein Matrilins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ming; Luo, Junming; Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN) 1 and 3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Methods Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time RT-PCR, while the protein levels of Col II and matrilins were determined by western blot analysis. Results SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with TGF-β1 for three days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a MATN1 or 3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of glycosaminoglycans, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Conclusion Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and 3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-β. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:18282772

  14. Enhancing and maintaining chondrogenesis of synovial fibroblasts by cartilage extracellular matrix protein matrilins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, M; Luo, J; Chen, Q

    2008-09-01

    Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN)1 and MATN3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans (GAG) with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while the protein levels of Col II and MATNs were determined by western blot analysis. SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) for 3 days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a Matn1 or Matn3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of GAG, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and MATN3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-beta. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation.

  15. Hyriopsis cumingii Hic52-A novel nacreous layer matrix protein with a collagen-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Pu, Jingwen; Zeng, Shimei; Jin, Can; Dong, Shaojian; Li, Jiale

    2017-09-01

    Nacre is a product of a precisely regulated biomineralization process and a major contributor to the luster of pearls. Nacre is composed of calcium carbonate and an organic matrix of proteins that is secreted from mollusc mantle tissue and is exclusively associated with shell formation. In this study, hic52, a novel matrix protein gene from mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii, was cloned and functionally analyzed. The full-length cDNA of hic52 encoded 542 amino acids and contained a signal peptide of 18 amino acids. Excluding the signal peptide, the theoretical molecular mass of the polypeptide was 52.2kDa. The predicted isoelectric point was 10.37, indicating a basic shell protein. The amino acid sequence of hic52 featured high proportion of Gly (28.8%) and Gln (12.4%) residues. The predicted tertiary structure was characterized as having similarities to collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2 in the structure. The polypeptide sequence shared no homology with collagen. The hic52 expression pattern by quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization exhibits at the dorsal epithelial cells of the mantle. Expression increased during the stages of pearl sac development. The data showed that hic52 is probably a framework shell protein that mediates and controls the nacreous biomineralization process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein-transitions in and out of the dough matrix in wheat flour mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Appels, Rudi; Zhang, Xiaoke; Bekes, Ferenc; Torok, Kitti; Tomoskozi, Sandor; Diepeveen, Dean; Ma, Wujun; Islam, Shahidul

    2017-02-15

    Sequential protein behavior in the wheat dough matrix under continuous mixing and heating treatment has been studied using Mixolab-dough samples from two Australian wheat cultivars, Westonia and Wyalkatchem. Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) analysis indicated that 32min (80°C) was a critical time point in forming large protein complexes and loosing extractability of several protein groups like y-type high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs), gamma-gliadins, beta-amylases, serpins, and metabolic proteins with higher mass. Up to 32min (80°C) Westonia showed higher protein extractability compared to Wyalkatchem although it was in the opposite direction thereafter. Twenty differentially expressed proteins could be assigned to chromosomes 1D, 3A, 4A, 4B, 4D, 6A, 6B, 7A and 7B. The results expanded the range of proteins associated with changes in the gluten-complex during processing and provided targets for selecting new genetic variants associated with altered quality attributes of the flour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular characterization of whey protein hydrolysate fractions with ferrous chelating and enhanced iron solubility capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Ian B; Kelly, Phil M; Murray, Brian A; FitzGerald, Richard J; Brodkorb, Andre

    2015-03-18

    The ferrous (Fe2+) chelating capabilities of WPI hydrolysate fractions produced via cascade membrane filtration were investigated, specifically 1 kDa permeate (P) and 30 kDa retentate (R) fractions. The 1 kDa-P possessed a Fe2+ chelating capability at 1 g L(-1) equivalent to 84.4 μM EDTA (for 30 kDa-R the value was 8.7 μM EDTA). Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the structural characteristics of hydrolysates and molecular interactions with Fe2+. Solid-phase extraction was employed to enrich for chelating activity; the most potent chelating fraction was enriched in histidine and lysine. The solubility of ferrous sulfate solutions (10 mM) over a range of pH values was significantly (Piron solubility was improved by 72% in the presence of the 1 kDa-P fraction following simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID) compared to control FeSO4·7H2O solutions.

  18. Vitamin K Intake and Plasma Desphospho-Uncarboxylated Matrix Gla-Protein Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, P.Y.; Berg, van den E.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Laverman, G.D.; Schurgers, L.J.; Vermeer, C.; Kema, I.P.; Muskiet, F.A.J.; Navis, G.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Borst, de M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin K is essential for activation of ¿-carboxyglutamate (Gla)-proteins including the vascular calcification inhibitor matrix Gla-protein (MGP). Insufficient vitamin K intake leads to production of uncarboxylated, mostly inactive proteins and contributes to an increased cardiovascular risk. In

  19. A comprehensive review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive and up-to-date review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes is reported. Recent applications of the method for in situ serial crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons are described. The lipid cubic phase or in meso method is a robust approach for crystallizing membrane proteins for structure determination. The uptake of the method is such that it is experiencing what can only be described as explosive growth. This timely, comprehensive and up-to-date review introduces the reader to the practice of in meso crystallogenesis, to the associated challenges and to their solutions. A model of how crystallization comes about mechanistically is presented for a more rational approach to crystallization. The possible involvement of the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases in crystallogenesis and the application of the method to water-soluble, monotopic and lipid-anchored proteins are addressed. How to set up trials manually and automatically with a robot is introduced with reference to open-access online videos that provide a practical guide to all aspects of the method. These range from protein reconstitution to crystal harvesting from the hosting mesophase, which is noted for its viscosity and stickiness. The sponge phase, as an alternative medium in which to perform crystallization, is described. The compatibility of the method with additive lipids, detergents, precipitant-screen components and materials carried along with the protein such as denaturants and reducing agents is considered. The powerful host and additive lipid-screening strategies are described along with how samples that have low protein concentration and cell-free expressed protein can be used. Assaying the protein reconstituted in the bilayer of the cubic phase for function is an important element of quality control and is detailed. Host lipid design for crystallization at low temperatures and for

  20. A comprehensive review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: martin.caffrey@tcd.ie [Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive and up-to-date review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes is reported. Recent applications of the method for in situ serial crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons are described. The lipid cubic phase or in meso method is a robust approach for crystallizing membrane proteins for structure determination. The uptake of the method is such that it is experiencing what can only be described as explosive growth. This timely, comprehensive and up-to-date review introduces the reader to the practice of in meso crystallogenesis, to the associated challenges and to their solutions. A model of how crystallization comes about mechanistically is presented for a more rational approach to crystallization. The possible involvement of the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases in crystallogenesis and the application of the method to water-soluble, monotopic and lipid-anchored proteins are addressed. How to set up trials manually and automatically with a robot is introduced with reference to open-access online videos that provide a practical guide to all aspects of the method. These range from protein reconstitution to crystal harvesting from the hosting mesophase, which is noted for its viscosity and stickiness. The sponge phase, as an alternative medium in which to perform crystallization, is described. The compatibility of the method with additive lipids, detergents, precipitant-screen components and materials carried along with the protein such as denaturants and reducing agents is considered. The powerful host and additive lipid-screening strategies are described along with how samples that have low protein concentration and cell-free expressed protein can be used. Assaying the protein reconstituted in the bilayer of the cubic phase for function is an important element of quality control and is detailed. Host lipid design for crystallization at low temperatures and for

  1. Utilization of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements for high-resolution NMR structure determination of a soluble loop-rich protein with sparse NOE distance restraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuita, Kyoko; Kataoka, Saori; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR structure determination of soluble proteins depends in large part on distance restraints derived from NOE. In this study, we examined the impact of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-derived distance restraints on protein structure determination. A high-resolution structure of the loop-rich soluble protein Sin1 could not be determined by conventional NOE-based procedures due to an insufficient number of NOE restraints. By using the 867 PRE-derived distance restraints obtained from the NOE-based structure determination procedure, a high-resolution structure of Sin1 could be successfully determined. The convergence and accuracy of the determined structure were improved by increasing the number of PRE-derived distance restraints. This study demonstrates that PRE-derived distance restraints are useful in the determination of a high-resolution structure of a soluble protein when the number of NOE constraints is insufficient

  2. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  3. Decreased UV light resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair and small, acid-soluble spore proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, B.; Setlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    Loss of small, acid-soluble spore protein alpha reduced spore UV resistance 30- to 50-fold in Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair, but gave only a 5- to 8-fold reduction in UV resistance in repair-proficient strains. However, both repair-proficient and -deficient spores lacking this protein had identical heat and gamma-radiation resistance

  4. Evaluation of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measurements of soluble HLA-G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, M; Dahl, M; Buus, S; Djurisic, S; Ohlsson, J; Hviid, T V F

    2014-08-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecule, HLA-G, has gained increased attention because of its assumed important role in immune regulation. The HLA-G protein exists in several soluble isoforms. Most important are the actively secreted HLA-G5 full-length isoform generated by alternative splicing retaining intron 4 with a premature stop codon, and the cleavage of full-length membrane-bound HLA-G1 from the cell surface, so-called soluble HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1). A specific and sensitive immunoassay for measurements of soluble HLA-G is mandatory for conceivable routine testing and research projects. We report a novel method, a competitive immunoassay, for measuring HLA-G5/sHLA-G1 in biological fluids. The sHLA-G immunoassay is based upon a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) principle. It includes a recombinant sHLA-G1 protein in complex with β2-microglobulin and a peptide as a standard, biotinylated recombinant sHLA-G1 as an indicator, and the MEM-G/9 anti-HLA-G monoclonal antibody (mAb) as the capture antibody. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay were evaluated. Testing with different recombinant HLA class I proteins and different anti-HLA class I mAbs showed that the sHLA-G immunoassay was highly specific. Optimal combinations of competitor sHLA-G1 and capture mAb concentrations were determined. Two versions of the assay were tested. One with a relatively wide dynamic range from 3.1 to 100.0 ng/ml, and another more sensitive version ranging from 1.6 to 12.5 ng/ml. An intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) of 15.5% at 88 ng/ml and an inter-assay CV of 23.1% at 39 ng/ml were determined. An assay based on the competitive sHLA-G ELISA may be important for measurements of sHLA-G proteins in several conditions: assisted reproduction, organ transplantation, cancer, and certain pregnancy complications, both in research studies and possibly in the future also for clinical routine use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  5. Soluble expression of recomb inant cMyc, Klf4, Oct4, and Sox2 proteins in bacteria and transduction into living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Dan Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To develop a new method to produce recombinant reprogramming proteins, cMyc, Klf4, Oct4, and Sox2, in soluble format with low cost for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. METHODS: A short polypeptide sequence derived from the HIV trans-activator of transcription protein (TAT and the nucleus localization signal (NLS polypeptide were fused to the N terminus of the reprogramming proteins and they were constructed into pCold-SUMO vector which can extremely improve the solubility of recombinant proteins. Then these vector plasmids were transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3 Chaperone competent cells for amplification. The solubility of these recombinant proteins was determined by SDS-PAGE and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. The recombinant proteins were purified by Ni-NTA resin and identified by Western blot. The transduction of these proteins into HEK 293T cells were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. RESULTS: These four reprogramming proteins could be produced in soluble format in pCold-SUMO expression vector system with the assistance of chaperone proteins in bacteria. The proteins were purified successfully with a purity of over 70% with a relative high transduction rate into 293 cells. CONCLUSION: The results in the present study indicate the four important reprogramming proteins, cMyc, Klf4, Oct4, and Sox2, can be produced in soluble format in bacteria with low cost. Our new method thus might be expected to greatly contribute to the future study of iPSCs.

  6. Unconventional transport routes of soluble and membrane proteins and their role in developmental biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pompa, A.; De Marchis, F.; Pallotta, M. T.; Benitez-Alfonso, Y.; Jones, A.; Schipper, K.; Moreau, K.; Žárský, Viktor; Di Sansebastiano, G. P.; Bellucci, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 703. E-ISSN 1422-0067 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Autophagy * Exosomes * Intercellular channels * Leaderless proteins * Protein secretion * Trafficking mechanisms * Unconventional secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology OBOR OECD: Developmental biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  7. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed.We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other.Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  8. A robust and rapid method of producing soluble, stable, and functional G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, are notoriously difficult to express. Using commercial E. coli cell-free systems with the detergent Brij-35, we could rapidly produce milligram quantities of 13 unique GPCRs. Immunoaffinity purification yielded receptors at >90% purity. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism indicated that the purified receptors were properly folded. Microscale thermophoresis, a novel label-free and surface-free detection technique that uses thermal gradients, showed that these receptors bound their ligands. The secondary structure and ligand-binding results from cell-free produced proteins were comparable to those expressed and purified from HEK293 cells. Our study demonstrates that cell-free protein production using commercially available kits and optimal detergents is a robust technology that can be used to produce sufficient GPCRs for biochemical, structural, and functional analyses. This robust and simple method may further stimulate others to study the structure and function of membrane proteins.

  9. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Structural Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in the modulation of cancer cell invasion. In urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC the role of ECM proteins has been widely studied. The mechanisms, which are involved in the development of invasion, progression and generalization, are complex, depending on the interaction of ECM proteins with each other as well as with cancer cells. The following review will focus on the pathogenetic role and prognostic value of structural proteins, such as laminins, collagens, fi bronectin (FN, tenascin (Tn-C and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 in UC. In addition, the role of integrins mediating the interaction of ECM molecules and cancer cells will be addressed, since integrin-mediated FN, Tn-C and TSP1 interactions seem to play an important role during tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis.

  11. Typing of Typhoidal Salmonella Using Extraction of Water Soluble Whole Cell Proteins and Analysing by SDS-PAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yousefi Mashouf

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective : Salmonella is one of the most important genus of Enterobacteriacea family. The aim of this study was typing of typhoidal Salmonella by SDS-PAGE and comparing the results with those of serotyping method.Materials and Methods: In this study, 4 reference strains of Salmonella species, 5 reference strains of Enterobacteriacea family and 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella that were previously collected from laboratories of Hamadan medical centers were studied. Serotyping of strains were performed by Biomereux and Difco monovalent antisera. Whole-cell proteins of strains were also separated on 10% poly acrylamide gel. Gels were stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue and analyzed by densitometry. Results: Of 100 cases of Salmonella species, 43 cases (43% were S. typhi, 20 cases (20% were S. typhymurium, 12 cases (12% were S. para typhi B, 10 cases (10% were S. para typhi C, S. para typhi A 1 case (1% and other cases were non-typhoidal Salmonella. The results of serotyping were compared with the results obtained by SDS-PAGE. Many protein bands from 220 KDa to 18.5 KDa were detected by SDS-PAGE and they were used to differentiate the strains. S. typhi serotypes were divided into 5 sub-species and S. para typhi B and C were divided each into 3 sub-species. Protein profiles of the reference strains of Salmonella were compared with protein profiles of Enterobacteriaceae species and showed some differences in major protein bands, however, they had a very similar protein band in 43 KDa area. Conclusion: Since our data was able to divide Salmonella species to sub-types and differentiate them from Enterobacteriacea species, we concluded that analsying SDS-PAGE profile of water soluble whole-cell proteins can be used for typing of these organisms and it is comparble with serotyping, nevertheless, further researches are needed to establish SDS-PAGE method and to replace it with serotyping method.

  12. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  13. Intergenotypic replacement of lyssavirus matrix proteins demonstrates the role of lyssavirus M proteins in intracellular virus accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Stefan; Granzow, Harald; Hurst, Jose; Pollin, Reiko; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2010-02-01

    Lyssavirus assembly depends on the matrix protein (M). We compared lyssavirus M proteins from different genotypes for their ability to support assembly and egress of genotype 1 rabies virus (RABV). Transcomplementation of M-deficient RABV with M from European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) types 1 and 2 reduced the release of infectious virus. Stable introduction of the heterogenotypic M proteins into RABV led to chimeric viruses with reduced virus release and intracellular accumulation of virus genomes. Although the chimeras indicated genotype-specific evolution of M, rapid selection of a compensatory mutant suggested conserved mechanisms of lyssavirus assembly and the requirement for only few adaptive mutations to fit the heterogenotypic M to a RABV backbone. Whereas the compensatory mutant replicated to similar infectious titers as RABV M-expressing virus, ultrastructural analysis revealed that both nonadapted EBLV M chimeras and the compensatory mutant differed from RABV M expressing viruses in the lack of intracellular viruslike structures that are enveloped and accumulate in cisterna of the degranulated and dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum compartment. Moreover, all viruses were able to bud at the plasma membrane. Since the lack of the intracellular viruslike structures correlated with the type of M protein but not with the efficiency of virus release, we hypothesize that the M proteins of EBLV-1 and RABV differ in their target membranes for virus assembly. Although the biological function of intracellular assembly and accumulation of viruslike structures in the endoplasmic reticulum remain unclear, the observed differences could contribute to diverse host tropism or pathogenicity.

  14. High-level expression and purification of soluble recombinant FGF21 protein by SUMO fusion in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yadong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a promising drug candidate to combat metabolic diseases. However, high-level expression and purification of recombinant FGF21 (rFGF21 in Escherichia coli (E. coli is difficult because rFGF21 forms inclusion bodies in the bacteria making it difficult to purify and obtain high concentrations of bioactive rFGF21. To overcome this problem, we fused the FGF21 with SUMO (Small ubiquitin-related modifier by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and expressed the fused gene in E. coli BL21(DE3. Results By inducing with IPTG, SUMO-FGF21 was expressed at a high level. Its concentration reached 30% of total protein, and exceeded 95% of all soluble proteins. The fused protein was purified by DEAE sepharose FF and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Once cleaved by the SUMO protease, the purity of rFGF21 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was shown to be higher than 96% with low endotoxin level (in vivo animal experiments showed that rFGF21 produced by using this method, could decrease the concentration of plasma glucose in diabetic rats by streptozotocin (STZ injection. Conclusions This study demonstrated that SUMO, when fused with FGF21, was able to promote its soluble expression of the latter in E. coli, making it more convenient to purify rFGF21 than previously. This may be a better method to produce rFGF21 for pharmaceutical research and development.

  15. Sub-nanoscale surface ruggedness provides a water-tight seal for exposed regions in soluble protein structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Schulz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Soluble proteins must maintain backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs water-tight to ensure structural integrity. This protection is often achieved by burying the BHBs or wrapping them through intermolecular associations. On the other hand, water has low coordination resilience, with loss of hydrogen-bonding partnerships carrying significant thermodynamic cost. Thus, a core problem in structural biology is whether natural design actually exploits the water coordination stiffness to seal the backbone in regions that are exposed to the solvent. This work explores the molecular design features that make this type of seal operative, focusing on the side-chain arrangements that shield the protein backbone. We show that an efficient sealing is achieved by adapting the sub-nanoscale surface topography to the stringency of water coordination: an exposed BHB may be kept dry if the local concave curvature is small enough to impede formation of the coordination shell of a penetrating water molecule. Examination of an exhaustive database of uncomplexed proteins reveals that exposed BHBs invariably occur within such sub-nanoscale cavities in native folds, while this level of local ruggedness is absent in other regions. By contrast, BHB exposure in misfolded proteins occurs with larger local curvature promoting backbone hydration and consequently, structure disruption. These findings unravel physical constraints fitting a spatially dependent least-action for water coordination, introduce a molecular design concept, and herald the advent of water-tight peptide-based materials with sufficient backbone exposure to remain flexible.

  16. Expression and purification of short hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides with maltose-binding protein as a solubility tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Laure; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Hocquellet, Agnès; Cabanne, Charlotte; Bathany, Katell; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Garbay, Bertrand; Garanger, Elisabeth

    2015-06-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are biodegradable polymers with interesting physico-chemical properties for biomedical and biotechnological applications. The recombinant expression of hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides is often difficult because they possess low transition temperatures, and therefore form aggregates at sub-ambient temperatures. To circumvent this difficulty, we expressed in Escherichia coli three hydrophobic ELPs (VPGIG)n with variable lengths (n=20, 40, and 60) in fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). Fusion proteins were soluble and yields of purified MBP-ELP ranged between 66 and 127mg/L culture. After digestion of the fusion proteins by enterokinase, the ELP moiety was purified by using inverse transition cycling. The purified fraction containing ELP40 was slightly contaminated by traces of undigested fusion protein. Purification of ELP60 was impaired because of co-purification of the MBP tag during inverse transition cycling. ELP20 was successfully purified to homogeneity, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses. The transition temperature of ELP20 was measured at 15.4°C in low salt buffer. In conclusion, this method can be used to produce hydrophobic ELP of low molecular mass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor-Derived Peptides for Regulation of Mast Cell Degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yoosoo; Kong, Byoungjae; Jung, Younghoon; Park, Joon-Bum; Oh, Jung-Mi; Hwang, Jaesung; Cho, Jae Youl; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2018-01-01

    Vesicle-associated V-soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins and target membrane-associated T-SNAREs (syntaxin 4 and SNAP-23) assemble into a core trans -SNARE complex that mediates membrane fusion during mast cell degranulation. This complex plays pivotal roles at various stages of exocytosis from the initial priming step to fusion pore opening and expansion, finally resulting in the release of the vesicle contents. In this study, peptides with the sequences of various SNARE motifs were investigated for their potential inhibitory effects against SNARE complex formation and mast cell degranulation. The peptides with the sequences of the N-terminal regions of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) and VAMP8 were found to reduce mast cell degranulation by inhibiting SNARE complex formation. The fusion of protein transduction domains to the N-terminal of each peptide enabled the internalization of the fusion peptides into the cells equally as efficiently as cell permeabilization by streptolysin-O without any loss of their inhibitory activities. Distinct subsets of mast cell granules could be selectively regulated by the N-terminal-mimicking peptides derived from VAMP2 and VAMP8, and they effectively decreased the symptoms of atopic dermatitis in mouse models. These results suggest that the cell membrane fusion machinery may represent a therapeutic target for atopic dermatitis.

  18. ADAM 12 cleaves extracellular matrix proteins and correlates with cancer status and stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Roopali; Wewer, Ulla M; Zurakowski, David

    2004-01-01

    -Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Four peptides were identified that spanned the amino acid sequence of ADAM 12. Immunoblot analysis using ADAM 12-specific antibodies detected an approximately 68-k......Da band identified as the mature form of ADAM 12. To characterize catalytic properties of ADAM 12, full-length ADAM 12-S was expressed in COS-7 cells and purified. Substrate specificity studies demonstrated that ADAM 12-S degrades gelatin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin but not type I collagen...... or casein. Gelatinase activity of ADAM 12 was completely abrogated by zinc chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA and was partially inhibited by the hydroxamate inhibitor Marimastat. Endogenous matrix metalloprotease inhibitor TIMP-3 inhibited activity. To validate our initial identification of this enzyme...

  19. The planar cell polarity protein VANGL2 coordinates remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B Blairanne; Mundell, Nathan; Dunlap, Julie; Jessen, Jason

    2012-07-01

    Understanding how planar cell polarity (PCP) is established, maintained, and coordinated in migrating cell populations is an important area of research with implications for both embryonic morphogenesis and tumor cell invasion. We recently reported that the PCP protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) regulates the endocytosis and cell surface level of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14 or MT1-MMP). Here, we further discuss these findings in terms of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, cell migration, and zebrafish gastrulation. We also demonstrate that VANGL2 function impacts the focal degradation of ECM by human cancer cells including the formation or stability of invadopodia. Together, our findings implicate MMP14 as a downstream effector of VANGL2 signaling and suggest a model whereby the regulation of pericellular proteolysis is a fundamental aspect of PCP in migrating cells.

  20. EcmPred: Prediction of extracellular matrix proteins based on random forest with maximum relevance minimum redundancy feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar Umar; Ganesan, Pugalenthi; Kalies, Kai Uwe; Hartmann, Enno; Martinetz, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of tissues of multicellular organisms. It consists of secreted macromolecules, mainly polysaccharides and glycoproteins. Malfunctions of ECM proteins lead to severe disorders such as marfan

  1. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kuzan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins’ expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such aspyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  2. Relationship of Soluble Grape-Derived Proteins to Condensed Tannin Extractability during Red Wine Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Lindsay F; Chen, Lei-An; Stahlecker, Avery C; Cousins, Peter; Sacks, Gavin L

    2016-11-02

    In red winemaking, the extractability of condensed tannins (CT) can vary considerably even under identical fermentation conditions, and several explanations for this phenomenon have been proposed. Recent work has demonstrated that grape pathogenesis-related proteins (PRPs) may limit retention of CT added to finished wines, but their relevance to CT extractability has not been evaluated. In this work, Vitis vinifera and interspecific hybrids (Vitis ssp.) from both hot and cool climates were vinified under small-scale, controlled conditions. The final CT concentration in wine was well modeled from initial grape tannin and juice protein concentrations using the Freundlich equation (r 2 = 0.686). In follow-up experiments, separation and pretreatment of juice by bentonite, heating, freezing, or exogenous tannin addition reduced protein concentrations in juices from two grape varieties. The bentonite treatment also led to greater wine CT for one of the varieties, indicating that prefermentation removal of grape protein may be a viable approach to increasing wine CT.

  3. Glucose, fructose and sucrose increase the solubility of protein-tannin complexes and at high concentration, glucose and sucrose interfere with bisulphite bleaching of wine pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbertson, James F; Yuan, Chunlong; Mireles, Maria S; Hanlin, Rachel L; Downey, Mark O

    2013-05-01

    Wines were modified with increasing sugar concentrations and decreasing tannin concentrations and analysed by a combination of protein precipitation and bisulphite bleaching. Increasing sugar concentration decreased the precipitation of tannin and protein-precipitable polymeric pigments (PPP). The use of a hydrogen bond disruptor (urea) to reduce protein-tannin and protein-pigment complex formation showed that the effect of sugar concentration occurred by increasing the solubility of the tannin-protein complex, not by interfering with protein-tannin complex formation. By increasing the solubility of pigment-protein complexes, non-protein-precipitable polymeric pigments (nPPP) appeared to increase. There was also an increase in total polymeric pigments at each tannin concentration with increasing glucose and sucrose concentration, indicating that sugar concentration might also affect bisulphite bleaching of wine pigments. While a significant effect of sugar concentration on tannin-protein complex solubility was observed, these effects were greatest at sugar concentrations far in excess of normal wine making conditions. Under normal wine making conditions, sugar concentration will have a negligible effect on protein-precipitable tannin, PPP and nPPP concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins: tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 in prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ulamec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The interchanged stromal-epithelial relations and altered expression profiles of various extracellular matrix (ECM proteins creates a suitable microenvironment for cancer development and growth. We support the opinion that remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM plays an important role in the cancer progression. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of ECM proteins tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 in prostatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: Glands and surrounding stroma were analyzed in randomly selected specimens from 52 patients with prostate cancer and 28 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP. To evaluate the intensity of tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 expression the percentage of positively immunostained stromal cells was examined.Results: Compared to BPH, stroma of prostatic adenocarcinoma showed statistically significant increase in tenascin-C expression (p<0.001, predominantly around neoplastic glands, while fibronectin (p=0.001 and galectin-3 (p<0.001 expression in the same area was decreased.Conclusions: Our study confirms changes in the expression of ECM proteins of prostate cancer which may have important role in the cancer development.

  5. Structure and expression of an unusually acidic matrix protein of pearl oyster shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Daiki; Sarashina, Isao; Endo, Kazuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    We report identification and characterization of the unusually acidic molluscan shell matrix protein Aspein, which may have important roles in calcium carbonate biomineralization. The Aspein gene (aspein) encodes a sequence of 413 amino acids, including a high proportion of Asp (60.4%), Gly (16.0%), and Ser (13.2%), and the predicted isoelectric point is 1.45; this is the most acidic of all the molluscan shell matrix proteins sequenced so far, or probably even of all known proteins on earth. The main body of Aspein is occupied by (Asp) 2-10 sequences punctuated with Ser-Gly dipeptides. RT-PCR demonstrated that the transcript of aspein is expressed at the outer edge of the mantle, corresponding to the calcitic prismatic layer, but not at the inner part of the mantle, corresponding to the aragonitic nacreous layer. Our findings and previous in vitro experiments taken together suggest that Aspein is responsible for directed formation of calcite in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata

  6. Matrix Gla Protein is Involved in Crystal Formation in Kidney of Hyperoxaluric Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrix Gla protein (MGP is a molecular determinant regulating vascular calcification of the extracellular matrix. However, it is still unclear how MGP may be invovled in crystal formation in the kidney of hyperoxaluric rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the hyperoxaluric group and control group. Hyperoxaluric rats were administrated by 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG for up to 8 weeks. Renal MGP expression was detected by the standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC method. Renal crystal deposition was observed by a polarizing microscope. Total RNA and protein from the rat kidney tissue were extracted. The levels of MGP mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Hyperoxaluria was induced successfully in rats. The MGP was polarly distributed, on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells, and was found in the ascending thick limbs of Henle's loop (cTAL and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT in hyperoxaluric rats, its expression however, was present in the medullary collecting duct (MCD in stone-forming rats. Crystals with multilaminated structure formed in the injurious renal tubules with lack of MGP expression.MGP mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by the crystals' stimulations. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the MGP was involved in crystals formation by the continuous expression, distributing it polarly in the renal tubular cells and binding directly to the crystals.

  7. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  8. Radiation synthesis of a water-soluble temperature sensitive polymer, activated copolymer and applications in immobilization of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Maolin; Ha Hongfei; Wu Jilan

    1993-01-01

    In this work the radiation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM) in aqueous solutions has been carried out and a water-soluble, temperature sensitive polymer and copolymer were obtained by using γ-rays from Co-60 source at room temperature. We have gained the optimum dose and dose-rate of radiation synthesis of linear polyNIPAAM through determining conversion yield and viscosity. In order to immobilize protein (BSA) and enzyme (HRP) into this water-soluble polymer, we prepared an activated copolymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide). The BSA and HRP has been immobilized onto the activated copolymer. The BSA (HRP)/copolymer conjugates still kept the original thermally sensitive properties of the linear polyNIPAAM. The conjugation yield of BSA to the activated copolymer decreased with increasing dose. Immobilized HRP was stable at 0 o C for a long time and has, at least, 4 days stability at room temperature. Immobilized HRP activity was lowered when the temperature was raised. This phenomenon was reversible and the immobilized HRP regained activity. The optimum pH of the immobilized HRP shifted from ca.5 upward to ca. 7. (author)

  9. Myristoylation drives dimerization of matrix protein from mouse mammary tumor virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Michal; Zábranský, Aleš; Dostál, Jiří; Vaněk, O.; Brynda, Jiří; Lepšík, Martin; Hadravová, Romana; Pichová, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, Jan 5 (2016), č. článku 2. ISSN 1742-4690 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : dimerization * matrix protein * MMTV * molecular dynamics * mouse mammary tumor virus * myristoylation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2016 http://retrovirology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12977-015-0235-8

  10. Efficacy of enamel matrix protein applied to spontaneous periodontal disease in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Okumura, Masahiro; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Fujinaga, Toru

    2003-09-01

    Enamel matrix protein (EMP) was applied for regeneration of periodontal tissue in 2 dogs with spontaneous periodontal disease. Case 1 had bony resorption around the root and root apex of the maxillary fourth premolars. Case 2 had vertical resorption of bone between the mandibular first and second molars. A flap was formed in the buccal gingiva, and EMP was applied onto the surface of the exposed root. One or 4 months postoperatively, increased bone level and clinical attachment were recognized. EMP was therefore suggested to be effective to induce regeneration of periodontal tissues in the cases with periodontal disease.

  11. OmpL1 is an extracellular matrix- and plasminogen-interacting protein of Leptospira spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Vieira, Monica L; Kirchgatter, Karin; Alves, Ivy J; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2012-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with multisystem involvement caused by pathogenic strains of the genus Leptospira. OmpL1 is an outer membrane protein of Leptospira spp. that is expressed during infection. In this work, we investigated novel features of this protein. We describe that OmpL1 is a novel leptospiral extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding protein and a plasminogen (PLG) receptor. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star/pLysS as inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified by metal-chelating chromatography. The protein presented a typical β-strand secondary structure, as evaluated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The recombinant protein reacted with antibodies in serum samples from convalescent leptospirosis patients with a high specificity compared to serum samples from individuals with unrelated diseases. These data strengthen the usefulness of OmpL1 as a diagnostic marker of leptospirosis. The characterization of the immunogenicity of recombinant OmpL1 in inoculated BALB/c mice showed that the protein has the capacity to elicit humoral and cellular immune responses, as denoted by high antibody titers and the proliferation of lymphocytes. We demonstrate that OmpL1 has the ability to mediate attachment to laminin and plasma fibronectin, with K(D) (equilibrium dissociation constant) values of 2,099.93 ± 871.03 nM and 1,239.23 ± 506.85 nM, respectively. OmpL1 is also a PLG receptor, with a K(D) of 368.63 ± 121.23 nM, capable of generating enzymatically active plasmin. This is the first report that shows and characterizes OmpL1 as an ECM-interacting and a PLG-binding protein of Leptospira spp. that may play a role in bacterial pathogenesis when expressed during infection.

  12. Reduction of facial wrinkles by hydrolyzed water-soluble egg membrane associated with reduction of free radical stress and support of matrix production by dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen GS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gitte S Jensen,1 Bijal Shah,2 Robert Holtz,3 Ashok Patel,4 Donald C Lo2 1NIS Labs, Klamath Falls, OR, 2Department of Neurobiology, Center for Drug Discovery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 3BioInnovation Laboratories, Inc., Lakewood, CO, 4Centre Manufacturing LLC, Eden Prairie, MN, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-soluble egg membrane (WSEM on wrinkle reduction in a clinical pilot study and to elucidate specific mechanisms of action using primary human immune and dermal cell-based bioassays.Methods: To evaluate the effects of topical application of WSEM (8% on human skin, an open-label 8-week study was performed involving 20 healthy females between the age of 45 years and 65 years. High-resolution photography and digital analysis were used to evaluate the wrinkle depth in the facial skin areas beside the eye (crow’s feet. WSEM was tested for total antioxidant capacity and effects on the formation of reactive oxygen species by human polymorphonuclear cells. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells were used for quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of the antioxidant response element genes Nqo1, Gclm, Gclc, and Hmox1. Evaluation of effects on human primary dermal fibroblasts in vitro included cellular viability and production of the matrix components collagen and elastin.Results: Topical use of a WSEM-containing facial cream for 8 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of wrinkle depth (P<0.05. WSEM contained antioxidants and reduced the formation of reactive oxygen species by inflammatory cells in vitro. Despite lack of a quantifiable effect on Nrf2, WSEM induced the gene expression of downstream Nqo1, Gclm, Gclc, and Hmox1 in human keratinocytes. Human dermal fibroblasts treated with WSEM produced more collagen and elastin than untreated cells or cells treated with dbcAMP control. The increase in collagen production was statistically significant (P<0.05.Conclusion: The topical use

  13. Functional Assembly of Soluble and Membrane Recombinant Proteins of Mammalian NADPH Oxidase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souabni, Hajer; Ezzine, Aymen; Bizouarn, Tania; Baciou, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Activation of phagocyte cells from an innate immune system is associated with a massive consumption of molecular oxygen to generate highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) as microbial weapons. This is achieved by a multiprotein complex, the so-called NADPH oxidase. The activity of phagocyte NADPH oxidase relies on an assembly of more than five proteins, among them the membrane heterodimer named flavocytochrome b 558 (Cytb 558 ), constituted by the tight association of the gp91 phox (also named Nox2) and p22 phox proteins. The Cytb 558 is the membrane catalytic core of the NADPH oxidase complex, through which the reducing equivalent provided by NADPH is transferred via the associated prosthetic groups (one flavin and two hemes) to reduce dioxygen into superoxide anion. The other major proteins (p47 phox , p67 phox , p40 phox , Rac) requisite for the complex activity are cytosolic proteins. Thus, the NADPH oxidase functioning relies on a synergic multi-partner assembly that in vivo can be hardly studied at the molecular level due to the cell complexity. Thus, a cell-free assay method has been developed to study the NADPH oxidase activity that allows measuring and eventually quantifying the ROS generation based on optical techniques following reduction of cytochrome c. This setup is a valuable tool for the identification of protein interactions, of crucial components and additives for a functional enzyme. Recently, this method was improved by the engineering and the production of a complete recombinant NADPH oxidase complex using the combination of purified proteins expressed in bacterial and yeast host cells. The reconstitution into artificial membrane leads to a fully controllable system that permits fine functional studies.

  14. Protein-resistant polymer coatings obtained by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusen, L. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mustaciosu, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mitu, B.; Filipescu, M.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Dinca, V., E-mail: dinali@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-08-01

    Adsorption of proteins and polysaccharides is known to facilitate microbial attachment and subsequent formation of biofilm on surfaces that ultimately results in its biofouling. Therefore, protein repellent modified surfaces are necessary to block the irreversible attachment of microorganisms. Within this context, the feasibility of using the Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) methyl ether (PEG-block-PCL Me) copolymer as potential protein-resistant coating was explored in this work. The films were deposited using Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique that allows good control of composition, thickness and homogeneity. The chemical and morphological characteristics of the films were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurements and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The FTIR data demonstrates that the functional groups in the MAPLE-deposited films remain intact, especially for fluences below 0.5 J cm{sup −2}. Optical Microscopy and AFM images show that the homogeneity and the roughness of the coatings are related to both laser parameters (fluence, number of pulses) and target composition. Protein adsorption tests were performed on the PEG-block-PCL Me copolymer coated glass and on bare glass surface as a control. The results show that the presence of copolymer as coating significantly reduces the adsorption of proteins.

  15. Two Overlapping Domains of a Lyssavirus Matrix Protein That Acts on Different Cell Death Pathways ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrous, Florence; Gholami, Alireza; Mouhamad, Shahul; Estaquier, Jérôme; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The lyssavirus matrix (M) protein induces apoptosis. The regions of the M protein that are essential for triggering cell death pathways are not yet clearly defined. We therefore compared the M proteins from two viruses that have contrasting characteristics in terms of cellular apoptosis: a genotype 3 lyssavirus, Mokola virus (MOK), and a genotype 1 rabies virus isolated from a dog from Thailand (THA). We identified a 20-amino-acid fragment (corresponding to positions 67 to 86) that retained the cell death activities of the full-length M protein from MOK via both the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) activity. We found that the amino acids at positions 77 and 81 have an essential role in triggering these two cell death pathways. Directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the amino acid at position 77 affects CcO activity, whereas the amino acid at position 81 affects TRAIL-dependent apoptosis. Mutations in the full-length M protein that compromised induction of either of these two pathways resulted in delayed apoptosis compared with the time to apoptosis for the nonmutated control. PMID:20631119

  16. Two overlapping domains of a lyssavirus matrix protein that acts on different cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrous, Florence; Gholami, Alireza; Mouhamad, Shahul; Estaquier, Jérôme; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-10-01

    The lyssavirus matrix (M) protein induces apoptosis. The regions of the M protein that are essential for triggering cell death pathways are not yet clearly defined. We therefore compared the M proteins from two viruses that have contrasting characteristics in terms of cellular apoptosis: a genotype 3 lyssavirus, Mokola virus (MOK), and a genotype 1 rabies virus isolated from a dog from Thailand (THA). We identified a 20-amino-acid fragment (corresponding to positions 67 to 86) that retained the cell death activities of the full-length M protein from MOK via both the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) activity. We found that the amino acids at positions 77 and 81 have an essential role in triggering these two cell death pathways. Directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the amino acid at position 77 affects CcO activity, whereas the amino acid at position 81 affects TRAIL-dependent apoptosis. Mutations in the full-length M protein that compromised induction of either of these two pathways resulted in delayed apoptosis compared with the time to apoptosis for the nonmutated control.

  17. Nitration of soluble proteins in organotypic culture models of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Protein nitration due to oxidative and nitrative stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but its relationship to the loss of dopamine (DA) or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity is not clear. Here we quantified protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) by a novel gas...... chromatography/negative chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry technique and DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) by HPLC in tissues or medium of organotypic, mouse mesencephalon cultures after acute or chronic treatments with the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1), the dopaminergic...

  18. Matrix metalloproteinases and soluble Fas/FasL system as novel regulators of apoptosis in children and young adults on chronic dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiał, Kinga; Zwolińska, Danuta

    2011-07-01

    The system of membrane receptor Fas and its ligand FasL compose one of the main pathways triggering apoptosis. However, the role of their soluble forms has not been clarified yet. Although sFasL can be converted from the membrane-bound form by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), there are no data on relations between sFas/sFasL, MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in patients on chronic dialysis--neither children nor adults. The aim of our study was to evaluate serum concentrations of sFas, sFasL, and their potential regulators (MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2), in children and young adults chronically dialyzed. Twenty-two children on automated peritoneal dialysis (APD), 19 patients on hemodialysis (HD) and 30 controls were examined. Serum concentrations of sFas, sFasL, MMPs and TIMPs were assessed by ELISA. Median values of sFas, sFasL, sFas/sFasL ratio, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were significantly elevated in all dialyzed patients vs. controls, the highest values being observed in subjects on HD. A single HD session caused the decrease in values of all parameters to the levels below those seen in children on APD. Regression analysis revealed that MMP-7 and TIMP-1 were the best predictors of sFas and sFasL concentrations. Children and young adults on chronic dialysis are prone to sFas/sFasL system dysfunction, more pronounced in patients on hemodialysis. The correlations between sFas/sFasL and examined enzymes suggest that MMPs and TIMPs take part in the regulation of cell death in the pediatric population on chronic dialysis, triggering both anti- (sFas) and pro-apoptotic (sFasL) mechanisms.

  19. The thermal structural transition of alpha-crystallin modulates subunit interactions and increases protein solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract, is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K. METHODS/RESULTS: To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ and the interfacial tension (γ of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. CONCLUSIONS/GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing.

  20. Quantitative proteomics reveals altered expression of extracellular matrix related proteins of human primary dermal fibroblasts in response to sulfated hyaluronan and collagen applied as artificial extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A; van der Smissen, Anja; von Feilitzsch, Margarete; Anderegg, Ulf; Kalkhof, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Fibroblasts are the main matrix producing cells of the dermis and are also strongly regulated by their matrix environment which can be used to improve and guide skin wound healing processes. Here, we systematically investigated the molecular effects on primary dermal fibroblasts in response to high-sulfated hyaluronan [HA] (hsHA) by quantitative proteomics. The comparison of non- and high-sulfated HA revealed regulation of 84 of more than 1,200 quantified proteins. Based on gene enrichment we found that sulfation of HA alters extracellular matrix remodeling. The collagen degrading enzymes cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -14 were found to be down-regulated on hsHA. Additionally protein expression of thrombospondin-1, decorin, collagen types I and XII were reduced, whereas the expression of trophoblast glycoprotein and collagen type VI were slightly increased. This study demonstrates that global proteomics provides a valuable tool for revealing proteins involved in molecular effects of growth substrates for further material optimization.

  1. Effects of Storage and Granary Weevil Infestation on Gel Electrophoresis and Protein Solubility Properties of Hard and Soft Wheat Flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Sule; Yalçin, Erkan; Özkaya, Hazim

    2018-02-24

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of storage and granary weevil, Sitophilus granarius (L.; Coleoptera: Curculionidae), infestation on pH, protein solubility (PS) and gel electrophoresis properties of meal and roller-milled flours of hard (Ceyhan-99 cv.) and soft (Eser cv.) wheat cultivars, respectively, after 6 mo of storage. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) technique was applied for studying the electrophoretic properties. Hard and soft wheats were infested with non-sexed S. granarius at a rate of two adults/ kg, and stored for 6 mo at 30 ± 1°C and 70 ± 5% RH. The pest-free wheat samples were used as control. The infested and its control samples were collected monthly, and after cleaning the granary weevils, they were hammer-milled or roller-milled in order to get meal flours and roller-milled flours, respectively. The effect of infestation on the storage proteins was more obvious in meal flours than that of the roller-milled flours. Granary weevil feeding resulted secreting of hydrolyzing enzymes and increased the acidity of flours; subsequently the breaking and releasing of some storage proteins generally caused a decrease in pH and an increase in PS values of the meal flours of wheat cultivars. SDS-PAGE results generally indicated that towards the end of storage, the insect population, that greatly increased, caused minor protein depletions resulting decreasing protein band intensities between 113 and 58 kDa of hard wheat meal flour and 101 and 40 kDa of soft wheat roller-milled flour. Consequently, the potential effect of changes probably occurred in high molecular weight glutenin subunits of both wheat cultivars.

  2. Are tyrosine residues involved in the photoconversion of the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein of Chenopodium album?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Seki, Y; Uchida, A; Nakayama, K; Satoh, H

    2015-05-01

    Non-photosynthetic and hydrophilic chlorophyll (Chl) proteins, called water-soluble Chl-binding proteins (WSCPs), are distributed in various species of Chenopodiaceae, Amaranthaceae, Polygonaceae and Brassicaceae. Based on their photoconvertibility, WSCPs are categorised into two classes: Class I (photoconvertible) and Class II (non-photoconvertible). Chenopodium album WSCP (CaWSCP; Class I) is able to convert the chlorin skeleton of Chl a into a bacteriochlorin-like skeleton under light in the presence of molecular oxygen. Potassium iodide (KI) is a strong inhibitor of the photoconversion. Because KI attacks tyrosine residues in proteins, tyrosine residues in CaWSCP are considered to be important amino acid residues for the photoconversion. Recently, we identified the gene encoding CaWSCP and found that the mature region of CaWSCP contained four tyrosine residues: Tyr13, Tyr14, Tyr87 and Tyr134. To gain insight into the effect of the tyrosine residues on the photoconversion, we constructed 15 mutant proteins (Y13A, Y14A, Y87A, Y134A, Y13-14A, Y13-87A, Y13-134A, Y14-87A, Y14-134A, Y87-134A, Y13-14-87A, Y13-14-134A, Y13-87-134A, Y14-87-134A and Y13-14-87-134A) using site-directed mutagenesis. Amazingly, all the mutant proteins retained not only chlorophyll-binding activity, but also photoconvertibility. Furthermore, we found that KI strongly inhibited the photoconversion of Y13-14-87-134A. These findings indicated that the four tyrosine residues are not essential for the photoconversion. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Seed salt-soluble protein expression as marker of local Medicago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleven patterns of M. ciliaris populations with two moderate sensitive ecotypes to NaCl, two reference genotypes and seven prospecting populations near and far from a strongly salted area (Sebkha of Oran) were investigated by one dimensional electrophoresis SDS-PAGE. The results show that the proteins profiles were ...

  4. Proteome array identification of bioactive soluble proteins/peptides in matrigel; relevance to stem cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrigel and similar commercial products are extracts of the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma that provide a basement-membrane-like attachment factor or gel that is used to grow cells on or in. To ascertain further what proteins may be present in Matrigel, besides its major basement-membrane constitue...

  5. Phosphatidylserine Lateral Organization Influences the Interaction of Influenza Virus Matrix Protein 1 with Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobone, Sara; Hilsch, Malte; Storm, Julian; Dunsing, Valentin; Herrmann, Andreas; Chiantia, Salvatore

    2017-06-15

    Influenza A virus matrix protein 1 (M1) is an essential component involved in the structural stability of the virus and in the budding of new virions from infected cells. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis of virion formation and the budding process is required in order to devise new therapeutic approaches. We performed a detailed investigation of the interaction between M1 and phosphatidylserine (PS) (i.e., its main binding target at the plasma membrane [PM]), as well as the distribution of PS itself, both in model membranes and in living cells. To this end, we used a combination of techniques, including Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), confocal microscopy imaging, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and number and brightness (N&B) analysis. Our results show that PS can cluster in segregated regions in the plane of the lipid bilayer, both in model bilayers constituted of PS and phosphatidylcholine and in living cells. The viral protein M1 interacts specifically with PS-enriched domains, and such interaction in turn affects its oligomerization process. Furthermore, M1 can stabilize PS domains, as observed in model membranes. For living cells, the presence of PS clusters is suggested by N&B experiments monitoring the clustering of the PS sensor lactadherin. Also, colocalization between M1 and a fluorescent PS probe suggest that, in infected cells, the matrix protein can specifically bind to the regions of PM in which PS is clustered. Taken together, our observations provide novel evidence regarding the role of PS-rich domains in tuning M1-lipid and M1-M1 interactions at the PM of infected cells. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus particles assemble at the plasma membranes (PM) of infected cells. This process is orchestrated by the matrix protein M1, which interacts with membrane lipids while binding to the other proteins and genetic material of the virus. Despite its importance, the initial step in virus assembly (i.e., M1-lipid interaction) is still

  6. Matrix reloaded: CCN, tenascin and SIBLING group of matricellular proteins in orchestrating cancer hallmark capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2016-12-01

    Matricellular proteins (MCPs) are the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with various regulatory functions. MCPs are critical regulators of ECM homeostasis and are often found dysregulated in various malignancies. They interact with various proteins like ECM structural proteins, integrins, growth factor receptors and growth factors to modulate their availability and activity. Cancer-supporting MCPs are known to induce proliferation, migration and invasion of cancer cells. MCPs also support cancer stem (like) cell growth and induce a drug-resistant state. Apart from their direct effects on cancer cells, they play key roles in angiogenesis, immunomodulation, stromal cell infiltration, stromal proliferation and matrix remodeling. High expression of various MCPs belonging to the tenascin, CCN and SIBLING families is often associated with aggressive tumors and poor patient prognosis. Due to their differential expression and distinct functional role, these MCPs are perceived as attractive therapeutic targets in cancer. Studies on preclinical models have indicated that targeting tumor-supportive MCPs could be a potent avenue for developing anti-cancer therapies. The MCP receptors, like integrins and some associated growth factor receptors, are already being targeted using pharmacological inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing antibodies against CCNs, tenascins and SIBLINGs have shown promising results in preclinical cancer models, suggesting an opportunity to develop anti-MCP therapies to target cancer. Peptides derived from anti-cancer MCPs could also serve as therapeutic entities. In the present review, in continuation with the expanding horizon of MCP functions and disease association, we focus on (i) their unique domain arrangement, (ii) their association with cancer hallmarks and (iii) available and possible therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Michels, Paul A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M r of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M r of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and 35 S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed

  8. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M., E-mail: paul.michels@uclouvain.be [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and {sup 35}S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed.

  9. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  10. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas [Hema-Quebec, Research and Development Department, Quebec City, G1V 5C3, PQ (Canada); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: nicolas.pineault@hema-quebec.qc.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, G1V 0A6, PQ (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  11. Wheat germ cell-free expression: Two detergents with a low critical micelle concentration allow for production of soluble HCV membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure; Badillo, Aurélie; Jirasko, Vlastimil; Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Paul, David; Lancien, Loick; Moradpour, Darius; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Meier, Beat H; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to express in a soluble form. Here, we use wheat germ cell-free expression in the presence of various detergents to produce the non-structural membrane proteins 2, 4B and 5A of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). We show that lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG-3) and dodecyl octaethylene glycol ether (C12E8) detergents can yield essentially soluble membrane proteins at detergent concentrations that do not inhibit the cell-free reaction. This finding can be explained by the low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of these detergents, which keeps the monomer concentrations low while at the same time providing the necessary excess of detergent concentration above CMC required for full target protein solubilization. We estimate that a tenfold excess of detergent micelles with respect to the protein concentration is sufficient for solubilization, a number that we propose as a guideline for detergent screening assays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced release of bone morphogenetic proteins from demineralized bone matrix by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2015-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a useful method for sterilizing demineralized bone matrix (DBM), but its effect on the osteoinductivity of DBM is still controversial. In this study, the osteoinductive activity of gamma-irradiated DBM was examined using a mouse myoblastic cell line (C2C12). DBM was extracted from adult bovine bone and was irradiated at a dose of 25 kGy using a 60 cobalt gamma-irradiator. Cell proliferation with DBM was not affected by gamma-irradiation, but alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin productions were significantly increased in C2C12 cell groups treated with gamma-irradiated DBM. It was reasoned that bone morphogenetic proteins were more efficiently released from gamma-irradiated DBM than from the non-irradiated control. This result suggests the effectiveness of radiation sterilization of bone implants - Highlights: • Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was gamma-irradiated for sterilization. • Irradiated DBM had higher alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin production. • It was reasoned the more released bone morphogenetic proteins by irradiation. • This result supports the application of radiation sterilization for bone implants

  13. Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein required for eruption of incisors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kii, Isao; Amizuka, Norio; Minqi, Li; Kitajima, Satoshi; Saga, Yumiko; Kudo, Akira

    2006-01-01

    A characteristic tooth of rodents, the incisor continuously grows throughout life by the constant formation of dentin and enamel. Continuous eruption of the incisor is accompanied with formation of shear zone, in which the periodontal ligament is remodeled. Although the shear zone plays a role in the remodeling, its molecular biological aspect is barely understood. Here, we show that periostin is essential for formation of the shear zone. Periostin -/- mice showed an eruption disturbance of incisors. Histological observation revealed that deletion of periostin led to disappearance of the shear zone. Electron microscopy revealed that the disappearance of the shear zone resulted from a failure in digestion of collagen fibers in the periostin -/- mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis using anti-periostin antibodies demonstrated the restricted localization of periostin protein in the shear zone. Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein, and immunoelectron microscopy showed a close association of periostin with collagen fibrils in vivo. These results suggest that periostin functions in the remodeling of collagen matrix in the shear zone

  14. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-05-01

    The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a "wreath" with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. RNAi reduces expression and intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Posey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP, a large extracellular glycoprotein expressed in musculoskeletal tissues, cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. These mutations lead to massive intracellular retention of COMP, chondrocyte death and loss of growth plate chondrocytes that are necessary for linear growth. In contrast, COMP null mice have only minor growth plate abnormalities, normal growth and longevity. This suggests that reducing mutant and wild-type COMP expression in chondrocytes may prevent the toxic cellular phenotype causing the skeletal dysplasias. We tested this hypothesis using RNA interference to reduce steady state levels of COMP mRNA. A panel of shRNAs directed against COMP was tested. One shRNA (3B reduced endogenous and recombinant COMP mRNA dramatically, regardless of expression levels. The activity of the shRNA against COMP mRNA was maintained for up to 10 weeks. We also demonstrate that this treatment reduced ER stress. Moreover, we show that reducing steady state levels of COMP mRNA alleviates intracellular retention of other extracellular matrix proteins associated with the pseudoachondroplasia cellular pathology. These findings are a proof of principle and the foundation for the development of a therapeutic intervention based on reduction of COMP expression.

  16. Soluble cysteine-rich tick saliva proteins Salp15 and Iric-1 from E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Philipp; Vorreiter, Jolanta; Habicht, J?ri; Bentrop, Detlef; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ticks transmit numerous pathogens, including borreliae, which cause Lyme disease. Tick saliva contains a complex mix of anti-host defense factors, including the immunosuppressive cysteine-rich secretory glycoprotein Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis ticks and orthologs like Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus. All tick-borne microbes benefit from the immunosuppression at the tick bite site; in addition, borreliae exploit the binding of Salp15 to their outer surface protein C (OspC) for enhanced transmissi...

  17. Binding of a cementum attachment protein to extracellular matrix components and to dental surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitaru, S; Hekmati, H [Department of Oral Biology, Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Savion, N [Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Olsen, S; Narayanan, S A [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Cementum proteins (CP) have been shown to mediate cell attachment. Among these, a 55 kDa protein was isolated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the capacity of CP to bind to non-demineralized and demineralized root surfaces and to support cell attachment to dentin. CP were prepared by sequential extraction of bovine cementum with 25 mM EDTA, 0.5 M acetic acid followed by 4 M guanidine HCl. The latter was subjected to ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE-3SW column and eluted stepwise with a 0-0.5 M NaCl gradient. CP were labelled with [sup 125]I and the capacity of [sup 125]I-CP to bind to mineralized and partially demineralized dentin, synthetic hydroxyapatite, collagen, fibronectin and fibrillar collagen-fibronectin cimplex was assessed. It was found that CP bind specifically to mineralized dentin and synthetic hydroxyapatite but not to demineralized dentin. The specific binding was 60% of the total binding. SDS-PAGE analysis of the proteins bound to dentin indicated that the main bound protein had a molecular weight of 55 kDa. CP exhibited high affinity for fibronectin (k[sub D] = 1.56 x 10[sup -10] M) and fibronectincollagen complex, but their binding to either molecular or fibrillar collagen was negligible. It is suggested that CP may play an important role in the attachment of cells of the periodontium to cementum extracellular matrix during homeostasis and regeneration. (au).

  18. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Soker, Shay; Khang, Gilson

    2013-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation. (paper)

  19. Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: powerful analytical tools in recombinant protein chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Svensson, B; Roepstorff, P

    1996-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy is presen......Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy...... is presented encompassing protein characterization prior to and after cloning of the corresponding gene....

  20. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  1. Nucleophosmin/B23 is a proliferate shuttle protein associated with nuclear matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jing-Ping; Chew, Eng Ching; Liew, Choong-Tsek; Chan, John Y H; Jin, Mei-Lin; Ding, Ming-Xiao; Fai, Yam Hin; Li, H K Richard; Liang, Xiao-Man; Wu, Qiu-Liang

    2003-12-15

    It has become obvious that a better understanding and potential elucidation of the nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 involving in functional interrelationship between nuclear organization and gene expression. In present study, protein B23 expression were investigated in the regenerative hepatocytes at different periods (at days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7) during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy on the rats with immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Another experiment was done with immunolabeling methods and two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis for identification of B23 in the regenerating hepatocytes and HepG2 cells (hepatoblastoma cell line) after sequential extraction with detergents, nuclease, and salt. The results showed that its expression in the hepatocytes had a locative move and quantitative change during the process of liver regeneration post-operation. Its immunochemical localization in the hepatocytes during the process showed that it moved from nucleoli of the hepatocytes in the stationary stage to nucleoplasm, cytoplasm, mitotic spindles, and mitotic chromosomes of the hepatocytes in the regenerating livers. It was quantitatively increased progressively to peak level at day 3 post-operation and declined gradually to normal level at day 7. It was detected in nuclear matrix protein (NMP) composition extracted from the regenerating hepatocytes and HepG2 cells and identified with isoelectric point (pI) value of 5.1 and molecular weight of 40 kDa. These results indicated that B23 was a proliferate shuttle protein involving in cell cycle and cell proliferation associated with nuclear matrix. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Proteomic analysis of pig (Sus scrofa olfactory soluble proteome reveals O-GlcNAcylation of secreted odorant-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eNAGNAN-LE MEILLOUR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of olfactory binding proteins (OBPs is a key point to understand their role in molecular olfaction. Since only few different sequences were characterized in each mammalian species, they have been considered as passive carriers of odors and pheromones. We have explored the soluble proteome of pig nasal mucus, taking benefit of the powerful tools of proteomics. Combining two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and western-blot with specific antibodies, our analyses revealed for the first time that the pig nasal mucus is mainly composed of secreted OBP isoforms, some of them being potentially modified by O-GlcNAcylation. An ortholog gene of the glycosyltransferase responsible of the O-GlcNAc linking on extracellular proteins in Drosophila and Mouse (EOGT was amplified from tissues of pigs of different ages and sex. The sequence was used in a phylogenetic analysis, which evidenced conservation of EOGT in insect and mammalian models studied in molecular olfaction. Extracellular O-GlcNAcylation of secreted OBPs could finely modulate their binding specificities to odors and pheromones. This constitutes a new mechanism for extracellular signaling by OBPs, suggesting that they act as the first step of odor discrimination.

  3. The diagnostic role of serum inflammatory and soluble proteins on dementia subtypes: correlation with cognitive and functional decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Candan; Ozge, Aynur; Yalin, Osman Ozgür; Yilmaz, I Arda; Delialioglu, Nuran; Yildiz, Cilem; Tesdelen, Bahar; Kudiaki, Cigdem

    2007-01-01

    In the past years, the possible involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of dementia has been the subject of several investigations. However there are restricted data about the profile of the inflammatory and soluble proteins in well evaluated Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls. There are also no reliable data regarding the relationship between the overlapping protein levels and cognitive or functional decline. We measured levels of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-18, TNF-alpha, beta-Amlyloid 1-40 and alpha1-antichymotrypsin levels in plasma in groups of total 82 subjects with AD, MCI, VD and controls using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Our study samples showed high levels of proinflammatory cytokine levels (especially IL-18) in all patient groups but only high levels of alpha1-antichymotrypsine in VD patients compared to controls. There is no significant correlation between the laboratory and clinical variables except for a link between IL-1beta and NPI scores of AD. In conclusion, this study yielded evidence of some shared mechanisms underlying AD and VD and thus motivates further studies of inflammatory markers in various types of dementia and MCI.

  4. The methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha contains an inducible import pathway for peroxisomal matrix proteins with an N-terminal targeting signal (PTS2 proteins)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Haima, Pieter; Gietl, Christine; Harder, Willem; Ab, Geert; Veenhuis, Marten

    1994-01-01

    Two main types of peroxisomal targeting signals have been identified that reside either at the extreme C terminus (PTS1) or the N terminus (PTS2) of the protein. In the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha the majority of peroxisomal matrix proteins are of the PTS1 type. Thus far, for H.

  5. Decreased concentrations of soluble interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein levels in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Nadège; Al-Akoum, Mahéra; Gagnon, Geneviève; Girard, Karine; Blanchet, Pierre; Rousseau, Julie Anne; Akoum, Ali

    2011-12-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL1) may play an important role in endometriosis-associated pelvic inflammation, and natural specific inhibitors, including soluble IL1 receptor accessory protein (sIL1RAcP) and soluble IL1 receptor type 2 (sIL1R2), are critical for counterbalancing the pleiotropic effects of IL1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of sIL1RAcP, together with those of sIL1R2 and IL1β, in the peritoneal fluid of women with and without endometriosis. Peritoneal fluid samples were obtained at laparoscopy and assessed by ELISA. sIL1RAcP concentrations were reduced in endometriosis stages I-II and III-IV. sIL1R2 concentrations were decreased, and those of IL1β were significantly increased in endometriosis stages I-II. sIL1RAcP and sIL1R2 concentrations were significantly decreased in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, and IL1β concentrations were elevated in the proliferative and the secretory phases. sIL1RAcP and sIL1R2 concentrations were reduced in women with endometriosis who were infertile, fertile, suffering from pelvic pain or pain-free. However, IL1β concentrations were significantly reduced in women with endometriosis who were infertile or had pelvic pain. These changes may exacerbate the local peritoneal inflammatory reaction observed in women with endometriosis and contribute to endometriosis pathophysiology and the major symptoms of this disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus manganese transport protein C (MntC is an extracellular matrix- and plasminogen-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Salazar

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus--particularly nosocomial infections--represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM. Manganese transport protein C (MntC, a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ε-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA. The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the α and β chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation.

  7. Effect of phospholipid, detergent and protein-protein interaction on stability and phosphoenzyme isomerization of soluble sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilsen, B; Andersen, J P

    1987-12-30

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the separate roles of lipid, detergent and protein-protein interaction for stability and catalytic properties of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase solubilized in the non-ionic detergent octa(ethylene glycol) monododecyl ether (C12E8). The use of large-zone high-performance liquid chromatography permitted us to define the self-association state of Ca-ATPase peptide at various detergent, phospholipid and protein concentrations, and also during enzymatic turnover with ATP. Conditions were established for monomerization of Ca-ATPase in the presence of a high concentration of phospholipid relative to detergent. The lipid-saturated monomeric preparation was relatively resistant to inactivation in the absence of Ca2+, whereas delipidated enzyme in monomeric or in oligomeric form was prone to inactivation. Kinetics of phosphoenzyme turnover were examined in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Dephosphorylation rates were sensitive to Mg2+, irrespective of whether the peptide was present in soluble monomeric form or was membrane-bound. C12E8-solubilized monomer without added phospholipid was, however, characterized by a fast initial phase of dephosphorylation in the absence of Mg2+. This was not observed with monomer saturated with phospholipid or with monomer solubilized in myristoylglycerophosphocholine or deoxycholate. The mechanism underlying this difference was shown to be a C12E8-induced acceleration of conversion of ADP-sensitive phosphoenzyme (E1P) to ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme (E2P). The phosphoenzyme isomerization rate was also found to be enhanced by low-affinity binding of ATP. This was demonstrated both in membrane-bound and in soluble monomeric Ca-ATPase. Our results indicate that a single peptide chain constitutes the target for modulation of phosphoenzyme turnover by Mg2+ and ATP, and that detergent effects, distinct from those arising from disruption of protein-protein contacts, are the major determinants of

  8. High Level Soluble Expression and ATPase Characterization of Human Heat Shock Protein GRP78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhang, Hongpeng; Luo, Miao; Chen, Ke; Yang, Wei; Bai, Lei; Huang, Ailong; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-02-01

    Human GRP78 has been shown to promote cancer progression and is regarded as a novel target for anticancer drugs. However, generation of recombinant full-length GRP78 remains challenging. This report demonstrates that E. coli autoinduction is an excellent method for the preparation of active recombinant GRP78 protein. The final yield was approximately 50 mg/liter of autoinduction culture. Gel-filtration experiments confirmed that the chaperone is a monomer. The purified human GRP78 catalyzed the conversion of ATP to ADP without requiring metal ions as cofactors. Three mutants, T38A, T229A, and S300A, exhibited much lower activity than wild-type GRP78, indicating that the active sites of the ATPase are located at the negatively charged cavity. Three mutants in the negatively charged cavity region dramatically reduced GRP78 activity, further confirming the region as the site of ATPase activity.

  9. Alteration of protein expression pattern of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from soluble to cell-associated isoform during tumourigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cressey, Ratchada; Wattananupong, Onusa; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Vinitketkumnuen, Usanee

    2005-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, and its expression has been correlated with increased tumour angiogenesis. Although numerous publications dealing with the measurement of circulating VEGF for diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring have been published, the relationship between the production of tissue VEGF and its concentration in blood is still unclear. The aims of this study were to determine: 1) The expression pattern of VEGF isoforms at the protein level in colorectal and lung adenocarcinoma in comparison to the pattern in corresponding adjacent normal tissues 2) The relationship between the expression pattern of VEGF and total level of circulating VEGF in the blood to clarify whether the results of measuring circulating VEGF can be used to predict VEGF expression in tumour tissues. Ninety-four tissue samples were obtained from patients, 76 colorectal tumour tissues and 18 lung tumour tissues. VEGF protein expression pattern and total circulating VEGF were examined using western blot and capture ELISA, respectively. Three major protein bands were predominately detected in tumour samples with an apparent molecular mass under reducing conditions of 18, 23 and 26 kDa. The 18 kDa VEGF protein was expressed equally in both normal and colorectal tumour tissues and predominately expressed in normal tissues of lung, whereas the 23 and 26 kDa protein was only detected at higher levels in tumour tissues. The 18, 23 and 26 kDa proteins are believed to represent the VEGF 121 , the VEGF 165 and the VEGF 189 , respectively. There was a significant correlation of the expression of VEGF 165 with a smaller tumour size maximum diameter <5 cm (p < 0.05), and there was a significant correlation of VEGF 189 with advanced clinical stage of colorectal tumours. The measurement of total circulating VEGF in serum revealed that cancer patients significantly (p < 0.001) possessed a higher level of circulating VEGF (1081 ± 652 pg/ml in

  10. The endothelial protein C receptor rs867186-GG genotype is associated with increased soluble EPCR and could mediate protection against severe malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabani, Estela; Opoka, Robert O; Bangirana, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) appears to play an important role in Plasmodium falciparum endothelial cell binding in severe malaria (SM). Despite consistent findings of elevated soluble EPCR (sEPCR) in other infectious diseases, field studies to date have provided conflicting data abo...

  11. Biological variation and reference intervals for circulating osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, H P; Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Monitoring inflammatory diseases and osteoclastogenesis with osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (total sRANKL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has recently attracted increased interest. The purpose...

  12. Alterations in the nuclear matrix protein mass correlate with heat-induced inhibition of DNA single-strand-break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Brizgys, L.M.; Lyons, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The total protein mass co-isolating with the nuclear matrix or nucleoid from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was observed to increase in heated cells as a function of increasing exposure temperature between 43 0 C and 45 0 C or of exposure time at any temperature. The sedimentation distance of the CHO cell nucleoid in sucrose gradients increased with increasing exposure time at 45 0 C. Both these nuclear alterations correlated in a log-linear manner with heat-induced inhibition of DNA strand break repair. A two-fold threshold increase in nuclear matrix protein mass preceded any substantial inhibition of repair of DNA single-strand breaks. When preheated cells were incubated at 37 0 C the nuclear matrix protein mass and nucleoid sedimentation recovered with a half-time of about 5 h, while DNA single-strand-break repair recovered with a half-time of about 2 h. When preheated cells were placed at 41 0 C a further increase was observed in the nuclear matrix protein mass and the half-time of DNA strand break repair, while nucleoid sedimentation recovered toward control values. These results implicate alterations in the protein mass of the nuclear matrix in heat-induced inhibition of repair of DNA single-strand breaks. (author)

  13. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  14. Interactions of GRF(1-29)NH2 with plasma proteins and their effects on the release of the peptide from a PLAGA matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariette, B; Coudane, J; Vert, M

    2005-09-02

    The administration of the GRF(1-29)NH2 Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone analog is known as relevant of the concept of drug delivery system using a bioresorbable matrix. However, the release of this peptide from poly(dl-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) matrices is affected by its insolubility at neutral in salted media and in plasma as well. In order to investigate the origin and the nature of the insolubility in these media in more details, the precipitates collected when the peptide was set in contact with saline, isotonic pH=7.4 phosphate buffer and plasma were analyzed by various techniques, namely weighting, gel chromatography, 1D- and 2D-immunoelectrophoresis, and dialysis to discern the soluble from the insoluble or aggregated fractions. It is shown that precipitation in protein-free salted media is due to a salting out phenomenon complemented by the neutralization of the solubilizing electrostatic charges in the isotonic buffer. In contrast, the precipitation in plasma is due to inter polyelectrolyte-type complexation that involved polyanionic proteins having a rather low isoelectric point like albumin, transferin, haptoglobulin and IgG immunoglobulins. When a rather large quantity of GRF(1-29)NH2 was entrapped in bioresorbable pellets working at a percolating regime after subcutaneous implantation in rats, the peptide was slowly released despite the complexation with plasma proteins. However only a very small part of the peptide was found in blood, this small part being still large enough to cause a detectable increase of the circulating growth hormone concentration. Attempts made to increase the solubility of the peptide in plasma were successful when the peptide was combined with arginine, an amino acid known to promote the poor hormonal activity of injected GRF(1-29)NH2 solutions under clinical conditions.

  15. Calcium Regulates Molecular Interactions of Otoferlin with Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor (SNARE) Proteins Required for Hair Cell Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Neeliyath A.; Drescher, Marian J.; Morley, Barbara J.; Kelley, Philip M.; Drescher, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in otoferlin, a C2 domain-containing ferlin family protein, cause non-syndromic hearing loss in humans (DFNB9 deafness). Furthermore, transmitter secretion of cochlear inner hair cells is compromised in mice lacking otoferlin. In the present study, we show that the C2F domain of otoferlin directly binds calcium (KD = 267 μm) with diminished binding in a pachanga (D1767G) C2F mouse mutation. Calcium was found to differentially regulate binding of otoferlin C2 domains to target SNARE (t-SNARE) proteins and phospholipids. C2D–F domains interact with the syntaxin-1 t-SNARE motif with maximum binding within the range of 20–50 μm Ca2+. At 20 μm Ca2+, the dissociation rate was substantially lower, indicating increased binding (KD = ∼10−9) compared with 0 μm Ca2+ (KD = ∼10−8), suggesting a calcium-mediated stabilization of the C2 domain·t-SNARE complex. C2A and C2B interactions with t-SNAREs were insensitive to calcium. The C2F domain directly binds the t-SNARE SNAP-25 maximally at 100 μm and with reduction at 0 μm Ca2+, a pattern repeated for C2F domain interactions with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. In contrast, C2F did not bind the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-1 (VAMP-1). Moreover, an antibody targeting otoferlin immunoprecipitated syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 but not synaptobrevin-1. As opposed to an increase in binding with increased calcium, interactions between otoferlin C2F domain and intramolecular C2 domains occurred in the absence of calcium, consistent with intra-C2 domain interactions forming a “closed” tertiary structure at low calcium that “opens” as calcium increases. These results suggest a direct role for otoferlin in exocytosis and modulation of calcium-dependent membrane fusion. PMID:24478316

  16. Lateral Fluid Percussion Injury Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide Sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun W. Carlson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI and the activation of secondary injury mechanisms have been linked to impaired cognitive function, which, as observed in TBI patients and animal models, can persist for months and years following the initial injury. Impairments in neurotransmission have been well documented in experimental models of TBI, but the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly understood. Formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE complex facilitates vesicular docking and neurotransmitter release in the synaptic cleft. Published studies highlight a direct link between reduced SNARE complex formation and impairments in neurotransmitter release. While alterations in the SNARE complex have been described following severe focal TBI, it is not known if deficits in SNARE complex formation manifest in a model with reduced severity. We hypothesized that lateral fluid percussion injury (lFPI reduces the abundance of SNARE proteins, impairs SNARE complex formation, and contributes to impaired neurobehavioral function. To this end, rats were subjected to lFPI or sham injury and tested for acute motor performance and cognitive function at 3 weeks post-injury. lFPI resulted in motor impairment between 1 and 5 days post-injury. Spatial acquisition and spatial memory, as assessed by the Morris water maze, were significantly impaired at 3 weeks after lFPI. To examine the effect of lFPI on synaptic SNARE complex formation in the injured hippocampus, a separate cohort of rats was generated and brains processed to evaluate hippocampal synaptosomal-enriched lysates at 1 week post-injury. lFPI resulted in a significant reduction in multiple monomeric SNARE proteins, including VAMP2, and α-synuclein, and SNARE complex abundance. The findings in this study are consistent with our previously published observations suggesting that impairments in hippocampal SNARE complex formation may contribute to

  17. The influenza A virus matrix protein as a marker to monitor initial virus internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eierhoff, Thorsten; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The uptake of influenza A viruses (IAV) into cells represents an attractive antiviral drug target, e.g., by interfering with essential cellular or viral entry factors. So far, this process could only be studied by time-consuming microscopical methods. Thus, there is a lack of rapid and easy assay systems to monitor viral entry. Here, we describe a rapid procedure to analyse internalisation of IAV via Western blot detection of virion-associated matrix protein (M1), the most abundant protein within the viral particle. The assay is broadly applicable and detects different virus strains of various subtypes. As a proof of principle, treatment of cells with various known or presumed entry inhibitors resulted in reduced M1 levels. Removal of sialic acids, the receptors for IAV, led to a complete loss of the M1 signal, indicating that virus internalisation can be monitored already at the stage of attachment. Prevention of endosomal acidification resulted in a delayed degradation of M1 indicative of IAV particles trapped in endosomes. Thus, early detection of the virus-associated M1 protein is a rapid method to monitor different steps of influenza virus internalisation and has potential for application as a screening method for drugs that interfere with the uptake of IAV.

  18. Mapping the nuclear localization signal in the matrix protein of potato yellow dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gavin; Jang, Chanyong; Wang, Renyuan; Goodin, Michael

    2018-05-01

    The ability of the matrix (M) protein of potato yellow dwarf virus (PYDV) to remodel nuclear membranes is controlled by a di-leucine motif located at residues 223 and 224 of its primary structure. This function can be uncoupled from that of its nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is controlled primarily by lysine and arginine residues immediately downstream of the LL motif. In planta localization of green fluorescent protein fusions, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays with nuclear import receptor importin-α1 and yeast-based nuclear import assays provided three independent experimental approaches to validate the authenticity of the M-NLS. The carboxy terminus of M is predicted to contain a nuclear export signal, which is belived to be functional, given the ability of M to bind the Arabidopsis nuclear export receptor 1 (XPO1). The nuclear shuttle activity of M has implications for the cell-to-cell movement of PYDV nucleocapsids, based upon its interaction with the N and Y proteins.

  19. The YPLGVG sequence of the Nipah virus matrix protein is required for budding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lianying

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV is a recently emerged paramyxovirus capable of causing fatal disease in a broad range of mammalian hosts, including humans. Together with Hendra virus (HeV, they comprise the genus Henipavirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Recombinant expression systems have played a crucial role in studying the cell biology of these Biosafety Level-4 restricted viruses. Henipavirus assembly and budding occurs at the plasma membrane, although the details of this process remain poorly understood. Multivesicular body (MVB proteins have been found to play a role in the budding of several enveloped viruses, including some paramyxoviruses, and the recruitment of MVB proteins by viral proteins possessing late budding domains (L-domains has become an important concept in the viral budding process. Previously we developed a system for producing NiV virus-like particles (VLPs and demonstrated that the matrix (M protein possessed an intrinsic budding ability and played a major role in assembly. Here, we have used this system to further explore the budding process by analyzing elements within the M protein that are critical for particle release. Results Using rationally targeted site-directed mutagenesis we show that a NiV M sequence YPLGVG is required for M budding and that mutation or deletion of the sequence abrogates budding ability. Replacement of the native and overlapping Ebola VP40 L-domains with the NiV sequence failed to rescue VP40 budding; however, it did induce the cellular morphology of extensive filamentous projection consistent with wild-type VP40-expressing cells. Cells expressing wild-type NiV M also displayed this morphology, which was dependent on the YPLGVG sequence, and deletion of the sequence also resulted in nuclear localization of M. Dominant-negative VPS4 proteins had no effect on NiV M budding, suggesting that unlike other viruses such as Ebola, NiV M accomplishes budding independent of MVB cellular proteins

  20. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haering, H.U.; White, M.F.; Machicao, F.; Ermel, B.; Schleicher, E.; Obermaier, B.

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, the authors labeled intact rat fat cells with [ 32 P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, they found, in addition to the 95-kDa β-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor β-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32 P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62 kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. They suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission

  1. Novel serological neo-epitope markers of extracellular matrix proteins for the detection of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Byrjalsen, I; Bendtsen, F; Trebicka, J; Nielsen, M J; Christiansen, C; Møller, S; Krag, A

    2013-11-01

    The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an invasive, but important diagnostic and prognostic marker in cirrhosis with portal hypertension (PHT). During cirrhosis, remodelling of fibrotic tissue by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a permanent process generating small fragments of degraded extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins known as neoepitopes, which are then released into the circulation. To investigate their potential as plasma markers for detection of PHT. Ninety-four patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and 20 liver-healthy controls were included. Clinical and laboratory data of the patients were collected. All patients received HVPG measurement with blood sampling. In these samples, the following degradation or formation markers were measured: C1M (type I-collagen), C3M and PRO-C3 (type III collagen), C4M and P4NP 7S (type IV collagen), C5M (type V collagen), C6M (type VI collagen), BGM (biglycan), ELM (elastin), CRPM (CRP). All ECM markers except for CRPM correlated significantly with HVPG. Interestingly, C4M, C5M and ELM levels were significantly higher in patients with HVPG >10 mmHg. Multiple regression analysis identified PRO-C3, C6M and ELM as significant determinants, while the models A and B including PRO-C3, ELM, C6M and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) provided better description of PHT (r = 0.75, P models provided odds ratios of >100 for having clinical significant PHT. These novel non-invasive extracellular matrix markers reflect the degree of liver dysfunction. The different degrees of portal hypertension correlated with these circulating neoepitopes. Using a single blood sample, these neoepitopes in combination with MELD detect the level of portal hypertension. © 2013 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The role of Matrix Gla Protein in ossification and recovery of the avian growth plate

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    Harel eDan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available ECM mineralization is an essential physiologic process in bone, teeth, and hypertrophic cartilage. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP, an inhibitor of mineralization, is expressed by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells to inhibit calcification of those soft tissues.Tibial Dyschondroplasia (TD, a skeletal abnormality apparent as a plug of non-vascularized, non-mineralized, white opaque cartilage in the tibial growth plate of avian species can serve as a good model for studying process and genes involved in matrix mineralization and calcification. In this work, we studied the involvement of MGP in the development of TD, as well as in the processes of spontaneous and induced recovery from this syndrome. First, we found that during normal bone development, MGP is expressed in specific time and locations, starting from wide spread expression in the yet un-ossified diaphysis during embryonic development, to specific expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes adjacent to the chondro-osseous junction and the secondary ossification center just prior to calcification. In addition, we show that MGP is not expressed in the impaired TD lesion, however when the lesion begins to heal, it strongly express MGP prior to its calcification. Moreover, we show that when calcification is inhibited, a gap is formed between the expression zones of MGP and BMP2 and that this gap is closed during the healing process. To conclude, we suggest that MGP, directly or through interaction with BMP2, plays a role as ossification regulator, rather then simple inhibitor that acts prior to ossification.

  3. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... in patients with recent-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). COMP levels in JIA and healthy children were compared with those in healthy adults. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1), which has been associated with COMP expression and growth velocity, were studied in parallel. METHODS......: 87 patients with JIA entered the study, including oligoarticular JIA (n = 34), enthesitis-related arthritis (n = 8), polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive JIA (n = 2), polyarticular RF-negative JIA (n = 27), systemic JIA (n = 6), and undifferentiated JIA (n = 10). Plasma levels of COMP were...

  4. Microseed matrix screening for optimization in protein crystallization: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Allan; Bergfors, Terese; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Marsh, May

    2014-09-01

    Protein crystals obtained in initial screens typically require optimization before they are of X-ray diffraction quality. Seeding is one such optimization method. In classical seeding experiments, the seed crystals are put into new, albeit similar, conditions. The past decade has seen the emergence of an alternative seeding strategy: microseed matrix screening (MMS). In this strategy, the seed crystals are transferred into conditions unrelated to the seed source. Examples of MMS applications from in-house projects and the literature include the generation of multiple crystal forms and different space groups, better diffracting crystals and crystallization of previously uncrystallizable targets. MMS can be implemented robotically, making it a viable option for drug-discovery programs. In conclusion, MMS is a simple, time- and cost-efficient optimization method that is applicable to many recalcitrant crystallization problems.

  5. Membrane association and localization dynamics of the Ebola virus matrix protein VP40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gc, Jeevan B; Gerstman, Bernard S; Chapagain, Prem P

    2017-10-01

    The Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 is a major structural protein that provides the scaffolding for new Ebola virus particles. For this, VP40 is first trafficked to the lower leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM) in its dimeric form. Once associated with the PM, the VP40 dimers undergo structural rearrangements and oligomerize into hexamers and filaments that make up the virus matrix. Therefore, association of the VP40 dimers and their stabilization at the PM is a crucial step in the Ebola life-cycle. To understand the molecular details of the VP40 dimer-PM interactions, we investigated the dimer association with the inner leaflet of the PM using detailed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The formation of the dimer-PM complex is facilitated by the interactions of the VP40 lysine residues and the anionic lipids POPS, POPI, and PIP 2 in the PM. In contrast, the dimer fails to associate with a membrane without POPS, POPI, or PIP 2 lipids. We explored the mechanisms of the association and identified important residues and lipids involved in localization and stabilization of VP40 dimers at the PM. MD simulations elucidate the role of a C-terminal α-helix alignment parallel to the lipid bilayer surface as well as the creation of membrane defects that allow partial insertion of the hydrophobic residue V276 into the membrane to further stabilize the VP40 dimer-PM complex. Understanding the mechanisms of the VP40 dimer-PM association that facilitate oligomerization can be important for potentially targeting the VP40 for small molecules that can interfere with the virus life-cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of plasma C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, neutrophils,macrophage migration inhibitory factor, soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 in combination to diagnose infections: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Andersen, Ove; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    the diagnostic characteristics of novel and routinely used biomarkers of sepsis alone and in combination. Methods: This prospective cohort study included patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome who were suspected of having community-acquired infections. It was conducted in a medical emergency...... department and department of infectious diseases at a university hospital. A multiplex immunoassay measuring soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator (suPAR) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM)-1 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was used in parallel...... with standard measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), and neutrophils. Two composite markers were constructed – one including a linear combination of the three best performing markers and another including all six – and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC...

  7. Blockade of CD26-mediated T cell costimulation with soluble caveolin-1-Ig fusion protein induces anergy in CD4{sup +}T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Kei [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Uchiyama, Masahiko [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Computational Intelligence and System Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Hatano, Ryo; Takasawa, Wataru; Endo, Yuko [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Department of Hematologic Malignancies, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-08-21

    CD26 binds to caveolin-1 in antigen-presenting cells (APC), and that ligation of CD26 by caveolin-1 induces T cell proliferation in a TCR/CD3-dependent manner. We report herein the effects of CD26-caveolin-1 costimulatory blockade by fusion protein caveolin-1-Ig (Cav-Ig). Soluble Cav-Ig inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to recall antigen, or allogeneic APC. Our data hence suggest that blocking of CD26-associated signaling by soluble Cav-Ig may be an effective approach as immunosuppressive therapy.

  8. [Morphology of basement membrane and associated matrix proteins in normal and pathological tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerlich, A

    1995-01-01

    Basement membranes (BM) are specialized structures of the extracellular matrix. Their composition is of particular importance for the maintenance of normal morphological and functional properties of a multitude of organs and tissue systems and it is thus required for regular homeostasis of body function. Generally, they possess three main functions, i.e. participation in the maintenance of tissue structure, control of fluid and substrate exchange, and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. BMs are made up by various components which are in part specifically localized within the BM zone, or which represent ubiquitous matrix constituents with specific quantitative and/or qualitative differences in their localization. On the basis of a thorough immunohistochemical analysis of normal and diseased tissues, we provide here a concept of "functional morphology/pathomorphology" of the different BM components analyzed: 1.) The ubiquitous BM-constituent collagen IV primarily stabilizes the BM-zone and thus represents the "backbone" of the BM providing mechanical strength. Its loss leads to cystic tissue transformation as it is evidenced from the analysis of polycystic nephropathies. Thus, in other cystic tissue transformations a similar formal pathogenesis may be present. 2.) The specific localization of collagen VII as the main structural component of anchoring fibrils underlines the mechanical anchoring function of this collagenous protein. Defects in this protein lead to hereditary epidermolysis. The rapid re-occurrence of epidermal collagen VII during normal human wound healing indicates a quick reconstitution of the mechanical tensile strength of healing wounds. 3.) The BM-specific heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG, Perlecan) with its highly negative anionic charge can be assumed to exert filter control. This assumption is corroborated by the localizatory findings of a preferential deposition of HSPG in endothelial and particularly in glomerular BM. Similarly

  9. The influence of γ-radiation on biosynthesis of nuclear matrix proteins of hepatic cells of pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkhamidova, P.; Shamsutdinova, G.T.; Mirakhmedov, A.K.; Filatova, L.S.; Bul'dyaeva, T.V.; Zbarskij, I.B.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of incorporation of 35 S-methionine into nuclear matrix proteins of hepatic cells of pregnant rats and their embryos subjected to single γ-irradiation ( 60 Co, 1 and 2 Gy, 0.0233 Gy/s) on days 3, 13 and 17 of pregrnancy and embryogenesis. On day 21 of pregnancy and embryogenesis a decrease in the rate of incorporation of 35 S-methionine into nuclear matrix proteins was shown to be a function of radiation dose and time of pregnancy and embryogenesis on the moment of exposure

  10. Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 is a soluble protein mediating blue light-dependent regulation of plant growth and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin ChenTao; Ahmad, M.; Cashmore, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) is a flavin-type blue type receptor of Arabidopsis thaliana which mediates inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. In the work described in this report it is demonstrated that CRY1 is a soluble protein expressed in both young seedlings grown either in the dark or under light, and in different organs of adult plants. The functional role of CRY1 was further investigated using transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CRY1. It is demonstrated that overexpression of CRY1 resulted in hypersensitivity to blue, UV-A, and green light for the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation response. Transgenic plants overexpressing CRY1 also exhibited a dwarf phenotype with reduced size in almost every organ. This was in keeping with the previous observation of reciprocal alterations found in hy4 mutant plants and is consistent with a hypothesis that CRY1 mediates a light-dependent process resulting in a general inhibitory effect on plant growth. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing CRY1 showed increased anthocyanin accumulation in response to blue, UV-A, and green light in a fluence rate-dependent manner. This increase in anthocyanin accumulation in transgenic plants was shown to be concomitant with increased blue light-induction of CHS gene expression. It is concluded that CRY1 is a photoreceptor mediating blue light-dependent regulation of gene expression in addition to its affect on plant growth. (author)

  11. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein

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    Bat-Erdene Jugder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2. Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni–Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression.

  12. Serum level of soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 in renal allograft recipients with acute rejection: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z; Yang, C; Tang, Q; Zhao, T; Jia, Y; Ma, Z; Rong, R; Xu, M; Zhu, T

    2012-12-01

    Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sfgl2), which is mainly secreted by T cells, is a novel effector of regulatory T cells with immunosuppressive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate serum levels of sfgl2 among renal allograft recipients. From November 2010 to August 2011 we retrospectively divided 47 renal allograft recipients into an acute rejection (n = 19) versus a stable group (n = 28) according to allograft biopsy results, using the Banff 2007 classification. The acute rejection group was subdivided into grade I (n = 8) versus grade II T-cell-mediated (n = 6) or antibody-mediated rejection episodes (n = 5). Peripheral blood samples were collected at the time of biopsy. Fourteen healthy volunteers were included as normal group controls. Serum levels of sfgl2 were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of sfgl2 were increased among renal allograft recipients suffering from biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (61.91 ± 45.68 ng/mL), versus those with stable allografts (38.59 ± 19.92 ng/mL, P rejection episodes (41.71 ± 16.44 ng/mL, P rejection (34.10 ± 9.26 ng/mL, P rejection episodes to an extent dependent upon the pathological type and severity of the response. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Soluble Eggshell Membrane Protein/PLGA Electro spun Nano fibers for Guided Tissue Regeneration Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, J.; Liu, G.; Duan, Y.; Guo, Z.; Yu, J.

    2012-01-01

    Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a widely used method in periodontal therapy, which involves the placement of a barrier membrane to exclude migration of epithelium and ensure repopulation of periodontal ligament cells. The objective of this study is to prepare and evaluate a new type of soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP)/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nano fibers using electro spinning method for GTR membrane application. SEP/PLGA nano fibers were successfully prepared with various blending ratios. The morphology, chemical composition, surface wettability, and mechanical properties of the nano fibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurement, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and a universal testing machine. L-929 fibroblast cells were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of SEP/PLGA nano fibers and investigate the interaction between cells and nano fibers. Results showed that the SEP/PLGA electro spun membrane was composed of uniform, bead-free nano fibers, which formed an interconnected porous network structure. Mechanical property of SEP has been greatly improved by the addition of PLGA. The biological study results showed that SEP/PLGA nano fibers could enhance cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. The study indicated the potential of SEP/PLGA nano fibers for GTR application and provided a basis for future optimization

  14. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  15. Peeping into human renal calcium oxalate stone matrix: characterization of novel proteins involved in the intricate mechanism of urolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanu Priya Aggarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing number of patients suffering from urolithiasis represents one of the major challenges which nephrologists face worldwide today. For enhancing therapeutic outcomes of this disease, the pathogenic basis for the formation of renal stones is the need of hour. Proteins are found as major component in human renal stone matrix and are considered to have a potential role in crystal-membrane interaction, crystal growth and stone formation but their role in urolithiasis still remains obscure. METHODS: Proteins were isolated from the matrix of human CaOx containing kidney stones. Proteins having MW>3 kDa were subjected to anion exchange chromatography followed by molecular-sieve chromatography. The effect of these purified proteins was tested against CaOx nucleation and growth and on oxalate injured Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK renal epithelial cells for their activity. Proteins were identified by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server. In silico molecular interaction studies with CaOx crystals were also investigated. RESULTS: Five proteins were identified from the matrix of calcium oxalate kidney stones by MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server with the competence to control the stone formation process. Out of which two proteins were promoters, two were inhibitors and one protein had a dual activity of both inhibition and promotion towards CaOx nucleation and growth. Further molecular modelling calculations revealed the mode of interaction of these proteins with CaOx at the molecular level. CONCLUSIONS: We identified and characterized Ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 2, RIMS-binding protein 3A, Macrophage-capping protein as novel proteins from the matrix of human calcium oxalate stone which play a critical role in kidney stone

  16. Interactions of cationic polystyrene nanoparticles with marine bivalve hemocytes in a physiological environment: Role of soluble hemolymph proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Laura; Ciacci, Caterina; Fabbri, Rita; Balbi, Teresa; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Cortese, Katia; Caratto, Valentina; Monopoli, Marco P; Dawson, Kenneth; Bergami, Elisa; Corsi, Ilaria

    2016-10-01

    The bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis has proven as a suitable model invertebrate for evaluating the potential impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in the marine environment. In particular, in mussels, the immune system represents a sensitive target for different types of NPs. In environmental conditions, both NP intrinsic properties and those of the receiving medium will affect particle behavior and consequent bioavailability/uptake/toxicity. However, the evaluation of the biological effects of NPs requires additional understanding of how, once within the organism, NPs interact at the molecular level with cells in a physiological environment. In mammalian systems, different NPs associate with serum soluble components, organized into a "protein corona", which affects particle interactions with target cells. However, no information is available so far on the interactions of NPs with biological fluids of aquatic organisms. In this work, the influence of hemolymph serum (HS) on the in vitro effects of amino modified polystyrene NPs (PS-NH2) on Mytilus hemocytes was investigated. Hemocytes were incubated with PS-NH2 suspensions in HS (1, 5 and 50µg/mL) and the results were compared with those obtained in ASW medium. Cell functional parameters (lysosomal membrane stability, oxyradical production, phagocytosis) were evaluated, and morphological changes were investigated by TEM. The activation state of the signalling components involved in Mytilus immune response (p38 MAPK and PKC) was determined. The results show that in the presence of HS, PS-NH2 increased cellular damage and ROS production with respect to ASW medium. The effects were apparently mediated by disregulation of p38 MAPK signalling. The formation of a PS-NH2-protein corona in HS was investigated by centrifugation, and 1D- gel electrophoresis and nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The results identified the Putative C1q domain containing protein (MgC1q6) as the only component of the PS-NH2 hard protein corona in Mytilus

  17. Patterned layers of adsorbed extracellular matrix proteins: influence on mammalian cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont-Gillain, C C; Alaerts, J A; Dewez, J L; Rouxhet, P G

    2004-01-01

    Three patterned systems aiming at the control of mammalian cell behavior are presented. The determinant feature common to these systems is the spatial distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (mainly collagen) on polymer substrates. This distribution differs from one system to another with respect to the scale at which it is affected, from the supracellular to the supramolecular scale, and with respect to the way it is produced. In the first system, the surface of polystyrene was oxidized selectively to form micrometer-scale patterns, using photolithography. Adsorption of ECM proteins in presence of a competitor was enhanced on the oxidized domains, allowing selective cell adhesion to be achieved. In the second system, electron beam lithography was used to engrave grooves (depth and width approximately 1 microm) on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substratum. No modification of the surface chemistry associated to the created topography could be detected. Cell orientation along the grooves was only observed when collagen was preadsorbed on the substratum. In the third system, collagen adsorbed on PMMA was dried in conditions ensuring the formation of a nanometer-scale pattern. Cell adhesion was enhanced on such patterned collagen layers compared to smooth collagen layers.

  18. [Nuclear protein matrix from giant nuclei of Chironomus plumosus determinates polythene chromosome organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, M S; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    Giant nuclei from salivary glands of Chironomus plumosus were treated in situ with detergent, 2 M NaCl and nucleases in order to reveal residual nuclear matrix proteins (NMP). It was shown, that preceding stabilization of non-histone proteins with 2 mM CuCl2 allowed to visualize the structure of polythene chromosomes at every stage of the extraction of histones and DNA. Stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes maintains their morphology and banding patterns, which is observed by light and electron microscopy, whereas internal fibril net or residual nucleoli are not found. In stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes, topoisomerase IIalpha and SMC1 retain their localization that is typical of untreated chromosomes. NPM of polythene chromosomes also includes sites of DNA replication, visualized with BrDU incubation, and some RNA-components. So, we can conclude that structure of NPM from giant nuclei is equal to NPM from normal interphase nuclei, and that morphological features of polythene chromosomes depend on the presence of NMP.

  19. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of glutaric aciduria type 1-related glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase with mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Schmiesing

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1 is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH, which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. GA1 patients are prone to the development of encephalopathic crises which lead to an irreversible disabling dystonic movement disorder. The clinical and biochemical manifestations of GA1 vary considerably and lack correlations to the genotype. Using an affinity chromatography approach we report here for the first time on the identification of mitochondrial proteins interacting directly with GCDH. Among others, dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST involved in the formation of glutaryl-CoA, and the β-subunit of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETFB serving as electron acceptor, were identified as GCDH binding partners. We have adapted the yellow fluorescent protein-based fragment complementation assay and visualized the oligomerization of GCDH as well as its direct interaction with DLST and ETFB in mitochondria of living cells. These data suggest that GCDH is a constituent of multimeric mitochondrial dehydrogenase complexes, and the characterization of their interrelated functions may provide new insights into the regulation of lysine oxidation and the pathophysiology of GA1.

  1. Transcriptional factor DLX3 promotes the gene expression of enamel matrix proteins during amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichun; Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Wang, Weiping; Jia, Zhuqing; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3) is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO) inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease.

  2. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Shimei; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  3. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Liu

    Full Text Available In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%. Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  4. Preparation and characterization of monodisperse large-porous silica microspheres as the matrix for protein separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongjun; Wan, Guangping; Zhao, Junlong; Liu, Jiawei; Bai, Quan

    2016-11-04

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a kind of efficient separation technology and has been used widely in many fields. Micro-sized porous silica microspheres as the most popular matrix have been used for fast separation and analysis in HPLC. In this paper, the monodisperse large-porous silica microspheres with controllable size and structure were successfully synthesized with polymer microspheres as the templates and characterized. First, the poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) microspheres (P GMA-EDMA ) were functionalized with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) to generate amino groups which act as a catalyst in hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to form Si-containing low molecular weight species. Then the low molecular weight species diffused into the functionalized P GMA-EDMA microspheres by induction force of the amino groups to form polymer/silica hybrid microspheres. Finally, the organic polymer templates were removed by calcination, and the large-porous silica microspheres were obtained. The compositions, morphology, size distribution, specific surface area and pore size distribution of the porous silica microspheres were characterized by infrared analyzer, scanning-electron microscopy, dynamic laser scattering, the mercury intrusion method and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. The results show that the agglomeration of the hybrid microspheres can be overcome when the templates were functionalized with TEPA as amination reagent, and the yield of 95.7% of the monodisperse large-porous silica microspheres can be achieved with high concentration of polymer templates. The resulting large-porous silica microspheres were modified with octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODS) and the chromatographic evaluation was performed by separating the proteins and the digest of BSA. The baseline separation of seven kinds of protein standards was achieved, and the column delivered a better performance when separating BSA digests

  5. Intervariability and intravariability of bone morphogenetic proteins in commercially available demineralized bone matrix products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyun W; Zhao, Li; Kanim, Linda E A; Wong, Pamela; Delamarter, Rick B; Dawson, Edgar G

    2006-05-20

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 2, 4, and 7 in 9 commercially available ("off the shelf") demineralized bone matrix (DBM) product formulations using 3 different manufacturer's production lots of each DBM formulation. To evaluate and compare the quantity of BMPs among several different DBM formulations (inter-product variability), as well as examine the variability of these proteins in different production lots within the same DBM formulation (intra-product variability). DBMs are commonly used to augment available bone graft in spinal fusion procedures. Surgeons are presented with an ever-increasing variety of commercially available human DBMs from which to choose. Yet, there is limited information on a specific DBM product's osteoinductive efficacy, potency, and constancy. There were protein extracts from each DBM sample separately dialyzed 4 times against distilled water at 4 degrees C for 48 hours. The amount of BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS.: The concentrations of detected BMP-2 and BMP-7 were low for all DBM formulations, only nanograms of BMP were extracted from each gram of DBM (20.2-120.6 ng BMP-2/g DBM product; 54.2-226.8 ng BMP-7/g DBM). The variability of BMP concentrations among different lots of the same DBM formulation, intra-product variability, was higher than the variability of concentrations among different DBM formulations, inter-product variability (coefficient of variation range BMP-2 [16.34% to 76.01%], P DBMs are low, in the order of 1 x 10(-9) g of BMP/g of DBM. There is higher variability in concentration of BMPs among 3 different lots of the same DBM formulation than among different DBM formulations. This variability questions DBM products' reliability and, possibly, efficacy in providing consistent osteoinduction.

  6. Influenza A virus infection engenders a poor antibody response against the ectodomain of matrix protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunner William

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix protein 2 (M2 is an integral tetrameric membrane protein of influenza A virus (IAV. Its ectodomain (M2e shows remarkably little diversity amongst human IAV strains. As M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to reduce the severity of infection in animals, M2e is being studied for its capability of providing protection against a broad range of IAV strains. Presently, there is little information about the concentration of M2e-specific Abs in humans. Two previous studies made use of ELISA and Western blot against M2e peptides and recombinant M2 protein as immunosorbents, respectively, and reported Ab titers to be low or undetectable. An important caveat is that these assays may not have detected all Abs capable of binding to native tetrameric M2e. Therefore, we developed an assay likely to detect all M2e tetramer-specific Abs. Results We generated a HeLa cell line that expressed full length tetrameric M2 (HeLa-M2 or empty vector (HeLa-C10 under the control of the tetracycline response element. These cell lines were then used in parallel as immunosorbents in ELISA. The assay was standardized and M2e-specific Ab titers quantified by means of purified murine or chimeric (mouse variable regions, human constant regions M2e-specific Abs in the analysis of mouse and human sera, respectively. We found that the cell-based ELISA was substantially more effective than immobilized M2e peptide in detecting M2e-specific Abs in sera of mice that had recovered from repetitive IAV infections. Still, titers remained low ( Conclusion The results provide convincing evidence that M2e-specific Ab-mediated protection is currently lacking or suboptimal in humans.

  7. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Ning; Gong Yingxue; Chan, Vincent; Liao Kin; Chian, Kerm Sin

    2008-01-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10 -7 J m -2 ) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute

  8. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry for the Investigation of Proteins and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnum, Kristin E.; Frappier, Sara L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2008-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent technology for molecular imaging because of its high data dimensionality. MS can monitor thousands of individual molecular data channels measured as mass-to-charge (m/z). We describe the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS for the image analysis of proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites in tissues. We discuss the basic instrumentation and sample preparation methods needed to produce high-resolution images and high image reproducibility. Matrix-addition protocols are briefly discussed along with normal operating procedures, and selected biological and medical applications of MALDI imaging MS are described. We give examples of both two- and three-dimensional imaging, including normal mouse embryo implantation, sperm maturation in mouse epididymis, protein distributions in brain sections, protein alterations as a result of drug administration, and protein changes in brain due to neurodegeneration and tumor formation. Advantages of this technology and future challenges for its improvement are discussed.

  9. KinD is a checkpoint protein linking spore formation to extracellular-matrix production in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Claudio; Vlamakis, Hera; Guzman, Alejandra; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-05-18

    Bacillus subtilis cells form multicellular biofilm communities in which spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression occurs, leading to differentiation of multiple coexisting cell types. These cell types include matrix-producing and sporulating cells. Extracellular matrix production and sporulation are linked in that a mutant unable to produce matrix is delayed for sporulation. Here, we show that the delay in sporulation is not due to a growth advantage of the matrix-deficient mutant under these conditions. Instead, we show that the link between matrix production and sporulation is through the Spo0A signaling pathway. Both processes are regulated by the phosphorylated form of the master transcriptional regulator Spo0A. When cells have low levels of phosphorylated Spo0A (Spo0A~P), matrix genes are expressed; however, at higher levels of Spo0A~P, sporulation commences. We have found that Spo0A~P levels are maintained at low levels in the matrix-deficient mutant, thereby delaying expression of sporulation-specific genes. This is due to the activity of one of the components of the Spo0A phosphotransfer network, KinD. A deletion of kinD suppresses the sporulation defect of matrix mutants, while its overproduction delays sporulation. Our data indicate that KinD displays a dual role as a phosphatase or a kinase and that its activity is linked to the presence of extracellular matrix in the biofilms. We propose a novel role for KinD in biofilms as a checkpoint protein that regulates the onset of sporulation by inhibiting the activity of Spo0A until matrix, or a component therein, is sensed.

  10. Soluble ST2 protein in the short-term prognosis after hospitalisation in chronic systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczak-Soska, Karolina; Sakowicz, Agata; Pietrucha, Tadeusz; Lelonek, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is poor. ST2 protein is a promising prognostic biomarker for CHF. ST2 belongs to the cardioprotective signalling pathway involving interleukin-33 and its concentration in the serum depends on the biomechanical stress of cardiomyocytes (biomechanical strain). To determine the prognostic value of ST2 in short term follow-up after hospitalisation among patients with CHF. The study included 167 patients (mean age 62 years, 83% men) in stable NYHA class I-III with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of ≤ 45% (average 29.65%, ranges 13-45%). We analysed 58 variables including: demographics, co-morbidities, resting ECG, echocardiographic and coronary arteriography data, basic laboratory tests including N-terminal prohormone B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), serum concentration of soluble form of ST2 (sST2) using quantitative ELISA test ST2 Kit (Medical and Biological Laboratories; Japan) and adverse cardiovascular events during a one year observation. In the study, the primary endpoint (death) and the composite endpoint (hospitalisation for HF worsening, worsening in NYHA functional class, the need to increase the dose of diuretics, and/or death in a one year observation) were determined. Patients who died (n = 24; 14.55%) were in more advanced NYHA class, had prolonged QRS duration, higher levels of sST2, NT-proBNP, and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate. From multivariate analysis, the independent variable for the primary endpoint was NT-proBNP (OR = 1.00012; 95% CI 1.00002-1.00022; p = 0.018). 93 (56%) patients reached the composite endpoint. Multivariate analysis revealed that fasting glucose (OR = 1.343; 95% CI 1.041-1.732; p = 0.023) and sST2 (OR = 3.593; 95% CI 1.427-9.05; p = 0.007) independently enhanced the risk of composite endpoint occurrence in a one year observation. In patients with CHF with LVEF ≤ 45%, the prognostic value of sST2 protein in a short-term observation of one

  11. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fanconi anemia proteins localize to chromatin and the nuclear matrix in a DNA damage- and cell cycle-regulated manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, F; Moss, A; Kupfer, G M

    2001-06-29

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Cells from patients with FA exhibit genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross linking agents such as mitomycin C. Despite the identification of seven complementation groups and the cloning of six genes, the function of the encoded gene products remains elusive. The FancA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A), FancC, and FancG proteins have been detected within a nuclear complex, but no change in level, binding, or localization has been reported as a result of drug treatment or cell cycle. We show that in immunofluorescence studies, FancA appears as a non-nucleolar nuclear protein that is excluded from condensed, mitotic chromosomes. Biochemical fractionation reveals that the FA proteins are found in nuclear matrix and chromatin and that treatment with mitomycin C results in increase of the FA proteins in nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. This induction occurs in wild-type cells and mutant FA-D (Fanconi complementation group D) cells but not in mutant FA-A cells. Immunoprecipitation of FancA protein in chromatin demonstrates the coprecipitation of FancA, FancC, and FancG, showing that the FA proteins move together as a complex. Also, fractionation of mitotic cells confirms the lack of FA proteins in chromatin or the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, phosphorylation of FancG was found to be temporally correlated with exit of the FA complex from chromosomes at mitosis. Taken together, these findings suggest a role for FA proteins in chromatin and nuclear matrix.

  13. Interactions of cationic polystyrene nanoparticles with marine bivalve hemocytes in a physiological environment: Role of soluble hemolymph proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canesi, Laura, E-mail: Laura.Canesi@unige.it [Dept. of Earth, Environmental and Life Sciences – DISTAV, University of Genoa (Italy); Ciacci, Caterina [Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences – DIBS, University of Urbino (Italy); Fabbri, Rita; Balbi, Teresa [Dept. of Earth, Environmental and Life Sciences – DISTAV, University of Genoa (Italy); Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca [Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research – CEBR, University of Genoa (Italy); Cortese, Katia [Department of Experimental Medicine – DIMES, University of Genoa (Italy); Caratto, Valentina [Dept. of Earth, Environmental and Life Sciences – DISTAV, University of Genoa (Italy); Monopoli, Marco P. [Centre for BioNanoInteractions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University College Dublin (Ireland); Department of Pharmaceutical and Medical Chemistry, Royal College of Surgeons, 123 St. Stephen Green, Dublin (Ireland); Dawson, Kenneth [Centre for BioNanoInteractions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University College Dublin (Ireland); Bergami, Elisa; Corsi, Ilaria [Dept. of Physical, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Siena (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    The bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis has proven as a suitable model invertebrate for evaluating the potential impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in the marine environment. In particular, in mussels, the immune system represents a sensitive target for different types of NPs. In environmental conditions, both NP intrinsic properties and those of the receiving medium will affect particle behavior and consequent bioavailability/uptake/toxicity. However, the evaluation of the biological effects of NPs requires additional understanding of how, once within the organism, NPs interact at the molecular level with cells in a physiological environment. In mammalian systems, different NPs associate with serum soluble components, organized into a “protein corona”, which affects particle interactions with target cells. However, no information is available so far on the interactions of NPs with biological fluids of aquatic organisms. In this work, the influence of hemolymph serum (HS) on the in vitro effects of amino modified polystyrene NPs (PS-NH{sub 2}) on Mytilus hemocytes was investigated. Hemocytes were incubated with PS-NH{sub 2} suspensions in HS (1, 5 and 50 µg/mL) and the results were compared with those obtained in ASW medium. Cell functional parameters (lysosomal membrane stability, oxyradical production, phagocytosis) were evaluated, and morphological changes were investigated by TEM. The activation state of the signalling components involved in Mytilus immune response (p38 MAPK and PKC) was determined. The results show that in the presence of HS, PS-NH{sub 2} increased cellular damage and ROS production with respect to ASW medium. The effects were apparently mediated by disregulation of p38 MAPK signalling. The formation of a PS-NH{sub 2}-protein corona in HS was investigated by centrifugation, and 1D- gel electrophoresis and nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The results identified the Putative C1q domain containing protein (MgC1q6) as the only component of the PS-NH{sub 2} hard

  14. Interactions of cationic polystyrene nanoparticles with marine bivalve hemocytes in a physiological environment: Role of soluble hemolymph proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canesi, Laura; Ciacci, Caterina; Fabbri, Rita; Balbi, Teresa; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Cortese, Katia; Caratto, Valentina; Monopoli, Marco P.; Dawson, Kenneth; Bergami, Elisa; Corsi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    The bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis has proven as a suitable model invertebrate for evaluating the potential impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in the marine environment. In particular, in mussels, the immune system represents a sensitive target for different types of NPs. In environmental conditions, both NP intrinsic properties and those of the receiving medium will affect particle behavior and consequent bioavailability/uptake/toxicity. However, the evaluation of the biological effects of NPs requires additional understanding of how, once within the organism, NPs interact at the molecular level with cells in a physiological environment. In mammalian systems, different NPs associate with serum soluble components, organized into a “protein corona”, which affects particle interactions with target cells. However, no information is available so far on the interactions of NPs with biological fluids of aquatic organisms. In this work, the influence of hemolymph serum (HS) on the in vitro effects of amino modified polystyrene NPs (PS-NH 2 ) on Mytilus hemocytes was investigated. Hemocytes were incubated with PS-NH 2 suspensions in HS (1, 5 and 50 µg/mL) and the results were compared with those obtained in ASW medium. Cell functional parameters (lysosomal membrane stability, oxyradical production, phagocytosis) were evaluated, and morphological changes were investigated by TEM. The activation state of the signalling components involved in Mytilus immune response (p38 MAPK and PKC) was determined. The results show that in the presence of HS, PS-NH 2 increased cellular damage and ROS production with respect to ASW medium. The effects were apparently mediated by disregulation of p38 MAPK signalling. The formation of a PS-NH 2 -protein corona in HS was investigated by centrifugation, and 1D- gel electrophoresis and nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The results identified the Putative C1q domain containing protein (MgC1q6) as the only component of the PS-NH 2 hard protein corona in

  15. A novel water-based process produces eco-friendly bio-adhesive made from green cross-linked soybean soluble polysaccharide and soy protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cheng; Chen, Mingsong; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiaona; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jianzhang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an eco-friendly soy protein adhesive was developed that utilized two components from soybean meal without addition of any toxic material. A plant-based, water-soluble and inexpensive soybean soluble polysaccharide was used as the novel renewable material to combine with soy protein to produce a soy protein adhesive. Three-plywood was fabricated with the resulting adhesive, and its wet shear strength was measured. The results showed the wet shear strength of plywood bonded by the adhesive reached 0.99MPa, meeting the water resistance requirement for interior use panels. This improvement was attributed to the following reasons: (1) Combination of cross-linked soybean soluble polysaccharide and soy protein formed an interpenetrating network structure, improving the thermal stability and water resistance of the cured adhesive. (2) Adding CL-SSPS decreased the adhesive viscosity to 15.14Pas, which increased the amount of the adhesive that penetrate the wood's surface and formed more interlocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial CpG-DNA activates dendritic cells in vivo: T helper cell-independent cytotoxic T cell responses to soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparwasser, T; Vabulas, R M; Villmow, B; Lipford, G B; Wagner, H

    2000-12-01

    Receptors for conserved molecular patterns associated with microbial pathogens induce synthesis of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines in immature dendritic cells (DC), as do antigen-reactive CD4 T helper cells via CD40 signaling. Once activated, antigen-presenting DC may activate CD8 T cell responses in a T helper cell-independent fashion. Using immunostimulatory CpG-oligonucleotides (ODN) mimicking bacterial CpG-DNA, we tested whether CpG-DNA bypasses the need for T helper cells in CTL responses towards proteins by directly activating antigen-presenting DC to transit into professional APC. We describe that immature DC in situ constitutively process soluble proteins and generate CD8 T cell determinants yet CD8 T cell responses remain abortive. Induction of primary antigen-specific CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated responses becomes initiated in wild-type as well as T helper cell-deficient mice, provided soluble protein and CpG-ODN are draining into the same lymph node. Specifically we show that CpG-ODN trigger antigen-presenting immature DC within the draining lymph node to acutely up-regulate co-stimulatory molecules and produce IL-12. These results provide new insights for generating in vivo efficient CTL responses to soluble proteins which may influence vaccination strategies.

  17. Efficient expression of a soluble lipid transfer protein (LTP) of Platanus orientalis using short peptide tags and structural comparison with the natural form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Farhad; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Ketabdar, Hanieh; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Successful recombinant allergen-based immunotherapy has drawn a great deal of attention to use recombinant allergens for new therapeutic and/or diagnostic strategies. The Escherichia coli expression system is frequently used to produce recombinant allergens; however, protein expression in E. coli often results in inclusion bodies. Here, we focused on the expression of two recombinant soluble forms of Pla or 3 using solubility-enhancing peptide tags, human immune deficiency virus type 1 transactivator of transcription core domain and poly-arginine-lysine: rTAT-Pla or 3 and rPoly-Arg-Lys-Pla or 3. Structural characteristics and IgE reactivity of purified recombinant proteins were compared with natural Pla or 3 (nPla or 3) isolated from Platanus orientalis using circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence spectroscopy, and immunoblotting. Likewise, intrinsic viscosity and Stokes radius of the natural and recombinant Pla or 3 allergens were determined to analyze structural compactness in aqueous media. The results indicate high-level solubility and efficient expression of the fusion proteins (rTAT-Pla or 3 and rPoly-Arg-Lys-Pla or 3) compared with the wild-type recombinant. Furthermore, the similar structural characteristics and IgE-binding activities of the fusion proteins to nPla or 3 provide a promising tool for allergy diagnosis and treatment. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Inherited complex I deficiency is associated with faster protein diffusion in the matrix of moving mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, W.J.H.; Distelmaier, F.; Hink, M.A.; Verkaart, S.; Wijers, M.; Fransen, J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria continuously change shape, position, and matrix configuration for optimal metabolite exchange. It is well established that changes in mitochondrial metabolism influence mitochondrial shape and matrix configuration. We demonstrated previously that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

  19. Dimerization Efficiency of Canine Distemper Virus Matrix Protein Regulates Membrane-Budding Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringolf, Fanny; Herren, Michael; Wyss, Marianne; Vidondo, Beatriz; Langedijk, Johannes P; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2017-08-15

    Paramyxoviruses rely on the matrix (M) protein to orchestrate viral assembly and budding at the plasma membrane. Although the mechanistic details remain largely unknown, structural data suggested that M dimers and/or higher-order oligomers may facilitate membrane budding. To gain functional insights, we employed a structure-guided mutagenesis approach to investigate the role of canine distemper virus (CDV) M protein self-assembly in membrane-budding activity. Three six-alanine-block (6A-block) mutants with mutations located at strategic oligomeric positions were initially designed. While the first one includes residues potentially residing at the protomer-protomer interface, the other two display amino acids located within two distal surface-exposed α-helices proposed to be involved in dimer-dimer contacts. We further focused on the core of the dimeric interface by mutating asparagine 138 (N138) to several nonconservative amino acids. Cellular localization combined with dimerization and coimmunopurification assays, performed under various denaturing conditions, revealed that all 6A-block mutants were impaired in self-assembly and cell periphery accumulation. These phenotypes correlated with deficiencies in relocating CDV nucleocapsid proteins to the cell periphery and in virus-like particle (VLP) production. Conversely, all M-N138 mutants remained capable of self-assembly, though to various extents, which correlated with proper accumulation and redistribution of nucleocapsid proteins at the plasma membrane. However, membrane deformation and VLP assays indicated that the M-N138 variants exhibiting the most reduced dimerization propensity were also defective in triggering membrane remodeling and budding, despite proper plasma membrane accumulation. Overall, our data provide mechanistic evidence that the efficiency of CDV M dimerization/oligomerization governs both cell periphery localization and membrane-budding activity. IMPORTANCE Despite the availability of

  20. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr...

  1. Ingestion of Casein in a Milk Matrix Modulates Dietary Protein Digestion and Absorption Kinetics but Does Not Modulate Postprandial Muscle Protein Synthesis in Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Snijders, Tim; Linkens, Armand M A; Hamer, Henrike M; van Kranenburg, Janneau; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-07-01

    The slow digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics of isolated micellar casein have been held responsible for its relatively lower postprandial muscle protein synthetic response compared with rapidly digested proteins such as isolated whey. However, casein is normally consumed within a milk matrix. We hypothesized that protein digestion and absorption kinetics and the subsequent muscle protein synthetic response after micellar casein ingestion are modulated by the milk matrix. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a milk matrix on casein protein digestion and absorption kinetics and postprandial muscle protein synthesis in older men. In a parallel-group design, 32 healthy older men (aged 71 ± 1 y) received a primed continuous infusion of L-[ring-(2)H5]-phenylalanine, L-[ring-3,5-(2)H2]-tyrosine, and L-[1-(13)C]-leucine, and ingested 25 g intrinsically L-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine and L-[1-(13)C]-leucine labeled casein dissolved in bovine milk serum (Cas+Serum) or water (Cas). Plasma samples and muscle biopsies were collected in the postabsorptive state and for 300 min in the postprandial period to examine whole-body and skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Casein ingestion increased plasma leucine and phenylalanine concentrations and L-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine enrichments, with a more rapid rise after Cas vs. Cas+Serum. Nonetheless, dietary protein-derived phenylalanine availability did not differ between Cas+Serum (47 ± 2%, mean ± SEM) and Cas (46 ± 3%) when assessed over the 300-min postprandial period (P = 0.80). The milk matrix did not modulate postprandial myofibrillar protein synthesis rates from 0 to 120 min (0.038 ± 0.005 vs. 0.031 ± 0.007%/h) or from 120 to 300 min (0.052 ± 0.004 vs. 0.067 ± 0.005%/h) after Cas+Serum vs. Cas. Similarly, no treatment differences in muscle protein-bound L-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine enrichments were observed at 120 min (0.003 ± 0.001 vs. 0.002 ± 0.001) or 300 min (0.015 ± 0.002 vs. 0.016 ± 0.002 mole

  2. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  3. Not All Inner Ears are the Same: Otolith Matrix Proteins in the Inner Ear of Sub-Adult Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis Mossambicus, Reveal Insights Into the Biomineralization Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The fish ear stones (otoliths) consist mainly of calcium carbonate and have lower amounts of a proteinous matrix. This matrix consists of macromolecules, which directly control the biomineralization process. We analyzed the composition of this proteinous matrix by mass spectrometry in a shotgun approach. For this purpose, an enhanced protein purification technique was developed that excludes any potential contamination of proteins from body fluids. Using this method we identified eight proteins in the inner ear of Oreochromis mossambicus. These include the common otolith matrix proteins (OMP-1, otolin-1, neuroserpin, SPARC and otoconin), and three proteins (alpha tectorin, otogelin and transferrin) not previously localized to the otoliths. Moreover, we were able to exclude the occurrence of two matrix proteins (starmaker and pre-cerebellin-like protein) known from other fish species. In further analyses, we show that the absence of the OMP starmaker corresponds to calcitic otoliths and that pre-cerebellin-like protein is not present at any stage during the development of the otoliths of the inner ear. This study shows O. mossambicus does not have all of the known otolith proteins indicating that the matrix proteins in the inner ear of fish are not the same across species. Further functional studies of the novel proteins we identified during otolith development are required. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Degradation of some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mays L. cv PR32-B10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Roberto; de Biasi, Margherita-Gabriella; Piccialli, Vincenzo; de Napoli, Lorenzo; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2016-10-01

    The ability of the water-soluble protein extracts from Zea mais L. cv. PR32-B10 to degrade some representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), has been evaluated. Surface sterilized seeds of corn (Zea mais L. Pioneer cv. PR32-B10) were hydroponically cultivated in a growth chamber under no-stressful conditions. The water-soluble protein extracts isolated from maize tissues showed peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and catalase activities. Incubation of the extracts with naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene, led to formation of oxidized and/or degradation products. GC-MS and TLC monitoring of the processes showed that naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene and pyrene underwent 100%, 78%, 92% and 65% oxidative degradation, respectively, after 120 min. The chemical structure of the degradation products were determined by (1)H NMR and ESI-MS spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Peroxisomal matrix protein import - Suppression of protein import defects in Hansenula polymorpha pex mutants by overproduction of the PTS1 receptor pex5p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, JAKW; Veenhuis, M

    2000-01-01

    In the past decade, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that govern sorting of proteins to the peroxisomal lumen. This article summarizes the principal features of how peroxisomal matrix enzymes are thought to reach the peroxisome. In addition, it describes recent data that

  6. Expression of uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein in ankylosing spondylitis and its significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-qing HUANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the serum level of uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein (ucMGP in ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients, and to evaluate its diagnostic value and the relation of ucMGP to inflammation and ossification process in AS. Methods Eight-two AS patients and 76 healthy controls were enrolled in this randomized controlled study. The clinical indices (age, gender, course of disease, disease activity, changes in radiographic studies, and indices of bone metabolism or inflammation, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, osteocalcin (OC, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP were evaluated or measured. The disease activity was assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, and changes in radiographic pictures were evaluated according to the modified Stoke AS Spine Score (mSASSS, and serum level of ucMGP was measured by a competitive ELISA. The relationship between ucMGP and clinical indexes, radiographic scoring, indices in bone metabolism or inflammation was estimated by SPSS software, and the diagnostic value of ucMGP was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve. Results The levels of ESR and CRP in AS patients were higher than those in healthy controls, but the serum ucMGP was lower (2958±654nmol/L compared with healthy controls (4551±1036nmol/L, P0, r=-0.715, P1, r=-0.741, P10, r=-0.776, P<0.01; mSASSS <10, r=-0.297, P=0.028. Conclusion Serum ucMGP may serve as a diagnostic biomarker of AS and progression index of ossification, especially in late stage of AS.

  7. Spatial Expression of Otolith Matrix Protein-1 and Otolin-1 in Normally and Kinetotically Swimming Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    Kinetosis (motion sickness) has been repeatedly shown to affect some fish of a given clutch following the transition from 1g to microgravity or from hypergravity to 1g. This susceptibility to kinetosis may be correlated with irregular inner ear otolith growth. Otoliths are mainly composed of calcium carbonate and matrix proteins, which play an important role in the process of otolith mineralization. Here, we examine the morphology of otoliths and the expression pattern of the major otolith proteins OMP-1 and otolin-1 in a series of hypergravity experiments. In the utricle, OMP-1 is present in centripetal (medial) and centrifugal (lateral) regions of the meshwork area. In the saccule, OMP-1 was expressed within a dorsal and a ventral narrow band of the meshwork area opposite to the periphery of the sulcus acusticus. In normal animals, the spatial expression pattern of OMP-1 reaches more posteriorly in the centrifugal aspect and is considerably broader in the centripetal portion of the utricle compared to kinetotic animals. However, otolin-1 was not expressed in the utricule. In the saccule, no differences were observed for either gene when comparing normal and kinetotically behaving fish. The difference in the utricular OMP-1 expression pattern between normally and kinetotically swimming fish indicates a different otolith morphology and thus a different geometry of the otoliths resting on the corresponding sensory maculae. As the utricle is the endorgan responsible for sensing gravity, the aberrant morphology of the utricular otoliths, based on OMP-1 expression, likely leads to the observed kinetotic behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transcriptional factor DLX3 promotes the gene expression of enamel matrix proteins during amelogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichun Zhang

    Full Text Available Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3 is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease.

  9. Modulation of enamel matrix proteins on the formation and nano-assembly of hydroxyapatite in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Huang Weiya; Zhang Yuanming; Xue Bo; Wen Xuejun

    2012-01-01

    Natural enamel has a hierarchically nanoassembled architecture that is regulated by enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) during the formation of enamel crystals. To understand the role of EMPs on enamel mineralization, calcium phosphate (CaP) growth experiments in both the presence and absence of native rat EMPs in a single diffusion system were conducted. The morphology and organization of formed CaP crystals were examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), High-Resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). In the system containing the EMPs, hydroxyapatite (HAP) with hierarchical lamellar nanostructure can be formed and the aligned HAP assembly tightly bundled by 3–4 rod-like nanocrystals like an enamel prism. However, in the absence of EMPs, only a sheet-like structure of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase was presented. EMPs promote HAP formation and inhibit the growth of OCP on the (010) plane. It is discussed that the organized Amelogenin/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate might be the precursor to the bundled HAP crystal prism. The study benefits the understanding of biomineralization of tooth enamel. - Highlights: ► An aligned hydroxyapatite crystal bundled by rod-like nanosize crystals was obtained. ► An organized Amel/ACP would be the precursor of the bundled hydroxyapatite crystal prism. ► EMPs inhibit the growth of octacalcium phosphate in a defined plane.

  10. Matrix Gla Protein Polymorphisms are Associated with Coronary Artery Calcification in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosier, Michael D.; Booth, Sarah L.; Peter, Inga; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Price, Paul A.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Hoffmann, Udo; Williamson, Matthew K.; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). Our aim was to examine the cross-sectional association between MGP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A), and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)] and CAC. CAC was measured by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), in older men and women of European descent, (n = 386; 60 to 80 y of age). Serum MGP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Linear, Tobit and Ordinal regression analyses all revealed that in men, homozygous carriers of the minor allele of rs1800802 , rs1800801 , or rs4236 (minor allele frequency: 21, 38, and 40%, respectively) were associated with a decreased quantity of CAC, relative to major allele carriers. This association was not found in women. Although genetic variation in MGP was associated with serum MGP concentrations, there were no associations between serum MGP and CAC. The results of this study suggest a role for MGP genetic variants in coronary atherosclerosis among men that is not reflected in serum MGP concentrations. PMID:19352064

  11. Hydroxychloroquine induces inhibition of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroxychloroquine on the level of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes of knee osteoarthritis. The rate of growth in cartilage cells was analyzed using MTT assay whereas the Col-2 and COMP expression levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. For the determination of MMP-13 expression, ELISA test was used. The results revealed no significant change in the rate of cartilage cell proliferation in hydroxychloroquine-treated compared to untreated cells. Hydroxychloro-quine treatment exhibited concentration- and time-dependent effect on the inhibition of collagen type II and COMP expression in chondrocytes. However, its treatment caused a significant enhancement in the expression levels of MMP-13 compared to the untreated cells. Therefore, hydroxychloro-quine promotes expression of MMP-13 and reduces collagen type II and COMP expression levels in chondrocytes without any significant change in the growth of cells.

  12. Silk-elastin-like protein polymer matrix for intraoperative delivery of an oncolytic vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel L; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Wong, Danni; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Nanhai G; Yu, Yong A; Szalay, Aladar A; Cappello, Joseph; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic viral efficacy may be limited by the penetration of the virus into tumors. This may be enhanced by intraoperative application of virus immediately after surgical resection. Oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 was delivered in silk-elastin-like protein polymer (SELP) in vitro and in vivo in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505c in nude mice. GLV-1h68 in SELP infected and lysed anaplastic thyroid cancer cells in vitro equally as effectively as in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and at 1 week retains a thousand fold greater infectious plaque-forming units. In surgical resection models of residual tumor, GLV-1h68 in SELP improves tumor control and shows increased viral β-galactosidase expression as compared to PBS. The use of SELP matrix for intraoperative oncolytic viral delivery protects infectious viral particles from degradation, facilitates sustained viral delivery and transgene expression, and improves tumor control. Such optimization of methods of oncolytic viral delivery may enhance therapeutic outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Modulation of enamel matrix proteins on the formation and nano-assembly of hydroxyapatite in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong, E-mail: tlihong@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Huang Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taizhou, Taizhou University, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Zhang Yuanming [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Xue Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Wen Xuejun [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Natural enamel has a hierarchically nanoassembled architecture that is regulated by enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) during the formation of enamel crystals. To understand the role of EMPs on enamel mineralization, calcium phosphate (CaP) growth experiments in both the presence and absence of native rat EMPs in a single diffusion system were conducted. The morphology and organization of formed CaP crystals were examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), High-Resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). In the system containing the EMPs, hydroxyapatite (HAP) with hierarchical lamellar nanostructure can be formed and the aligned HAP assembly tightly bundled by 3-4 rod-like nanocrystals like an enamel prism. However, in the absence of EMPs, only a sheet-like structure of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase was presented. EMPs promote HAP formation and inhibit the growth of OCP on the (010) plane. It is discussed that the organized Amelogenin/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate might be the precursor to the bundled HAP crystal prism. The study benefits the understanding of biomineralization of tooth enamel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An aligned hydroxyapatite crystal bundled by rod-like nanosize crystals was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An organized Amel/ACP would be the precursor of the bundled hydroxyapatite crystal prism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMPs inhibit the growth of octacalcium phosphate in a defined plane.

  14. Undersulfation of proteoglycans and proteins alter C6 glioma cells proliferation, adhesion and extracellular matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Aguiar, Claudia B N; Garcez, Ricardo Castilho; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves

    2002-11-01

    Proteoglycans are considered to be important molecule in cell-microenvironment interactions. They are overexpressed in neoplastic cells modifying their growth and migration in hosts. In this work we verified that undersulfation of proteoglycans and other sulfated molecules, induced by sodium chlorate treatment, inhibited C6 glioma cells proliferation in a dose-dependent way. This effect was restored by the addition of exogenous heparin. We could not detect significant cell mortality in our culture condition. The treatment also impaired in a dose-dependent manner, C6 cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin). In addition, sodium chlorate treatment altered C6 glioma cell morphology, from the fibroblast-like to a more rounded one. This effect was accompanied by increased synthesis of fibronectin and alterations in its extracellular network organization. However, we could not observe modifications on laminin organization and synthesis. The results suggest an important connection between sulfation degree with important tumor functions, such as proliferation and adhesion. We suggest that proteoglycans may modulate the glioma microenvironment network during tumor cell progression and invasion.

  15. [Antitumor effects of matrix protein of vesicular stomatic virus on EL4 lymphoma mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-jia; Yu, Qin-mei; Meng, Wen-tong; Wen, Yan-jun; Chen, Li-juan; Niu, Ting

    2011-03-01

    To explore antitumor effects of plasmid pcDNA3. 1-MP encoding matrix protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP:CHOL) in mice with EL4 lymphoma. C57BL/6 mouse model with EL4 lymphoma was established. Sixty mice bearing EL4 lymphoma were divided randomly into five groups including Lip-MP, Lip-pVAX, Lip, ADM and NS groups, which were intravenously injected with liposome-pcDNA 3. 1-MP complex, liposome-pVAX complex, empty liposome, Adriamycin and normal saline respectively every three days. Tumor volumes and survival time were monitored. Microvessel density and tumor proliferative index in tumor tissues were determined by CD31, Ki-67 immunohistochemistry staining, meanwhile the tumor apoptosis index was measured by TUNEL method. From 6 days after treatments on, the tumor volume in Lip-MP group was much smaller than that in Lip-pVAX, Lip and NS group (P EL4 tumor cells in vivo (P EL4 lymphoma, which may be related to the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor cell proliferation.

  16. Embedding nano-Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} in hierarchical porous carbon matrixes derived from water soluble polymers for ultra-fast lithium ion batteries anodic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Chun-Kai; Bao, Qi; Huang, Yao-Hui; Duh, Jenq-Gong, E-mail: jgd@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-07-15

    Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/hierarchical porous carbon matrixes composites are successfully prepared by a facile and fast polymers assisted sol–gel method, aiming to promote both electronic and ionic conductivity. As indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, three less expensive cost and available water soluble polymers (e.g. PAA, CMC, and SA) can homogeneously react with Li–Ti–O precursor to incorporate into interior of nano-scale lithium titanate and provide a continues conductive network after pyrolysis. In addition, the results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy also prove that the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} nanoparticles are firmly embedded in porous carbon matrix with no obvious agglomeration. EIS measurement and cyclic voltammetry further reveal that the facilitated electrode kinetics and better ionic transport of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/hierarchical porous carbon matrixes composites than that of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. The c-CMC-LTO exhibits a superior capacity of 92 mAh g{sup −1} and retains its initial value with no obviously capacity decay over 200 cycles under an ultra-high C rate (50 C). - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustrations of the formation process of embedding LTO into Carbon matrixes derived from water soluable polymers (upper) and the electrochemical reaction paths in LTO/Carbon composites during charging/discharging processes (lower). - Highlights: • Hierarchical porous carbon matrixes were used to improve the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anodes. • Carbon matrixes could suppress the agglomeration of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} nanoparticles. • meso-nanoporous carbon structure was beneficial for filtration of electrolyte. • The c-CMC-LTO exhibited superior high rate capability and cycling durability.

  17. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix of human lung fibroblasts. Isolation, purification, and core protein characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremans, A.; Cassiman, J.J.; Van den Berghe, H.; David, G.

    1988-01-01

    Confluent cultured human lung fibroblasts were labeled with 35SO4(2-). After 48 h of labeling, the pericellular matrix was prepared by Triton X-100 and deoxycholate extraction of the monolayers. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) accounted for nearly 80% of the total matrix [35S]proteoglycans. After solubilization in 6 M guanidinium HCl and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation, the majority (78%) of these [35S] HSPG equilibrated at an average buoyant density of 1.35 g/ml. This major HSPG fraction was purified by ion-exchange chromatography on Mono Q and by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B, and further characterized by gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Intact [35S]HSPG eluted with Kav 0.1 from Sepharose CL-4B, whereas the protein-free [35S]heparan sulfate chains, obtained by alkaline borohydride treatment of the proteoglycan fractions, eluted with Kav 0.45 (Mr approximately 72,000). When analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, core (protein) preparations, obtained by heparitinase digestion of 125I-labeled HSPG fractions, yielded one major labeled band with apparent molecular mass of approximately 300 kDa. Reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol slightly increased the apparent Mr of the labeled band, suggesting a single polypeptide structure and the presence of intrachain disulfide bonds. Immunoadsorption experiments and immunostaining of electrophoretically separated heparitinase-digested core proteins with monoclonal antibodies raised against matrix and cell surface-associated HSPG suggested that the major matrix-associated HSPG of cultured human lung fibroblasts is distinct from the HSPG that are anchored in the membranes of these cells. Binding studies suggested that this matrix HSPG interacts with several matrix components, both through its glycosaminoglycan chains and through its heparitinase-resistant core. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Airway remodelling and inflammation in asthma are dependent on the extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Cooley, Marion A; Nair, Prema M; Donovan, Chantal; Hsu, Alan C; Jarnicki, Andrew G; Haw, Tatt Jhong; Hansbro, Nicole G; Ge, Qi; Brown, Alexandra C; Tay, Hock; Foster, Paul S; Wark, Peter A; Horvat, Jay C; Bourke, Jane E; Grainge, Chris L; Argraves, W Scott; Oliver, Brian G; Knight, Darryl A; Burgess, Janette K; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. It is characterized by allergic airway inflammation, airway remodelling, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Asthma patients, in particular those with chronic or severe asthma, have airway remodelling that is associated with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagens. Fibulin-1 (Fbln1) is an important ECM protein that stabilizes collagen and other ECM proteins. The level of Fbln1c, one of the four Fbln1 variants, which predominates in both humans and mice, is increased in the serum and airways fluids in asthma but its function is unclear. We show that the level of Fbln1c was increased in the lungs of mice with house dust mite (HDM)-induced chronic allergic airway disease (AAD). Genetic deletion of Fbln1c and therapeutic inhibition of Fbln1c in mice with chronic AAD reduced airway collagen deposition, and protected against AHR. Fbln1c-deficient (Fbln1c -/- ) mice had reduced mucin (MUC) 5 AC levels, but not MUC5B levels, in the airways as compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Fbln1c interacted with fibronectin and periostin that was linked to collagen deposition around the small airways. Fbln1c -/- mice with AAD also had reduced numbers of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells around the airways and reduced airway contractility as compared with WT mice. After HDM challenge, these mice also had fewer airway inflammatory cells, reduced interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-33, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and CXCL1 levels in the lungs, and reduced IL-5, IL-33 and TNF levels in lung-draining lymph nodes. Therapeutic targeting of Fbln1c reduced the numbers of GATA3-positive Th2 cells in the lymph nodes and lungs after chronic HDM challenge. Treatment also reduced the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 from co-cultured dendritic cells and T cells restimulated with HDM extract. Human epithelial cells cultured with Fbln1c peptide produced more CXCL1 mRNA than medium-treated controls. Our data show

  19. EcmPred: Prediction of extracellular matrix proteins based on random forest with maximum relevance minimum redundancy feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar Umar

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of tissues of multicellular organisms. It consists of secreted macromolecules, mainly polysaccharides and glycoproteins. Malfunctions of ECM proteins lead to severe disorders such as marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, numerous chondrodysplasias, and skin diseases. In this work, we report a random forest approach, EcmPred, for the prediction of ECM proteins from protein sequences. EcmPred was trained on a dataset containing 300 ECM and 300 non-ECM and tested on a dataset containing 145 ECM and 4187 non-ECM proteins. EcmPred achieved 83% accuracy on the training and 77% on the test dataset. EcmPred predicted 15 out of 20 experimentally verified ECM proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome, we predicted novel ECM proteins validated with gene ontology and InterPro. The dataset and standalone version of the EcmPred software is available at http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/Extracellular_matrix_proteins/EcmPred. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A Versatile System for High-Throughput In Situ X-ray Screening and Data Collection of Soluble and Membrane-Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broecker, Jana; Klingel, Viviane; Ou, Wei-Lin; Balo, Aidin R.; Kissick, David J.; Ogata, Craig M.; Kuo, Anling; Ernst, Oliver P.

    2016-10-12

    In recent years, in situ data collection has been a major focus of progress in protein crystallography. Here, we introduce the Mylar in situ method using Mylar-based sandwich plates that are inexpensive, easy to make and handle, and show significantly less background scattering than other setups. A variety of cognate holders for patches of Mylar in situ sandwich films corresponding to one or more wells makes the method robust and versatile, allows for storage and shipping of entire wells, and enables automated crystal imaging, screening, and goniometerbased X-ray diffraction data-collection at room temperature and under cryogenic conditions for soluble and membrane-protein crystals grown in or transferred to these plates. We validated the Mylar in situ method using crystals of the water-soluble proteins hen egg-white lysozyme and sperm whale myoglobin as well as the 7-transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin from Haloquadratum walsbyi. In conjunction with current developments at synchrotrons, this approach promises high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins to become faster and more routine.

  1. Efficient soluble expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli in fed-batch fermentations on chemically defined minimal media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąciarz, Anna; Khatri, Narendar Kumar; Velez-Suberbie, M Lourdes; Saaranen, Mirva J; Uchida, Yuko; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ruddock, Lloyd W

    2017-06-15

    The production of recombinant proteins containing disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli is challenging. In most cases the protein of interest needs to be either targeted to the oxidizing periplasm or expressed in the cytoplasm in the form of inclusion bodies, then solubilized and re-folded in vitro. Both of these approaches have limitations. Previously we showed that soluble expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli is possible at shake flask scale with a system, known as CyDisCo, which is based on co-expression of a protein of interest along with a sulfhydryl oxidase and a disulfide bond isomerase. With CyDisCo it is possible to produce disulfide bonded proteins in the presence of intact reducing pathways in the cytoplasm. Here we scaled up production of four disulfide bonded proteins to stirred tank bioreactors and achieved high cell densities and protein yields in glucose fed-batch fermentations, using an E. coli strain (BW25113) with the cytoplasmic reducing pathways intact. Even without process optimization production of purified human single chain IgA 1 antibody fragment reached 139 mg/L and hen avidin 71 mg/L, while purified yields of human growth hormone 1 and interleukin 6 were around 1 g/L. Preliminary results show that human growth hormone 1 was also efficiently produced in fermentations of W3110 strain and when glucose was replaced with glycerol as the carbon source. Our results show for the first time that efficient production of high yields of soluble disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli with the reducing pathways intact is feasible to scale-up to bioreactor cultivations on chemically defined minimal media.

  2. Proteomic analysis of the crayfish gastrolith chitinous extracellular matrix reveals putative protein complexes and a central role for GAP 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Lilah; Roth, Ziv; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2015-10-14

    Chitin is a major component of arthropod cuticles, where it forms a three-dimensional network that constitutes the scaffold upon which cuticles form. The chitin fibers that form this network are closely associated with specific structural proteins, while the cuticular matrix contains many additional structural, enzymatic and other proteins. We study the crayfish gastrolith as a simple model for the assembly of calcified cuticular structures, with particular focus on the proteins involved in this process. The present study integrates a gastrolith-forming epithelium transcriptomic library with data from mass spectrometry analysis of proteins extracted from the gastrolith matrix to obtain a near-complete picture of gastrolith protein content. Using native protein separation we identified 24 matrix proteins, of which 14 are novel. Further analysis led to discovery of three putative protein complexes, all containing GAP 65 the most abundant gastrolith structural protein. Using immunological methods we further studied the role of GAP 65 in the gastrolith matrix and forming epithelium, as well as in the newly identified protein complexes. We propose that gastrolith matrix construction is a sequential process in which protein complexes are dynamically assembled and disassembled around GAP 65, thus changing their functional properties to perform each step in the construction process. The scientific interest on which this study is based arises from three main features of gastroliths: (1) Gastroliths possess partial analogy to cuticles both in structural and molecular properties, and may be regarded, with the appropriate reservations (see Introduction), as simple models for cuticle assembly. At the same time, gastroliths are terminally assembled during a well-defined period, which can be controlled in the laboratory, making them significantly easier to study than cuticles. (2) Gastroliths, like the crayfish exoskeleton, contain stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) rather

  3. Antinuclear Matrix Protein 2 Autoantibodies and Edema, Muscle Disease, and Malignancy Risk in Dermatomyositis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayda, Jemima; Pinal-Fernandez, Iago; Huang, Wilson; Parks, Cassie; Paik, Julie; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Danoff, Sonye K; Johnson, Cheilonda; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Mammen, Andrew L

    2017-11-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) patients typically present with proximal weakness and autoantibodies that are associated with distinct clinical phenotypes. We observed that DM patients with autoantibodies recognizing the nuclear matrix protein NXP-2 often presented with especially severe weakness. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features associated with anti-NXP-2 autoantibodies. There were 235 DM patients who underwent testing for anti-NXP-2 autoantibodies. Patient characteristics, including muscle strength, were compared between those with and without these autoantibodies. The number of cancer cases observed in anti-NXP-2-positive subjects was compared with the number expected in the general population. Of the DM patients, 56 (23.8%) were anti-NXP-2-positive. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of proximal extremity weakness in patients with and without anti-NXP-2. In contrast, anti-NXP-2-positive patients had more prevalent weakness in the distal arms (35% versus 20%; P = 0.02), distal legs (25% versus 8%; P edema (36% versus 19%; P = 0.01) than anti-NXP-2-negative patients. Five anti-NXP-2-positive subjects (9%) had cancer-associated myositis, representing a 3.68-fold increased risk (95% confidence interval 1.2-8.6) compared to the expected prevalence in the general population. In DM, anti-NXP-2 autoantibodies are associated with subcutaneous edema, calcinosis, and a muscle phenotype characterized by myalgia, proximal and distal weakness, and dysphagia. As anti-NXP-2-positive patients have an increased risk of cancer, we suggest that they undergo comprehensive cancer screening. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Vitamin K-Dependent Carboxylation of Matrix Gla Protein Influences the Risk of Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Bloch, Donald B; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Vermeer, Cees; Booth, Sarah L; Xu, Dihua; Thadhani, Ravi I; Malhotra, Rajeev

    2017-06-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a potent inhibitor of vascular calcification. The ability of MGP to inhibit calcification requires the activity of a vitamin K-dependent enzyme, which mediates MGP carboxylation. We investigated how MGP carboxylation influences the risk of calciphylaxis in adult patients receiving dialysis and examined the effects of vitamin K deficiency on MGP carboxylation. Our study included 20 patients receiving hemodialysis with calciphylaxis (cases) and 20 patients receiving hemodialysis without calciphylaxis (controls) matched for age, sex, race, and warfarin use. Cases had higher plasma levels of uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) and carboxylated MGP (cMGP) than controls. However, the fraction of total MGP that was carboxylated (relative cMGP concentration = cMGP/[cMGP + uncarboxylated MGP]) was lower in cases than in controls (0.58±0.02 versus 0.69±0.03, respectively; P =0.003). In patients not taking warfarin, cases had a similarly lower relative cMGP concentration. Each 0.1 unit reduction in relative cMGP concentration associated with a more than two-fold increase in calciphylaxis risk. Vitamin K deficiency associated with lower relative cMGP concentration in multivariable adjusted analyses ( β =-8.99; P =0.04). In conclusion, vitamin K deficiency-mediated reduction in relative cMGP concentration may have a role in the pathogenesis of calciphylaxis. Whether vitamin K supplementation can prevent and/or treat calciphylaxis requires further study. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Plant plasma membrane 14-3-3 proteins differ in solubility and form fusicoccin-dependent complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthout, H.A.A.J.; de Boer, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    The binding protein for the phytotoxin fusicoccin belongs to the class of highly conserved 14-3-3 proteins. A general principle for the mode of action of 14-3-3 proteins is that they serve as docking clamps in order to facilitate protein interactions. This implies that 14-3-3 proteins may behave

  7. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization mass spectrometry of proteins using a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, R.; Hillenkamp, F.; Haglund, R.

    1995-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most promising techniques for spectral fingerprinting large molecules, such as proteins, oligonucleotides and carbohydrates. In the usual implementation of this technique, the analyte molecule is dissolved in an aromatic liquid matrix material which resonantly absorbs ultraviolet laser light. Resonant absorption by π-π* transitions volatilizes the matrix and initiates subsequent charge transfer to the analyte molecules, which are detected by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Recent MALDI-MS studies with Er:YAG (2.94 μm) and CO 2 4 (9.4-10.6 μm) lasers suggest that them is significant unexplored potential for mass spectrometry of macromolecules, including oligonucleotide, in the mid-infrared. Preliminary experiments show that it is possible to capitalize on the rich rovibronic absorption spectrum of virtually all organics to initiate resonant desorption in matrix material over the entire range of pH values. However, the mechanism of charge transfer is particularly problematic for infrared MALDI because of the low photon energy. In this paper, we report the results of MALI-MS studies on small proteins using the Vanderbilt FEL and several matrix materials. Proteins with masses up to roughly 6,000 amu were detected with high resolution in a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By varying the pulse duration using a broadband Pockels cell, we have been able to compare the results of relatively long (5 μs) and short (0.1 μs) irradiation on the desorption and ionization processes. Compared to uv-MALDI spectra of identical analytes obtained with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) in the same time-of-flight spectrometer, the infrared results appear to show that the desorption and ionization process goes on over a somewhat longer time scale

  8. Characteristics of global organic matrix in normal and pimpled chicken eggshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Song, L; Zhang, F; He, W; Linhardt, R J

    2017-10-01

    The organic matrix from normal and pimpled calcified chicken eggshells were dissociated into acid-insoluble, water-insoluble, and facultative-soluble (both acid- and water-soluble) components, to understand the influence of shell matrix on eggshell qualities. A linear correlation was shown among these 3 matrix components in normal eggshells but was not observed in pimpled eggshells. In pimpled eggshells, the percentage contents of all 4 groups of matrix (the total matrix, acid-insoluble matrix, water-insoluble matrix, and facultative-soluble matrix) were significantly higher than that in normal eggshells. The amounts of both total matrix and acid-insoluble matrix in individual pimpled calcified shells were high, even though their weight was much lower than a normal eggshell. In both normal and pimpled eggshells, the calcified eggshell weight and shell thickness significantly and positively correlated with the amounts of all 4 groups of matrix in an individual calcified shell. In normal eggshells, the calcified shell thickness and shell breaking strength showed no significant correlations with the percentage contents of all 4 groups of matrix. In normal eggshells, only the shell membrane weight significantly correlated with the constituent ratios of both acid-insoluble matrix and facultative-soluble matrix in the whole matrix. In pimpled eggshells, 3 variables (calcified shell weight, shell thickness, and breaking strength) were significantly correlated with the constituent proportions of both acid-insoluble matrix and facultative-matrix. This study suggests that mechanical properties of normal eggshells may not linearly depend on the organic matrix content in the calcified eggshells and that pimpled eggshells might result by the disequilibrium enrichment of some proteins with negative effects. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. A Human Nuclear Shuttling Protein That Interacts with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Matrix Is Packaged into Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpana; Ott, David; Hope, Thomas J.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2000-01-01

    Active nuclear import of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preintegration complex (PIC) is essential for the productive infection of nondividing cells. Nuclear import of the PIC is mediated by the HIV-1 matrix protein, which also plays several critical roles during viral entry and possibly during virion production facilitating the export of Pr55Gag and genomic RNA. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified a novel human virion-associated matrix-interacting protein (VAN) that is highly conserved in vertebrates and expressed in most human tissues. Its expression is upregulated upon activation of CD4+ T cells. VAN is efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 virions and, like matrix, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, overexpression of VAN significantly inhibits HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. We propose that VAN regulates matrix nuclear localization and, by extension, both nuclear import of the PIC and export of Pr55Gag and viral genomic RNA during virion production. Our data suggest that this regulatory mechanism reflects a more global process for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:11090181

  10. Canine distemper virus matrix protein influences particle infectivity, particle composition, and envelope distribution in polarized epithelial cells and modulates virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Erik; Anderson, Danielle E; Castan, Alexandre; von Messling, Veronika; Maisner, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    In paramyxoviruses, the matrix (M) protein mediates the interaction between the envelope and internal proteins during particle assembly and egress. In measles virus (MeV), M mutations, such as those found in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) strains, and differences in vaccine and wild-type M proteins can affect the strength of interaction with the envelope glycoproteins, assembly efficiency, and spread. However, the contribution of the M protein to the replication and pathogenesis of the closely related canine distemper virus (CDV) has not been characterized. To this end this, we generated a recombinant wild-type CDV carrying a vaccine strain M protein. The recombinant virus retained the parental growth phenotype in VerodogSLAMtag cells, but displayed an increased particle-to-infectivity ratio very similar to that of the vaccine strain, likely due to inefficient H protein incorporation. Even though infectious virus was released only from the apical surface, consistent with the release polarity of the wild-type CDV strain, envelope protein distribution in polarized epithelial cells reproduced the bipolar pattern seen in vaccine strain-infected cells. Most notably, the chimeric virus was completely attenuated in ferrets and caused only a mild and transient leukopenia, indicating that the differences in particle infectivity and envelope protein sorting mediated by the vaccine M protein contribute importantly to vaccine strain attenuation.

  11. Ubiquitin-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix protein is important for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao E Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxoviruses are known to replicate in the cytoplasm and bud from the plasma membrane. Matrix is the major structural protein in paramyxoviruses that mediates viral assembly and budding. Curiously, the matrix proteins of a few paramyxoviruses have been found in the nucleus, although the biological function associated with this nuclear localization remains obscure. We report here that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix (NiV-M protein and associated post-translational modification play a critical role in matrix-mediated virus budding. Nipah virus (NiV is a highly pathogenic emerging paramyxovirus that causes fatal encephalitis in humans, and is classified as a Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4 pathogen. During live NiV infection, NiV-M was first detected in the nucleus at early stages of infection before subsequent localization to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. Mutations in the putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS and the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES found in NiV-M impaired its nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking and also abolished NiV-M budding. A highly conserved lysine residue in the NLS served dual functions: its positive charge was important for mediating nuclear import, and it was also a potential site for monoubiquitination which regulates nuclear export of the protein. Concordantly, overexpression of ubiquitin enhanced NiV-M budding whereas depletion of free ubiquitin in the cell (via proteasome inhibitors resulted in nuclear retention of NiV-M and blocked viral budding. Live Nipah virus budding was exquisitely sensitive to proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor for treating multiple myeloma, reduced viral titers with an IC(50 of 2.7 nM, which is 100-fold less than the peak plasma concentration that can be achieved in humans. This opens up the possibility of using an "off-the-shelf" therapeutic against acute NiV infection.

  12. GOLGA2/GM130, cis-Golgi Matrix Protein, is a Novel Target of Anticancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Hong, Seong-Ho; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Kang, Bitna; Park, Sungjin; Han, Kiwon; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-01-01

    Achievement of long-term survival of patients with lung cancer treated with conventional chemotherapy is still difficult for treatment of metastatic and advanced tumors. Despite recent progress in investigational therapies, survival rates are still disappointingly low and novel adjuvant and systemic therapies are urgently needed. A recently elucidated secretory pathway is attracting considerable interest as a promising anticancer target. The cis-Golgi matrix protein, GOLGA2/GM130, plays an im...

  13. Matrix tablets: the effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate ratio on the release rate of a water-soluble drug through the gastrointestinal tract I. In vitro tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Pseidy L; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Veiga, María D

    2012-12-01

    Different hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (ADCP) matrix tablets have been developed aiming to evaluate the influence of both components ratio in the control release of a water-soluble drug (theophylline). In order to characterise the matrix tablets, swelling, buoyancy and dissolution studies have been carried out in different aqueous media (demineralised water, progressive pH medium, simulated gastric fluid, simulated intestinal fluid and simulated colonic fluid). The HPMC/ADCP ratio has turned out to be the determinant in the matrix behaviour: the HPMC characteristic swelling behaviour was modulated, in some cases, by the ADCP characteristic acidic dissolution. When the HPMC/ADCP ratio was ≥0.69, buoyancy, continuous swelling and low theophylline dissolution rate from the matrices (H1, H2 and H3) were observed in all dissolution media. Consequently, these formulations could be adequate as gastro-retentive drug delivery systems. Additionally, HPMC/ADCP ratio ≤0.11 (H5 and H6) induces a pH-dependent drug release which could be applied to design control drug release enteric formulations (with a suitable enteric coating). Finally, a HPMC/ADCP ratio between 0.11 and 0.69 (H4) yield a gastrointestinal controlled drug release, due to its time-dependent buoyancy (7 h) and a total drug delivery in 17 h in simulated colonic fluid.

  14. A high-protein diet during hospitalization is associated with an accelerated decrease in soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor levels in acutely ill elderly medical patients with SIRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavenier, Juliette; Haupt, Thomas Huneck; Andersen, Aino L

    2017-01-01

    inflammation in healthy elderly. We hypothesized that nutritional support and resistance training would accelerate the resolution of inflammation in hospitalized elderly patients with SIRS. Acutely admitted patients aged >65 years with SIRS were randomized to an intervention consisting of a high-protein diet...... (1.7 g/kg per day) during hospitalization, and daily protein supplement (18.8 g) and 3 weekly resistance training sessions for 12 weeks after discharge (Intervention, n=14), or to standard-care (Control, n=15). Plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarkers soluble urokinase plasminogen activator...... receptor (suPAR), interleukin-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and albumin were measured at admission, discharge, and 4 and 13 weeks after discharge. The Intervention group had an earlier decrease in suPAR levels than the Control group: -15.4% vs. +14.5%, P=.007 during hospitalization, and -2.4% vs. -28.6%, P...

  15. Intravirion cohesion of matrix protein M1 with ribonucleocapsid is a prerequisite of influenza virus infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhirnov, O.P.; Manykin, A.A.; Rossman, J.S.; Klenk, H.D.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus has two major structural modules, an external lipid envelope and an internal ribonucleocapsid containing the genomic RNA in the form of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, both of which are interlinked by the matrix protein M1. Here we studied M1-RNP cohesion within virus exposed to acidic pH in vitro. The effect of acidification was dependent on the cleavage of the surface glycoprotein HA. Acidic pH caused a loss of intravirion RNP-M1 cohesion and activated RNP polymerase activity in virus with cleaved HA (HA1/2) but not in the uncleaved (HA0) virus. The in vitro acidified HA1/2 virus rapidly lost infectivity whereas the HA0 one retained infectivity, following activation by trypsin, suggesting that premature activation and release of the RNP is detrimental to viral infectivity. Rimantadine, an inhibitor of the M2 ion channel, was found to protect the HA1/2 virus interior against acidic disintegration, confirming that M2-dependent proton translocation is essential for the intravirion RNP release and suggesting that the M2 ion channel is only active in virions with cleaved HA. Acidic treatment of both HA0 and HA1/2 influenza viruses induces formation of spikeless bleb-like protrusion of ~25 nm in diameter on the surface of the virion, though only the HA1/2 virus was permeable to protons and permitted RNP release. It is likely that this bleb corresponds to the M2-enriched and M1-depleted focus arising from pinching off of the virus during the completion of budding. Cooperatively, the data suggest that the influenza virus has an asymmetric structure where the M1-mediated organization of the RNP inside the virion is a prerequisite for infectious entry into target cell. - Highlights: • The influenza A virus has a novel asymmetric internal structure. • The structure is largely maintained by M1-RNP cohesion within the virion. • This asymmetry plays an important role during viral entry, facilitating virus uncoating and the initiation of a productive

  16. Molecular decay of enamel matrix protein genes in turtles and other edentulous amniotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary edentulism (toothlessness has evolved on multiple occasions in amniotes including several mammalian lineages (pangolins, anteaters, baleen whales, birds, and turtles. All edentulous amniote clades have evolved from ancestors with enamel-capped teeth. Previous studies have documented the molecular decay of tooth-specific genes in edentulous mammals, all of which lost their teeth in the Cenozoic, and birds, which lost their teeth in the Cretaceous. By contrast with mammals and birds, tooth loss in turtles occurred in the Jurassic (201.6-145.5 Ma, providing an extended time window for tooth gene degradation in this clade. The release of the painted turtle and Chinese softshell turtle genomes provides an opportunity to recover the decayed remains of tooth-specific genes in Testudines. Results We queried available genomes of Testudines (Chrysemys picta [painted turtle], Pelodiscus sinensis [Chinese softshell turtle], Aves (Anas platyrhynchos [duck], Gallus gallus [chicken], Meleagris gallopavo [turkey], Melopsittacus undulatus [budgerigar], Taeniopygia guttata [zebra finch], and enamelless mammals (Orycteropus afer [aardvark], Choloepus hoffmanni [Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth], Dasypus novemcinctus [nine-banded armadillo] for remnants of three enamel matrix protein (EMP genes with putative enamel-specific functions. Remnants of the AMBN and ENAM genes were recovered in Chrysemys and retain their original synteny. Remnants of AMEL were recovered in both testudines, although there are no shared frameshifts. We also show that there are inactivated copies of AMBN, AMEL and ENAM in representatives of divergent avian lineages including Galloanserae, Passeriformes, and Psittaciformes, and that there are shared frameshift mutations in all three genes that predate the basal split in Neognathae. Among enamelless mammals, all three EMP genes exhibit inactivating mutations in Orycteropus and Choloepus. Conclusions Our results

  17. Intravirion cohesion of matrix protein M1 with ribonucleocapsid is a prerequisite of influenza virus infectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhirnov, O.P., E-mail: zhirnov@inbox.ru [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Manykin, A.A. [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Rossman, J.S. [School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT27NJ (United Kingdom); Klenk, H.D. [Institute of Virology, Philipps University, Marburg 35037 (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Influenza virus has two major structural modules, an external lipid envelope and an internal ribonucleocapsid containing the genomic RNA in the form of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, both of which are interlinked by the matrix protein M1. Here we studied M1-RNP cohesion within virus exposed to acidic pH in vitro. The effect of acidification was dependent on the cleavage of the surface glycoprotein HA. Acidic pH caused a loss of intravirion RNP-M1 cohesion and activated RNP polymerase activity in virus with cleaved HA (HA1/2) but not in the uncleaved (HA0) virus. The in vitro acidified HA1/2 virus rapidly lost infectivity whereas the HA0 one retained infectivity, following activation by trypsin, suggesting that premature activation and release of the RNP is detrimental to viral infectivity. Rimantadine, an inhibitor of the M2 ion channel, was found to protect the HA1/2 virus interior against acidic disintegration, confirming that M2-dependent proton translocation is essential for the intravirion RNP release and suggesting that the M2 ion channel is only active in virions with cleaved HA. Acidic treatment of both HA0 and HA1/2 influenza viruses induces formation of spikeless bleb-like protrusion of ~25 nm in diameter on the surface of the virion, though only the HA1/2 virus was permeable to protons and permitted RNP release. It is likely that this bleb corresponds to the M2-enriched and M1-depleted focus arising from pinching off of the virus during the completion of budding. Cooperatively, the data suggest that the influenza virus has an asymmetric structure where the M1-mediated organization of the RNP inside the virion is a prerequisite for infectious entry into target cell. - Highlights: • The influenza A virus has a novel asymmetric internal structure. • The structure is largely maintained by M1-RNP cohesion within the virion. • This asymmetry plays an important role during viral entry, facilitating virus uncoating and the initiation of a productive

  18. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Jin, Aishun [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150081 (China); Kishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: immkishi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Muraguchi, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  19. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  20. Colon-specific delivery of a probiotic-derived soluble protein ameliorates intestinal inflammation in mice through an EGFR-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Cao, Hanwei; Cover, Timothy L.; Washington, M. Kay; Shi, Yan; Liu, LinShu; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.; Polk, D. Brent

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria can potentially have beneficial effects on the clinical course of several intestinal disorders, but our understanding of probiotic action is limited. We have identified a probiotic bacteria–derived soluble protein, p40, from Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), which prevents cytokine-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. In the current study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which p40 regulates cellular responses in intestinal epithelial cells and p40’s effects on experimental colitis using mouse models. We show that the recombinant p40 protein activated EGFR, leading to Akt activation. Activation of EGFR by p40 was required for inhibition of cytokine-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, we developed a pectin/zein hydrogel bead system to specifically deliver p40 to the mouse colon, which activated EGFR in colon epithelial cells. Administration of p40-containing beads reduced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and disruption of barrier function in the colon epithelium in an EGFR-dependent manner, thereby preventing and treating DSS-induced intestinal injury and acute colitis. Furthermore, p40 activation of EGFR was required for ameliorating colon epithelial cell apoptosis and chronic inflammation in oxazolone-induced colitis. These data define what we believe to be a previously unrecognized mechanism of probiotic-derived soluble proteins in protecting the intestine from injury and inflammation. PMID:21606592

  1. Soluble polymorphic bank vole prion proteins induced by co-expression of quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase in E. coli and their aggregation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abskharon, Romany; Dang, Johnny; Elfarash, Ameer; Wang, Zerui; Shen, Pingping; Zou, Lewis S; Hassan, Sedky; Wang, Fei; Fujioka, Hisashi; Steyaert, Jan; Mulaj, Mentor; Surewicz, Witold K; Castilla, Joaquín; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Zou, Wen-Quan

    2017-10-04

    The infectious prion protein (PrP Sc or prion) is derived from its cellular form (PrP C ) through a conformational transition in animal and human prion diseases. Studies have shown that the interspecies conversion of PrP C to PrP Sc is largely swayed by species barriers, which is mainly deciphered by the sequence and conformation of the proteins among species. However, the bank vole PrP C (BVPrP) is highly susceptible to PrP Sc from different species. Transgenic mice expressing BVPrP with the polymorphic isoleucine (109I) but methionine (109M) at residue 109 spontaneously develop prion disease. To explore the mechanism underlying the unique susceptibility and convertibility, we generated soluble BVPrP by co-expression of BVPrP with Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) in Escherichia coli. Interestingly, rBVPrP-109M and rBVPrP-109I exhibited distinct seeded aggregation pathways and aggregate morphologies upon seeding of mouse recombinant PrP fibrils, as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy. Moreover, they displayed different aggregation behaviors induced by seeding of hamster and mouse prion strains under real-time quaking-induced conversion. Our results suggest that QSOX facilitates the formation of soluble prion protein and provide further evidence that the polymorphism at residue 109 of QSOX-induced BVPrP may be a determinant in mediating its distinct convertibility and susceptibility.

  2. Enhancer of rudimentary homologue interacts with scaffold attachment factor B at the nuclear matrix to regulate SR protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakouli, Sotiria; Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Papathanassiou, Maria; Mylonis, Ilias; Georgatsou, Eleni

    2017-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor B1 (SAFB1) is an integral component of the nuclear matrix of vertebrate cells. It binds to DNA on scaffold/matrix attachment region elements, as well as to RNA and a multitude of different proteins, affecting basic cellular activities such as transcription, splicing and DNA damage repair. In the present study, we show that enhancer of rudimentary homologue (ERH) is a new molecular partner of SAFB1 and its 70% homologous paralogue, scaffold attachment factor B2 (SAFB2). ERH interacts directly in the nucleus with the C-terminal Arg-Gly-rich region of SAFB1/2 and co-localizes with it in the insoluble nuclear fraction. ERH, a small ubiquitous protein with striking homology among species and a unique structure, has also been implicated in fundamental cellular mechanisms. Our functional analyses suggest that the SAFB/ERH interaction does not affect SAFB1/2 function in transcription (e.g. as oestrogen receptor α co-repressors), although it reverses the inhibition exerted by SAFB1/2 on the splicing kinase SR protein kinase 1 (SRPK1), which also binds on the C-terminus of SAFB1/2. Accordingly, ERH silencing decreases lamin B receptor and SR protein phosphorylation, which are major SRPK1 substrates, further substantiating the role of SAFB1 and SAFB2 in the co-ordination of nuclear function. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Electrochemistry and biosensing reactivity of heme proteins adsorbed on the structure-tailored mesoporous Nb2O5 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xin; Tian Bozhi; Zhang Song; Kong Jilie; Zhao Dongyuan; Liu Baohong

    2004-01-01

    The highly ordered mesoporous niobium oxides fabricated by self-adjusted synthesis have been used as immobilization matrices of heme proteins including Cytochrome c (Cyt C) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for their large surface areas, narrow pore size distributions and good biocompatibility. The assembling process was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, amperometry and potential step chronoamperometry in details. Niobium oxide matrices with different structural features were templated with the surfactants and the selectivity of these hosts to specific protein characteristics was determined. It was observed that proteins could be readily assembled onto the mesoporous films with detectable retention of bioactivity. The Nb 2 O 5 matrix with a tailored pore size and counterpoised surface charge to that of hemes allowed for a maximum adsorption capacity of biomolecules. The adsorbed redox molecules exhibited direct electrochemical behavior and gave a pair of well-defined quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks, indicating that the mesoporous niobium oxide matrix could effectively promote the direct electron transfer between the protein redox site adsorbed and the electrode surface. The midpoint redox potentials of adsorbed Cyt-c and HRP were 14 and -122 mV versus SCE, respectively. Furthermore, the immobilized HRP onto Nb 2 O 5 derived electrode presented good bioactivity and thus was fabricated as an amperometric biosensor for the response of hydrogen peroxide in the range from 0.1 μM to 0.1 mM

  4. pH-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles to improve oral bioavailability of peptide/protein drugs and poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-10-01

    pH-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles are promising for oral drug delivery, especially for peptide/protein drugs and poorly water-soluble medicines. This review describes current status of pH-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles for oral drug delivery and introduces the mechanisms of drug release from them as well as possible reasons for absorption improvement, with emphasis on our contribution to this field. pH-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles are prepared mainly with polyanions, polycations, their mixtures or cross-linked polymers. The mechanisms of drug release are the result of carriers' dissolution, swelling or both of them at specific pH. The possible reasons for improvement of oral bioavailability include the following: improve drug stability, enhance mucoadhesion, prolong resident time in GI tract, ameliorate intestinal permeability and increase saturation solubility and dissolution rate for poorly water-soluble drugs. As for the advantages of pH-sensitive nanoparticles over conventional nanoparticles, we conclude that (1) most carriers used are enteric-coating materials and their safety has been approved. (2) The rapid dissolution or swelling of carriers at specific pH results in quick drug release and high drug concentration gradient, which is helpful for absorption. (3) At the specific pH carriers dissolve or swell, and the bioadhesion of carriers to mucosa becomes high because nanoparticles turn from solid to gel, which can facilitate drug absorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Significance of soluble growth factors in the chondrogenic response of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells in a porous three dimensional scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RS Nirmal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell based tissue engineering has emerged as a promising strategy for articular cartilage regeneration. Foetal derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with their ease of availability, pluripotency and high expansion potential have been demonstrated to be an attractive cell source over adult MSCs. However, there is a need for optimisation of chondrogenic signals to direct the differentiation of these multipotent MSCs to chondrogenic lineage. In this study we have demonstrated the in vitro chondrogenesis of human umbilical cord matrix MSCs in three dimensional PVA-PCL (polyvinyl alcohol-polycaprolactone scaffolds in the presence of the individual growth factors TGFβ1, TGFβ3, IGF, BMP2 and their combination with BMP2. Gene expression, histology and immunohistology were evaluated after 28 d culture. The induced cells showed the feature of chondrocytes in their morphology and expression of typical chondrogenic extracellular matrix molecules. Moreover, the real-time PCR assay has shown the expression of gene markers of chondrogenesis, SOX9, collagen type II and aggrecan. The expression of collagen type I and collagen type X was also evaluated. This study has demonstrated the successful chondrogenic induction of human umbilical cord MSCs in 3D scaffolds. Interestingly, the growth factor combination of TGF-β3 and BMP-2 was found to be more effective for chondrogenesis as shown by the real-time PCR studies. The findings of this study suggest the importance of using growth factor combinations for successful chondrogenic differentiation of umbilical cord MSCs.

  6. Structure and dynamics of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 (consisting of 326 residues) plays a critical role in viral assembly and its functions such as regulation of viral transcription, packaging, and budding of mature virions into the plasma membrane of infected cells. How does the protein VP40 go through structural evolution during the viral life cycle remains an open question? Using a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation we investigate the structural evolution of VP40 as a function of temperature with the input of a knowledge-based residue-residue interaction. A number local and global physical quantities (e.g. mobility profile, contact map, radius of gyration, structure factor) are analyzed with our large-scale simulations. Our preliminary data show that the structure of the protein evolves through different state with well-defined morphologies which can be identified and quantified via a detailed analysis of structure factor.

  7. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging and its development for plant protein imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millar A Harvey

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI uses the power of high mass resolution time of flight (ToF mass spectrometry coupled to the raster of lasers shots across the cut surface of tissues to provide new insights into the spatial distribution of biomolecules within biological tissues. The history of this technique in animals and plants is considered and the potential for analysis of proteins by this technique in plants is discussed. Protein biomarker identification from MALDI-MSI is a challenge and a number of different approaches to address this bottleneck are discussed. The technical considerations needed for MALDI-MSI are reviewed and these are presented alongside examples from our own work and a protocol for MALDI-MSI of proteins in plant samples.

  9. A Simple Sonication Improves Protein Signal in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-En; Su, Pin-Rui; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2018-02-01

    Proper matrix application is crucial in obtaining high quality matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Solvent-free sublimation was essentially introduced as an approach of homogeneous coating that gives small crystal size of the organic matrix. However, sublimation has lower extraction efficiency of analytes. Here, we present that a simple sonication step after the hydration in standard sublimation protocol significantly enhances the sensitivity of MALDI MSI. This modified procedure uses a common laboratory ultrasonicator to immobilize the analytes from tissue sections without noticeable delocalization. Improved imaging quality with additional peaks above 10 kDa in the spectra was thus obtained upon sonication treatment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFα leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  11. Protein biosynthesis in isolated human scalp hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermorken, A J; Weterings, P J; Bloemendal, H

    1979-02-15

    The present study demonstrates that protein biosynthesis can be studied in single isolated human scalp hair follicles. The matrix and the sheath are the main regions where amino acids are built in. Incorporation is linear for at least five hours. The newly synthesized proteins can be separated into a water-soluble, a urea-soluble and a urea-insoluble fraction. Product analysis has been performed on the first two fractions, revealing different protein patterns.

  12. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Fisher, L W; Hansma, P K

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface, and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence. PMID:18843380

  13. Mueller-matrix mapping of biological tissues in differential diagnosis of optical anisotropy mechanisms of protein networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushenko, V A; Sidor, M I [Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Marchuk, Yu F; Pashkovskaya, N V; Andreichuk, D R [Bukovinian State Medical University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

    2015-03-31

    We report a model of Mueller-matrix description of optical anisotropy of protein networks in biological tissues with allowance for the linear birefringence and dichroism. The model is used to construct the reconstruction algorithms of coordinate distributions of phase shifts and the linear dichroism coefficient. In the statistical analysis of such distributions, we have found the objective criteria of differentiation between benign and malignant tissues of the female reproductive system. From the standpoint of evidence-based medicine, we have determined the operating characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the Mueller-matrix reconstruction method of optical anisotropy parameters and demonstrated its effectiveness in the differentiation of benign and malignant tumours. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of dentin matrix protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Hansma, P K; Fisher, L W

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence

  15. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of dentin matrix protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Hansma, P K [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Fisher, L W [Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch, NIDCR, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)], E-mail: adams@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: fantner@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: lfisher@dir.nidcr.nih.gov, E-mail: prasant@physics.ucsb.edu

    2008-09-24

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence.

  16. ASH1L Suppresses Matrix Metalloproteinase through Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway in Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yin; Tianqian, Hui; Fanyuan, Yu; Haiyun, Luo; Xueyang, Liao; Jing, Yang; Chenglin, Wang; Ling, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Pulpitis is an inflammation of dental pulp produced by a response to external stimuli. The response entails substantial cellular and molecular activities. Both genetic and epigenetic regulators contribute to the occurrence of pulpitis. However, the epigenetic mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this research, we studied the role of the absent, small, or homeotic-like (ASH1L) gene in the process of pulpitis. Human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were stimulated with proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Gene expression profiling was performed to assess the occurrence of epigenetic regulators. Pulp tissue from rat experimental pulpitis was subjected to immunofluorescence to detect the occurrence of ASH1L and trimethylation of lysine 4 histone 3 (H3K4me3). The presence of ASH1L in HDPCs that had been generated by TNF-α stimulation was analyzed by Western blot procedures and cellular immunofluorescence. Once detected, ASH1L was silenced through the use of specific small interfering RNA. The effects of ASH1L on the occurrence and operation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were then tested by analysis of quantitative polymerase chain reactions, Western blotting, and zymography. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to detect whether ASH1L and H3K4me3 were present in the promoter regions of MMPs. We then used Western blot procedures to examine the nuclear factor kappa B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) responses to the silencing of ASH1L. We also examined the specific pathway involved in ASH1L regulation of the MMPs. After stimulating HDPCs with TNF-α, ASH1L emerged as 1 of the most strongly induced epigenetic mediators. We found that TNF-α treatment induced the expression of ASH1L through the nuclear factor kappa B and MAPK signal pathways. ASH1L was found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. TNF-α treatment was particularly active in inducing the accumulation of ASH1L in cellular cytoplasm. As is also consistent

  17. Effects of wheat dried distillers' grains with solubles and cinnamaldehyde on in vitro fermentation and protein degradation using the Rusitec technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lia, Yangling; He, Maolong; Li, Chun; Forster, Robert; Beauchemin, Karen Anne; Yang, Wenzhu

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of wheat dried distillers' grains with solubles (DDGS) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) on in vitro fermentation and microbial profiles using the rumen simulation technique. The control substrate (10% barley silage, 85% barley grain and 5% supplement, on dry matter basis) and the wheat DDGS substrate (30% wheat DDGS replaced an equal portion of barley grain) were combined with 0 and 300 mg CIN/l of culture fluid. The inclusion of DDGS increased (p fermentation pattern changed to greater acetate and less propionate proportions (p fermentability and potentially increase protein flows to the intestine. Supplementation of high-grain substrates with CIN reduced methane production and potentially increased the true protein reaching the small intestine; however, overall reduction of feed fermentation may lower the feeding value of a high-grain diet.

  18. Expression by Streptomyces lividans of the Rat α Integrin CD11b A-Domain as a Secreted and Soluble Recombinant Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Zouari Ayadi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We already reported the use of a long synthetic signal peptide (LSSP to secrete the Streptomyces sp. TO1 amylase by Streptomyces lividans strain. We herein report the expression and secretion of the rat CD11b A-domain using the same LSSP and S. lividans as host strain. We have used the Escherichia coli/Streptomyces shuttle vector pIJ699 for the cloning of the A-domain DNA sequence downstream of LSSP and under the control of the constitutive ermE-up promoter of Streptomyces erythraeus. Using this construct and S. lividans as a host strain, we achieved the expression of 8 mg/L of soluble secreted recombinant form of the A-domain of the rat leukocyte β2 integrin CD11/CD18 alpha M subunit (CD11b. This secreted recombinant CD11b A-domain reacted with a function blocking antibody showing that this protein is properly folded and probably functional. These data support the capability of Streptomyces to produce heterologous recombinant proteins as soluble secreted form using the “LSSP” synthetic signal peptide.

  19. Identification of a Novel Dentin Matrix Protein-1 (DMP-1) Mutation and Dental Anomalies in a Kindred with Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemia

    OpenAIRE

    Turan, Serap; Aydin, Cumhur; Bereket, Abdullah; Akcay, Teoman; Güran, Tülay; Yaralioglu, Betul Akmen; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2009-01-01

    An autosomal recessive form of hypophosphatemia (ARHP) was recently shown to be caused by homozygous mutations in DMP1, the gene encoding dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), a non-collagenous bone matrix protein with an important role in the development and mineralization of bone and teeth. Here, we report a previously not reported consanguineous ARHP kindred in which the three affected individuals carry a novel homozygous DMP-1 mutation. The index case presented at the age of 3 years with bowin...

  20. Computer program for Scatchard analysis of protein: Ligand interaction - use for determination of soluble and nuclear steroid receptor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leake, R.; Cowan, S.; Eason, R.

    1998-01-01

    Steroid receptor concentration may be determined routinely in biopsy samples of breast and endometrial cancer by the competition method. This method yields data for both the soluble and nuclear fractions of the tissue. The data are usually subject to Scatchard analysis. This Appendix describes a computer program written initially for a PDP-11. It has been modified for use with IBM, Apple Macintosh and BBC microcomputers. The nature of the co