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Sample records for solid uranium values

  1. In situ leaching process for recording uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, W.M.; Timmins, T.H.; Sherry, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium values from a subterranean deposit comprising: injecting an alkaline carbonate lixiviant into said deposit; flowing said alkaline carbonate lixiviant through said deposit to dissolve said uranium values into said lixiviant; producing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values from said deposit; flowing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values through an adsorption material to adsorp said uranium values from said lixiviant; eluting said adsorption material with an eluant of ammonium carbonate to desorb said uranium values from said adsorption material into said eluate in a concentration greater than in said lixiviant; heating said eluate and said desorbed uranium values to vaporize off ammonia and carbon dioxide therefrom, thereby causing uranium values to crystallize from the eluate; and recovering said solid uranium values

  2. Recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for the recovery of uranium from an organic extractant phase containing an amine. The extractant phase is contacted in a number of mixing stages with an acidic aqueous stripping phase containing sulphate ions, and the phases are passed together through a series of mixing stages while maintaining a dispersion of droplets of one phase in the other. Uranium is precipitated from the final stage by raising the pH. An apparatus having several mixing chambers is described

  3. Study on the solid state chemistry of ternary uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Toshiyuki

    1988-03-01

    With the increase of burnup of uranium oxide fuels, various kinds of fission products are formed, and the oxygen atoms combined with the consumed heavy atoms are freed. The solid state chemical and/or thermodynamic properties of these elements at high temperatures are complex, and have not been well clarified. In the present report, an approach was taken that the chemical interactions between UO 2 and these fission products can be regarded as causing overlapped effects of composing ternary uranium oxides, and formation reactions and phase behavior were studied for several ternary uranium oxides with typical fission product elements such as alkaline earth metals and rare earth elements. Precise determination methods for the composition of ternary uranium oxides were developed. The estimated accuracies for x and y values in M y U 1-y O 2+x were ± 0.006 and ± 0.004, respectively. The thermodynamic properties and the lattice parameters of the phases in the Ca-U-O and Pr-U-O systems were discussed in relation to the composition determined by the methods. Crystal structure analyses of cadmium monouranates were made with X-ray diffraction method. (author) 197 refs

  4. Characterization of Uranium Solids Precipitated with Aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUFF, MC

    2004-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the High-Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms store and process high-level liquid radioactive wastes from the Canyons and recycle water from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The waste is concentrated using evaporators to minimize the volume of space required for HLW storage. Recently, the 2H Evaporator was shutdown due to the crystallization of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) solids (such as cancrinite and sodalite) that contained close to 10 weight percent of elementally-enriched uranium (U). Prior to extensive cleaning,the evaporator deposits resided on the evaporator walls and other exposed internal surfaces within the evaporator pot. Our goal is to support the basis for the continued safe operation of SRS evaporators and to gain more information that could be used to help mitigate U accumulation during evaporator operation. To learn more about the interaction between U(VI) and NAS in HLW salt solutions, we performed several fundamental studies to examine the mechanisms of U accumulation with NAS in highly caustic solutions. This larger group of studies focused on the following processes: co-precipitation/structural incorporation, sorption, and precipitation (with or without NAS), which will be reviewed in this presentation. We will present and discuss local atomic structural characterization data about U that has been co-precipitated with NAS solids (such as amorphous zeolite precursor material and sodalite) using X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques

  5. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    The invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and alkaline earth metal oxide (e.g. CaO, MgO) in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. (author)

  6. Minimization of radioactive solid wastes from uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueli; Xu Lechang; Wei Guangzhi; Gao Jie; Wang Erqi

    2010-01-01

    The concept and contents of radioactive waste minimization are introduced. The principle of radioactive waste minimization involving administration optimization, source reduction, recycling and reuse as well as volume reduction are discussed. The strategies and methods to minimize radioactive solid wastes from uranium mining and metallurgy are summarized. In addition, the benefit from its application of radioactive waste minimization is analyzed. Prospects for the research on radioactive so-lid waste minimization are made in the end. (authors)

  7. Measurement of fission track of uranium particle by solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S. C.; Pyo, H. W.; Ji, K. Y.; Kim, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we discussed results of the measurement of fission tracks for the uranium containing particles by solid state nuclear track detector. Uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were prepared by uranium sorption onto silica powder in weak acidic medium and laser ablation on uranium pellet, respectively. Fission tracks for the uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were detected on Lexan plastic detector. It was found that the fission track size and shapes depend on the particle size uranium content in particles. Correlation of uranium particle diameter with fission track radius was also discussed

  8. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of uranium compound adsorption on solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Yuki; Takizawa, Yuji; Okamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Particles mixed in the UF6 gas have the property of accumulating on the inside of piping or units. This type of accumulation will cause material unaccounted for (MUF) in the UF6 gas processing facilities. Development of a calculation model for estimating the accumulation rate of uranium compounds has been expected. And predicting possible part of the units where uranium compounds adsorb will contribute to design an effective detection system. The purpose of this study is to take the basic knowledge of the particle's adsorption mechanism from the microscopic point of view. In simulation analysis, UF5 model particle is produced, then two types of solid surfaces are prepared; one is a solid surface at rest and the other is a moving solid surface. The result obtained by the code 'PABS' showed that when the solid surface moves at a lower velocity, the particle's adsorption process dominates over the particle's breakup one. Besides the velocity of the solid surface, other principal factors affecting an adsorption ratio were also discussed. (author)

  11. Liquid-solid extraction of uranium (VI) with TOPO - molten naphthalene and determination by laser fluorimetry in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnakumar, M.; Patwardhan, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, cost-effective and efficient method for separation of uranium using tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO)-molten naphthalene as solid phase extractant and its determination by laser fluorimetry in geological samples (rock, soil, sediment) was developed. Under optimum conditions, using 50 mg TOPO and 100 mg naphthalene, 50 - 5000 ng of uranium in 10 ml sample solution (3% (v/v) HNO 3 ) could be extracted quantitatively. The extracted uranium was stripped using tetra sodium pyrophosphate (5% (v/v) solution, pH adjusted to 7.0 with H 3 PO 4 ) and determined by laser fluorimetry. The influence of different acid concentrations, the amount of solid phase extractant, sample volumes, different stripping reagents, their volumes and effect of foreign ions on the extraction and determination of uranium (VI) were investigated. Synthetic samples of varying concentration as regards uranium were prepared and analysed. Recoveries ranging from 90% to 105% were obtained. The method was validated by analyzing four certified reference materials namely, BL-5, DH-1a, SY-2, SY-3 and the values obtained for uranium agreed well with the certified values. The method was also applied to the determination of uranium in geological samples (rock, soil and sediment) by laser fluorimetry and the results obtained compared favorably with those obtained from the pellet fluorimetry method. Following the proposed method, determination limit for uranium was found to be 1 μg/g with RSD ± 10%. (author)

  12. Recovering phosphorus and uranium values from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, M.C.Y.; Long, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphate rock is acidulated with aqueous nitric acid to produce an aqueous solution containing phosphate values, calcium and uranium values. The aqueous solution is contacted with an extraction solvent for the uranium values: the extraction solvent comprising a water immiscible organic diluent, a dialkyl phosphoric acid having at least 10 carbon atoms, and an organic phosphorus compound having the formula R 1 R 2 R 3 P = O where R 1 , R 2 and R 3 are each either alkyl or alkoxy, the organic phosphorus compound having at least 10 carbon atoms. The uranium values are then recovered from the extraction solvent. In an example the extraction solvent is HDEHP and TOPO in kerosene. (author)

  13. Recovering phosphorus and uranium values from phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, M C.Y.; Long, R H

    1981-02-11

    Phosphate rock is acidulated with aqueous nitric acid to produce an aqueous solution containing phosphate values, calcium and uranium values. The aqueous solution is contacted with an extraction solvent for the uranium values: the extraction solvent comprising a water immiscible organic diluent, a dialkyl phosphoric acid having at least 10 carbon atoms, and an organic phosphorus compound having the formula R/sub 1/ R/sub 2/ R/sub 3/ P = O where R/sub 1/, R/sub 2/ and R/sub 3/ are each either alkyl or alkoxy, the organic phosphorus compound having at least 10 carbon atoms. The uranium values are then recovered from the extraction solvent. In an example the extraction solvent is HDEHP and TOPO in kerosene.

  14. Benchmarking the DFT+U method for thermochemical calculations of uranium molecular compounds and solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beridze, George; Kowalski, Piotr M

    2014-12-18

    Ability to perform a feasible and reliable computation of thermochemical properties of chemically complex actinide-bearing materials would be of great importance for nuclear engineering. Unfortunately, density functional theory (DFT), which on many instances is the only affordable ab initio method, often fails for actinides. Among various shortcomings, it leads to the wrong estimate of enthalpies of reactions between actinide-bearing compounds, putting the applicability of the DFT approach to the modeling of thermochemical properties of actinide-bearing materials into question. Here we test the performance of DFT+U method--a computationally affordable extension of DFT that explicitly accounts for the correlations between f-electrons - for prediction of the thermochemical properties of simple uranium-bearing molecular compounds and solids. We demonstrate that the DFT+U approach significantly improves the description of reaction enthalpies for the uranium-bearing gas-phase molecular compounds and solids and the deviations from the experimental values are comparable to those obtained with much more computationally demanding methods. Good results are obtained with the Hubbard U parameter values derived using the linear response method of Cococcioni and de Gironcoli. We found that the value of Coulomb on-site repulsion, represented by the Hubbard U parameter, strongly depends on the oxidation state of uranium atom. Last, but not least, we demonstrate that the thermochemistry data can be successfully used to estimate the value of the Hubbard U parameter needed for DFT+U calculations.

  15. Removal of radioactivity and mineral values from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Cokal, E.J.; Dreesen, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    One possible approach to remedial action on uranium mill tailings involves the removal of the components that are responsible for the environmental concern (notably radon releases) posed by these materials. Removing mineral values at the same time can defray much of the cost. This paper presents laboratory results on sulfuric acid leachings and their effectiveness in accomplishing these aims. 9 figures, 4 tables

  16. In situ leach method for recovering uranium and related values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, T.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for in-situ leaching of uranium from a calcium-containing clay which does not result in contamination of the clay formation by any cations not already present. A lixiviant is prepared by dissolving carbon dioxide into water having essentially the same cationic composition as that of the formation connate water. The solution is injected along with an oxidant, for example oxygen, into the formation. Calcium that has become dissolved in the lixiviant must be removed to control the pH, preferably by the addition of lime in a calcium precipitator. After calcium removal the lixiviant is filtered to remove suspended solids and is passed through an ion exchange resin or other uranium extraction means. The barren solution goes to a mix tank where carbon dioxide is added, and the fresh lixiviant is injected along with additional oxidant into the formation

  17. Options: the value of flexibilities in long term uranium contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    It has been commonplace for uranium suppliers to offer utilities long-term contracts with significant quantity flexibilities. These are attractive to the utility for which the consumption of fuel is dependent on variable reactor performance and have given the suppliers an additional competitive tool. The return to a uranium market in which near-term supply is likely to be tight is a disincentive to suppliers to offer new contracts with flexibilities. Typical recent flexibility offers have been significantly less generous than in the past. A methodology is outlined which can be used to give a theoretical estimate of the value of the flexibility provision to the supplier and buyer. It is based on the similarity between flexibility provision and option contracts in the securities and commodity markets. By regarding flexibilities as ''embedded options'' it is possible to apply to them the Black-Scholes option pricing formula as long as the necessary inputs, such as the price of uranium, the loan rate and the volatility, are available. The formula does have its shortfalls, however; in particular, it cannot incorporate the political perturbations that are continually taking place in the uranium industry. (13 figures, 15 references). (UK)

  18. On the technical development to minimize the quantity of solid wastes in a uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otomura, Keiichiro; Ogura, Yoshikazu; Fujisaki, Sakae

    1987-01-01

    We have developed the new process of treating the waste liquor from a uranium conversion at Ningyo Toge Works PNC, Japan. This process consists of neutralizing precipitation, solid liquid separation, distillation and adsorption. At a neutralizing precipitation step a magnesium oxide is added in the waste liquor containing uranium and fluorine. Most of the uranium and fluorine in the waste liquor precipitate as magnesium compounds. A sulfuric acid is added to the precipitate separated by a filter to dissolve. The resulting solution is then distilled to recover a hydrofluoric acid as a distillate. Uranium is recovered from a residue by an anion exchange method. The recoverd fluorine and uranium are recycled to the main process of conversion. The filtrate separated at the precipitation step is then passed through adsorbing columns. The residual fluorine and uranium in the filtrate were adsorbed and removed by the chelating resine which selectively adsorb the uranium and fluorine. After that the treated waste liquor is discharged out of the plant. This process has merits of being able to minimize the quantity of solid waste in comparison with the conventional process and to recover uranium and fluorine. This process can also be applied to uranium reconversion process from uranium hexafluoride to uranium oxide and to uranium metal production process, which produce the same kind of waste liquor. (author)

  19. Uranium and sulphate values from carbonate leach process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, B.

    1983-01-01

    The process concerns the recovery of uraniferous and sulphur values from liquor resulting from the attack of sulphur containing uraniferous ores by an alkaline solution of sodium carbonate and/or bicarbonate. Ammonia is introduced into the liquor to convert any HCO 3 - to CO 3 2- . The neutralised liquor from this step is then contacted with an anion exchange resin to fix the uranium and sulphate ions, leaving a liquor containing ammonia, sodium carbonate and/or bicarbonate in solution. Uranium and sulphate ions are eluted with an ammonia carbonate and/or bicarbonate solution to yield a solution of ammonium uranyl carbonate complex and ammonium sulphate. The solution is subjected to thermal treatment until a suspension of precipitated ammonium uranate and/or diuranate is obtained in a solution of the ammonium sulphate. Carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor are driven off. The precipitated ammonium uranate and/or diuranate is then separated from the solution of ammonium sulphate and the precipitate is calcined to yield uranium trioxide and ammonia

  20. Obtaining uranium and/or vanadium values from solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojkovic, M

    1982-04-22

    A process for the recovery of at least one of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous liquor is claimed. It comprises: (a) treating the liquor with a low molecular weight completely water-miscible solvent selected from the group consisting of methanol, iso-propyl alcohol or acetone to form at least two phases; (b) separating the phases; (c) recovering the solvent from the first phase as the azeotropic solvent/water mixture by simple, non-fractional distillation and recycling the mixture to step (a); and (d) recovering metal values from a second one of the phases.

  1. Uranium isotope separation in the solid state. Final report for period ending September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.R.

    1978-09-01

    The final results of an investigation on the isotope separation of uranium in the solid state are presented in this report. The feasibility of separating uranium isotopes using the proposed system based on uranium borohydride (borodeuteride) in a low temperature mixed crystal has been determined. The first section of the report summarizes the background material relating to this work which includes: a calculation of isotope shifts (borodeuteride), details on the two-step, two-photon spectroscopic isotope separation technique, and a brief overview of the method and equipment used for separating uranium isotopes in the solid state. The second section concerns the experimental details of the present work performed in the laboratory. Representative spectroscopic data obtained in this investigation are presented and discussed in the third section. Finally, the report is concluded with recommendations for further investigations on the uranium borohydride (borodeuteride) system for isotope separation

  2. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  3. Preparation of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol functionalized benzophenone/naphthalene and their uses in solid phase extractive preconcentration/separation of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preetha, C.R.; Prasada Rao, T.

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of solid reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol functionalized benzophenone/naphthalene for preconcentration/separation of uranium(VI) is described. These reagents enriches uranium(VI) quantitatively from dilute aqueous solutions in the pH range 10.5-11.0. The solid mixture consisting of the enriched metal ion along with solid phase extractant were dissolved in 2 ml of acetone and uranium(VI) content was established spectrophotometrically by using Arsenazo III procedure. Calibration graphs were rectilinear over the uranium(VI) concentration in the range 0.002-0.1 μg cm -3 . Five replicate determinations of 40 μg of uranium present in 1 dm 3 of sample solution gave a mean absorbance of 0.185 with a relative standard deviation of 1.4%. The detection limit (corresponding to 3 times the standard deviation of the blank) and the enrichment factor were found to be 2 μg dm -3 and 500 respectively. Further the possible separation of uranium(VI) from several bivalent, trivalent and tetravalent elements was also established. In addition to validating the developed method by successfully analysing marine sediment reference material (MESS-3), uranium content was established in soil, river and marine sediment samples by the developed method and compared with standard inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) values. (orig.)

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  5. Distribution of uranium and radium radionuclides in the 'solid phase-interstitial soil solution' system and their migratory properties in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The background content of the main alpha-emitting radionuclides of uranium and radium in the soils of the south-east territory of the Republic of Belarus has been established. The reserve of migratory active species of uranium and radium in the soils has been determined using the data on the content of the radionuclides in the interstitial soil solutions, which are the most important chain of geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements in ecosystems. The values of radionuclides distribution coefficients in the 'solid phase - interstitial solution of soil' system were estimated. It was shown that the migratory ability of uranium in the investigated soils is higher than that of radium. A direct correlation between the contents of organic components and uranium in the soil solution has been revealed. The used approach to the investigation of the uranium and radium behavior allows comparing their abilities to the migration in dependence of the soil medium peculiarities. (authors)

  6. Study on the vibrational scraping of uranium product from a solid cathode of electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput electrorefiner has been developed for commercialization use by enhancing the uranium recovery from the reduced metal which is produced from the oxide reduction process. It is necessary to scrap and effectively collect uranium dendrites from the surface of the solid cathode for high yield. When a steel electrode is used as the cathode in the electrorefining process, uranium is deposited and regularly stuck to the steel cathode during electrorefining. The sticking coefficient of a steel cathode is very high. In order to decrease the sticking coefficient of the steel cathode effectively, vibration mode was applied to the electrode in this study. Uranium dendrites were scraped and fell apart from the steel cathode by a vibration force. The vibrational scraping of the steel cathode was compared to the self-scraping of the graphite cathode. Effects of the applied current density and the vibration stroke on the scraping of the uranium dendrites were also investigated.

  7. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM VALUES, PLUTONIUM VALUES AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY CHLORINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H.S.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of plutonium and uranium from each other and from other substances is described. In general, the method comprises the steps of contacting the uranium with chlorine in the presence of a holdback material selected from the group consisting of lanthanum oxide and thorium oxide to form a uranium chloride higher than uranium tetrachloride, and thereafter heating the uranium chloride thus formed to a temperature at which the uranium chloride is volatilized off but below the volatilizalion temperature of plutonium chloride.

  8. Uranium analysis by neutron induced fissionography method using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyuez, T.; Tretyakova, S. P.; Guezel, T.; Akyuz, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study total twenty samples (eight reference materials and twelve sediment samples) were analysed for their uranium content which is in the range of 1-17 μg/g, by neutron induced fissionography (NIF) method using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) in comparison with the results of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) technique or fluorometric method. It is found that NIF method using SSNTDs is very sensitive for analysis of uranium

  9. Uranium analysis by neutron induced fissionography method using solid state nuclear track detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Akyuez, T; Guezel, T; Akyuz, S

    1999-01-01

    In this study total twenty samples (eight reference materials and twelve sediment samples) were analysed for their uranium content which is in the range of 1-17 mu g/g, by neutron induced fissionography (NIF) method using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) in comparison with the results of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) technique or fluorometric method. It is found that NIF method using SSNTDs is very sensitive for analysis of uranium.

  10. Solid phase extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid. Kinetic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry

    2017-07-01

    There is a high interest to develop suitable solid phase extractants for uranium separation from aqueous solutions in order to reduce cost and enhance the efficiency. This paper describes solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous phosphoric acid solution using MCM-41 based D2HEPA-TOPO organophosphorous extractants. The mixture of D2HEPA (di-2-ethyl-hexylphosphoric acid) and TOPO (tri-n-octylphosphine oxide) was impregnated into the pores of MCM-41 and the synthesized sorbent was fully characterized. The influences of different factors such as synergistic mixture ratio, phosphoric acid concentration, mixing time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that 90% of uranium(VI) extraction can be achieved within 5 min, using D2HEPA-TOPO rate at MCM-41 (mass ratio 2:1 w/w) from 1 M phosphoric acid containing 64 ppm of uranium at room temperature. High adsorption capacity of uranium(VI) have been achieved at the mentioned conditions. The rate constant for the chemical adsorption of uranium(VI) was 0.988 g mg{sup -1} min{sup -1} calculated by the pseudo-second order rate equation. The obtained thermodynamics parameters showed that uranium(VI) adsorption from H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is an exothermic and spontaneous process.

  11. Investigation of the uranium-molybdenum diffusion in body centered {gamma} solid solutions; Etude de la diffusion uranium-molybdene dans la solution solide {gamma} cubique centree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adda, Y; Mairy, C; Bouchet, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Philibert, J [IRSID, 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1958-07-01

    The body centered {gamma} phase uranium-molybdenum intermetallic diffusion has been studied by different technical methods: micrography, electronic microanalyser, microhardness. The values of several numbers of penetration coefficients are given, and their physical significations has been discussed. The diffusion coefficients, the frequency factor and activation energies has been determined for each concentration. After determination of the Kirkendall effect in this system, we calculated the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of uranium and molybdenum. (author) [French] La dilution intermetallique uranium-molybdene, en phase {gamma} cubique centree, a ete etudiee au moyen de differentes techniques: micrographie, microsonde electronique, microdurete. Les valeurs d'un certain nombre de coefficients de penetration sont donnees et leur signification physique discutee. Les coefficients de diffusion, les facteurs de frequence et les energies d'activation ont ete determines pour chaque concentration. Apres avoir mis en evidence un effet Kirkendall dans ce systeme, on a calcule les coefficients de diffusion intrinseques de l'uranium et du molybdene. (auteur)

  12. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  14. Hexavalent uranium reduction from solid phase by thermophilic bacterium Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khijniak, T.V.; Slobodkin, A.I.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E.A.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.; Coker, V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Birkeland, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that in uranium-contaminated sites, solid-phase U(VI) present in sediments is resistant to microbial reduction. Also, it was demonstrated that mesophilic iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria can reduce hexavalent uranium and sulphate-reducing bacteria were able to grow via uranium reduction. Among thermophilic microorganisms reduction of hexavalent uranium has been demonstrated only for cell suspensions of two genera: Pyrobaculum and Thermus. In the present study, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens was tested for reduction of U(VI), a thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium capable for growth with the reduction of various electron acceptors including Fe(III). Kinetic of bacterial growth, uranium reduction and influence of different uranium concentrations were investigated at 65 deg. C. Due to presence of phosphate in the basal medium yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was formed after addition of uranyl acetate. After 68 h of incubation control tubes without bacteria were contained yellow precipitate whereas in presence of bacteria precipitate turned to the grey color. In the control tubes uranium phosphates and other elements formed a uniform mixture of crystals, but in presence of bacteria the round shape particles, containing uranium, were found by Environmental Scan Electron Microscopy of air-dried or frozen samples. To determine valent state speciation spectroscopic investigations were performed also. Initial yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was separated and identified as uramphite - (NH 4 )(UO 2 )(PO 4 )*3H 2 O by X-Ray Powder Diffraction. Grey precipitate, which was formed by bacterial reduction, was identified as ningyoite - CaU(PO 4 ) 2 *H 2 O. The fact that final grey precipitate contain U(IV) was also confirmed by EXAFS investigation. High concentration of uranium has toxic effect. 1 and 2.5 mM of uranium (VI) support bacterial growth and bacterial biomass was accumulated, but if 5 or 10

  15. Aspects and application of etch-pit technique in the distribution detection of uranium in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachett, I.A.

    1973-01-01

    Some aspects related to the use of standard glass microscope slide as solid state track detector are presented, as well as studies of measurement of distribution of uranium in various solids determined by means of this technique. The behavior of the various parameters related to the properties of the detector and the results of their measurements are treated. Results obtained on the determination of distribution of uranium in samples of fuel elements of the 'ARGONAUTA' research reactor of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - Rio de Janeiro, are included. The samples were taken from the fuel-cladding interface. Finally, some data on levels of contamination of the laboratory equipment in use by uranium during the course of this work are presented [pt

  16. Thermal expansion studies on uranium-neodymium mixed oxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Antony, M.P.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium-Neodymium mixed oxides solid solutions (U 1-y Nd y ) O 2 (y=0.2-0.95) were prepared by combustion synthesis using citric acid as fuel. Structural characterization and computation of lattice parameter was carried out from room temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. Single-phase fluorite structure was observed up to y=0.80. For solid solutions with y>0.80 additional Nd 2 O 3 lines were visible

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  18. Uranium transport to solid electrodes in pyrochemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomczuk, Z.; Ackerman, J.P.; Wolson, R.D.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    A unique pyrochemical process developed for the separation of metallic nuclear fuel from fission products by electrotransport through molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt to solid and liquid metal cathodes. The process allow for recovery and reuse of essentially all of the actinides in spent fuel from the integral fast reactor (IFR) and disposal of wastes in satisfactory forms. Electrotransport is used to minimize reagent consumption and, consequently, waste volume. In particular, electrotransport to solid cathodes is used for recovery of an essentially pure uranium product in the presence of other actinides; removal of pure uranium is used to adjust the electrolyte composition in preparation for recovery of a plutonium-rich mixture with uranium in liquid cadmium cathodes. This paper presents experiments that delineate the behavior of key actinide and rare-earth elements during electrotransport to a solid electrode over a useful range of PuCl 3 /UCl 3 ratios in the electrolyte, a thermodynamic basis for that behavior, and a comparison of the observed behavior with that calculated from a thermodynamic model. This work clearly established that recovery of nearly pure uranium can be a key step in the overall pyrochemical-fuel-processing strategy for the IFR

  19. Environmental Guide Value (VGE) and specific reference values (QS) for uranium. Synthesis and elements for application to French fresh waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This report proposes a synthesis of works performed to determine criteria of protection of continental aquatic ecosystems with respect to uranium. These works resulted in the determination of an environmental guide value (VGE) for the assessment of the ecological and chemical condition of waters. Other specific reference values have been determined to be used in risk assessment: average annual concentration, maximum admissible concentration. After a recall of the methodology adopted for the determination of VGE in the case of uranium, the report discusses the specific reference values in the case of uranium for different organisms, for predators, for the protection of human health against a risk of exposure by consumption of fished products or drinkable water. The determination of VGE and its application are reported, and its consistency with the criterion of radiation protection of the environment applied to water and sediments is discussed. The determination of specific reference values is then discussed

  20. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 2. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with cerium(IV) and ISO 7097-1 uses a titration with potassium dichromate

  1. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 1. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for the determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with potassium dichromate and ISO 7097-2 uses a titration with cerium(IV)

  2. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongsheng; Liu Chunxia; Feng Miao; Chen Zhen; Li Shuqiong; Tian Gan; Wang Li; Huang Jingbo; Li Shoujian

    2010-01-01

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min -1 from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 = -46.2 kJ/mol; ΔS 0 = -98.0 J/mol K; ΔG 0 = -17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na + , Co 2+ , Sr 2+ , Cs + and La 3+ .

  3. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yongsheng; Liu Chunxia; Feng Miao; Chen Zhen; Li Shuqiong; Tian Gan; Wang Li; Huang Jingbo [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Lu, Chengdu, 610064, Sichuan (China); Li Shoujian, E-mail: sjli000616@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Lu, Chengdu, 610064, Sichuan (China)

    2010-04-15

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min{sup -1} from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup 0} = -46.2 kJ/mol; {Delta}S{sup 0} = -98.0 J/mol K; {Delta}G{sup 0} = -17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na{sup +}, Co{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Cs{sup +} and La{sup 3+}.

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  9. Demonstration and evaluation of solid state photomultiplier tube for uranium exploration instrumentation. National uranium resources evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polichar, R.M.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this program has been to evaluate the recently developed solid state photomultiplier tube (SSPMT) technology as a potential improvment to future uranium exploration instrumentation. To this end, six SSPMTs have been constructed and evaluated in a manner similar to that of conventional phototubes. Special regard has been placed on the measurement of pulse height resolution and the factors that affect it in tube design and manufacture. The tubes were subjected to a number of tests similar to those performed on conventional photomultiplier tubes. The results indicate that good, high-resolution spectra can be obtained from the tubes and that they behave generally in a predictable manner. They exhibited a linear gain increase with applied potential. They show only slight dependence of performance with applied potential. Their sensitivity is, for the most part, uniform and predictable. However, several characteristics were found that were not predictable. These include a general drop in measured quantum efficiency, a worsening resolution with operation, and a bump in the sensitivity curve corresponding to the shape of the projected dimension of the anode. The SSPMT remains an attractive new technology in gamma-ray spectroscopy, and promises to make significant improvements in the area of uranium exploration instrumentation. 16 figures, 5 tables

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  11. Uranium analysis in water flowing by the nuclear track detection method on solid dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arambula, H.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was threefold: to study the content of uranium in tap and spring water, to establish a technique for the quantitative analysis for the presence of uranium in liquids, and to test the qualities as detector fission fragments of three solid insulator materials using the nuclear tracks register method. The latter allows for the measurement of concentrations of fissile elements up to 10 -12 gr/gm employing (n, f.f.) reactions. The test samples were of tap water and of water from six fresh water springs located in San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato. Glass, lexan polycarbonate and muscovite mica were the detector materials used. The technique consisted in evaporating the water from the test samples, which had been previously placed upon the detector materials, and in doing the same for the standard control sample solutions having known concentrations of uranium. All the samples were then irradiated with thermal neutrons, and the 235 U, present in the samples, fissioned. The fission fragments produced permanent damage on the detectors, known as latent tracks. A specific corroding chemical was then applied to each detector which caused the latent tracks to dissolve into grooves. Known as etching tracks, these grooves were microscopically visible and could be measured for track density (tracks/mm 2 ). The concentrations of uranium present in the test samples were measured by comparing the track densities of the test samples with those of the standard control samples. The concentration of uranium found in the spring water samples ranged from 0.09 to 0.89 μqr.U/1, and those of tap water, from 0.18 to 0.19 μqr U/1. Lexan polycarbonate and muscovite mica proved to be better, as detectors, than glass. Glass for quantitative analysis, we found not recommendable as a detector material because of its alterable composition in the presence of uranium. (author)

  12. Studies on supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from liquid and solid matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Pal, Ankita; Saxena, M.K.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2006-05-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is being widely used in pharmaceutical and food industry. Because of its simplicity, ease of operation and more importantly the reduction in the analytical waste generation, this technique is being viewed as a potential application technique in nuclear industry also. CO 2 is employed as supercritical fluid (SCF) as it is easily recyclable, non-toxic, chemically inert, radiochemically stable and inexpensive. Radioanalytical chemistry section (Radiochemistry and Isotope group) has recently procured a supercritical fluid extraction/chromatography system. The present report describes the work carried out on the system. Detailed study on uranium and thorium extraction from highly acidic medium and tissue paper matrix has been carried out. Direct dissolution and extraction of uranium compounds employing SCF has been carried out. CO 2 was employed as supercritical fluid along with very small amount of Tri n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and Tri n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-solvents. The effect of various operating parameters like CO 2 flow rate, co-solvent percentage, temperature and pressure on extraction was investigated and parameters for maximum extraction were optimized. For comparison, the modes of extraction viz. static and dynamic and modes of complexation viz. in-situ and online were studied. Uranium extraction of ∼98% has been achieved from nitric acid medium employing TBP as co-solvent in 30 minutes extraction time, whereas with TOPO ∼99% uranium extraction could be achieved. Uranium from tissue paper matrix could be extracted upto the extent of 98% with TOPO as co-solvent whereas with TBP extraction of (66.83± 9.80)% was achievable. Direct dissolution of UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , U metal, U-Al alloy solids into SCF CO 2 was carried out employing TBP-HNO 3 complex and SFE of uranium was performed using TBP as co-solvent. UO 2 and U 3 O 8 solids could be dissolved within 20 minutes and extraction of ∼98% was achieved. For U

  13. Electrodeposition of uranium and transuranic metals (Pu) on solid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplace, A. F.; Lacquement, J.; Willitt, J. L.; Finch, R. A.; Fletcher, G. A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The results from a study of U and Pu metal electrodeposition from molten eutectic LiCl-KCl on a solid inert cathode are presented. This study has been conducted using ∼ to 50 g of U-Pu together with rare earths (mostly Nd) and 1.5 kg of salt. The introduction of a three-electrode probe with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode has allowed voltammetric measurement during electrolysis and control of the cathode potential versus the reference. Cyclic and square-wave voltammetric measurements proved to be very useful tools for monitoring the electrolysis as well as selecting the cathode versus reference potential to maximize the separation between actinides and rare earths. The voltammetric data also highlighted the occurrence of back reactions between the cathode deposit and oxidizing equivalents formed at the anode that remained in the molten salt electrolyte. Any further electrolysis test needs to be conducted continuously and followed by immediate removal of the cathode to minimize those back reactions. (authors)

  14. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes

  15. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with uranium zirconium oxide solid solution - Zirconium hinders oxidative uranium dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yuta; Takano, Masahide; Watanabe, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    We studied oxidative dissolution of uranium and zirconium oxide [(U,Zr)O2] in aqueous H2O2 solution to estimate (U,Zr)O2 stability to interfacial reactions with H2O2. Studies on the interfacial reactions are essential for anticipating how a (U,Zr)O2-based molten fuel may chemically degrade after a severe accident. The fuel's high radioactivity induces water radiolysis and continuous H2O2 generation. Subsequent reaction of the fuel with H2O2 may oxidize the fuel surface and facilitate U dissolution. We conducted our experiments with (U,Zr)O2 powder (comprising Zr:U mole ratios of 25:75, 40:60, and 50:50) and quantitated the H2O2 reaction via dissolved U and H2O2 concentrations. Although (U,Zr)O2 reacted more quickly than UO2, the dissolution yield relative to H2O2 consumption was far less for (U,Zr)O2 compared to that of UO2. The reaction kinetics indicates that most of the H2O2 catalytically decomposed to O2 at the surface of (U,Zr)O2. We confirmed the H2O2 catalytic decomposition via O2 production (quantitative stoichiometric agreement). In addition, post-reaction Raman scattering spectra of the undissolved (U,Zr)O2 showed no additional peaks (indicating a lack of secondary phase formation). The (U,Zr)O2 matrix is much more stable than UO2 against H2O2-induced oxidative dissolution. Our findings will improve understanding on the molten fuels and provide an insight into decommissioning activities after a severe accident.

  16. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  17. Uranium isotope separation in the solid state. Progress report, December 1, 1976--June 1, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.R.

    1977-06-01

    Since we were actively able to work on this project, we have been engaged in three separate lines of research. Each of these has been related to laser-induced isotope separation of uranium in the solid state. The three areas are: (a) improved reaction chemistry for both host materials Zr(BH 4 ) 4 and Hf(BH 4 ) 4 and U(BH 4 ) 4 itself; (b) improved spectroscopic techniques in order to obtain sharper spectra; and (c) solid state photochemical investigations to study U(BH 4 ) 4 photodecomposition mechanism and yield as a function of wave length. These are all integral parts of the solid state isotope separation procedure and are discussed in terms of the overall process proposed

  18. Electrotransport of Uranium from a Liquid Cadmium Anode to a Solid Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Hua, Thanh Q.

    2002-01-01

    During anodic dissolution of irradiated binary Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel, a portion of the electrorefined uranium collects in the underlying cadmium pool. It is periodically recovered by setting up a cell configuration in which the pool is made the anode and uranium is electrodeposited on a solid cathode mandrel. A theoretical model is used to determine the current structure of the liquid cadmium anode. The model is validated by comparing against the measured composition of the cathode deposits. Multinodal simulations are conducted to explain the bell shape of deposits observed with this mode of electrotransport. The simulations also determine the dependence of collection efficiency on the electrical charge passed that is functionally consistent with the experimental data. Finally, a simplified operating map of the electrorefiner is presented that can be used to determine the conditions for growing cathode deposits of target composition

  19. Chemical process for recovery of uranium values contained in phosphoric mineral lixivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, E.L.H. da; Awwal, M.A.; Coelho, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A recovery process of uranium values from phosporic mineral lixivia for obtaining uranio oxide concentrate adjusted to specifications of purity for its commercialization the process consists of the adjustment of electromotive force of lixiviem to suitable values for uranium extraction, extraction with organic solvent containing phosphoric acid ester and oxidant reextraction from this solvent with phosphoric acid solution, suggesting a new solvent extraction containing synergetic mixture of di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid and tri-octyl phosphine, leaching this solvent with water and re-extraction/precipitation with ammonium carbonate solution, resulting in the formation of uranyl tricarbonate and ammonium, that by drying and calcination gives the uranium oxide with purity degree for commercialization. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  1. Separation of uranium and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, Nimai; Kumar, Mithlesh; Thulasidas, S.K.; Hon, N.S.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mhatre, Amol; Natarajan, V.

    2014-07-01

    The report describes separation of uranium (U) and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium (Pu). This will be useful in recovery of Pu from nuclear waste. This is an important activity of any nuclear program in view of the strategic importance of Pu. In Radiochemistry Division, the trace metal analysis of Pu bearing fuel materials such as PuO 2 , (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,Pu)C are being carried out using the DC arc-Carrier Distillation technique. During these analyses, solid analytical waste containing Pu and 241 Am is generated. This comprises of left-over of samples and prepared charges. The main constituents of this waste are uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and silver chloride used as carrier. This report describes the entire work carried out to separate gram quantities of Pu from large amounts of U and mg quantities of 241 Am and the effect of leaching of the waste with nitric acid as a function of batch size. The effect of leaching the solid analytical waste of (U,Pu)O 2 and AgCl with concentrated nitric acid for different time intervals was also studied. Later keeping the time constant, the effect of nitric acid molarity on the leaching of U and Pu was investigated. Four different lots of the waste having different amounts were subjected to multiple leaching with 8 M nitric acid, each for 15 minutes duration. In all the experiments the amount of Uranium, Plutonium and other impurities leached were determined using ICP as an excitation source. The results are discussed in this report. (author)

  2. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, M.; Rericha, V.; Rericha, R.; Shore, D.L.; Sandler, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: → Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. → We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. → No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. → Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

  3. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yusuke, E-mail: ohhashi.yusuke@jaea.go.jp [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1550 Kamisaibara, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Harada, Masayuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Asanuma, Noriko [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The uranium component of steel wastes and spent NaF adsorbent are easily dissolved into BMICl. • The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl are reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V. • The dissolved uranium species in BMICl are recovered as black deposits electrolytically. • The deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. - Abstract: In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at −1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  4. A new method for determining the uranium and thorium distribution in volcanic rock samples using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M.A.; Bakhchi, A.; Ktata, A.; Koutit, A.; Lamine, J.; Ait nouh, F.; Oufni, L.

    2000-01-01

    A method based on using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) CR- 39 and LR-115 type II and calculating the probabilities for the alpha particles emitted by the uranium and thorium series to reach and be registered on these films was utilized for uranium and thorium contents determination in various geological samples. The distribution of uranium and thorium in different volcanic rocks has been investigated using the track fission method. In this work, the uranium and thorium contents have been determined in different volcanic rock samples by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The mean critical angles of etching of the solid state nuclear track detectors utilized have been calculated. A petrographical study of the volcanic rock thin layers studied has been conducted. The uranium and thorium distribution inside different rock thin layers has been studied. The mechanism of inclusion of the uranium and thorium nuclei inside the volcanic rock samples studied has been investigated. (author)

  5. Magnetic separation for pre-concentration of uranium values from copper plant tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, R.S.; Sreenivas, T.; Natarajan, R.; Sridhar, U.; Rao, N.K.

    1991-01-01

    Using the paramagnetic character of uranium minerals, the preconcentration of uranium bearing ores and copper plant tailings of Singhbhum area have been investigated in a pilot plant scale wet high intensity magnetic separator (WHIMS). The variables studied include magnetic field intensity, matrix drum speed feed slurry flow rate and its pulp density. The results of these investigations have shown that 75-85% of the contained uranium values could be recovered in 45-55% weight in the magnetic fraction in the case of copper plant tailings from Rakha, Surda and Mosabani. The losses in the non magnetics were primarily due to the ultrafine liberated uraninite particles not collected by WHIMS due to machine limitations and the values occurring as fine inclusions in quartz. Improved recovery can be obtained by offering higher field gradients and preventing loss of very fine liberated uranium values. High gradient magnetic separator (HGMS) offers higher field gradients. A test sample of Mosabani copper tailings studied at the Sala Magnetic Inc in HGMS has indicated superior results in comparison to WHIMS. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  7. Direct electrochemical reduction of solid uranium oxide in molten fluoride salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibilaro, Mathieu; Cassayre, Laurent; Lemoine, Olivier; Massot, Laurent; Dugne, Olivier; Malmbeck, Rikard; Chamelot, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    The direct electrochemical reduction of UO 2 solid pellets was carried out in LiF-CaF 2 (+2 mass.% Li 2O) at 850 °C. An inert gold anode was used instead of the usual reactive sacrificial carbon anode. In this case, oxidation of oxide ions present in the melt yields O 2 gas evolution on the anode. Electrochemical characterisations of UO 2 pellets were performed by linear sweep voltammetry at 10 mV/s and reduction waves associated to oxide direct reduction were observed at a potential 150 mV more positive in comparison to the solvent reduction. Subsequent, galvanostatic electrolyses runs were carried out and products were characterised by SEM-EDX, EPMA/WDS, XRD and microhardness measurements. In one of the runs, uranium oxide was partially reduced and three phases were observed: nonreduced UO 2 in the centre, pure metallic uranium on the external layer and an intermediate phase representing the initial stage of reduction taking place at the grain boundaries. In another run, the UO 2 sample was fully reduced. Due to oxygen removal, the U matrix had a typical coral-like structure which is characteristic of the pattern observed after the electroreduction of solid oxides.

  8. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Lorenzo, D.S.; Vejvoda, E.J.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic wastes, now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site, are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 7% of the transuranic waste to be retrieved for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been generated at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by PUREX using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The PUREX Plant is currently operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy and is now in standby status while being prepared for permanent shutdown. The PUREX Plant is a collection of facilities that has been used primarily to separate plutonium for nuclear weapons from spent fuel that had been irradiated in the Hanford Site's defense reactors. Originally designed to reprocess aluminum-clad uranium fuel, the plant was modified to reprocess zirconium alloy clad fuel elements from the Hanford Site's N Reactor. PUREX has provided plutonium for research reactor development, safety programs, and defense. In addition, the PUREX was used to recover slightly enriched uranium for recycling into fuel for use in reactors that generate electricity and plutonium. Section 2.0 provides further details of the PUREX's physical plant and its operations. The PUREX Plant functions that generate solid waste are as follows: processing operations, laboratory analyses and supporting activities. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these activities are discussed in detail

  9. Study on environmental background values of uranium in water of Dongting Lake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Pengji; Kang Tiesheng

    1987-01-01

    Study on environmental background values in water is the base of evaluating water quality and also is the foundational work of studying the law of distribution, accumulation and transfer of the elements. Research on background values of U in water not only can understand radioactive level but also has actual significance for the general survey of U by water. In the work uranium contents were determined by fission track analytical technique in the filtered and unfiltered specimens of river water, reservoir water and spring water taken from more than one hundred sections located in Dongting Lake system and the statistical process of data were carried out by computer. The environmental background values in water of various river system were obtained and compared with the situation of home and abroad. The seasonal variety of uranium content and the level of U in reservoir, spring water and natural reserve were discussed

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  11. Evaluation of Solid Geologic Reference Materials for Uranium-Series Measurements via LA-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K. A.; Goldstein, S. J.; Norman, D. E.; Nunn, A. J.; Murrell, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology have a wide range of applications in paleoclimatology, volcanology and other disciplines. To further explore these fields, the geoanalytical community has now begun to exploit recent advances in in situ, micron-scale sampling via laser ablation-ICPMS. Unfortunately, improvements in instrumentation have generally outpaced development of the appropriate geologic reference materials required for in situ U-series work. We will report results for uranium and thorium isotopic ratios and elemental concentrations measured in a suite of solid standards from the USGS (e.g., BCR-2G, BHVO-2G, GSD-1G, MACS-1, NKT-2G), as well as those from the MPI-DING series (e.g., ATHO-G, T1-G, StHs6/80-G). Specifically created for microanalysis, two of these standards are synthetic (GSD-1G, MACS-1) and the remainder are naturally-sourced glasses. They cover a range of compositions, ages (± secular equilibrium), elemental concentrations and expected isotopic ratios. The U-series isotopics of some powdered source materials have been characterized (e.g., BCR-2, BHVO-2), although there is no confirmation of the same ratios in the glass. Bulk measurement of these solid standards via TIMS and solution multicollector-ICPMS can then be used to assess the performance of LA-ICPMS techniques which require matrix-matched solid standards for correction of U-series elemental and isotopic ratios. These results from existing, widely-available reference materials will also facilitate quantification and comparison of U-series data among laboratories in the broader geoscience community.

  12. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: a case-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulich, M; Reřicha, V; Reřicha, R; Shore, D L; Sandler, D P

    2011-04-01

    Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Příbram region, Czech Republic. A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  15. Development of a portable mass spectrometric system for determination of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples using fluorine volatilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loge, G.

    1994-09-01

    Using hardware and materials supplied by LANL, a prototype quadrupole mass spectrometer system designed for portable field analysis of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples was assembled and tested. The system contained the capability for fluorine volatilization of solid uranium samples with gas introduction, which was successfully tested and demonstrated using 100 mg samples of U3O8. Determination of precision and accuracy for measuring isotopic composition was performed using isotopic standards. Use with soil samples containing uranium were also attempted. Silicates in the soil forming SiF4 were found to be a kinetic bottleneck to the formation of UF6. This could be avoided by performing some sort of chemical separation as a pre-treatment step, which was demonstrated using nitric acid.

  16. The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs

  17. The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. An experimental study of molten salt electrorefining of uranium using solid iron cathode and liquid cadmium cathode for development of pyrometallurgical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Shoji, Yuichi; Fujita, Reiko; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Electrorefining of uranium was studied for developing pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology of metal fuel cycle. After concentration dependence of polarization curve was measured, uranium was electrodeposited either on solid iron cathode or in liquid cadmium cathode. Design and operational conditions of the cathode were improved for obtaining much greater quantity of deposit, resulting in recovery of 732g of dendritic uranium on a single solid cathode, and of 232g of uranium in 2,344g of a liquid cadmium cathode. The behaviors of electro-codeposition of rare earth elements with uranium were observed for liquid cadmium cathode, and were found to follow the local equilibrium between salt electrolyte and cathode. The decontamination factors of FP simulating elements from uranium were tentatively determined as >2,000 for deposition to solid cathode and as >7 for deposition to liquid cadmium cathode, respectively. (author)

  19. Uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF6 and solid UF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yato, Yumio; Kishimoto, Yoichiro; Sasao, Nobuyuki; Suto, Osamu; Funasaka, Hideyuki

    1996-01-01

    Based on a collision model, a new rate equation is derived for uranium isotope exchange between gaseous UF 6 and solid UF 5 by considering the number of UF 5 molecules on the solid surface to be dependent on time. The reaction parameters included in the equation are determined from the experimental data and compared with the previous ones. A remarkable agreement is found between the particle sizes of UF 5 estimated from the reaction parameter and from the direct observation with an electron microscope. The rate equation given in this work fully satisfies the related mass conservation and furthermore includes explicitly the terms related to the UF 6 density and the mean size of UF 5 particles, both of which are considered to cause an important effect on the reaction. This remarkable feature facilitates the simulation studies on this reaction under various conditions. The long term behavior of a simulated exchange reaction is studied under the condition considered to be close to that in a recovery zone of the MLIS process. The result indicates that the reaction is virtually limited to the solid surface under this conditions and thus the depletion of 235 UF 5 concentration averaged over the whole UF 5 particles is not significant even after 200 h of the exchange reaction

  20. Mapping of uranium and thorium in radioactive rocks using nuclear track solid detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouch, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    α-Autoradiography and studies of induced fission in a research nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, IPEN, Sao Paulo) were done, employing Solid-State Nuclear Track detectors, in order to study the distribution of α-emitters, U and Th in rocks. Polished sections of rocks were prepared and photographed. Etching conditions were studied in order to adapt the detectors to the studies of microdistribution and macrodistribution of tracks. Polycarbonate foils (Bayer, Makrofol) were chosen as fission-fragments detectors and the technique of fission induced with reactor neutrons to obtain the distribution of U and Th were studied. Uranium and thorium standards evaporated on the surface of the detectors, as well as thorite and uraninite grains, were irradiated in order to measure the integrated flux of neutrons, the effective cross sections for fission with reactor neutrons for 232 Th(0,05b) and 238 U(0,30b) and to study the contribution of 238 U fission in thorium mapping. A technique for determination of uranium and thorium in minerals was studied and applied to Mica, for which were determined the contents of 4,2 ppb U e 58 ppb Th. (Author) [pt

  1. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  2. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished

  3. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotti, P.; Jha, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally insoluble high-density sol-gel thoria-urania nuclear reactor fuel pellets. 7 claims

  4. Reference values and their application to the monitoring of occupational exposure to natural uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Natural uranium compounds, which enter the oxide fuel cycle offer physico-chemical characteristics dependent on their structure and their production process. These characteristics govern their biological behaviour and the degree of their radioactive and chemical toxicity. The monitoring of workers occupationnally exposed to these compounds is carried out by bioassays; in order to get the best interpretation, the resulting data must be compared to reference values. These values must be closely related to the type of contaminant and the real exposure conditions. In this report, the occupational medicine services working group has examined the possibilities of obtaining such reference values and suggests recommendations and operational values covering most situations found in routine monitoring [fr

  5. Magnetic study of solid uranium-fluorine complexes; Contribution a l'etude magnetique de composes fluores solides de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianoux, A J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-06-01

    A study of the magnetic susceptibility of uranium V fluorine complexes and of the magnetic resonance of fluorine atoms in uranium VI fluorine complexes has made it possible to put forward a structural model for these compounds for which it is impossible, because of the lack of suitable single crystals for X-ray diffraction work, to deduce the exact position of the fluorine atoms. It is shown that it is difficult to interpret the paramagnetism of uranium fluorides, because the uranium ions are in low-symmetry sites. A theoretical study of the magnetism of the U{sup V} ion in complex fluorides of the type M{sub 3}UF{sub 8} (M = NH{sub 4}, Na, Rb, Cs) leads to an interpretation based on a trigonal deformation of the eight fluorine atom structure surrounding the uranium atom. By applying a Hamiltonian spin formalism and making a systematic use of group theory, it is possible to present the susceptibility calculations very concisely. Study of the resonance and of the relaxation of the fluorine atoms in powdered uranium VI complex fluorides suggests a structural model in the case of NaUF{sub 7}. It is shown that the shape of the magnetic resonance absorption lines is strongly affected by the presence of large anisotropic chemical shifts. In the model proposed here, six fluorine atoms are linked to the uranium, atom by strongly covalent bonds in a deformed UF{sub 6} octahedral structure; the seventh fluorine atom remains ionic. The occurrence of a rotational movement of the octahedron is confirmed by a study of the longitudinal relaxation of the fluorine atoms, the activation energy being 0.46 eV. (author) [French] L'etude de la susceptibilite magnetique de complexes fluores d'uranium V et la resonance magnetique des fluors dans des complexes fluores d'uranium VI permettent de proposer un modele structural pour ces composes, ou la diffraction des rayons X, en l'absence de monocristaux convenables, est incapable de preciser la position des atomes de fluor. Nous montrons

  6. Magnetic study of solid uranium-fluorine complexes; Contribution a l'etude magnetique de composes fluores solides de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianoux, A.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-06-01

    A study of the magnetic susceptibility of uranium V fluorine complexes and of the magnetic resonance of fluorine atoms in uranium VI fluorine complexes has made it possible to put forward a structural model for these compounds for which it is impossible, because of the lack of suitable single crystals for X-ray diffraction work, to deduce the exact position of the fluorine atoms. It is shown that it is difficult to interpret the paramagnetism of uranium fluorides, because the uranium ions are in low-symmetry sites. A theoretical study of the magnetism of the U{sup V} ion in complex fluorides of the type M{sub 3}UF{sub 8} (M = NH{sub 4}, Na, Rb, Cs) leads to an interpretation based on a trigonal deformation of the eight fluorine atom structure surrounding the uranium atom. By applying a Hamiltonian spin formalism and making a systematic use of group theory, it is possible to present the susceptibility calculations very concisely. Study of the resonance and of the relaxation of the fluorine atoms in powdered uranium VI complex fluorides suggests a structural model in the case of NaUF{sub 7}. It is shown that the shape of the magnetic resonance absorption lines is strongly affected by the presence of large anisotropic chemical shifts. In the model proposed here, six fluorine atoms are linked to the uranium, atom by strongly covalent bonds in a deformed UF{sub 6} octahedral structure; the seventh fluorine atom remains ionic. The occurrence of a rotational movement of the octahedron is confirmed by a study of the longitudinal relaxation of the fluorine atoms, the activation energy being 0.46 eV. (author) [French] L'etude de la susceptibilite magnetique de complexes fluores d'uranium V et la resonance magnetique des fluors dans des complexes fluores d'uranium VI permettent de proposer un modele structural pour ces composes, ou la diffraction des rayons X, en l'absence de monocristaux convenables, est incapable de preciser la position des atomes de

  7. Establishing Value of Ceramic Solid Waste Into Light Weight Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarigan, U.; Prasetya, H. R.; Tarigan, U. P. P.

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic solid waste is a waste in the form of the ceramic or ceramic powder that has a defect and cannot be resold where the amount will continue to increase as the ceramic industry continues to produce. Handling waste so far is done by pilling it on vacant land so that if the waste continues to grow the more areas are also needed to stockpile. In addition, waste handling by boards can be a potential hazard to the surrounding environment such as chemical content in ceramics can be carried to the waters and the dust can be blown by the wind and disrupt breathing. This study aims to convert ceramics solid wastes into bricks that have more added value. Data collection is done with primary and secondary data. The method used is Taguchi experiment design to determine the optimum brick composition. The experiment consisted of 4 factors and 3 levels of ceramic with 4 kg, 5 kg and 6 kg, cement with level 3 kg, 4 kg and 5 kg, silica with level 3 kg, 4 kg and 5 kg, water level 500 ml, 750 ml, and 1000 ml. After that proceed with the financial analysis that is determining the selling price, Break Event Point (BEP, Internal Rate of Return (IRR), Pay Back Period (PBP), and Profitability Index. The results of this research are the optimum composition of the concrete blocks, 6 kg of ceramics, 5 kg of cement, 4 kg of silica sand and 1000 ml of water with the compressive strength of 125,677 kg/cm2 and signal to noise is 41,964 dB. In the financial analysis, the selling price of brick is Rp 7,751.75/unit and BEP 318,612 units of product, IRR level 43.174% and PBP for 1 year and 10 months

  8. Obtaining S values for rectangular--solid tumors inside rectangular--solid host organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Durham, J.S.; Fisher, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for obtaining S values between a tumor and its host organ for use with the MIRD formalism. It applies the point-source specific absorbed fractions for an infinite water medium, tabulated by Berger, to a rectangular solid of arbitrary dimensions which contains a rectangular tumor of arbitrary dimensions. Contributions from pairs of source and target volume elements are summed for the S values between the tumor and itself, between the remaining healthy host organ and itself, and between the tumor and the remaining healthy host organ, with the reciprocity theorem assumed for the last. This method labeled MTUMOR, is interfaced with the widely used MIRDOSE program which incorporates the MIRD formalism. An example is calculated

  9. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  10. Recovery of fluorine, uranium, and rare earth metal values from phosphoric acid by-product brine raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamser, C.A.; Bruen, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    A method for recovering substantially all of the fluorine and uranium values and at least 90 percent of the rare earth metal values from brine raffinate obtained as by-product in the production of phosphoric acid by the hydrochloric acid decomposition of tricalcium phosphate minerals is described. A basically reacting compound is added to the brine raffinate to effect a pH 9 or greater, whereby fluorine, uranium and rare earth metal values are simultaneously precipitated. These values may then be separately recovered from the precipitate by known processes

  11. Solid phase extraction of uranium and thorium on octadecyl bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Shariati Dehaghan, T.; Rasouli Garmarodi, S.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for rapid extraction and determination of uranium and thorium using octadecyl-bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 is presented. Extraction efficiency and the influence of various parameters such as aqueous phase pH, flow rate of sample solution and amount of extractant has been investigated. The study showed that the extraction of uranium and thorium increase with increasing pH value and was found to be quantitative at pH 6; and the retention of ions was not affected significantly by the flow rate of sample solution. The extraction percent were found to be 89.55 and 86.27 % for uranium and thorium, respectively. The maximal capacity of the cartridges modified by 30 mg of Cyanex 302 was found to be 20 mg of uranium and thorium. The method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions. The percentage recovery of uranium and thorium in a number of natural as well as seawater samples of Iran were also investigated and found to be in the range of 85-95%. (author)

  12. Stationary and protable instruments for assay of HEU [highly enriched uranium] solids holdup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Stephens, M.M.; Brumfield, T.L.; Gunn, C.S.; Watson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two NaI(Tl)-based instruments, one stationary and one portable, designed for automated assay of highly enriched uranium (HEU) solids holdup, are being evaluated at the scrap recovery facility of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The stationary instrument, a continuous monitor of HEU within the filters of the chip burner exhaust system, measures the HEU deposits that accumulate erratically and rapidly during chip burner operation. The portable system was built to assay HEU in over 100 m of elevated piping used to transfer UO 3 , UO 2 , and UF 4 powder to, from, and between the fluid bed conversion furnances and the powder storage hoods. Both instruments use two detector heads. Both provide immediate automatic readout of accumulated HEU mass. The 186-keV 235 U gamma ray is the assay signature, and the 60-keV gamma ray from an 241 Am source attached to each detector is used to normalize the 186-keV rate. The measurement geometries were selected for compatibility with simple calibration models. The assay calibrations were calculated from these models and were verified and normalized with measurements of HEU standards built to match geometries of uniform accumulations on the surfaces of the process equipment. This instrumentation effort demonstrates that simple calibration models can often be applied to unique measurement geometries, minimizing the otherwise unreasonable requirements for calibration standards and allowing extension of the measurements to other process locations

  13. Using 238U/235U ratios to understand the formation and oxidation of reduced uranium solids in naturally reduced zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemison, N.; Johnson, T. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Davis, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Uranium occurs in groundwater primarily as soluble and mobile U(VI), which can be reduced to immobile U(IV), often observed in sediments as uraninite. Numerous U(VI)-contaminated sites, such as the DOE field site in Rifle, CO, contain naturally reduced zones (NRZ's) that have relatively high concentrations of organic matter. Reduction of heavy metals occurs within NRZ's, producing elevated concentrations of iron sulfides and U(IV). Slow, natural oxidation of U(IV) from NRZ's may prolong U(VI) contamination of groundwater. The reduction of U(VI) produces U(IV) with a higher 238U/235U ratio. Samples from two NRZ sediment cores recovered from the Rifle site revealed that the outer fringes of the NRZ contain U(IV) with a high 238U/235U ratio, while lower values are observed in the center . We suggest that as aqueous U(VI) was reduced in the NRZ, it was driven to lower 238U/235U values, such that U(IV) formed in the core of the NRZ reflects a lower 238U/235U. Two oxidation experiments were conducted by injecting groundwater containing between 14.9 and 21.2 mg/L dissolved O2 as an oxidant into the NRZ. The oxidation of U(IV) from this NRZ increased aqueous U(VI) concentrations and caused a shift to higher 238U/235U in groundwater as U(IV) was oxidized primarily on the outer fringes of the NRZ. In total these observations suggest that the stability of solid phase uranium is governed by coupled reaction and transport processes. To better understand various reactive transport scenarios we developed a model for the formation and oxidation of NRZ's utilizing the reactive transport software CrunchTope. These simulations suggest that the development of isotopically heterogeneous U(IV) within NRZ's is largely controlled by permeability of the NRZ and the U(VI) reduction rate. Oxidation of U(IV) from the NRZ's is constrained by the oxidation rate of U(IV) as well as iron sulfides, which can prevent oxidation of U(IV) by scavenging dissolved oxygen.

  14. Recovery of uranium from the Syrian phosphate by solid-liquid method using alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were analyzed in the Syrian phosphate deposits. Mean concentrations were found between 50 and 110 ppm. As a consequence, an average phosphate dressing of 22 kg/ha phosphate would charge the soil with 5-20 g/ha uranium when added as a mineral fertilizer. Fine grinding phosphate produced at the Syrian mines was used for uranium recovery by carbonate leaching. The formation of the soluble uranyl tricarbonate anion UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- permits use of alkali solutions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate salts for the nearly selective dissolution of uranium from phosphate. Separation of iron, aluminum, titanium, etc., from the uranium during leaching was carried out. Formation of some small amounts of molybdates, vanadates, phosphates, aluminates, and some complexes metal was investigated. This process could be used before the manufacture of TSP fertilizer, and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author)

  15. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  16. Solid state speciation of uranium and its local structure in Sr2CeO4 using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, M.; Gupta, Santosh K.; Jain, D.; Saxena, M. K.; Kadam, R. M.

    2018-04-01

    An effort was taken to carry our speciation study of uranium ion in technologically important cerate host Sr2CeO4 using time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such studies are not relevant only to nuclear industry but can give rich insight into fundamentals of 5f electron chemistry in solid state systems. In this work both undoped and varied amount of uranium doped Sr2CeO4 compound is synthesized using complex polymerization method and is characterized systematically using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both XRD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of pure Sr2CeO4 which has tendency to decompose peritectically to SrCeO3 and SrO at higher temperature. Uranium doping is confirmed by XRD. Uranium exhibits a rich chemistry owing to its variable oxidation state from +3 to +6. Each of them exhibits distinct luminescence properties either due to f-f transitions or ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT). We have taken Sr2CeO4 as a model host lattice to understand the photophysical characteristics of uranium ion in it. Emission spectroscopy revealed the stabilization of uranium as U (VI) in the form of UO66- (octahedral uranate) in Sr2CeO4. Emission kinetics study reflects that uranate ions are not homogeneously distributed in Sr2CeO4 and it has two different environments due to its stabilization at both Sr2+ as well as Ce4+ site. The lifetime population analysis interestingly pinpointed that majority of uranate ion resided at Ce4+ site. The critical energy-transfer distance between the uranate ion was determined based on which the concentration quenching mechanism was attributed to electric multipolar interaction. These studies are very important in designing Sr2CeO4 based optoelectronic material as well exploring it for actinides studies.

  17. Reevaluation of the average prompt neutron emission multiplicity (nubar) values from fission of uranium and transuranium nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    In response to a need of the safeguards community, we have begun an evaluation effort to upgrade the recommended values of the prompt neutron emission multiplicity distribution, P/sub nu/ and its average value, nubar. This paper will report on progress achieved thus far. The evaluation of the uranium, plutonium, americium and curium nuclide's nubar values will be presented. The recommended values will be given and discussed. 61 references

  18. A soil radiological quality guideline value for wildlife-based protection in uranium mine rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, Che; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A soil guideline value for radiological protection of the environment was determined for the impending rehabilitation of Ranger uranium mine in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. The guideline value was 1000 Bq kg"−"1 of "2"2"6Ra in the proposed waste rock substrate of the rehabilitated landform and corresponded to an above-baseline dose rate of 100 μGy h"−"1 to the most highly exposed individuals of the limiting organism. The limiting organism was reptile based on an assessment using site-specific concentration ratio data. - Highlights: • A soil guideline value for wildlife was derived for a mine rehabilitation situation. • The value was 1000 Bq kg"−"1 of "2"2"6Ra in the rehabilitation substrate. • The value was back-calculated from a benchmark dose rate of 100 μGy h"−"1. • Exposures from "2"2"2Rn and progeny were considered and included. • Use of site-specific concentration ratio data gave lower results than generic data.

  19. Preconcentration of trace uranium from seawater with solid phase extraction followed by differential pulse polarographic determination in chloroform eluate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dojozan, Dj.; Pournaghi-Azar, M.H.; Toutounchi-Asr, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, an effective method is presented for the separation and preconcentration of uranium (VI) by solid phase extraction (SPE). For this purpose, U(VI) oxinate is formed by the reaction of U(VI) with 8-hydroxyquinoline and adsorbed onto the octylsilane (C-8) SPE cartridge. The analyte is completely eluted with chloroform and determined by differential pulse polarography. The SPE conditions were optimized by evaluating the effective factors such as pH, oxine concentration, type and concentration of buffer and masking agent. By the proposed method a preconcentration factor of more than 100 was achieved. The average recovery of uranium (VI) oxinate (0.1 mg l -1 ) was 99.8%. The relative standard deviation was 1.6% for seven replicate determinations of uranyl ion in the solution with a concentration 20 μg l -1 . Some concomitant ions such as Ca +2 , Mg +2 and Fe +3 which interfere in extraction or determination process of uranium were masked with EDTA in aqueous phase during the extraction process. The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of uranium in Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf water samples

  20. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 1. Chlorination of phosphate ore using solid or gas chlorinating agent and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1995-01-01

    A thermodynamical and pyrometallurgical study to recover uranium from the phosphate ores was undertaken using the chloride volatilization method. Iron was chlorinated with solid chlorinating agents such as NaCl and CaCl 2 in combination with activated carbon, which will be used for removing this element from the ore, but uranium was not. On the other hand, the chlorination using Cl 2 gas and activated carbon gave a good result at 1,223 K. Not only uranium but also iron, phosphorus, aluminum and silicon were found to form volatile chlorides which vaporized out of the ore, while calcium remained in the ore as non-volatile CaCl 2 . The chlorination condition was studied as functions of temperature, reaction time and carbon content. The volatilization ratio of uranium around 95% was obtained by heating the mixture of the ore and activated carbon (35 wt%) in a mixed gas flow of Cl 2 (200 ml/min) and N 2 (200 ml/min) at 1,223 K for 120 min. (author)

  1. Understanding the solid phase chemical fractionation of uranium in soil and effect of ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Sabyasachi, E-mail: srout.barc@gmail.com [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Ajay [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M. [Homi Bhabha National Institute Anushaktinagar, Mumbai (India)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Apart of U(VI) converted to U(IV) during adsorption to soil. • Ageing leads to rearrangement of chemical fractionation of U in soil. • Organic matter and carbonate minerals responsible for Surface enrichment of U. • There occurs Occlusion of U-Fe-Oxides (Hydroxide) in to silica. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to understand the solid phase chemical fractionation of Uranium (U) in soil and the mechanism involved. This study integrated batch experiments of U(VI) adsorption to soil, study of U in different soil fractions, ageing impact on fractionation of U and spectroscopic investigation of adsorbed U(VI) using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). For the study three soils, pedogenically different (S1: Igneous, S2: Sedimentary and S3: Metamorphic) were amended with U(VI) and chemical fractionation of U was studied by sequential extraction after an interval of one month and 12 months. It was found that there occurs a significant rearrangement of U in different fractions with ageing and no correlation was observed between the U content in different fractions and the adsorbents of respective fractions such as soil organic matter (SOM), Fe/Mn oxides (hydroxides) carbonates, soil cation exchange capacity (CEC). XPS study revealed that surface enrichment of U mainly governed by the carbonate minerals and SOM, whereas bulk concentration was controlled by the oxides (hydroxides) of Si and Al. Occlusion of U-Fe-oxides (hydroxides) on silica was identified as an important mechanism for bulk enrichment (Increase in residual fraction) and depletion of U concentration in reducible fraction.

  2. Understanding the solid phase chemical fractionation of uranium in soil and effect of ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Ajay; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Apart of U(VI) converted to U(IV) during adsorption to soil. • Ageing leads to rearrangement of chemical fractionation of U in soil. • Organic matter and carbonate minerals responsible for Surface enrichment of U. • There occurs Occlusion of U-Fe-Oxides (Hydroxide) in to silica. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to understand the solid phase chemical fractionation of Uranium (U) in soil and the mechanism involved. This study integrated batch experiments of U(VI) adsorption to soil, study of U in different soil fractions, ageing impact on fractionation of U and spectroscopic investigation of adsorbed U(VI) using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). For the study three soils, pedogenically different (S1: Igneous, S2: Sedimentary and S3: Metamorphic) were amended with U(VI) and chemical fractionation of U was studied by sequential extraction after an interval of one month and 12 months. It was found that there occurs a significant rearrangement of U in different fractions with ageing and no correlation was observed between the U content in different fractions and the adsorbents of respective fractions such as soil organic matter (SOM), Fe/Mn oxides (hydroxides) carbonates, soil cation exchange capacity (CEC). XPS study revealed that surface enrichment of U mainly governed by the carbonate minerals and SOM, whereas bulk concentration was controlled by the oxides (hydroxides) of Si and Al. Occlusion of U-Fe-oxides (hydroxides) on silica was identified as an important mechanism for bulk enrichment (Increase in residual fraction) and depletion of U concentration in reducible fraction.

  3. Analytical review of minimum critical mass values for selected uranium and plutonium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morman, J.A.; Henrikson, D.J.; Garcia, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Current subcritical limits for a number of uranium and plutonium materials (metals and compounds) as given in the ANSI/ANS standards for criticality safety are based on evaluations performed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This paper presents the results of an analytical study of the minimum critical mass values for a set of materials using current codes and standard cross section sets. This work is meant to produce a consistent set of minimum critical mass values that can form the basis for adding new materials to the single-parameter tables in ANSI/ANS-8.1. Minimum critical mass results are presented for bare and water reflected full-density spheres and for full density moist (1.5 wt-% water) as calculated with KENO-Va, MCNP4A and ONEDANT. Calculations were also performed for both dry and moist materials at one-half density. Some KENO calculations were repeated using several cross section sets to examine potential bias differences. The results of the calculations were compared to the currently accepted subcritical limits. The calculated minimum critical mass values are reasonably consistent for the three codes, and differences most likely reflect differences in the cross section sets. The results are also consistent with values given in ANSI/ANS-8.1. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  4. How effective project management will add value to your uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, R.; Titley, M.

    2014-01-01

    Up until the recent Fukushima incident in March 2011 project activity in the uranium sector was driven by high uranium prices and merger and acquisition corporate activity. Soon after the incident, project development in the uranium sector collapsed and capital slowly dried up as Uranium prices dropped. New projects were put on hold, significantly reducing growth in the small to medium capital markets. Existing brownfield growth plans were halted as corporate strategies focused on improving the efficiency of existing assets. Recent positive sentiment supported by positive commentary in the uranium market, driven by an improved understanding of the supply and demand fundamentals and the restart of Japan’s nuclear reactors, has seen renewed corporate merger and acquisition activity. Developers are again taking an interest in new uranium project development.

  5. Uranium estimation in toothpastes and fruit juices using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    A fission track analysis has been used to estimate the uranium concentration in some toothpastes manufactured in India and fruit juices derived from the fruits available in the local market of Amritsar. The uranium content in these toothpastes has been found to vary from 0.91 to 3.56 ppm. The uranium content in fruit juices has been found to vary from 0.25 to 1.69 ppb. The present investigations have been carried out with an aim to estimate the level of U content in these materials for the studies of radiation health hazards. (author)

  6. Radiological analyses of solids in the area of the old uranium mine of Rosglas (Morbihan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    After a brief presentation of the different uranium sites previously exploited in Brittany, this document reports measurements performed on one of them, the old uranium mine of Rosglas. In situ radiation measurements and sampling (surface soil, rocks, and sediments) were performed. Samples were then analysed (gamma radiation measurements) in order to asses the contamination by Uranium 238 and 235. The authors outline that some radioactive wastes are still accessible and therefore expose public to health risks. They discuss how to take these risks into account and discuss the required restructuring works to be done

  7. Uranium fate in wetland mesocosms: Effects of plants at two iron loadings with different pH values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small-scale continuous flow wetland mesocosms (~0.8 L) were used to evaluate how plant roots under different iron loadings affect uranium (U) mobility. When significant concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe) were present at circumneutral pH values, U concentrations in root exposed ...

  8. Homogeneity and fissure determination in uranium bars with solid state nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, F. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Facultad de Ciencias); Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Tapia, A. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Inst. de Fisica); Somogyi, G. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen. Atommag Kutato Intezete)

    1984-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for determining fissure and concentration inhomogeneity in uranium bars is the alpha-radiographic technique. In our present work uranium bars made by ININ (Mexico) were studied by using CR-39 track detectors. The space inhomogeneity in track density was measured by an optical densitometer. The presence of fissure is determined by a microfiche reader. Such a study takes only few hours and does not require sophisticated instrumentation.

  9. Determination of enrichment of recycle uranium fuels for different burnup values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabunoglu, Okan H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium (U) recovered from spent LWR fuels by reprocessing, which contains small amounts of U-236, is to be enriched before being re-irradiated as the recycle U. During the enrichment of recovered U in U-235, the mass fraction of U-236 also increases. Since the existence of U-236 in the recycle U has a negative effect on neutron economy, a greater enrichment of U-235 in the recycle U is required for reaching the same burnup as can be reached by the fresh U fuel. Two burnup values play the most important role in determining the enrichment of recycle U: (1) discharge burnup of spent fuel from which the recycle U is obtained and (2) desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel. A step-by-step procedure for calculating the enrichment of the recycle U as a function of these two burnup values is introduced. The computer codes MONTEBURNS and ORIGEN-S are made use of and a three-component (U-235, U-236, U-238) enrichment scheme is applied for calculating the amount of U-236 in producing the recycle U from the recovered U. As was aimed, the resulting expression is simple enough for quick/hand calculations of the enrichment of the recycle U for any given discharge burnup of spent fuel and for any desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel, most accurately within the range of 33,000-50,000 MWd/tonU

  10. Results of solid state nuclear track detector technique application in radon detection, by alpha particles tracks, for uranium prospecting in Caetite (BA-Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, M.A.P.V. de; Khouri, M.T.F.C.

    1988-11-01

    The solid state nuclear track detector technique has been used in radon detection, by alpha particles tracks for uranium prospecting on the ground in Caetite city (Bahia-Brazil). The sensitive film to alpha particles used were CA 8015 exposed during 15 days and the results of three anomalies of this region are showed in a form of maps, made with the density of tracks obtained, and were compared with scintillation counter measurements. The technique showed to be simple and an effective auxiliary for the prospection of uranium ore bodies. The initial uranium exploration costs can be reduced by using this technique. (author) [pt

  11. Externalities in solid waste managements: Values, instruments and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisson, I. E.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis was stimulated by and completed against the backdrop of the unfolding 'waste crisis'. It critically examines whether the crisis is real or whether it merely reflects mis-perceptions. Three principal problems associated with the disposal of solid waste are identified. First, there is increasing concern over the environmental pollution of waste disposal, reflecting not just the increase in actual waste arisings, but also the increased public awareness of environmental pollution. Secondly, there is concern over the financial costs of waste collection and disposal, which can constitute a considerable drain on available public revenues. Lastly, there is the perceived scarcity of suitable land for siting disposal facilities. Although some low-lying, densely populated regions are inappropriate for the sitting of landfills, the scarcity more often reflects political constraints rather than a genuine shortage. This thesis asserts that a non-optimal quantity of waste, together with the concomitant environmental pollution and financial costs of disposal, partly result from government failure. Current practice fails to ensure that the parties generating the waste face a price at the point of disposal and that such a price reflects the full social costs of disposal. A model is presented which argues that the socially optimal configuration of waste management is that where the marginal social costs of each waste treatment method equals those of the others. In an empirical section, the external costs of landfill, incineration, recycling and composting are estimated for the European Union, based on existing studies of damage costs for different pollutants. This is followed by estimations of the financial costs of municipal solid waste management. Combining financial and external cost estimates, a cost-benefit analysis of municipal solid waste management in the European Union is undertaken. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Solid state processing of massive uranium mononitride, using uranium and uranium higher nitride powders as starting materials (1962); Preparation a l'etat solide de mononitrure d'uranium massif a partir de poudres d'uranium et de nitrures superieurs d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-12-15

    The mechanism and the optimum conditions for preparing uranium mononitride have been studied. The results have been used for hot pressing (250 kg/cm{sup 2}, 1000 deg. C, under vacuum) a mixture of powders of uranium and uranium higher nitrides. The products obtained have been identified by X-ray measurements and may be - at will and depending upon the stoichiometry - either UN, or a cermet a U{sub {alpha}}-UN. As revealed by the curved shape of grain boundaries, the sinters obtained here do not easily evolve towards physico-chemical equilibrium when submitted to heat treatment. This behaviour is quite different from the one observed with uranium monocarbide prepared by a similar method. This fact may be ascribed to the insolubility in the matrix UN of particles of UO{sub 2} being present as impurities. The density, hardness and thermal conductivity of these products are higher than those measured on uranium nitride or cermets U-UN obtained by other methods. (author) [French] Apres une etude prealable du mecanisme et des conditions optimales de nitruration de l'uranium, on a montre qu'il est possible de preparer par frittage sous charge (250 kg/cm{sup 2}, 1000 deg. C sous vide) d'un melange de poudres d'uranium et de nitrures superieurs d'uranium, un produit qui a ete identifie par diffraction de rayons X. On peut ainsi obtenir a volonte, soit le monocarbure UN, soit un cermet U{sub {alpha}}-UN dans le cas de compositions sous-stoechiometriques. Au contraire du monocarbure d'uranium prepare dans des conditions analogues, les produits obtenus ici, soumis a un traitement thermique, n'evoluent pas facilement vers un etat d'equilibre physico-chimique caracterise par l'existence de joints de grains rectilignes. On attribue ce phenomene a l'insolubilite de l'impurete UO{sub 2} dans UN. La densite, la durete, la conductibilite thermique de ces produits se revelent superieures a celles des nitrures d'uranium ou des cermets U-UN obtenus par les autres methodes. (auteur)

  13. Determination of uranium and thorium isotopes by solid phase extraction and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Kovacova, M.; Strisovska, J.; Galanda, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test the modified method suitable for the separation of isotopes of uranium and thorium samples of rocks, including gold ore and gold concentrate using of extraction chromatography method, after digestion of the sample, concentrating, separate the isotopes of uranium and thorium isotopes to prepare sources for the measurement of alpha spectra. Samples of rocks, gold ore and gold concentrate were digered in microwave decomposition in the environment of hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid. For the separation of uranium and thorium the vacuum box with cartridges DGA Resin and Resin(R) UTEVA (Triskem International, France) was used. Both sorbents allow separation of uranium from thorium. The results confirmed that the both sorbents give the same results within expanded uncertainty. The mass activity of monitored uranium and thorium radioisotopes was determined by alpha spectrometry method. The yields of separation were determined using uranium-232 as a tracer radionuclide; the activity of 232 U was 0.1438 Bq. Alpha spectra were measured on the Alpha spectrometer EG and G ORTEC 576A with the software MAESTRO, MCA Emulator and Gamma Vision-32 for Windows, USA. Mass activities of radionuclides were converted to mass concentration of isotopes 238 U, 234 U, 232 Th, 230 Th and 228 Th. The highest concentration of 238 U was sampled in granodiorite (Tunnel S-XIV-2, southwards, mining of Cu ore, not working there since 1990), where m( 238 U) = (0.81 ± 0.09) mg kg -1 (DGA Resin) and m( 238 U) = (0.90 ± 0.09) mg kg -1 (UTEVA(R) Resin), as well as m( 232 Th) = (18.8 ± 1.7) mg kg -1 (DGA Resin) and m( 232 Th) = (17.8 ± 1.5) mg kg -1 (UTEVA(R) Resin). In other samples of rocks, gold ore and gold concentrates have specific masses of isotopes of uranium and thorium two-to ten-folds lower. It can be concluded that the rocks, gold ores and concentrates of gold from the 'Rozalia' mine contain lower concentrations of uranium several times against

  14. Measurement test on creep strain rate of uranium-zirconium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Takanari; Akabori, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Toru

    1996-11-01

    In order to measure creep strain rate of a small specimen of U-Zr solid solution, authors proposed an estimation method which was based upon the stress relaxation after compression. It was applied to measurement test on creep strain rate of the U-10wt%Zr specimen in the temperature range of 757 to 911degC. It may be concluded that the proposed method is valid, provided that the strain is within the appropriate range and that sufficient amount of the load decrement is observed. The obtained creep rate of U-10wt%Zr alloy indicated significantly smaller value, compared to the experimental data for pure U metal and evaluated data for U-Pu-Zr alloy. However, more careful measurement is desired in future since the present data are thought to be influenced by the precipitations included in the specimen. (author)

  15. Thin film-XRF determination of uranium following thin-film solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Jalal, E-mail: jalalhassan@ut.ac.ir [Department of Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyed M.; Mozaffari, Shahla [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanparast, Babak; Karbasi, Mohammad H. [Iranian Mineral Processing Research Center, Ministry of Industry and Mineral, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive method based on the preconcentration of uranium on modified filter paper (thin film) has been developed to determinate this element in water and soil samples by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence. Uranium (VI) extraction from nitric acid medium by trioctyl phosphine (TOPO) from 100 mL of sample was carried out. The effects of nitric acid concentration, TOPO concentration and sample breakthrough on uranium extraction were investigated in this study. The proposed method provided good linearity from 7 to 1000 μg and the limit of detection (LOD), based on a signal-to noise ratio (S/N) of 3, was 2.5 μg. (author)

  16. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF 6 and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  17. Comparison of the half-value layer: ionization chambers vs solid-state meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.C.S.; Navarro, V.C.C.; Navarro, M.V.T.; Macedo, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Generally, the half value layer (HVL) is determined by using ionization chambers and aluminum filters. However, some solid-state dosimeters allow simultaneous measurements of X-ray's parameters, among which the HVL. The main objective of this study was to compare the HVL's values indicated by four different solid-state dosimeters, whose values were measured by ionization chambers. The maximum difference found between the two methods was 11.42%, one the solid-state dosimeters, showing that the use these instruments to determine CSR in industrial X-ray should be subject to a more thorough evaluation. (author)

  18. 226Ra and 210Pb relationship in solid wastes and plants at Uranium mill tailing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madruga, M.J.; Faria, I.; Brogueira, A.

    2002-01-01

    After the uranium extraction from the ore, the waste residues (tailings) contain several radionuclides in elevated levels comparing to normal soils. Nearly all of the uranium progenies (2 30T h, 2 26R a, 2 10P b and 2 10P o) and the unextracted uranium fraction are present in tailings. These large quantities of tailings may provide a significant source of environmental and food chain contamination. The transfer of radioisotopes between different ecological compartments is frequently evaluated using ratios which relate the radionuclide content in one ecosystem compartment to that of another. For instance, the concentration ratio (CR), i.e., the ratio between radionuclide concentrations in tailings and plants can be evaluated. Radium-226, a long-lived alfa emitter, is a chemical analog of calcium. The 2 26R a uptake is similar to calcium in biological and ecological systems. The uptake of 2 10P b will follow the same pattern as natural lead. Plants do not require lead but in contrast they require the Ra/Ca group elements. The uptake of lead is mainly a function of the lead tolerance of the plant and the hydrogen ion concentration of the soil. Kalin and Sharma (1982) reported that 2 26R a and 2 10P b uptake by indigenous species from inactive uranium mill tailings in Canada differ from the uptake of the elements by the same plants growing in soil. Ibrahim and Whicker (1992) reported that tailing acidity tends to enhance radionuclide availability for plant uptake. The transport of radionuclides to foliage and subsequent retention and absorption may play a role in plant contamination. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the 2 26R a and 2 10P b relationship in tailings and plants growing at uranium mill tailings

  19. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method; NF ISO 7097-1. Technologie du combustible nucleaire. Dosage de l'uranium dans des solutions, l'hexafluorure d'uranium et des solides. Partie 1: reduction par fer (II) / oxydation par bichromate de potassium / methode par titrage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF{sub 6} and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  20. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation; Synthese, frittage et caracterisation de solutions solides d'oxydes mixtes de thorium et d'uranium (IV): influence de la methode de preparation du precurseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingant, N

    2008-12-15

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th{sub 1-x}U{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the

  1. Development of a portable mass spectrometric system for determination of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples using fluorine volatilization. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loge, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using hardware and materials supplied by LANL, a prototype quadrupole mass spectrometer system designed for portable field analysis of isotopic composition of solid uranium samples was assembled and tested. The system contained the capability for fluorine volatilization of solid uranium samples with gas introduction, which was successfully tested and demonstrated using 100 mg samples of U 3 O 8 . Determination of precision and accuracy for measuring isotopic composition was performed using isotopic standards. Use with soil samples containing uranium were also attempted. Silicates in the soil forming SiF 4 were found to be a kinetic bottleneck to the formation of UF 6 . This could be avoided by performing some sort of chemical separation as a pre-treatment step, which was demonstrated using nitric acid

  2. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study on the chlorination of uranium oxide by gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.; Park, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine the operating condition of an uranium chlorination process with U 3 O 8 -C-Cl 2 system, the experimental conditions have been evaluated preliminarily by the thermochemical analysis and experimentally confirmed in this study. The dry-type chlorination of U 3 O 8 occurs as irreversible and exothermic reaction and produces many kinds of chloride compounds such as UCl 3 , UCl 4 , UCl 5 , and UCl 6 in the air and humidity controlled argon environment. Taking account of Gibbs free energy and vapor pressure for various chloride compounds, the proper temperature range of chlorination appears to be 863 to 953 K in aspects of increasing reaction rate and the yield of nonvolatile product. In the course of the experimental confirmation the powder of U 3 O 8 is perfectly converted into uranium chlorides within 4 hours above 863 K, and then the maximum fraction of uranium chloride remaining in the reactor is about 30% of total conversion mass. (author)

  3. Flotation of uranium values using di (2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ajoy Kumar; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.; Sridhar, U.; Krishna Rao, N.

    1998-01-01

    The use of solvent extractants for mineral flotation, especially for difficult-to-float minerals, is gaining importance as they are highly selective to specific metal ions and form strong and stable complexes mostly by chelation. Studies carried out with di(2 ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) (an organic solvent used in the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid) as collector for flotation of uranium minerals from ore samples of Domiasiat, Meghalaya and Jaduguda, Bihar have yielded encouraging results. Although flotation of uranium minerals using other solvent extractants like tributyl phosphoric acid (TBP) has been studied, the uraninite-D2EHPA system has not been tested so far. This technical note puts on record the findings of the preliminary studies carried out. (author)

  4. Comparison of sodium iodide and solid-state detectors for the measurement of lung-stored uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.; Scott, L.M.; Disney, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    A series of measurement of uranium sources were made, using a solid state detector consisting of 4 high-purity germanium detectors, and compared with measurements made with a single NaI detector. The comparative efficiencies at various energies are shown. As energy increases the differences in efficiencies increase in favour of NaI. A estimate of detection sensitivity gave the limit of error on the net count of a subject with one maximum permissible lung burden as 27 +- 7.2 counts/min for NaI and 3.73 +- 1.04 counts/min for the solid state detector. On a microgram basis the respective limits of error are +- 66 and +- 67 μg. It is concluded that solid state detectors can give 17 times better resolution compared with NaI while maintaining the same detection sensitivity. Sensitivity is related to the scatter of higher energy gammas into a fairly wide energy range. This 17-fold improvement in resolution results in a narrower energy range in which the scattered radiation can fall. Thus gamma analysis with such a system would be less subject to background errors. (author)

  5. Biological pathways of exposure and ecotoxicity values for uranium and associated radionuclides: Chapter D in Hydrological, geological, and biological site characterization of breccia pipe uranium deposits in Northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Linder, Greg L.; Finger, Susan E.; Little, Edward E.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Kuhne, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    plant’s or an animal’s life history and surrounding environment. Various species of plants, invertebrates, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals found in the segregation areas that are considered species of concern by State and Federal agencies were included in the development of the site-specific food web. The utilization of subterranean habitats (burrows in uranium-rich areas, burrows in waste rock piles or reclaimed mining areas, mine tunnels) in the seasonally variable but consistently hot, arid environment is of particular concern in the segregation areas. Certain species of reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals in the segregation areas spend significant amounts of time in burrows where they can inhale or ingest uranium and other radionuclides through digging, eating, preening, and hibernating. Herbivores may also be exposed though the ingestion of radionuclides that have been aerially deposited on vegetation. Measured tissues concentrations of uranium and other radionuclides are not available for any species of concern in the segregation areas. The sensitivity of these animals to uranium exposure is unknown based on the existing scientific literature, and species-specific uranium presumptive effects levels were only available for two endangered fish species known to inhabit the segregation areas. Overall, the chemical toxicity data available for biological receptors of concern were limited, although chemical and radiation toxicity guidance values are available from several sources. However, caution should be used when directly applying these values to northern Arizona given the unique habitat and life history strategies of biological receptors in the segregation areas and the fact that some guidance values are based on models rather than empirical (laboratory or field) data. No chemical toxicity information based on empirical data is available for reptiles, birds, or wild mammals; therefore, the risks associated with uranium and other

  6. How Effective Project Management Will Add Value to Your Uranium Asset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, Russell; Titley, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Key learnings: • Timely stakeholder communication and education; • Mineralogy and testwork; • Learn from other Uranium developers. Feasibility work can cost anywhere from $1m up to $30m, construction and operation costs run into $100m’s. Spend investors money wisely to ensure a good product.

  7. Term value/band-gap energy correlations for solid rare gas excitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Term value/ionization energy correlation algorithms have proven to be of considerable utility in the assignment of atomic and molecular Rydberg states. Many examples of empirical term value/ionization energy correlations are known for diverse classes of atoms and molecules. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that similar correlations are also obtained for excitons in rare gas solids

  8. On-line caloric value sensor and validation of dynamic models applied to municipal solid waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van L.B.M.; Leskens, M.; Brem, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with two aspects concerning the optimization of municipal solid waste combustion (MSWC) processes. First of all, an on-line calorific value sensor is discussed by means of which the calorific value of the waste can be estimated from actual process data. Experimental results on a

  9. Solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, near Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Benzel, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This report releases solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. These cores were collected by Powertech Uranium Corporation, and material not used for their analyses were given to the U.S. Geological Survey for additional sampling and analyses. These additional analyses included total carbon and sulfur, whole rock acid digestion for major and trace elements, 234U/238U activity ratios, X-ray diffraction, thin sections, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and cathodoluminescence. This report provides the methods and data results from these analyses along with a short summary of observations.

  10. Box-Behnken design in modeling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of uranium from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Jahanbin, Elham; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, Mansour; Moghaddam, Zahra Safaei; Bohlooli, Mousa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the solid-phase tea waste procedure was used for separation, preconcentration and determination of uranium from water samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to investigated the influence of six variables including pH, mass of adsorbent, eluent volume, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN); and sample and eluent flow rates on the extraction of analyte. High determination coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.972 and adjusted-R 2 of 0.943 showed the satisfactory adjustment of the polynomial regression model. This method was used for the extraction of uranium from real water samples.

  11. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  12. Processing of Indian monazite for the recovery of thorium and uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    The mineral monazite, a phosphate of rare earths and thorium with significant quantity of uranium is one of the six heavy minerals present in the beach sands of specific coastal areas of India. Indian Rare Earths Ltd is mining and processing monazite at its Rare Earths Division for the last many decades with an aim of building up enough stock of thorium concentrate for its future use in the three stage nuclear power programme of the country. The present paper briefly describes the monazite resource position of he country, the past and present modified processing schemes and the future programme commensurate with the requirement of the country for quality thorium and uranium bearing nuclear materials

  13. Geochemistry of uranium in the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhorov, V.A.; Bogushlavskij, S.G.; Babinets, A.E.; Solov'eva, L.V.; Kirchanova, A.I.; Kir'yanov, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    According to the results of expedition investigations on the base of SCOICH program (''Acade''Mmician Vernadsky'' and ichael Lomonosov'' shiptrips) main geometrical peculiarities of uranium distribution in deep water of the Black Sea including benthic and silt waters are studied. Sampling have been made from the surface layer across the whole width of the water and from benthic sediments (silt water). Uranium in samples has been determined by the adsorption-colorimetric method. Nonuniform uranium distribution (depending on water dynamics) over the basin area and across the whole width of water is established. Most of uranium is contained in the 0-500 m layer and in the eastern part of the sea. Uranium content decreases in depth, it is higher in the benthic water layer. It is shown that uranium decrease in a hydrogen-sulphide sea zone is conditioned by its reduction due to formation of more adsorption-active forms and effective sedimentation. Causes of differences in uranium content in silt waters have been found. High uranium concentrations in silt waters are confined to active sulphate reduction characterized by elevated values of pHsub(#betta#), alkalinity, Eh. In weak suphate reduction zones (pHsub(#betta#), Alsub(k) value decrease) in silt waters uranium content is lower as a result of sorption-active forms formation and their transition into the solid phase of sediments

  14. Laboratory-scale catalysis studies of uranium and plutonium fluorination reactions by solid metal-fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1984-03-01

    Various catalysts were evaluated for their effect on the rate of fluorination of the tetrafluorides of uranium and plutonium to produce the hexafluorides. Results of this work show that CoF 3 and AgF 2 are more effective than NiF 2 for UF 4 fluorination, producing rate increases in the range of 150 to 300 compared to UF 4 and fluorine alone. The use of these three catalysts was also found effective in the fluorinations of PuO 2 /PuF 4 and pure PuF 4 . However, enhancements were less. NiF 2 produced the best increases which were 8.1 for PuO 2 /PuF 4 and 3.6 for PuF 4 . Experiments were conducted in a simple flow-loop. Even larger enhancements might be obtained with fluidized beds. Details of the apparatus, experiments, methods, and a discussion of results are presented

  15. Impact of aging on the solid phase chemical fractionation of uranium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Sabyasachi; Ajay Kumar; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    A distinction should be made between persistence of total uranium (U) in soil and persistence of its bioavailable forms. As U age in soil, there is a change in bioavailability. The aging process is partially reversible if environmental parameters change, although a portion of the U ion will be securely entrapped in the soil particle lattice and not available to be re-solubilized. A study was carried out to reveals the impact of aging on chemical fractionation of U in amended soils from three different origin (Soil A: Metamorphic; Soil B: Sedimentary and Soil C: Ingenious basalt). For the study, 5g from each soil were amended with the 50 ml of water containing 100.0 mg/L of U in a falcon tube. After 7 days the supernatant was removed by centrifugation and the soil was allowed to air dry at room temperature

  16. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  17. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH · 1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity

  18. Revisiting the elemental composition and the calorific value of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komilis, Dimitrios; Evangelou, Alexandros; Giannakis, Georgios; Lymperis, Constantinos

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the elemental content (C, N, H, S, O), the organic matter content and the calorific value of various organic components that are commonly found in the municipal solid waste stream were measured. The objective of this work was to develop an empirical equation to describe the calorific value of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste as a function of its elemental composition. The MSW components were grouped into paper wastes, food wastes, yard wastes and plastics. Sample sizes ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 kg. In addition to the above individual components, commingled municipal solid wastes were sampled from a bio-drying facility located in Crete (sample sizes ranged from 8 to 15 kg) and were analyzed for the same parameters. Based on the results of this work, an improved empirical model was developed that revealed that carbon, hydrogen and oxygen were the only statistically significant predictors of calorific value. Total organic carbon was statistically similar to total carbon for most materials in this work. The carbon to organic matter ratio of 26 municipal solid waste substrates and of 18 organic composts varied from 0.40 to 0.99. An approximate chemical empirical formula calculated for the organic fraction of commingled municipal solid wastes was C(32)NH(55)O(16). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid state speciation and potential bioavailability of depleted uranium particles from Kosovo and Kuwait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway)], E-mail: ole-christian.lind@umb.no; Salbu, B.; Skipperud, L. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway); Janssens, K.; Jaroszewicz, J.; De Nolf, W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    A combination of synchrotron radiation based X-ray microscopic techniques ({mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES, {mu}-XRD) applied on single depleted uranium (DU) particles and semi-bulk leaching experiments has been employed to link the potential bioavailability of DU particles to site-specific particle characteristics. The oxidation states and crystallographic forms of U in DU particles have been determined for individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kosovo and Kuwait that were contaminated by DU ammunition during the 1999 Balkan conflict and the 1991 Gulf war. Furthermore, small soil or sand samples heavily contaminated with DU particles were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal fluid (0.16 M HCl) extractions. Characteristics of DU particles in Kosovo soils collected in 2000 and in Kuwait soils collected in 2002 varied significantly depending on the release scenario and to some extent on weathering conditions. Oxidized U (+6) was determined in large, fragile and bright yellow DU particles released during fire at a DU ammunition storage facility and crystalline phases such as schoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.25H{sub 2}O), dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}.0.75H{sub 2}O) and metaschoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.0H{sub 2}O) were identified. As expected, these DU particles were rapidly dissolved in 0.16 M HCl (84 {+-} 3% extracted after 2 h) indicating a high degree of potential mobility and bioavailability. In contrast, the 2 h extraction of samples contaminated with DU particles originating either from corrosion of unspent DU penetrators or from impacted DU ammunition appeared to be much slower (20-30%) as uranium was less oxidized (+4 to +6). Crystalline phases such as UO{sub 2}, UC and metallic U or U-Ti alloy were determined in impacted DU particles from Kosovo and Kuwait, while the UO{sub 2,34} phase, only determined in particles from Kosovo, could reflect a more corrosive environment. Although the results are based on a limited number of DU particles

  20. Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance study of enrichment effects in gaseous, liquid and solid uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Demco, D.E.; Simplaceanu, V.; Valcu, N.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance method is able to provide information concerning the isotopic content of 235 U in UF 6 by means of measuring the nuclear magnetic transverse relaxation time (T,L2) of 19 F nuclei in liquid UF 6 . In this work, the sources of errors in the T 2 measurements have been analysed and methods for reducing them are dicussed. Typical errors in T 2 determinations are below 2%. The enrichment estimations made by using the linear calibration curves had a deviation of less than 2% with some exceptions. It was found that the chemical impurities may significantly affect the enrichment estimations. 19 F NMR spectra of liquid and gaseous UF 6 at low pressures did not reveal any structure or enrichment effect. The longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation of 19 F nuclei in low pressure, gaseous and solid UF 6 showed no enrichment dependence, nor the dipolar relaxation time in solid UF 6 did. (author)

  1. Critical micelle concentration values for different surfactants measured with solid-phase microextraction fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftka, Joris J H; Scherpenisse, Peter; Oetter, G??nter; Hodges, Geoff; Eadsforth, Charles V.; Kotthoff, Matthias; Hermens, Joop L M

    The amphiphilic nature of surfactants drives the formation of micelles at the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibres were used in the present study to measure CMC values of twelve nonionic, anionic, cationic and zwitterionic surfactants. The SPME derived CMC

  2. On-line determination of the calorific value of solid fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, L.B.M. van; Arendsen, A.R.J.; Brem, G.

    2004-01-01

    In thermal processes with highly inhomogeneous fuels it is desirable to know real time fuel characteristics. In the case of municipal solid waste combustion (MSWC) it was up till now not possible to determine the calorific value of the waste on-line with a high accuracy. In this paper, a new method

  3. Determination of thermodynamic properties and stability limit from fluorite phase of uranium and lanthanide mixed oxides, using galvanic cells with solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, T.N.

    1980-10-01

    A method for thermodynamic properties determination for oxygen solubility in oxide systems at temperature interval 973 ≤ T [K] ≤ 1773 is described. A galvanic cell using as solid electrolytes zircon dioxide doped with 15% of calcium oxide is presented. This method was used for determining the phase change, temperature dependent, of uranium-lanthanides-oxygen Ln U O 4 stoichiometric system. (C.G.C.)

  4. Uranium in the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinets, A.E.; Zhorov, V.A.; Bezborodov, A.A.; Kobylyanskaya, A.G.; Solov'eva, L.V.; Urdenko, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    Water samples for uranium analysis have been collected over the entire Black Sea, from the surface to the sea floor. As distinct from the previously known facts, it has been established that the uranium content in different parts of the sea appears to vary both in extent and with depth. A behaviour of uranium is governed by redox conditions of the environment. A decrease in pH value of water to 7.5 and a change of Eh value from +0.4 to -0.2 v lead to reduction of U 6+ → U 4+ and ensure higher sorption properties of the solid phases. The reducing reaction is proved possible through the calculated data. It is shown that the rate of uranium isolation is increasing with depth and its content is going down. Using optical properties of water, a hydrogeochemical behaviour of organic matter and uranium in water thickness is explained. Role of organic matter and mineral components in the uranium deposition is described. Sorption of U 6+ ions on twelve components, which constitute a base of suspensions and floor sediments, has been also studied [ru

  5. Uranium solubility values: note in response to issues raised by Dr Hopper in NRX/15/42

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haszeldine, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Comments are made on behalf of Greenpeace Ltd to a Planning Inquiry in 1995 in support of their objections to an application by UK Nirex Ltd for permission to construct an underground Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF) at a site near Sellafield. The RCF is part of an investigation by Nirex into a suitable site for the disposal of radioactive waste. The comments are a response to evidence on uranium solubility values presented by a witness for Nirex. An assertion made by Nirex that the Probability Density Function (PDF) used in their modelling of flux through the repository is biased towards solubilities that are too high is challenged. Reasons are given for concluding that, by contrast, the PDF appears consistent with realistic solubility values measured in field surveys of a natural analogue site. (3 references). (UK)

  6. Radiological analysis of solids around the old uranium mine of Rosglas (Morbihan). CRIIRAD N.08-119 note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    As uranium mines present significant radiological contaminations years after their exploitation, this document reports preliminary investigations performed around old uranium mines in Brittany. This preliminary work showed significant radiological anomalies, with gamma radiation fluxes between ten and twenty times higher than the natural level. Measurement procedures and results are presented. Sampling has been performed on surface soil, stones and waters. Sample processing is briefly described. Results are commented in terms of contamination by uranium 238 and 235

  7. The cohesive energy of uranium dioxide and thorium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, B.G.

    1958-08-01

    Theoretical values have been calculated of the heats of formation of uranium dioxide and thorium dioxide on the assumption that the atomic binding forces in these solids are predominantly ionic in character. The good agreement found between the theoretical and observed values shows that the ionic model may, with care, be used in calculating the energies of defects in the uranium and thorium dioxide crystal structures. (author)

  8. Solid-state syntheses and single-crystal characterizations of three tetravalent thorium and uranium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Geng Bang; Soderholm, L.

    2015-01-01

    Colorless crystals of ThSiO 4 (huttonite) (1) and (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaThSi 8 O 20 (2) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of ThO 2 , CaSiO 3 , and Na 2 WO 4 at 1073 K. Green crystals of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaUSi 8 O 20 (3) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of UO 2 , CaSiO 3 , and Na 2 WO 4 at 1003 K. All three compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 adopts a monazite-type three-dimensional condensed structure, which is built from edge- and corner-shared ThO 9 polyhedra and SiO 4 tetrahedra. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural and they crystallize in a steacyite-type structure. The structure consists of discrete pseudocubic [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− polyanions, which are connected by An 4+ cations into a three-dimensional framework. Each An atom coordinates to eight monodentate [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− moieties in a square antiprismatic geometry. Na + and Ca 2+ ions reside in the void within the framework. Raman spectra of 1, 2, and 3 were collected on single crystal samples. 1 displays more complex vibrational bands than thorite. Raman spectra of 2 and 3 are analogous with most of vibrational bands located at almost the same regions. - Graphical abstract: A Raman spectrum and crystal structures of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaAnSi 8 O 20 (An=Th, U), which contain pseudocubic [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− polyanions and eight-coordinate An 4+ cations. - Highlights: • Single crystal growth of three tetravalent actinide silicates from melts. • Single-crystal structures and Raman spectra of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaAnSi 8 O 20 (An=Th, U). • First report of Raman spectrum of huttonite on single crystal samples

  9. On-line solid phase extraction using ion-pair microparticles combined with ICP-OES for the simultaneous preconcentration and determination of uranium and thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Zolfonoun, Ehsan [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). NFCRS

    2016-07-01

    In this work, after on-line and in-situ solid phase extraction technique was used for the extraction and preconcentration of uranium and thorium from aqueous samples prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) determination. In this method, sodium hexafluorophosphate (as an ion-pairing agent) was added to the sample solution containing the cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide) and the complexing agent (dibenzoylmethane). A cloudy solution was formed as a result of formation of an ion pair between surfactant and hexafluorophosphate. The solid microparticles were passed through a microcolumn filter and the adsorbed microparticles were subsequently eluted with acid, which was directly introduced into the ICP-OES nebulizer. The main variables affecting the pre-concentration and determination steps of uranium and thorium were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enhancement factors of 97 and 95 and the detection limits of 0.52 and 0.21 μg L{sup -1} were obtained for uranium and thorium, respectively.

  10. Distribution of natural uranium in groundwater around Kudankulam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, B.S.; Vijayakumar, B.; Rana, B.K.; Ravi, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study was carried out to estimate the uranium concentration in the ground water around Kudankulam in Southern Tamil Nadu. The uranium concentration in ground water varies from 0.2 to 6.6 μg/l, with a mean value of 2.0 μg/l. The Quantalase uranium analyzer was used to measure the uranium concentration. These groundwater samples were analyzed for the water quality parameters such as pH, conductance, total dissolved solids (TDS), salinity, chloride, and sulfate. An attempt has been made to correlate the uranium concentration with the water quality parameters. It is observed that conductance, TDS, salinity, chloride, and sulfate show positive correlation with uranium concentration. (author)

  11. Effluents from a waste rock deposit of a former uranium mine in Saxony/Germany - Mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Soon after uranium mining had ceased in eastern Germany in 1990, work for remediation of several mining sites began. The Wismut GmbH, owner of the Mine of Dresden-Gittersee's waste rock dump, introduced the concept of reducing the impact to the environment via water and air paths by implementing a multi-layer soil cover. The deposit consists mainly of waste rock (clastic sediments of Doehlener Becken, deep metamorphic rocks) but also of low-grade ore (U-rich coal) and tailing materials. At the time when remediation started, the effluents completely infiltrated the underground. Because of previous surface exfiltration activities, they were already known to be very rich in dissolved solids, especially in sulphate and uranium. As demanded by the state authorities, the owner funded a vast hydrogeological study of the site. In testing the efficiency of surface sealing, the study indicated a mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids for the current situation, and predicted emissions into the water path which would occur after realisation of the proposed soil cover. The field investigation program consisted of: measurements of flow, of concentrations of dissolved solids (esp. U and Ra-226) and of contents of environmental isotopes in precipitation, surface runoff, seepage water and groundwater in the current condition of the dump; the study of waste rock material (geochemistry, mineralogy); waste rock material elution tests; underground investigation by drilling boreholes up to 270 m in depth. The resulting data allowed for: a hydrogeological conceptual model of the site; a consistent mass flow balance for the current condition of the dump; a prediction of concentrations in groundwater resulting after the realisation of a soil cover. The predictions show that the concentrations of dissolved solids in the contaminated groundwater would be significantly decreased. Furthermore it would be possible to reach the standards for drinking water with respect to uranium

  12. Price of military uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  13. Box-Behnken design in modeling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of uranium from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Jahanbin, Elham; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, Mansour; Moghaddam, Zahra Safaei [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Bohlooli, Mousa [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Biology

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the solid-phase tea waste procedure was used for separation, preconcentration and determination of uranium from water samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to investigated the influence of six variables including pH, mass of adsorbent, eluent volume, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN); and sample and eluent flow rates on the extraction of analyte. High determination coefficient (R{sup 2}) of 0.972 and adjusted-R{sup 2} of 0.943 showed the satisfactory adjustment of the polynomial regression model. This method was used for the extraction of uranium from real water samples.

  14. Department of Energy depleted uranium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosinski, F.E.; Butturini, W.G.; Kurtz, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    With its strategic supply of depleted uranium, the Department of Energy is studying reuse of the material in nuclear radiation shields, military hardware, and commercial applications. the study is expected to warrant a more detailed uranium recycle plan which would include consideration of a demonstration program and a program implementation decision. Such a program, if implemented, would become the largest nuclear material recycle program in the history of the Department of Energy. The bulk of the current inventory of depleted uranium is stored in 14-ton cylinders in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). The radioactive 235 U content has been reduced to a concentration of 0.2% to 0.4%. Present estimates indicate there are about 55,000 UF 6 -filled cylinders in inventory and planned operations will provide another 2,500 cylinders of depleted uranium each year. The United States government, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, considers the depleted uranium a highly-refined strategic resource of significant value. A possible utilization of a large portion of the depleted uranium inventory is as radiation shielding for spent reactor fuels and high-level radioactive waste. To this end, the Department of Energy study to-date has included a preliminary technical review to ascertain DOE chemical forms useful for commercial products. The presentation summarized the information including preliminary cost estimates. The status of commercial uranium processing is discussed. With a shrinking market, the number of chemical conversion and fabrication plants is reduced; however, the commercial capability does exist for chemical conversion of the UF 6 to the metal form and for the fabrication of uranium radiation shields and other uranium products. Department of Energy facilities no longer possess a capability for depleted uranium chemical conversion

  15. Effect of storage conditions on the calorific value of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzioka, Antony Mutua; Hwang, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Myung-Gyun; Yan, Cao Zheng; Lee, Chang-Soo; Kim, Young-Ju

    2017-08-01

    Storage conditions are considered to be an important factor as far as waste material characteristics are concerned. This experimental investigation was conducted using municipal solid waste (MSW) with a high moisture content and varying composition of organic waste. The objective of this study was to understand the effect of storage conditions and temperature on the moisture content and calorific value of the waste. Samples were subjected to two different storage conditions and investigated at specified temperatures. The composition of sample materials investigated was varied for each storage condition and temperature respectively. Gross calorific value was determined experimentally while net calorific value was calculated using empirical formulas proposed by other researchers. Results showed minimal changes in moisture content as well as in gross and net calorific values when the samples were subjected to sealed storage conditions. Moisture content reduced due to the ventilation process and the rate of moisture removal increased with a rise in storage temperature. As expected, rate of moisture removal had a positive effect on gross and net calorific values. Net calorific values also increased at varying rates with a simultaneous decrease in moisture content. Experimental investigation showed the effectiveness of ventilation in improving the combustion characteristics of the waste.

  16. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  17. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  19. Groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium in Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Rick; Ortiz, Roderick F.; Brown, Christopher R.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    2016-11-28

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arkansas River Basin Regional Resource Planning Group, initiated a study of groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and loading of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium to Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, to improve understanding of sources and processes affecting loading of these constituents to streams in the Arkansas River Basin. Fourteen monitoring wells were installed in a series of three transects across Fountain Creek near Pueblo, and temporary streamgages were established at each transect to facilitate data collection for the study. Groundwater and surface-water interaction was characterized by using hydrogeologic mapping, groundwater and stream-surface levels, groundwater and stream temperatures, vertical hydraulic-head gradients and ratios of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the hyporheic zone, and streamflow mass-balance measurements. Water quality was characterized by collecting periodic samples from groundwater, surface water, and the hyporheic zone for analysis of dissolved solids, selenium, uranium, and other selected constituents and by evaluating the oxidation-reduction condition for each groundwater sample under different hydrologic conditions throughout the study period. Groundwater loads to Fountain Creek and in-stream loads were computed for the study area, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium were evaluated on the basis of geology, geochemical conditions, land and water use, and evapoconcentration.During the study period, the groundwater-flow system generally contributed flow to Fountain Creek and its hyporheic zone (as a single system) except for the reach between the north and middle transects. However, the direction of flow between the stream, the hyporheic zone, and the near-stream aquifer was variable in response to streamflow and stage. During periods of low streamflow, Fountain Creek generally gained flow from

  20. Value-added probiotic development by high-solid fermentation of sweet potato with Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Carmen; Nanjundaswamy, Ananda K; Njiti, Victor; Xia, Qun; Chukwuma, Franklin

    2017-05-01

    Controlled fermentation of Sweet potato ( Ipomoea batatas ) var. Beauregard by yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii (MAY 796) to enhance the nutritional value of sweet potato was investigated. An average 8.00 × 10 10 Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g of viable cells were obtained over 5-day high-solid fermentation. Yeast cell viability did not change significantly over time at 4°C whereas the number of viable yeast cells reduced significantly at room temperature (25°C), which was approximately 40% in 12 months. Overall, the controlled fermentation of sweet potato by MAY 796 enhanced protein, crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, amino acid, and fatty acid levels. Development of value-added sweet potato has a great potential in animal feed and human nutrition. S. boulardii - fermented sweet potato has great potential as probiotic-enriched animal feed and/or functional food for human nutrition.

  1. Predicting the calorific value of refuse derived fuel from the characteristics of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivapalan Kathiravale; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Mohamad Puad Abu; Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Mohd Fairus Abdul Farid; Norasalwa Zakaria; Khaironie Mohd Takip; Rohyiza Ba'an

    2006-01-01

    The Imposing need to manage the municipal solid waste generated by society in a proper manner has urged municipalities to look into new management methods, which are not only environmentally friendly but also economically profitable. One such way is by converting this waste material into fuel. Currently, Kajang in the State of Selangor, Malaysia, generates about 700 tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) a day. Due to rapid development, lack of land area for new landfill and the environmental impact of raw landfills, the local municipal council has collaborated with a local company in the management of this waste. The company has proposed to convert the MSW to Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF). In view of this, a pilot plant to convert MSW to RDF was erected by the company and begun operation in January 2002. This pilot plant has the capability of converting 15 tons of MSW to 5 tons of RDF. At the same time studies, have been carried out to assess the plant performance, the flue gas analysis, and also the MSW and RDF characteristic. This paper will highlight the findings of the MSW and RDF characterization work carried out over the past year. Sampling and analysis was carried in accordance with ASTM standards. Results of the waste analysis showed that the calorific value of the resulting RDF could be predicted from the physical characteristics as well as the moisture content. Regression analysis on the available data has been used to create equations relating the proximate composition and moisture content of the incoming municipal solid waste to the calorific value of the RDF

  2. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  3. Analysis of the value of imaging in diagnosing pancreatic solid-pseudopapillary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Canhui; Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei; Feng Shiting; Fan Miao; Peng Zhenpeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the imaging features of solid-pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas(SPTP) and evaluate the value of imaging in diagnosing SPTP. Methods: The imaging appearances in seven cases of SPTP confirmed by surgery and pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The un-enhanced and biphasic enhanced CT scanning were per- formed on all seven cases, including gastrointestinal barium meal series on three cases, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) on three cases, and MRI on one case. Results All tumors presented well-encapsulated heterogeneous soft tissue mass with varying degrees of solid and cystic components. Barium meal examination showed displaced gastrointestinal wall due to the tumoral compression. EUS demonstrated hyper-echoic mass with scattered small anechoic areas within the tumor. The tumor capsules were hyper-echoic. On un-enhanced CT, the mass appeared hypo-dense with mixed solid and cystic portions in six cases, and with predominantly cystic portion in one case. Calcification appeared in two cases. On biphasic enhanced CT, the mass showed peripheral and heterogeneous enhancement. Three tumors showed marked enhancement, and four tumors showed mild enhancement. Multiple small vessels within the tumor revealed on the arterial phase scanning in one case. The tumor capsules showed discontinuous enhancement in three cases. On T 1 WI, the mass appeared heterogeneous and predominantly isodense. On T 2 WI, the mass appeared heterogeneous and predominantly hyper-dense. The tumor capsule was hypo-dense on T 1 WI and T 2 WI. The mild dilatation of the biliary tract and pancreatic duct was revealed in two cases, respectively. Conclusion: Both CT and MRI can describe characteristic features of SPTP well, and should be used as the main diagnostic methods for SPTP before operation. (authors)

  4. A novel method for the preparation of uranium metal, oxide and carbide via electrolytic amalgamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.C.; Lee, H.C.; Lee, T.S.; Lai, W.C.; Chang, C.T.

    1978-01-01

    A solid uranium amalgam was prepared electrolytically using a two-compartment cell separated with an ion exchange membrane for the purpose of regulating pH value within a narrowly restricted region of 2 to 3. The mercury cathode was kept at -1.8V vs SCE during electrolysis. The thereby obtained amalgam containing as high as 1.9gm U/ml Hg is easily converted into uranium metal by heating in vacuo above 1300 0 C. Uranium dioxide and uranium monocarbide could be easily obtained at relatively low temperature by reacting the amalgam with water vapor and methane. (author)

  5. Study of uranium plating measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei; Wang Mei; Wang Dalun; Liu Rong; Jiang Li; Lu Xinxin

    2007-06-01

    In neutron physics experiments, the measurement for plate-thickness of uranium can directly affect uncertainties of experiment results. To measure the plate-thickness of transform target (enriched uranium plating and depleted uranium plating), the back to back ionization chamber, small solid angle device and Au-Si surface barrier semi-conductor, were used in the experiment study. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment were analyzed. Because the inhomo-geneous of uranium lay of plate can quantitively affect the result, the homogeneity of uranium lay is checked, the experiment result reflects the homogeneity of uranium lay is good. (authors)

  6. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite [UO 2 (OH) 2 . H 2 O], UO 2 (OH) 2 , and rutherfordine ((UO 2 CO 3 ) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions

  7. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  8. On magnetic properties of thorium and uranium borides and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chachkhiani, L.G.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Slovyanskikh, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of magnetic susceptibility on temperature of UB 4 compound and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) alloy system in the 140-1300 K temperature range is investigated. It has been found that paramagnetic susceptibility does not obeys the Curie-Weiss law. The interpretation of experimental results is performed on the basis of Stoner model of collectivized electrons which permits also to explain the magnetic properites of other thorium and uranium borides

  9. Analysis of impurities in uranium oxide by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, M.; Hager, J.

    1989-01-01

    The method offers detection limits of less than 0.1 μg/g in solid samples and a wide linear dynamic working range and allows a fast sample throughput. The poster summarizes recent authors' experience with the analysis of high purity uranium oxide. The samples are analyzed using both conventional solution analysis and solid sampling method, using a new powerful laser sampling system attached to the ICP mass spectrometer. The total analysis time required for one uranium oxide sample is about 4 minutes including sample handling, data acquisition and processing. The results achieved from semiquantitative and quantitative analysis applying both techniques are in good agreement with the reference values. (author)

  10. Separation of uranium(VI) by liquid-solid extraction with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide diluted with naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigetomi, Y.; Kojima, T.; Kamba, H.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Liquid-liquid distribution with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and molten naphthalene has been investigated for the extraction of 20 metals from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions. Uranium is quantitatively extracted from 1 M nitric acid or hydrochloric acid by using 100 mg of TOPO and 200 mg of naphthalene and shaking for 5 min at 80 0 C, and separated from transition metals, alkaline earth metals and rare earth metals (except scandium). Addition of naphthalene increases the extraction efficiency. (Auth.)

  11. The value of a mature, stable, and transparent regulatory framework in facilitating ER programs lessons learned in decommissioning of uranium recovery and other facilities in the USA - 59411

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Keith I.; Camper, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The history of decommissioning activities in the United States has demonstrated the value of a mature, stable and transparent regulatory framework in facilitating the timely completion of environmental remediation. Two examples are given as case studies. The first example relates to the history of uranium concentrate (yellowcake) production in the U.S. to support the initial development of civilian nuclear power in the U.S. in the 1950's, 60's, 70's and 80's. This yellowcake production, which took place mostly in the western U.S., was undertaken before laws and regulations to prevent contamination and protect public health and safety were fully developed. Significant contamination occurred in terms of both surface and ground water contamination. Although most conventional mills producing uranium during these early years entered decommissioning in the 70's and 80's, the vast majority are still remediating their sites because of persistent contamination in ground water. Had an effective regulatory framework been in place, much of this contamination would have been prevented and remediation accomplished more effectively. In contrast to this experience, a second example is provided related to development of the regulatory framework for decommissioning of non-uranium recovery facilities in the U.S. in the late 1990's and early 2000's

  12. Thermal properties of nonstoichiometry uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazauri, R.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Tenishev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, was developed a method of oxidation pure uranium dioxide to a predetermined deviation from the stoichiometry. Oxidation was carried out using the thermogravimetric method on NETZSCH STA 409 CD with a solid electrolyte galvanic cell for controlling the oxygen potential of the environment. 4 samples uranium oxide were obtained with a different ratio of oxygen-to-metal: O / U = 2.002, O / U = 2.005, O / U = 2.015, O / U = 2.033. For the obtained samples were determined basic thermal characteristics of the heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity. The error of heat capacity determination is equal to 5%. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing deviation from stoichiometry. For the sample with O / M = 2.033, difference of both values with those of stoichiometric uranium dioxide is close to 50%.

  13. In situ characterization of uranium and americium oxide solid solution formation for CRMP process: first combination of in situ XRD and XANES measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisso, Marie; Picart, Sébastien; Belin, Renaud C; Lebreton, Florent; Martin, Philippe M; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Neuville, Daniel R; Delahaye, Thibaud; Ayral, André

    2015-04-14

    Transmutation of americium in heterogeneous mode through the use of U1-xAmxO2±δ ceramic pellets, also known as Americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB), has become a major research axis. Nevertheless, in order to consider future large-scale deployment, the processes involved in AmBB fabrication have to minimize fine particle dissemination, due to the presence of americium, which considerably increases the risk of contamination. New synthesis routes avoiding the use of pulverulent precursors are thus currently under development, such as the Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP) process. It is based on the use of weak-acid resin (WAR) microspheres as precursors, loaded with actinide cations. After two specific calcinations under controlled atmospheres, resin microspheres are converted into oxide microspheres composed of a monophasic U1-xAmxO2±δ phase. Understanding the different mechanisms during thermal conversion, that lead to the release of organic matter and the formation of a solid solution, appear essential. By combining in situ techniques such as XRD and XAS, it has become possible to identify the key temperatures for oxide formation, and the corresponding oxidation states taken by uranium and americium during mineralization. This paper thus presents the first results on the mineralization of (U,Am) loaded resin microspheres into a solid solution, through in situ XAS analysis correlated with HT-XRD.

  14. Characteristics and Classification of Solid Radioactive Waste From the Front-End of the Uranium Fuel Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhua; Wei, Fangxin; Xu, Chunyan; Liao, Yunxuan; Jiang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The proper classification of radioactive waste is the basis upon which to define its disposal method. In view of differences between waste containing artificial radionuclides and waste with naturally occurring radionuclides, the scientific definition of the properties of waste arising from the front end of the uranium fuel cycle (UF Waste) is the key to dispose of such waste. This paper is intended to introduce briefly the policy and practice to dispose of such waste in China and some foreign countries, explore how to solve the dilemma facing such waste, analyze in detail the compositions and properties of such waste, and finally put forward a new concept of classifying such waste as waste with naturally occurring radionuclides.

  15. Development and underground testing of the α dosimeter: a solid state electronic personal radiation dosimeter for uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, R.N.; Roze, V.; Shepherd, R.

    1981-01-01

    The αDOSIMETER is a complete, integrated system designed to monitor the immediate worksite of underground miners where the disintegration for radon daughters is a risk to the health of mining personnel. The dosimeter weighing little more than one pound is worn by each miner throughout the entire shift and is powered by the miner's cap lamp battery. After this integration period, the unit is connected to a reading network whereupon the day's data is dumped, calculated and stored. Beginning in July 1980, prototype units were subjected to vigorous underground testing in uranium mines in Canada and the United States and in tin mines in Cornwall, UK. The testing results are summarized and proposals advanced for a typical mine monitoring system utilizing the αDOSIMETER

  16. Value solidity in government and business: Results of an empirical study on public and private sector organizational values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Z.; Huberts, L.W.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a survey study of 382 managers from a variety of public and private sector organizations, on the values that guide sectoral decision making. Just as some important classical differences emerge, a number of similarities between the public and private sector appear to result in

  17. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  18. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  19. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  20. Uranium content of Philippine coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Rosa, A.M.; Sombrito, E.Z.; Nuguid, Z.S.; Bulos, A.M.; Bucoy, B.M.; De la Cruz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium content of coal samples from seven areas in the Philippines, i.e. Cebu, Semirara, Bislig, Albay, Samar, Malangas and Polilio Is. was found to contain trace quantities of uranium. The mean value of 0.401 ppm U is lower than reported mean uranium contents for coal from other countries. (ELC)

  1. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  2. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  3. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF 4 and UF 6 , including UF 4 (solid and gas), U 4 F 17 (solid), U 2 F 9 (solid), UF 5 (solid and gas), U 2 F 10 (gas), and UF 6 (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior

  4. Study of gamma irradiation effects on the etching and optical properties of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector and its application to uranium assay in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amol Mhatre; Kalsi, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The gamma irradiation effects in the dose range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad on the etching and optical characteristics of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) have been studied by using etching and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. From the measured bulk etch rates at different temperatures, the activation energies for bulk etching at different doses have also been determined. It is seen that the bulk etch rates increase and the activation energies for bulk etching decrease with the increase in gamma dose. The optical band gaps of the unirradiated and the gamma -irradiated detectors determined from the UV-Visible spectra were found to decrease with the increase in gamma dose. These results have been explained on the basis of scission of the detector due to gamma irradiation. The present studies can be used for the estimation of gamma dose in the range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad and can also be used for estimating track registration efficiency in the presence of gamma dose. The CR-39 detector has also been applied for the assay of uranium in some soil samples of Jammu city. (author)

  5. Development of uranium milling and conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shingo; Hirono, Shuichiro.

    1983-11-01

    The development and improvement of uranium milling and refining producing uranium tetrafluoride from ores by the wet process, without producing yellowcake as an intermediate product, have been carried out for over ten years with a small pilot plant (50 t-ore/day). In the past several years, a process for converting uranium tetrafluoride into hexafluoride has been developed successfully. To develop the process further, the construction of an integrated milling and conversion pilot plant (200 t-U/year) started in 1979 and was completed in 1981. This new plant has two systems of solvent extraction using tri-noctylamine: one of the systems treats the pregnant solution (uranyl sulphate) by heap-leaching followed by ion exchange, and the other treats the uranyl sulphate solution by dissolving imported yellowcake. The uranium loading solvents from the two systems are stripped with hydrochloric acid solution to obtain the concentrated uranium solution containing 100 g-U/1. Uranyl sulphate solution from the stripping circuit is reduced to a uranous sulphate solution by the electrolytic method. In a reduction cell, uranyl sulphate solution and dilute sulphuric acid are used respectively as catholyte and anolyte, and a cation exchange membrane is used to prevent re-oxidation of the uranous sulphate. In the following hydrofluorination step, uranium tetrafluoride, UF 4 .1-1.2H 2 O (particle size: 50-100μ), is produced continuously as the precipitate in an improved reaction vessel, and this makes it possible to simplify the procedures of liquid-solid separation, drying and granulation. The uranium tetrafluoride is dehydrated by heating to 350 0 C in an inert gas flow. The complete conversion from UF 4 into UF 6 is achieved by a fluidized-bed reactor and a high value of utilization efficiency of fluorine, over 99.9 percent, is attained at about 400 0 C. (author)

  6. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  7. Radioactive pollution investigation and disposal of abandoned uranium mines in Jiangsu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qihong; Zhao Fuxiang; Wang Lihua

    2008-01-01

    The environment influence of five abandoned uranium mines in Jiangsu province from 1950s to 1960s is introduced. By monitoring air absorbed dose rate of external exposure γ radiation, it is found that the pollution scope of No.1 abandoned uranium mine is the biggest in five abandoned uranium mines. The No. 2 and No. 3 mine areas has achieved the limit use after they were desposed. The radioactivity and the gamma nuclein in solid samples(slag, soil, silt) and liquid samples (the surface water, the well water)of No. 1 abandoned uranium mine were further analyzed and measured, the measured values are higher. The pollution of abandoned uranium mines still exists and diffuses after 30 years. According to the monitoring results and the analysis of pollution present situation, suggestions and measures are proposed for the pollution control. (authors)

  8. Recovery of metal values and hydrofluoric acid from tantalum and columbium waste sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielecki, E.; Romberger, K.; Bakke, B.; Hobin, M.A.; Clark, C.

    1992-01-01

    A metallurgical processing system for economically recovering metal values, such as columbium, tantalum, thorium, and uranium from dilute source solids, such as digestion sludges, by a series of steps including: (1) slurrying the source solids with dilute hydrofluoric acid to produce a solid phase and a liquid phase containing dissolved tantalum and columbium, then extracting tantalum and/or columbium from the liquid phase by means of a liquid ion-exchange process and then, additionally; (2) roasting the solid phase with sulfuric acid to recover and recycle hydrofluoric acid, leaching the roasted solids with dilute sulfuric acid to produce a disposable solid phase and a liquid phase containing thorium and uranium, and extracting thorium and uranium from the liquid phase by means of a liquid-liquid amine extraction process

  9. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  10. Uranium mineralization in the central region of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, M.G.; Olivera, J.; Fernandez, P.

    1995-01-01

    The present work shows different geological and geophysical index for uranium mineralization found at Loma Alta iron ore deposit, located in the central region of Cuba. In this deposit was carried out pull work of iron ore. The tunnels were radiometrically documented in the wall and the floor observing some anomalies of the gamma ray intensity (up to 1700 c.p.s.) associated with the poor iron ore. In those points were collected solid sample. The obtained results were very important (uranium concentrations values up to 3500 ppm)

  11. Optimal siting of solid waste-to-value-added facilities through a GIS-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Mohib-Ul-Haque; Vaezi, Mahdi; Kumar, Amit

    2018-01-01

    Siting a solid waste conversion facility requires an assessment of solid waste availability as well as ensuring compliance with environmental, social, and economic factors. The main idea behind this study was to develop a methodology to locate suitable locations for waste conversion facilities considering waste availability as well as environmental and social constraints. A geographic information system (GIS) spatial analysis was used to identify the most suitable areas and to screen out unsuitable lands. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used for a multi-criteria evaluation of relative preferences of different environmental and social factors. A case study was conducted for Alberta, a western province in Canada, by performing a province-wide waste availability assessment. The total available waste considered in this study was 4,077,514tonnes/year for 19 census divisions collected from 79 landfills. Finally, a location-allocation analysis was performed to determine suitable locations for 10 waste conversion facilities across the province. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Theoretical calculations of L alpha one x-ray emission intensity ratios for uranium in various matrices: a comparison with experimental values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The U L/sub α1/ x-ray emission intensity ratios (I/sub lambda/sub L//I sub lambda/sub L/, sub 100 percent/sub UO 2 /) in various matrices were calculated using the fundamental parameters formula of Criss and Birks and mass absorption coefficients calculated from a formula developed by Dewey. The use of the intensity ratio made it unnecessary to know the fluorescence yield for the U L/sub III/ level, the probability of emission of the U L/sub α1/ line, and the jump ratios for the three absorption edges of uranium. Also, since an intensity ratio was used, the results are independent of the x-ray tube current and the spectral distribution of the x-ray tube. A method is presented to calculate the intensity ratios for x-ray tube voltages other than the value (45 kV) used in the calculations. The theoretical results are calculated and compared with the experimental results obtained for 141 matrices. Difficulties due to oxidation of some of the metal powders used in the sample preparation, to small concentrations of uranium, and to an excessively large number of elements present in some of the samples resulted in the invalidation of the experimental results for 91 of the matrices. For the remaining 50 matrices, the theoretical and experimental values agreed to within +-5 percent relative error for 36 matrices; to within +-5 percent to +- 10 percent for 7 matrices; to within +-10 percent to +-20 percent for 6 matrices; and was greater than +-20 percent for 1 matrix

  13. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  14. S.210: A Bill to establish the United States Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the United States, to provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry and to provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated pursuant to Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, January 15, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The bill would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to establish the US Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the US, would provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated as a result of Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites, and would provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry

  15. Uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritcey, G.M.; Haque, K.E.; Lucas, B.H.; Skeaff, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have developed a complete method of recovering separately uranium, thorium and radium from impure solids such as ores, concentrates, calcines or tailings containing these metals. The technique involves leaching, in at least one stage. The impure solids in finely divided form with an aqueous leachant containing HCl and/or Cl 2 until acceptable amounts of uranium, thorium and radium are dissolved. Uranium is recovered from the solution by solvent extraction and precipitation. Thorium may also be recovered in the same manner. Radium may be recovered by at least one ion exchange, absorption and precipitation. This amount of iron in the solution must be controlled before the acid solution may be recycled for the leaching process. The calcine leached in the first step is prepared in a two stage roast in the presence of both Cl 2 and a metal sulfide. The first stage is at 350-450 0 and the second at 550-700 0

  16. Method and apparatus for separating uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    A uranium compound in the solid phase (uranium borohydride four) is subjected to radiation of a first predetermined frequency that excites the uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules but not the uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules. The compound is simultaneously subjected to radiation of a second predetermined frequency which causes the excited uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules to chemically decompose but which does not affect the uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules. Sufficient heat is then applied to the irradiated compound in the solid phase to vaporize the non-decomposed uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules but not the decomposed uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules, thereby physically separating the uranium-235 isotope-bearing molecules from the uranium-238 isotope-bearing molecules. The uranium compound sample in the solid phase is deposited or grown in an elongated tube supported within a dewar vessel having a clear optical path tail section surrounded by a coolant. Two sources of radiation are focused on the uranium compound sample. A heating element is attached to the elongated tube to vaporize the irradiated compound

  17. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Pass the sample through the basic alumina column ⇒ elute retained uranium along with the cations ⇒ convert the uranium to its anionic benzoate complex ⇒ extract its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform by DLLME ⇒ measure its absorption at 621 nm using fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry. -- Highlights: • By combination of SPE and DDLME a high preconcentration factor of 2500 was obtained. • Development of SPE-DDLME-Spectrophotometric method for det. of trace amounts of uranium. • Ultra trace amount of uranium in water samples was det. by the proposed method. • The detection limit of the proposed method is comparable to the most sensitive method. • The proposed method is a free interference spectrophotometric method for uranium det. -- Abstract: A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L −1 ) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L −1 , and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n = 6) at 400 ng L −1 were obtained. The method was

  18. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  19. Comparison of the half-value layer: ionization chambers vs solid-state meters; Comparacao entre medidas de camada semirredutora: camara de ionizacao vs medidores de estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.C.S.; Navarro, V.C.C.; Navarro, M.V.T.; Macedo, E.M., E-mail: larapereira@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Laboratorio de Produtos para a Saude

    2015-07-01

    Generally, the half value layer (HVL) is determined by using ionization chambers and aluminum filters. However, some solid-state dosimeters allow simultaneous measurements of X-ray's parameters, among which the HVL. The main objective of this study was to compare the HVL's values indicated by four different solid-state dosimeters, whose values were measured by ionization chambers. The maximum difference found between the two methods was 11.42%, one the solid-state dosimeters, showing that the use these instruments to determine CSR in industrial X-ray should be subject to a more thorough evaluation. (author)

  20. Alterations of MicroRNAs in Solid Cancers and Their Prognostic Value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chira, Panagiota; Vareli, Katerina; Sainis, Ioannis; Papandreou, Christos; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved, naturally abundant, small, regulatory non-coding RNAs that inhibit gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in a sequence-specific manner. Each miRNA represses the protein expression of several coding genes in a manner proportional to the sequence complementarity with the target transcripts. MicroRNAs play key regulatory roles in organismal development and homeostasis. They control fundamental biological processes, such as stem-cell regulation and cellular metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, stress resistance, and apoptosis. Differential miRNA expression is found in malignant tumors in comparison to normal tissue counterparts. This indicates that miRNA deregulation contributes to the initiation and progression of cancer. Currently, miRNA expression signatures are being rigorously investigated in various tumor types, with the aim of developing novel, efficient biomarkers that can improve clinical management of cancer patients. This review discusses deregulated miRNAs in solid tumors, and focuses on their emerging prognostic potential

  1. Uranium extraction from colofanite via organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Valeria Aparecida Leitao

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the use of pure or combined extractants dissolved in organic solvents for quantitative uranium recovery from colofanite, a fluoroapatite ore, from Itataia, Santa Quiteria, Ceara, Brazil. This ore contains the highest brazilian uranium reserve. The metal is associated to phosphate species. The ore is digested with sulfuric acid (wet process), producing phosphoric acid, which is used for manufacturing of fertilizers and animal food. >From the acid leaching, some systems for uranium recovery were tested. Among them, PC88A (2-ethyl-hexyl phosphonic acid, mono-2-ethyl-hexyl ester) 40% vol. and DEHPA (di(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid) 40% vol. in kerosene presented the highest values for the distribution coefficient (D) for uranium. When synergistic systems were employed, the best results were obtained for DEHPA 40%vol. + PC88A 40%vol. and DEHPA 40% vol. + TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) 5% vol. in kerosene. 15% wt/v sodium carbonate was the best medium for uranium stripping and separation from iron, the main interfering element. Uranium was precipitated as sodium diuranate by adding sodium hydroxide (5,0 mol L -1 ). Thorium in the raffinate was extracted by TOPO (0,1% vol.) in cyclohexane. The radioactivity level of the final aqueous waste is similar to natural background, according to CNEN-NE 6.05 Norm. After neutralization, the solid can be co-processed, according to the Directory 264 from the National Brazilian Environmental Council (CONAMA), whereas the treated effluent can be discarded according to the Directory 357 from CONAMA. (author)

  2. Assessment Of Depleted Uranium Contamination In Selective IRAQI Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A.A.; Hussien, A.Sh.M.; Tawfiq, N.F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to measure the radiation exposure rates in three selected Locations in southren part of Iraq (two in Nassireya, and one in Amara) resulted from the existence of depleted uranium in soil and metal pieces have been taken from destroyed tank and study mathmatically the concentration of Depleted Uranium by its dispersion from soil surface by winds and rains from 2003 to 2007. The exposure rates were measured using inspector device, while depleted uranium concentration in soil samples and tank's matal pieces were detected with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors(SSNTDs). The wind and rain effects were considered in the calculation of dispersion effect on depleted uranium concentration in soil, where the wind effect were calculated with respect to the sites nature and soil conditions, and rain effect with respect to dispersive-convective equation for radionuclide in soil. The results obtained for the exposure rates were high near the penetrated surfac, moderate and low in soil and metal pices. The Depleted Uranium concentration in soil and metal pieces have the highest value in Nassireya. The results from dispersion calculation (wind & rain) showed that the depleted uranium concentration in 2008 will be less than the danger level and in allowable contamination range

  3. Solid phase bio-electrofermentation of food waste to harvest value-added products associated with waste remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, K; Amulya, K; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-11-01

    A novel solid state bio-electrofermentation system (SBES), which can function on the self-driven bioelectrogenic activity was designed and fabricated in the laboratory. SBES was operated with food waste as substrate and evaluated for simultaneous production of electrofuels viz., bioelectricity, biohydrogen (H2) and bioethanol. The system illustrated maximum open circuit voltage and power density of 443 mV and 162.4 mW/m(2), respectively on 9 th day of operation while higher H2 production rate (21.9 ml/h) was observed on 19th day of operation. SBES system also documented 4.85% w/v bioethanol production on 20th day of operation. The analysis of end products confirmed that H2 production could be generally attributed to a mixed acetate/butyrate-type of fermentation. Nevertheless, the presence of additional metabolites in SBES, including formate, lactate, propionate and ethanol, also suggested that other metabolic pathways were active during the process, lowering the conversion of substrate into H2. SBES also documented 72% substrate (COD) removal efficiency along with value added product generation. Continuous evolution of volatile fatty acids as intermediary metabolites resulted in pH drop and depicted its negative influence on SBES performance. Bio-electrocatalytic analysis was carried out to evaluate the redox catalytic capabilities of the biocatalyst. Experimental data illustrated that solid-state fermentation can be effectively integrated in SBES for the production of value added products with the possibility of simultaneous solid waste remediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Added value of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatobiliary phase MR imaging in evaluation of focal solid hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haimerl, Michael; Wächtler, Max; Platzek, Ivan; Müller-Wille, Rene; Niessen, Christoph; Hoffstetter, Patrick; Schreyer, Andreas Georg; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Correct characterization of focal solid hepatic lesions has always been a challenge and is of great diagnostic and therapeutic relevance. The purpose of this study was to determine the added value of hepatobiliary phase images in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiating focal solid hepatic lesions. In this retrospective trial 84 consecutive patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR examinations. MRI was conducted for 64 patients with malignant focal hepatic lesions (34 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 30 metastases) and for 20 patients with benign hepatic lesions (14 focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), 3 adenoma, 3 hemangioma). Five radiologists independently reviewed three sets of MR images by means of a 5-point confidence scale from score 1 (definitely benign) to score 5 (definitely malignant): set 1: unenhanced images; set 2: unenhanced and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced dynamic images; set 3: hepatobiliary phase images in addition to set 2. Accuracy was assessed by the alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic curve (A z ) and the index of diagnostic performance was calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was significantly improved by the addition of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced dynamic images: A z in set 1 was 0.708 and 0.833 in set 2 (P = 0.0002). The addition of hepatobiliary phase images increased the A z value to 0.941 in set 3 (set 3 vs set 2, P < 0.0001; set 3 vs set 1, P < 0.0001). The index of diagnostic performance was lowest in set 1 (45%), improved in set 2 (71%), and highest in set 3 (94%). Hepatobiliary phase images obtained after Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MRI improve the differentiation of focal solid hepatic lesions

  5. Modern microbial solid state fermentation technology for future biorefineries for the production of added-value products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaalbakri Abdul Manan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The promise of industrial biotechnology has been around since Chaim Weizmann developed acetone–butanol–ethanol fermentation at the University of Manchester in 1917 and the prospects nowadays look brighter than ever. Today’s biorefinery technologies would be almost unthinkable without biotechnology. This is a growing trend and biorefineries have also increased in importance in agriculture and the food industry. Novel biorefinery processes using solid state fermentation (SSF technology have been developed as alternative to conventional processing routes, leading to the production of added-value products from agriculture and food industry raw materials. SSF involves the growth of microorganisms on moist solid substrate in the absence of free-flowing water. Future biorefineries based on SSF aim to exploit the vast complexity of the technology to modify biomass produced by agriculture and the food industry for valuable by-products through microbial bioconversion. In this review, a summary has been made of the attempts at using modern microbial SSF technology for future biorefineries for the production of many added-value products ranging from feedstock for the fermentation process and biodegradable plastics to fuels and chemicals.

  6. Recent progress in the development of solid catalysts for biomass conversion into high value-added chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Michikazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kamata, Keigo

    2015-06-01

    In recent decades, the substitution of non-renewable fossil resources by renewable biomass as a sustainable feedstock has been extensively investigated for the manufacture of high value-added products such as biofuels, commodity chemicals, and new bio-based materials such as bioplastics. Numerous solid catalyst systems for the effective conversion of biomass feedstocks into value-added chemicals and fuels have been developed. Solid catalysts are classified into four main groups with respect to their structures and substrate activation properties: (a) micro- and mesoporous materials, (b) metal oxides, (c) supported metal catalysts, and (d) sulfonated polymers. This review article focuses on the activation of substrates and/or reagents on the basis of groups (a)-(d), and the corresponding reaction mechanisms. In addition, recent progress in chemocatalytic processes for the production of five industrially important products (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, lactic acid, glyceraldehyde, 1,3-dihydroxyacetone, and furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid) as bio-based plastic monomers and their intermediates is comprehensively summarized.

  7. Recent progress in the development of solid catalysts for biomass conversion into high value-added chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Michikazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kamata, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the substitution of non-renewable fossil resources by renewable biomass as a sustainable feedstock has been extensively investigated for the manufacture of high value-added products such as biofuels, commodity chemicals, and new bio-based materials such as bioplastics. Numerous solid catalyst systems for the effective conversion of biomass feedstocks into value-added chemicals and fuels have been developed. Solid catalysts are classified into four main groups with respect to their structures and substrate activation properties: (a) micro- and mesoporous materials, (b) metal oxides, (c) supported metal catalysts, and (d) sulfonated polymers. This review article focuses on the activation of substrates and/or reagents on the basis of groups (a)–(d), and the corresponding reaction mechanisms. In addition, recent progress in chemocatalytic processes for the production of five industrially important products (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, lactic acid, glyceraldehyde, 1,3-dihydroxyacetone, and furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid) as bio-based plastic monomers and their intermediates is comprehensively summarized. (focus issue review)

  8. Recent progress in the development of solid catalysts for biomass conversion into high value-added chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Michikazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kamata, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the substitution of non-renewable fossil resources by renewable biomass as a sustainable feedstock has been extensively investigated for the manufacture of high value-added products such as biofuels, commodity chemicals, and new bio-based materials such as bioplastics. Numerous solid catalyst systems for the effective conversion of biomass feedstocks into value-added chemicals and fuels have been developed. Solid catalysts are classified into four main groups with respect to their structures and substrate activation properties: (a) micro- and mesoporous materials, (b) metal oxides, (c) supported metal catalysts, and (d) sulfonated polymers. This review article focuses on the activation of substrates and/or reagents on the basis of groups (a)–(d), and the corresponding reaction mechanisms. In addition, recent progress in chemocatalytic processes for the production of five industrially important products (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, lactic acid, glyceraldehyde, 1,3-dihydroxyacetone, and furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid) as bio-based plastic monomers and their intermediates is comprehensively summarized. PMID:27877800

  9. Real time alpha value measurement with Feynman-α method utilizing time series data acquisition on low enriched uranium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoike, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Shoichi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    As a part of the development of a subcriticality monitoring system, a system which has a time series data acquisition function of detector signals and a real time evaluation function of alpha value with the Feynman-alpha method was established, with which the kinetic parameter (alpha value) was measured at the STACY heterogeneous core. The Hashimoto's difference filter was implemented in the system, which enables the measurement at a critical condition. The measurement result of the new system agreed with the pulsed neutron method. (author)

  10. Analytical method of uranium (IV) and uranium (VI) in uranium ores and uranium-bearing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhuqin; Zheng Yongfeng; Li Qingzhen; Zhong Miaolan; Gu Dingxiang

    1995-11-01

    The best conditions for keeping the original valences of uranium during the dissolution and separation procedure of geological samples (especially those micro uranium-bearing rock) were studied. With the exist of high concentration protectants, the sample was decomposed with concentration HF at 40 +- 5 degree C. The U(VI) was dissolved completely and formed stable complex UO 2 F 2 , the U(IV) was precipitated rapidly and carried by carrier. Quantitative separation was carried out immediately with suction. The decomposition of sample and separation of solid/liquid phases was completed within two minutes. After separation, the U(IV) and U(VI) were determined quantitatively with laser fluorescence or voltametry respectively according to the uranium content. The limit of detection for this method is 0.7 μg/g, RSD is 10.5%, the determinate range of uranium is 2 x 10 -6 ∼10 -1 g/g. The uranium contents and their valence state ratio were measured for more than one hundred samples of sand stone and granite, the accuracy and precision of these results are satisfactory for uranium geological research. (12 tabs.; 11 refs.)

  11. Assessment of nonpoint source chemical loading potential to watersheds containing uranium waste dumps associated with uranium exploration and mining, Browns Hole, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Thomas M.; Beisner, Kimberly R.; Naftz, David L.; Snyder, Terry

    2012-01-01

    During August of 2008, 35 solid-phase samples were collected from abandoned uranium waste dumps, undisturbed geologic background sites, and adjacent streambeds in Browns Hole in southeastern Utah. The objectives of this sampling program were (1) to assess impacts on human health due to exposure to radium, uranium, and thorium during recreational activities on and around uranium waste dumps on Bureau of Land Management lands; (2) to compare concentrations of trace elements associated with mine waste dumps to natural background concentrations; (3) to assess the nonpoint source chemical loading potential to ephemeral and perennial watersheds from uranium waste dumps; and (4) to assess contamination from waste dumps to the local perennial stream water in Muleshoe Creek. Uranium waste dump samples were collected using solid-phase sampling protocols. Solid samples were digested and analyzed for major and trace elements. Analytical values for radium and uranium in digested samples were compared to multiple soil screening levels developed from annual dosage calculations in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act's minimum cleanup guidelines for uranium waste sites. Three occupancy durations for sites were considered: 4.6 days per year, 7.0 days per year, and 14.0 days per year. None of the sites exceeded the radium soil screening level of 96 picocuries per gram, corresponding to a 4.6 days per year exposure. Two sites exceeded the radium soil screening level of 66 picocuries per gram, corresponding to a 7.0 days per year exposure. Seven sites exceeded the radium soil screening level of 33 picocuries per gram, corresponding to a 14.0 days per year exposure. A perennial stream that flows next to the toe of a uranium waste dump was sampled, analyzed for major and trace elements, and compared with existing aquatic-life and drinking-water-quality standards. None of the water-quality standards were exceeded in the stream samples.

  12. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The processes and types of dispersion that produce anomalies in stream water, stream sediment, and ground water, and the factors that must be considered in planning and interpreting geochemical surveys are reviewed. Examples of surveys near known deposits show the types of results to be expected. Background values depend mainly on the content of U in rocks of the drainage area. In igneous rocks, U tends to increase with potassium from ultramafic rocks (0.01 ppM) to granitic rocks (1 to 5 ppM). Some alkalic rocks have unusually high contents of U (15 to 100 ppM). Uranium-rich provinces marked by igneous rocks unusually rich in U are recognized in several areas and appear to have a deep crustal or mantle origin. In western U.S., many tertiary tuffaceous rocks have a high U content. Sandstones, limestones, and many shales approximate the crustal abundance at 0.5 to 4 ppM, but black shales, phosphates, and some organic materials are notably enriched in U. Uranium is very soluble in most oxidizing waters at the earth's surface, but is precipitated by reducing agents (organic matter, H 2 S) and adsorbed by organic material and some Fe oxides. In most surface and ground waters, U correlates approximately with the total dissolved solids, conductivity, and bicarbonate concentration of the water, and with the U content of rocks it comes into contact with. Most surveys of stream water near known districts show distinct anomalies extending a few km to tens of km downstream. A complication with water is the large variability with time, up to x 50, as a result of changes in the ratio of ground water to direct runoff, and changes in rate of oxidation and leaching. Collection and analysis of water samples also pose some difficulties

  13. Effect of materials mixture on the higher heating value: Case of biomass, biochar and municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumanchar, Imane; Chhiti, Younes; M'hamdi Alaoui, Fatima Ezzahrae; El Ouinani, Amal; Sahibed-Dine, Abdelaziz; Bentiss, Fouad; Jama, Charafeddine; Bensitel, Mohammed

    2017-03-01

    The heating value describes the energy content of any fuel. In this study, this parameter was evaluated for different abundant materials in Morocco (two types of biochar, plastic, synthetic rubber, and cardboard as municipal solid waste (MSW), and various types of biomass). Before the evaluation of their higher heating value (HHV) by a calorimeter device, the thermal behavior of these materials was investigated using thermogravimetric (TGA) and Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses. The focus of this work is to evaluate the calorific value of each material alone in a first time, then to compare the experimental and theoretical HHV of their mixtures in a second time. The heating value of lignocellulosic materials was between 12.16 and 20.53MJ/kg, 27.39 for biochar 1, 32.60MJ/kg for biochar 2, 37.81 and 38.00MJ/kg for plastic and synthetic rubber respectively and 13.81MJ/kg for cardboard. A significant difference was observed between the measured and estimated HHVs of mixtures. Experimentally, results for a large variety of mixture between biomass/biochar and biomass/MSW have shown that the interaction between biomass and other compounds expressed a synergy of 2.37% for biochar 1 and 6.11% for biochar 2, 1.09% for cardboard, 5.09% for plastic and 5.01% for synthetic rubber. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. METHOD OF PURIFYING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, R.E.; Morrison, B.H.

    1958-12-23

    The removal of lmpurities from uranlum metal can be done by a process conslstlng of contacting the metal with liquid mercury at 300 icient laborato C, separating the impunitycontalnlng slag formed, cooling the slag-free liquld substantlally below the point at which uranlum mercurlde sollds form, removlng the mercury from the solids, and recovering metallic uranium by heating the solids.

  15. The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horttanainen, M.; Teirasvuo, N.; Kapustina, V.; Hupponen, M.; Luoranen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New experimental data of mixed MSW properties in a Finnish case region. • The share of renewable energy of mixed MSW. • The results were compared with earlier international studies. • The average share of renewable energy was 30% and the average LHVar 19 MJ/kg. • Well operating source separation decreases the renewable energy content of MSW. - Abstract: For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose

  16. Predicting moisture and economic value of solid forest fuel piles for improving the profitability of bioenergy use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren, Ari; Kinnunen, Jyrki-Pekko; Sikanen, Lauri

    2016-04-01

    Bioenergy contributes 26 % of the total energy use in Finland, and 60 % of this is provided by solid forest fuel consisting of small stems and logging residues such as tops, branches, roots and stumps. Typically the logging residues are stored as piles on site before transporting to regional combined heat and power plants for combustion. Profitability of forest fuel use depends on smart control of the feedstock. Fuel moisture, dry matter loss, and the rate of interest during the storing are the key variables affecting the economic value of the fuel. The value increases with drying, but decreases with wetting, dry matter loss and positive rate of interest. We compiled a simple simulation model computing the moisture change, dry matter loss, transportation costs and present value of feedstock piles. The model was used to predict the time of the maximum value of the stock, and to compose feedstock allocation strategies under the question: how should we choose the piles and the combustion time so that total energy yield and the economic value of the energy production is maximized? The question was assessed concerning the demand of the energy plant. The model parameterization was based on field scale studies. The initial moisture, and the rates of daily moisture change and dry matter loss in the feedstock piles depended on the day of the year according to empirical field measurements. Time step of the computation was one day. Effects of pile use timing on the total energy yield and profitability was studied using combinatorial optimization. Results show that the storing increases the pile maximum value if the natural drying onsets soon after the harvesting; otherwise dry matter loss and the capital cost of the storing overcome the benefits gained by drying. Optimized timing of the pile use can improve slightly the profitability, based on the increased total energy yield and because the energy unit based transportation costs decrease when water content in the biomass is

  17. The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horttanainen, M., E-mail: mika.horttanainen@lut.fi; Teirasvuo, N.; Kapustina, V.; Hupponen, M.; Luoranen, M.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • New experimental data of mixed MSW properties in a Finnish case region. • The share of renewable energy of mixed MSW. • The results were compared with earlier international studies. • The average share of renewable energy was 30% and the average LHVar 19 MJ/kg. • Well operating source separation decreases the renewable energy content of MSW. - Abstract: For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

  18. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-12-15

    A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L(-1)) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n=6) at 400 ng L(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in mineral water, river water, well water, spring water and sea water samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid-state fermentation of cornmeal with the basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum for degrading starch and upgrading nutritional value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J R; An, C H; Yuan, J M

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the ability of the basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum to degrade starch and upgrade nutritional value of cornmeal during solid-state fermentation (SSF). On the basal medium that consisted of cornmeal and salt solution, alpha-amylase activity of G. lucidum reached its maximum value of 267 U g(-1) of culture on day 20 after inoculation. Prolongation of fermentation time from 10 to 25 days increased significantly the degradation rate of starch and ergosterol yield (a kind of physiologically active substances of G. lucidum, also as an indicator of mycelial biomass) (P cornmeal, ground to 30-mesh powder, moistened with 67 ml of nutrient salt solution supplemented with 3 g yeast extract and 7.5 g glucose per litre. Under the optimum culture condition, the degradation rate of starch reached its maximum values of 70.4%; the starch content of the fermented product decreased from 64.5 to 25.3%, while the reducing sugar content increased from 4.2 to 20.6%. SSF also produced a significant increase (P cornmeal was strikingly increased and some active substances originated from G. lucidum remained in the fermented product. This implied that cornmeal could be processed into many kinds of special functional foods by SSF of G. lucidum.

  20. Separation of uranium from aqueous solutions using calix[6]arenes in liquid-liquid extraction as well as solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmeide, K.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G.

    2004-11-01

    The suitability of different calyx[n] arene types for uranyl extraction from liquid solutions was examined by means of liquid-liquid extraction using aqueous phases and organic solvents of varying compositions. It was found that COOH-derivatised calyx[6] arenes have good extraction properties and can even be used in the acid pH range. The use of calixarene-modified fleeces for the separation of uranyl from aqueous phases was examined in batch experiments with pH and uranyl concentration as variables and in the presence or absence of competing ions. The results showed that calixarene-modified fleeces can be used for uranium separation starting from pH 4. At pH 5, up to a maximum of 7.6 x 10 -7 mol uranium can be bound per 1 g of calixarene-modified fleece. The separation of uranyl from synthetic pit waters was examined as a means of testing the separation capacity of calixarene-modified fleeces in environmentally sensitive waters. Studies on the reversibility of uranium bonding to calixarene-treated polyester fleeces have shown that under environmentally realistic conditions (neutral pH range) the uranium is firmly bound to the calixarene-modified fleeces and cannot be mobilised. By contrast, in acidic environments calixarene-modified fleeces are capable of near-complete regeneration. Such regenerated textile filter materials can then be used for further uranium separation cycles [de

  1. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  2. An Overview of Natural Gas Conversion Technologies for Co-Production of Hydrogen and Value-Added Solid Carbon Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dagle, Vanessa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamelyn D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krause, Theodore R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahmed, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-16

    This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Congressional Appropriation language to support research on carbon-free production of hydrogen using new chemical processes that utilize natural gas to produce solid carbon and hydrogen. The U.S. produces 9-10 million tons of hydrogen annually with more than 95% of the hydrogen produced by steam-methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas. SMR is attractive because of its high hydrogen yield; but it also converts the carbon to carbon dioxide. Non-oxidative thermal decomposition of methane to carbon and hydrogen is an alternative to SMR and produces CO2-free hydrogen. The produced carbon can be sold as a co-product, thus providing economic credit that reduces the delivered net cost of hydrogen. The combination of producing hydrogen with potentially valuable carbon byproducts has market value in that this allows greater flexibility to match the market prices of hydrogen and carbon. That is, the higher value product can subsidize the other in pricing decisions. In this report we highlight the relevant technologies reported in the literature—primarily thermochemical and plasma conversion processes—and recent research progress and commercial activities. Longstanding technical challenges include the high energetic requirements (e.g., high temperatures and/or electricity requirements) necessary for methane activation and, for some catalytic processes, the separation of solid carbon product from the spent catalyst. We assess current and new carbon product markets that could be served given technological advances, and we discuss technical barriers and potential areas of research to address these needs. We provide preliminary economic analysis for these processes and compare to other emerging (e.g., electrolysis) and conventional (e.g., SMR) processes for hydrogen production. The overarching conclusion of this study is that the cost of hydrogen can be potentially

  3. IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-06-15

    Full text: Governments and organizations interested in developing uranium resources will be assisted by a new service, now being inaugurated by the Agency's laboratories, for the distribution of reference samples of uranium ores. This is an addition to the service which began at Seibersdorf in January 1962 for the distribution of calibrated radionuclides, and which has met with a steadily increasing demand. * Uranium deposits consisting of ores with a uranium content in the range 0.5 - 0.05 per cent occur in a number of countries, including developing countries and can present considerable analytical difficulties. In 1962 the Agency asked Member States whether they would be interested in receiving reference samples of uranium ores to assist them in checking their methods of chemical analysis. The response encouraged the Agency to proceed. There is a multiplicity of types of uranium ores and, initially, three of the most commonly occurring have been selected - torbernite, uraninite and carnotite. Member States have provided the laboratory with supplies of these three types of ore. In order to determine the uranium content, samples are sent to leading laboratories throughout the world, so as to arrive at the most accurate values possible. This work has proved to be useful to the laboratories themselves ; in searching for reasons for discrepancies between the different collaborating laboratories, they enlarge their own knowledge and improve their methods. The reference samples are sent out in the form of fine powder, and are available to atomic energy commissions, research laboratories or mining companies. The requesting laboratory, having worked out the analytical process best suited to its needs, is then able to check its results by analysing an IAEA reference sample of known uranium content. By the end of 1966, reference samples will be available of the three ores mentioned, and later also of pure uranium oxide and of uranium oxide containing trace impurities, the

  4. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  5. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  6. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, C.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U 3 O 8 (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO 2 phase appear at the surface of the U 3 O 8 grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.)

  7. The theory and uses of natural uranium isotopic variations in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmond, J.K.; Cowart, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    The dissolved concentration of uranium and the relative abundance of two uranium isotopes, 234 U and 238 U, vary over a wide range of values in natural waters. The concentration is controlled mainly by the redox potential of the environment and by CO 2 . The mechanism of isotope fractionation is thought to be entrainment of 234 U in the aqueous phase either by selective leaching of the solid phase or by direct recoil of the daughter nuclide. Ion exchange techniques and alpha-spectrometry permit the measurement of uranium at concentrations as low as pp 10 11 and the isotopic ratio to a few per cent. In oxidizing conditions the uranium isotopes behave in a chemically stable conservative manner such that separate groundwater sources may have identifiably different characteristics and mixing volume calculations may be made. Other potential use of these isotopes include radiometric dating, tracing of hydrologic systems, ore prospecting and earthquake prediction. (author)

  8. Enhancement of nutritive value of tea leaf waste by solid-state fermentation with Lentinus sajor–caju

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah-Al-Mahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional value of tea leaf waste was improved significantly (p<0.05 by solid-state fermentation for 8 weeks with a white rot fungus, Pleurotus sajor-caju. The proximate analysis revealed that crude protein, ash, cellulose-lignin ratio and reducing sugar contents were increased by 2001.53, 117.62, 31.38, and 619.10%, respectively. In contrary, crude fiber, lipid, carbohydrate, lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses contents were decreased by 40.70, 71.87, 47.65, 35.63, 15.26, and 61.03%, respectively. Ascorbic acid and carotenoid were also increased by 129.17 and 398.79%, respectively. At 7 weeks of fermentation, the crude tea leaf waste extract showed very high CMCase, avicelase, cellobiase and amylase activity, moderate pectinase and poor xylanase activity. Furthermore, In-vitro dry matter digestibility was increased by 50.35% at the end of fermentation. Therefore, it was concluded that P. sajor-caju efficiently degraded tea leaf waste and improved its nutritive value.

  9. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, S.; Reades, D.W.; Cherry, J.A.; Chambers, D.B.; Case, G.G.; Ibbotson, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  10. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  11. Mobilization of uranium isotopes in Brazilian aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    1994-01-01

    The uranium isotopes 234 U and 238 U have been extensively used to study geochemical problems, mainly related to the hydrological medium. Active dissolution of these isotopes is occurring in groundwaters from several aquifers at southeastern region of Brazil. The dissolved uranium concentration showed variability related to the rainwater infiltration with the U content of groundwaters increasing during wet periods. The amount of uranium mobilized during rainwater infiltration showed an inverse correlation with the thickness of unsaturated silty clay at Morro do Ferro area. The experimental data favour the possibility of formation of soluble complexes of U and dissolved organic compounds at Morro do Ferro area, and also some absorption of U by clays during rainwater infiltration. Enhanced 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios for dissolved uranium have been found and explained in terms of combined chemical etch and leach processes for groundwaters of the Pocos de Caldas alkaline complex. These processes are considered responsible for the bulk dissolution of rock matrix rather then alpha-recoil effects. Several direct correlations have been found for groundwaters of Agua da Prata, which supported the effectiveness of etch/lead mechanisms, for example, between 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio and dissolved solids, ionic strength, C O 2 partial pressure, 'traditional' index of base exchange and 'new' index of base exchange (involving the anion fluoride). A higher 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio was found to be directly related to a higher value of dissolution rate and a higher value of 222 Rn content was found to be related with a higher value of specific surface area. These relationships explained a good inverse logarithmic correlation between 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio and 222 Rn content of the spring waters of Aguas da Prata. (author)

  12. Fossile fuel and uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorkum, A.A. van.

    1975-01-01

    The world's resources of coal, lignite, oil, natural gas, shale oil and uranium are reviewed. These quantities depend on the prices which make new resources exploitable. Uranium resources are given exclusively for the USSR, Eastern Europe and China. Their value in terms of energy depends heavily on the reactor type used. All figures given are estimated to be conservative

  13. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  14. Solid state solvation effect and reduced amplified spontaneous emission threshold value of glass forming DCM derivative in PMMA films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vembris, Aivars, E-mail: aivars.vembris@cfi.lu.lv [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV 1063 (Latvia); Zarins, Elmars; Kokars, Valdis [Institute of Applied Chemistry, Riga Technical University, 14/24 Azenes Street, Riga LV 1048 (Latvia)

    2015-02-15

    Molecule crystallization is one of the limitations for obtaining high-gain organic laser systems. One of the examples is well known red laser dye 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). The lowest threshold value of amplified spontaneous emission was achieved by doping 2 wt% of DCM molecule in tris-(8-hydroxy quinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) matrix. Further increase of the DCM dye concentration makes the system less efficient as its threshold value increases. It is due to large intermolecular interaction, which induces photoluminescence quenching. Compounds with reduced intermolecular interaction could be prospective in organic laser systems due to higher possible doping. In this work photoluminescence and amplified spontaneous emission properties of modified DCM molecule in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix were investigated. Bulky trityloxyethyl groups were attached to the donor part of DCM. These groups increase intermolecular distance wherewith reduce photoluminescence quenching. More than one order of magnitude lower excitation threshold energy of the amplified spontaneous emission was achieved in doped polymer films with investigated compound in comparison to doped polymer with DCM. It means that the investigated compound is more perspective as a laser material compared to the previously studied. In addition, amplified spontaneous emission maximum could be tuned within 15 nm by changing concentration from 0.1 wt% to 10 wt% DWK-1 in PMMA matrix due to solid state solvation effect. - Highlights: • Bulky groups attached to DCM dye reduce photoluminescence quenching. • Amplified spontaneous emission is in red spectral region. • Amplified spontaneous emission spectra were tuned by 15 nm. • Amplified spontaneous emission threshold value was reduced by one order of magnitude.

  15. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  16. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  17. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  18. The solubility of solid fission products in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium. Part I: literature review on experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1977-01-01

    This review compiles the available data on the solubility of the most important non-volatile fission products in the carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides of uranium and plutonium. It includes some elements which are not fission products, but belong to a group of the Periodic Table which contains one or more fission products elements

  19. 226Ra bioavailability of plants at urgeirica uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madruga, M.J.; Brogueira, A.

    2002-01-01

    Large amounts of solid wastes (tailings) resulting from the exploitation and treatment of uranium ore at the Urgeirica mine (north of Portugal) have been accumulated in dams (tailing ponds). To reduce the dispersion of natural radionuclides into the environment some dams were revegetated with eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globolus) and pines (Pinus pinea). Besides, some shrubs (Cytisus s.p.) are growing at some of the dams. The objective of this study is to determine the 226 Ra bioavailability from uranium mill tailings through the quantification of the total and available fraction of radium in the solid wastes and to estimate its transfer to the plants growing on the tailing piles. Plants and solid waste samples were randomly collected at dams. Activity concentration of 226 Ra in plants (aerial part and roots) and solid wastes were measured by gamma spectrometry. The exchangeable fraction of radium in solid wastes was quantified using one single step extraction with 1 mol dm -3 ammonium acetate (pH=7) or 1 mol dm -3 calcium chloride solutions. The results obtained for the 226 Ra uptake by plants show that 226 Ra concentration ratios for eucalyptus and pines decrease at low 226 Ra concentration in the solid wastes and appear relatively constant at higher radium concentrations. For shrubs, the concentration ratios increase at higher 226 Ra solid waste concentrations approaching a saturation value. Percentage values of 16.0±8.3 and 12.9±8.9, for the fraction of radium extracted from the solid wastes, using 1 mol dm -3 ammonium acetate or calcium chloride solutions respectively, were obtained. The 226 Ra concentration ratios determined on the basis of exchangeable radium are one order of magnitude higher than those based on total radium. It can be concluded that, within the standard error values, more consistent 226 Ra concentration ratios were obtained when calculated on the basis of available radium than when total radium was considered, for all the dams. (author)

  20. Synthesis of UN coatings on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar, R.W.; Hastings, J.C.

    1975-04-01

    A single-displacement reaction approach was used to form uranium mononitride as a protective coating for uranium; the source of the nitrogen was a solid nitride, and magnesium nitride was chosen as the most attractive candidate for the experiment. While the goal of synthesizing a single-phase uranium mononitride coating at temperatures lower than 1405 K was met, a number of problems inherent in the process were identified. 6 figures, 2 tables

  1. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J.; Corbin, Rob; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2014-03-01

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time-temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal.

  2. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J., E-mail: carissahelmreich@tamu.edu [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 337 Zachry Engineering Center, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Corbin, Rob, E-mail: rcorbin@terrapower.com [TerraPower, LLC, 330 120th Ave NE, Suite 100, Bellevue, WA 98005 (United States); McDeavitt, Sean M., E-mail: mcdeavitt@tamu.edu [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 337 Zachry Engineering Center, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time–temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal.

  3. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J.; Corbin, Rob; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2014-01-01

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time–temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal

  4. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, F.E.; Kreuz, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A process is claimed of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H 2 O 2 per part of vanadium (V 2 O 5 ) above the stoichiometric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three sequential phases consisting of I, a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction medium maintained in the range of 2.5 to 5.5 for a period of from about 1 to 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; II, a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 5 to 180 minutes and III, a final phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. The excess hydrogen peroxide is maintained during the entire treatment up until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction medium

  5. Deep groundwater redox reactions in the Palmottu uranium deposit: The role of uranium and iron in these processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Duro, L.; Ahonen, L.

    1996-12-01

    The reduction oxidation properties of the deep bedrock and groundwater are important geochemical factors with respect to the chemical stability of the multibarrier system, which isolates the disposed nuclear fuel from biosphere. In the report are described the results of the redox experiments carried out in the field using the natural groundwaters of Palmottu, in Nummi-Pusula, Finland. The experiments include (1) measurements of natural water redox potential values during four to eight hours continuous pumping; (2) monitoring of the redox-potential response to an artificial change of pH of the groundwater. Separate tests were made in iron and uranium-rich groundwaters, respectively. The data of the field experiments were used in the redox-modelling of the iron and uranium systems. In accordance with earlier knowledge, it was showed that dissolved iron is an important redox electrolyte in natural waters, at least at concentration levels of milligrams per liter. However, a striking observation was that in the absence of dissolved iron dissolved uranium (in concentrations of about 200 nM or more) seems to be able to give nernstian response on platinum electrode in acid/base titrations. The effective redox properties of the bedrock-groundwater system depend on the availability and reactivity of solid phases able to exchange electrons with dissolved redox electrolytes. The present results indicate that, in the bedrock/groundwater system of the Palmottu uranium mineralization, uranium minerals are important redox buffers. (orig.) (refs.)

  6. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  7. Solid-state fermentation of cornmeal with the basidiomycete Hericium erinaceum for degrading starch and upgrading nutritional value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jianrong

    2003-01-15

    The ability of the basidiomycete Hericium erinaceum to degrade starch and upgrade nutritional value of cornmeal during solid-state fermentation was studied. On the basal medium which consisted of cornmeal and salt solution, H. erinaceum produced a strong alpha-amylase on the 15th day after inoculation, which resulted in a 52% degradation of the starch. By supplementation with 5-15 g soybean meal per 100 g cornmeal the alpha-amylase activity and degradation rate of starch was raised significantly (P cornmeal, the starch content in the product decreased from 63% to 22% (P < 0.001) and protein content increased from 12% to 17% (P < 0.01). In the protein in the product, the lysine content was increased from 36 to 56 mg/ g and tryptophan from 9 to 13 mg/g. Using egg protein as a standard, an evaluation on the protein quality of the fermented product showed that it was superior to that of the nonfermented control and to other cereals, was close to that of soybean and chicken, but was inferior to that of milk and red meats.

  8. Value addition of vegetable wastes by solid-state fermentation using Aspergillus niger for use in aquafeed industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, N; Imelda-Joseph; Raj, R Paul

    2010-11-01

    Vegetable waste typically has high moisture content and high levels of protein, vitamins and minerals. Its value as an agricultural feed can be enhanced through solid-state fermentation (SSF). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the nutritional status of the products derived by SSF of a mixture of dried vegetable waste powder and oil cake mixture (soybean flour, wheat flour, groundnut oil cake and sesame oil cake at 4:3:2:1 ratio) using fungi Aspergillus niger S(1)4, a mangrove isolate, and A. niger NCIM 616. Fermentation was carried out for 9 days at 35% moisture level and neutral pH. Significant (p<0.05) increase in crude protein and amino acids were obtained in both the trials. The crude fat and crude fibre content showed significant reduction at the end of fermentation. Nitrogen free extract (NFE) showed a gradual decrease during the fermentation process. The results of the study suggest that the fermented product obtained on days 6 and 9 in case of A. niger S(1)4 and A. niger NCIM 616 respectively contained the highest levels of crude protein. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  10. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka; Benesova, Dagmar; Dvorakova, Marcela; Vanek, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC 50 value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC 50 = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: → The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. → Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. → Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. → The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  11. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  12. Determination of the O/M ratios of polynary uranium oxides by Ce(IV)-Fe(II) back titration after dissolution in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, T.; Sato, N.; Yamada, K.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium (IV) in polynary uranium oxides is determined after the solid has been dissolved in a warm mixed solution of sulphuric and phosphoric acids containing excess Ce(IV). The latter is titrated with a Fe(II) standard solution using ferroin as indicator. This method is especially effective for (mixed) uranium oxides which are difficult to dissolve in hot Ce(IV) sulphuric acid. The standard deviation of the determined x value in polynary oxides is estimated to be below ± 0.004 for samples of 10-30 mg. (orig.)

  13. Determination of the O/M ratios of polynary uranium oxides by Ce(IV)-Fe(II) back titration after dissolution in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, T; Sato, N; Yamada, K

    1996-01-01

    Uranium (IV) in polynary uranium oxides is determined after the solid has been dissolved in a warm mixed solution of sulphuric and phosphoric acids containing excess Ce(IV). The latter is titrated with a Fe(II) standard solution using ferroin as indicator. This method is especially effective for (mixed) uranium oxides which are difficult to dissolve in hot Ce(IV) sulphuric acid. The standard deviation of the determined x value in polynary oxides is estimated to be below +/- 0.004 for samples of 10-30 mg.

  14. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  15. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  16. Simultaneous determination of Ra-226, natural uranium and natural thorium by gamma-ray spectrometry INa(Ti), in solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, S.; Navarro, T.; Alvarez, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine activities of Ra-226, natural uranium and natural thorium by gamma-ray spectrometry. The measurement system has been calibrated using standards specially prepared at the laboratory. It is necessary to assume secular equilibrium in the samples, between Ra-226 and Th-232 and its daughters nuclides, and between U-238 and its immediate daughter Th-234, as the photo peaks measured are those of the daughters. The results obtained indicate that this method can of ter replace the radiochemical techniques used to measure activities in this type of sample. The method has been successfully used to determine these natural isotopes in samples from uranium mills. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  18. Multi-column bioleaching of a uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yunsheng; Zheng Ying; Liu Hui; Cheng Hao

    2014-01-01

    The technology of bioleaching uranium ore can increase the uranium leaching rate and shorten the leaching uranium period, save consumption of acid and oxidant, lower production costs. An experiment on multi-column bioleaching of a uranium ore was done using mesophilic bacteria, the average uranium recovery of 90% was achieved in 39 days. Compared with traditional process, leaching period was shortened to 39 d from 59 d, acid consumption and liquid-solid ratio were also reduced. The results showed it is suitable to bioleach the uranium ore. (authors)

  19. Three-dimensional thermal simulations of thin solid carbon foils for charge stripping of high current uranium ion beams at a proposed new heavy-ion linac at GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extensive numerical study of heating of thin solid carbon foils by 1.4  MeV/u uranium ion beams to explore the possibility of using such a target as a charge stripper at the proposed new Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy–ion linac. These simulations have been carried out using a sophisticated 3D computer code that accounts for physical phenomena that are important in this problem. A variety of beam and target parameters have been considered. The results suggest that within the considered parameter range, the target will be severely damaged by the beam. Thus, a carbon foil stripper does not seem to be a reliable option for the future Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy–ion linac, in particular, at FAIR design beam intensities.

  20. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  1. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  2. Application of resin in pulp technique for ion exchange separation of uranium from alkaline leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas, T.; Rajan, K.; Chakravorty, J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of uranium from different ores uses ion exchange (IX) technique for the separation of dissolved uranium values. Conventionally, the IX process is carried out on leach solution obtained after the filtration or counter-current decantation of the leach slurries. Amongst the two types of leach pulps generated in uranium ore processing, viz acidic and alkaline, the latter one consists of predominantly fine-size pulps of higher viscosity, thus making the solid-liquid separation an arduous task. Sustained research for improvising the efficiency of various unit operations in the uranium process flowsheet have resulted in advent of new generation resins which are mechanically re-silent, posses higher exchange capacity thereby enabling separation of dissolved uranium ions from the leach pulps directly. Some of the prominent low-grade uranium ore deposits in India are hosted in acid consuming gangue matrix. These ore deposits necessitate fine grinding as well as application of alkaline leaching for the dissolution of uranium values. The leach pulps analyse 500 – 600 mg/l of U3O8 and contain total dissolved solutes (TDS) to the extent of about 50 g/l. Analysis of the characteristics of the leach pulp indicated suitability of resin-in-pulp technique for the separation of uranyl carbonate anions from the leachate. This paper describes the results of the RIP test work on alkaline leach slurry using various commercially available strong base anionic exchange resins. Parametric variation studies were conducted to establish the adsorption isotherm and sorption kinetics followed by elution of loaded uranium. Based on these results semi-continuous experiments on “carousel” mode were carried out. The results indicate superiority of gel type polystyrene based resins grafted with quaternary ammonium ion in comparison to the macro-porous resins. Semi-continuous counter-current extraction and elution tests indicated that about 98% of

  3. Equations of state for enriched uranium and uranium alloy to 3500 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Chaomao; Hai Yuying; Liu Jenlong; Li Zhenrong

    1990-04-01

    The volume compressions of 6 kinds of cast materials including enriched uranium, poor uranium, U-0.57 wt% Ti, U-0.33 wt% Nb, U-2.85 wt% Nb and U-7.5 wt% Nb-3.3 wt% Zr have been determined by monitoring piston displacements in a piston cylinder apparatus with double strengthening rings to 3500 MPa at room temperature. The dilation of the cylinder vessel and the press deformation were corrected by some experiments. The calculational data free from using the standard sample closed with used standard sample. The volume compressions of enriched uranium and poor uranium are nearly coincident. Pure uranium is more compressible than uranium alloys. These values of enriched uranium are in close agreement with values of Bridgman's pure uranium. The fitting coefficients of Bridgman's polynomial and Anderson's equation of state and isothermal bulk modules for the above materials are given

  4. Sensibility test for uranium ores from Qianjiadian sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingyu

    2005-01-01

    Sensibility tests for uranium ores from Qianjiadian sandstone type uranium deposit in Songliao Basin which is suitable to in-situ leach are carried out, including water sensibility, velocity sensibility, salt sensibility, acid sensibility and alkaline sensibility. The sensibility critical value of this ore is determined. Some references on mining process and technical parameter are provided for in-situ leaching of uranium. (authors)

  5. Geochemical methods for identification of formations being prospective for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, A.M.; Komarova, N.I.; Spiridonov, A.A.; Shor, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical methods of uranium content evaluation in metamorphic, ultrametamorphic and sedimentary formations are considered. At that, the following four factors are of the highest importance: 1) average uranium content-geochemical background; 2) character of uranium distribution; 3) forms of uranium presence; 4) the value of thorium-uranium ratio. A complex of radiogeochemical criteria, favourable for uranium presence is formulated: high average background content of total and '' mobile''uranium and high value of variation coefficient (80-100% and above); low (approximately one or lower) thorium-uranium ratio; sharp increase in uranium concentration in accessory minerals. Radiogeochemical peculiarities of metamorphic and ultrametamorphic formations prospective for uranium are enumerated. The peculiarities condition specificity of geochemical prospecting methods. Prospecting methods first of all must be directed at the evaluation of radioelement distribution parameters and specification of the forms of their presence

  6. Uranium in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1979-01-01

    When fission fragments pass through certain solids they leave trails of radiation damage which can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. If the solid can be chemically etched these tracks are 'developed' and brought within the resolving power of the light optical microscope. Since its introduction the etching technique has been used to reveal tracks formed due to the thermal neutron induced fission of U 235 atoms in many uranium bearing materials of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Successful experiments have been performed in determining the distribution of uranium in selected botanical species. On the basis of this most recent work it was decided to make a feasibility study of a determination of the concentration in human blood. This short report produces evidence not only that the fission track etching technique is useful for this purpose but that there are significant uranium concentration differences in blood taken from leukemia patients compared with samples taken from healthy norms. Whilst experiments of this kind generally employ direct registration of the fission fragments in the material itself, as with minerals, an alternative procedure is to employ some overlay, such as thin sheets of muscovite mica, or of a suitable plastic. In the present investigations the plastic Lexan polycarbonate (C 6 H 15 O 3 ) was selected as an overlay since it is easy to etch chemically. (author)

  7. Uranium exploration of Samar Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.

    1979-02-01

    Uranium exploration is being undertaken to meet the requirements of the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant-1 (PNPP-1) programmed to operate in 1982, for about 140 metric tons annually or 2664 MT of U 3 O 8 up to the year 2000. Samar was chosen as the survey pilot project and the method used was a geochemical reconnaissance or low density observation survey to delineate broad areas where follow-up uranium surveys may be undertaken. Stream sediments or surface waters were collected at each sampling point at a density of one sample per 20-25 sq. km. The conductance and pH of the water were measured with a conductivity meter and pH respectively. Radioactivity was determined using a portable scintillometer. The stream sediment and heavy mineral samples were analyzed for uranium (U), copper (CCu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), silver (Ag), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni). Water samples were analyzed for uranium only. The solid samples were digested in an acid mixture of 85% concentrated nitric acid and 15% concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the leachable uranium was determined using a fluorimeter. The detection limits for uranium were 0.3 ppb and 0.3 ppm for water and solid samples, respectively. Analysis for Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Ag, Co, and Ni were done by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry using the same leaching solution prepared for uranium analysis. Over 9000 determinations were done on nearly 1600 samples. The survey delineated at least two areas where follow-up surveys for uranium are warranted. These areas are the San Isidro - Catarman in Northwestern Samar, and the vicinity of Bagacay mines in Central Samar

  8. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth; Modelisation de la cinetique de reduction d`oxydes d`uranium par l`hydrogene. Reactivites de germination et de croissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, C

    1997-12-04

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO{sub 2} phase appear at the surface of the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.) 45 refs.

  9. Waste monitoring of the uranium ore processing activities in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nica, L.

    2002-01-01

    The uranium ore processing activities at the Feldioara site produce a range of liquid and solid waste that are monitored. Liquids are treated through decantation, pH correction and uranium precipitation before their release into the environment. The solid waste is gathered into ore specific area and are covered regularly with clay materials. (author)

  10. Rossing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  11. Simultaneous determination of RA-226, natural uranium and natural thorioum by gamma-ray spectrometry INa(Tl) in solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, S.; Navarro, T.; Alvarez, A.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been described to determine activities of Ra-226, natural uranium, and natural thorium, by gamma-ray spectrometry. The system was calibrated for efficiency by using synthetic calibrated standards. It is necessary, in the samples, to assume secular equilibrium between Ra-226 and Th-232 and its daughters nuclides, and U-238 and its immediate daughter Th-234, because the photopeaks measured are from these dsaugthers. Our results indicate that a non destructive gamma spectrometric method can ofter replace the radiochemical techniques used in measuring radiactivities in this type of samples. (Author). 9 refs

  12. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  13. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  14. Dry uranium tetrafluoride process preparation using the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, Joao Batista da

    2008-01-01

    It is a well known fact that the use of uranium tetrafluoride allows flexibility in the production of uranium suicide and uranium oxide fuel. To its obtention there are two conventional routes, the one which reduces uranium from the UF 6 hydrolysis solution with stannous chloride, and the hydro fluorination of a solid uranium dioxide. In this work we are introducing a third and a dry way route, mainly utilized to the recovery of uranium from the liquid effluents generated in the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process, at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Working in the liquid phase, this route comprises the recuperation of ammonium fluoride by NH 4 HF 2 precipitation. Working with the solid residues, the crystallized bifluoride is added to the solid UO 2 , which comes from the U mini plates recovery, also to its conversion in a solid state reaction, to obtain UF 4 . That returns to the process of metallic uranium production unity to the U 3 Si 2 obtention. This fuel is considered in IPEN CNEN/SP as the high density fuel phase for IEA-R1m reactor, which will replace the former low density U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel. (author)

  15. Extraction and desorption of accessible uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, T.

    1987-01-01

    The proportion of the uranium in natural ore samples which is in isotopic equilibrium with the uranium in the groundwater may be designated accessible uranium, and can be regarded as being in short-term exchange with the aqueous phase. Some of the natural uranium is secured in resistant crystalline minerals, and is described as inaccessible, because it may not be brought into solution unless the mineral is subjected to extreme chemical attack. It is not available for groundwater transport in the short term. An estimate of the proportion of accessible uranium is therefore useful when modeling radionuclide migration. The amount of accessible natural uranium is some uranium ore samples from the Ranger deposit has been determined by combining a sequential extraction with isotopic measurements of the extracted phases. The solid samples were crushed drill core form Ranger S1/146 which had previously been used for uranium adsorption experiments and therefore contained 236 U as well as natural uranium. This Section discusses how the uranium partitioning found with the sequential extraction procedure predicts the leaching behavior of these samples

  16. Assessment of nonpoint source chemical loading potential to watersheds containing uranium waste dumps and human health hazards associated with uranium exploration and mining, Red, White, and Fry Canyons, southeastern Utah, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Marston, Thomas M.; Naftz, David L.; Snyder, Terry; Freeman, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    During May, June, and July 2007, 58 solid-phase samples were collected from abandoned uranium mine waste dumps, background sites, and adjacent streambeds in Red, White, and Fry Canyons in southeastern Utah. The objectives of this sampling program were to (1) assess the nonpoint-source chemical loading potential to ephemeral and perennial drainage basins from uranium waste dumps and (2) assess potential effects on human health due to recreational activities on and around uranium waste dumps on Bureau of Land Management property. Uranium waste-dump samples were collected using solid-phase sampling protocols. After collection, solid-phase samples were homogenized and extracted in the laboratory using a leaching procedure. Filtered (0.45 micron) water samples were obtained from the field leaching procedure and were analyzed for major and trace elements at the Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry Metals Analysis Laboratory at the University of Utah. A subset of the solid-phase samples also were digested with strong acids and analyzed for major ions and trace elements at the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Division Laboratory in Denver, Colorado. For the initial ranking of chemical loading potential for uranium waste dumps, results of leachate analyses were compared with existing aquatic-life and drinking-water-quality standards. To assess potential effects on human health, solid-phase digestion values for uranium were compared to soil screening levels (SSL) computed using the computer model RESRAD 6.5 for a probable concentration of radium. One or more chemical constituents exceeded aquatic life and drinking-water-quality standards in approximately 64 percent (29/45) of the leachate samples extracted from uranium waste dumps. Most of the uranium waste dump sites with elevated trace-element concentrations in leachates were located in Red Canyon. Approximately 69 percent (31/45) of the strong acid digestible soil concentration values were greater than a calculated

  17. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  18. Comparison of ANN (MLP), ANFIS, SVM, and RF models for the online classification of heating value of burning municipal solid waste in circulating fluidized bed incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Haihui; Ma, Zengyi; Tang, Yijun; Wang, Yuelan; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa; Huang, Qunxing

    2017-10-01

    The heating values, particularly lower heating values of burning municipal solid waste are critically important parameters in operating circulating fluidized bed incineration systems. However, the heating values change widely and frequently, while there is no reliable real-time instrument to measure heating values in the process of incinerating municipal solid waste. A rapid, cost-effective, and comparative methodology was proposed to evaluate the heating values of burning MSW online based on prior knowledge, expert experience, and data-mining techniques. First, selecting the input variables of the model by analyzing the operational mechanism of circulating fluidized bed incinerators, and the corresponding heating value was classified into one of nine fuzzy expressions according to expert advice. Development of prediction models by employing four different nonlinear models was undertaken, including a multilayer perceptron neural network, a support vector machine, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, and a random forest; a series of optimization schemes were implemented simultaneously in order to improve the performance of each model. Finally, a comprehensive comparison study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the models. Results indicate that the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model outperforms the other three models, with the random forest model performing second-best, and the multilayer perceptron model performing at the worst level. A model with sufficient accuracy would contribute adequately to the control of circulating fluidized bed incinerator operation and provide reliable heating value signals for an automatic combustion control system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  20. Uranium tailings reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of uranium tailings from Bancroft and Elliot Lake, Ontario, and from Beaverlodge and Rabbit Lake, Saskatchewan, have been prepared as compositional reference materials at the request of the National Uranium Tailings Research Program. The four samples, UTS-1 to UTS-4, were ground to minus 104 μm, each mixed in one lot and bottled in 200-g units for UTS-1 to UTS-3 and in 100-g units for UTS-4. The materials were tested for homogeneity with respect to uranium by neutron activation analysis and to iron by an acid-decomposition atomic absorption procedure. In a free choice analytical program, 18 laboratories contributed results for one or more of total iron, titanium, aluminum, calcium, barium, uranium, thorium, total sulphur, and sulphate for all four samples, and for nickel and arsenic in UTS-4 only. Based on a statistical analysis of the data, recommended values were assigned to all elements/constituents, except for sulphate in UTS-3 and nickel in UTS-4. The radioactivity of thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210 in UTS-1 to UTS-4 and of thorium-232, radium-228, and thorium-228 in UTS-1 and UTS-2 was determined in a radioanalytical program composed of eight laboratories. Recommended values for the radioactivities and associated parameters were calculated by a statistical treatment of the results

  1. Application of alkaline leaching to the extraction of uranium from shale of the Vosges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Pottier, P.; Le Bris, J.

    1958-01-01

    Description of chemical treatment of Vosges shales to obtain uranium by alkaline leaching. Mineralogy aspects of ore, physical and chemical conditions of leaching, solid/liquid separation, uranium recovery by either ion exchange process or electrolytic precipitation. (author) [fr

  2. Beta activity of enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambiar, P.P.V.J.; Ramachandran, V.

    1975-01-01

    Use of enriched uranium as reactor fuel necessitates its handling in various forms. For purposes of planning and organising radiation protection measures in enriched uranium handling facilities, it is necessary to have a basic knowledge of the radiation status of enriched uranium systems. The theoretical variations in beta activity and energy with U 235 enrichment are presented. Depletion is considered separately. Beta activity build up is also studied for two specific enrichments, in respect of which experimental values for specific alpha activity are available. (author)

  3. The solubility of solid fission products in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium: Pt.2. Solubility rules based on lattice parameter differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1977-01-01

    The Relative Lattice Parameter Difference (RLPD) is defined for a solute element with respect to cubic carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium as solvents. Rules are given for the relationship between the solubility and the RLPD. NaCl type monocarbides with RLPD's from -10.2% to +7.8% are completely miscible with UC and PuC. NaCl type mononitrides with RLPD's from -7.5% to +8.5% are completely miscible with UN and PuN. The solubility in the sesquicarbides increases with decreasing RPLD and becomes complete in Pu 2 C 3 at RLPD = +4%, and in U 2 C 3 at RLPD approximately +1.5%. Solubilities are predicted on the basis of these rules for the cases where no experimental results are available

  4. End plate for e.g. solid oxide fuel cell stack, sets thermal expansion coefficient of material to predetermined value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    .05-0.3 mm. USE - End plate for solid oxide fuel cell stack (claimed). Can also be used in polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack and direct methanol fuel cell stack. ADVANTAGE - The robustness of the end plate is improved. The structure of the end plate is simplified. The risk of delamination of the stack...

  5. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  6. Estimation of uranium migration parameters in sandstone aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malov, A I

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition and isotopes of carbon and uranium were investigated in groundwater samples that were collected from 16 wells and 2 sources in the Northern Dvina Basin, Northwest Russia. Across the dataset, the temperatures in the groundwater ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 °C, the pH ranged from 7.6 to 9.0, the Eh ranged from -137 to +128 mV, the total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 209 to 22,000 mg L(-1), and the dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged from 0 to 9.9 ppm. The (14)C activity ranged from 0 to 69.96 ± 0.69 percent modern carbon (pmC). The uranium content in the groundwater ranged from 0.006 to 16 ppb, and the (234)U:(238)U activity ratio ranged from 1.35 ± 0.21 to 8.61 ± 1.35. The uranium concentration and (234)U:(238)U activity ratio increased from the recharge area to the redox barrier; behind the barrier, the uranium content is minimal. The results were systematized by creating a conceptual model of the Northern Dvina Basin's hydrogeological system. The use of uranium isotope dating in conjunction with radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of important water-rock interaction parameters, such as the dissolution rate:recoil loss factor ratio Rd:p (a(-1)) and the uranium retardation factor:recoil loss factor ratio R:p in the aquifer. The (14)C age of the water was estimated to be between modern and >35,000 years. The (234)U-(238)U age of the water was estimated to be between 260 and 582,000 years. The Rd:p ratio decreases with increasing groundwater residence time in the aquifer from n × 10(-5) to n × 10(-7) a(-1). This finding is observed because the TDS increases in that direction from 0.2 to 9 g L(-1), and accordingly, the mineral saturation indices increase. Relatively high values of R:p (200-1000) characterize aquifers in sandy-clayey sediments from the Late Pleistocene and the deepest parts of the Vendian strata. In samples from the sandstones of the upper part of the Vendian strata, the R:p value is ∼ 24, i.e., sorption processes are

  7. Preconcentration of uranium in water samples using dispersive liquid-liquid micro- extraction coupled with solid-phase extraction and determination with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rezaee,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new liquid phase microextraction method based on the dispersion of an extraction solvent into aqueous phase coupled with solid-phase extraction was investigated for the extraction, preconcentration and determination of uranium in water samples. 1-(2-Pyridylazo-2-naphthol reagent (PAN at pH 6.0 was used as a chelating agent prior to extraction. After concentration and purification of the samples in SPE C18 sorbent, 1.5 mL elution sample containing 40.0 µL chlorobenzene was injected into the 5.0 mL pure water. After extraction and centrifuging, the sedimented phase was evaporated and the residue was dissolved in nitric acid (0.5 M and was injected by injection valve into the ICP-OES. Some important extraction parameters, such as sample solution flow rate, sample pH, type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents as well as the salt addition were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.5-500 µg L-1. The detection limit was 0.1 µg L-1. The relative standard deviation (RSD at 5.0 µg L-1 concentration level was 6.6%. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of uranium in the well, river, mineral, waste and tap water samples and satisfactory results were obtained.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v29i3.4

  8. The supply of the European community countries with enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    A discussion is given of a survey regarding the supply of enriched uranium to the countries of the European Community. Costs of enriched uranium imports were not available but import values were calculated using world market prices. (R.L.)

  9. Uranium distribution in Brazilian granitic rocks. Identification of uranium provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassinari, C.G.G.

    1993-01-01

    The research characterized and described uranium enriched granitoids in Brazil. They occur in a variety of tectonic environments and are represented by a variety granite types of distinct ages. It may be deduced that in general they have been generated by partial melting process of continental crust. However, some of them, those with tonality composition, indicate a contribution from mantle derived materials, thus suggesting primary uranium enrichment from the upper mantle. Through this study, the identification and characterization of uranium enriched granite or uranium provinces in Brazil can be made. This may also help identify areas with potential for uranium mineralization although it has been note that uranium mineralization in Brazil are not related to the uranium enrichment process. In general the U-anomalous granitoids are composed of granites with alkaline composition and granite ''sensu strictu'' which comprise mainly of syenites, quartz-syenites and biotite-hornblende granites, with ages between 1,800 - 1,300 M.a. The U-anomalous belongings to this period present high Sr initial ratios values, above 0.706, and high Rb contents. Most of the U-enriched granitoids occur within ancient cratonic areas, or within Early to Mid-Proterozoic mobile belts, but after their cratonization. Generally, these granitoids are related to the border zones of the mobile belts or deep crustal discontinuity. Refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  11. Uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-01-01

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10 5 , which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10 3 in seawater instead of the reported values of 10 5 . However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10 5 in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater

  12. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  13. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  14. Review of recent developments in uranium extraction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredson, P.G.; Crawford, R.E.; Ring, R.J.

    1978-12-01

    Developments in uranium ore processing technology since the AAEC Symposium on Uranium Processing in July 1972 are reviewed. The main developments include the use of autogenous or semi-autogenous grinding, beneficiation techniques such as radiometric sorting, flotation, magnetic and gravity seperation, strong acid and ferric bacterial leaching processes, solution mining and heap leaching operations, horizontal belt filters for solid-liquid separation, continuous ion exchange processes for use with solutions containing up to 8 wt % solids, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia for the precipitation of uranium to improve product yield and purity, and the recovery of by-product uranium from the manufacture of phosphoric acid and copper processing operations

  15. Uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separation by the Purex process using hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhaowu; He Jianyu; Zhang Zefu; Zhang Yu; Zhu Jianmin; Zhen Weifang

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxyurea dissolved in nitric acid can strip plutonium and neptunium from tri-butyl phosphate efficiently and has little influence on the uranium distribution between the two phases. Simulating the 1B contactor of the Purex process by hydroxyurea with nitric acid solution as a stripping agent, the separation factors of uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium can reach values as high as 4.7 x 10 4 and 260, respectively. This indicates that hydroxyurea is a promising salt free agent for uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separations. (author)

  16. Application of Resin in Pulp Technique for Ion Exchange Separation of Uranium from Alkaline Leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas, T.; Rajan, K.C.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Resin-in-pulp technique was applied for purification and enrichment of uranium values from a finely ground uranium ore leach slurry of alkaline nature using strong base anion exchange resin (size 500 - 675μm). • The chemical composition of the solution phase of the alkaline leach slurry (pH 9.5) was consisting of about 40 g/L of total dissolved solutes (TDS) predominantly with Na_2CO_3 and NaHCO_3 and minor levels of Na_2SO_4. The uranium content was only 730 mg/L and d50 of solids was 34μm. • Amongst the various commercially available resins studied PFA 4740 and 4783 having quaternary ammonium ion on polystyrene crosslink with divibyl benzez (DVB) gave best performance. The maximum loading capacity achieved in the RIP studies was about 60-65 g of U_3O_8/L of wet settled resin amounting to 98% of loading. This has necessitated 4 stages of counter-current extraction with overall contact time of 100 minutes at a resin to leach slurry volume ratio of about 1:50. Practically the entire uranium values loaded on the resin were eluted using NaCl. • The RIP process was found quite efficient for uranium bearing alkaline leach slurries.

  17. Estimation of uranium and cobalt-60 distribution coefficients and uranium-235 enrichment at the Combustion Engineering Company site in Windsor, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Orlandini, K.A.; Yu, C.

    1996-05-01

    Site-specific distribution coefficients for uranium isotopes and cobalt-60 (Co-60) and the fraction of uranium-235 (U-235) enrichment by mass were estimated for environmental samples collected from the Combustion Engineering Company site in Windsor, CT. This site has been identified for remedial action under the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The authority of DOE at the Combustion Engineering site is limited to (1) Building 3; (2) other activities or areas associated exclusively with Building 3 (such as sewer lines); or (3) contamination that is exclusively highly enriched uranium. In this study, 16 samples were collected from the Combustion Engineering site, including 8 soil, 4 sediment, 3 water, and 1 water plus sludge sample. These samples were analyzed for isotopic uranium by alpha spectrometry and for Co-60 by gamma spectrometry. The site-specific distribution coefficient for each isotope was estimated as the ratio of extractable radionuclide activity in the solid phase to the activity in the contact solution following a 19-day equilibration. The uranium activity measurements indicate that uranium-234 (U-234) and uranium-238 (U-238) were in secular equilibrium in two soil samples and that soil and sediment samples collected from other sampling locations had higher U-234 activity than U-238 activity in both the solid and solution phases. The site-specific distribution coefficient (Kd) ranged from 82 to 44,600 mL/g for U-238 and from 102 to 65,900 mL/g for U-234. Calculation of U-235 enrichment by mass indicated that four soil samples had values greater than 0.20; these values were 0.37, 0.38, 0.46, and 0.68. Cobalt-60 activity was detected in only three sediment samples. The measured Co-60 activity in the solid phase ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 pCi/g and that in the water phase of all three samples combined was 4 pCi/L. The Kd value for Co-60 in the site brook sediment was calculated to be 70 mL/g

  18. On the value of electrical resistivity tomography for monitoring leachate injection in solid state anaerobic digestion plants at farm scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueurce, Axelle; Clément, Rémi; Moreau, Sylvain; Peu, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Agricultural waste is a valuable resource for solid state anaerobic digestion (SSAD) thanks to its high solid content (>15%). Batch mode SSAD with leachate recirculation is particularly appropriate for such substrates. However, for successful degradation, the leachate must be evenly distributed through the substrate to improve its moisture content. To study the distribution of leachate in agricultural waste, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was performed. First, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to check the reliability of this method to monitor infiltration of the leachate throughout the solid. Two representative mixtures of agricultural wastes were prepared: a "winter" mixture, with cattle manure, and a "summer" mixture, with cattle manure, wheat straw and hay. The influence of density and water content on electrical resistivity variations was assessed in the two mixtures. An increase in density was found to lead to a decrease in electrical resistivity: at the initial water content, resistivity decreased from 109.7 to 19.5Ω·m in the summer mixture and from 9.8 to 2.7Ω·m in the "winter" mixture with a respective increased in density of 0.134-0.269, and 0.311-0.577. Similarly, resistivity decreased with an increase in water content: for low densities, resistivity dropped from 109.7 to 7.1Ω·m and 9.8 to 4.0Ω·m with an increase in water content from 64 to 90w% and 74 to 93w% for "summer" and "winter" mixtures respectively. Second, a time-lapse ERT was performed in a farm-scale SSAD plant to monitor leachate infiltration. Results revealed very heterogeneous distribution of the leachate in the waste, with two particularly moist areas around the leachate injection holes. However, ERT was successfully applied in the SSAD plant, and produced a reliable 3D map of leachate infiltration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid-State Fermentation of Silybum marianum L. Seeds Used as Additive to Increase the Nutritional Value of Wheat Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Cizeikiene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study Silybum marianum L. seeds were fermented using solid-state fermentation (SSF with several lactic acid bacteria (LAB of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus genera, isolated from spontaneously fermented Lithuanian rye sourdough. A possibility to improve sensory properties (flavour of Silybum marianum L. seeds using LAB fermentation was investigated. The composition of volatile compounds of the unfermented and LAB-fermented seeds of this plant was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Fermented seeds have shown considerable differences mainly due to the accumulation of higher alcohols. Total amount of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of unfermented and fermented seeds were determined spectrophotometrically. The obtained results indicate that Silybum marianum L. seeds are a valuable source of bioactive compounds. The highest content of phenolic compounds and flavonoids (4596 and 1346 mg of rutin equivalents (RE per 100 g, respectively was determined in the seeds fermented with Pediococcus acidilactici KTU05-7 bacteria in solid-state fermentation. Silybum marianum L. seeds fermented with P. acidilactici KTU05-7 and Pediococcus pentosaceus KTU05-9 showed stronger antioxidant activity (1263 and 1041 mg of RE per 100 g, respectively, compared to the unfermented seeds (805 mg of RE per 100 g. The addition of Silybum marianum L. seeds fermented with P. acidilactici KTU05-7 bacteria had the highest effect on the decrease of the bacterial spoilage of bread. The aroma compounds from the fermented seeds extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity against the tested microorganisms. Ultrasonic pretreatment of the seeds reduced the total amount of microorganisms in the raw material. Microbiological tests revealed that the highest antimicrobial effect was achieved using the solid-state fermentation conditions. This

  20. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  1. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  2. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  3. Oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves an improvement to the reductive stripping process for recovering uranium values from wet-process phosphoric acid solution, where uranium in the solution is oxidized to uranium (VI) oxidation state and then extracted from the solution by contact with a water immiscible organic solvent, by adding sufficient oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, to obtain greater than 90 percent conversion of the uranium to the uranium (VI) oxidation state to the phosphoric acid solution and simultaneously extracting the uranium (VI)

  4. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  5. Fluorometric analysis for uranium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterbury, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    A fluorometric method is used for the routine determination of uranium at 0.2 to parts-per-billion (ppB) concentrations in natural surface waters. Duplicate 200-μl aliquots of the water samples are pipetted onto 0.4-g pellets of 98 percent NaF-2 percent LiF flux contained in platinum dishes. The pellets are dried under heat lamps and fused over special propane burners. The fused pellets are subjected to ultraviolet radiation and the fluorescence is measured in a fluorometer. The lower limit of detection is 0.2 ppB of uranium, and the precision is about 15 relative percent in the 0.2 to 10 ppB uranium concentration range. Two analysts determine uranium in 750 to 900 samples per week using this method. Samples containing solids or more than 19 ppB of uranium are analyzed by a delayed neutron counting method

  6. Solar Energy Gain and Space-Heating Energy Supply Analyses for Solid-Wall Dwelling Retrofitted with the Experimentally Achievable U-value of Novel Triple Vacuum Glazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saim Memon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A considerable effort is devoted to devising retrofit solutions for reducing space-heating energy in the domestic sector. Existing UK solid-wall dwellings, which have both heritage values and historic fabric, are being improved but they tend to have meagre thermal performance, partly, due to the heat-loss through glazings. This paper takes comparative analyses approach to envisage space-heating supply required in order to maintain thermal comfort temperatures and attainable solar energy gains to households with the retrofit of an experimentally achievable thermal performance of the fabricated sample of triple vacuum glazing to a UK solid-wall dwelling. 3D dynamic thermal models (timely regimes of heating, occupancy, ventilation and internal heat gains of an externally-insulated solid-wall detached dwelling with a range of existing glazing types along with triple vacuum glazings are modelled. A dramatic decrease of space-heating load and moderate increase of solar gains are resulted with the dwelling of newly achievable triple vacuum glazings (having centre-of-pane U-value of 0.33 Wm-2K-1 compared to conventional glazing types. The space-heating annual cost of single glazed dwellings was minimised to 15.31% (≈USD 90.7 with the retrofit of triple-vacuum glazings. An influence of total heat-loss through the fabric of solid-wall dwelling was analysed with steady-state calculations which indicates a fall of 10.23 % with triple vacuum glazings compared to single glazings.

  7. Laboratory simulation studies of uranium mobility in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giblin, A.M.; Swaine, D.J.; Batts, B.D.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of imposed variations of pH and Eh on aqueous uranium mobility at 25 0 C have been studied in three simulations of natural water systems. Constituents tested for their effect on uranium mobility were: (a) hydrous ferric oxide, to represent adsorptive solids which precipitate or dissolve in response to variations in pH and Eh; (b) kaolinite, representing minerals which, although modified by pH and Eh changes, are present as solids over the pH-Eh range of natural waters; and (c) carbonate, to represent a strong uranium-complexing species. Uranium mobility measurements from each simulation were regressed against pH and Eh within a range appropriate to natural waters. Hydrous ferric oxide and kaolinite each affected uranium mobility, but in separate pH-Eh domains. Aqueous carbonate increased mobility of uranium, and adsorption of UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- caused colloidal dispersion of hydrous ferric oxide, possibly explaining the presence of 'hydrothermal hematite' in some uranium deposits. Enhanced uranium mobility observed in the pH-Eh domains of thermodynamically insoluble uranium oxides could be explained if the oxides were present as colloids. Uranium persisting as a mobile species, even after reduction, has implications for the near surface genesis of uranium ores. (author)

  8. Spectroscopy and chemistry of uranium IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folcher, G.; Rigny, P.

    1980-06-01

    Different fundamental research papers on uranium IV are presented, some were never edited. Molecular spectroscopy was used for identification and structural study of uranium IV in aqueous or organic solutions. The fields studied are: coordination, stereochemistry, electronic structure and chemical properties. For interpretation of results some studies were made with solid compounds or with thorium compounds or thorium complexes. Knowledge of actinides chemistry is improved, uranium and thorium being models for 5 f ions, extractive chemistry is better understood and new applications are possible [fr

  9. Disposal and reclamation of southwestern coal and uranium wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wewerka, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The types of solid wastes and effluents produced by the southwestern coal and uranium mining and milling industries are considered, and the current methods for the disposal and reclamation of these materials discussed. The major means of disposing of the solid wastes from both industries is by land fill or in some instances ponding. Sludges or aqueous wastes are normally discharged into settling and evaporative ponds. Basic reclamation measures for nearly all coal and uranium waste disposal sites include solids stabilization, compacting, grading, soil preparation, and revegetation. Impermeable liners and caps are beginning to be applied to disposal sites for some of the more harmful coal and uranium waste materials

  10. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.F.; Phillips, J.F. Jr.; Tate, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is claimed where the acid is treated with a mixture of an ammonium salt or ammonia, a reducing agent, and then a miscible solvent. Solids are separated from the phosphoric acid liquid phase. The solid consists of a mixture of metal phosphates and uranium. It is washed free of adhering phosphoric acid with fresh miscible solvent. The solid is dried and dissolved in acid whereupon uranium is recovered from the solution. Miscible solvent and water are distilled away from the phosphoric acid. The distillate is rectified and water discarded. All miscible solvent is recovered for recycle. 5 claims

  11. Poultry feed based on protein hydrolysate derived from chrome-tanned leather solid waste: creating value from waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rubina; Pati, Anupama

    2016-04-01

    Leather industry generates huge amount of chrome-containing leather solid waste which creates major environment problems to tanners worldwide. Chrome-tanned leather solid waste is primarily chromium complex of collagen protein. The presence of chromium limits its protein application in animal feed industry. The purified protein hydrolysate with zero chromium could be used in poultry feed. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess performance of poultry with purified protein hydrolysate as a feed derived from chrome-tanned leather waste as partial replacement of soyabean meal as a sole source of protein for growing broiler chickens. Growth study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding protein hydrolysate on performance and physiochemical characteristics of meat of broiler chickens. Two experimental diets containing various levels of protein hydrolysate (EI-20 % and EII-30 %) were evaluated. The comparative study was performed as control with soyabean meal. Daily feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio were measured from day 8 to day 35. At the end of the study, birds were randomly selected and slaughtered to evaluate for physiochemical characteristics of meat. Diet had significant effects on feed intake and body weight gain. Birds fed with 20 and 30 % protein hydrolysate consumed 9.5 and 17.5 % higher amount of feed and gained 6.5 and 16.6 % higher than soyabean meal-fed birds. The current study produced evidence that protein hydrolysate can replace up to 75 % of soyabean meal in broiler diets without affecting either growth performance or meat characteristics.

  12. Uranium. Suppl. Vol. C7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, R.; Keller, C.

    1982-01-01

    In this supplement volume C7 the nitrogen compounds of uranium-anides, imides, nitrides, nitrites, nitrates are dealt with. Whereas amides, imides and nitrates have only been of scientific interest up to now, uranium nitride and uranylnitrate are of great technological importance. Therefore the description of the chemical and physical characteristics of UN as a potential fuel for future reactors already comprises about 1/4 of this volume. Also the description of uranyl nitrate - as one of the most important commercial forms of uranium and because of its importance in the chemistry of nuclear fuel element reprocessing - comprises many pages. This is supplemented by further uranium nitrides, ternary and polynary nitrides, oxide nitrides, double nitrides of the various valence steps as well as nitrate complexes and ternary and quarternary systems containing uranyl nitrate. The radiation behaviour of UN, and its distribution (liquid/liquid, liquid solid) as well as the complex formation of the uranyl ion with nitrate are described in other volumes of the uranium series. (RB) [de

  13. Uranium and drinking water; Uran und Trinkwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konietzka, Rainer [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet II 3.6 - Toxikologie des Trink- und Badebeckenwassers; Dieter, Hermann H.

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is provoking public anxiety based on the radioactivity of several isotopes and the connection to nuclear technology. Drinking water contains at the most geogenic uranium in low concentrations that might be interesting in the frame of chemical of toxicology, but not due to radiological impact. The contribution gives an overview on the uranium content in drinking water and health effects for the human population based on animal tests. These experiments indicate a daily tolerable intake of 0.2 microgram per kg body mass. The actual limiting value for uranium in drinking water is 0.3 microgram per kg body mass water (drinking water regulation from 2001).

  14. Uranium - what role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, T.; Gaul, J.; Crooks, P.; Robotham, R.

    1980-01-01

    Opposing viewpoints on the future role of uranium are presented. Topics covered include the Australian Government's uranium policy, the status of nuclear power around the world, Australia's role as a uranium exporter and problems facing the nuclear industry

  15. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper analyzes under four different scenarios the adequacy of a $500 million annual deposit into a fund to pay for the cost of cleaning up the Department of Energy's (DOE) three aging uranium enrichment plants. These plants are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. In summary the following was found: A fixed annual $500 million deposit made into a cleanup fund would not be adequate to cover total expected cleanup costs, nor would it be adequate to cover expected decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) costs. A $500 million annual deposit indexed to an inflation rate would likely be adequate to pay for all expected cleanup costs, including D and D costs, remedial action, and depleted uranium costs

  17. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  18. Uranium - raw material reserves for coming generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutner, H.

    1981-01-01

    Large uranium occurences have been discovered in the South of Mexico. The deposits are situated in the Sierra Mixteca. Reserves of 9.400 tons had been at Mexico's disposal even before these new discoveries. The quantitiy discovered recentyl amounts to 20.000 tons. The uranium reserves available apart from those in centrally controlled economic systems are presently estimated at five million tons. Meanwhile American scientists have found out that all the rivers of the world transport about 16.000 tons of uranium from the continents into the oceans per annum. The energy value of this washed out amount of uranium corresponds to the 25-fold world power demand of today. US scientists have discovered that the oceans can provide uranium for about seven million years of the present world energy demand. While the petroleum reserves decrease worldwide it seems that the exploration of uranium has just been started. (orig.) [de

  19. The uranium market and its characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled as shown. Numerical data are indicated in parenthesis. General characteristics of the uranium market, (enrichment plant variables, fuel requirements of a 1000 MWe power plant); demand pattern (enrichment cost relationships), supply pattern; uranium price analysis, production cost (relationship between future uranium requirements and discovery rates necessary), market break-even cost (break-even uranium cost as a function of fossil fuel prices), market value (theoretical and actual supply - demand balance in uranium market, relationship between U 3 O 8 price and world production); geographic and economic distribution of producers and consumers (world resources of uranium, relationship between U 3 0 8 world production capacity and annual requirements in 1990). (U.K.)

  20. Optimization algorithm that generates the lowest ΔEab values to a reference standard based on spectral measurements of solid inks in offset lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Tapdrup

    2014-01-01

    ISO 12647-2 specifies CIELAB values for primary and secondary colors, but only tolerances for the primary solid colors. Press operators in lithography still favor density measurements for process control to assure quality and reproducibility during a production run. Since there is no direct...... relationship between density and CIELAB measurements, there is a gap between what the standard specifies and what the industry is actually doing. This research investigates the possibility of using the tolerances specified for the primary colors to achieve a better conformance of the secondary colors...

  1. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  2. South Australia, uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The Report sets out the salient data relating to the establishment of a uranium processing centre at Redcliff in South Australia. It is conceived as a major development project for the Commonwealth, the South Australian Government and Australian Industry comprising the refining and enrichment of uranium produced from Australian mines. Using the data currently available in respect of markets, demand, technology and possible financial return from overseas sales, the project could be initiated immediately with hexafluoride production, followed rapidly in stages by enrichment production using the centrifuge process. A conceptual development plan is presented, involving a growth pattern that would be closely synchronised with the mining and production of yellowcake. The proposed development is presented in the form of an eight-and-half-year programme. Costs in this Report are based on 1975 values, unless otherwise stated. (Author)

  3. Spot market for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colhoun, C.

    1982-01-01

    The spot market is always quoted for the price of uranium because little information is available about long-term contracts. A review of the development of spot market prices shows the same price curve swings that occur with all raw materials. Future long-term contracts will probably be lower to reflect spot market prices, which are currently in the real-value range of $30-$35. An upswing in the price of uranium could come in the next few months as utilities begin making purchases and trading from stockpiles. The US, unlike Europe and Japan, has already reached a supply and demand point where the spot market share is increasing. Forecasters cannot project the market price, they can only predict the presence of an oscillating spot or a secondary market. 5 figures

  4. Derived enriched uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market

  5. Determination of trace level thorium and uranium in high purity gadolinium sulfate using ICP-MS with solid-phase chromatographic extraction resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S.; Takaku, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2018-01-01

    The Super Kamiokand-Gadolinium (SK-Gd) project is the upgrade of the Super-Kamiokande (SK) detector in order to discover Supernova Relic Neutrinos (SRNs) by loading 0.2% of Gd2(SO4)3 into a 50 kton of the SK water tank. In order to continue solar neutrino measurement with low energy threshold at ˜3.5 MeV, main radioactive contamination, U and Th in Gd2(SO4)3, should be purified before loading. We developed solid-phase extraction technique to measure low concentration of U and Th in Gd2(SO4)3 by ICP-MS. The extraction technique and current status will be presented.

  6. Reference values on safety regulation of land disposal of low level radioactive solid waste (the second interim report) and its incorporation into legal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Terumi

    1994-01-01

    Safety regulation of land disposal of low level radioactive solid waste in Japan is based on 'the basic philosophy on the safety regulation of land disposal of low level radioactive solid waste' determined by the Nuclear safety Committee (October 1985). The basic philosophy on the upper limit of radioactivity of disposed wastes was published as the reference values in the interim report (February 1987) and in the second interim report (June 1992). In the second interim report, the upper limits of radioactivity are established for three types of solid radioactive wastes: 1) metals, incombustible or flame resistant wastes generated nuclear reactor facilities and solidified in vessels, 2) large metallic structures generated from decommissioning of reactor facilities and difficult to solidify in vessels, and 3) radioactive concrete waste generated from decommissioning of reactor facilities. The upper limits of radioactivity are presented for C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, Cs-137, alfa-emmitters, Ca-41 (for concrete) and Eu-152 (for concrete). Related laws and regulations in Japan on safe disposal of low level wastes are explained. (T.H.)

  7. Uranium isotopes in ground water as a prospecting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

    1980-02-01

    The isotopic concentrations of dissolved uranium were determined for 300 ground water samples near eight known uranium accumulations to see if new approaches to prospecting could be developed. It is concluded that a plot of 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio (A.R.) versus uranium concentration (C) can be used to identify redox fronts, to locate uranium accumulations, and to determine whether such accumulations are being augmented or depleted by contemporary aquifer/ground water conditions. In aquifers exhibiting flow-through hydrologic systems, up-dip ground water samples are characterized by high uranium concentration values (> 1 to 4 ppB) and down-dip samples by low uranium concentration values (less than 1 ppB). The boundary between these two regimes can usually be identified as a redox front on the basis of regional water chemistry and known uranium accumulations. Close proximity to uranium accumulations is usually indicated either by very high uranium concentrations in the ground water or by a combination of high concentration and high activity ratio values. Ground waters down-dip from such accumulations often exhibit low uranium concentration values but retain their high A.R. values. This serves as a regional indicator of possible uranium accumulations where conditions favor the continued augmentation of the deposit by precipitation from ground water. Where the accumulation is being dispersed and depleted by the ground water system, low A.R. values are observed. Results from the Gulf Coast District of Texas and the Wyoming districts are presented

  8. Purification of free hydrogen or hydrogen combined in a gaseous mixture by chemical reactions with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron-Charles, M.; Gilot, B.

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of the European fusion program, the authors are dealing with the tritium technology aspect. Hydrogen, free or under a combined form within a H 2 , N 2 , NH 3 , O 2 , gaseous mixture, can be purified by chemical reactions with uranium metal. The resulting reactions consist in absorbing the impurities without holding back H 2 . Working conditions have been defined according to two main goals: the formation of stable solid products, especially under hydrogenated atmosphere and the optimization of the material quantities to be used. Thermodynamical considerations have shown that the 950-1300 K temperature range should be suitable for this chemical process. Experiments performed with massive uranium set in a closed reactor at 973 K, have produced hydrogen according to the predicted reactions rates. But they have also pointed out the importance of interferences that might occur in the uranium-gas system, on the gases conversion rates. The comparison between the chemical kinetic ratings of the reactions of pure gases and the chemical kinetic ratings of the reactions of the same gases in mixture, has been set up. It proves that simultaneous reactions can modify the working conditions of the solid products formation, and particularly modify their structure. In this case, chemical kinetic ratings are increased up to their maximal value; that means surface phenomena are favoured as with uranium powder gases reactions. (orig.)

  9. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  10. Uranium Industry. Annual 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, M.S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a statistical description of activities of the US uranium industry during 1984 and includes a statistical profile of the status of the industry at the end of 1984. It is based on the results of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey entitled ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (Form EIA-858). The principal findings of the survey are summarized under two headings - Uranium Raw Materials Activities and Uranium Marketing Activities. The first heading covers exploration and development, uranium resources, mine and mill production, and employment. The second heading covers uranium deliveries and delivery commitments, uranium prices, foreign trade in uranium, inventories, and other marketing activities. 32 figs., 48 tabs

  11. Solvent extraction of uranium from lean grade acidic sulfate leach liquor with alamine 336 reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the solvent extraction studies carried out on an acidic low assay uranium bearing leach liquor generated during sulfuric acid leaching of a refractory uranium ore using alamine 336-isodecenol-kerosene reagent combine. The leach liquor has a U 3 O 8 content of about 270 mg/L, free acidity 2.4 N H 2 SO 4 and total dissolved solids concentration of 260 g/L. Process parameteric variation studies indicated strong influence of free acidity of the leach liquor, alamine 336 concentration and aqueous to organic phase ratio on the extraction efficiency of uranium. An extraction efficiency of about 95% was achieved when the free acidity of leach liquor was 1 N H 2 SO 4 or lower, using 2% (v/v) alamine 336 at ambient temperature with an aqueous to organic phase ratio of 1:1. The loading capacity under these conditions was 1.2 g/L of U 3 O 8 . About 98% of the uranium values could be stripped from the loaded organic using 1 N NaCl in 0.2 N H 2 SO 4 . The solvent extraction studies aided in developing a suitable process flowsheet for treating refractory uranium ores which need high acidity during leaching and relatively lower acidity for purification by solvent extraction. (author)

  12. Fate of soluble uranium in the I{sub 2}/KI leaching process for mercury removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials and Chemistry Lab.

    1997-09-01

    General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of {approximately} 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake.

  13. Fate of soluble uranium in the I2/KI leaching process for mercury removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of ∼ 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake

  14. Modeling and optimization of proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cell: Conversion of CO2 into value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwong, Lawit; Authayanun, Suthida; Saebea, Dang; Patcharavorachot, Yaneeporn; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2016-11-01

    Proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC-H+) are a promising technology that can utilize carbon dioxide to produce syngas. In this work, a detailed electrochemical model was developed to predict the behavior of SOEC-H+ and to prove the assumption that the syngas is produced through a reversible water gas-shift (RWGS) reaction. The simulation results obtained from the model, which took into account all of the cell voltage losses (i.e., ohmic, activation, and concentration losses), were validated using experimental data to evaluate the unknown parameters. The developed model was employed to examine the structural and operational parameters. It is found that the cathode-supported SOEC-H+ is the best configuration because it requires the lowest cell potential. SOEC-H+ operated favorably at high temperatures and low pressures. Furthermore, the simulation results revealed that the optimal S/C molar ratio for syngas production, which can be used for methanol synthesis, is approximately 3.9 (at a constant temperature and pressure). The SOEC-H+ was optimized using a response surface methodology, which was used to determine the optimal operating conditions to minimize the cell potential and maximize the carbon dioxide flow rate.

  15. Kinetics of the chain uranium decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.; Khariton, Yu.B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of chain reaction in uranium mass, when passing through the mass critical value, is studied. It is shown that thermal expanson is a powerful regulating factor, making the limit passing quite safe. The case of convergence of two uranium masses of precritical dimensions is considered in particular. The critical mass value is assessed and it is shown that its gradual increase above the critical value results in the reaction vibrational regime with the period inversely proportional to the square root of uranium supply rate. The role of delaying neutrons in the fission chain reaction development is pointed out

  16. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  17. Uranium production in thorium/denatured uranium fueled PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium-232 buildup in a thorium/denatured uranium fueled pressurized water reactor, PWR(Th), was studied using a modified version of the spectrum-dependent zero dimensional depletion code, LEOPARD. The generic Combustion Engineering System 80 reactor design was selected as the reactor model for the calculations. Reactors fueled with either enriched natural uranium and self-generated recycled uranium or uranium from a thorium breeder and self-generated recycled uranium were considered. For enriched natural uranium, concentrations of 232 U varied from about 135 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) in the zeroth generation to about 260 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at the end of the fifth generation. For the case in which thorium breeder fuel (with its relatively high 232 U concentration) was used as reactor makeup fuel, concentrations of 232 U varied from 441 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at discharge from the first generation to about 512 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at the end of the fifth generation. Concentrations in freshly fabricated fuel for this later case were 20 to 35% higher than the discharge concentration. These concentrations are low when compared to those of other thorium fueled reactor types (HTGR and MSBR) because of the relatively high 238 U concentration added to the fuel as a denaturant. Excellent agreement was found between calculated and existing experimental values. Nevertheless, caution is urged in the use of these values because experimental results are very limited, and the relevant nuclear data, especially for 231 Pa and 232 U, are not of high quality

  18. Uranium price reporting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the systems for uranium price reporting currently available to the uranium industry. The report restricts itself to prices for U 3 O 8 natural uranium concentrates. Most purchases of natural uranium by utilities, and sales by producers, are conducted in this form. The bulk of uranium in electricity generation is enriched before use, and is converted to uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , prior to enrichment. Some uranium is traded as UF 6 or as enriched uranium, particularly in the 'secondary' market. Prices for UF 6 and enriched uranium are not considered directly in this report. However, where transactions in UF 6 influence the reported price of U 3 O 8 this influence is taken into account. Unless otherwise indicated, the terms uranium and natural uranium used here refer exclusively to U 3 O 8 . (author)

  19. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  20. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  1. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  2. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  3. Drug delivery to solid tumors: the predictive value of the multicellular tumor spheroid model for nanomedicine screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marie Millard,1,2 Ilya Yakavets,1–3 Vladimir Zorin,3,4 Aigul Kulmukhamedova,1,2,5 Sophie Marchal,1,2 Lina Bezdetnaya1,2 1Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 7039, Université de Lorraine, 2Research Department, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France; 3Laboratory of Biophysics and Biotechnology, 4International Sakharov Environmental Institute, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus; 5Department of Radiology, Medical Company Sunkar, Almaty, Kazakhstan Abstract: The increasing number of publications on the subject shows that nanomedicine is an attractive field for investigations aiming to considerably improve anticancer chemotherapy. Based on selective tumor targeting while sparing healthy tissue, carrier-mediated drug delivery has been expected to provide significant benefits to patients. However, despite reduced systemic toxicity, most nanodrugs approved for clinical use have been less effective than previously anticipated. The gap between experimental results and clinical outcomes demonstrates the necessity to perform comprehensive drug screening by using powerful preclinical models. In this context, in vitro three-dimensional models can provide key information on drug behavior inside the tumor tissue. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS model closely mimics a small avascular tumor with the presence of proliferative cells surrounding quiescent cells and a necrotic core. Oxygen, pH and nutrient gradients are similar to those of solid tumor. Furthermore, extracellular matrix (ECM components and stromal cells can be embedded in the most sophisticated spheroid design. All these elements together with the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs play a key role in drug transport, and therefore, the MCTS model is appropriate to assess the ability of NP to penetrate the tumor tissue. This review presents recent developments in MCTS models for a

  4. A clean environment approach to uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grancea, Luminita

    2015-01-01

    A global and multi-faceted response to climate change is essential if meaningful and cost-effective progress is to be made in reducing the effects of climate change around the world. There is no doubt that the uranium mining sector has an important role to play in such a goal. Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of baseload low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Given expectations of growth in nuclear generating capacity and the associated uranium demand, enhancing awareness of leading practices in uranium mining is indispensable. Actors in the uranium mining sector operate in a complex world, throughout different geographies, and involving global supply chains. They manage climate-sensitive water, land and energy resources and balance the interests of various stakeholders. Managed well, uranium mining delivers sustainable value for economic growth, employment and infrastructure, with specific attention given to the preservation of the environment. In the early phases of the industry, however, downside risks existed, which created legacy environmental and health issues that still can be recalled today. This article addresses key aspects of modern uranium mining operations that have been introduced as regulations and practices have evolved in response to societal attitudes about health, safety and environmental protection. Such aspects of mine management were seldom, if ever, respected in the early stages of uranium mining. With the implementation of modern mine lifecycle parameters and regulatory requirements, uranium mining has become a leader in safety and environmental management. Today, uranium mining is conducted under significantly different circumstances and is now the most regulated and one of the safest forms of mining in the world. Experiences from modern uranium mines show that successful companies develop innovative strategies to manage all the

  5. Nutritional value and proteases of Lentinus citrinus produced by solid state fermentation of lignocellulosic waste from tropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Gaia Machado

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the growth and yield performance of Lentinus citrinus on cupuaçu exocarp (Theobroma grandiflorum mixed with litter (CE + LI or rice bran (Oryza sativa (CE + RB in the ratio of 2:1 (800 g:200 g to investigate the nutritional composition and proteolytic potential of the fruiting body produced. Significance values of yield were determined on substrate combinations. In CE + LI the biological efficiency of the mushrooms was 93.5% and the content of fat (4.5%, fiber (11.0%, protein (27.0% and amino acids were higher when compared with CE + RB. Among the amino acids, the amount of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, arginine and leucine was high. The biological efficiency on CE + RB reduced to 84.2% and based on the nutritional value, carbohydrates (53.59%, energy (324.33 kcal and minerals such as zinc, iron, copper, potassium and phosphorus were higher in this substrate combination. Protease activity from fruiting body was significant in CE + LI (463.55 U/mL. This protease showed an optimal activity at 50 °C in neutral and alkaline pH with maximum stability at 30 °C at alkaline pH. This is the first report of L. citrinus fruiting body nutritional composition with potential for human food and application in industrial processes.

  6. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of uranium isotopes in order to enrich the fuel for light water reactors with the light isotope U-235 is an important part of the nuclear fuel cycle. After the basic principals of isotope separation the gaseous diffusion and the centrifuge process are explained. Both these techniques are employed on an industrial scale. In addition a short review is given on other enrichment techniques which have been demonstrated at least on a laboratory scale. After some remarks on the present situation on the enrichment market the progress in the development and the industrial exploitation of the gas centrifuge process by the trinational Urenco-Centec organisation is presented. (orig.)

  7. Preconcentration of uranium in water samples using dispersive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preconcentration of uranium in water samples using dispersive liquid-liquid micro- extraction coupled with solid-phase extraction and determination with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

  8. Kinetics of dissolution of thorium and uranium doped britholite ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N., E-mail: nicolas.dacheux@univ-montp2.f [Groupe de Radiochimie, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Bat. 100, Universite Paris-Sud-11, 91406 Orsay (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 (Universite Montpellier 2/CNRS/CEA/ENSCM), Bat. 426, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur ceze cedex (France); Du Fou de Kerdaniel, E. [Groupe de Radiochimie, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Bat. 100, Universite Paris-Sud-11, 91406 Orsay (France); Clavier, N. [Groupe de Radiochimie, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Bat. 100, Universite Paris-Sud-11, 91406 Orsay (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 (Universite Montpellier 2/CNRS/CEA/ENSCM), Bat. 426, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur ceze cedex (France); Podor, R. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 (Universite Montpellier 2/CNRS/CEA/ENSCM), Bat. 426, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur ceze cedex (France); Institut Jean Lamour - Departement CP2S - Equipe 206, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques - Nancy Universite, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy cedex (France); Aupiais, J. [CEA DAM DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Szenknect, S. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 (Universite Montpellier 2/CNRS/CEA/ENSCM), Bat. 426, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur ceze cedex (France)

    2010-09-01

    In the field of immobilization of actinides in phosphate-based ceramics, several thorium and uranium doped britholite samples were submitted to leaching tests. The normalized dissolution rates determined for several pH values, temperatures and acidic media from the calcium release range from 4.7 x 10{sup -2} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} to 21.6 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. Their comparison with that determined for phosphorus, thorium and uranium revealed that the dissolution is clearly incongruent for all the conditions examined. Whatever the leaching solution considered, calcium and phosphorus elements were always released with higher R{sub L} values than the other elements (Nd, Th, U). Simultaneously, thorium was found to quickly precipitate as alteration product, leading to diffusion phenomena for uranium. For all the media considered, the uranium release is higher than that of thorium, probably due to its oxidation from tetravalent oxidation state to uranyl. Moreover, the evaluation of the partial order related to proton concentration and the apparent energy of activation suggest that the reaction of dissolution is probably controlled by surface chemical reactions occurring at the solid/liquid interface. Finally, comparative leaching tests performed in sulphuric acid solutions revealed a significant influence of such media on the chemical durability of the leached pellets, leading to higher normalized dissolution rates for all the elements considered. On the basis of the results of chemical speciation, this difference was mainly explained in the light of higher complexion constants by sulfate ions compared to nitrate, chloride and phosphate.

  9. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  10. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  11. Australian uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, R K

    1976-04-01

    Various aspects of the Australian uranium industry are discussed including the prospecting, exploration and mining of uranium ores, world supply and demand, the price of uranium and the nuclear fuel cycle. The market for uranium and the future development of the industry are described.

  12. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  13. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  14. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  15. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  16. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  17. Determination of trace levels of uranium and thorium in high purity gadolinium sulfate using the ICP-MS with solid-phase chromatographic extraction resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S.; Takaku, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2017-11-01

    The new Super-Kamiokande-Gadolinium (SK-Gd) project is an upgrade of the Super-Kamiokande (SK) detector. In the SK-Gd project, 0.2% Gd_2(SO_4)_3 is loaded into the 50 kton water tank of the SK. One of the main purposes of the project is to discover supernova relic neutrinos. Neutrino measurements and proton decay searches will also be performed in the SK-Gd. In order to measure solar neutrinos with a low energy threshold of ˜3.5 MeV in the SK-Gd, the main radioactive contaminations, ^{238}U and ^{232}Th, in Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O, should be minimized before loading. Our maximum levels for U and Th are 5 mBq (U)/kg (Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O) and 0.05 mBq (Th)/kg (Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O). In order to measure such low concentrations of U and Th in Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O, we developed the solid-phase extraction technique. Using this method, about 90% or more U and Th could be efficiently extracted while Gd was reduced by a factor of about 104. This allowed these radioactivity contaminations to be measured precisely as 0.04 mBq/kg (Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O) for U and 0.01 mBq/kg (Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O) for Th. We measured three pure Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O samples using this method and estimated that the purest one contained <0.04 mBq (U)/kg (Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O) and 0.06 ± 0.01 mBq (Th)/kg (Gd_2(SO_4)_3{\\cdot}8H_2O) by the ICP-MS.

  18. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  19. Uranium industry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, K.

    2008-01-01

    The global uranium market is undergoing a major expansion due to an increase in global demand for uranium, the highest uranium prices in the last 20 years and recognition of the potential greenhouse benefits of nuclear power. Australia holds approximately 27% of the world's uranium resources (recoverable at under US$80/kg U), so is well placed to benefit from the expansion in the global uranium market. Increasing exploration activity due to these factors is resulting in the discovery and delineation of further high grade uranium deposits and extending Australia's strategic position as a reliable and safe supplier of low cost uranium.

  20. Catechol functionalized aminopropyl silica gel: synthesis, characterization and preconcentrative separation of uranium(VI) from thorium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metilda, P.; Mary Gladis, J.; Prasada Rao, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    A novel solid phase extractant is prepared by chemically immobilizing catechol with diazotized aminopropyl silica gel. The resulting catechol functionalized silica gel (CASG) was characterized by FTIR, and microanalysis and was used for selective enrichment of uranium(VI) from other inorganic ions. The optimum pH range for maximum sorption of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) was found to be in the range 3.5-6.0. The above actinides were eluted with 10 cm 3 of 1.0 mol dm -3 HCl and determined by using an Arsenazo III spectrophotometric procedure. The calibration graph was rectilinear over the uranium(VI) concentration in the range 2-100 μg dm -3 with a relative standard deviation of 2.15% (for 25 μg of uranium(VI) present in 1.0 dm 3 of sample). The validation of the developed preconcentration procedure was carried out by analyzing marine sediment (MESS-3, NRC, Canada) and soil (IAEA soil-7, Austria) reference materials. The developed preconcentration method enables a simple instruments like a spectrophotometer gave comparable values of uranium(VI) to that of standard inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric values during the analysis of real soil and sediment samples. (orig.)

  1. Catechol functionalized aminopropyl silica gel: synthesis, characterization and preconcentrative separation of uranium(VI) from thorium(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metilda, P.; Mary Gladis, J.; Prasada Rao, T.P. [Regional Research Lab. (CSIR), Trivandrum (India)

    2005-07-01

    A novel solid phase extractant is prepared by chemically immobilizing catechol with diazotized aminopropyl silica gel. The resulting catechol functionalized silica gel (CASG) was characterized by FTIR, and microanalysis and was used for selective enrichment of uranium(VI) from other inorganic ions. The optimum pH range for maximum sorption of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) was found to be in the range 3.5-6.0. The above actinides were eluted with 10 cm{sup 3} of 1.0 mol dm{sup -3} HCl and determined by using an Arsenazo III spectrophotometric procedure. The calibration graph was rectilinear over the uranium(VI) concentration in the range 2-100 {mu}g dm{sup -3} with a relative standard deviation of 2.15% (for 25 {mu}g of uranium(VI) present in 1.0 dm{sup 3} of sample). The validation of the developed preconcentration procedure was carried out by analyzing marine sediment (MESS-3, NRC, Canada) and soil (IAEA soil-7, Austria) reference materials. The developed preconcentration method enables a simple instruments like a spectrophotometer gave comparable values of uranium(VI) to that of standard inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric values during the analysis of real soil and sediment samples. (orig.)

  2. Status of technology of uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu; Saito, Kyoichi.

    1990-01-01

    By bringing the solid material called adsorbent in contact with seawater, uranium can be collected, therefore, the adsorbent to which uranium was adsorbed in seawater can be regarded as the resource of uranium storing. To the adsorbent, also rare metals are concentrated in addition to uranium. From such viewpoint, the development of the technology for collecting seawater uranium is important for the Japanese energy policy. The uranium concentration in seawater is about 3 mg/m 3 and its form of dissolution is uranyl tricarbonate ions. The technology of collecting seawater uranium is the separation technology for extracting the component of very low concentration from the aqueous solution containing many components. The total amount of uranium in the whole oceans reaches about 4 billion t, which is about 1000 times as much as the uranium commercially mined on land. It is the target of the technology to make artificial uranium ore of as high quality as possible quickly. The process of collecting seawater uranium comprises adsorption, desorption, separation and enrichment. As the adsorbents, hydrated titanium oxide and chelate resin represented by amidoxime are promising. The adsorption system is described. (K.I.)

  3. Integrated geophysical investigations for uranium : a case study from Jamiri, West Kameng district, Arunachal Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, R.; Dash, J.K.; Sethuram, S.; Tiku, K.L.; Behari, Bipan

    1991-01-01

    An integrated geophysical approach was attempted for uranium exploration in Jamiri area, Arunachal Pradesh, using the techniques of magnetic, self-potential (SP) and resistivity profiling, coupled with solid state nuclear track detection (SSNTD), to delineate favourable structures controlling uranium mineralisation in phyllitic quartzites and quartzites of the Precambrian Daling formation. Three promising zones of uranium mineralisation were recognised based on integrated results from these surveys. Magnetic survey identified lithologic contacts and faults in the area. A high-order SP anomaly of -900 millivolts was observed near the contact of phyllites in the east and phyllitic quartzites in the west. A very low resistivity of 1.0 ohm.m and high SSNTD values of 120 tracks/mm 2 over a background of 20 to 30 tracks/mm 2 were also recorded near this contact. These anomalies are characteristic of a fault that channelises radon and gives low resistivities. The SP anomaly may indicate sulphide mineralisation, and hence, uranium mineralisation in this contact zone may be associated with sulphides. The phyllitic quartzites west of this contact are characterised by magnetic highs ranging from 540 to 900 gammas. Here, SP anomalies are also small closures of -80 to -100 mV. The SSNTD values range between 100 and 120 tracks/mm 2 . This rock unit (phyllitic quartzite) appears to host uranium mineralisation along with sulphides at some places where radon anomalies are high. A fault in the western portion of the area interpreted from the magnetic map separates phyllitic quartzites in the east and quartzites to its west. The faulted contact is characterised by a high SP gradient and SSNTD anomalies of 100 to 140 tracks/mm 2 . This contact may also be promising for uranium mineralisation at depth. (author). 10 refs., 8 figs

  4. Study on the radiotoxicology of enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Zheng Siying; Wang Guolin; Wang Chongdao; Cao Genfa

    1987-12-01

    A study on the retentive peculiarity of soluble enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 were observed after iv once or consecutive ip qd x 3d to Wistar male rats. The dynamic retention of radioactivity in the body showed that the enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 was chiefly localized in kidney, and then in skeleton and liver. The radioactivity of the enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 in skeleton rose steadily while the concentratoin in kidney and liver droped. When enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 was accumulated in organism, it caused chromosome aberrations on bone marrow cells. Results indicated that the chromosome aberration rates were elevated when the dose of the enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 was increased, at the same time, the cell division was depressed. Accumulation of insoluble enriched uranium U 3 O 8 in gastrointestinal tract was well described by a two exponential expression. Values of retention estimate for fast component, T 1 = 0.34 d, and for relatively long term component, T 2 = 4.05 d. The deposition of UO 2 F 2 in the intact skin was only 0.16 to 0.18% of the total contaminated UO 2 F 2 . Penetration of the enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 was dominantly increased in abraded skin. This value is about 25 to 32 times as compaired with that in intact skin. Retention of the enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 through abraded skins was dominantly localized in kidney and skeleton

  5. Design of a uranium recovery pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The engineering design of a pilot plant of uranium recover, is presented. The diagrams and specifications of the equipments such as pipelines, pumps, values tanks, filters, engines, etc... as well as metallic structure and architetonic design is also presented. (author)

  6. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  7. Uranium - the world picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  8. Effect of recycling activities on the heating value of solid waste: case study of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (Metro Vancouver).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Ali R; Atwater, James W; Fu, George Yuzhu

    2012-08-01

    Two main goals of the integrated solid waste management system (ISWMS) of Metro Vancouver (MV) include further recycling of waste and energy recovery via incineration of waste. These two very common goals, however, are not always compatible enough to fit in an ISWMS depending on waste characteristics and details of recycling programs. This study showed that recent recycling activities in MV have negatively affected the net heating value (NHV) of municipal solid waste (MSW) in this regional district. Results show that meeting MV's goal for additional recycling of MSW by 2015 will further reduce the NHV of waste, if additional recycling activities are solely focused on more extensive recycling of packaging materials (e.g. paper and plastic). It is concluded that 50% additional recycling of paper and plastic in MV will increase the overall recycling rate to 70% (as targeted by the MV for 2015) and result in more than 8% reduction in NHV of MSW. This reduction translates to up to 2.3 million Canadian dollar (CAD$) less revenue at a potential waste-to-energy (WTE) plant with 500 000 tonnes year(-1) capacity. Properly designed recycling programmes, however, can make this functional element of ISWMS compatible with green goals of energy recovery from waste. Herein an explanation of how communities can increase their recycling activities without affecting the feasibility of potential WTE projects is presented.

  9. Uranium-bearing wastes and their radon emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Imamura, Mitsutaka; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    There are no data available with regard to radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes; such data are needed for the assessment of radiation exposure from radon that will be generated in the distant future as one uranium progeny at shallow land disposal sites for uranium-bearing wastes. There are many kinds of uranium-bearing wastes. However, it is not necessary to measure the radon emanation coefficients for all of them for two reasons. First, the radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium are determined by the uranium chemical form, the manner of uranium deposition on the waste matrix, and the size of the particles which constitute the waste matrix. Therefore, only a few representative measurements are sufficient for such uranium-bearing wastes. Second, it is possible to make theoretical calculations of radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. In the present study, simulated uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium were prepared, their radon emanation coefficients were measured and radon emanation coefficients were calculated theoretically for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. The obtained radon emanation coefficients are distributed at higher values than those for ubiquitous soils and rocks in the natural environment. Therefore, it is not correct to just compare uranium concentrations among uranium-bearing wastes, ubiquitous soils and rocks in terms of radiation exposure. The radon emanation coefficients obtained in the present study have to be employed together with the uranium concentration in uranium-bearing wastes in order to achieve proper assessment of radiation exposure. (author)

  10. Ion-exchanger ultraviolet spectrophotometry for uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waki, H.; Korkisch, J.

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive method based on solid-phase spectrophotometry has been developed for the microdetermination of uranium(VI) in water samples. Uranium is sorbed on the anion-exchanger QAE-Sephadex from thiocyanate solution and the absorbance of the exchanger is measured at 300 nm. This method is about 30 times more sensitive than solution spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of various metals in the anion-exchanger phase are presented and their interferences discussed. A procedure for the cation-exchange separation of uranium from accompanying elements before spectral measurement of uranium is proposed. (author)

  11. Temporal variation of uranium in ground water with conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulhani, Vandana; Chaudhury, Moushumi D.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of uranium in drinking water sources is a matter of health concern since it has been proved to be chemo-toxic to humans. Uranium being a more soluble actinide is also very mobile in the environment. The effect of water quality parameters and their co-relation to uranium content in the water is an interesting study to understand and predict its behavior in ground water and subsequently to judge the hazard posed. Hence studies on spatial and temporal variation of uranium concentration with electrical conductivity, pH, total dissolved solids and salinity in ground water was carried out. (author)

  12. Differentiating benign from malignant solid breast masses: value of shear wave elastography according to lesion stiffness combined with greyscale ultrasound according to BI-RADS classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A; Whelehan, P; Thomson, K; Brauer, K; Jordan, L; Purdie, C; McLean, D; Baker, L; Vinnicombe, S; Thompson, A

    2012-07-10

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of shear wave elastography combined with BI-RADS classification of greyscale ultrasound images for benign/malignant differentiation in a large group of patients. One hundred and seventy-five consecutive patients with solid breast masses on routine ultrasonography undergoing percutaneous biopsy had the greyscale findings classified according to the American College of Radiology BI-RADS. The mean elasticity values from four shear wave images were obtained. For mean elasticity vs greyscale BI-RADS, the performance results against histology were sensitivity: 95% vs 95%, specificity: 77% vs 69%, Positive Predictive Value (PPV): 88% vs 84%, Negative Predictive Value (NPV): 90% vs 91%, and accuracy: 89% vs 86% (all P>0.05). The results for the combination (positive result from either modality counted as malignant) were sensitivity 100%, specificity 61%, PPV 82%, NPV 100%, and accuracy 86%. The combination of BI-RADS greyscale and shear wave elastography yielded superior sensitivity to BI-RADS alone (P=0.03) or shear wave alone (P=0.03). The NPV was superior in combination compared with either alone (BI-RADS P=0.01 and shear wave P=0.02). Together, BI-RADS assessment of greyscale ultrasound images and shear wave ultrasound elastography are extremely sensitive for detection of malignancy.

  13. Potentiometric determination of hexavalent uranium in uranium silicide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlegui, Oscar

    1999-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Department of Nuclear Materials has among its projects the production of fuels elements for nuclear reactors, and, therefore, the Chemical Analysis Laboratory must have a rapid and reliable method for uranium analysis, to control the uranium concentration during each stage of the production process. For this reason the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Chemical Analysis Laboratory has validated a potentiometric method, which is a modification of the Davies and Gray method proposed by A.R. Eberle. This method uses the Potentiometric Titration Technique and is based on the direct and rapid reduction of uranium (VI) to Uranium (IV), in a concentrated phosphoric acid medium, with excess iron (II) used as a reducing agent. In this medium the excess iron (II) selectively oxidizes to iron (III) with nitric acid, using molybdenum (IV) as a catalyzer, the nitrous acid that is produced is eliminated by adding amidosulfuric acid. The solution is diluted with 1M sulfuric acid and the uranium (IV) obtained is titrated potentiometrically with potassium dichromate in the presence of vanadilic sulfate to obtain a better defined final titration point. The samples were softened with hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and later 50 ml were estimated in a 20% sulfuric acid medium. The analytical method was validated by comparing it with Certified Reference Material (C.R.M.) from the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), Metallic Uranium, CRM 112-A. The F Test and the T Test show that the value calculated is less than the tabulated value so the result is traceable to the reference material. The quantification limit, sensitivity, precision and accuracy were quantified for the method

  14. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  15. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  16. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  17. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  18. Radium, uranium and metals in acidic or alkaline uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somot, St.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium mill study sites have been chosen in function of their different characteristics: deposits age, treatment nature (alkaline or acid), mill origin. The realization of specific drilling allowed the simultaneous study of the interstitial water and the solid fraction of samples, cut at determined deep. A radiation imbalance between 230 Th and 226 Ra is observed in the acid treatment residues. The trace elements concentration spectrum is directly bound to the nature of the ore. Diamagnetic evolutions are observed in residues. The uranium concentrations are higher in carbonated waters than in calcic sulfated waters. The selective sequential lixiviation showed that the 226 Ra activity of the interstitial water is controlled by the Gypsum in acid treatment residues. In other hand in the alkaline treatment waters, the carbonates occur. The Ra retention is largely bound to the Fe and Mn oxy-hydroxides. (A.L.B.)

  19. Uranium districts in South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Tukiainen, T.; Wallin, B.

    1981-01-01

    A short review is given of reconnaissance work in South Greenland. The work has demonstrated that there are areas in the Motzfeldt centre of at least 1 km 2 with continuously high radioactivity. If the uranium content of these radioactive zones are sufficiently high, then potential ore tonnages could prove to be substantial. The reconnaissance exploration has proved that uranium mineralization is widely distributed in the Narssaq-Narssarssuaq district. It is, no doubt, responsible for the high uranium values in the exploration geochemical samples. Although the size of the pitchblende occurences which have been found so far are small, the high grade of the mineralisation, the great frequency of the fracturing and the evidence for an all pervasive mineralising event over a wide area indicate that there is a good possibility of finding economic mineralisation within the Narssaq-Narssarssuaq area. The area as a whole may, perhaps, be termed a ''uranium mineral district''. As the potential targets are small, only detailed follow-up exploration will establish this. At the same time more detailed work on individual showings, and geological mapping to demonstrate the relative ages of the various petrological and mineralising events, will establish the possible origin of this uranium mineralisation. (author)

  20. Energetics and dynamics of atomic uranium levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miron, E.

    1978-01-01

    New methods for discovering and identifying new electronic levels of atomic uranium and measuring parameters, such as radiative lifetimes and absorption cross-sections, are described. The uranium atoms are produced within an especially designed induction-heated oven. The uranium vapor is irradiated by nitrogen laser pumped, pulsed dye lasers. The various measurements are accomplished by detection of laser induced fluorescence from selectively excited levels. 138 atomic-uranium odd levels in the region 32260-34900 cm -1 and 16 even levels in the region 49500-49900 cm -1 are reported. Unique J values are presented for 64 levels and partial assignment (two possibilities) for 42 levels. Radiative lifetimes are presented for 134 levels. Absorption cross sections were measured for 12 transitions. Isotope shifts of 17 levels are given. Cross-sections for internal excitation transfer in uranium which are induced by collisions with argon atoms, are presented for 11 levels. (author)

  1. Applied internal dosimetry staff exposed to Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotta, Marisa V.; Arguelles, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Dosimetric calculations are performed in order to estimate the quantity of a radionuclide that is incorporated by a worker. Urine determinations of activity and mass of uranium are made in the laboratory of Personal and Area Dosimetry. The paper presents reference values concerning the activity excreted in urine due to the incorporation of uranium compounds. The compounds analyzed are natural uranium and uranium enriched to 20 %, both soluble and insoluble. According to the limits allowed for the incorporation of uranium compounds of Type F and M, we verify that the times of monitoring and the detection limits of the equipment used to determine the activity are appropriate. On the other hand, the S-type compounds determination in urine is useful in cases of accidental incorporations (above the ALI) as a first and quick estimate; MDA (0.017 Bq / L) does not allow detection in routine monitoring; measurement in lungs, and faeces should be included. (author)

  2. Alpha and fission autoradiography of uranium rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copic, M.; Ilicj, R.; Najzher, M.; Rant, J.

    1977-01-01

    Macro and micro-distribution of uranium minerals in ore bodies are investigated by alpha autoradiography and by neutron induced fission autoradiography using LR 115 solid state track detector. Optimal conditions are determined experimentally for both methods and examples presented. For field applications the alpha autoradiography (author)

  3. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  4. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  5. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  6. Uranium uptake of Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Viet Hung; Maslov, O.D.; Trinh Thi Thu My; Phung Khac Nam Ho; Dang Duc Nhan

    2010-01-01

    Uranium uptake of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) from Eutric Fluvisols (AK), Albic Acrisols (BG), Dystric Fluvisols (HP) and Ferralic Acrisols (TC) in northern Vietnam is assessed. The soils were mixed with aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate to make soils contaminated with uranium at 0, 50, 100, 250 mg/kg before planting the grass. The efficiency of uranium uptake by the grass was assessed based on the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF U , kg·kg -1 ). It was found that the TF U values are dependent upon the soils properties. CEC facilitates the uptake and the increased soil pH could reduce the uptake and translocation of uranium in the plant. Organic matter content, as well as iron and potassium, inhibits the uranium uptake of the grass. It was revealed that the lower fertile soil, the higher uranium uptake. The translocation of uranium in root for all the soil types studied is almost higher than that in its shoot. It seems that vetiver grass could potentially be used for the purpose of phytoremediation of soils contaminated with uranium

  7. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crull, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  8. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  9. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  10. Interactions of uranium (VI) with biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, Sina; Arnold, Thuro; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-01-01

    In this study a detailed investigation was made of natural biofilms from two uranium-contaminated sites, namely the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony) and the ground surface of the former Grassenhalde tailing heap in Thuringia. A predominance of uranyl sulphate (UO 2 SO 4 ), a highly mobile, solute uranium species, was found in the mine waters of both sites. In this study an investigation was made of the capacity of Euglena mutabilis cells for bioaccumulation of uranium in a pH range of 3 to 6 using living cells and sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulphate (3.48 g/l) as background media. At acidic pH values in the range from 3 to 4 it was possible to remove more than 90% of the original uranium content from the test solution regardless of the medium being used. The speciation of the uranium accumulated in the Euglena cells was investigated by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). It was found that a new uranium species of low variability forms on the cells independent of the background medium, state of life of the cells and pH value. By comparing the data from the LIFS measurements with reference values it was possible to narrow down the identity of the uranium species to one bonded to (organo) phosphate and/or carboxylic functional groups. Using time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy it was possible to demonstrate carboxylic bonding of uranium to dead cells. However it was not possible to exclude (organo) complexation with this method. An investigation of the specific location of the uranium on or in the cells using combined CLSM/LIFS technology yielded first indications of intracellular accumulation of uranium in the living cells. Supplementary TEM/EDX measurements confirmed the intracellular uptake, showing it to occur in round to oval cell organelles which are thought to be vacuoles or vacuole-like vesicles. It was not possible to detect uranium on dead cells using these methods. This points to passive, homogeneously distributed biosorption of

  11. Natural and depleted uranium in the topsoil of Qatar: Is it something to worry about?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shomar, Basem; Amr, Mohamed; Al-Saad, Khalid; Mohieldeen, Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Scientific studies on Uranium in the arid environment are almost absent. • Qatar is closed to Iraq and Iran where the two countries were exposed to long wars. • The paper introduces baseline study integrates chemistry, instrumentation and GIS mapping. • The study opens new horizons for similar studies on the field using similar approach. - Abstract: This study examines uranium in soils of Qatar to investigate whether there is any detectable traces of depleted uranium (DU). 409 soil samples were collected using a 10 km grid system throughout the State of Qatar. The U concentrations and isotopic compositions ( 235 U/ 238 U) were determined using an ICP-MS. The U concentrations range from 0.05 to 4.7 mg/kg and the 235 U/ 238 U isotopic signatures are in the range 0.007–0.008, i.e. comparable to the isotopic ratio in natural uranium (NU). The distribution of these concentrations in the topsoil were used to see correlations with locations of pollution point sources and environmentally hot areas associated with human activity: industrial estates, solid waste dumping sites, wastewater treatment plants, sea harbors, airports, and public transport network. New thematic maps were built using Geographic Information System (GIS) software. The results showed that there is no linkage between the occurrence, distribution, concentrations and isotopic ratios of U and these hotspots. More importantly, due to the low concentration of organic matter (OM) in soils of Qatar, very limited P-fertilization, the alkaline nature of soil (pH 8) and low Fe/Mn contents make soil uranium concentrations very low. The residential areas, including the capital Doha, had the lowest total concentrations of uranium and isotopic ratios of the country while the northern and western parts showed the highest values

  12. Reconnaissance geochemical survey for uranium and related industrial minerals in Cebu Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, R.Y.; Ramos, A.F.; Magsambol, W.N.; Hernandez, E.

    1989-03-01

    Consistent with the program of evaluating the nuclear mineral resource potential and related industrial minerals of the Philippines, a reconnaissance geochemical survey was conducted in Cebu with considerable success. The total area covered by the survey was about 5,088 sq. kms. The survey consisted of systematic collection of 857 geochemical stream and water and heavy mineral samples, and measurement of radioactivity in over 352 stations. The average sampling density was about one set of samples per 15 to 30 sq. kms. All solid samples were analyzed for U, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Ag, Co and Ni. Uranium, radon and conductivity were measured on most water samples collected. A total of 4,518 elemental determinations were involved. All field and analytical data were treated by statistics, and the computed parameters data were correlated with the geology of the area to establish anomalous zones. Four areas were delineated for possible uranium mineralization. Of the areas, the Mandaue river area is the most interesting for uranium. The contact zone between the diorite and the sedimentary rocks in this area appears to be a favorable geological environment for uranium mineralization. The other anomalous uranium values were found to be related with the guano and phosphate deposits. Uranium was also shown to be independent of the other seven elements in the geologic environment of Cebu. No definite elemental association could be established at present. This study also marks the thorough utilization of Q'GAS, Cadplot and Autocad, all microcomputer-based programs/systems, in the evaluation and interpretation of exploration-oriented geochemical and geological data, and with more significance in the sense that computer generated quality geochemical maps were produced, a first in the country. (Author). Appendices (23); 23 figs; 13 refs.; 4 tabs

  13. Uranium evaluation and mining techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    accurate, comprehensive, and understandable appraisal of the world's potential uranium resources, and the ability to discover, develop and produce these resources within an acceptable time frame are absolutely essential to making meaningful decisions in relation to the future supply of nuclear fuel. Therefore, the methods used to appraise undiscovered uranium resources were examined and compared in the light of the needs of the world nuclear power industry as a whole. Notable among these methods is one based on interactive genetic models. It is currently being developed to reduce the amount of subjectivity inherent in most of the currently used appraisal techniques The goal is to use more geologic data and depend less on the intuition and experience of the estimator. The more esoteric statistical techniques based on past production rates, prices, rates of increase or decrease in reported reserves or resources, etc., while of unknown or unproved value, were not discussed at the symposium. The symposium provided a forum for discussion of closely related subjects as well. One of the major problems in reporting internationally in uranium resources is classification of the resources into various categories and defining those categories. Conceptually, among earth scientists, there is general agreement, but defining these concepts is a difficult task. At least three organizations have undertaken to develop classifications and definitions to satisfy the needs of international reporting. Two of these were described at the symposium. (The third has been used by the joint NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources but was not described.) The techniques of winning uranium from its several sources include, besides mining by conventional open pit or underground methods, in situ leaching of low-grade ores in special environments, and from ores left in mines In addition, virtually all marine phosphates contain some uranium that can be recovered as a by-product in the manufacture of

  14. Ingot formation using uranium dendrites recovered by electrolysis in LiCl-KCl-PuCl3-UCl3 melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineo Fukushima; Akira Nakayoshi; Shinichi Kitawaki; Masaki Kurata; Noboru Yahagi

    2008-01-01

    Products on solid cathodes recovered by the metal pyrochemical processing were processed to obtain uranium ingot. Studies on process conditions of uranium formation, assay recovered uranium products and by-products and evaluation of mass balance were carried out. In these tests, it is confirmed that uranium ingots can be obtained with heating the products more than melting temperature of metal uranium under atmospheric pressure because adhered salt cover the uranium not to oxidize it during uranium cohering. Covered salt can be removed after ingot formation. Inside the ingot, there were a lump of uranium and dark brown colored dross was observed. Material balance of uranium is 77 ∼ 96%, that of plutonium is 71 ∼ 109%, and that of americium that is a volatile substance more than uranium and plutonium become 79 ∼ 119%. Volatilization of americium is very small under the condition of high temperature. (authors)

  15. Determining the release of radionuclides from tank waste residual solids. FY2015 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-11

    Methodology development for pore water leaching studies has been continued to support Savannah River Site High Level Waste tank closure efforts. For FY2015, the primary goal of this testing was the achievement of target pH and Eh values for pore water solutions representative of local groundwater in the presence of grout or grout-representative (CaCO3 or FeS) solids as well as waste surrogate solids representative of residual solids expected to be present in a closed tank. For oxidizing conditions representative of a closed tank after aging, a focus was placed on using solid phases believed to be controlling pH and Eh at equilibrium conditions. For three pore water conditions (shown below), the target pH values were achieved to within 0.5 pH units. Tank 18 residual surrogate solids leaching studies were conducted over an Eh range of approximately 630 mV. Significantly higher Eh values were achieved for the oxidizing conditions (ORII and ORIII) than were previously observed. For the ORII condition, the target Eh value was nearly achieved (within 50 mV). However, Eh values observed for the ORIII condition were approximately 160 mV less positive than the target. Eh values observed for the RRII condition were approximately 370 mV less negative than the target. Achievement of more positive and more negative Eh values is believed to require the addition of non-representative oxidants and reductants, respectively. Plutonium and uranium concentrations measured during Tank 18 residual surrogate solids leaching studies under these conditions (shown below) followed the general trends predicted for plutonium and uranium oxide phases, assuming equilibrium with dissolved oxygen. The highest plutonium and uranium concentrations were observed for the ORIII condition and the lowest concentrations were observed for the RRII condition. Based on these results, it is recommended that these test methodologies be used to

  16. The concentrations of uranium in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuba, Mitsue; Ishii, Toshiaki; Nakahara, Motokazu; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watabe, Teruhisa; Hirano, Shigeki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki (Japan). Laboratory for Radioecology

    2000-07-01

    Determination of uranium in sixty-one species of marine organisms was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to obtain concentration factors and to estimate the internal radiation dose. The concentrations of uranium in soft tissues of marine animals were ranged from 0.077 to 5040 ng/g wet wt. Especially, the branchial heart of cephalopod molluscs showed the specific accumulation of uranium. The concentration factor of the branchial heart of Octopus vulgaris, which indicated the highest value, was calculated to be about 1.6 x 10{sup 3}, comparing with that (3.1 ng/ml) in coastal seawaters of Japan. The concentrations of uranium in hard tissues of marine invertebrates such as clam and sea urchin were similar to those in soft tissues. In contrast, hard tissues like bone, scale, fin, etc. of fishes showed much higher concentrations of uranium than soft tissues like muscle. The concentrations of uranium of twenty-two species of algae were ranged from 2 to 310 ng/g wet wt. Particularly, the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida showed the highest value of the uranium content in the algae and its concentration factor was calculated to be 10{sup 2}. (author)

  17. The concentrations of uranium in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuba, Mitsue; Ishii, Toshiaki; Nakahara, Motokazu; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watabe, Teruhisa; Hirano, Shigeki

    2000-01-01

    Determination of uranium in sixty-one species of marine organisms was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to obtain concentration factors and to estimate the internal radiation dose. The concentrations of uranium in soft tissues of marine animals were ranged from 0.077 to 5040 ng/g wet wt. Especially, the branchial heart of cephalopod molluscs showed the specific accumulation of uranium. The concentration factor of the branchial heart of Octopus vulgaris, which indicated the highest value, was calculated to be about 1.6 x 10 3 , comparing with that (3.1 ng/ml) in coastal seawaters of Japan. The concentrations of uranium in hard tissues of marine invertebrates such as clam and sea urchin were similar to those in soft tissues. In contrast, hard tissues like bone, scale, fin, etc. of fishes showed much higher concentrations of uranium than soft tissues like muscle. The concentrations of uranium of twenty-two species of algae were ranged from 2 to 310 ng/g wet wt. Particularly, the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida showed the highest value of the uranium content in the algae and its concentration factor was calculated to be 10 2 . (author)

  18. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.Q.

    1981-01-01

    The domestic uranium industry is in a state of stagflation. Costs continue to rise while the market for the product remains stagnant. During the last 12 months, curtailments and closures of mines and mills have eliminated over 5000 jobs in the industry, plus many more in those industries that furnish supplies and services. By January 1982, operations at four mills and the mines that furnish them ore will have been terminated. Other closures may follow, depending on cost trends, duration of current contracts, the degree to which mills have been amortized, the feasibility of placing mines on standby, the grade of the ore, and many other factors. Open-pit mines can be placed on standby without much difficulty, other than the possible cost of restoration before all the ore has been removed. There are a few small, dry, underground mines that could be mothballed; however, the major underground producers are wet sandstone mines that in most cases could not be reopened after a prolonged shutdown; mills can be mothballed for several years. Figure 8 shows the location of all the production centers in operation, as well as those that have operated or are on standby. Table 1 lists the same production centers plus those that have been deferred, showing nominal capacity of conventional mills in tons of ore per calendar day, and the industry production rate for those mills as of October 1, 1981

  19. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  20. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  1. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  2. Uranium market and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, G.; Arnold, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The controversy about the extend of the uranium resources worldwide is still important, this article sheds some light on this topic. Every 2 years IAEA and NEA (nuclear energy agency) edit an inventory of uranium resources as reported by contributing countries. It appears that about 4.6 millions tons of uranium are available at a recovery cost less than 130 dollars per kg of uranium and a total of 14 millions tons of uranium can be assessed when including all existing or supposed resources. In fact there is enough uranium to sustain a moderate growth of the park of nuclear reactors during next decades and it is highly likely that the volume of uranium resources can allow a more aggressive development of nuclear energy. It is recalled that a broad use of the validated breeder technology can stretch the durability of uranium resources by a factor 50. (A.C.)

  3. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  4. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  5. Brazilian uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.C.S. dos.

    1985-01-01

    Estimatives of uranium reserves carried out in Figueira, Itataia, Lagoa Real and Espinharas, in Brazil are presented. The samples testing allowed to know geological structures, and the characteristics of uranium mineralization. (M.C.F.) [pt

  6. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  7. Uranium in the Bunter sediments of the Polish area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldan, M.; Strzelecki, R.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium mineralization occurring in the Triassic sediments in the Polish area is discussed. Systematic work conducted for over ten years revealed the presence of uranium mineralization in the following geological units: Peribaltic syneclize, Fore-Sudetic monocline, Zary pericline and Pomerania trough. Out of three uranium-bearing horizons which can be correlated with each other two (the lower and the middle) are connected with the Middle Bunter, while the upper horizon is related to the Upper Bunter. Mineralization was found in sandstones, conglomerates, mudstones and claystones and, in the Fore-Sudetic monocline, also in carbonates. Among uranium minerals uranium black and coffinite were identified. In addition to uranium, increased vanadium, selenium and molybdenum contents were found in the sandstones. Some of the uranium-bearing horizons are of economic value. (author)

  8. Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2009-01-01

    The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 (micro)g U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred

  9. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  10. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.

    1998-01-01

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  11. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.

    1998-12-31

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

  12. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  13. Gastrointestinal absorption of uranium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Orlandini, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been established for determining the fractional absorption of uranium directly in man. Measurements are made of the urinary excretion rates of uranium for individuals whose drinking water has a high 234 U to 238 U activity ratio and is the primary source of 234 U in their diets. For two individuals, the values obtained for the fractional absorption of 234 U were 0.004 and 0.006. The values obtained for the fractional absorption of 238 U, using a literature value for the 238 U intake from food, were 0.008 and 0.015. The present ICRP value is 0.20. 7 references, 1 table

  14. Contribution to the thermodynamic study of the uranium-carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanne, Francis

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis aims at illustrating, in the particular case of uranium carbides, the contribution which the elaboration of a thermodynamic model may have, as experiments provide reliable but diffuse results, and as the lack of quantitative knowledge delays the practical application of the studied materials. The objective is then to develop such models for the calculation, in any point of the phase diagram, of the value of activities of uranium and carbon. Thus, after the presentation of two models (pair energies independent on stoichiometry, varying pair energies with respect to stoichiometry), the author reports and discusses numerical applications, and compares the obtained results with experimental results and with those obtained by other theoretical models. A thermodynamic model of a U-C quadratic solid solution is then presented, applied and discussed

  15. Plant start-up operation of treatment of liquid radioactive waste containing uranium in sulfuric acid by means of ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante Escobedo, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    The hydrometallurgy of uranium developed by CCHEN in the '80s generated different types of liquid radioactive waste: organic and aqueous, which have to be treated to extract the uranium, obtaining uranium concentrate less than 3 [ppm], in order to comply with the current regulations and to be able to be discharged as industrial waste over to specialized companies. The radioactive wastes were treated using strongly basic ion exchange resins to obtain a lower volume of concentrated uranium in solid phase. Batch processes were carried out with different pH values (1.4-1.6-1.7-1-8 and 2.0) and different residence times (5-10-15-240 [min]), to define the optimum processing conditions. Three resins were used: IONAC, AFP-329, IONAC A-641, DOWEX 11. The load capacities for each one were: 2[g/l], 1.85 [g/l] and 2.1 [g/l], respectively. Dowex 11 obtained the best uranium load results. Because of the nature of the treated solutions, the pH variation with sodium hydroxide generated precipitation and then crystallization of the existing pieces. Ninety-five percent of the resin's maximum load was attained after about 20 [min] of residence time. Continuous tests were carried out at the solution's original pH to verify the results obtained in the batch stage. This ion exchange process was compared with the chemical precipitation, with lime and sodium hydroxide as well as evaporation and in both processes the volumes of solid that were generated were significantly greater. The ion exchange plant worked with two serially connected columns, using 10 [l] of Dowex 11 resin in each one, with a residence time of 20 [min] per column. A total of 8 [m 3 ] of solution, obtaining an effluent with a uranium concentrate of less than 3 [ppm], using 140 [l] of resin, which generated an average load of 3 [g/l] of uranium (au)

  16. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  17. Microbial accumulation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Dong Faqin; Dai Qunwei

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of microbial accumulation of uranium and the effects of some factors (including pH, initial uranium concentration, pretreatment of bacteria, and so on) on microbial accumulation of uranium are discussed briefly. The research direction and application prospect are presented. (authors)

  18. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  19. Australian uranium today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: Australia's resources; Northern Territory uranium in perspective; the government's decision [on August 25, 1977, that there should be further development of uranium under strictly controlled conditions]; Government legislation; outlook [for the Australian uranium mining industry]. (U.K.)

  20. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  2. Salt Separation from Uranium Deposits in Integrated Crucible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, S. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processsing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non-volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. The adhered salt in the uranium deposits was removed successfully. The salt content in the deposits was below 0.1 wt% after the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation - salt distillation.

  3. Radiation dose-dependent risk on individuals due to ingestion of uranium and radon concentration in drinking water samples of four districts of Haryana, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panghal, Amanjeet; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Suneel; Singh, Joga; Sharma, Sumit; Singh, Parminder; Mehra, Rohit; Bajwa, B. S.

    2017-06-01

    Uranium gets into drinking water when the minerals containing uranium are dissolved in groundwater. Uranium and radon concentrations have been measured in drinking water samples from different water sources such as hand pumps, tube wells and bore wells at different depths from various locations of four districts (Jind, Rohtak, Panipat and Sonipat) of Haryana, India, using the LED flourimetry technique and RAD7, electronic silicon solid state detector. The uranium (238U) and radon (222Rn) concentrations in water samples have been found to vary from 1.07 to 40.25 µg L-1 with an average of 17.91 µg L-1 and 16.06 ± 0.97 to 57.35 ± 1.28 Bq L-1 with an average of 32.98 ± 2.45 Bq L-1, respectively. The observed value of radon concentration in 43 samples exceeded the recommended limits of 11 Bq L-1 (USEPA) and all the values are within the European Commission recommended limit of 100 Bq L-1. The average value of uranium concentration is observed to be within the safe limit recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. The annual effective dose has also been measured in all the water samples and is found to be below the prescribed dose limit of 100 µSv y-1 recommended by WHO. Risk assessment of uranium in water is also calculated using life time cancer risk, life time average daily dose and hazard quotient. The high uranium concentration observed in certain areas is due to interaction of ground water with the soil formation of this region and the local subsurface geology of the region.

  4. Uranium in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, M.R.; Edmond, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of dissolved uranium has been determined in over 250 river waters from the Orinoco, Amazon, and Ganges basins. Uranium concentrations are largely determined by dissolution of limestones, although weathering of black shales represents an important additional source in some basins. In shield terrains the level of dissolved U is transport limited. Data from the Amazon indicate that floodplains do not represent a significant source of U in river waters. In addition, the authors have determined dissolved U levels in forty rivers from around the world and coupled these data with previous measurements to obtain an estimate for the global flux of dissolved U to the oceans. The average concentration of U in river waters is 1.3 nmol/kg, but this value is biased by very high levels observed in the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Yellow rivers. When these river systems are excluded from the budget, the global average falls to 0.78 nmol/kg. The global riverine U flux lies in the range of 3-6 x 10 7 mol/yr. The major uncertainty that restricts the accuracy of this estimate (and that of all other dissolved riverine fluxes) is the difficulty in obtaining representative samples from rivers which show large seasonal and annual variations in runoff and dissolved load

  5. The mechanism of uranium adsorption on Resin 508 and isoelectric point of the resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Qingping; Lu Weichang; Su Huijuan; Hu Jinbo; Zhang Liqin; Chen Banglin

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption process of uranium by Resin 508 at the solid-liquid interface was investigated and the mechanism of uranium adsorption including adsorption dynamics, adsorption thermodynamics and isoelectric point of resin was studied. The results are as follows: The maximum of uranium adsorption is attained at pH5-7; Uranium adsorption isotherm by Resin 508 in experimental conditions agrees with Langmuir's adsorption isotherm, the maximum of uranium adsorbed (Vm) is 716 mg U/g-dried resin; The adsorption of uranium by Resin 508 is an endothermic reaction and ΔH = 16.87 kJ/mol; The exchange-adsorption rate is mainly controlled by liquid film diffusion; The isoelectric points of Resin 508 before and after uranium adsorption are found to be pH7.5 and pH5.7 respectively. It is a specific adsorption for uranium

  6. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  7. Metals other than uranium affected microbial community composition in a historical uranium-mining site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Jana; Löffler, Sylvia; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Büchel, Georg; Hazen, Terry C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    To understand the links between the long-term impact of uranium and other metals on microbial community composition, ground- and surface water-influenced soils varying greatly in uranium and metal concentrations were investigated at the former uranium-mining district in Ronneburg, Germany. A soil-based 16S PhyloChip approach revealed 2358 bacterial and 35 archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTU) within diverse phylogenetic groups with higher OTU numbers than at other uranium-contaminated sites, e.g., at Oak Ridge. Iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB), which have the potential to attenuate uranium and other metals by the enzymatic and/or abiotic reduction of metal ions, were found at all sites. Although soil concentrations of solid-phase uranium were high, ranging from 5 to 1569 μg·g (dry weight) soil(-1), redundancy analysis (RDA) and forward selection indicated that neither total nor bio-available uranium concentrations contributed significantly to the observed OTU distribution. Instead, microbial community composition appeared to be influenced more by redox potential. Bacterial communities were also influenced by bio-available manganese and total cobalt and cadmium concentrations. Bio-available cadmium impacted FeRB distribution while bio-available manganese and copper as well as solid-phase zinc concentrations in the soil affected SRB composition. Archaeal communities were influenced by the bio-available lead as well as total zinc and cobalt concentrations. These results suggest that (i) microbial richness was not impacted by heavy metals and radionuclides and that (ii) redox potential and secondary metal contaminants had the strongest effect on microbial community composition, as opposed to uranium, the primary source of contamination.

  8. Radiological hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the present document is to review and assess the occupational hazards to uranium miners in Canada. Amendments to regulations set the maximum permissible dose to uranium miners at 50 mSv per year. Uranium miners are exposed to radon and thoron progeny, external gamma radiation and long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides in dust. The best estimate for the lifetime risk of inhaled radon progeny is about 3 x 10 -4 lung cancers per WLM for the average miner, with a range of uncertainty from about 1 -6 x 10 -4 per WLM. This central value is nearly twice as high as that recommended by the ICRP in 1981. The probability of serious biological consequences following exposure to external gamma rays is currently under review but is expected to be in the range of 3 - 6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . Dosimetric calculations indicate that the stochastic risks per WLM of thoron progeny are about one-third of those for radon progeny. The annual limits on intake of inhaled ore dusts recommended by the ICRP are probably too low by at least a factor of two for the type of ore and dust normally encountered in underground uranium mines in Ontario; this is due in part to the fact that the average diameter of these dusts is five times greater than the value used by the ICRP. Radiological exposures of uranium miners in Canada were reviewed. The biological impact of these exposures were compared with those of conventional accidents on the basis of the years of normal life expectancy that are lost or seriously impaired due to occupational hazards. The objectives in considering all occupational risks are to reduce the total risk from all causes and to use funds spent for health protection as effectively as possible

  9. Salt Removal from the Uranium Deposits of Electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Cho, C. H.; Choi, S. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Electrorefining is a key step in pyroprocessing. The electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps. The deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode and the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode. The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. In the liquid cathode, cadmium metal should be removed to recover actinide product. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. In this study, the solid-liquid separation was proposed prior to distillation of salt and a feasibility of the separation of the liquid salt by a metallic wire mesh (sieve) was tested for the reduction of the burden of the following vacuum distillation process

  10. Salt Removal from the Uranium Deposits of Electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Cho, C. H.; Choi, S. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Electrorefining is a key step in pyroprocessing. The electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps. The deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode and the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode. The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. In the liquid cathode, cadmium metal should be removed to recover actinide product. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. In this study, the solid-liquid separation was proposed prior to distillation of salt and a feasibility of the separation of the liquid salt by a metallic wire mesh (sieve) was tested for the reduction of the burden of the following vacuum distillation process

  11. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  12. Process for recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiewiorowski, T.K.; Thornsberry, W.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Process is claimed for the recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution in which an organic extractant, containing uranium values and dissolved iron impurities and comprising a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkylphosphine oxide dissolved in a water immiscible organic solvent, is contacted with a substantially iron-free dilute aqueous phosphoric acid to remove said iron impurities. The removed impurities are bled from the system by feeding the resulting iron-loaded phosphoric acid to a secondary countercurrent uranium extraction operation from which they leave as part of the uranium-depleted acid raffinate. Also, process for recovering uranium in which the extractant, after it has been stripped of uranium values by aqueous ammonium carbonate, is contacted with a dilute aqueous acid selected from the group consisting of H 2 SO 4 , HCl, HNO 3 and iron-free H 3 PO 4 to improve the extraction efficiency of the organic extractant

  13. Measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium (U90+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, H.; Munger, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    The production in 1983 of a beam of bare U 92+ at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac, the Bevatron and Super-HILAC operating in tandem, demonstrated the feasibility of experiments using few-electron uranium. In 1984 x rays from radiative electron capture into the K shell of uranium was observed by Anholt et. al., and in the same year x rays from n = 2 → n = 1 transitions in hydrogenlike uranium (U 91+ ) and heliumlike uranium (U 90+ ) were observed by Munger and Gould. In this article the authors discuss their recent measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium. Their value of 70.4 (8.1) eV for the one-electron Lamb shift in uranium is in agreement with the theoretical value of 75.3 (0.4) eV. 20 refs.; 5 figs

  14. Calculation of oxygen distribution in uranium-plutonium oxide fuels during irradiation (programme CODIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, A.; Sari, C.

    1978-01-01

    Radial gradients of oxygen to metal ratio, O/M, in uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pins, during irradiation and at the end of life, have been calculated on the basis of solid-state thermal diffusion using measured values of the heat of transport. A detailed computer model which includes the calculation of temperature profiles and the variation of the average O/M ratio as a function of burn-up is given. Calculations show that oxygen profiles are affected by the isotopic composition of the fuel, by the temperature profiles and by fuel-cladding interactions

  15. Studies on uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, I.S.; Chun, J.K.; Park, S.W.; Choi, S.J.; Lee, C.H.; Chung, M.K.; Lim, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    For the exploitation of domestic uranium ore deposit, comprehensive studies on uranium ore processing of the Geum-San pit ore are carried out. Physical and chemical characteristics of the Geum-San ore are similar to those of Goe-San ore and the physical beneficiation could not be applicable. Optimum operating conditions such as uranium leaching, solid-liquid separation, solvent extraction and precipitation of yellow cake are found out and the results are confirmed by the continous operation of the micro-plant with the capacity of 50Kg, ore/day. In order to improve the process of ore milling pilot plant installed recently, the feasibility of raffinate-recycle and the precipitation methods of yellow cake are intensively examined. It was suggested that the raffinate-recycle in the leaching of filtering stage could be reduced the environmental contamination and the peroxide precipitation technique was applicable to improve the purity of yellow cake. The mechanism and conditions the third phase formation are thoroughly studied and confirmed by chemical analysis of the third phase actually formed during the operation of pilot plant. The major constituents of the third phase are polyanions such as PMosub(12)Osub(40)sup(3-) or SiMosub(12)Osub(40)sup(4-). And the formation of these polyanions could be reduced by the control of redox potential and the addition of modifier. (Author)

  16. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, F F; Bracilović, D M; Krajincanić, B V; Lucić, J L

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid.

  17. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbic, F.F.; Bracilovic, D.M.; Krajincanic, B.V.; Lucic, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.0372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid. (author)

  18. Uranium deposition in bones of Wistar rats associated with skeleton development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G; Arruda-Neto, J D T; Pereira, R M R; Kleeb, S R; Geraldo, L P; Primi, M C; Takayama, L; Rodrigues, T E; Cavalcante, G T; Genofre, G C; Semmler, R; Nogueira, G P; Fontes, E M

    2013-12-01

    Sixty female Wistar rats were submitted to a daily intake of ration doped with uranium from weaning to adulthood. Uranium in bone was quantified by the SSNTD (solid state nuclear track detection) technique, and bone mineral density (BMD) analysis performed. Uranium concentration as a function of age exhibited a sharp rise during the first week of the experiment and a drastic drop of 70% in the following weeks. Data interpretation indicates that uranium mimics calcium. Results from BMD suggest that radiation emitted by the incorporated Uranium could induce death of bone cells. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  20. Uranium speciation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, A.; Bernhard, G.; Geipel, G.; Reich, T.; Rossberg, A.; Nitsche, H.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the nature of uranium complexes formed after the uptake by plants is an essential prerequisite to describe the migration behavior of uranium in the environment. This study focuses on the determination of uranium speciation after uptake of uranium by lupine plants. For the first time, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical speciation of uranium in plants. Differences were detected between the uranium speciation in the initial solution (hydroponic solution and pore water of soil) and inside the lupine plants. The oxidation state of uranium did not change and remained hexavalent after it was taken up by the lupine plants. The chemical speciation of uranium was identical in the roots, shoot axis, and leaves and was independent of the uranium speciation in the uptake solution. The results indicate that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl(VI) phosphate to the phosphoryl groups. Dandelions and lamb's lettuce showed uranium speciation identical to lupine plants. (orig.)

  1. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The...

  2. The case for enrichment of uranium in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Information is presented on the number of nuclear power plants in operation and under construction and on the extent of the use of uranium. The case for enrichment of uranium in Australia is then considered in detail and the status of feasbility studies being carried out is discussed. Arguments to support an enrichment industry include: the need for additional enrichment capacity; added value; potential profitability; increased employment and industrial opportunities; and retention of depleted uranium

  3. Measurement of unattached fractions in open-pit uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.; Wise, K.N.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary set of measurements of the unattached fraction of potential alpha energy was made at the Ranger open pit uranium uranium mine and the Nabarlek uranium mill. The measurement system, which incorporated a parallel plate diffusion battery and diffuse junction detectors, is described. Results for RaA show a wide variation in the unattached fraction. They range up to 0.76 and are higher than corresponding values for underground mining operations

  4. Economics of Australian uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, P.

    1983-07-01

    This paper argues that the uranium industry in Australia is inefficient in economic terms. The author also states that it is inefficient in that various social resources are tied up in producing a material which has an intrinsically negative value, in being the raw material for nuclear weapons, and having unacceptable social costs in safety, environmental and cultural problems throughout the process of production and usage

  5. Canadian resources of uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.W.; Roscoe, S.M.

    1964-01-01

    Canada has been one of the world's leading producers of uranium since the metal became important as a raw material in the development and production of atomic energy. One of the largest known deposits in the world is in Canada where present reserves represent about 37 per cent of the total among those countries that have published reserve statistics. The production of uranium has been characterized by features which are unique in Canadian mining, because the industry was created by the government at a time of emergency and, unlike other minerals, the sale of its product is controlled by the state. The rapid growth of the uranium-mining industry since World War II has been a remarkable achievement. In 1958, Canada was the world's leading producer of uranium and the value of U 3 O 8 produced in both 1958 and 1959 exceeded the value of any other Canadian-produced metal. As an export commodity, uranium ranked fourth in value in 1959 following newsprint, wheat, and lumber. Production from 25 mines in that year was 14 462 tonnes of U 3 O 8 valued at $345 million (all monetary values are in U.S. dollars). Since 1959, however, the decline in production, resulting from declining export markets, has been almost as rapid as the spectacular rise from 1953 to 1959. At the end of 1963 only seven mines were in production and by the end of 1965 only two mines are expected to remain in operation. (author)

  6. Analysis of uranium intake, risk assessments uranium content in blood and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukesh Kumar; Prasher, Sangeeta; Singh, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    Bathinda district of Punjab is in light since the last few years because of the high mortality rate due to cancer. In order to explore the possibility of uranium as one of the causes for cancer an attempt has been made to estimate the level of uranium in the environmental samples viz. soil, water, food items and to correlate it with that in the blood and urine of the cancer patients and the normal persons of the area. The fission track technique has been employed for such studies. Though the uranium content in soil is normal and close to the world average, the uranium values in most of the water samples exceed the recommended safe limits. The cancer risk estimate from drinking of uranium contaminated water during the life time of sixty year is very high. The daily intake of Uranium for the population of these villages including the drinking water has also been estimated using the daily intake of these foodstuffs recommended by WHO and is found to exceed the typical world wide dietary intake of 0.9-4.5 μg/day. The concentration of uranium in urine and blood is found higher in cancer patients, whereas the urine excretion of uranium is lower in the cancer patients compared to the normal persons. (author)

  7. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF URANIUM DEPOSITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Kamen, M.D.

    1958-10-14

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from UCl/sub 4/ deposits formed on calutrons. Such deposits are removed from the calutron parts by an aqueous wash solution which then contains the uranium values in addition to the following impurities: Ni, Cu, Fe, and Cr. This impurity bearing wash solution is treated with an oxidizing agent, and the oxidized solution is then treated with ammonia in order to precipitate the uranium as ammonium diuranate. The metal impurities of iron and chromium, which form insoluble hydroxides, are precipitated along with the uranium values. The precipitate is separated from the solution, dissolved in acid, and the solution again treated with ammonia and ammonium carbonate, which results in the precipitation of the metal impurities as hydroxides while the uranium values remain in solution.

  8. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part II. Screening study results: Identification of an effective non-thermal uranium dissolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Screening experiments were performed to evaluate reagent systems that deactivate pyrophoric, metallic depleted uranium waste streams at ambient temperature. The results presented led to the selection of two systems, which would be investigated further, for the design of the LLNL onsite treatment process of metallic depleted uranium wastes. The two feasible systems are: (a) 7.5 mol/l H 2 SO 4 - 1 mol/l HNO 3 and (b) 3 mol/l HCl - 1 mol/l H 3 PO 4 . The sulfuric acid system dissolves uranium metal completely, while the hydrochloric-phosphoric acid system converts the metal completely into a solid, which might be suitable for direct disposal. Both systems combine oxidation of metallic uranium with complexation of the uranium ions formed to effectively deactivate uranium.s pyrophoricity at ambient temperature. (author)

  9. RECALIBRATION OF H CANYON ONLINE SPECTROPHOTOMETER AT EXTENDED URANIUM CONCENTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascola, R

    2008-01-01

    The H Canyon online spectrophotometers are calibrated for measurement of the uranium and nitric acid concentrations of several tanks in the 2nd Uranium Cycle.[1] The spectrometers, flow cells, and prediction models are currently optimized for a process in which uranium concentrations are expected to range from 0-15 g/L and nitric acid concentrations from 0.05-6 M. However, an upcoming processing campaign will involve 'Super Kukla' material, which has a lower than usual enrichment of fissionable uranium. Total uranium concentrations will be higher, spanning approximately 0-30 g/L U, with no change in the nitric acid concentrations. The new processing conditions require the installation of new flow cells with shorter path lengths. As the process solutions have a higher uranium concentration, the shorter path length is required to decrease the absorptivity to values closer to the optimal range for the instrument. Also, new uranium and nitric acid prediction models are required to span the extended uranium concentration range. The models will be developed for the 17.5 and 15.4 tanks, for which nitric acid concentrations will not exceed 1 M. The restricted acid range compared to the original models is anticipated to reduce the measurement uncertainty for both uranium and nitric acid. The online spectrophotometers in H Canyon Second Uranium Cycle were modified to allow measurement of uranium and nitric acid for the Super Kukla processing campaign. The expected uranium concentrations, which are higher than those that have been recently processed, required new flow cells with one-third the optical path length of the existing cells. Also, new uranium and nitric acid calibrations were made. The estimated reading uncertainties (2σ) for Tanks 15.4 and 17.5 are ∼5% for uranium and ∼25% for nitric acid

  10. Effect of different pH-values on process parameters in two-phase anaerobic digestion of high-solid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In many publications, primary fermentation is described as a limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of fibre-rich biomass [Eastman JA, Ferguson JF. Solubilization of particulacte carbon during the anaerobic digeston. J WPCF. 1981;53:352-366; Noike T, Endo G, Chang J, Yaguchi J, Matsumoto J. Characteristics of carbohydrate degradation and the rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. Biotechnol Bioeng. 1985;27:1482-1489; Arntz HJ, Stoppok E, Buchholz K. Anaerobic hydroysis of beet pulp-discontiniuous experiments. Biotechnol Lett. 1985;7:113-118]. The microorganisms of the primary fermentation process differ widely from the methanogenic microorganisms [Pohland FG, Ghosh S. Developments in anaerobic stabilization of organic wastes-the two-phase concept. Environ Lett. 1971;1:255-266]. To optimize the biogas process, a separation in two phases is suggested by many authors [Fox P, Pohland GK. Anaerobic treatment applications and fundamentals: substrate specificity during phase separation. Water Environ Res. 1994;66:716-724; Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580]. To carry out the examination, a two-phase laboratory-scale biogas plant was established, with a physical phase separation. In previous studies, the regulation of the pH-value during the acid formation was usually carried out by the addition of sodium hydroxide [Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580; Ueno Y, Tatara M, Fukui H, Makiuchi T, Goto M, Sode K. Production of hydrogen and methane from organic solid wastes by phase separation of anaerobic process. Bioresour Technol. 2007;98:1861-1865; Zoetemeyer RJ, van den Heuvel JC, Cohen A. pH influence on acidogenic dissimilation of glucose in an anaerobic digestor. Water Res. 1982;16:303-311]. A new technology

  11. Enriched uranium recovery at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrick, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Graphite casting scrap, fuel elements and nongraphite combustibles are calcined to impure oxides. These materials along with zircaloy fuel elements and refractory solids are leach-dissolved separately in HF-HNO 3 acid to solubilize the contained enriched uranium. The resulting slurry is filtered and the clear filtrate (to which mineral acid solutions bearing enriched uranium may be added) are passed through solvent extraction. The solvent extraction product is filtered, precipitated with H 2 O 2 and the precipitate calcined to U 3 O 8 . Metal is made from U 3 O 8 by conversion to UO 2 , hydrofluorination and reduction to metal. Throughput is 150 to 900 kg uranium per year depending on the type of scrap

  12. Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

    1994-12-01

    A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF 6 , of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF 6 processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete

  13. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 0 C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving, cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means

  14. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 ± 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 ± 0.0006 wt. % 234 U, 19.8336 ± 0.0059 wt. % 235 U, 0.1337 ± 0.0006 wt. % 236 U, and 79.9171 ± 0.0057 wt. % 238 U

  15. Conversion of finished leather waste incorporated with plant fibers into value added consumer products - An effort to minimize solid waste in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklay, A; Gebeyehu, G; Getachew, T; Yaynshet, T; Sastry, T P

    2017-10-01

    Presently, the leftovers from leather product industries are discarded as waste in Ethiopia. The objective of the present study was therefore, to prepare composite sheets by incorporating various plant fibers like enset (Ensete ventricosum), hibiscus (Hibiscus cannabinus), jute (Corchorus trilocularis L.), palm (Phoenix dactylifera) and sisal (Agave sisal) in various proportions into the leather waste. Resin binder (RB) and natural rubber latex (NRL) were used as binding agents for the preparation of the composite sheets. The composite sheets prepared were characterized for their physicochemical properties (tensile strength, elongation at break, stitch tear strength, water absorption, water desorption and flexing strength). Composite sheets prepared using RB having 10% hibiscus, 20% palm and 40% sisal fibers showed better mechanical properties than their respective controls. In composite sheets prepared using NRL having 30% jute fiber exhibited better mechanical properties than its control. Most of the plant fibers used in this study played a role in increasing the performance of the sheets. However, as seen from the results, the contribution of these plant fibers on performance of the composite sheets prepared is dependent on the ratio used and the nature of binder. The SEM studies have exhibited the composite nature of the sheets and FTIR studies have shown the functional groups of collagen protein, cellulose and binders. The prepared sheets were used as raw materials for preparation of items like stiff hand bags, ladies' purse, keychain, chappal upper, wallet, wall cover, mouse pad and other interior decorating products. By preparing such value added products, we can reduce solid waste; minimize environmental pollution and thereby securing environmental sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recovering and recycling uranium used for production of molybdenum-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-12-12

    A processes for recycling uranium that has been used for the production of molybdenum-99 involves irradiating a solution of uranium suitable for forming fission products including molybdenum-99, conditioning the irradiated solution to one suitable for inducing the formation of crystals of uranyl nitrate hydrates, then forming the crystals and a supernatant and then separating the crystals from the supernatant, thus using the crystals as a source of uranium for recycle. Molybdenum-99 is recovered from the supernatant using an adsorbent such as alumina. Another process involves irradiation of a solid target comprising uranium, forming an acidic solution from the irradiated target suitable for inducing the formation of crystals of uranyl nitrate hydrates, then forming the crystals and a supernatant and then separating the crystals from the supernatant, thus using the crystals as a source of uranium for recycle. Molybdenum-99 is recovered from the supernatant using an adsorbent such as alumina.

  17. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglizaud, N.

    2006-12-01

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS 2 ). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH ≥ 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 , an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. ≥ -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 ± 0.8) x 10 -7 mol L -1 of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage (≥ 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 ) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10 7 L mol -1 . Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the saturation concentration allows the observation of

  18. Uranium and radon surveys in western Himalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    The water samples from mountain springs, streams and river systems in the western Himalaya were collected and analysed in the laboratory for uranium and radon contents. It is observed that the Himalayan river system is conspicuous by its high dissolved uranium and radium concentration. The water samples contain from 0.89 ppb to 63.4 ppb of uranium and from 34 Bq/I to 364 Bq/I of radon. The radon emanation in soil is measured by the track-etch method, emanometry and alpha-logger technique. The daily and long-term variation of radon was monitored in some mineralized zones of Himachal Pradesh (HP) state with high uranium content in the soil. The maximum values of radon are recorded in Chhinjra, Rameda, Samurkala and Kasol areas of HP. (author)

  19. Extraction of metal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, R F

    1988-10-19

    Metal values (especially uranium values) are extracted from aqueous solutions of metal oxyions in the absence of halogen ion using an imidazole of defined formula. Especially preferred extractants are 1-alkyl imidazoles and benzimidazoles having from 7 to 25 carbon atoms in the alkyl group.

  20. Uranium of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsalyuk, Yu.; Gurevich, D.

    2000-01-01

    Over 25 % of the world's uranium reserves are concentrated in Kazakhstan. So, the world's largest Shu-Sarysu uranium province is situated on southern Kazakhstan, with resources exceeding 1 billion tonnes of uranium. No less, than 3 unique deposits with resources exceeding 100,000 tonnes are situated here. From the economic point of view the most important thing is that these deposits are suitable for in-situ leaching, which is the cheapest, environmentally friendly and most efficient method available for uranium extracting. In 1997 the Kazatomprom National Joint-Stock Company united all Kazakhstan's uranium enterprises (3 mine and concentrating plants, Volkovgeologiya Joint-Stock Company and the Ulbinskij Metallurgical plant). In 1998 uranium production came to 1,500 tonnes (860 kg in 1997). In 1999 investment to the industry were about $ 30 million. Plans for development of Kazakhstan's uranium industry provide a significant role for foreign partners. At present, 2 large companies (Comeco (Canada), Cogema (France) working in Kazakhstan. Kazakatomprom continues to attract foreign investors. The company's administration announced that in that in next year they have plan to make a radical step: to sell 67 % of stocks to strategic investors (at present 100 % of stocks belongs to state). Authors of the article regard, that the Kazakhstan's uranium industry still has significant reserves to develop. Even if the scenario for the uranium industry could be unfavorable, uranium production in Kazakhstan may triple within the next three to four years. The processing of uranium by the Ulbinskij Metallurgical Plant and the production of some by-products, such as rhenium, vanadium and rare-earth elements, may provide more profits. Obviously, the sale of uranium (as well as of any other reserves) cannot make Kazakhstan a prosperous country. However, country's uranium industry has a god chance to become one of the most important and advanced sectors of national economy

  1. Uranium geochemistry on the Amazon shelf: Evidence for uranium release from bottom sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, B.A.; DeMaster, D.J.; Nittrouer, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    In Amazon-shelf waters, as salinity increases to 36.5 x 10 -3 , dissolved uranium activities increase to a maximum of 4.60 dpm 1 -1 . This value is much higher than the open-ocean value (2.50 dpm 1 -1 ), indicating a source of dissolved uranium to shelf waters in addition to that supplied from open-ocean and riverine waters. Uranium activities are much lower for surface sediments in the Amazon-shelf sea bed (mean: 0.69 ± .09 dpm g -1 ) than for suspended sediments in the Amazon river (1.82 dpm g -1 ). Data suggest that the loss of particulate uranium from riverine sediments is probably the result of uranium desorption from the ferric-oxyhydroxide coatings on sediment particles, and/or uranium release by mobilization of the ferric oxyhydroxides. The total flux of dissolved 238 U from the Amazon shelf (about 1.2 x 10 15 dpm yr -1 ) constitutes about 15% of uranium input to the world ocean, commensurate to the Amazon River's contribution to world river-water discharge. Measurement of only the riverine flux of dissolved 238 U underestimates, by a factor of about 5, the flux of dissolved 238 U from the Amazon shelf to the open ocean

  2. Highly Enriched Uranium Metal Annuli and Cylinders with Polyethylene Reflectors and/or Internal Polyethylene Moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler Sumner; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Montierth

    2007-01-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, experiments of uranium metal annuli with and without polyethylene reflectors and with the central void region either empty or filled with polyethylene were evaluated under ICSBEP Identifier HEU-MET-FAST-076. The outer diameter of the uranium annuli varied from 9 to 15 inches in two-inch increments. In addition, there were uranium metal cylinders with diameters varying from 7 to 15 inches with complete reflection and reflection on one flat surface to simulate floor reflection. Most of the experiments were performed between February 1964 and April 1964. Five partially reflected (reflected on the top only) experiments were assembled in November 1967, but are judged by the evaluators not to be of benchmark quality. Twenty-four of the twenty-five experiments have been determined to have fast spectra. The only exception has a mixed spectrum. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with five different parameters associated with the uranium parts and three associated with the polyethylene parts was evaluated. Included were uranium mass, height, diameter, isotopic content, and impurity content and polyethylene mass, diameter, and impurity content. There were additional uncertainties associated with assembly alignment, support structure, and the value

  3. Synthesis of xanthate functionalized silica gel and its application for the preconcentration and separation of uranium(VI) from inorganic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopi Krishna, P.; Naidu, G.R.K.; Rao, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    A new chelating solid extractant prepared by the chemical immobilization of xanthate on silica gel was characterized by Fourier transform infra red spectrometry (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and microanalysis and used for the preconcentration and separation of uranyl ion prior to its determination by Arsenazo-III. The effect of pH, weight of the solid extractant, volume of the aqueous phase and the interference of neutral electrolytes, cations and anions on the determination of uranium, have been studied in detail to optimize the conditions for trace determination of uranium(VI). The accuracy of the developed procedure was tested by analyzing marine sediment (MESS-3) and soil (IAEA-SOIL-7) reference materials. The results obtained on analysis of soil and sediment samples are comparable to standard ICP-MS values. (author)

  4. Process for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, S.; Carrington, F.

    1982-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid solutions uses an acidified alkali metal carbonate solution for the second-stage strip of uranyl uranium from the ion-exchange solution. The stripped solution is then recycled to the ion-exchange circuit. In the first stripping stage the ion-exchange solution containing the recovered uranyl uranium and an inert organic diluent is stripped with ammonium carbonate, producing a slurry of ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. The second strip, with a solution of 50-200 grams per litre of sodium carbonate eliminates the problems of inadequate removal of phosphorus, iron and vanadium impurities, solids accumulation, and phase separation in the strip circuit

  5. Investigation of transformation of uranium hexafluoride into dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, N.P.; Veryatin, U.D.; Yakhonin, I.F.; Logunov, A.F.; Dymkov, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    The process of transformation of uranium hexafluoride into dioxide using the method of pyrohydrolysis by steam-hydrogen mixture in a boiling layer using uranium dioxide granules applicable for production of fuel elements is considered. Technological parameters and equipment of the process are described, intermediate stages and process products are considered. Physicochemical and physicomechanical properties of the obtained uranium dioxide granules are given. The results of metallographical investigations into solid products of pyrohydrolysis in phase transformations at certain stages of the process as well as test on vibration packing of the obtained granules in fuel cans are presented

  6. Oxidizing attack process of uranium ore by a carbonated liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Pierre; Nicolas, Francois.

    1981-01-01

    A continuous process for digesting a uraniferous ore by oxidation with a recycling aqueous liquor containing alkaline carbonates and bicarbonates in solution as well as uranium in a concentration close to its solubility limit at digestion temperature, and of recuperation of the precipitated uranium within the solid phase remaining after digestion. The digestion is carried out by spraying oxygen into the hot reactional medium in order not only to permit oxidation of the uranium and its solubilization but also to ensure that the sulphides of impurities and organic substances present in the ore are oxidized [fr

  7. Uranium-lead shielding for nuclear material transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusk, E.C.; Miller, N.E.; Basham, S.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basis for the selection of shielding materials for spent fuel shipping containers is described with comments concerning the favorable and unfavorable aspects of steel, lead, and depleted uranium. A concept for a new type of material made of depleted uranium and lead is described which capitalizes on the best cask shielding characteristics of both materials. This cask shielding is made by filling the shielding cavity with pieces of depleted uranium and then backfilling the interstitial voids with lead. The lead would be bonded to the uranium and also to the cask shells if desired. Shielding density approaching 80 percent of that of solid uranium could be achieved, while a density of 65 percent is readily obtainable. This material should overcome the problems of the effect of lead melting in the fire accident, high thermal gradients at uranium-stainless steel interfaces and at a major reduction in cost over that of a solid uranium shielded cask. A development program is described to obtain information on the properties of the composite material to aid in design analysis and licensing and to define the fabrication techniques

  8. Study on technology for radioactive waste treatment and management from uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Hung Trieu; Vu Thanh Quang; Nguyen Duc Thanh; Trinh Giang Huong; Tran Van Hoa; Hoang Minh Chau; Ngo Van Tuyen; Nguyen Hoang Lan; Vuong Huu Anh

    2007-01-01

    There is some solid and liquid radioactive waste created during producing Uranium that needs being treated and managed to keep our environment safe. This radioactive waste contains Uranium (U-238), Thorium (Th-232), Radium (Ra-226) and some heavy metals and mainly is low radioactive waste. Our project has researched and built up appropriate technology for treating and managing the radioactive waste. After researching and experimenting, we have built up four technology processes as follows: Technology for separating Radium from liquid waste; Technology for treating and managing solid waste containing Ra; Technology for separating Thorium from liquid waste after recovering radium; Technology for stabilizing solid waste from Uranium production. (author)

  9. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

  10. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy

  11. Methods for the exploration and recovering of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    The uranium reserves in the western world occur basically in two types of deposits a) vein type and vein like types b) sedimentary types, with the vein deposits providing only 5 percent of the actual uranium production. 85% of the known uranium reserves in the western world, amounting to about 5 million metric tons U occur in a relatively small number of countries (U.S.A., Canada, Australia, South Africa and Namibia, France, Niger and Gabun). Exploration on uranium deposits is carried out by using geophysical and geochemical methods. Radiometry, i.e. the determination of the radioactivity of the ground in a prospective area, is the main geophysical tool. In the mining of uranium ores, practically all mining methods, applied in other metal mining branches, are being used. The benefication of uranium ore is characterized by a large up-grading factor (i.e. the ratio between the uranium content in the concentrates and the uranium content in the ore) which is higher than in most other metal mining operations. In the field of health and safety in uranium mines, the radiation protection of the workers plays a paramount role. Strict rules exist for maximum values of certain elements in waste air and waste water of uranium mining operations, emitted into the environment. (orig.)

  12. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W.

    1994-06-01

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments

  13. Welding of a powder metallurgy uranium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holbert, R.K.; Doughty, M.W.; Alexander-Morrison, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The interest at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in powder metallurgy (P/M) uranium parts is due to the potential cost savings in the fabrication of the material, to achieving a more homogeneous product, and to the reduction of uranium scrap. The joining of P/M uranium-6 wt-% niobium (U-6Nb) alloys by the electron beam (EB) welding process results in weld porosity. Varying the EB welding parameters did not eliminate the porosity. Reducing the oxygen and nitrogen content in this P/M uranium material did minimize the weld porosity, but this step made the techniques of producing the material more difficult. Therefore, joining wrought and P/M U-6Nb rods with the inertia welding technique is considered. Since no gases will be evolved with the solid-state welding process and the weld area will be compacted, porosity should not be a problem in the inertia welding of uranium alloys. The welds that are evaluated are wrought-to-wrought, wrought-to-P/M, and P/M-to-P/M U-6Nb samples

  14. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Buffleben, George M.; Johnson, Terry A.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  15. Lichens as biomonitors of uranium in the Balkan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loppi, S.; Riccobono, F.; Zhang, Z.H.; Savic, S.; Ivanov, D.; Pirintsos, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Widespread contamination by depleted uranium was not detected in the Balkan area. - The contribution of the conflict of 1999 to the environmental levels of uranium in the Balkan area was evaluated by means of lichens used as biomonitors. The average U concentration found in lichens in the present study was in line with the values reported for lichens from other countries and well below the levels found in lichens collected in areas with natural or anthropogenic sources of U. Measurement of isotopic ratios 235 U/ 238 U allowed to exclude the presence of depleted uranium. According to these results, we could not detect widespread environmental contamination by depleted uranium in the Balkan area

  16. Titrimetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Titrimetric methods are almost invariably used for the high precision assay of uranium compounds, because gravimetric methods are nonselective, and not as reliable. Although precipitation titrations have been used, for example with cupferron and ferrocyanide, and chelate titrations with EDTA and oxine give reasonable results, in practice only redox titrations find routine use. With all redox titration methods for uranium a precision of 01 to 02 percent can be achieved, and precisions as high as 0.003 percent have been claimed for the more refined techniques. There are two types of redox titrations for uranium in common use. The first involves the direct titration of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with a standard solution of a strong reductant, such as chromous chloride or titanous chloride, and the second requires a preliminary reduction of uranium to the (IV) or (III) state, followed by titration back to the (VI) state with a standard oxidant. Both types of redox titrations are discussed. 4 figs

  17. Politics of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is the most political of all the elements, the material for the production of both the large amounts of electricity and the most destructive weapons in the world. The problems that its dual potential creates are only now beginning to become evident. Author Norman Moss looks at this situation and sheds light on many of the questions that emerge. The nuclear issue always comes back to how much uranium there is, what can be done with it, and which countries have it. Starting with a concise history of uranium and explaining its technology in terms the nonspecialist can understand, The Politics of Uranium considers the political issues that technical arguments obscure. It tells the little-known story of the international uranium cartel, explains the entanglements of governments with the uranium trade, and describes the consequences of wrong decisions and blunders-especially the problems of nuclear waste. It also examines the intellectual and emotional roots of the anti-nuclear movement

  18. Uranium resources and supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.

    1973-01-01

    The future supply of uranium has to be considered against a background of forecasts of uranium demand over the next decades which show increases of a spectacular nature. It is not necessary to detail these forecasts, they are well known. A world survey by the Joint NEA/IAEA Working Party on 'Uranium Resources, Production and Demand', completed this summer, indicates that from a present production level of just over 19,000 tonnes uranium per year, the demand will rise to the equivalent of an annual production requirement of 50,000 tonnes uranium by 1980, 100,000 by 1985 and 180,000 by 1990. Few, if any, mineral production industries have been called upon to plan for a near tenfold increase in production in a space of about 15 years as these forecasts imply. This might possibly mean that, perhaps, ten times the present number of uranium mines will have to be planned and engineered by 1990

  19. How much uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenward, M.

    1976-01-01

    Comment is made on the latest of a series of reports on world uranium resources from the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency and the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (Uranium resources, production and demand (including other nuclear fuel cycle data), published by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris). The report categories uranium reserves by their recovery cost and looks at power demand and the whole of the nuclear fuel cycle, including uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing. The effect that fluctuations in uranium prices have had on exploration for new uranium resources is considered. It is stated that increased exploration is essential considering the long lead times involved but that thanks to today's higher prices there are distinct signs that prospecting activities are increasing again. (U.K.)

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements)

  1. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  2. Classification of Uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlkamp, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A listing of the recognized types of uranium mineralization shows nineteen determinable types out of which only six can be classified as of economic significance at present: Oligomiitic quartz pebble conglomerates, sandstone types, calcretes, intra-intrusive types, hydrothermal veins, veinlike types. The different types can be genetically related to prevalent geological environments, i.e. 1. the primary uranium occurrences formed by endogenic processes, 2. the secondary derived from the primary by subsequent exogenic processes, 3. the tertiary occurrences are assumed to be formed by endogenic metamorphic processes, although little is known about the behaviour of the uranium during the metamorphosis and therefore the metallogenesis of this tertiary uranium generation is still vague. A metallotectonic-geochronologic correlation of the uranium deposits shows a distinct affinity of the uranium to certain geological epochs: The Upper Archean, Lower Proterozoic, the Hercynian and, in a less established stage, the Upper Proterozoic. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  3. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  4. Uranium purchases report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B ''Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data

  5. Process development study on production of uranium metal from monazite sourced crude uranium tetra-fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S; Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an economic process for recovery, process flow sheet development, purification and further conversion to nuclear grade uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been a technological challenge and the present paper, discusses the same.The developed flow-sheet is a combination of hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Crude UF 4 is converted to uranium di-oxide (UO 2 ) by chemical conversion route and UO 2 produced is made fluoride-free by repeated repulping, followed by solid liquid separation. Uranium di-oxide is then purified by two stages of dissolution and suitable solvent extraction methods to get uranium nitrate pure solution (UNPS). UNPS is then precipitated with air diluted ammonia in a leak tight stirred vessel under controlled operational conditions to obtain ammonium di-uranate (ADU). The ADU is then calcined and reduced to produce metal grade UO 2 followed by hydro-fluorination using anhydrous hydrofluoric acid to obtain metal grade UF 4 with ammonium oxalate insoluble (AOI) content of 4 is essential for critical upstream conversion process. Nuclear grade uranium metal ingot is finally produced by metallothermic reduction process at 650℃ in a closed vessel, called bomb reactor. In the process, metal-slag separation plays an important role for attaining metal purity as well as process yield. Technological as well economic feasibility of indigenously developed process for large scale production of uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been established in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India

  6. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  7. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  8. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  9. Uranium demand. An exploration challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, A J.A.

    1976-10-01

    The estimated world resources of uranium as well as the estimated consumption of uranium over the next 25 years are briefly discussed. Attention is also given to the prospecting for uranium in South Africa and elsewhere in the world.

  10. Methodology for uranium compounds characterization applied to biomedical monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Pujol, E.

    1991-01-01

    Chronic exposure and accidental contamination to uranium compounds in the nuclear industry, led the authors to develop a methodology in order to characterize those compounds applied to biomedical monitoring. Such a methodology, based on the recommendation of the ICRP and the assessment of Annual Limit on Intake (ALI) values, involves two main steps: (1) The characterization of the industrial compound, i.e. its physico-chemical properties like density (g cm -3 ), specific area (m 2 g -1 ), x-ray spectrum (crystalline form), solid infrared spectrum (wavelength and bounds), mass spectrometry (isotopic composition), and particle size distribution including measurement of the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD). They'll specially study aging and hydration state of some compounds. (2) The study of in vitro solubility in several biochemical medium like bicarbonates, Basal Medium Eagle (BME) used in cellular culture, Gamble solvent, which is a serum simulant, with oxygen bubbling, and Gamble added with superoxide anions O2 - . Those different mediums allow one to understand the dissolution mechanisms (oxidation, chelating effects...) and to give ICRP classification D, W, or Y. Those two steps are essential to assess a biomedical monitoring either in routine or accidental exposure, and to calculate the ALI. Results on UO3, UF4 and U02 in the French uranium industry are given

  11. Uranium fate in wetland mesocosms: Effects of plants at two ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small-scale continuous flow wetland mesocosms (~0.8 L) were used to evaluate how plant roots under different iron loadings affect uranium (U) mobility. When significant concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe) were present at circumneutral pH values, U concentrations in root exposed sediments were an order of magnitude greater than concentrations in root excluded sediments. Micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µ-XANES) spectroscopy indicated that U was associated with the plant roots primarily as U(VI) or U(V), with limited evidence of U(IV). Micro X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) of plant roots suggested that for high iron loading at circumneutral pH, U was co-located with Fe, perhaps co-precipitated with root Fe plaques, while for low iron loading at a pH of ~4 the correlation between U and Fe was not significant, consistent with previous observations of U associated with organic matter. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated that the root exposed sediments also contained elevated numbers of Geobacter spp., which are likely associated with enhanced iron cycling, but may also reduce mobile U(VI) to less mobile U(IV) species. There are significant uncertainties regarding the environmental fate of uranium (U) and efforts to minimize U exposures require understanding of its mobility in environmental systems. Much research has focused on sequestering U as solids within groundwater aquifers, where localized risks can be controlled.1 Subsurface sequestration limits t

  12. Uranium reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1987-07-01

    The Technical Measurements Center has prepared uranium mill tailings reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. Four materials were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides, using three tailings materials and a river-bottom soil diluent. All materials were ground, dried, and blended thoroughly to ensure homogeneity. The analyses on which the recommended values for nuclides in the reference materials are based were performed, using independent methods, by the UNC Geotech (UNC) Chemistry Laboratory, Grand Junction, Colorado, and by C.W. Sill (Sill), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Several statistical tests were performed on the analytical data to characterize the reference materials. Results of these tests reveal that the four reference materials are homogeneous and that no large systematic bias exists between the analytical methods used by Sill and those used by TMC. The average values for radionuclides of the two data sets, representing an unbiased estimate, were used as the recommended values for concentrations of nuclides in the reference materials. The recommended concentrations of radionuclides in the four reference materials are provided. Use of these reference materials will aid in providing uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial action contractors. 11 refs., 9 tabs

  13. Contribution to the study of second phases particles dispersion in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, V.

    1994-06-01

    To reduce fission gas release of irradiated polycrystalline uranium dioxide, the dispersion of intragranular nanometric particles of second phase necessary to pin gas bubbles may complete the advantage of a large-grained fuel microstructure. Moreover, intergranular glass films may improve high temperatures mechanical properties of UO 2 . In this study, mixtures of additives composed of ''corindon'' structure oxides that enhance the fuel grain growth and composed of different oxides with variable solid solubilities in the UO 2 matrix were achieved. Additives with a negligible solubility inhibit grain boundaries motion except those, such as silica, that involve a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. Rare earth oxides that form stable solid solutions with UO 2 cannot lead to precipitation, but have no effect on the fuel grain growth doped with ''corindon'' type oxides. A chromium oxide excess allows the creation of a fuel microstructure described by large grains and intragranular spherical Cr 2 O 3 inclusions observed by scanning electron microscopy. Values for the bulk lattice diffusion coefficient of Cr 3+ cations in UO 2 can be deduced from the experimental growth of those dispersed particles by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of small precipitated metal particles inside the uranium dioxide matrix induced by the internal reduction of a solid solution has not been performed. However, direct reduction of insoluble chromium oxide particles is easy and produces metallic intragranular precipitates. (author). 119 refs., 112 figs., 33 tabs., 5 annexes

  14. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  15. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  16. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  17. Uranium mine ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katam, K.; Sudarsono

    1982-01-01

    Uranium mine ventilation system aimed basically to control and decreasing the air radioactivity in mine caused by the radon emanating from uranium ore. The control and decreasing the air ''age'' in mine, with adding the air consumption volume, increasing the air rate consumption, closing the mine-out area; using closed drainage system. Air consumption should be 60m 3 /minute for each 9m 2 uranium ore surfaces with ventilation rate of 15m/minute. (author)

  18. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  19. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  20. The uranium production cycle and the environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    issues and performance in several countries; problems of acid rock drainage at uranium mine sites; national examples of environmental impact assessment in the uranium industry; natural background radioactivity of the earth's surface at and away from uranium production facilities; technology and the uranium industry; environmental design aspects of uranium mines and mills; design, management and closure of uranium tailings facilities; national experience with management and disposal of liquid and solid wastes from uranium mining and milling; national experience with treatment and restoration of waste water from both conventional and in situ leach uranium mining; safe management of radioactive waste from mining and milling activities; evolving regulation and rehabilitation standards for uranium recovery operations; national experience with regulation of uranium production. This publication contains 71 individual papers presented at the symposium. Each of the papers was indexed separately.