WorldWideScience

Sample records for solar energy harvest

  1. Graphene based materials: Enhancing solar energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gua, Chun Xian; Guai, Guan Hong; Li, Chang Ming [Nanyang Tecnological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). Center for Advanded Bioanaosystems

    2011-05-15

    Due to their excellent electronic and physiochemical properties, graphene based materials have been extensively explored for solar energy harvesting as either electron and hole transport materials, buffer layers, or window and counter electrodes. This research news surveys very recent advances in this emerging field with emphasis on fundamental understanding of their enhancement mechanism, while discussing future challenges.

  2. Chalcogenide Perovskites for Solar Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Samanthe

    Methylammonium Lead halide perovskites have recently emerged as a promising candidate for realizing high efficient low cost photovoltaic modules. Charge transport properties of the solution processed halide perovskites are comparable to some of the existing absorbers used in the current PV industry which require sophisticated processing techniques. Due to this simple processing required to achieve high efficiencies, halide perovskites have become an active field of research. As a result, perovskite solar cells are rapidly reaching towards theoretical efficiency limit of close to 30%. It's believed that ionicity inherent to perovskite materials is one of the contributing factors for the excellent charge transport properties of perovskites. Despite the growing interest for solar energy harvesting purposes, these halide perovskites have serious limitations such as toxicity and instability that need to be addressed in order to commercialize the solar cells incorporating them. This dissertation focuses on a new class of ionic semiconductors, chalcogenide perovskites for solar energy harvesting purposes. Coming from the family perovskites they are expected to have same excellent charge transport properties inherent to perovskites due to the ionicity. Inspired by few theoretical studies on chalcogenide perovskites, BaZrS3 and its Ti alloys were synthesized by sulfurizing the oxide counterpart. Structural characterizations have confirmed the predicted distorted perovskite phase. Optical characterizations have verified the direct band gap suitable for thin film single junction solar cells. Anion alloying was demonstrated by synthesizing oxysulfides with widely tunable band gap suitable for applications such as solid state lighting and sensing.

  3. Light harvesting for quantum solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvart, Tomas

    2000-05-01

    Despite wide structural and functional differences, the laws that govern quantum solar energy conversion to chemical energy or electricity share many similarities. In the photosynthetic membrane, in common with semiconductor solar cells, the conversion process proceeds from the creation of electron-hole pairs by a photon of light, followed by charge separation to produce the required high-energy product. In many cases, however, mechanisms are needed to enhance the optical absorption cross-section and extend the spectral range of operation. A common way of achieving this is by light harvesting: light absorption by a specialised unit which transfers the energy to the conversion apparatus. This paper considers two examples of light harvesting - semiconductor solar cells and the photosynthetic apparatus - to illustrate the basic operation and principles that apply. The existence of a light harvesting unit in photosynthesis has been known since the early 1930's but details of the process - relating, in particular, to the relationship between the structure and spectral properties - are still being unravelled. The excitation energy carriers are excitons but the precise nature of the transport - via the solid state Frenkel-Peierls variety or by Förster's resonant energy transfer - is still subject to debate. In semiconductor solar cells, the energy of the absorbed photon is collected by minority carriers but the broad principles remain the same. In both cases it is shown that the rate of energy conversion is described by a law which parallels the Shockley's solar cell equation, and the light harvesting energy collection is subject to reciprocity relations which resemble Onsager's reciprocity relations between coefficients which couple appropriate forces and flows in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Differences in the basic atomic make-up in the two systems lead to different energy transport equations. In both cases, however, similar mathematical techniques based on Green

  4. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    Semiconductor photovoltaics (solar-to-electrical) and photocatalysis (solar-to-chemical) requires sunlight to be converted into excited charge carriers with sufficient lifetimes and mobility to drive a current or photoreaction. Thin semiconductor films are necessary to reduce the charge recombination and mobility losses, but thin films also limit light absorption, reducing the solar energy conversion efficiency. Further, in photocatalysis, the band edges of semiconductor must straddle the redox potentials of a photochemical reaction, reducing light absorption to half the solar spectrum in water splitting. Plasmonics transforms metal nanoparticles into antennas with resonances tuneable across the solar spectrum. If energy can be transferred from the plasmon to the semiconductor, light absorption in the semiconductor can be increased in thin films and occur at energies smaller than the band gap. This thesis investigates why, despite this potential, plasmonic solar energy harvesting techniques rarely appear in top performing solar architectures. To accomplish this goal, the possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for solar energy conversion were identified, isolated, and optimized by combining systematic sample design with transient absorption spectroscopy, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic testing, and theoretical development. Specifically, metal semiconductor nanostructures were designed to modulate the plasmon's scattering, hot carrier, and near field interactions as well as remove heating and self-catalysis effects. Transient absorption spectroscopy then revealed how the structure design affected energy and charge carrier transfer between metal and semiconductor. Correlating this data with wavelength-dependent photoconversion efficiencies and theoretical developments regarding metal-semiconductor interactions identified the origin of the plasmonic enhancement. Using this methodology, it has first been proven that three plasmonic enhancement routes are

  5. Organoruthenium Complexes for Solar Energy Harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of this time is providing the world with the energy it needs to sustain human kind's current standard of living. Solar energy is the most abundant and ubiquitous renewable energy source available, and as such it holds great promises. Traditionally, the field of solar

  6. Seebeck nanoantennas for solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, E.; Briones, J.; Cuadrado, A.; Martinez-Anton, J. C.; McMurtry, S.; Hehn, M.; Montaigne, F.; Alda, J.; Gonzalez, F. J.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a mid-infrared device based on thermocouple optical antennas for light sensing and energy harvesting applications. We numerically demonstrate that antennas are able to generate low-power dc signals by beneficing of the thermoelectric properties of the metals that constitute them. We theoretically evaluate the optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency for harvesting applications and finally discuss strategies to increase its performance. Thermocouple optical antennas therefore open the route toward the design of photovoltaic devices.

  7. Flexible wearable sensor nodes with solar energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiyang Wu; Arefin, Md Shamsul; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-07-01

    Wearable sensor nodes have gained a lot of attention during the past few years as they can monitor and record people's physical parameters in real time. Wearable sensor nodes can promote healthy lifestyles and prevent the occurrence of potential illness or injuries. This paper presents a flexible wearable sensor system powered by an efficient solar energy harvesting technique. It can measure the subject's heartbeats using a photoplethysmography (PPG) sensor and perform activity monitoring using an accelerometer. The solar energy harvester adopts an output current based maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm, which controls the solar panel to operate within its high output power range. The power consumption of the flexible sensor nodes has been investigated under different operation conditions. Experimental results demonstrate that wearable sensor nodes can work for more than 12 hours when they are powered by the solar energy harvester for 3 hours in the bright sunlight.

  8. Energy harvesting solar, wind, and ocean energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Khaligh, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Also called energy scavenging, energy harvesting captures, stores, and uses ""clean"" energy sources by employing interfaces, storage devices, and other units. Unlike conventional electric power generation systems, renewable energy harvesting does not use fossil fuels and the generation units can be decentralized, thereby significantly reducing transmission and distribution losses. But advanced technical methods must be developed to increase the efficiency of devices in harvesting energy from environmentally friendly, ""green"" resources and converting them into electrical energy.Recognizing t

  9. Single/Dual-Polarized Infrared Rectenna for Solar Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Zainud-Deen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Single and dual linearly-polarized receiving mode nanoantennas are designed for solar energy harvesting at 28.3 THz. The infrared rectennas are used to harvest the solar energy and converting it to electrical energy.  The proposed infrared rectenna is a thin dipole made of gold and printed on a silicon dioxide substrate. Different shapes of the dipole arms have been investigated for maximum collected energy. The two poles of the dipole have been determined in a rectangular, circular and rhombus shapes. The rectenna dipole is used to concentrate the electromagnetic energy into a small localized area at the inner tips of the gap between the dipole arms. The dimensions of the different dipole shapes are optimized for maximum near electric field intensity at a frequency of 28.3 THz. A Metal Insulator Metal (MIM diode is incorporated with the nanoantenna dipole to rectify the received energy. The receiving efficiency of the solar energy collector with integrated MIM diode has been investigated. A dual-polarized, four arms, rhombus shaped nanoantenna dipole for solar energy harvesting has been designed and optimized for 28.3 THz applications.

  10. Progress and Design Concerns of Nanostructured Solar Energy Harvesting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Zhang, Qianpeng; Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; He, Jin; Mo, Xiaoliang; Fan, Zhiyong

    2016-05-01

    Integrating devices with nanostructures is considered a promising strategy to improve the performance of solar energy harvesting devices such as photovoltaic (PV) devices and photo-electrochemical (PEC) solar water splitting devices. Extensive efforts have been exerted to improve the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of such devices by utilizing novel nanostructures to revolutionize device structural designs. The thicknesses of light absorber and material consumption can be substantially reduced because of light trapping with nanostructures. Meanwhile, the utilization of nanostructures can also result in more effective carrier collection by shortening the photogenerated carrier collection path length. Nevertheless, performance optimization of nanostructured solar energy harvesting devices requires a rational design of various aspects of the nanostructures, such as their shape, aspect ratio, periodicity, etc. Without this, the utilization of nanostructures can lead to compromised device performance as the incorporation of these structures can result in defects and additional carrier recombination. The design guidelines of solar energy harvesting devices are summarized, including thin film non-uniformity on nanostructures, surface recombination, parasitic absorption, and the importance of uniform distribution of photo-generated carriers. A systematic view of the design concerns will assist better understanding of device physics and benefit the fabrication of high performance devices in the future. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Flexible hybrid energy cell for simultaneously harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Hulin; Zhu, Guang; Lee, Sangmin; Lin, Zong-Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-01-22

    We report the first flexible hybrid energy cell that is capable of simultaneously or individually harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies to power some electronic devices. For having both the pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties, a polarized poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film-based nanogenerator (NG) was used to harvest thermal and mechanical energies. Using aligned ZnO nanowire arrays grown on the flexible polyester (PET) substrate, a ZnO-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) heterojunction solar cell was designed for harvesting solar energy. By integrating the NGs and the solar cells, a hybrid energy cell was fabricated to simultaneously harvest three different types of energies. With the use of a Li-ion battery as the energy storage, the harvested energy can drive four red light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  12. Integrated Solar-Energy-Harvesting and -Storage Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    whitacre, Jay; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Mojarradi, Mohammed; Johnson, Travis; Ryan, Margaret Amy; Bugga, Ratnakumar; West, William; Surampudi, Subbarao; Blosiu, Julian

    2004-01-01

    A modular, integrated, completely solid-state system designed to harvest and store solar energy is under development. Called the power tile, the hybrid device consists of a photovoltaic cell, a battery, a thermoelectric device, and a charge-control circuit that are heterogeneously integrated to maximize specific energy capacity and efficiency. Power tiles could be used in a variety of space and terrestrial environments and would be designed to function with maximum efficiency in the presence of anticipated temperatures, temperature gradients, and cycles of sunlight and shadow. Because they are modular in nature, one could use a single power tile or could construct an array of as many tiles as needed. If multiple tiles are used in an array, the distributed and redundant nature of the charge control and distribution hardware provides an extremely fault-tolerant system. The figure presents a schematic view of the device.

  13. EFRC: Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy (stimulus)"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    The University of Massachusetts Amherst is proposing an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) on Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy that will integrate the widely complementary experimental and theoretical expertise of 23 faculty at UMass-Amherst Departments with researchers from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, University of Pittsburgh, the Pennsylvania State University and Konarka Technologies, Inc. Collaborative efforts with researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Bayreuth, Seoul National University and Tohoku University will complement and expand the experimental efforts in the EFRC. Our primary research aim of this EFRC is the development of hybrid polymer-based devices with efficiencies more than twice the current organic-based devices, by combining expertise in the design and synthesis of photoactive polymers, the control and guidance of polymer-based assemblies, leadership in nanostructured polymeric materials, and the theory and modeling of non-equilibrium structures. A primary goal of this EFRC is to improve the collection and conversion efficiency of a broader spectral range of solar energy using the directed self-assembly of polymer-based materials so as to optimize the design and fabrication of inexpensive devices.

  14. Solar Cells on CMOS Chips as Energy Harvesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Energy scavenging - also known as Energy harvesting - has recently drawn huge interests in both academia and industry. The concept is to power micro-electronic devices by gathering energy from the environment surrounding the device itself. It is a potential solution for powering various low power

  15. Overview of optical rectennas for solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zixu; Joshi, Saumil; Pelz, Bradley; Moddel, Garret

    2013-09-01

    Although the concept of using optical rectenna for harvesting solar energy was first introduced four decades ago, only recently has it invited a surge of interest, with dozens of laboratories around the world working on various aspects of the technology. An optical rectenna couples an ultra-high-speed diode to a submicron antenna so that the incoming radiation received by the antenna is rectified by the diode to produce a DC power output. The result is a technology that can be efficient and inexpensive, requiring only low-cost materials. Conventional classical rectification theory does not apply at optical frequencies, necessitating the application of quantum photon-assisted tunneling theory to describe the device operation. At first glance it would appear that the ultimate conversion efficiency is limited only by the Landsberg limit of 93%, but a more sober analysis that includes limitation due to the coherence of solar radiation leads to a result that coincides with the Trivich-Flinn limit of 44%. Innovative antenna designs are required to achieve high efficiency at frequencies where resistive losses in metal are substantial. The diode most often considered for rectennas make use of electron tunneling through ultra-thin insulators in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes. The most severe constraint is that the impedances of the antenna and diodes must match for efficient power transfer. The consequence is an RC time constant that cannot be achieved with parallel-plate MIM diodes, leading to the need for real innovations in diode structures. Technologies under consideration include sharp-tip and traveling-wave MIM diodes, and graphene geometric diodes. We survey the technologies under consideration.

  16. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  17. Self-reverse-biased solar panel optical receiver for simultaneous visible light communication and energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Won-Ho; Yang, Se-Hoon; Kwon, Do-Hoon; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-10-31

    We propose a self-reverse-biased solar panel optical receiver for energy harvesting and visible light communication. Since the solar panel converts an optical component into an electrical component, it provides both energy harvesting and communication. The signal component can be separated from the direct current component, and these components are used for communication and energy harvesting. We employed a self-reverse-biased receiver circuit to improve the communication and energy harvesting performance. The reverse bias on the solar panel improves the responsivity and response time. The proposed system achieved 17.05 mbps discrete multitone transmission with a bit error rate of 1.1 x 10-3 and enhanced solar energy conversion efficiency.

  18. Adaptive control of the packet transmission period with solar energy harvesting prediction in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kideok; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-04-24

    A number of research works has studied packet scheduling policies in energy scavenging wireless sensor networks, based on the predicted amount of harvested energy. Most of them aim to achieve energy neutrality, which means that an embedded system can operate perpetually while meeting application requirements. Unlike other renewable energy sources, solar energy has the feature of distinct periodicity in the amount of harvested energy over a day. Using this feature, this paper proposes a packet transmission control policy that can enhance the network performance while keeping sensor nodes alive. Furthermore, this paper suggests a novel solar energy prediction method that exploits the relation between cloudiness and solar radiation. The experimental results and analyses show that the proposed packet transmission policy outperforms others in terms of the deadline miss rate and data throughput. Furthermore, the proposed solar energy prediction method can predict more accurately than others by 6.92%.

  19. Adaptive Control of the Packet Transmission Period with Solar Energy Harvesting Prediction in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kideok Kwon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of research works has studied packet scheduling policies in energy scavenging wireless sensor networks, based on the predicted amount of harvested energy. Most of them aim to achieve energy neutrality, which means that an embedded system can operate perpetually while meeting application requirements. Unlike other renewable energy sources, solar energy has the feature of distinct periodicity in the amount of harvested energy over a day. Using this feature, this paper proposes a packet transmission control policy that can enhance the network performance while keeping sensor nodes alive. Furthermore, this paper suggests a novel solar energy prediction method that exploits the relation between cloudiness and solar radiation. The experimental results and analyses show that the proposed packet transmission policy outperforms others in terms of the deadline miss rate and data throughput. Furthermore, the proposed solar energy prediction method can predict more accurately than others by 6.92%.

  20. EDITORIAL Solar harvest Solar harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-12-01

    The first observations of the photoelectric effect date back to the early 19th century from work by Alexandre Edmond Becquerel, Heinrich Hertz, Wilhelm Hallwachs and J J Thomson. The theory behind the phenomena was clarified in a seminal paper by Einstein in 1905 and became an archetypical feature of the wave-particle description of light. A different manifestation of quantised electron excitation, whereby electrons are not emitted but excited into the valence band of the material, is what we call the photoconductive effect. As well as providing an extension to theories in fundamental physics, the phenomenon has spawned a field with enormous ramifications in the energy industry through the development of solar cells. Among advances in photovoltaic technology has been the development of organic photovoltaic technology. These devices have many benefits over their inorganic counterparts, such as light-weight, flexible material properties, as well as versatile materials' synthesis and low-cost large-scale production—all highly advantageous for manufacturing. The first organic photovoltaic systems were reported over 50 years ago [1], but the potential of the field has escalated in recent years in terms of efficiency, largely through band offsetting. Since then, great progress has been made in studies for optimising the efficiency of organic solar cells, such as the work by researchers in Germany and the Netherlands, where investigations were made into the percentage composition and annealing effects on composites of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) [2]. Hybrid devices that aim to exploit the advantages of both inorganic and organic constituents have also proven promising. One example of this is the work reported by researchers in Tunisia and France on a systematic study for optimising the composition morphology of TiO2 nanoparticles in poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK), which also led to insights

  1. Energy Harvesting by Subcutaneous Solar Cells: A Long-Term Study on Achievable Energy Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereuter, L; Williner, S; Pianezzi, F; Bissig, B; Buecheler, S; Burger, J; Vogel, R; Zurbuchen, A; Haeberlin, A

    2017-05-01

    Active electronic implants are powered by primary batteries, which induces the necessity of implant replacement after battery depletion. This causes repeated interventions in a patients' life, which bears the risk of complications and is costly. By using energy harvesting devices to power the implant, device replacements may be avoided and the device size may be reduced dramatically. Recently, several groups presented prototypes of implants powered by subcutaneous solar cells. However, data about the expected real-life power output of subcutaneously implanted solar cells was lacking so far. In this study, we report the first real-life validation data of energy harvesting by subcutaneous solar cells. Portable light measurement devices that feature solar cells (cell area = 3.6 cm 2 ) and continuously measure a subcutaneous solar cell's output power were built. The measurement devices were worn by volunteers in their daily routine in summer, autumn and winter. In addition to the measured output power, influences such as season, weather and human activity were analyzed. The obtained mean power over the whole study period was 67 µW (=19 µW cm -2 ), which is sufficient to power e.g. a cardiac pacemaker.

  2. Stand alone solar energy harvesting and storage systems in off-grid applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Gormly, Justin Blake; Bilbao, Jose

    2017-06-01

    The following is an implementation of a stand-alone system for solar energy harvesting and electrical energy storage systems for use in off-grid housing applications. The principal aim of this project was to construct a compact and affordable system for an off-grid house and to monitor its efficiency along the year.

  3. Compact hybrid cell based on a convoluted nanowire structure for harvesting solar and mechanical energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chen; Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A fully integrated, solid-state, compact hybrid cell (CHC) that comprises ''convoluted'' ZnO nanowire structures for concurrent harvesting of both solar and mechanical energy is demonstrated. The compact hybrid cell is based on a conjunction design of an organic solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and piezoelectric nanogenerator in one compact structure. The CHC shows a significant increase in output power, clearly demonstrating its potential for simultaneously harvesting multiple types of energy for powering small electronic devices for independent, sustainable, and mobile operation. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Powering Autonomous Sensors An Integral Approach with Focus on Solar and RF Energy Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Penella-López, María Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous sensors transmit data and power their electronics without using cables. They can be found in e.g. wireless sensor networks (WSNs) or remote acquisition systems. Although primary batteries provide a simple design for powering autonomous sensors, they present several limitations such as limited capacity and power density, and difficulty in predicting their condition and state of charge. An alternative is to extract energy from the ambient (energy harvesting). However, the reduced dimensions of most autonomous sensors lead to a low level of available power from the energy transducer. Thus, efficient methods and circuits to manage and gather the energy are a must. An integral approach for powering autonomous sensors by considering both primary batteries and energy harvesters is presented. Two rather different forms of energy harvesting are also dealt with: optical (or solar) and radiofrequency (RF). Optical energy provides high energy density, especially outdoors, whereas RF remote powering is possibly...

  5. Design of Hybrid Solar and Wind Energy Harvester for Fishing Boat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjarnahor, D. A.; Hanifan, M.; Budi, E. M.

    2017-07-01

    In southern beach of West Java, Indonesia, there are many villagers live as fishermen. They use small boats for fishing, in one to three days. Therefore, they need a fish preservation system. Fortunately, the area has high potential of solar and wind energy. This paper presents the design of a hybrid solar and wind energy harvester to power a refrigerator in the fishing boat. The refrigerator should keep the fish in 2 - 4 °C. The energy needed is 720 Wh daily. In the area, the daily average wind velocity is 4.27 m/s and the sun irradiation is 672 W/m2. The design combined two 100W solar panels and a 300W wind turbine. The testing showed that the solar panels can harvest 815 - 817 Wh of energy, while the wind turbine can harvest 43 - 62 Wh of energy daily. Therefore, the system can fulfil the energy requirement in fishing boat, although the solar panels were more dominant. To install the wind turbine on the fishing-boat, a computational design had been conducted. The boat hydrostatic dimension was measured to determine its stability condition. To reach a stable equilibrium condition, the wind turbine should be installed no more than 1.7 m of height.

  6. Energy harvester

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Tolou, N.

    2013-01-01

    Energy harvester comprising a mass (2) that is subjectable to environmental forces for bringing it into the status of a moving mass, and means (5) linked to the mass (2) for converting and storing of energy embodied in the moving mass, which means (5) are arranged for subsequent release of said

  7. Efficient Solar-Thermal Energy Harvest Driven by Interfacial Plasmonic Heating-Assisted Evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Yang, Chao; Liu, Yanming; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Deng, Tao

    2016-09-07

    The plasmonic heating effect of noble nanoparticles has recently received tremendous attention for various important applications. Herein, we report the utilization of interfacial plasmonic heating-assisted evaporation for efficient and facile solar-thermal energy harvest. An airlaid paper-supported gold nanoparticle thin film was placed at the thermal energy conversion region within a sealed chamber to convert solar energy into thermal energy. The generated thermal energy instantly vaporizes the water underneath into hot vapors that quickly diffuse to the thermal energy release region of the chamber to condense into liquids and release the collected thermal energy. The condensed water automatically flows back to the thermal energy conversion region under the capillary force from the hydrophilic copper mesh. Such an approach simultaneously realizes efficient solar-to-thermal energy conversion and rapid transportation of converted thermal energy to target application terminals. Compared to conventional external photothermal conversion design, the solar-thermal harvesting device driven by the internal plasmonic heating effect has reduced the overall thermal resistance by more than 50% and has demonstrated more than 25% improvement of solar water heating efficiency.

  8. Tailorable and Wearable Textile Devices for Solar Energy Harvesting and Simultaneous Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhisheng; Zhang, Nannan; Sun, Peng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Chuanxi; Fan, Hong Jin; Fan, Xing; Mai, Wenjie

    2016-10-05

    The pursuit of harmonic combination of technology and fashion intrinsically points to the development of smart garments. Herein, we present an all-solid tailorable energy textile possessing integrated function of simultaneous solar energy harvesting and storage, and we call it tailorable textile device. Our technique makes it possible to tailor the multifunctional textile into any designed shape without impairing its performance and produce stylish smart energy garments for wearable self-powering system with enhanced user experience and more room for fashion design. The "threads" (fiber electrodes) featuring tailorability and knittability can be large-scale fabricated and then woven into energy textiles. The fiber supercapacitor with merits of tailorability, ultrafast charging capability, and ultrahigh bending-resistance is used as the energy storage module, while an all-solid dye-sensitized solar cell textile is used as the solar energy harvesting module. Our textile sample can be fully charged to 1.2 V in 17 s by self-harvesting solar energy and fully discharged in 78 s at a discharge current density of 0.1 mA.

  9. Photothermally Activated Pyroelectric Polymer Films for Harvesting of Solar Heat with a Hybrid Energy Cell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Teahoon; Na, Jongbeom; Kim, Byeonggwan; Kim, Younghoon; Shin, Haijin; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2015-12-22

    Photothermal effects in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)s (PEDOTs) were explored for pyroelectric conversion. A poled ferroelectric film was coated on both sides with PEDOT via solution casting polymerization of EDOT, to give highly conductive and effective photothermal thin films of PEDOT. The PEDOT films not only provided heat source upon light exposure but worked as electrodes for the output energy from the pyroelectric layer in an energy harvester hybridized with a thermoelectric layer. Compared to a bare thermoelectric system under NIR irradiation, the photothermal-pyro-thermoelectric device showed more than 6 times higher thermoelectric output with the additional pyroelectric output. The photothermally driven pyroelectric harvesting film provided a very fast electric output with a high voltage output (Vout) of 15 V. The pyroelectric effect was significant due to the transparent and high photothermal PEDOT film, which could also work as an electrode. A hybrid energy harvester was assembled to enhance photoconversion efficiency (PCE) of a solar cell with a thermoelectric device operated by the photothermally generated heat. The PCE was increased more than 20% under sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5G) utilizing the transmitted light through the photovoltaic cell as a heat source that was converted into pyroelectric and thermoelectric output simultaneously from the high photothermal PEDOT electrodes. Overall, this work provides a dynamic and static hybrid energy cell to harvest solar energy in full spectral range and thermal energy, to allow solar powered switching of an electrochromic display.

  10. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-10-16

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m(2) mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems.

  11. Novel Semiconducting Polymers for Highly Efficient Solar Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-11

    rooftops of buildings. However, the cost of these devices is still too high to be economically viable. 2 The urgency of securing sustainable...inorganic counterparts. 4 So far, the most successful architecture to build organic photovoltaic solar cells is the BHJ structure prepared by

  12. A Single-Chip Solar Energy Harvesting IC Using Integrated Photodiodes for Biomedical Implant Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Law, Man-Kay; Mak, Pui-In; Martins, Rui P

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an ultra-compact single-chip solar energy harvesting IC using on-chip solar cell for biomedical implant applications is presented. By employing an on-chip charge pump with parallel connected photodiodes, a 3.5 × efficiency improvement can be achieved when compared with the conventional stacked photodiode approach to boost the harvested voltage while preserving a single-chip solution. A photodiode-assisted dual startup circuit (PDSC) is also proposed to improve the area efficiency and increase the startup speed by 77%. By employing an auxiliary charge pump (AQP) using zero threshold voltage (ZVT) devices in parallel with the main charge pump, a low startup voltage of 0.25 V is obtained while minimizing the reversion loss. A 4 Vin gate drive voltage is utilized to reduce the conduction loss. Systematic charge pump and solar cell area optimization is also introduced to improve the energy harvesting efficiency. The proposed system is implemented in a standard 0.18- [Formula: see text] CMOS technology and occupies an active area of 1.54 [Formula: see text]. Measurement results show that the on-chip charge pump can achieve a maximum efficiency of 67%. With an incident power of 1.22 [Formula: see text] from a halogen light source, the proposed energy harvesting IC can deliver an output power of 1.65 [Formula: see text] at 64% charge pump efficiency. The chip prototype is also verified using in-vitro experiment.

  13. Design, fabrication, and characterization of multifunctional wings to harvest solar energy in flapping wing air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Gehlhar, Rachel D.; Nolen, Savannah; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Bruck, Hugh A.

    2015-06-01

    Currently, flapping wing unmanned aerial vehicles (a.k.a., ornithopters or robotic birds) sustain very short duration flight due to limited on-board energy storage capacity. Therefore, energy harvesting elements, such as flexible solar cells, need to be used as materials in critical components, such as wing structures, to increase operational performance. In this paper, we describe a layered fabrication method that was developed for realizing multifunctional composite wings for a unique robotic bird we developed, known as Robo Raven, by creating compliant wing structure from flexible solar cells. The deformed wing shape and aerodynamic lift/thrust loads were characterized throughout the flapping cycle to understand wing mechanics. A multifunctional performance analysis was developed to understand how integration of solar cells into the wings influences flight performance under two different operating conditions: (1) directly powering wings to increase operation time, and (2) recharging batteries to eliminate need for external charging sources. The experimental data is then used in the analysis to identify a performance index for assessing benefits of multifunctional compliant wing structures. The resulting platform, Robo Raven III, was the first demonstration of a robotic bird that flew using energy harvested from solar cells. We developed three different versions of the wing design to validate the multifunctional performance analysis. It was also determined that residual thrust correlated to shear deformation of the wing induced by torsional twist, while biaxial strain related to change in aerodynamic shape correlated to lift. It was also found that shear deformation of the solar cells induced changes in power output directly correlating to thrust generation associated with torsional deformation. Thus, it was determined that multifunctional solar cell wings may be capable of three functions: (1) lightweight and flexible structure to generate aerodynamic forces, (2

  14. Platinum Alloy Tailored All-Weather Solar Cells for Energy Harvesting from Sun and Rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qunwei; Duan, Yanyan; He, Benlin; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-11-07

    Solar cells that can harvest energy in all weathers are promising in solving the energy crisis and environmental problems. The power outputs are nearly zero under dark conditions for state-of-the-art solar cells. To address this issue, we present herein a class of platinum alloy (PtMx , M=Ni, Fe, Co, Cu, Mo) tailored all-weather solar cells that can harvest energy from rain and realize photoelectric conversion under sun illumination. By tuning the stoichiometric Pt/M ratio and M species, the optimized solar cell yields a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 10.38 % under simulated sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2) ) as well as current of 3.90 μA and voltage of 115.52 μV under simulated raindrops. Moreover, the electric signals are highly dependent on the dripping velocity and the concentration of simulated raindrops along with concentrations of cation and anion. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evaluating Micro-Power Management of Solar Energy Harvesting using a Novel Modular Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokert, J.; Beckedahl, T.; Reindl, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    Micro-Power Management (μPM) is essential to supply power to autarkic sensor nodes from energy harvesting sources. As there are numerous ways to realize a μPM, the question arises of how to benchmark different managements under reproducible boundary conditions. In this paper we present these conditions for solar harvesting. Further, we propose a system efficiency definition, which is applicable to all self-powered systems. For verification, we use our modular construction kit, which is used to set up four different μPM configurations. We examined the interplay of state-of-the-art power converters with a supercapacitor array. As one result, the improvement of using a buck converter compared to an LDO was quantified by an increase of 10 percentage points in the system efficiency. The experiments show that the modular setup and the boundary conditions are suitable for such investigations.

  16. Energy-Efficient Control with Harvesting Predictions for Solar-Powered Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengyue Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks equipped with rechargeable batteries are useful for outdoor environmental monitoring. However, the severe energy constraints of the sensor nodes present major challenges for long-term applications. To achieve sustainability, solar cells can be used to acquire energy from the environment. Unfortunately, the energy supplied by the harvesting system is generally intermittent and considerably influenced by the weather. To improve the energy efficiency and extend the lifetime of the networks, we propose algorithms for harvested energy prediction using environmental shadow detection. Thus, the sensor nodes can adjust their scheduling plans accordingly to best suit their energy production and residual battery levels. Furthermore, we introduce clustering and routing selection methods to optimize the data transmission, and a Bayesian network is used for warning notifications of bottlenecks along the path. The entire system is implemented on a real-time Texas Instruments CC2530 embedded platform, and the experimental results indicate that these mechanisms sustain the networks’ activities in an uninterrupted and efficient manner.

  17. Energy-Efficient Control with Harvesting Predictions for Solar-Powered Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tengyue; Lin, Shouying; Feng, Qijie; Chen, Yanlian

    2016-01-04

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with rechargeable batteries are useful for outdoor environmental monitoring. However, the severe energy constraints of the sensor nodes present major challenges for long-term applications. To achieve sustainability, solar cells can be used to acquire energy from the environment. Unfortunately, the energy supplied by the harvesting system is generally intermittent and considerably influenced by the weather. To improve the energy efficiency and extend the lifetime of the networks, we propose algorithms for harvested energy prediction using environmental shadow detection. Thus, the sensor nodes can adjust their scheduling plans accordingly to best suit their energy production and residual battery levels. Furthermore, we introduce clustering and routing selection methods to optimize the data transmission, and a Bayesian network is used for warning notifications of bottlenecks along the path. The entire system is implemented on a real-time Texas Instruments CC2530 embedded platform, and the experimental results indicate that these mechanisms sustain the networks' activities in an uninterrupted and efficient manner.

  18. Optimization Design and Simulation of a Multi-Source Energy Harvester Based on Solar and Radioisotope Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel multi-source energy harvester based on solar and radioisotope energy sources is designed and simulated in this work. We established the calculation formulas for the short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage, and then studied and analyzed the optimization thickness of the semiconductor, doping concentration, and junction depth with simulation of the transport process of β particles in a semiconductor material using the Monte Carlo simulation program MCNP (version 5, Radiation Safety Information Computational Center, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In order to improve the efficiency of converting solar light energy into electric power, we adopted PC1D (version 5.9, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia to optimize the parameters, and selected the best parameters for converting both the radioisotope energy and solar energy into electricity. The results concluded that the best parameters for the multi-source energy harvester are as follows: Na is 1 × 1019 cm−3, Nd is 3.8 × 1016 cm−3, a PN junction depth of 0.5 μm (using the 147Pm radioisotope source, and so on. Under these parameters, the proposed harvester can achieve a conversion efficiency of 5.05% for the 147Pm radioisotope source (with the activity of 9.25 × 108 Bq and 20.8% for solar light radiation (AM1.5. Such a design and parameters are valuable for some unique micro-power fields, such as applications in space, isolated terrestrial applications, and smart dust in battlefields.

  19. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-28

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.

  20. Solar energy harvesting in the epicuticle of the oriental hornet ( Vespa orientalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Marian; Hod, Idan; Zaban, Arie; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.; Galushko, Dmitry; Bergman, David J.

    2010-12-01

    The Oriental hornet worker correlates its digging activity with solar insolation. Solar radiation passes through the epicuticle, which exhibits a grating-like structure, and continues to pass through layers of the exo-endocuticle until it is absorbed by the pigment melanin in the brown-colored cuticle or xanthopterin in the yellow-colored cuticle. The correlation between digging activity and the ability of the cuticle to absorb part of the solar radiation implies that the Oriental hornet may harvest parts of the solar radiation. In this study, we explore this intriguing possibility by analyzing the biophysical properties of the cuticle. We use rigorous coupled wave analysis simulations to show that the cuticle surfaces are structured to reduced reflectance and act as diffraction gratings to trap light and increase the amount absorbed in the cuticle. A dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) was constructed in order to show the ability of xanthopterin to serve as a light-harvesting molecule.

  1. Broad-band polarization-independent metamaterial absorber for solar energy harvesting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağmancı, Mehmet; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Ünal, Emin; Akgol, Oguzhan; Karadağ, Faruk; Sabah, Cumali

    2017-06-01

    A novel broad-band polarization-independent with wide-angle metamaterial absorber(MA) is investigated and demonstrated for solar energy harvesting applications. The proposed MA is composed of two metal layers which have different thickness and a dielectric layer which is sandwiched between these metal layers. By this combination, the proposed MA indicates plasmonic resonance characteristic. Numeric results show that proposed MA has perfect absorption characteristic which is above 88.28% with wide-angle for all visible region. It shows almost perfect absorption of 98.4% at the resonance frequency of 621.76 THz and has also 90% absorption between frequencies of 445 THz and 770 THz which is nearly all visible light region. Besides, numerical results validate that the proposed MA could achieve very high absorption at wide-angles of incidence for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves.. The proposed MA and its variations enable for solar cell applications due to have upper ratio of 90% in the widest range of visible spectrum comparing to the studies in literature. In order to show additional features of the proposed structure, parametric studies are realized and discussed. Furthermore, the absorption characteristic of proposed MA is investigated for infrared and ultraviolet region. The enhancement of absorption of the structure will provide new type of sensors in these frequency ranges.

  2. Photoelectrochemical reaction in conducting polymers for solar energy harvesting and charge storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Tevi, Tete; Takshi, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Energy storage is an essential ground for solar energy systems, particularly for the off-grid applications. Concurrent energy harvesting and charge storage in a photoactive supercapacitor has already been demonstrated. The key element in such a device is a conducting polymer which stores the charge via change in its redox states. In this work, we have studied the photoelectrochemical reactions in composites of polyaniline (PANI). We used the electrochemical deposition method for the polymer growth. The results of the current study indicate that the photo-reactivity of the materials largely depends on the electrolyte and the type of the dye molecule. Among different synthetic dyes, methylene blue has shown the strongest photoelectrochemical reaction in an HCl electrolyte. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results showed that the amplitude of the redox peaks changes significantly upon illumination. The amount of stored charges in the polymer was estimated from the CV results. The results encourage the application of PANI for charge storage in a photoactive supercapacitor.

  3. Energy transfer in nanowire solar cells with photon-harvesting shells

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of a nanowire solar cell with photon-harvesting shells is presented. In this architecture, organic molecules which absorb strongly in the near infrared where silicon absorbs weakly are coupled to silicon nanowires (SiNWs). This enables an array of 7-μm -long nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm to absorb over 85% of the photons above the bandgap of silicon. The organic molecules are bonded to the surface of the SiNWs forming a thin shell. They absorb the low-energy photons and subsequently transfer the energy to the SiNWs via Förster resonant energy transfer, creating free electrons and holes within the SiNWs. The carriers are then separated at a radial p-n junction in a nanowire and extracted at the respective electrodes. The shortness of the nanowires is expected to lower the dark current due to the decrease in p-n junction surface area, which scales linearly with wire length. The theoretical power conversion efficiency is 15%. To demonstrate this concept, we measure a 60% increase in photocurrent from a planar silicon-on-insulator diode when a 5 nm layer of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′ -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene is applied to the surface of the silicon. This increase is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Micro-cable structured textile for simultaneously harvesting solar and mechanical energy

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Developing lightweight, flexible, foldable and sustainable power sources with simple transport and storage remains a challenge and an urgent need for the advancement of next-generation wearable electronics. Here, we report a micro-cable power textile for simultaneously harvesting energy from ambient sunshine and mechanical movement. Solar cells fabricated from lightweight polymer fibres into micro cables are then woven via a shuttle-flying process with fibre-based triboelectric nanogenerators to create a smart fabric. A single layer of such fabric is 320 μm thick and can be integrated into various cloths, curtains, tents and so on. This hybrid power textile, fabricated with a size of 4 cm by 5 cm, was demonstrated to charge a 2 mF commercial capacitor up to 2 V in 1 min under ambient sunlight in the presence of mechanical excitation, such as human motion and wind blowing. The textile could continuously power an electronic watch, directly charge a cell phone and drive water splitting reactions. In light of concerns about global warming and energy crises, searching for renewable energy resources that are not detrimental to the environment is one of the most urgent challenges to the sustainable development of human civilization1,2,3. Generating electricity from natural forces provides a superior solution to alleviate expanding energy needs on a sustainable basis4,5,6,7,8,9. With the rapid advancement of modern technologies, developing lightweight, flexible, sustainable and stable power sources remains both highly desirable and a challenge10,11,12,13,14,15,16. Solar irradiance and mechanical motion are clean and renewable energy sources17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24. Fabric-based materials are most common for humans and fibre-based textiles can effectively accommodate the complex deformations induced by body motion25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32. A smart textile that generates electrical power from absorbed solar irradiance and mechanical motion could be an important

  5. Energy Harvest Predictions for a Spectrally Tuned Multiple Quantum Well Device Utilising Measured and Modelled Solar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Alison; Norton, Matthew; Georghiou, George E.; Lumb, Matthew; Tibbits, Tom N. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a comparison between modelled and measured solar spectra in Nicosia, Cyprus. The modelled spectra were generated using the SMARTS model, driven by various sources of measured atmospheric data, updated every 30 minutes or less. A comparison with measured spectra reveals the most reliable source of data for that location and period. The spectral simulations demonstrate that both aerosol optical depth and precipitable water content must be accurately known at the location of interest in order to realistically recreate the shape and power of measured spectra accurately. Energy harvest calculations of four triple junction (3J) solar cell designs were performed using the simulated spectra. The model predicts a 5.7% increase in energy harvest when multiple quantum wells are included in a standard 3J device. Simple modifications made to the quantum well device to `tune' the cell to the incident spectra result in a 6.3% increase in predicted energy production over the standard 3J device.

  6. Light-harvesting host-guest antenna materials for solar energy conversion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stefan; Calzaferri, Gion

    2006-04-01

    In natural photosynthesis, light is absorbed by photonic antenna systems consisting of a few hundred chlorophyll molecules. These devices allow fast energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to an unexcited neighbour molecule in such a way that the excitation energy reaches the reaction centre with high probability. Trapping occurs there. The anisotropic arrangement of the chlorophyll molecules is important for efficient energy migration. In natural antennae the formation of aggregates is prevented by fencing the chlorophyll molecules in polypeptide cages. A similar approach is possible by enclosing dyes inside a microporous material and by choosing conditions such that the cavities are able to uptake only monomers but not aggregates. In most of our experiments we have been using zeolite L as a host because it was found to be very versatile. Its crystals are of cylindrical shape and consist of an extended one-dimensional tube system. They can be prepared in wide size range. We have filled the individual tubes with successive chains of different dye molecules and we have shown that photonic antenna materials can be prepared. Moreover, fluorescent dye molecules can be bound covalently to the channel entrances. Dependent on the spectral properties of these stopcock molecules, the electronic excitation energy is transported radiationless to the stopcock fixed at the ends of the nanochannels or injected from the stopcock to the dyes inside the zeolite. The radiationless energy migration is in competition with spontaneous emission, thermal deactivation, quenching, and photochemically induced degradation. Fast energy migration is therefore crucial for an efficient antenna material. - The supramolecular organization of the dyes inside the channels is a first stage of organization. It allows light harvesting within the volume of a dye-loaded zeolite L crystal and radiationless transport to both ends of the cylinder or from the ends to the centre. The second

  7. Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shan

    This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of

  8. Micro-cable structured textile for simultaneously harvesting solar and mechanical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Nannan; Zou, Haiyang; Liu, Ruiyuan; Tao, Changyuan; Fan, Xing; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-10-01

    Developing lightweight, flexible, foldable and sustainable power sources with simple transport and storage remains a challenge and an urgent need for the advancement of next-generation wearable electronics. Here, we report a micro-cable power textile for simultaneously harvesting energy from ambient sunshine and mechanical movement. Solar cells fabricated from lightweight polymer fibres into micro cables are then woven via a shuttle-flying process with fibre-based triboelectric nanogenerators to create a smart fabric. A single layer of such fabric is 320 μm thick and can be integrated into various cloths, curtains, tents and so on. This hybrid power textile, fabricated with a size of 4 cm by 5 cm, was demonstrated to charge a 2 mF commercial capacitor up to 2 V in 1 min under ambient sunlight in the presence of mechanical excitation, such as human motion and wind blowing. The textile could continuously power an electronic watch, directly charge a cell phone and drive water splitting reactions.

  9. Design of Contact Electrodes for Semiconductor Nanowire Solar Energy Harvesting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzuging; Ramadurgam, Sarath; Yang, Chen

    2017-04-12

    Transparent, low-resistive contacts are critical for efficient solar energy harvesting devices. It is important to reconsider the material choices and electrode design as devices move from 2D films to 1D nanostructures. In this paper, we study the effectiveness of indium tin oxide (ITO) and metals, such as Ag and Cu, as contacts in 2D and 1D systems. Although ITO has been studied extensively and developed into an effective transparent contact for 2D devices, our results show that effectiveness does not translate to 1D systems. Particularly with consideration of resistance requirement, nanowires with metal shells as contacts enable better absorption within the semiconductor as compared to ITO. Furthermore, there is a strong dependence of contact performance on the semiconductor band gap and diameter of nanowires. We found that metal contacts outperform ITO for nanowire devices, regardless of the sheet resistance constraint, in the regime of diameters less than 100 nm and band-gaps greater than 1 eV. These metal shells optimized for best absorption are significantly thinner than ITO, which enables for the design of devices with high nanowire number density and consequently higher device efficiencies.

  10. Electromagnetic energy harvester for harvesting acoustic energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AEH) for extracting acoustical energy. The developed AEH comprises Helmholtz resonator (HR), a wound coil bonded to a flexible membrane and a permanent magnet placed in a magnet holder. The harvester's performance is analyzed ...

  11. Harvesting wood for energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger A. Arola; Edwin W. Miyata

    1981-01-01

    Illustrates the potential of harvesting wood for industrial energy, based on the results of five harvesting studies. Presents information on harvesting operations, equipment costs, and productivity. Discusses mechanized thinning of hardwoods, clearcutting of low-value stands and recovery of hardwood tops and limbs. Also includes basic information on the physical and...

  12. Increased light harvesting in dye-sensitized solar cells with energy relay dyes

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.

    2009-06-21

    Conventional dye-sensitized solar cells have excellent charge collection efficiencies, high open-circuit voltages and good fill factors. However, dye-sensitized solar cells do not completely absorb all of the photons from the visible and near-infrared domain and consequently have lower short-circuit photocurrent densities than inorganic photovoltaic devices. Here, we present a new design where high-energy photons are absorbed by highly photoluminescent chromophores unattached to the titania and undergo Förster resonant energy transfer to the sensitizing dye. This novel architecture allows for broader spectral absorption, an increase in dye loading, and relaxes the design requirements for the sensitizing dye. We demonstrate a 26% increase in power conversion efficiency when using an energy relay dye (PTCDI) with an organic sensitizing dye (TT1). We estimate the average excitation transfer efficiency in this system to be at least 47%. This system offers a viable pathway to develop more efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

  13. Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  14. An Efficient and Effective Design of InP Nanowires for Maximal Solar Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tang, Xiaohong; Wang, Kai; He, Zhubing; Li, Xianqiang

    2017-11-01

    Solar cells based on subwavelength-dimensions semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays promise a comparable or better performance than their planar counterparts by taking the advantages of strong light coupling and light trapping. In this paper, we present an accurate and time-saving analytical design for optimal geometrical parameters of vertically aligned InP NWs for maximal solar energy absorption. Short-circuit current densities are calculated for each NW array with different geometrical dimensions under solar illumination. Optimal geometrical dimensions are quantitatively presented for single, double, and multiple diameters of the NW arrays arranged both squarely and hexagonal achieving the maximal short-circuit current density of 33.13 mA/cm2. At the same time, intensive finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations are performed to investigate the same NW arrays for the highest light absorption. Compared with time-consuming simulations and experimental results, the predicted maximal short-circuit current densities have tolerances of below 2.2% for all cases. These results unambiguously demonstrate that this analytical method provides a fast and accurate route to guide high performance InP NW-based solar cell design.

  15. An Efficient and Effective Design of InP Nanowires for Maximal Solar Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tang, Xiaohong; Wang, Kai; He, Zhubing; Li, Xianqiang

    2017-11-25

    Solar cells based on subwavelength-dimensions semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays promise a comparable or better performance than their planar counterparts by taking the advantages of strong light coupling and light trapping. In this paper, we present an accurate and time-saving analytical design for optimal geometrical parameters of vertically aligned InP NWs for maximal solar energy absorption. Short-circuit current densities are calculated for each NW array with different geometrical dimensions under solar illumination. Optimal geometrical dimensions are quantitatively presented for single, double, and multiple diameters of the NW arrays arranged both squarely and hexagonal achieving the maximal short-circuit current density of 33.13 mA/cm2. At the same time, intensive finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations are performed to investigate the same NW arrays for the highest light absorption. Compared with time-consuming simulations and experimental results, the predicted maximal short-circuit current densities have tolerances of below 2.2% for all cases. These results unambiguously demonstrate that this analytical method provides a fast and accurate route to guide high performance InP NW-based solar cell design.

  16. Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  17. Energy harvesting for microsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruichao Xu

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this project is to design and fabricate piezoelectric energy harvesters based on integration of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT) thick film technology and silicon microtechnology. The fabrication processes are carried out in close collaboration with Meggitt Sensing Systems (MSS) who has the unique expertise to screen print piezoelectric thick film layers, thus all screen printing steps are done by MSS while the silicon micromachining is carried out at Danchip facility at DTU. The presented energy harvesters are all based on using piezoelectric thick film operating in the 31-mode to generate power when strained. Three archetypes of the numerous fabricated energy harvesters will be presented in detail, they represent three major milestones in this project. The first energy harvester archetype has an unimorph cantilever beam, which consists of a 20 {mu}m silicon layer and 10-30 {mu}m screen printed PZT layer, anchored on a silicon frame at one end and attached to a silicon proof mass at the other. Electrodes will cover both side of the PZT layer, so the harvested energy can be collected electrically. The second archetype has a bimorph cantilever beam, which consists of two 15-35 {mu}m PZT layers, anchored on a silicon frame at the one end and attached to a silicon proof mass at the other. Electrodes are deposited below, between and above the two PZT layers. The root mean square (RMS) power output measured on this type of harvesters is as high as 37.1{mu}W at 1 g. The third archetype is similar to the first one, the screen printed PZT layer is replaced by a lead free piezoelectric material, (KxNa1-x)NbO3 (KNN). Some of the major challenges encountered during the development processes are bad adhesion, fragile structures and short circuiting through the PZT layer. All of which have being fully or partially solved in this project. The final energy harvesters are designed to be used in an energy harvester powered wireless sensing system. (Author)

  18. Silicon Nanowires for Solar Thermal Energy Harvesting: an Experimental Evaluation on the Trade-off Effects of the Spectral Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekone, Abdoul Karim; Chen, Yu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chen, Wen-Kai; Liu, Chia-An; Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2016-12-01

    Silicon nanowire possesses great potential as the material for renewable energy harvesting and conversion. The significantly reduced spectral reflectivity of silicon nanowire to visible light makes it even more attractive in solar energy applications. However, the benefit of its use for solar thermal energy harvesting remains to be investigated and has so far not been clearly reported. The purpose of this study is to provide practical information and insight into the performance of silicon nanowires in solar thermal energy conversion systems. Spectral hemispherical reflectivity and transmissivity of the black silicon nanowire array on silicon wafer substrate were measured. It was observed that the reflectivity is lower in the visible range but higher in the infrared range compared to the plain silicon wafer. A drying experiment and a theoretical calculation were carried out to directly evaluate the effects of the trade-off between scattering properties at different wavelengths. It is clearly seen that silicon nanowires can improve the solar thermal energy harnessing. The results showed that a 17.8 % increase in the harvest and utilization of solar thermal energy could be achieved using a silicon nanowire array on silicon substrate as compared to that obtained with a plain silicon wafer.

  19. Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Gregory D.; Fleming, Graham R.; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-10-01

    Solar fuel production often starts with the energy from light being absorbed by an assembly of molecules; this electronic excitation is subsequently transferred to a suitable acceptor. For example, in photosynthesis, antenna complexes capture sunlight and direct the energy to reaction centres that then carry out the associated chemistry. In this Review, we describe the principles learned from studies of various natural antenna complexes and suggest how to elucidate strategies for designing light-harvesting systems. We envisage that such systems will be used for solar fuel production, to direct and regulate excitation energy flow using molecular organizations that facilitate feedback and control, or to transfer excitons over long distances. Also described are the notable properties of light-harvesting chromophores, spatial-energetic landscapes, the roles of excitonic states and quantum coherence, as well as how antennas are regulated and photoprotected.

  20. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  1. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Caliò

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions.

  2. Piezoelectric energy harvesting solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-03-10

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions.

  3. Wearable Biomechanical Energy Harvesting Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Man Choi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting has been attracting attention as a technology that is capable of replacing or supplementing a battery with the development of various mobile electronics. In environments where stable electrical supply is not possible, energy harvesting technology can guarantee an increased leisure and safety for human beings. Harvesting with several watts of power is essential for directly driving or efficiently charging mobile electronic devices such as laptops or cell phones. In this study, we reviewed energy harvesting technologies that harvest biomechanical energy from human motion such as foot strike, joint motion, and upper limb motion. They are classified based on the typical principle of kinetic energy harvesting: piezoelectric, triboelectric, and electromagnetic energy harvesting. We focused on the wearing position of high-power wearable biomechanical energy harvesters (WBEHs generating watt-level power. In addition, the features and future trends of the watt-level WBEHs are discussed.

  4. Solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer-Larsen, P.; Krebs, F.C. (Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark)); Plaza, D.M. (Plataforma Solar de Almeria-CIEMAT (Spain))

    2010-11-15

    Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on earth. In a sustainable future with an ever-increasing demand for energy, we will need to use this resource better. Solar energy technologies either convert sunlight directly into heat and electrical energy or use it to power chemical conversions which create 'solar fuels' or synthetic compounds. Solar heating technologies have developed steadily for many years and solar heating and cooling is one of the world's commonest renewable energy technologies. This chapter, however, focuses on technologies for electricity production and touches more briefly on the prospects for solar fuels. The section on Danish perspectives also discusses solar thermal heating in district heating plants. In recent decades, two technologies for converting solar energy into electrical energy have dominated: photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP). Today's silicon and thin-film PV technologies are advancing steadily, with new materials and technologies constantly being developed, and there are clear roadmaps for lowering production costs. In the discussion below we assess the maturation potential of currently emerging PV technologies within the next 40 years. Concentrating solar power is already a proven technology, and below we evaluate its potential to become a substantial part of the energy mix by 2050. Solar fuels cover a range of technologies. The chapter is to a great extent based on two recent roadmaps from the International Energy Agency (IEA). Many reports, predictions, scenarios and roadmaps for solar energy deployment exist. The IEA predictions for the penetration of solar energy in the future energy system are low relative to many of the other studies. The IEA roadmaps, however, cover most aspects of the future deployment of the technologies and reference older work. (Author)

  5. Multifunctional Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Anton, Steven Robert

    2011-01-01

    Energy harvesting technology has the ability to create autonomous, self-powered electronic systems that do not rely on battery power for their operation. The term energy harvesting describes the process of converting ambient energy surrounding a system into useful electrical energy through the use of a specific material or transducer. A widely studied form of energy harvesting involves the conversion of mechanical vibration energy into electrical energy using piezoelectric materials, which ...

  6. Advances in energy harvesting methods

    CERN Document Server

    Elvin, Niell

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Energy Harvesting Methods presents a state-of-the-art understanding of diverse aspects of energy harvesting with a focus on: broadband energy conversion, new concepts in electronic circuits, and novel materials. This book covers recent advances in energy harvesting using different transduction mechanisms; these include methods of performance enhancement using nonlinear effects, non-harmonic forms of excitation and non-resonant energy harvesting, fluidic energy harvesting, and advances in both low-power electronics as well as  material science. The contributors include a brief liter

  7. Micro energy harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Briand, Danick; Roundy, Shad

    2015-01-01

    With its inclusion of the fundamentals, systems and applications, this reference provides readers with the basics of micro energy conversion along with expert knowledge on system electronics and real-life microdevices. The authors address different aspects of energy harvesting at the micro scale with a focus on miniaturized and microfabricated devices. Along the way they provide an overview of the field by compiling knowledge on the design, materials development, device realization and aspects of system integration, covering emerging technologies, as well as applications in power management, e

  8. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  9. Visible light-harvesting photoanodes for solar energy conversion: A comparison of anchoring groups to titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Lauren A.

    Environmental concerns related to climate change and geopolitical issues related to energy security have led to a widespread pursuit of alternative, non-fossil fuel energy sources capable of meeting our increasing global energy demands. Solar energy, which strikes the earth's surface at a rate vastly exceeding our current worldwide power demand, presents itself as a promising source of clean, abundant and renewable energy. The capture and conversion of solar energy into electricity as well as storable, transportable chemical fuels has therefore become major area of chemical research. Inspired by photosynthesis in nature, in which plants and algae convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into oxygen and stored chemical fuel in the form of sugars, recent work has focused on visible light-driven water-splitting technologies for the production of solar fuels. Honda and Fujishima reported the first example of photoelectrochemical water oxidation in 1972. In their system, an inexpensive titanium dioxide semiconductor irradiated with ultraviolet light produced oxygen at the photoanode surface and hydrogen at the surface of a platinum counter electrode. In attempt to harness visible light instead, titanium dioxide and other inexpensive wide band gap photoanodes have been functionalized with visible light-absorbing molecular dyes. These dye-sensitized photoanodes have been used successfully to convert solar energy into electrical current, as in dye-sensitized solar cells, and to drive chemical processes like water oxidation, as in photocatalytic cells. In both systems, a long-lived charge separation is established upon illumination of the photoanode surface when a photoexcited molecular chromophore transfers an electron to the semiconductor conduction band. Following this electron injection process, a nearby redox-active species is oxidized and refills the hole left behind on the molecular chromophore. While the steps of this scheme are relatively straightforward, the

  10. Can Integrated Micro-Optical Concentrator Technology Revolutionize Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Solar Energy Harvesting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Michael W.

    2015-12-01

    The economies-of-scale and enhanced performance of integrated micro-technologies have repeatedly delivered disruptive market impact. Examples range from microelectronics to displays to lighting. However, integrated micro-scale technologies have yet to be applied in a transformational way to solar photovoltaic panels. The recently announced Micro-scale Optimized Solar-cell Arrays with Integrated Concentration (MOSAIC) program aims to create a new paradigm in solar photovoltaic panel technology based on the incorporation of micro-concentrating photo-voltaic (μ-CPV) cells. As depicted in Figure 1, MOSAIC will integrate arrays of micro-optical concentrating elements and micro-scale PV elements to achieve the same aggregated collection area and high conversion efficiency of a conventional (i.e., macro-scale) CPV approach, but with the low profile and mass, and hopefully cost, of a conventional non-concentrated PV panel. The reduced size and weight, and enhanced wiring complexity, of the MOSAIC approach provide the opportunity to access the high-performance/low-cost region between the conventional CPV and flat-plate (1-sun) PV domains shown in Figure 2. Accessing this portion of the graph in Figure 2 will expand the geographic and market reach of flat-plate PV. This talk reviews the motivation and goals for the MOSAIC program. The diversity of the technical approaches to micro-concentration, embedded solar tracking, and hybrid direct/diffuse solar resource collection found in the MOSAIC portfolio of projects will also be highlighted.

  11. Energy harvesting with functional materials and microsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Bhaskaran, Madhu; Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    For decades, people have searched for ways to harvest energy from natural sources. Lately, a desire to address the issue of global warming and climate change has popularized solar or photovoltaic technology, while piezoelectric technology is being developed to power handheld devices without batteries, and thermoelectric technology is being explored to convert wasted heat, such as in automobile engine combustion, into electricity. Featuring contributions from international researchers in both academics and industry, Energy Harvesting with Functional Materials and Microsystems explains the growi

  12. Waste energy harvesting mechanical and thermal energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ling Bing, Kong; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    Waste Energy Harvesting overviews the latest progress in waste energy harvesting technologies, with specific focusing on waste thermal mechanical energies. Thermal energy harvesting technologies include thermoelectric effect, storage through phase change materials and pyroelectric effect. Waste mechanical energy harvesting technologies include piezoelectric (ferroelectric) effect with ferroelectric materials and nanogenerators. The book aims to strengthen the syllabus in energy, materials and physics and is well suitable for students and professionals in the fields.

  13. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters Integrating Solar Radiation with Wind Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric harvesters use temperature fluctuations to generate electrical outputs. Solar radiation and waste heat are rich energy sources that can be harvested. Pyroelectric energy converters offer a novel and direct energy-conversion technology by transforming time-dependent temperatures directly into electricity. Moreover, the great challenge for pyroelectric energy harvesting lies in finding promising temperature variations or an alternating thermal loading in real situations. Hence, in this article, a novel pyroelectric harvester integrating solar radiation with wind power by the pyroelectric effect is proposed. Solar radiation is a thermal source, and wind is a dynamic potential. A disk generator is used for harvesting wind power. A mechanism is considered to convert the rotary energy of the disk generator to drive a shutter for generating temperature variations in pyroelectric cells using a planetary gear system. The optimal period of the pyroelectric cells is 35 s to harvest the stored energy, about 70 μJ, while the rotary velocity of the disk generator is about 31 RPM and the wind speed is about 1 m/s. In this state, the stored energy acquired from the pyroelectric harvester is about 75% more than that from the disk generator. Although the generated energy of the proposed pyroelectric harvester is less than that of the disk generator, the pyroelectric harvester plays a complementary role when the disk generator is inactive in situations of low wind speed.

  14. Molecular coatings of nitride semiconductors for optoelectronics, electronics, and solar energy harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2018-02-01

    Gallium nitride based semiconductors are provided having one or more passivated surfaces. The surfaces can have a plurality of thiol compounds attached thereto for enhancement of optoelectronic properties and/or solar water splitting properties. The surfaces can also include wherein the surface has been treated with chemical solution for native oxide removal and / or wherein the surface has attached thereto a plurality of nitrides, oxides, insulating compounds, thiol compounds, or a combination thereof to create a treated surface for enhancement of optoelectronic properties and / or solar water splitting properties. Methods of making the gallium nitride based semiconductors are also provided. Methods can include cleaning a native surface of a gallium nitride semiconductor to produce a cleaned surface, etching the cleaned surface to remove oxide layers on the surface, and applying single or multiple coatings of nitrides, oxides, insulating compounds, thiol compounds, or a combination thereof attached to the surface.

  15. Energy harvesting for microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Ruichao

    to the first one, the screen printed PZT layer is replaced by a lead free piezoelectric material, (KxNa1-x)NbO3 (KNN). Some of the major challenges encountered during the development processes are bad adhesion, fragile structures and short circuiting through the PZT layer. All which have being fully......The purpose of this project is to design and fabricate piezoelectric energy harvesters based on integration of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT) thick film technology and silicon microtechnology. The fabrication processes are carried out in close collaboration with Meggitt Sensing Systems (MSS) who has...

  16. Energy harvesting water vehicle

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Devendra

    2018-01-04

    An efficient energy harvesting (EEH) water vehicle is disclosed. The base of the EEH water vehicle is fabricated with rolling cylindrical drums that can rotate freely in the same direction of the water medium. The drums reduce the drag at the vehicle-water interface. This reduction in drag corresponds to an increase in speed and/or greater fuel efficiency. The mechanical energy of the rolling cylindrical drums is also transformed into electrical energy using an electricity producing device, such as a dynamo or an alternator. Thus, the efficiency of the vehicle is enhanced in two parallel modes: from the reduction in drag at the vehicle-water interface, and from capturing power from the rotational motion of the drums.

  17. Photonic Color Filters Integrated with Organic Solar Cells for Energy Harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hui Joon

    2011-09-27

    Color filters are indispensable in most color display applications. In most cases, they are chemical pigment-based filters, which produce a particular color by absorbing its complementary color, and the absorbed energy is totally wasted. If the absorbed and wasted energy can be utilized, e.g., to generate electricity, innovative energy-efficient electronic media could be envisioned. Here we show photonic nanostructures incorporated with photovoltaics capable of producing desirable colors in the visible band and utilize the absorbed light to simultaneously generate electrical powers. In contrast to the traditional colorant-based filters, these devices offer great advantages for electro-optic applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Progress on bioinspired, biomimetic, and bioreplication routes to harvest solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-06-01

    Although humans have long been imitating biological structures to serve their particular purposes, only a few decades ago engineered biomimicry began to be considered a technoscientific discipline with a great problem-solving potential. The three methodologies of engineered biomimicry-viz., bioinspiration, biomimetic, and bioreplication-employ and impact numerous technoscientific fields. For producing fuels and electricity by artificial photosynthesis, both processes and porous surfaces inspired by plants and certain marine animals are under active investigation. Biomimetically textured surfaces on the subwavelength scale have been shown to reduce the reflectance of photovoltaic solar cells over the visible and the near-infrared regimes. Lenticular compound lenses bioreplicated from insect eyes by an industrially scalable technique offer a similar promise.

  19. Hybrid Energy Cell with Hierarchical Nano/Micro-Architectured Polymer Film to Harvest Mechanical, Solar, and Wind Energies Individually/Simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudem, Bhaskar; Ko, Yeong Hwan; Leem, Jung Woo; Lim, Joo Ho; Yu, Jae Su

    2016-11-09

    We report the creation of hybrid energy cells based on hierarchical nano/micro-architectured polydimethylsiloxane (HNMA-PDMS) films with multifunctionality to simultaneously harvest mechanical, solar, and wind energies. These films consist of nano/micro dual-scale architectures (i.e., nanonipples on inverted micropyramidal arrays) on the PDMS surface. The HNMA-PDMS is replicable by facile and cost-effective soft imprint lithography using a nanoporous anodic alumina oxide film formed on the micropyramidal-structured silicon substrate. The HNMA-PDMS film plays multifunctional roles as a triboelectric layer in nanogenerators and an antireflection layer for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), as well as a self-cleaning surface. This film is employed in triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) devices, fabricated by laminating it on indium-tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate (ITO/PET) as a bottom electrode. The large effective contact area that emerged from the densely packed hierarchical nano/micro-architectures of the PDMS film leads to the enhancement of TENG device performance. Moreover, the HNMA-PDMS/ITO/PET, with a high transmittance of >90%, also results in highly transparent TENG devices. By placing the HNMA-PDMS/ITO/PET, where the ITO/PET is coated with zinc oxide nanowires, as the top glass substrate of DSSCs, the device is able to add the functionality of TENG devices, thus creating a hybrid energy cell. The hybrid energy cell can successfully convert mechanical, solar, and wind energies into electricity, simultaneously or independently. To specify the device performance, the effects of external pushing frequency and load resistance on the output of TENG devices are also analyzed, including the photovoltaic performance of the hybrid energy cells.

  20. Thermoelectrics and its energy harvesting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowe, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    .... It details the latest techniques for the preparation of thermoelectric materials employed in energy harvesting, together with advances in the thermoelectric characterisation of nanoscale material...

  1. Innovative Power-Augmentation-Guide-Vane Design of Wind-Solar Hybrid Renewable Energy Harvester for Urban High Rise Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chong Wen; Zainon, M. Z.; Chew, Poh Sin; Kui, Soo Chun; Keong, Wee Seng; Chen, Pan Kok

    2010-06-01

    To generate greater quantities of energy from wind, the most efficient solution would be by increasing the wind speed. Also, due to the decreasing number of economic wind energy sites, there are plans to place wind turbines closer to populated areas. To site wind turbines out from rural areas, the current problems of wind turbines need to be resolved, especially visual impact, poor starting behaviour in low wind speeds, noise and danger caused by blade failure. In this paper, a patented wind-solar hybrid renewable energy harvester is introduced. It is a compact system that integrates and optimizes several green elements and can be built on the top (or between upper levels) of high rise buildings or structures. This system can be used in remote and urban areas, particularly at locations where the wind speed is lower and more turbulent. It overcomes the inferior aspect on the low wind speed by guiding and increasing the speed of the high altitude free-stream wind through fixed or yaw-able power-augmentation-guide-vane (PAGV) before entering the wind turbine (straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine, VAWT in this project) at center portion. PAGV is a new and innovative design where its appearance or outer design can be blended into the building architecture without negative visual impact. From the studies, it is shown that the wind speed increment in the PAGV can be produced according to the Bernoulli's principle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is used to optimize the geometry of the PAGV and the simulation results demonstrated the technical possibility of this innovative concept. The PAGV replaces the free air-stream from wind by multiple channels of speed-increased and directional-controlled air-stream. With the PAGV, this lift-type VAWT can be self-started and its size can be reduced for a given power output. The design is also safer since the VAWT is enclosed by the PAGV. By integrating the PAGV with the VAWT (the diameter and height of PAGV are 2

  2. Radio Frequency Energy Harvesting Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Action NECHIBVUTE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This radio frequency (RF energy harvesting is an emerging technology and research area that promises to produce energy to run low-power wireless devices. The great interest that has recently been paid to RF harvesting is predominantly driven by the great progress in both wireless communication systems and broadcasting technologies that have availed a lot of freely propagating ambient RF energy. The principle aim of an RF energy harvesting system is to convert the received ambient RF energy into usable DC power. This paper presents a state of the art concise review of RF energy harvesting sources for low power applications, and also discusses open research questions and future research directions on ambient RF energy harvesting.

  3. Nanostructured antireflective in-plane solar harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Jared; Bagal, Abhijeet; Zhang, Xu A; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-08-07

    In this work, we demonstrate a two-dimensional nano-hole array that can reduce reflection losses while passively trapping and harvesting incident light. The surface structure is designed to scavenge a small portion of incident light that would typically be lost due to Fresnel reflection, while the majority of light transmits unobstructed like a regular window. The trapping mechanism is dependent on angle and wavelength, and can be designed to selectively trap narrow wavelength bands using the constructed theoretical models. We demonstrate that structures with periods of 275 nm and 325 nm can trap different wavelength range within the visible spectrum, while simultaneously suppressing reflection losses. The trapping effect can be observed visually, and can be converted to a current output using a photovoltaic (PV) cell on the glass edge. The fabrication of such materials employs a simple replication process, and can be readily scaled up for large-scale manufacturing. The demonstrated solar harvester can be potentially be widely deployed in residential and commercial buildings as multifunctional windows for solar energy harvesting, scavenging, spectra splitting, and anti-glare properties.

  4. Electromagnetic energy harvester for harvesting acoustic energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farid U Khan

    giadis et al [10] respectively. Moreover, acoustical noise is also present in abundance in the surroundings [11–15]. Converting ambient acoustical noise with an acoustic energy (AEH) into a useful electrical power is most appropriate for applications like health monitoring of vehicles, machineries, buildings and bridges.

  5. Potential Ambient Energy-Harvesting Sources and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Ambient energy harvesting is also known as energy scavenging or power harvesting, and it is the process where energy is obtained from the environment. A variety of techniques are available for energy scavenging, including solar and wind powers, ocean waves, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity, and physical motions. For example, some systems…

  6. Multi-source energy harvester for wildlife tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You; Zuo, Lei; Zhou, Wanlu; Liang, Changwei; McCabe, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Sufficient power supply to run GPS machinery and transmit data on a long-term basis remains to be the key challenge for wildlife tracking technology. Traditional way of replacing battery periodically is not only time and money consuming but also dangerous to live-trapping wild animals. In this paper, an innovative wildlife tracking device with multi-source energy harvester with advantage of high efficiency and reliability is investigated and developed. This multi-source energy harvester entails a solar energy harvester and an innovative rotational electromagnetic energy harvester is mounted on the "wildlife tracking collar" which will remarkably extend the duration of wild life tracking. A feedforward and feedback control of DC-DC converter circuit is adopted to passively realize the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) logic for the solar energy harvester. The rotational electromagnetic energy harvester can mechanically rectify the irregular bidirectional motion into unidirectional motion has been modeled and demonstrated.

  7. Solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz I

    2012-01-01

    Finally filling a gap in the literature for a text that also adopts the chemist?s view of this hot topic, Prof Likhtenshtein, an experienced author and internationally renowned scientist, considers different physical and engineering aspects in solar energy conversion. From theory to real-life systems, he shows exactly which chemical reactions take place when converting light energy, providing an overview of the chemical perspective from fundamentals to molecular harvesting systems and solar cells. This essential guide will thus help researchers in academia and industry better understa

  8. Magnetic Nanocomposite Cilia Energy Harvester

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Asadullah

    2016-02-11

    An energy harvester capable of converting low frequency vibrations into electrical energy is presented. The operating principle, fabrication process and output characteristics at different frequencies are discussed. The harvester is realized by fabricating an array of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - iron nanowire nanocomposite cilia on a planar coil array. Each coil element consists of 14 turns and occupies an area of 600 μm x 600μm. The cilia are arranged in a 12x5 array and each cilium is 250 μm wide and 2 mm long. The magnetic characteristics of the fabricated cilia indicate that the nanowires are well aligned inside of the nanocomposite, increasing the efficiency of energy harvesting. The energy harvester occupies an area of 66.96 mm2 and produces an output r.m.s voltage of 206.47μV, when excited by a 40 Hz vibration of 1 mm amplitude.

  9. Energy harvesting on highway bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A concept for harvesting energy from the traffic-induced loadings on a highway bridge using piezoelectric : materials to generate electricity was explored through the prototype stage. A total of sixteen lead-zirconate : titanate (PZT) Type 5A piezoel...

  10. Harvesting biomechanical energy or carrying batteries? An evaluation method based on a comparison of metabolic power

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2015-01-01

    ... (or any other power supply, e.g., solar panels), which provide equal amount of energy. Energy harvesting is preferred over batteries if the metabolic power required to harvest the energy is lower than that required to carry the batteries...

  11. Performance analysis of nanodisk and core/shell/shell-nanowire type III-Nitride heterojunction solar cell for efficient energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, S. R.; Lenka, T. R.

    2017-11-01

    Now-a-days III-Nitride nanowires with axial (nanodisk) and radial (core/shell/shell-nanowire) junctions are two unique and potential methods for solar energy harvesting adopted by worldwide researchers. In this paper, polarization behavior of GaN/InGaN/GaN junction and its effect on carrier dynamics of nanodisk and CSS-nanowire type solar cells are intensively studied and compared with its planar counterpart by numerical simulations using commercially available Victory TCAD. It is observed that CSS-NW with hexagonal geometrical shapes are robust to detrimental impact of polarization charges and could be good enough to accelerate carrier collection efficiency as compared to nanodisk and planar solar cells. This numerical study provides an innovative aspect of fundamental device physics with respect to polarization charges in CSS-NW and nanodisk type junction towards photovoltaic applications. The internal quantum efficiencies (IQE) are also discussed to evaluate carrier collection mechanisms and recombination losses in each type of junctions of solar cell. Finally, it is interesting to observe a maximum conversion efficiency of 6.46% with 91.6% fill factor from n-GaN/i-In0.1Ga0.9N/p-GaN CSS-nanowire solar cell with an optimized thickness of 180 nm InGaN layer under one Sun AM1.5 illumination.

  12. Triboelectric effect in energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, I.; Vassiliadis, S.; Siores, E.

    2017-10-01

    With the development of wearable technology, much research has been undertaken in the field of flexible and stretchable electronics for use in interactive attire. The challenging problem wearable technology faces is the ability to provide energy whilst keeping the endproduct comfortable, light, ergonomic and nonintrusive. Energy harvesting, or energy scavenging as it is also known, is the process by which ambient energy is captured and converted into electric energy. The triboelectric effect converts mechanical energy into electrical energy based on the coupling effect of triboelectrification and electrostatic induction and is utilized as the basis for triboelectric generators (TEG). TEG’s are promising for energy harvesting due their high output power and efficiency in conjunction with simple and economical production. Due to the wide availability of materials and ease of integration, in order to produce the triboelectric effect such functional materials are effective for wearable energy harvesting systems. Flexible TEG’s can be built and embedded into attire, although a thorough understanding of the underlying principle of how TEG’s operate needs to be comprehended for the development and in incorporation in smart technical textiles. This paper presents results associated with TEG’S and discusses their suitability for energy harvesting in textiles structures.

  13. Collecting Solar Energy. Solar Energy Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Alexander

    This solar energy learning module for use with junior high school students offers a list of activities, a pre-post test, job titles, basic solar energy vocabulary, and diagrams of solar energy collectors and installations. The purpose is to familiarize students with applications of solar energy and titles of jobs where this knowledge could be…

  14. Maximum power point tracking for optimizing energy harvesting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, S.; Thang, P. C.; Veselov, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    There has been a growing interest in using energy harvesting techniques for powering wireless sensor networks. The reason for utilizing this technology can be explained by the sensors limited amount of operation time which results from the finite capacity of batteries and the need for having a stable power supply in some applications. Energy can be harvested from the sun, wind, vibration, heat, etc. It is reasonable to develop multisource energy harvesting platforms for increasing the amount of harvesting energy and to mitigate the issue concerning the intermittent nature of ambient sources. In the context of solar energy harvesting, it is possible to develop algorithms for finding the optimal operation point of solar panels at which maximum power is generated. These algorithms are known as maximum power point tracking techniques. In this article, we review the concept of maximum power point tracking and provide an overview of the research conducted in this area for wireless sensor networks applications.

  15. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lioz Etgar

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG) capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based ...

  16. Solar thermal large power plant feeds into district heating grid. Solar energy is harvested at Braedstrup; Solarthermische Grossanlage speist ins Fernwaermenetz. In Braedstrup wird Sonnenenergie geerntet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Anders Otte [Arcon Solar, Skoerping (Denmark); Winnemoeller, Ralf [General Solar Systems Deutschland GmbH, Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    In Braedstrup (Denmark), a solarthermal large-scale installation with 641 large area collectors and a gross surface of 8.653 m{sup 2} was installed. This installation has to cover about 10 % of the total heat requirement for 1,400 households. The energy costs amount about 7 Ct/kWh incl. all energy taxes. The following project study discusses the design, the advantages to connect solar thermic into the grid. (orig./GL)

  17. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgar, Lioz

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG) capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered. PMID:28809318

  18. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioz Etgar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered.

  19. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgar, Lioz

    2013-02-04

    Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG) capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered.

  20. Wideband Piezomagnetoelastic Vibration Energy Harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Anders; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a small-scale wideband piezomagnetoelastic vibration energy harvester (VEH) aimed for operation at frequencies of a few hundred Hz. The VEH consists of a tape-casted PZT cantilever with thin sheets of iron foil attached on each side of the free tip. The wideband operation...

  1. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  2. Energy Harvesting from Mechanical Shocks Using a Sensitive Vibration Energy Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenek Hadas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a unique principle of energy harvesting technologies. An energy harvesting device generates electric energy from its surroundings using some kind of energy conversion method. Therefore, the considered energy harvesting device does not consume any fuel or substance. The presented energy harvesting system is used forenergy harvesting of electrical energy from mechanical shocks. The presented energy harvesting system uses a very sensitive vibration energy harvester, which was developed for an aeronautic application at Brno University of Technology. This energy harvesting system is a complex mechatronic device, which consists of a precise mechanical part, an electromagnetic converter, power electronics (power management and a load (e.g., wireless sensor. The very sensitive vibration energy harvester is capable of usingthe mechanical energy of mechanical shocks and it can harvest useful energy. This energy harvesting system is used with a wireless temperature sensor and measured results are presented in this paper.

  3. Solar energy collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brin, Raymond L.; Pace, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar energy collector comprising solar energy absorbing material within chamber having a transparent wall, solar energy being transmitted through the transparent wall, and efficiently absorbed by the absorbing material, for transfer to a heat transfer fluid. The solar energy absorbing material, of generally foraminous nature, absorbs and transmits the solar energy with improved efficiency.

  4. Review of Energy Harvesters Utilizing Bridge Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Ullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For health monitoring of bridges, wireless acceleration sensor nodes (WASNs are normally used. In bridge environment, several forms of energy are available for operating WASNs that include wind, solar, acoustic, and vibration energy. However, only bridge vibration has the tendency to be utilized for embedded WASNs application in bridge structures. This paper reports on the recent advancements in the area of vibration energy harvesters (VEHs utilizing bridge oscillations. The bridge vibration is narrowband (1 to 40 Hz with low acceleration levels (0.01 to 3.8 g. For utilization of bridge vibration, electromagnetic based vibration energy harvesters (EM-VEHs and piezoelectric based vibration energy harvesters (PE-VEHs have been developed. The power generation of the reported EM-VEHs is in the range from 0.7 to 1450000 μW. However, the power production by the developed PE-VEHs ranges from 0.6 to 7700 μW. The overall size of most of the bridge VEHs is quite comparable and is in mesoscale. The resonant frequencies of EM-VEHs are on the lower side (0.13 to 27 Hz in comparison to PE-VEHs (1 to 120 Hz. The power densities reported for these bridge VEHs range from 0.01 to 9539.5 μW/cm3 and are quite enough to operate most of the commercial WASNs.

  5. Solar Energy and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  6. Ionic and electronic behaviors of earth-abundant semiconductor materials and their applications toward solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Matthew T.

    Semiconductor devices offer promise for efficient conversion of sunlight into other useful forms of energy, in either photovoltaic or photoelectrochemical cell configurations to produce electrical power or chemical energy, respectively. This dissertation examines ionic and electronic phenomena in some candidate semiconductors and seeks to understand their implications toward solar energy conversion applications. First, copper sulfide (Cu2S) was examined as a candidate photovoltaic material. It was discovered that its unique property of cation diffusion allows the room-temperature synthesis of vertically-aligned nanowire arrays, a morphology which facilitates study of the diffusion processes. This diffusivity was found to induce hysteresis in the electronic behavior, leading to the phenomena of resistive switching and negative differential resistance. The Cu2S were then demonstrated as morphological templates for solid-state conversion into different types of heterostructures, including segmented and rod-in-tube morphologies. Near-complete conversion to ZnS, enabled by the out-diffusion of Cu back into the substrate, was also achieved. While the ion diffusion property likely hinders the reliability of Cu 2S in photovoltaic applications, it was shown to enable useful electronic and ionic behaviors. Secondly, iron oxide (Fe2O3, hematite) was examined as a photoanode for photoelectrochemical water splitting. Its energetic limitations toward the water electrolysis reactions were addressed using two approaches aimed at achieving greater photovoltages and thereby improved water splitting efficiencies. In the first, a built-in n-p junction produced an internal field to drive charge separation and generate photovoltage. In the second, Fe 2O3 was deposited onto a smaller band gap material, silicon, to form a device capable of producing enhanced total photovoltage by a dual-absorber Z-scheme mechanism. Both approaches resulted in a cathodic shift of the photocurrent onset

  7. Towards increasing the photon harvesting in bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. : Electrochemical, Radiational, and Thermal Energy Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winder, Christoph; Loi, Maria A.; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Denk, Patrick; Padinger, Franz; Hummelen, Jan C.; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Gouloumis, Andreas; Vazquez, Purificacion; Torres, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    Org. solar cells based on interpenetrating networks of conjugated polymer donors and fullerene-based acceptors with MA 1.5 efficiencies up to 3% were presented recently. For further improvement of the efficiency, the absorption of the solar light should be increased. This can be done by matching the

  8. Electrical Energy Harvesting from Thermal Energy with Converged Infrared Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, S. Y.; Kok, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) cell is a common energy harvester that had been used to harvest solar energy and convert it into electrical energy. However, the vast energy from the spectrum of sunlight is not fully harvested. Therefore, thermoelectric (TE) module that harvest electrical energy from heat is being proposed in this paper. Generally, the part of the sunlight spectrum that induce heat is in the spectrum band of infrared (IR). For the experimental set-up in this paper, infrared (IR) light bulb was being used to simulate the IR spectrum band of the sunlight. In order to maximize the heat energy collection, a convex lens was being used to converge the IR light and therefore focused the heat on an aluminium sheet and heat sink which was placed on top of the hot side of the TE module. The distance between convex lens and IR light bulb is varying in between 10cm and 55cm and the reading was taken at an interval of 5cm. Firstly, the temperature of the IR light and converged IR light were recorded and plotted in graph. The graph showed that the temperature of the converged IR light bulb is higher than the IR light bulb. Lastly, the voltage and power output of the TE module with different heat source was compared. The output voltage and power of the TE module increased inverse proportional to the distance between IR light bulb and TE module.

  9. Energy harvesting through piezoelectricity - technology foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laumann, Felix; Sørensen, Mette Møller; Hansen, Tina Mølholm

    2017-01-01

    scientific articles. In contrast to this, is found a low level of ability to convert the technology from academia to commercialization. A decision making model is proposed including a requirement for better understanding of niches, niche definitions and configuration of energy harvesting design......Energy harvesting is important in designing low power intelligent networks, such as Internet-of-Things. Energy harvesting can ensure wireless and lossless energy supply to energy dependent technological solutions with independence of infrastructure. Electrical energy created through...

  10. BLM Solar Energy Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Priority development areas for utility-scale solar energy facilities as identified in the Solar PEIS Record of Decision. An additional Solar Energy Zone identified...

  11. Design, Fabrication and Characterization of MIM Diodes and Frequency Selective Thermal Emitters for Solar Energy Harvesting and Detection Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Saumya

    Energy harvesting using rectennas for infrared radiation continues to be a challenge due to the lack of fast switching diodes capable of rectification at THz frequencies. Metal insulator metal diodes which may be used at 30 THz must show adequate nonlinearity for small signal rectification such as 30 mV. In a rectenna assembly, the voltage signal received as an output from a single nanoantenna can be as small as ~30microV. Thus, only a hybrid array of nanoantennas can be sufficient to provide a signal in the ~30mV range for the diode to be able to rectify around 30THz. A metal-insulator-metal diode with highly nonlinear I-V characteristics is required in order for such small signal rectification to be possible. Such diode fabrication was found to be faced with two major fabrication challenges. The first one being the lack of a precisely controlled deposition process to allow a pinhole free insulator deposition less than 3nm in thickness. Another major challenge is the deposition of a top metal contact on the underlying insulating thin film. As a part of this research study, most of the MIM diodes were fabricated using Langmuir Blodgett monolayers deposited on a thin Ni film that was sputter coated on a silicon wafer. UV induced polymerization of the Langmuir Blodgett thin film was used to allow intermolecular crosslinking. A metal top contact was sputtered onto the underlying Langmuir Blodgett film assembly. In addition to material characterization of all the individual films using IR, UV-VIS spectroscopy, electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, the I-V characteristics, resistance, current density, rectification ratio and responsivity with respect to the bias voltage were also measured for the electrical characterization of these MIM diodes. Further improvement in the diode rectification ratio and responsivity was obtained with Langmuir Blodgett films grown by the use of horizontally oriented organic molecules, due to a smaller tunneling distance that

  12. Review of magnetostrictive vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2017-10-01

    The field of energy harvesting has grown concurrently with the rapid development of portable and wireless electronics in which reliable and long-lasting power sources are required. Electrochemical batteries have a limited lifespan and require periodic recharging. In contrast, vibration energy harvesters can supply uninterrupted power by scavenging useful electrical energy from ambient structural vibrations. This article reviews the current state of vibration energy harvesters based on magnetostrictive materials, especially Terfenol-D and Galfenol. Existing magnetostrictive harvester designs are compared in terms of various performance metrics. Advanced techniques that can reduce device size and improve performance are presented. Models for magnetostrictive devices are summarized to guide future harvester designs.

  13. Microelectronic circuit design for energy harvesting systems

    CERN Document Server

    Di Paolo Emilio, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the design of microelectronic circuits for energy harvesting, broadband energy conversion, new methods and technologies for energy conversion. The author also discusses the design of power management circuits and the implementation of voltage regulators. Coverage includes advanced methods in low and high power electronics, as well as principles of micro-scale design based on piezoelectric, electromagnetic and thermoelectric technologies with control and conditioning circuit design. Provides a single-source reference to energy harvesting and its applications; Serves as a practical guide to microelectronics design for energy harvesting, with application to mobile power supplies; Enables readers to develop energy harvesting systems for wearable/mobile electronics.

  14. Energy harvesting through piezoelectricity - technology foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laumann, Felix; Sørensen, Mette Møller; Hansen, Tina Mølholm

    2017-01-01

    Energy harvesting is important in designing low power intelligent networks, such as Internet-of-Things. Energy harvesting can ensure wireless and lossless energy supply to energy dependent technological solutions with independence of infrastructure. Electrical energy created through piezoelectric......Energy harvesting is important in designing low power intelligent networks, such as Internet-of-Things. Energy harvesting can ensure wireless and lossless energy supply to energy dependent technological solutions with independence of infrastructure. Electrical energy created through...... scientific articles. In contrast to this, is found a low level of ability to convert the technology from academia to commercialization. A decision making model is proposed including a requirement for better understanding of niches, niche definitions and configuration of energy harvesting design...

  15. Solar Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Calibrated in kilowatt hours per square meter, the solar counter produced by Dodge Products, Inc. provides a numerical count of the solar energy that has accumulated on a surface. Solar energy sensing, measuring and recording devices in corporate solar cell technology developed by Lewis Research Center. Customers for their various devices include architects, engineers and others engaged in construction and operation of solar energy facilities; manufacturers of solar systems or solar related products, such as glare reducing windows; and solar energy planners in federal and state government agencies.

  16. Energy-Harvesting Performances of Two Tandem Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters with Cylinders in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobiao Shan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new energy-harvesting system with two identical piezoelectric energy harvesters in a tandem configuration. Each harvester consists of a piezoelectric beam and a circular cylinder. Experiments are performed to investigate the energy-harvesting performances of this system in water. It can be found that their energy-harvesting performances are all different from that of the single harvester (without an upstream or downstream harvester. The experimental results show that the water speed and the spacing ratio have significant effects on the energy-harvesting performances of the two tandem harvesters. The output power of the upstream harvester first increases, and then decreases with the water speed increasing. The maximum output power of 167.8 μW is achieved at the water speed of 0.306 m/s and the spacing ratio (L/D of 2.5. Increasing the water speed results in an increase in the energy performance of the downstream harvester. Compared with the single harvester, the performance of the downstream harvester is weakened in the low water speed range, but enhanced in the higher water speed range. Further, the output power of 533 μW is obtained by the downstream harvester at the water speed of 0.412 m/s and the spacing ratio of 1.7, which is 29 times more than that of the single harvester. The results indicate the superiority of the two tandem harvesters in energy-harvesting performance.

  17. Light-harvesting fullerenes for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffreau, J.; Leroy-Lhez, S.; Derbal, H.; Inigo, A. R.; Nunzi, J.-M.; Groeneveld, M. M.; Williams, R. M.; Hudhomme, P.

    2006-12-01

    Novel dyads containing [60]fullerene perylenediimide units were developed as light-harvesting acceptors for the preparation of efficient solar cells. The antenna was grafted onto C{60} with the aim to improve the absorption spectrum of materials used in bulk-heterojunction devices. Electrochemical and photophysical studies of these dyads in solution have revealed that there was no significant ground-state electronic interaction between the covalently bonded PDI and fullerene moieties. Steady-state fluorescence experiments evidenced an effective photoinduced energy transfer from the PDI moiety to C{60}. The potential use of these light-harvesting fullerenes in organic solar cells was estimated with their incorporation in bulk-heterojunctions using poly(3-hexylthiophene) as the conjugated π -donor polymer. This paper has been presented at “ECHOS06”, Paris, 28 30 juin 2006.

  18. Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon; Vuckovic, Dusan; Di Mauro, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    Energy Harvesting comprises a promising solution to one of the key problems faced by battery-powered Wireless Sensor Networks, namely the limited nature of the energy supply (finite battery capacity). By harvesting energy from the surrounding environment, the sensors can have a continuous lifetime...... Sensor Networks with energy harvesting capability....... without any needs for battery recharge or replacement. However, energy harvesting introduces a change to the fundamental principles based on which WSNs are designed and realized. In this poster we sketch some of the key research challenges as well as our ongoing work in designing and realizing Wireless...

  19. Solar energy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Solar Energy presents an introduction to all aspects of solar energy, from photovoltaic devices to active and passive solar thermal energy conversion, giving both a detailed and broad perspective of the field. It is aimed at the beginner involved in solar energy or a related field, or for someone wanting to gain a broader perspective of solar energy technologies. A chapter considering solar radiation, basic principles applied to solar energy, semiconductor physics, and light absorption brings the reader on equal footing with the technology of either solar generated electrical current or useful heat. Details of how a solar cell works and then production of current from a photovoltaic device is discussed. Characterization of a solar cell is examined, allowing one the ability to interpret the current-voltage relation, followed by discussion of parameter extraction from this relation. This information can be used to understand what limits the performance of a given solar cell with the potential to optimize its pe...

  20. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srbinovski, Bruno; Magno, Michele; Edwards-Murphy, Fiona; Pakrashi, Vikram; Popovici, Emanuel

    2016-03-28

    Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA) for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind). Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA) in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources) and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors). The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA.

  1. Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Blue Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2016-07-26

    Blue energy in the form of ocean waves offers an enormous energy resource. However, it has yet to be fully exploited in order to make it available for the use of mankind. Blue energy harvesting is a challenging task as the kinetic energy from ocean waves is irregular in amplitude and is at low frequencies. Though electromagnetic generators (EMGs) are well-known for harvesting mechanical kinetic energies, they have a crucial limitation for blue energy conversion. Indeed, the output voltage of EMGs can be impractically low at the low frequencies of ocean waves. In contrast, triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly suitable for blue energy harvesting as they can effectively harvest mechanical energies from low frequencies (energy harvesting. In this Perspective, we describe some of the recent progress and also address concerns related to durable packaging of TENGs in consideration of harsh marine environments and power management for an efficient power transfer and distribution for commercial applications.

  2. Solar thermal harvesting for enhanced photocatalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad Hosseini; Choi, Jae-Woo; Psaltis, Demetri

    2014-03-21

    The Shockley-Queisser limit predicts a maximum efficiency of 30% for single junction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The rest of the solar energy is lost as heat and due to phenomena such as reflection and transmission through the PV and charge carrier recombination. In the case of photocatalysis, this maximum value is smaller since the charge carriers should be transferred to acceptor molecules rather than conductive electrodes. With this perspective, we realize that at least 70% of the solar energy is available to be converted into heat. This is specifically useful for photocatalysis, since heat can provide more kinetic energy to the reactants and increase the number of energetic collisions leading to the breakage of chemical bonds. Even in natural photosynthesis, at the most 6% of the solar spectrum is used to produce sugar and the rest of the absorbed photons are converted into heat in a process called transpiration. The role of this heating component is often overlooked; in this paper, we demonstrate a coupled system of solar thermal and photocatalytic decontamination of water by titania, the most widely used photocatalyst for various photo reactions. The enhancement of this photothermal process over solely photocatalytic water decontamination is demonstrated to be 82% at 1× sun. Our findings suggest that the combination of solar thermal energy capture with photocatalysis is a suitable strategy to utilize more of the solar spectrum and improve the overall performance.

  3. Pyroelectric Quantum Well Energy Harvesters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the investigation of pyroelectric energy harvesters with enhanced efficiencies through quantum wells induced by a multilayer design.  Pyroelectric...

  4. Solar Thermal Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    Solar Thermal Energy Technology (PST) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide research and development information that would expand the technology base required for the advancement of solar thermal systems as a significant energy resource.

  5. Experimental measurement of energy harvesting with backpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelkova, Radka; Vala, David; Suranek, Pavel; Mahdal, Miroslav

    2017-08-01

    This article deals with the energy harvesting systems, especially the energy harvesting backpack, which appears as a convenient means for energy harvesting for mobile sensors power. Before starting the experiment, it was necessary to verify whether this energy will be sufficient to get acquainted with the human kinematics and analyze problematics itself. For this purpose there was used motion capture technology from Xsens. Measured data on the position of a particle moving man and back when walking, these data were then used for experimental realization of energy harvesting backpack and as input data to the simulation in Simulink, which brought us a comparison between theoretical assumptions and practical implementation. When measuring characteristics of energy harvesting system we have a problem with measurements on backpack solved when redoing of the hydraulic cylinder as a source of a suitable movement corresponding to the amplitude and frequency of human walk.

  6. Solar energy: principles and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    As the world faces an impending dearth of fossil fuels, most immediately oil, alternative sources of energy must be found. 174 PW worth of energy falls onto the top of the Earth's atmosphere in the form of sunlight which is almost 10,000 times the total amount of energy used by humans on Earth, as taken from all sources, oil, coal, natural gas, nuclear and hydroelectric power combined. If even a fraction of this could be harvested efficiently, the energy crunch could in principle be averted. Various means for garnering energy from the Sun are presented, including photovoltaics (PV), thin film solar cells, quantum dot cells, concentrating PV and thermal solar power stations, which are more efficient in practical terms. Finally the prospects of space based (satellite) solar power are considered. The caveat is that even if the entire world electricity budget could be met using solar energy, the remaining 80% of energy which is not used as electricity but thermal power (heat) still needs to be found in the absence of fossil fuels. Most pressingly, the decline of cheap plentiful crude oil (peak oil) will not find a substitution via solar unless a mainly electrified transportation system is devised and it is debatable that there is sufficient time and conventional energy remaining to accomplish this. The inevitable contraction of transportation will default a deconstruction of the globalised world economy into that of a system of localised communities.

  7. Midinfrared radiation energy harvesting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Ren; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2017-07-01

    The International Energy Agency reports a 17.6% annual growth rate in sustainable energy production. However, sustainable power generation based on environmental conditions (wind and solar) requires an infrastructure that can handle intermittent power generation. An electromagnetic thermoelectric (EMTE) device to overcome the intermittency problems of current sustainable energy technologies, providing the continuous supply unachievable by photovoltaic cells with portability impossible for traditional thermoelectric (TE) generators, is proposed. The EMTE converts environmental electromagnetic waves to a voltage output without requiring additional input. A single cell of this TE-inspired broadband EMTE can generate a 19.50 nV output within a 7.2-μm2 area, with a verified linear scalability of the output voltage through cell addition. This idea leads to a challenge: the electrical polarity of each row of cells is the same but may require additional routing to combine output from each row. An innovative layout is proposed to overcome this issue through switching the electrical polarity every other row. In this scheme, the EM wave absorption spectrum is not altered, and a simple series connection can be implemented to boost the total voltage output by 1 order within a limited area.

  8. Solar energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brownson, Jeffrey R S

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion requires a different mind-set from traditional energy engineering in order to assess distribution, scales of use, systems design, predictive economic models for fluctuating solar resources, and planning to address transient cycles and social adoption. Solar Energy Conversion Systems examines solar energy conversion as an integrative design process, applying systems thinking methods to a solid knowledge base for creators of solar energy systems. This approach permits different levels of access for the emerging broad audience of scientists, engineers, architects, planners

  9. Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The research in the Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory (PEHREL) is mainly focused on investigation, modeling, simulation, design,...

  10. Thermal Energy Harvesting from Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woias, P.; Schule, F.; Bäumke, E.; Mehne, P.; Kroener, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present the measurement of temperature differences between the ambient air and the body temperature of a sheep (Heidschnucke) and its applicability for thermoelectric energy harvesting from livestock, demonstrated via the test of a specially tailored TEG system in a real-life experiment. In three measurement campaigns average temperature differences were found between 2.5 K and 3.5 K. Analytical models and FEM simulations were carried out to determine the actual thermal resistance of the sheep's fur from comparisons with the temperature measurements. With these data a thermoelectric (TEG) generator was built in a thermally optimized housing with adapted heats sink. The whole TEG system was mounted to a collar, including a data logger for recording temperature and TEG voltage. First measurements at the neck of a sheep were accomplished, with a calculated maximal average power output of 173 μW at the TEG. Taking the necessity of a low-voltage step-up converter into account, an electric output power of 54 μW is available which comes close to the power consumption of a low-power VHF tracking system.

  11. Solar energy emplacement developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Michael; Sauls, Bob

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design was developed for a Lunar Power System (LPS) composed of photovoltaic arrays and microwave reflectors fabricated from lunar materials. The LPS will collect solar energy on the surface of the Moon, transform it into microwave energy, and beam it back to Earth where it will be converted into usable energy. The Solar Energy Emplacement Developer (SEED) proposed will use a similar sort of solar energy collection and dispersement to power the systems that will construct the LPS.

  12. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from broadband random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S.; Friswell, M. I.; Inman, D. J.

    2009-11-01

    Energy harvesting for the purpose of powering low power electronic sensor systems has received explosive attention in the last few years. Most works using deterministic approaches focusing on using the piezoelectric effect to harvest ambient vibration energy have concentrated on cantilever beams at resonance using harmonic excitation. Here, using a stochastic approach, we focus on using a stack configuration and harvesting broadband vibration energy, a more practically available ambient source. It is assumed that the ambient base excitation is stationary Gaussian white noise, which has a constant power-spectral density across the frequency range considered. The mean power acquired from a piezoelectric vibration-based energy harvester subjected to random base excitation is derived using the theory of random vibrations. Two cases, namely the harvesting circuit with and without an inductor, have been considered. Exact closed-form expressions involving non-dimensional parameters of the electromechanical system have been given and illustrated using numerical examples.

  13. Hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Rehrig, Paul W. (Inventor); Hackenberger, Wesley S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system includes: (a) first and second symmetric, pre-curved piezoelectric elements mounted separately on a frame so that their concave major surfaces are positioned opposite to each other; and (b) a linear piezoelectric element mounted separately on the frame and positioned between the pre-curved piezoelectric elements. The pre-curved piezoelectric elements and the linear piezoelectric element are spaced from one another and communicate with energy harvesting circuitry having contact points on the frame. The hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system has a higher electromechanical energy conversion efficiency than any known piezoelectric transducer.

  14. Solar Energy Technician/Installer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Solar power (also known as solar energy) is solar radiation emitted from the sun. Large panels that absorb the sun's energy as the sun beats down on them gather solar power. The energy in the rays can be used for heat (solar thermal energy) or converted to electricity (photovoltaic energy). Each solar energy project, from conception to…

  15. Solar energy potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The potential of solar energy as a national resource is discussed. Research and development programs for the development of eleven concepts are described to show the proposed funding for each year over a fifteen year period. The estimated energy contributions by period for each of the solar concepts are analyzed. The estimated impact of the solar concepts to the year 2020 are tabulated.

  16. Cooperative energy harvesting for long-endurance autonomous vehicle teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, S. F.; Rogers, J. D.; May, K.; Myatt, D. R.; Hickman, D.; Smith, M. I.

    2010-04-01

    This paper considers the exploitation of energy harvesting technologies for teams of Autonomous Vehicles (AVs). Traditionally, the optimisation of information gathering tasks such as searching for and tracking new objects, and platform level power management, are only integrated at a mission-management level. In order to truly exploit new energy harvesting technologies which are emerging in both the commercial and military domains (for example the 'EATR' robot and next-generation solar panels), the sensor management and power management processes must be directly coupled. This paper presents a novel non-myopic sensor management framework which addresses this issue through the use of a predictive platform energy model. Energy harvesting opportunities are modelled using a dynamic spatial-temporal energy map and sensor and platform actions are optimised according to global team utility. The framework allows the assessment of a variety of different energy harvesting technologies and perceptive tasks. In this paper, two representative scenarios are used to parameterise the model with specific efficiency and energy abundance figures. Simulation results indicate that the integration of intelligent power management with traditional sensor management processes can significantly increase operational endurance and, in some cases, simultaneously improve surveillance or tracking performance. Furthermore, the framework is used to assess the potential impact of energy harvesting technologies at various efficiency levels. This provides important insight into the potential benefits that intelligent power management can offer in relation to improving system performance and reducing the dependency on fossil fuels and logistical support.

  17. Solar energy modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, R. R. (Inventor); Mcdougal, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A module is described with a receiver having a solar energy acceptance opening and supported by a mounting ring along the optic axis of a parabolic mirror in coaxial alignment for receiving solar energy from the mirror, and a solar flux modulator plate for varying the quantity of solar energy flux received by the acceptance opening of the module. The modulator plate is characterized by an annular, plate-like body, the internal diameter of which is equal to or slightly greater than the diameter of the solar energy acceptance opening of the receiver. Slave cylinders are connected to the modulator plate for supporting the plate for axial displacement along the axis of the mirror, therby shading the opening with respect to solar energy flux reflected from the surface of the mirror to the solar energy acceptance opening.

  18. Harvesting renewable energy from Earth's mid-infrared emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Byrnes, S. J.

    2014-03-03

    It is possible to harvest energy from Earth\\'s thermal infrared emission into outer space. We calculate the thermodynamic limit for the amount of power available, and as a case study, we plot how this limit varies daily and seasonally in a location in Oklahoma. We discuss two possible ways to make such an emissive energy harvester (EEH): A thermal EEH (analogous to solar thermal power generation) and an optoelectronic EEH (analogous to photovoltaic power generation). For the latter, we propose using an infrared-frequency rectifying antenna, and we discuss its operating principles, efficiency limits, system design considerations, and possible technological implementations.

  19. Harvesting renewable energy from Earth's mid-infrared emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Steven J; Blanchard, Romain; Capasso, Federico

    2014-03-18

    It is possible to harvest energy from Earth's thermal infrared emission into outer space. We calculate the thermodynamic limit for the amount of power available, and as a case study, we plot how this limit varies daily and seasonally in a location in Oklahoma. We discuss two possible ways to make such an emissive energy harvester (EEH): A thermal EEH (analogous to solar thermal power generation) and an optoelectronic EEH (analogous to photovoltaic power generation). For the latter, we propose using an infrared-frequency rectifying antenna, and we discuss its operating principles, efficiency limits, system design considerations, and possible technological implementations.

  20. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  1. Investigation of RF Signal Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudeh Heydari Nasab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential utilization of RF signals for DC power is experimentally investigated. The aim of the work is to investigate the levels of power that can be harvested from the air and processed to achieve levels of energy that are sufficient to charge up low-power electronic circuits. The work presented shows field measurements from two selected regions: an urbanized hence signal congested area and a less populated one. An RF harvesting system has been specifically designed, built, and shown to successfully pick up enough energy to power up circuits. The work concludes that while RF harvesting was successful under certain conditions, however, it required the support of other energy harvesting techniques to replace a battery. Efficiency considerations have, hence, placed emphasis on comparing the developed harvester to other systems.

  2. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Walkemeyer, Phillip E. (Inventor); Hall, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Colonius, Tim (Inventor); Tosi, Phillipe (Inventor); Kim, Namhyo (Inventor); Sun, Kai (Inventor); Corbett, Thomas Gary (Inventor); Arrazola, Alvaro Jose (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A flow energy harvesting device having a harvester pipe includes a flow inlet that receives flow from a primary pipe, a flow outlet that returns the flow into the primary pipe, and a flow diverter within the harvester pipe having an inlet section coupled to the flow inlet, a flow constriction section coupled to the inlet section and positioned at a midpoint of the harvester pipe and having a spline shape with a substantially reduced flow opening size at a constriction point along the spline shape, and an outlet section coupled to the constriction section. The harvester pipe may further include a piezoelectric structure extending from the inlet section through the constriction section and point such that the fluid flow past the constriction point results in oscillatory pressure amplitude inducing vibrations in the piezoelectric structure sufficient to cause a direct piezoelectric effect and to generate electrical power for harvesting.

  3. Materials in energy conversion, harvesting, and storage

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    First authored book to address materials' role in the quest for the next generation of energy materials Energy balance, efficiency, sustainability, and so on, are some of many facets of energy challenges covered in current research. However, there has not been a monograph that directly covers a spectrum of materials issues in the context of energy conversion, harvesting and storage. Addressing one of the most pressing problems of our time, Materials in Energy Conversion, Harvesting, and Storage illuminates the roles and performance requirements of materials in energy an

  4. Energy Harvesting Wireless Strain Networks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Research LC (PPLC) and Virginia Tech (VT) propose to develop an energy harvesting wireless strain node technology that utilizes single-crystal piezoelectric...

  5. An implantable fluidic vibrational energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S.; Takahashi, T.; Kumemura, M.; Fujita, H.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2016-11-01

    Targeting implantable medical devices such as respiratory pace-maker, we have developed a proof-of-concept level energy harvester device that could earn electric power of 44 μW/cm2 by the fluidic motion in a PDMS microchannel placed on a silicon substrate with built-in permanent electrical charges or so-called electrets. The motion of the working fluid will be operated by the heart beat or breathing as a final shape of the energy harvesting system.

  6. Thermoelectric energy harvesting as a wireless sensor node power source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, C.; Davidson, J.

    2010-04-01

    Size and power requirements of wireless sensor nodes are gradually decreasing and this has allowed data collection across a range of spatial and temporal ranges. These nodes have power requirements that often necessitate batteries as an energy source. As the power requirements decrease for these sensors, alternative energy sources become more attractive. One such technology is thermal energy harvesting. Thermal energy harvesting requires a differential temperature between a heat source and a cool sink. As heat energy flows from source to the sink, energy can be harvested and utilized to power sensor nodes. By exploiting the temperature difference between a sun-warmed plate and a heat sink immersed in water, electrical energy can be harvested. The proposed concept utilizes a thermoelectric device to convert solar energy into electrical power. Initial experiments were carried out at the CSIRO Energy Centre for a variety of winter time intervals in 2009, with peak power outputs in the order of 50mW. Results indicate such a system could power a wireless sensor node continuously at ocean, lake and river water interfaces. We are presently in the process of evaluating the concept by powering a CSIRO FleckTM wireless node to transmit water temperature and battery voltage data.

  7. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srbinovski, Bruno; Magno, Michele; Edwards-Murphy, Fiona; Pakrashi, Vikram; Popovici, Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA) for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind). Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA) in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources) and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors). The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA. PMID:27043559

  8. An Energy Aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm for Energy Harvesting WSN with Energy Hungry Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Srbinovski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor nodes have a limited power budget, though they are often expected to be functional in the field once deployed for extended periods of time. Therefore, minimization of energy consumption and energy harvesting technology in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN are key tools for maximizing network lifetime, and achieving self-sustainability. This paper proposes an energy aware Adaptive Sampling Algorithm (ASA for WSN with power hungry sensors and harvesting capabilities, an energy management technique that can be implemented on any WSN platform with enough processing power to execute the proposed algorithm. An existing state-of-the-art ASA developed for wireless sensor networks with power hungry sensors is optimized and enhanced to adapt the sampling frequency according to the available energy of the node. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using two in-field testbeds that are supplied by two different energy harvesting sources (solar and wind. Simulation and comparison between the state-of-the-art ASA and the proposed energy aware ASA (EASA in terms of energy durability are carried out using in-field measured harvested energy (using both wind and solar sources and power hungry sensors (ultrasonic wind sensor and gas sensors. The simulation results demonstrate that using ASA in combination with an energy aware function on the nodes can drastically increase the lifetime of a WSN node and enable self-sustainability. In fact, the proposed EASA in conjunction with energy harvesting capability can lead towards perpetual WSN operation and significantly outperform the state-of-the-art ASA.

  9. High-performance piezoelectric thick film based energy harvesting micro-generators for MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zawada, Tomasz; Hansen, Karsten; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    Energy harvesting, known also as energy scavenging, covers a great body of technologies and devices that transform low grade energy sources such as solar energy, environmental vibrations, thermal energy, human motion into usable electrical energy. In this paper vibrations are used as energy sourc...

  10. Electromagnetic ferrofluid-based energy harvester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibo, A.; Masana, R.; King, A.; Li, G. [Nonlinear Vibrations and Energy Harvesting Laboratory (NOVEHL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Daqaq, M.F., E-mail: mdaqaq@clemson.edu [Nonlinear Vibrations and Energy Harvesting Laboratory (NOVEHL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2012-06-25

    This Letter investigates the use of ferrofluids for vibratory energy harvesting. In particular, an electromagnetic micro-power generator which utilizes the sloshing of a ferrofluid column in a seismically-excited tank is proposed to transform mechanical motions directly into electricity. Unlike traditional electromagnetic generators that implement a solid magnet, ferrofluids can easily conform to different shapes and respond to very small acceleration levels offering an untapped opportunity to design scalable energy harvesters. The feasibility of the proposed concept is demonstrated and its efficacy is discussed through several experimental studies. -- Highlights: ► A ferrofluid-based electromagnetic energy harvester is proposed and tested. Conformability of fluids offers unique capabilities to design scalable harvesters. ► Power is sensitive to changes in the fluid surface area and external magnetization. ► Device generates 1 microwatt of output power at a base acceleration of 3 m/s{sup 2}.

  11. Harvesting Raindrop Energy with Piezoelectrics: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin-Hong; Dahari, Zuraini; Abd Manaf, Asrulnizam; Miskam, Muhammad Azman

    2015-01-01

    Harvesting vibration energy from piezoelectric material impacted by raindrops has proved to be a promising approach for future applications. A piezoelectric harvester has interesting advantages such as simple structure, easy fabrication, reduced number of components, and direct conversion of vibrations to electrical charge. Extensive research has been carried out and is still underway to explore this technique for practical applications. This review provides a comprehensive picture of global research and development of raindrop energy harvesting using piezoelectric material to enable researchers to determine the direction of further investigation. The work published so far in this area is reviewed and summarized with relevant suggestions for future work. In addition, a brief experiment was carried out to investigate the suitable piezoelectric structure for raindrop energy harvesting. Results showed that the bridge structure generated a higher voltage compared with the cantilever structure.

  12. Porphyrin nanorods-polymer composites for solar radiation harvesting applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mongwaketsi, NP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest in exploring porphyrin-based nanostructures for artificial solar radiation harvesting stems from their structural similarity to chlorophylls. In nature, the precise organization and orientation of the chlorophylls result in efficient...

  13. Harvesting sunlight energy: a biophysics approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The most efficient light harvesting and energy transfer systems are found in nature as part of the photosynthesis process. In the photosynthetic system light energy is absorbed by antenna chlorophylls and this energy is then passed onto a reaction...

  14. Harvesting Energy from CO2 Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Paz-García, J.M.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    When two fluids with different compositions are mixed, mixing energy is released. This holds true for both liquids and gases, though in the case of gases, no technology is yet available to harvest this energy source. Mixing the CO2 in combustion gases with air represents a source of energy with a

  15. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  16. Vivaldi Antenna for RF Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting is a future technology for capturing ambient energy from the environment to be recycled to feed low-power devices. A planar antipodal Vivaldi antenna is presented for gathering energy from GSM, WLAN, UMTS and related applications. The designed antenna has the potential to be used in energy harvesting systems. Moreover, the antenna is suitable for UWB applications, because it operates according to FCC regulations (3.1 – 10.6 GHz. The designed antenna is printed on ARLON 600 substrate and operates in frequency band from 0.810 GHz up to more than 12 GHz. Experimental results show good conformity with simulated performance.

  17. Energy harvesting with piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Muensit, Nantakan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present the current state of knowledge in the field of energy harvesting using piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials. The book is addressed to students and academics engaged in research in the fields of energy harvesting, material sciences and engineering. Scientists and engineers who are working in the area of energy conservation and renewable energy resources should find it useful as well. Explanations of fundamental physical properties such as piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity are included to aid the understanding of the non-specialist. Specific technolo

  18. Flexible energy harvesting from hard piezoelectric beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents design, multiphysics finite element modeling and experimental validation of a new miniaturized PZT generator that integrates a bulk piezoelectric ceramic onto a flexible platform for energy harvesting from the human body pressing force. In spite of its flexibility, the mechanical structure of the proposed device is simple to fabricate and efficient for the energy conversion. The finite element model involves both mechanical and piezoelectric parts of the device coupled with the electrical circuit model. The energy harvester prototype was fabricated and tested under the low frequency periodic pressing force during 10 seconds. The experimental results show that several nano joules of electrical energy is stored in a capacitor that is quite significant given the size of the device. The finite element model is validated by observing a good agreement between experimental and simulation results. the validated model could be used for optimizing the device for energy harvesting from earcanal deformations.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of porphyrin nanotubes/rods for solar radiation harvesting and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongwaketsi, N.; Khamlich, S.; Klumperman, B.; Sparrow, R.; Maaza, M.

    2012-05-01

    Energy transfer and electron transfer events as they occur between well arranged light harvesting antenna molecules, the reaction center and other factors determine the function of natural photosynthesis. The overall small reorganization energy and the well-balanced electronic coupling between each component bear key characters for the unique efficiency of natural photosynthesis. Such aspects permit the design and assembly of artificial systems that efficiently process solar energy, replicating the natural processes. The rich and extensive transitions seen in porphyrin-based materials hold great expectation as light harvesting building blocks in the construction of molecular architectures, allowing an efficient use of the solar spectrum. Hence in this study porphyrin nanorods are synthesized and characterized for future application in the construction of the artificial light harvesting system. Understanding the sizes and growth mechanism of porphyrins nanorods by self-assembly and molecular recognition is essential for their successful implementation in nanodevices. Spectroscopic and microscopic studies were carried out to investigate the effect that time, concentration and solvents have on the fabrication of porphyrin nanorods by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins. We investigate in details the heteroaggregate behavior formation of [H4TPPS4]2- and [SnTPyP]2+ mixture by means of the UV-vis spectroscopy and aggregates structure and morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This study demonstrates the potential for using different concentrations and solvents to influence the physical and optical properties of porphyrin based nanorods.

  20. Mechanisms of Light Energy Harvesting in Dendrimers and Hyperbranched Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Andrews

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Since their earliest synthesis, much interest has arisen in the use of dendritic and structurally allied forms of polymer for light energy harvesting, especially as organic adjuncts for solar energy devices. With the facility to accommodate a proliferation of antenna chromophores, such materials can capture and channel light energy with a high degree of efficiency, each polymer unit potentially delivering the energy of one photon—or more, when optical nonlinearity is involved. To ensure the highest efficiency of operation, it is essential to understand the processes responsible for photon capture and channelling of the resulting electronic excitation. Highlighting the latest theoretical advances, this paper reviews the principal mechanisms, which prove to involve a complex interplay of structural, spectroscopic and electrodynamic properties. Designing materials with the capacity to capture and control light energy facilitates applications that now extend from solar energy to medical photonics.

  1. Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    wafers backed with platinum are patterned into 2- mm devices with bridge wires (Fig. 1 [left]). Using a silicon nitride layer as a mask, the silicon is...ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine, Matthew...Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine Academy of Applied Science, Concord, NH Matthew H Ervin and Wayne A Churaman Sensors and

  2. The solar cyclone: A solar chimney for harvesting atmospheric water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwa, B.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kashiwa, Corey B. [191 University Blvd PMB 876, Denver, CO 80206 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    The Solar Cyclone has been introduced as a means of extracting fresh water from Earth's atmosphere. The conceptual device operates in the fashion of a Solar Chimney; it is composed of a greenhouse for collecting and storing solar energy as heat, with a central chimney that channels an updraft of surface air heated in the greenhouse. An expansion cyclone separator for condensing and removing atmospheric water is placed at the base of the chimney. The separator consists of a strongly rotating vortex in which the central temperature is well below the dew point for the greenhouse air. Power consumed in the expansion and separation is furnished by the motive potential of the chimney updraft. Turbulent flow conditions are established in the expansion cyclone separator to enhance the centrifugal separation. Excess updraft power is used to generate electricity, as is done in the Solar Chimney. The article furnishes a theoretical basis for the feasibility of the Solar Cyclone, suggesting that an experimental study of the separation device would be worthwhile. (author)

  3. Energy harvesting devices, systems, and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, Dale K.

    2016-10-18

    Energy harvesting devices include a substrate and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to collect energy in the visible and infrared light spectra and to reradiate energy having a wavelength in the range of about 0.8 .mu.m to about 0.9 .mu.m. The resonance elements are arranged in groups of two or more resonance elements. Systems for harvesting electromagnetic radiation include a substrate, a plurality of resonance elements including a conductive material carried by the substrate, and a photovoltaic material coupled to the substrate and to at least one resonance element. The resonance elements are arranged in groups, such as in a dipole, a tripole, or a bowtie configuration. Methods for forming an energy harvesting device include forming groups of two or more discrete resonance elements in a substrate and coupling a photovoltaic material to the groups of discrete resonance elements.

  4. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foruzande, Hamid Reza; Hajnayeb, Ali; Yaghootian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton's principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  5. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Foruzande

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton’s principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  6. Wind-driven pyroelectric energy harvesting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mengying; Zabek, Daniel; Bowen, Chris; Abdelmageed, Mostafa; Arafa, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Pyroelectric materials have recently received attention for harvesting waste heat owing to their potential to convert temperature fluctuations into useful electrical energy. One of the main challenges in designing pyroelectric energy harvesters is to provide a means to induce a temporal heat variation in a pyroelectric material autonomously from a steady heat source. To address this issue, we propose a new form of wind-driven pyroelectric energy harvester, in which a propeller is set in rotational motion by an incoming wind stream. The speed of the propeller’s shaft is reduced by a gearbox to drive a slider-crank mechanism, in which a pyroelectric material is placed on the slider. Thermal cycling is obtained as the reciprocating slider moves the pyroelectric material across alternative hot and cold zones created by a stationary heat lamp and ambient temperature, respectively. The open-circuit voltage and closed-circuit current are investigated in the time domain at various wind speeds. The device was experimentally tested under wind speeds ranging from 1.1 to 1.6 m s-1 and charged an external 100 nF capacitor through a signal conditioning circuit to demonstrate its effectiveness for energy harvesting. Unlike conventional wind turbines, the energy harvested by the pyroelectric material is decoupled from the wind flow and no mechanical power is drawn from the transmission; hence the system can operate at low wind speeds (<2 m s-1).

  7. 3D Energy Harvester Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V. Janicek; M. Husak

    2013-01-01

    ...]. The designed generator is based on electrostatic converter and uses the principle of conversion of non-electric energy into electrical energy by periodical modification of gap between electrodes of a capacitor [4...

  8. Solar Renewable Energy. Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Marion; And Others

    This unit develops the concept of solar energy as a renewable resource. It includes: (1) an introductory section (developing understandings of photosynthesis and impact of solar energy); (2) information on solar energy use (including applications and geographic limitations of solar energy use); and (3) future considerations of solar energy…

  9. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  10. A hybrid nonlinear vibration energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Towfighian, Shahrzad

    2017-06-01

    Vibration energy harvesting converts mechanical energy from ambient sources to electricity to power remote sensors. Compared to linear resonators that have poor performance away from their natural frequency, nonlinear vibration energy harvesters perform better because they use vibration energy over a broader spectrum. We present a hybrid nonlinear energy harvester that combines bi-stability with internal resonance to increase the frequency bandwidth. A two-fold increase in the frequency bandwidth can be obtained compared to a bi-stable system with fixed magnets. The harvester consists of a piezoelectric cantilever beam carrying a movable magnet facing a fixed magnet. A spring allows the magnet to move along the beam and it provides an extra stored energy to further increase the amplitude of vibration acting as a mechanical amplifier. An electromechanically coupled mathematical model of the system is presented to obtain the dynamic response of the cantilever beam, the movable magnet and the output voltage. The perturbation method of multiple scales is applied to solve these equations and obtain approximate analytical solutions. The effects of various system parameters on the frequency responses are investigated. The numerical approaches of the long time integration (Runge-Kutta method) and the shooting technique are used to verify the analytical results. The results of this study can be used to improve efficiency in converting wasted mechanical vibration to useful electrical energy by broadening the frequency bandwidth.

  11. A Galloping Energy Harvester with Attached Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Petr; Khovanov, Igor; Tucker-Harvey, Sam

    2017-11-01

    Aeroelastic energy harvesters are a promising technology for the operation of wireless sensors and microelectromechanical systems, as well as providing the possibility of harvesting wind energy in applications were conventional wind turbines are ineffective, such as in highly turbulent flows, or unreliable, such as in harsh environmental conditions. The development of aeroelastic energy harvesters to date has focused on the flutter of airfoils, the galloping of prismatic structures, and the vortex induced vibrations. We present a novel type of galloping energy harvester with the flow becoming attached when the oscillation amplitude is high enough. With the flow attached, the harvester blade acts closer to an aerofoil than a bluff body, which results in a higher efficiency. The dynamics of a prototype device has been characterised experimentally with the use of a motion tracking system. The flow structure in the vicinity of the device has been studied using smoke visualisation and PIV measurements. A lumped parameter mathematical model has been developed and related to the experimental results.

  12. Cantilever-based electret energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Boisseau, S; Ricart, T; Defay, E; Sylvestre, A; 10.1088/0964-1726/20/10/105013

    2011-01-01

    Integration of structures and functions allowed reducing electric consumptions of sensors, actuators and electronic devices. Therefore, it is now possible to imagine low-consumption devices able to harvest their energy in their surrounding environment. One way to proceed is to develop converters able to turn mechanical energy, such as vibrations, into electricity: this paper focuses on electrostatic converters using electrets. We develop an accurate analytical model of a simple but efficient cantilever-based electret energy harvester. Therefore, we prove that with vibrations of 0.1g (~1m/s^{2}), it is theoretically possible to harvest up to 30\\muW per gram of mobile mass. This power corresponds to the maximum output power of a resonant energy harvester according to the model of William and Yates. Simulations results are validated by experimental measurements but the issues of parasitic capacitances get a large impact. Therefore, we 'only' managed to harvest 10\\muW per gram of mobile mass, but according to our...

  13. Harvesting energy from airflow with a michromachined piezoelectric harvester inside a Helmholtz resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matova, S.P.; Elfrink, R.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Schaijk, R. van

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report an airflow energy harvester that combines a piezoelectric energy harvester with a Helmholtz resonator. The resonator converts airflow energy to air oscillations which in turn are converted into electrical energy by a piezoelectric harvester. Two Helmholtz resonators with

  14. Solar energy policy review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-17

    A number of memoranda and reports are collected which deal with evaluations of solar energy policy options, including direct and indirect labor impacts and costs of different options and consumer protection. (LEW)

  15. Solar energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2015-01-01

    While solar is the fastest-growing energy source in the world, key concerns around solar power's inherent variability threaten to de-rail that scale-up . Currently, integration of intermittent solar resources into the grid creates added complication to load management, leading some utilities to reject it altogether, while other operators may penalize the producers via rate increases or force solar developers to include storage devices on-site to smooth out power delivery at the point of production. However these efforts at mitigation unfold, it is increasingly clear to parties on all sides th

  16. Harvesting-Aware Energy Management for Environmental Monitoring WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rodway

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks can be used to collect data in remote locations, especially when energy harvesting is used to extend the lifetime of individual nodes. However, in order to use the collected energy most effectively, its consumption must be managed. In this work, forecasts of diurnal solar energies were made based on measurements of atmospheric pressure. These forecasts were used as part of an adaptive duty cycling scheme for node level energy management. This management was realized with a fuzzy logic controller that has been tuned using differential evolution. Controllers were created using one and two days of energy forecasts, then simulated in software. These controllers outperformed a human-created reference controller by taking more measurements while using less reserve energy during the simulated period. The energy forecasts were comparable to other available methods, while the method of tuning the fuzzy controller improved overall node performance. The combination of the two is a promising method of energy management.

  17. The Energy Crisis and Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1974-01-01

    Examines the status of the energy crisis in Australia. Outlines energy alternatives for the 1990's and describes the present status of solar energy research and the economics of solar energy systems. (GS)

  18. Acoustic energy harvesting based on multilateral metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Assouar, Badreddine

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically and numerically report on an innovative acoustic energy harvester based on acoustic multilateral metasurfaces and a piezoelectric bimorph. The coiling-up-space concept realized by labyrinthine units is applied to achieve the desired phase profiles for the acoustic focusing and energy confinement. The acoustic energy confined by the metasurfaces from a point source is converted into electrical energy by a structured piezoelectric bimorph. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis evidenced that the output voltage and power drastically increase with the sides of the multilateral metasurface energy harvesting system. Maximum output voltage and power 52 and 407 times higher than those under the case without metasurfaces are achieved with enclosed multilateral metasurface design.

  19. MAC Protocols for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks: Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kosunalp, Selahattin

    2015-01-01

    Energy harvesting (EH) technology in the field of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is gaining increasing popularity through removing the burden of having to replace/recharge depleted energy sources by energy harvester devices...

  20. Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy data - over 200 satellite-derived meteorology and solar energy parameters, monthly averaged from 22 years of data, global solar...

  1. Energy Harvesting with Coupled Magnetorestrictive Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    concentration of iron and gallium as 83 and 17%, respectively. Here, we describe a coupled system of meso- scale (1- to 10-cm) cantilever beams. The coupled... Cantilever beam with magnetostrictive energy harvesting transducer ............................... 3  4. Mechanical domain lumped element model of the...aircraft, and machines. 1.3 BACKGROUND At mesoscale, the dominant transduction mechanisms are electromagnetic and piezoelectric . The

  2. Electrodynamic energy harvester for electrical transformer's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 6th international workshop on micro and nanotechnology, Berkeley, California, USA, pp. 165–168. Moghe R, Divan D and Lambert F 2011 Powering low-cost utility sensors using energy harvesting. Proceedings of 14th European Conference on Power Electronics and Applications, pp. 1–10. Moghe R, Yang Y, Lambert ...

  3. Energy harvesting autonomous sensor systems design, analysis, and practical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yen Kheng

    2013-01-01

    This book is the considered the first to describe sensor-oriented energy harvesting issues. Its content is derived from the author's research on the development of a truly self-autonomous and sustainable energy harvesting wireless sensor network (EH-WSN). This network harvests energy from a variety of ambient energy sources and converts it into electrical energy to power batteries. The book discusses various types of energy harvesting (EH) systems and their respective main components.

  4. Pyroelectric Harvesters for Generating Cyclic Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric energy conversion is a novel energy process which directly transforms waste heat energy from cyclic heating into electricity via the pyroelectric effect. Application of a periodic temperature profile to pyroelectric cells is necessary to achieve temperature variation rates for generating an electrical output. The critical consideration in the periodic temperature profile is the frequency or work cycle which is related to the properties and dimensions of the air layer; radiation power and material properties, as well as the dimensions and structure of the pyroelectric cells. This article aims to optimize pyroelectric harvesters by matching all these requirements. The optimal induced charge per period increases about 157% and the efficient period band decreases about 77%, when the thickness of the PZT cell decreases from 200 μm to 50 μm, about a 75% reduction. Moreover, when using the thinner PZT cell for harvesting the pyroelectric energy it is not easy to focus on a narrow band with the efficient period. However, the optimal output voltage and stored energy per period decrease about 50% and 74%, respectively, because the electrical capacitance of the 50 μm thick pyroelectric cell is about four times greater than that of the 200 μm thick pyroelectric cell. In addition, an experiment is used to verify that the work cycle to be able to critically affect the efficiency of PZT pyroelectric harvesters. Periods in the range between 3.6 s and 12.2 s are useful for harvesting thermal cyclic energy by pyroelectricity. The optimal frequency or work cycle can be applied in the design of a rotating shutter in order to control the heated and unheated periods of the pyroelectric cells to further enhance the amount of stored energy.

  5. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  6. Biomechanical Energy Harvester Design For Active Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Oğuz Kaptı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors restricting the functions of active prostheses is limited charge times and weights of the batteries. Therefore, some biomechanical energy harvesting studies are conducted for reducing the dependence on batteries and developing the systems that produce energy by utilizing one's own actions during daily living activities. In this study, as a new approach to meet energy needs of active-controlled lower limb prostheses, the design of a biomechanical energy harvester that produces electrical energy from the movements of the knee joint during gait were carried out. This harvester is composed of the generator, planetary gear system and one-way clutch that transmit just the knee extension. Low weight, low additional metabolic power consumption requirement and high electrical power generation are targeted in design process. The total reduction ratio of the transmission is 104, and the knee joint reaction torque applied by the system is 6 Nm. Average electrical powers that can be obtained are 17 W and 5,8 W for the swing extension phase and the entire cycle, respectively. These values seem to be sufficient for charging the battery units of many prostheses and similar medical systems, and portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, navigation devices and laptops.

  7. Performance Limits of Communication with Energy Harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Znaidi, Mohamed Ridha

    2016-04-01

    In energy harvesting communications, the transmitters have to adapt transmission to the availability of energy harvested during communication. The performance of the transmission depends on the channel conditions which vary randomly due to mobility and environmental changes. During this work, we consider the problem of power allocation taking into account the energy arrivals over time and the quality of channel state information (CSI) available at the transmitter, in order to maximize the throughput. Differently from previous work, the CSI at the transmitter is not perfect and may include estimation errors. We solve this problem with respect to the energy harvesting constraints. Assuming a perfect knowledge of the CSI at the receiver, we determine the optimal power policy for different models of the energy arrival process (offline and online model). Indeed, we obtain the power allocation scheme when the transmitter has either perfect CSI or no CSI. We also investigate of utmost interest the case of fading channels with imperfect CSI. Moreover, a study of the asymptotic behavior of the communication system is proposed. Specifically, we analyze of the average throughput in a system where the average recharge rate goes asymptotically to zero and when it is very high.

  8. A Hybrid Indoor Ambient Light and Vibration Energy Harvester for Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To take advantage of applications where both light and vibration energy are available, a hybrid indoor ambient light and vibration energy harvesting scheme is proposed in this paper. This scheme uses only one power conditioning circuit to condition the combined output power harvested from both energy sources so as to reduce the power dissipation. In order to more accurately predict the instantaneous power harvested from the solar panel, an improved five-parameter model for small-scale solar panel applying in low light illumination is presented. The output voltage is increased by using the MEMS piezoelectric cantilever arrays architecture. It overcomes the disadvantage of traditional MEMS vibration energy harvester with low voltage output. The implementation of the maximum power point tracking (MPPT for indoor ambient light is implemented using analog discrete components, which improves the whole harvester efficiency significantly compared to the digital signal processor. The output power of the vibration energy harvester is improved by using the impedance matching technique. An efficient mechanism of energy accumulation and bleed-off is also discussed. Experiment results obtained from an amorphous-silicon (a-Si solar panel of 4.8 × 2.0 cm2 and a fabricated piezoelectric MEMS generator of 11 × 12.4 mm2 show that the hybrid energy harvester achieves a maximum efficiency around 76.7%.

  9. Energy Harvesting From Low Frequency Applications Using Piezoelectric Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-11-06

    This paper reviewed the state of research on piezoelectric energy harvesters. Various types of harvester configurations, piezoelectric materials, and techniques used to improve the mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency were discussed. Most of the piezoelectric energy harvesters studied today have focused on scavenging mechanical energy from vibration sources due to their abundance in both natural and industrial environments. Cantilever beams have been the most studied structure for piezoelectric energy harvester to date because of the high responsiveness to small vibrations.

  10. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  11. Heat to electricity conversion by cold carrier emissive energy harvesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, Rune [Department of Engineering Sciences, University of Agder, Jon Lilletuns vei 9, 4879 Grimstad (Norway)

    2015-12-07

    This paper suggests a method to convert heat to electricity by the use of devices called cold carrier emissive energy harvesters (cold carrier EEHs). The working principle of such converters is explained and theoretical power densities and efficiencies are calculated for ideal devices. Cold carrier EEHs are based on the same device structure as hot carrier solar cells, but works in an opposite way. Whereas a hot carrier solar cell receives net radiation from the sun and converts some of this radiative heat flow into electricity, a cold carrier EEH sustains a net outflux of radiation to the surroundings while converting some of the energy supplied to it into electricity. It is shown that the most basic type of cold carrier EEHs have the same theoretical efficiency as the ideal emissive energy harvesters described earlier by Byrnes et al. In the present work, it is also shown that if the emission from the cold carrier EEH originates from electron transitions across an energy gap where a difference in the chemical potential of the electrons above and below the energy gap is sustained, power densities slightly higher than those given by Byrnes et al. can be achieved.

  12. Fixed solar energy concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, A.J.; Knasel, T.M.

    1981-01-20

    An apparatus for the concentration of solar energy upon a fixed array of solar cells is disclosed. A transparent material is overlayed upon the cell array, and a diffuse reflective coating is applied to the surface area of the transparent medium in between cells. Radiant light, which reflects through the transparent layer and does not fall directly incident to a cell surface is reflected by the coating layer in an approximate cosine pattern. Thereafter, such light undergoes internal reflection and rediffusion until subsequently it either strikes a solar cell surface or is lost through the upper surface of the transparent material.

  13. Biomimetic utilization of solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhabiev, T. S.; Shilov, Aleksandr E.

    2012-12-01

    The most interesting recent publications dealing with so-called artificial photosynthesis, i.e., the development of photocatalytic converters of solar energy to the chemical bond energy using the fundamental principles of natural oxygenic photosynthesis, are discussed. The key stages of photosynthesis that should be reproduced in the artificial converters include light harvesting and transport of the light quantum to reaction centres where photoinduced charge separation occurs to give elementary reducing agents and oxidants (electrons and holes). The dark catalytic reactions involving the elementary reducing agents and oxidants give stable end products, namely, dioxygen and carbohydrates in the natural photosynthesis or dioxygen and hydrogen in the artificial photosynthesis. The bibliography includes 99 references.

  14. Multistable chain for ocean wave vibration energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, R. L.; Schoemaker, M. E.; Wang, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    The heaving of ocean waves is a largely untapped, renewable kinetic energy resource. Conversion of this energy into electrical power could integrate with solar technologies to provide for round-the-clock, portable, and mobile energy supplies usable in a wide variety of marine environments. However, the direct drive conversion methodology of gridintegrated wave energy converters does not efficiently scale down to smaller, portable architectures. This research develops an alternative power conversion approach to harness the extraordinarily large heaving displacements and long oscillation periods as an excitation source for an extendible vibration energy harvesting chain. Building upon related research findings and engineering insights, the proposed system joins together a series of dynamic cells through bistable interfaces. Individual impulse events are generated as the inertial mass of each cell is pulled across a region of negative stiffness to induce local snap through dynamics; the oscillating magnetic inertial mass then generates current in a coil which is connected to energy harvesting circuitry. It is shown that linking the cells into a chain transmits impulses through the system leading to cascades of vibration and enhancement of electrical energy conversion from each impulse event. This paper describes the development of the multistable chain and ways in which realistic design challenges were addressed. Numerical modeling and corresponding experiments demonstrate the response of the chain due to slow and large amplitude input motion. Lastly, experimental studies give evidence that energy conversion efficiency of the chain for wave energy conversion is much higher than using an equal number of cells without connections.

  15. Direct sun-driven artificial heliotropism for solar energy harvesting based on a photo-thermomechanical liquid-crystal elastomer nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chensha; Liu, Ye; Huang, Xuezhen [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Jiang, Hongrui [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States)

    2012-12-19

    Inspired by heliotropism in nature, artificial heliotropic devices that can follow the sun for increased light interception are realized. The mechanism of the artificial heliotropism is realized via direct actuation by the sunlight, eliminating the need for additional mechatronic components and resultant energy consumption. For this purpose, a novel reversible photo-thermomechanical liquid crystalline elastomer (LCE) nanocomposite is developed that can be directly driven by natural sunlight and possesses strong actuation capability. Using the LCE nanocomposite actuators, the artificial heliotropic devices show full-range heliotropism in both laboratory and in-field tests. As a result, significant increase in the photocurrent output from the solar cells in the artificial heliotropic devices is observed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gottfried H

    2015-01-01

    This concise primer on photovoltaic solar energy conversion invites readers to reflect on the conversion of solar light into energy at the most fundamental level and encourages newcomers to the field to help find meaningful answers on how photovoltaic solar energy conversion can work (better), eventually contributing to its ongoing advancement. The book is based on lectures given to graduate students in the Physics Department at the University of Oldenburg over the last two decades, yet also provides an easy-to-follow introduction for doctoral and postdoctoral students from related disciplines such as the materials sciences and electrical engineering. Inspired by classic textbooks in the field, it reflects the author’s own ideas on how to understand, visualize and eventually teach the microscopic physical mechanisms and effects, while keeping the text as concise as possible so as to introduce interested readers to the field and balancing essential knowledge with open questions.

  17. MEMS-Based Waste Vibrational Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    low spring constant objective to be achieved. A piezoelectric cantilever beam that is very long and very thin would produce the maximum voltage...California, Berkeley, 2002. [11] A. Kasyap, “Development of MEMS-based piezoelectric cantilever arrays for vibrational energy harvesting,” Gainesville, FL...maximum 200 words) The piezoelectric effect is a phenomenon where strain on a piezoelectric crystal structure causes potential difference at its

  18. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingguo; Naing, Veronica; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2009-06-23

    Biomechanical energy harvesting-generating electricity from people during daily activities-is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm), and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%). Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 +/- 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 +/- 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices.

  19. Human Motion Energy Harvesting for AAL Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Becker, P.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Research and development into the topic of ambient assisted living has led to an increasing range of devices that facilitate a person's life. The issue of the power supply of these modern mobile systems however has not been solved satisfactorily yet. In this paper a flat inductive multi-coil harvester for integration into the shoe sole is presented. The device is designed for ambient assisted living (AAL) applications and particularly to power a self-lacing shoe. The harvester exploits the horizontal swing motion of the foot to generate energy. Stacks of opposing magnets move through a number of equally spaced coils to induce a voltage. The requirement of a flat structure which can be integrated into the shoe sole is met by a reduced form factor of the magnet stack. In order to exploit the full width of the shoe sole, supporting structures are used to parallelize the harvester and therefore increase the number of active elements, i.e. magnets and coils. The development and characterization of different harvester variations is presented with the best tested design generating an average power of up to 2.14 mW at a compact device size of 75 × 41.5 × 15 mm3 including housing.

  20. Characterization of Energy Availability in RF Energy Harvesting Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple nodes forming a Radio Frequency (RF Energy Harvesting Network (RF-EHN have the capability of converting received electromagnetic RF signals in energy that can be used to power a network device (the energy harvester. Traditionally the RF signals are provided by high power transmitters (e.g., base stations operating in the neighborhood of the harvesters. Admitting that the transmitters are spatially distributed according to a spatial Poisson process, we start by characterizing the distribution of the RF power received by an energy harvester node. Considering Gamma shadowing and Rayleigh fading, we show that the received RF power can be approximated by the sum of multiple Gamma distributions with different scale and shape parameters. Using the distribution of the received RF power, we derive the probability of a node having enough energy to transmit a packet after a given amount of charging time. The RF power distribution and the probability of a harvester having enough energy to transmit a packet are validated through simulation. The numerical results obtained with the proposed analysis are close to the ones obtained through simulation, which confirms the accuracy of the proposed analysis.

  1. Wave energy harvesting by piezoelectric flexible plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoele, Kourosh

    2013-11-01

    The ocean tidal currents and waves are very attractive sources of energy for extraction due to their vast availability and very low environmental impacts. Among different technologies, the harvesting of flow energy through the flapping of flexible plates has recently gained attentions. The sustained oscillation of a flexible plate is the result of a fluid-structure interaction occurrence, mainly from two different situations. In the first case, the oscillation is from the fluttering instability of the plate. In the second case, the unsteady flow is presented in the incoming flow either from the oscillatory sources such as surface waves. The mechanical energy is then converted to electricity using piezoelectric patches connected to the plate. In this paper, we discuss the novel approach to extract the wave energy using piezoelectric plates and discuss how parameters of the piezoelectric plate can be adjusted to increase the amount of energy that can be extracted from the current and free-surface waves.

  2. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  3. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donelan J Maxwell

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomechanical energy harvesting–generating electricity from people during daily activities–is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Methods Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. Results The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm, and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%. Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 ± 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 ± 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Conclusion Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices.

  4. Purdue Solar Energy Utilization Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Rakesh [Purdue

    2014-01-21

    The objective of this project is to establish and set-up a laboratory that will facilitate research and development of new low-cost and high-efficiency solar energy utilization technologies at Purdue University. The outcome will help spur the creation of solar energy start-up companies and eventually a solar energy industry in Indiana that can help fulfill the growing national demand for solar energy.

  5. Power Management Integrated Circuit for Indoor Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vipul

    In today's world, power dissipation is a main concern for battery operated mobile devices. Key design decisions are being governed by power rather than area/delay because power requirements are growing more stringent every year. Hence, a hybrid power management system is proposed, which uses both a solar panel to harvest energy from indoor lighting and a battery to power the load. The system tracks the maximum power point of the solar panel and regulates the battery and microcontroller output load voltages through the use of an on-chip switched-capacitor DC-DC converter. System performance is verified through simulation at the 180nm technology node and is made to be integrated on-chip with 0.25 second startup time, 79% efficiency, --8/+14% ripple on the load, an average 1micro A of quiescent current (3.7micro W of power) and total on-chip area of 1.8mm2 .

  6. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam

    2017-04-11

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester\\'s overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  7. Combining light-harvesting with detachability in high-efficiency thin-film silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sanjay K; Desta, Derese; Rizzoli, Rita; Bellettato, Michele; Lyckegaard, Folmer; Jensen, Pia B; Jeppesen, Bjarke R; Chevallier, Jacques; Summonte, Caterina; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Balling, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Efforts to realize thin-film solar cells on unconventional substrates face several obstacles in achieving good energy-conversion efficiency and integrating light-management into the solar cell design. In this report a technique to circumvent these obstacles is presented: transferability and an efficient light-harvesting scheme are combined for thin-film silicon solar cells by the incorporation of a NaCl layer. Amorphous silicon solar cells in p-i-n configuration are fabricated on reusable glass substrates coated with an interlayer of NaCl. Subsequently, the solar cells are detached from the substrate by dissolution of the sacrificial NaCl layer in water and then transferred onto a plastic sheet, with a resultant post-transfer efficiency of 9%. The light-trapping effect of the surface nanotextures originating from the NaCl layer on the overlying solar cell is studied theoretically and experimentally. The enhanced light absorption in the solar cells on NaCl-coated substrates leads to significant improvement in the photocurrent and energy-conversion efficiency in solar cells with both 350 and 100 nm thick absorber layers, compared to flat-substrate solar cells. Efficient transferable thin-film solar cells hold a vast potential for widespread deployment of off-grid photovoltaics and cost reduction.

  8. Models for 31-Mode PVDF Energy Harvester for Wearable Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, wearable electronics are increasingly widely used, leading to an increasing need of portable power supply. As a clean and renewable power source, piezoelectric energy harvester can transfer mechanical energy into electric energy directly, and the energy harvester based on polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF operating in 31-mode is appropriate to harvest energy from human motion. This paper established a series of theoretical models to predict the performance of 31-mode PVDF energy harvester. Among them, the energy storage one can predict the collected energy accurately during the operation of the harvester. Based on theoretical study and experiments investigation, two approaches to improve the energy harvesting performance have been found. Furthermore, experiment results demonstrate the high accuracies of the models, which are better than 95%.

  9. Energy harvesting using a thermoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nersessian, Nersesse [Van Nuys, CA; Carman, Gregory P [Los Angeles, CA; Radousky, Harry B [San Leandro, CA

    2008-07-08

    A novel energy harvesting system and method utilizing a thermoelectric having a material exhibiting a large thermally induced strain (TIS) due to a phase transformation and a material exhibiting a stress induced electric field is introduced. A material that exhibits such a phase transformation exhibits a large increase in the coefficient of thermal expansion over an incremental temperature range (typically several degrees Kelvin). When such a material is arranged in a geometric configuration, such as, for a example, a laminate with a material that exhibits a stress induced electric field (e.g. a piezoelectric material) the thermally induced strain is converted to an electric field.

  10. System for harvesting water wave energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Su, Yanjie; Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun

    2016-07-19

    A generator for harvesting energy from water in motion includes a sheet of a hydrophobic material, having a first side and an opposite second side, that is triboelectrically more negative than water. A first electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material. A second electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material and is spaced apart from the first electrode sheet. Movement of the water across the first side induces an electrical potential imbalance between the first electrode sheet and the second electrode sheet.

  11. Electrochemical systems configured to harvest heat energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Woo; Yang, Yuan; Ghasemi, Hadi; Chen, Gang; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-31

    Electrochemical systems for harvesting heat energy, and associated electrochemical cells and methods, are generally described. The electrochemical cells can be configured, in certain cases, such that at least a portion of the regeneration of the first electrochemically active material is driven by a change in temperature of the electrochemical cell. The electrochemical cells can be configured to include a first electrochemically active material and a second electrochemically active material, and, in some cases, the absolute value of the difference between the first thermogalvanic coefficient of the first electrochemically active material and the second thermogalvanic coefficient of the second electrochemically active material is at least about 0.5 millivolts/Kelvin.

  12. Multimodal piezoelectric devices optimization for energy harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Acciani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of the piezoelectric effect to convert ambient vibration into useful electrical energy constitutes one of the most studied areas in Energy Harvesting (EH research. This paper presents a typical cantilevered Energy Harvester device, which relates the electrical outputs to the vibration mode shape easily. The dynamic strain induced in the piezoceramic layer results in an alternating voltage output. The first six modes of frequencies and the deformation pattern of the beam are carried out basing on an eigenfrequency analysis conducted by the MEMS modules of the COMSOL Multiphysic® v3.5a to perform the Finite Element Analysis of the model. Subsequently, the piezoelectric material is cut around the inflection points to minimize the voltage cancellation effect occurring when the sign changes in the material. This study shows that the voltage produced by the device, increases in as the dimensions of the cuts vary in the piezoelectric layer. Such voltage reaches the optimum amount of piezoelectric material and cuts positioning. This proves that the optimized piezoelectric layer is 16% more efficient than the whole piezoelectric layer.

  13. Photovoltaic Energy Harvester with Power Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a photovoltaic energy harvester, realized in 0.35-μm CMOS technology. The proposed system collects light energy from the environment, by means of 2-mm2 on-chip integrated microsolar cells, and accumulates it in an external capacitor. While the capacitor is charging, the load is disconnected. When the energy in the external capacitor is enough to operate the load for a predefined time slot, the load is connected to the capacitor by a power management circuit. The choice of the value of the capacitance determines the operating time slot for the load. The proposed solution is suitable for discrete-time-regime applications, such as sensor network nodes, or, in general, systems that require power supply periodically for short time slots. The power management circuit includes a charge pump, a comparator, a level shifter, and a linear voltage regulator. The whole system has been extensively simulated, integrated, and experimentally characterized.

  14. Nanogenerators for Human Body Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proto, Antonino; Penhaker, Marek; Conforto, Silvia; Schmid, Maurizio

    2017-07-01

    Humans generate remarkable quantities of energy while performing daily activities, but this energy usually dissipates into the environment. Here, we address recent progress in the development of nanogenerators (NGs): devices that are able to harvest such body-produced biomechanical and thermal energies by exploiting piezoelectric, triboelectric, and thermoelectric physical effects. In designing NGs, the end-user's comfort is a primary concern. Therefore, we focus on recently developed materials giving flexibility and stretchability to NGs. In addition, we summarize common fabrics for NG design. Finally, the mid-2020s market forecasts for these promising technologies highlight the potential for the commercialization of NGs because they may help contribute to the route of innovation for developing self-powered systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy harvesting from a backpack instrumented with piezoelectric shoulder straps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstrom, Jonathan; Feenstra, Joel; Sodano, Henry A.; Farinholt, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    Over the past few decades the use of portable and wearable electronics has grown steadily. These devices are becoming increasingly more powerful. However, the gains that have been made in the device performance have resulted in the need for significantly higher power to operate the electronics. This issue has been further complicated due to the stagnant growth of battery technology over the past decade. In order to increase the life of these electronics, researchers have begun investigating methods of generating energy from ambient sources such that the life of the electronics can be prolonged. Recent developments in the field have led to the design of a number of mechanisms that can be used to generate electrical energy, from a variety of sources including thermal, solar, strain, inertia, etc. Many of these energy sources are available for use with humans, but their use must be carefully considered such that parasitic effects that could disrupt the user's gait or endurance are avoided. These issues have arisen from previous attempts to integrate power harvesting mechanisms into a shoe such that the energy released during a heal strike could be harvested. This study develops a novel energy harvesting backpack that can generate electrical energy from the differential forces between the wearer and the pack. The goal of this system is to make the energy harvesting device transparent to the wearer such that his or her endurance and dexterity is not compromised. This will be accomplished by replacing the traditional strap of the backpack with one made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Piezoelectric materials have a structure such that an applied electrical potential results in a mechanical strain. Conversely, an applied stress results in the generation of an electrical charge, which makes the material useful for power harvesting applications. PVDF is highly flexible and has a high strength, allowing it to effectively act as the load bearing

  16. Energy Harvesting. Fundamentals and practice of energy-autonomous systems; Energy Harvesting. Grundlagen und Praxis energieautarker Systeme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoun, Olfa; Wallaschek, Joerg (eds.)

    2008-07-01

    Energy Harvesting is a term that describes the conversion of ambient energy - e.g. ambient heat, air, vibration or air currents. In view of the many conversion and application options, considerable research and development is going on in this field in order to make use of the potential of the new technologies. Important developments were recorded in the fields of energy converters, energy stores, energy management and energy-efficient switching systems. The papers of this book provide an outline of the state of the art. They show new trends and enable an assessment of the potential of energy harvesting in energy self-sufficient systems. (orig.)

  17. Harvesting Near Earth Asteroid Resources Using Solar Sail Technology

    OpenAIRE

    McInnes, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Near Earth asteroids represent a wealth of material resources to support future space ventures. These resources include water from C-type asteroids for crew logistic support; liquid propellants electrolytically cracked from water to fuel crewed vehicles and commercial platforms; and metals from M-type asteroids to support in-situ manufacturing. In this paper the role of solar sail technology will be investigated to support the future harvesting of near Earth asteroid resources. This will incl...

  18. Multireference excitation energies for bacteriochlorophylls A within light harvesting system 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range ...

  19. Energy harvesting with piezoelectric applied on shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Enrico; Carloni, Mirko; Giammarini, Marco; Conti, Massimo

    2013-05-01

    In the last few years the continuous demand of energy saving has brought continuous research on low-power devices, energy storage and new sources of energy. Energy harvesting is an interesting solution that captures the energy from the environment that would otherwise be wasted. This work presents an electric-mechanical model of a piezoelectric transducer in a cantilever configuration. The model has been characterized measuring the acceleration and the open circuit voltage of a piezoelectric cantilever subjected to a sinusoidal force with different values frequency and subject to an impulsive force. The model has been used to identify the optimal position in which the piezoelectric cantilever has to be placed on a shoe in order to obtain the maximum energy while walking or running. As a second step we designed the DC-DC converter with an hysteresis comparator. The circuit is able to give energy to switch on a microprocessor for the amount of time long enough to capture and store the information required. The complete system has been implemented, installed on a shoe and used in a 10 Km running competition.

  20. Energy Harvesting & Recapture from Human Subjects: Dual-Stage MEMS Cantilever Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    percentage of past thermal energy harvesting research examines Seebeck devices. The Seebeck Effect describes a material property that produces a voltage...sparked acute observance to device aspect ratios and maximum achievable power density. But despite the advances made in Seebeck Effect ...thermoelectric devices, there are inherent problems and disadvantages associated with procuring effective Seebeck materials, mainly related to the Wiedemann

  1. Nonmonotonic energy harvesting efficiency in biased exciton chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaming, S.M.; Malyshev, V.A.; Knoester, J.

    2007-01-01

    We theoretically study the efficiency of energy harvesting in linear exciton chains with an energy bias, where the initial excitation is taking place at the high-energy end of the chain and the energy is harvested (trapped) at the other end. The efficiency is characterized by means of the average

  2. Looped energy harvester for human motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, M.; Boisseau, S.; Gasnier, P.; Willemin, J.; Gobbo, C.; Despesse, G.; Ait-Ali, I.; Perraud, S.

    2017-10-01

    The development of energy harvesters for smart wearables is a challenging topic, with a difficult combination of ergonomics constraints, lifetime and electrical requirements. In this work, we focus on an inertial inductive structure, composed of a magnetic ball circulating inside a closed-loop guide and converting the kinetic energy of the user’s limbs into electricity during the run. A specific induction issue related to the free self-rotation of the ball is underlined and addressed using a ferromagnetic ‘rail’ component. From a 2 g moving ball, a 5 cm-diameter 21 cm3 prototype generated up to 4.8 mW of average power when worn by someone running at 8 km h-1. This device is demonstrated to charge a 2.4 V NiMH battery and supply an acceleration and temperature Wireless Sensor Node at 20 Hz.

  3. Performance of a multipurpose piezoelectric energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kangqi; Wang, Liansong; Zhu, Yingmin; Liu, Zhaohui; Yu, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surrounding environment through piezoelectric conversion is a promising method for implementing self-sustained low-power devices. To date, most piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) developed can only scavenge energy from the unidirectional mechanical vibration. This deficiency severely limits the adaptability of PEHs because the real-world excitations may involve different mechanical motions and the mechanical vibration may come from various directions. To tackle this issue, we proposed a multipurpose PEH, which is composed of a ferromagnetic ball, a cylindrical track and four piezoelectric cantilever beams. In this paper, theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to examine the performance of the multipurpose PEH. The experimental results indicate that, under the vibrations that are perpendicular to the ground, the maximum peak voltage is increased by 3.2 V and the bandwidth of the voltage above 4 V is expanded by more than 4 Hz by the proposed PEH as compared to its linear counterpart; the maximum power output of 0.8 mW is attained when the PEH is excited at 39.5 Hz. Under the sway motion around different directions on the horizontal plane, significant power outputs, varying from 0.05 mW to 0.18 mW, are also generated by the multipurpose PEH when the sway angle is larger than 5∘ and the sway frequency is smaller than 2.8 Hz. In addition, the multipurpose PEH demonstrates the capacity of collecting energy from the rotation motion, and approximately 0.14 mW power output is achieved when the rotation frequency is 1 Hz.

  4. Solar energy applications in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilenikhena, P.A.; Ezemonye, L.I.N.

    2010-09-15

    Solar radiation being abundantly present in Nigeria was one area of focus in renewable energy sources. Researches were carried out and technologies produced for direct harnessing of the energy in six energy centres across the country. Some state governments in collaboration with non-governmental agencies also sponsored solar energy projects in some villages that are not connected to the national grid.

  5. Fundamentals of solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. E.

    This textbook strives to strengthen a student's knowledge of the basic sciences as well as to provide a practical background in solar energy conversion. Particular consideration is given to solar geometry, the availability of solar energy, solar concentrators, elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer in solar systems, flat-plate collectors, and thermal storage of solar energy. The use of solar energy for specific types of loads is then discussed. The application of active solar systems to space and hot-water heating is considered, and a description is given of the empirical f-chart method for thermal-performance analysis. The economics of solar systems is examined along with the application of solar energy to cooling and dehumidification loads as well as the application of solar energy to industrial and other thermal loads. The concept of passive systems is explained, and the evaluation of thermal performance on the basis of the empirical load/collector ratio method is described. Appendixes are presented with such information as solar-position charts, tables of solar radiation and climatic data, and programs for hand-held calculators.

  6. Solar eclipse monitoring for solar energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the interest in using solar energy as a major contributor to renewable energy applications has increased, and the focus to optimize the use of electrical energy based on demand and resources from different locations has strengthened. This article includes a procedure for implementing an algorithm to calculate the Moon's zenith angle with uncertainty of ±0.001° and azimuth angle with uncertainty of ±0.003°. In conjunction with Solar Position Algorithm, the angular distance between the Sun and the Moon is used to develop a method to instantaneously monitor the partial or total solar eclipse occurrence for solar energy applications. This method can be used in many other applications for observers of the Sun and the Moon positions for applications limited to the stated uncertainty.

  7. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  8. Fluidic Energy Harvester Optimization in Grid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, Amir; Elvin, Niell; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2017-11-01

    Even though it is omnipresent in nature, there has not been a great deal of research in the literature involving turbulence as an energy source for piezoelectric fluidic harvesters. In the present work, a grid-generated turbulence forcing function model which we derived previously is employed in the single degree-of-freedom electromechanical equations to find the power output and tip displacement of piezoelectric cantilever beams. Additionally, we utilize simplified, deterministic models of the turbulence forcing function to obtain closed-form expressions for the power output. These theoretical models are studied using experiments that involve separately placing a hot-wire anemometer probe and a short PVDF beam in flows where turbulence is generated by means of passive and semi-passive grids. From a parametric study on the deterministic models, we show that the white noise forcing function best mimics the experimental data. Furthermore, our parametric study of the response spectrum of a generic fluidic harvester in grid-generated turbulent flow shows that optimum power output is attained for beams placed closer to the grid with a low natural frequency and damping ratio and a large electromechanical coupling coefficient. NSF Grant No. CBET 1033117.

  9. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  10. Piezoelectric energy harvesting in internal fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-10-14

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph's clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  11. Solar-powered electrochemical energy storage: an alternative to solar fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingzhe; McCulloch, William D.; Huang, Zhongjie; Trang, Brittany B.; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Wu, Yiying

    2016-01-01

    Because of the intermittent nature of solar radiation, being able to simultaneously convert and store solar energy is a significant advance for efficiently harnessing solar energy. Solar fuels have already been recognized as a promising method towards this goal and have attracted tremendous research interest recently. Alternatively, this goal can also be achieved by using the solar-powered electrochemical energy storage (SPEES) strategy, which integrates a photoelectrochemical cell and an electrochemical cell into a single device. The integrated device is able to harvest solar energy and store it in situ within the device via a photocharging process and also distribute the energy as electric power when needed. This essay reviews the past SPEES research and analyzes its future prospects with a special emphasis on chemical design and material choices. We hope that the article will help draw more research attention to this field and stimulate additional exciting investigations toward more efficient solar energy utilization.

  12. Solar energy receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jacob

    1978-01-01

    An improved long-life design for solar energy receivers provides for greatly reduced thermally induced stress and permits the utilization of less expensive heat exchanger materials while maintaining receiver efficiencies in excess of 85% without undue expenditure of energy to circulate the working fluid. In one embodiment, the flow index for the receiver is first set as close as practical to a value such that the Graetz number yields the optimal heat transfer coefficient per unit of pumping energy, in this case, 6. The convective index for the receiver is then set as closely as practical to two times the flow index so as to obtain optimal efficiency per unit mass of material.

  13. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Lotsch, H.K.V; U.Hoffmann, Volker; Rhodes, William T; Asakura, Toshimitsu; Brenner, Karl-Heinz; Hänsch, Theodor W; Kamiya, Takeshi; Krausz, Ferenc; Monemar, Bo; Venghaus, Herbert; Weber, Horst; Weinfurter, Harald

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive description and discussion of photovoltaics (PV) is presented at a level that makes it accessible to the interested academic. Starting with an historical overview, the text outlines the relevance of photovoltaics today and in the future. Then follows an introduction to the physical background of solar cells and the most important materials and technologies, with particular emphasis placed on future developments and prospects. The book goes beyond technology by also describing the path from the cell to the module to the system, proceeding to important applications, such as grid-connected and stand-alone systems. The composition and development of the markets and the role of PV in future energy systems are also considered. Finally, the discussion turns to the future structure of energy supplies, expected to comprise more distributed generation, and addresses synergies and competition from other carbon-free energy sources.

  14. Enhanced piezoelectric wind energy harvesting based on a buckled beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiantao; Zhang, Jia; Shu, Chang; Fang, Zhou

    2017-05-01

    In order to improve the wind energy conversion efficiency, this study entails a concept utilizing the buckling behavior of a buckled beam to induce large amplitude oscillations in a PVDF beam harvester. Specifically, when the buckled beam subjected to the buckling load is in an unstable condition, the wind load can trigger the drastic vibration of the PVDF beam harvester. Experimental results demonstrate that the output performances of the proposed harvester are improved dramatically compared with a traditional cantilever beam harvester.

  15. Simulation of Wave Energy Harvesting by Piezoelectric Seaweed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yiliang; Wang, Haifeng; Li, Meng; Sun, Kaili

    2017-10-01

    In the last decade, the research about energy harvesting for low-power electricity generation has received growing interest all around the world. In this study, a piezoelectric seaweed made by piezoelectric polymer (PVDF) has been used as the energy harvester. ANSYS Workbench is utilized to construct the flow domain and piezoelectric energy harvester, set up working conditions for the simulation, and calculate the power generating capacity of the piezoelectric seaweed actuated by the vibration. The results show that the maximal and minimal output voltages are 117.65V and -112.53V respectively, and it is possible to harvest energy from ocean wave using piezoelectric seaweed.

  16. Solar Power for Post Harvest Losses - A Sensible Solution for Developing Countries!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheshwar, C.; Chilukuri, Snigdha

    2010-09-15

    About 30% of horticultural crops grown in developing countries like India (38.77 million tonnes amounting to US $13 billion), get wasted annually due to gaps in Cold Chain like insufficient cold storage capacity, unavailability of cold storages in close proximity to farms, poor transportation infrastructure etc. With solar energy availability (Insolation) averaging 5.0 KWh/sq. m/day with 3000 hours of sunshine every year, about 30-35% of these losses can be reduced by transporting the freshly harvested produce to the cold storages in 40,000 TEUs of refrigerated containers with 5 million sq. ft. of solar PV panels fixed on their rooftops and sides.

  17. Micro thermal energy harvester design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trioux, E.; Monfray, S.; Basrour, S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports the recent progress of a new technology to scavenge thermal energy, implying a double-step transduction through the thermal buckling of a bilayer aluminum nitride/aluminum bridge and piezoelectric transduction. A completely new scavenger design is presented, with improved performance. The butterfly shape reduces the overall device mechanical rigidity, which leads to a decrease in buckling temperatures compared to previously studied rectangular plates. Firstly, an analytical model exposes the basic principle of the presented device. Then a numerical model completes the explanations by introducing a butterfly shaped structure. Finally the fabrication process is briefly described and both the rectangular and butterfly harvesters are characterized. We compare their performances with an equal thickness of Al and AlN. Secondly, with a thicker Al layer than AlN layer, we will characterize only the butterfly structure in terms of output power and buckling temperatures, and compare it to the previous stack.

  18. Energy Harvesting Using PVDF Piezoelectric Nanofabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafii, Chakameh Shafii

    Energy harvesting using piezoelectric nanomaterial provides an opportunity for advancement towards self-powered electronics. The fabrication complexities and limited power output of these nano/micro generators have hindered these advancements thus far. This thesis presents a fabrication technique with electrospinning using a grounded cylinder as the collector. This method addresses the difficulties with the production and scalability of the nanogenerators. The non-aligned nanofibers are woven into a textile form onto the cylindrical drum that can be easily removed. The electrical poling and mechanical stretching induced by the electric field and the drum rotation increase the concentration of the piezoelectric beta phase in the PVDF nanofabric. The nanofabric is placed between two layers of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) that have interdigitated electrodes painted on them with silver paint. Applying continuous load onto the flexible PVDF nanofabric at 35Hz produces a peak voltage of 320 mV and maximum power of 2200 pW/(cm2) .

  19. MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Scott R; Datskos, Panagiotis G

    2013-08-27

    A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending between a first surface and a second surface, where the first surface includes a temperature difference from the second surface. The layered pyroelectric capacitor includes a conductive, bimetal top electrode layer, an intermediate pyroelectric dielectric layer and a conductive bottom electrode layer. In addition, a pair of proof masses is affixed at a distal end of the layered pyroelectric capacitor to face the first surface and the second surface, wherein the proof masses oscillate between the first surface and the second surface such that a pyroelectric current is generated in the pyroelectric capacitor due to temperature cycling when the proof masses alternately contact the first surface and the second surface.

  20. Conceptual design of rotary magnetostrictive energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Woo; Kang, Han-Sam; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a rotary magnetostrictive energy harvester (RMEH), which consists of one coil-wound Galfenol cantilever, with two PMs adhered onto the each end, and one permanent magnet (PM) array sandwiched between two wheels. Modeling and simulation are used to validate the concept. The proof-of-concept RMEH is fabricated by using the simulation results, and subjected to the experimental characterization. The experimental setup for the simulated characterization uses the motor-driven PM array to induce a forced vibration. It can be concluded that the theoretical prediction on the induced voltage agrees well with the experimental results and that induced voltage increases with rpm and with number of PMs. Future work includes optimization of RMEH performance via PM array configuration and development of prototype.

  1. Harvesting Broad Frequency Band Blue Energy by a Triboelectric-Electromagnetic Hybrid Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Zi, Yunlong; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Wang, Xin; Deng, Jianan; Wang, Jie; Li, Shengming; Hu, Chenguo; Zhu, Liping; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-07-26

    Ocean wave associated energy is huge, but it has little use toward world energy. Although such blue energy is capable of meeting all of our energy needs, there is no effective way to harvest it due to its low frequency and irregular amplitude, which may restrict the application of traditional power generators. In this work, we report a hybrid nanogenerator that consists of a spiral-interdigitated-electrode triboelectric nanogenerator (S-TENG) and a wrap-around electromagnetic generator (W-EMG) for harvesting ocean energy. In this design, the S-TENG can be fully isolated from the external environment through packaging and indirectly driven by the noncontact attractive forces between pairs of magnets, and W-EMG can be easily hybridized. Notably, the hybrid nanogenerator could generate electricity under either rotation mode or fluctuation mode to collect energy in ocean tide, current, and wave energy due to the unique structural design. In addition, the characteristics and advantages of outputs indicate that the S-TENG is irreplaceable for harvesting low rotation speeds (energy, which fits the frequency range for most of the water wave based blue energy, while W-EMG is able to produce larger output at high frequencies (>10 Hz). The complementary output can be maximized and hybridized for harvesting energy in a broad frequency range. Finally, a single hybrid nanogenerator unit was demonstrated to harvest blue energy as a practical power source to drive several LEDs under different simulated water wave conditions. We also proposed a blue energy harvesting system floating on the ocean surface that could simultaneously harvest wind, solar, and wave energy. The proposed hybrid nanogenerator renders an effective and sustainable progress in practical applications of the hybrid nanogenerator toward harvesting water wave energy offered by nature.

  2. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex

  3. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nangle, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  4. Solar energy implementation in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Museckaite, Rasa; Kevelaitis, Karolis; Obialo, Gaisva R.; Raudonis, Vytautas

    2008-01-01

    This research focuses on energy sector in Nigeria, more precisely, the electricity sector. The current situation in the Nigeria is that energy supply is not covering the energy demand. We made a research to investigate if solar energy could be a solution for the present situation in the mentioned country acting as a supportive energy supply. We analyzed both economical and environmental costs/benefits of implementation of solar energy system. We analyzed environmental aspect by comparing...

  5. Analog self-powered harvester achieving switching pause control to increase harvested energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Asahina, Kei

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a self-powered analog controller circuit to increase the efficiency of electrical energy harvesting from vibrational energy using piezoelectric materials. Although the existing synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) method is designed to produce efficient harvesting, its switching operation generates a vibration-suppression effect that reduces the harvested levels of electrical energy. To solve this problem, the authors proposed—in a previous paper—a switching method that takes this vibration-suppression effect into account. This method temporarily pauses the switching operation, allowing the recovery of the mechanical displacement and, therefore, of the piezoelectric voltage. In this paper, we propose a self-powered analog circuit to implement this switching control method. Self-powered vibration harvesting is achieved in this study by attaching a newly designed circuit to an existing analog controller for SSHI. This circuit aims to effectively implement the aforementioned new switching control strategy, where switching is paused in some vibration peaks, in order to allow motion recovery and a consequent increase in the harvested energy. Harvesting experiments performed using the proposed circuit reveal that the proposed method can increase the energy stored in the storage capacitor by a factor of 8.5 relative to the conventional SSHI circuit. This proposed technique is useful to increase the harvested energy especially for piezoelectric systems having large coupling factor.

  6. Graphene-Based Integrated Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting/Storage Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chih-Tao; Hiralal, Pritesh; Wang, Di-Yan; Huang, I-Sheng; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chen, Chun-Wei; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2015-06-24

    Energy scavenging has become a fundamental part of ubiquitous sensor networks. Of all the scavenging technologies, solar has the highest power density available. However, the energy source is erratic. Integrating energy conversion and storage devices is a viable route to obtain self-powered electronic systems which have long-term maintenance-free operation. In this work, we demonstrate an integrated-power-sheet, consisting of a string of series connected organic photovoltaic cells (OPCs) and graphene supercapacitors on a single substrate, using graphene as a common platform. This results in lighter and more flexible power packs. Graphene is used in different forms and qualities for different functions. Chemical vapor deposition grown high quality graphene is used as a transparent conductor, while solution exfoliated graphene pastes are used as supercapacitor electrodes. Solution-based coating techniques are used to deposit the separate components onto a single substrate, making the process compatible with roll-to-roll manufacture. Eight series connected OPCs based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60 BM) bulk-heterojunction cells with aluminum electrodes, resulting in a ≈5 V open-circuit voltage, provide the energy harvesting capability. Supercapacitors based on graphene ink with ≈2.5 mF cm(-2) capacitance provide the energy storage capability. The integrated-power-sheet with photovoltaic (PV) energy harvesting and storage functions had a mass of 0.35 g plus the substrate. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Energy harvesting and storage in 1D devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-06-01

    Power systems and electronic devices that are bulky and rigid are not practical for use in wearable applications that require flexibility and breathability. To address this, a range of 1D energy harvesting and storage devices have been fabricated that show promise for such applications compared with their 2D and 3D counterparts. These 1D devices are based on fibres that are flexible and can accommodate deformation, for example, by twisting and stretching. The fibres can be woven into textiles and fabrics that breathe freely or can be integrated into different materials that fit the curved surface of the human body. In this Review, the development of fibre-based energy harvesting and storage devices is presented, focusing on dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and their integrated devices. An emphasis is placed on the interface between the active materials and the electrodes or electrolyte in the 1D devices. The differing properties of these interfaces compared with those in 2D and 3D devices are derived from the curved surface and long charge transport path in 1D electrodes.

  8. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam; Hassan, Islam; Jiang, Tao; Youssef, Khalid; Liu, Lian; Hedaya, Mohammad; Abu Yazid, Taher; Zu, Jean; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-05-01

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester’s overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  9. Recent Progress on PZT Based Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gyu Kang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting is the most effective way to respond to the energy shortage and to produce sustainable power sources from the surrounding environment. The energy harvesting technology enables scavenging electrical energy from wasted energy sources, which always exist everywhere, such as in heat, fluids, vibrations, etc. In particular, piezoelectric energy harvesting, which uses a direct energy conversion from vibrations and mechanical deformation to the electrical energy, is a promising technique to supply power sources in unattended electronic devices, wireless sensor nodes, micro-electronic devices, etc., since it has higher energy conversion efficiency and a simple structure. Up to now, various technologies, such as advanced materials, micro- and macro-mechanics, and electric circuit design, have been investigated and emerged to improve performance and conversion efficiency of the piezoelectric energy harvesters. In this paper, we focus on recent progress of piezoelectric energy harvesting technologies based on PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT materials, which have the most outstanding piezoelectric properties. The advanced piezoelectric energy harvesting technologies included materials, fabrications, unique designs, and properties are introduced to understand current technical levels and suggest the future directions of piezoelectric energy harvesting.

  10. Design of Solar Harvested Semi Active RFID Transponder with Supercapacitor Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Valentine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis, design and manufacture of a low cost, low maintenance and long-range prototype of RFID transponder with continuous operability. A prototype of semi-active RFID transponder is produced with a range that can be extended via a DC input to allow all of the readers signal power to be reflected via backscatter modulation. The transponder is powered via solar harvested power which is selected over other energy harvesting technologies as it provides a greater energy density and lower cost. Solar has one major drawback in terms of providing a steady DC voltage in it needed a constant supply of sunlight. A method of power storage is proposed, and the use of a supercapacitor over a rechargeable battery is used as it has a longer lifespan due to higher recharge rates. The prototype underwent a series of experiments in various working environments and proves an effective solution in providing long lasting operability. The paper concludes the use of solar harvesting with supercapacitor storage has potential for further uses in external remote sensors used in the Internet of Things.

  11. Towards doubling solar harvests using wide-angle, broad-band microfluidic beam steering arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Leo D

    2015-11-30

    This paper introduces Microfluidic Beam Steering (MBS), which is a new technique for electronically steering light having multiple octaves of bandwidth, any polarization state and incidence from any direction of the sky without significant restrictions due to physical area, optical loss and power handling capacity. It is based on optical elements comprising both transparent solids and electronically controllable fluids to control Total Internal Reflection (TIR), refraction and/or diffraction from micro-structured surfaces within a transparent solid. A TIR-based MBS is discussed in the context of solar energy and its potential to significantly increase annual energy harvests from solar arrays situated on fixed areas like roofs. The advantages and challenges associated with analog and digital MBS systems are discussed and early-stage MBS hardware is demonstrated. Finally, an analytic model of sun-tracking is provided to formally establish the potential for MBS to increase annual solar energy harvests by approximately 45% more than conventional 0-Degree Of Freedom (0-DOF) solar arrays, 62% more than 1-DOF arrays and 233% more than 2-DOF arrays, all at 20% atmospheric aerosol scattering.

  12. Support for solar energy collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Corey; Ardell-Smith, Zachary; Ciasulli, John; Jensen, Soren

    2016-11-01

    A solar energy collection system can include support devices configured to accommodate misalignment of components during assembly. For example, the system can include piles fixed to the earth and an adjustable bearing assembly at the upper end of the pile. The adjustable bearing assembly can include at least one of a vertical adjustment device, a lateral adjustment device and an angular adjustment device. The solar energy collection system can also include a plurality of solar energy collection device pre-wired together and mounted to a support member so as to form modular units. The system can also include enhanced supports for wire trays extending between rows of solar energy collection devices.

  13. Recent Advances in Energy Harvesting Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Davidson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent developments in energy harvesting technologies for structural health monitoring applications. Many industries have a great deal of interest in obtaining technology that can be used to monitor the health of machinery and structures. In particular, the need for autonomous monitoring of structures has been ever-increasing in recent years. Autonomous SHM systems typically include embedded sensors, data acquisition, wireless communication, and energy harvesting systems. Among all of these components, this paper focuses on the energy harvesting technologies. Since low-power sensors and wireless communications are used in newer SHM systems, a number of researchers have recently investigated techniques to extract energy from the local environment to power these stand-alone systems. Ambient energy sources include vibration, thermal gradients, solar, wind, pressure, etc. If the structure has a rich enough loading, then it may be possible to extract the needed power directly from the structure itself. Harvesting energy using piezoelectric materials by converting applied stress to electricity is most common. Other methods to harvest energy such as electromagnetic, magnetostrictive, or thermoelectric generator are also reviewed. Lastly, an energy harvester with frequency tuning capability is demonstrated.

  14. National Energy Act statutes and solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.

    1980-02-01

    The National Energy Act of 1978 contains many provisions that will significantly affect solar technology commercialization and solar energy users. Four of the five statutes that comprise the National Energy Act deserve close attention. The National Energy Conservation Policy Act will promote residential solar installations. The Energy Tax Act will accelerate both residential and commercial solar system applications. The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act promotes efficient use of utility resources as well as decentralized power production. And, the Power Plan and Industrial Fuel Use Act places severe restrictions on future burning of petroleum and natural gas, which should lead some operators to build or convert to solar energy systems. Each of the preceding acts are considered in separate sections of this report. Federal regulations issued pursuant to the various provisions are also identified and discussed, and some of the problems with the provisions and regulations are noted.

  15. Solar energy technical training directory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcoleotes, G; Kramer, K; O& #x27; Connor, K

    1979-06-01

    Available solar energy offerings in the technical training area are presented. Institutions are listed alphabetically by state. Each listing includes an institution address and phone number, solar programs or curricula offered, and detailed solar couse information. An alphabetical index of institutions in included. (MHR)

  16. An Approach to Increase the Battery Time of a Mobile Phone Using Free Energy Harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkegaard Jensen, Jesper; Jessen, Kasper; Laugesen, Kasper; Mortensen, Signe Møller; Bech Sørensen, Juliane; Forouzbaksh, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    The increasing market of mobile phones, has increased the need for electricity to power mobile phones, as well. This paper investigates the possibilities to charge a mobile phone by harvesting energy from the surroundings. Some technologies are better suited for this purpose than others. Through previous analyses solar cells and electromagnetic generator were found to be the most suitable solution. This paper will give a basic description of the operating conditions of solar cells and an elec...

  17. Thermoelectric energy harvesting from small ambient temperature transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Andre

    2012-07-01

    up, combining all relevant source properties (e.g.{Delta}T) and harvester properties (e.g. thermal/electrical interface). The model ensures maximum power in the electrical load if the harvester's interfaces are adapted to the source (source-matching) before adapting the TEG to the interfaces (load-matching). At the start of this design process, the energy source is characterized by field measurements of the temperature difference (mean absolute values: vertical stroke {Delta}T{sub building} vertical stroke = 2.16 K, vertical stroke {Delta}T{sub tunnel} vertical stroke = 1.23 K), the mean heat transfer mode (forced convention: {upsilon}{sub building} = 0.28 {sup m}/s, {upsilon}{sub tunnel} = 1.15 {sup m}/s), and the time dependence (frequency components in the {mu}Hz/Hz-range). The interfaces depend on these source properties: the source-matching requires the use of a pin fin heat sink as a thermal interface to the air (Fischer ICKPEN45W) and a DC/DC step-up converter (EnOcean ECT310) as an electrical interface. Since the heat sink has the largest impact on the output power, its geometry is optimized by analytical and numerical means, yielding a final heat transfer improvement of +41.7% for an inclined and staggered fin arrangement (ick45inc60stag) versus the original geometry (ICKPEN45W). The load-matching of the TEG to the interfaces states that the TEG Peltron 128A0023 produces maximum power. The optimized harvester (heat sink, DC/DC converter, TEG) is able to power a WSN in two application scenarios: The source- and load-matched harvester operates with a total temperature difference of only vertical stroke {Delta}T{sub building} vertical stroke = 0.74 K and vertical stroke {Delta}T{sub tunnel} vertical stroke = 1.27 K, without relying on direct solar irradiation. The accumulated electrical energy of E{sub building} = 0.317{sup J}/day and E{sub tunnel} = 0.354{sup J}/day enables the WSN to transmit more than 400 data packages per day in both applications. This

  18. A low frequency rotational energy harvesting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S. P.; Ramirez, J. M.; Gatti, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a rotary power scavenging unit comprised of two systems of flexible beams connected by two masses which are joined by means of a spring, considering a PZT (QP16N, Midé Corporation) piezoelectric sheet mounted on one of the beams. The energy harvesting (EH) system is mounted rigidly on a rotating hub. The gravitational force on the masses causes sustained oscillatory motion in the flexible beams as long as there is rotary motion. The intention is to use the EH system in the wireless autonomous monitoring of wind turbines under different wind conditions. Specifically, the development is oriented to monitor the dynamic state of the blades of a wind generator of 30 KW which rotates between 50 and 150 rpm. The paper shows a complete set of experimental results on three devices, modifying the amount of beams in the frame supporting the system. The results show an acceptable sustained voltage generation for the expected range, in the three proposed cases. Therefore, it is possible to use this system for generating energy in a low-frequency rotating environment. As an alternative, the system can be easily adapted to include an array of piezoelectric sheets to each of the beams, to provide more power generation.

  19. Solar energy - new photovoltaic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommr-Larsen, P.

    2009-09-15

    Solar energy technologies directly convert sunlight into electricity and heat, or power chemical reactions that convert simple molecules into synthetic chemicals and fuels. The sun is by far the most abundant source of energy, and a sustainable society will need to rely on solar energy as one of its major energy sources. Solar energy is a focus point in many strategies for a sustainable energy supply. The European Commission's Strategic Energy Plan (SET-plan) envisages a Solar Europe Initiative, where photovoltaics and concentrated solar power (CSP) supply as much power as wind mills in the future. Much focus is directed towards photovoltaics presently. Installation of solar cell occurs at an unprecedented pace and the expectations of the photovoltaics industry are high: a total PV capacity of 40 GW by 2012 as reported by a recent study. The talk progresses from general solar energy topics to photovoltaics with a special focus on the new photovoltaic technologies that promises ultra low cost solar cells. Unlike many other renewable energy technologies, a pipeline of new technologies is established and forms a road towards low cost energy production directly from the sun. (au)

  20. Sustainable Performance in Energy Harvesting - Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon; Di Mauro, Alessio; Dragoni, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    In this practical demo we illustrate the concept of "sustainable performance" in Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks (EH-WSNs). In particular, for different classes of applications and under several energy harvesting scenarios, we show how it is possible to have sustainable performance when...

  1. Data retrieval time for energy harvesting wireless sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitici, M.A.; Goseling, Jasper; de Graaf, Maurits; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of retrieving a reliable estimate of an attribute monitored by a wireless sensor network, where the sensors harvest energy from the environment independently, at random. Each sensor stores the harvested energy in batteries of limited capacity. Moreover, provided they have

  2. Energy harvesting with Di-Electro Active Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Jens; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Nielsen, Rasmus Ørndrup

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a way of using Di-Electro Active Polymers (D-EAPs) for harvesting mechanical energy sources. The article describes the basics of energy harvesting with D-EAPs, and an electrical model of a D-EAP is suggested. This leads to a converter design which is able to extract...

  3. Solar Thermal Energy; Energia Solar Termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Martinez, M.; Cuesta-Santianes, M. J.; Cabrera Jimenez, J. A.

    2008-07-01

    Approximately, 50 % of worldwide primary energy consumption is done in the form of heat in applications with a temperature lower than 250 degree centigree (low-medium temperature heat). These data clearly demonstrate the great potential of solar thermal energy to substitute conventional fossil fuels, which are becoming more expensive and are responsible for global warming. Low-medium temperature solar thermal energy is mainly used to obtain domestic hot water and provide space heating. Active solar thermal systems are those related to the use of solar thermal collectors. This study is dealing with low temperature solar thermal applications, mainly focusing on active solar thermal systems. This kind of systems has been extensively growing worldwide during the last years. At the end of 2006, the collector capacity in operation worldwide equalled 127.8 GWth. The technology is considered to be already developed and actions should be aimed at favouring a greater market penetration: diffusion, financial support, regulations establishment, etc. China and USA are the leading countries with a technology based on evacuated tube collectors and unglazed collectors, respectively. The rest of the world markets are dominated by the flat glazed collectors technology. (Author) 15 refs.

  4. First book on solar energy in Urdu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, M.

    1979-01-01

    This document introduces the field of solar energy and its applications. A history of work in the field of solar energy, both in Pakistan and abroad, is included. Various solar energy systems are included with special chapters on greenhouses, solar water heaters, solar cells, solar desalination, solar dryers, solar furnaces and a solar powered radio receiver. A list of solar energy scientists and engineers and a list of publications and reports on solar energy produced by the Atomic Energy Commission Laboratories at Lahore, Pakistan, complete the document.

  5. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Devices: An Alternative Energy Source for Wireless Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Action Nechibvute

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in ultralow power device integration, communication electronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS technology have fuelled the emerging technology of wireless sensor networks (WSNs. The spatial distributed nature of WSNs often requires that batteries power the individual sensor nodes. One of the major limitations on performance and lifetime of WSNs is the limited capacity of these finite power sources, which must be manually replaced when they are depleted. Moreover, the embedded nature of some of the sensors and hazardous sensing environment make battery replacement very difficult and costly. The process of harnessing and converting ambient energy sources into usable electrical energy is called energy harvesting. Energy harvesting raises the possibility of self-powered systems which are ubiquitous and truly autonomous, and without human intervention for energy replenishment. Among the ambient energy sources such as solar energy, heat, and wind, mechanical vibrations are an attractive ambient source mainly because they are widely available and are ideal for the use of piezoelectric materials, which have the ability to convert mechanical strain energy into electrical energy. This paper presents a concise review of piezoelectric microgenerators and nanogenerators as a renewable energy resource to power wireless sensors.

  6. Energy harvesting from mouse click of robot finger using piezoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Hong, Jin; Lee, Jaemin; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of energy harvesting from the mouse click motion using a piezoelectric energy transducer. Specifically, we use a robotic finger to realize repeatable mouse click motion. The robotic finger wears a glove with a pocket for including the piezoelectric material as an energy transducer. We propose a model for the energy harvesting system through the inverse kinematic framework of parallel joints in the finger and the electromechanical coupling equations of the piezoelectric material. Experiments are performed to elucidate the effect of the load resistance and the mouse click motion on energy harvesting.

  7. Radio Frequency Energy Harvesting for Long Lifetime Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    , harvesting energy from the radio frequency (RF) waves gives the lowest system design. Previous research on RF energy harvesting is based on the model that the radio energy is omnidirectional in the air. In this paper, a directional transmission/receiving model is proposed which can further overcome the path...... loss of the RF signals. On the node level, a virtual floating gate based CMOS biasing is used for the energy conversion circuit. With the proposed technique, the sensor node is able to harvest the energy from base station up to 30 meters....

  8. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  9. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting design concept: multimodal energy harvesting skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soobum; Youn, Byeng D

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an advanced design concept for a piezoelectric energy harvesting (EH), referred to as multimodal EH skin. This EH design facilitates the use of multimodal vibration and enhances power harvesting efficiency. The multimodal EH skin is an extension of our previous work, EH skin, which was an innovative design paradigm for a piezoelectric energy harvester: a vibrating skin structure and an additional thin piezoelectric layer in one device. A computational (finite element) model of the multilayered assembly - the vibrating skin structure and piezoelectric layer - is constructed and the optimal topology and/or shape of the piezoelectric layer is found for maximum power generation from multiple vibration modes. A design rationale for the multimodal EH skin was proposed: designing a piezoelectric material distribution and external resistors. In the material design step, the piezoelectric material is segmented by inflection lines from multiple vibration modes of interests to minimize voltage cancellation. The inflection lines are detected using the voltage phase. In the external resistor design step, the resistor values are found for each segment to maximize power output. The presented design concept, which can be applied to any engineering system with multimodal harmonic-vibrating skins, was applied to two case studies: an aircraft skin and a power transformer panel. The excellent performance of multimodal EH skin was demonstrated, showing larger power generation than EH skin without segmentation or unimodal EH skin.

  10. Electrodynamic energy harvester for electrical transformer's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    COMSOL Multiphysics software is used to optimize the design of the harvester. The split-cylindrical design of the developed EDEH permitted the harvester to be wrapped around the output power cable of the electrical transformer without shutting-off the power or disconnecting the power cable. From the electrical transformer ...

  11. Control of Solar Energy Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, Eduardo F; Rubio, Francisco R; Martínez, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Control of Solar Energy Systems details the main solar energy systems, problems involved with their control, and how control systems can help in increasing their efficiency.  After a brief introduction to the fundamental concepts associated with the use of solar energy in both photovoltaic and thermal plants, specific issues related to control of solar systems are embarked upon. Thermal energy systems are then explored in depth, as well as  other solar energy applications such as solar furnaces and solar refrigeration systems. Problems of variable generation profile and of the contribution of many solar plants to the same grid system are considered with the necessary integrated and supervisory control solutions being discussed. The text includes material on: ·         A comparison of basic and advanced control methods for parabolic troughs from PID to nonlinear model-based control; ·         solar towers and solar tracking; ·         heliostat calibration, characterization and off...

  12. The case for energy harvesting on wildlife in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Michael W.; MacCurdy, Robert; Shipley, J. Ryan; Winkler, David; Guglielmo, Christopher G.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-02-01

    The confluence of advancements in microelectronic components and vibrational energy harvesting has opened the possibility of remote sensor units powered solely from the motion of their hosts. There are numerous applications of such systems, including the development of modern wildlife tracking/data-logging devices. These ‘bio-logging’ devices are typically mass-constrained because they must be carried by an animal. Thus, they have historically traded scientific capability for operational longevity due to restrictions on battery size. Recently, the precipitous decrease in the power requirements of microelectronics has been accompanied by advancements in the area of piezoelectric vibrational energy harvesting. These energy harvesting devices are now capable of powering the type of microelectronic circuits used in bio-logging devices. In this paper we consider the feasibility of employing these vibrational energy harvesters on flying vertebrates for the purpose of powering a bio-logging device. We show that the excess energy available from birds and bats could be harvested without adversely affecting their overall energy budget. We then present acceleration measurements taken on flying birds in a flight tunnel to understand modulation of flapping frequency during steady flight. Finally, we use a recently developed method of estimating the maximum power output from a piezoelectric energy harvester to determine the amount of power that could be practically harvested from a flying bird. The results of this analysis show that the average power output of a piezoelectric energy harvester mounted to a bird or bat could produce more than enough power to run a bio-logging device. We compare the power harvesting capabilities to the energy requirements of an example system and conclude that vibrational energy harvesting on flying birds and bats is viable and warrants further study, including testing.

  13. Ultrathin 1T-phase MoS2 nanosheets decorated hollow carbon microspheres as highly efficient catalysts for solar energy harvesting and storage

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Min-Chien

    2017-02-08

    The composite of MoS2 and hollow carbon sphere (MoS2@HCS) is prepared via a glucose-assisted one pot synthesis. The composite consists of hierarchical spheres with a diameter of 0.5–4 μm and these hollow spheres are decorated with a number of curled and interlaced MoS2 nanosheets. After the composite is subject to the lithium intercalation, the MoS2 is converted from 2H to 1T phase. In this current work, the activities of 1T-MoS2@HCS toward photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and the reduction of I3− in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are systemically investigated. When evaluated as the photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution, the amount of evolved hydrogen over 1T-MoS2@HCS can reach 143 μmol in 2 h, being 3.6 times higher than as-synthesized 2H-MoS2@HCS. Additionally, the 1T-MoS2@HCS can be employed as the counter electrode (CE) material in DSCs. The DSCs based on 1T-MoS2@HCS CE possesses the power conversion efficiency of 8.94%, being higher than that with 2H-MoS2@HCS CE (8.16%) and comparable to that with Pt CE (8.87%). Our study demonstrates that 1T-MoS2@HCS has a great potential as an inexpensive alternative to Pt catalysts.

  14. Modelling of micro vibration energy harvester considering size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuangye; Huo, Rui; Wang, Weike

    2017-09-01

    Considering increase of stiffness caused by size effect, equivalent Young's modulus was introduced for futher analysis. Experimental platform was established to test vibration characteristics. Dynamic equation for micro piezoelectric cantilever beam considering size effect was studied with finite element analysis and experiment. Results shows it is accurate. Based on that, dynamic model for micro vibration energy harvester was improved, a T-type micro vibration energy harvester was designed and fabricated. Resonant frequency, tip displacement and output voltage of the harvester were obtained. Comparing with macroscopic model for vibration harvester, improved one reduces errors by 13%, 35% and 22%.

  15. Stability-Aware Geographic Routing in Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu, Tran Dinh; Dung, Le The; Kim, Byung-Seo

    2016-05-14

    A new generation of wireless sensor networks that harvest energy from environmental sources such as solar, vibration, and thermoelectric to power sensor nodes is emerging to solve the problem of energy limitation. Based on the photo-voltaic model, this research proposes a stability-aware geographic routing for reliable data transmissions in energy-harvesting wireless sensor networks (EH-WSNs) to provide a reliable routes selection method and potentially achieve an unlimited network lifetime. Specifically, the influences of link quality, represented by the estimated packet reception rate, on network performance is investigated. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms an energy-harvesting-aware method in terms of energy consumption, the average number of hops, and the packet delivery ratio.

  16. Increased Bandwidth of Mechanical Energy Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ahmed Seddik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for enlarging the relative movement of a base excited cantilevered system at off-resonance. The aim is to broaden the peak resonance of resonators without compromising the quality factor. The idea is to gather the resonance phenomenon conditions at off resonance. We do so by using a rebound system to block the seismic mass of the cantilever with support of vibration, when the speed of this one is maximum. The present study shows that using this technique will amplify the movement of the seismic mass and hence, the transferred mechanical energy from the source to the cantilever. This approach is useful for vibration harvesters operating in environments presenting a variable frequency or even for random vibrations. In this work we detail the approach; we also show how to optimize the efficiency of the present structure. Finally we present the experimental results that validate the approach. We show that a gain six times greater than simple resonator was obtained over more than one octave.

  17. High performance metamaterial device with enhanced electromagnetic energy harvesting efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shuai; Yang, Shizhong; Shan, Meng; Liu, Jing; Cao, Hailin

    2017-10-01

    A high performance metamaterial device for electromagnetic energy harvesting is presented. The unit cell of the metamaterial device consists of four identical omega ring resonators arranged in rotational symmetry, and each omega ring is loaded with a 50 Ω resistor that mimics the input impedance of a rectifier circuit. A proof-of-concept prototype is designed for operation at the frequency of 5.8 GHz. Here, the efficient energy harvesting is validated by the energy dissipated in each resistor. Based on the full absorption concept, the metamaterial device achieves a harvesting efficiency up to 93.1% under normal incidence. In addition, the energy harvester shows polarization independent and wide-angle incident frequency responses with good harvesting characteristics over the entire operating range. The surface current distribution is analyzed to gain an insight into the energy harvesting mechanism. Moreover, the harvester prototype is manufactured and measured, and the simulated and measured results are in good agreement. Due to the enhanced electromagnetic energy harvesting efficiency, the proposed device is a good candidate for microwave power transmission.

  18. Energy Harvesting Chip and the Chip Based Power Supply Development for a Wireless Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dasheng

    2008-12-02

    In this study, an energy harvesting chip was developed to scavenge energy from artificial light to charge a wireless sensor node. The chip core is a miniature transformer with a nano-ferrofluid magnetic core. The chip embedded transformer can convert harvested energy from its solar cell to variable voltage output for driving multiple loads. This chip system yields a simple, small, and more importantly, a battery-less power supply solution. The sensor node is equipped with multiple sensors that can be enabled by the energy harvesting power supply to collect information about the human body comfort degree. Compared with lab instruments, the nodes with temperature, humidity and photosensors driven by harvested energy had variation coefficient measurement precision of less than 6% deviation under low environmental light of 240 lux. The thermal comfort was affected by the air speed. A flow sensor equipped on the sensor node was used to detect airflow speed. Due to its high power consumption, this sensor node provided 15% less accuracy than the instruments, but it still can meet the requirement of analysis for predicted mean votes (PMV) measurement. The energy harvesting wireless sensor network (WSN) was deployed in a 24-hour convenience store to detect thermal comfort degree from the air conditioning control. During one year operation, the sensor network powered by the energy harvesting chip retained normal functions to collect the PMV index of the store. According to the one month statistics of communication status, the packet loss rate (PLR) is 2.3%, which is as good as the presented results of those WSNs powered by battery. Referring to the electric power records, almost 54% energy can be saved by the feedback control of an energy harvesting sensor network. These results illustrate that, scavenging energy not only creates a reliable power source for electronic devices, such as wireless sensor nodes, but can also be an energy source by building an energy efficient

  19. Energy Harvesting Chip and the Chip Based Power Supply Development for a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasheng Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an energy harvesting chip was developed to scavenge energy from artificial light to charge a wireless sensor node. The chip core is a miniature transformer with a nano-ferrofluid magnetic core. The chip embedded transformer can convert harvested energy from its solar cell to variable voltage output for driving multiple loads. This chip system yields a simple, small, and more importantly, a battery-less power supply solution. The sensor node is equipped with multiple sensors that can be enabled by the energy harvesting power supply to collect information about the human body comfort degree. Compared with lab instruments, the nodes with temperature, humidity and photosensors driven by harvested energy had variation coefficient measurement precision of less than 6% deviation under low environmental light of 240 lux. The thermal comfort was affected by the air speed. A flow sensor equipped on the sensor node was used to detect airflow speed. Due to its high power consumption, this sensor node provided 15% less accuracy than the instruments, but it still can meet the requirement of analysis for predicted mean votes (PMV measurement. The energy harvesting wireless sensor network (WSN was deployed in a 24-hour convenience store to detect thermal comfort degree from the air conditioning control. During one year operation, the sensor network powered by the energy harvesting chip retained normal functions to collect the PMV index of the store. According to the one month statistics of communication status, the packet loss rate (PLR is 2.3%, which is as good as the presented results of those WSNs powered by battery. Referring to the electric power records, almost 54% energy can be saved by the feedback control of an energy harvesting sensor network. These results illustrate that, scavenging energy not only creates a reliable power source for electronic devices, such as wireless sensor nodes, but can also be an energy source by building an

  20. A Novel Ropes-DrivenWideband Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel piezoelectric vibration energy harvester (PVEH in which a high-frequency generating beam (HFGB is driven by an array of low-frequency driving beams (LFDBs using ropes. Two mechanisms based on frequency upconversion and multimodal harvesting work together to broaden the frequency bandwidth of the proposed vibration energy harvester (VEH. The experimental results show that the output power of generating beam (GB remains unchanged with the increasing number of driving beams (DBs, compared with the traditional arrays of beams vibration energy harvester (AB-VEH, and the output power and bandwidth behavior can be adjusted by parameters such as acceleration, rope margin, and stiffness of LFDBs, which shows the potential to achieve unlimited wideband vibration energy-harvesting for a variable environment.

  1. Nonlinear spring-less electromagnetic vibration energy harvesting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Z.; Ondrusek, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with a description and modelling of a spring-less electromagnetic vibration energy harvesting system. The presented unique electromagnetic vibration energy harvester consists of a nonlinear resonance mechanism, magnetic circuit with a coil and an electronic load. The mechanical vibrations excite the nonlinear resonance mechanism and the relative movement of the magnetic circuit against fixed coil induces voltage due to Faraday's Law. When the electronics is connected the current flows through the load and output power is harvested. There are several nonlinearities which affects operations of the presented electromagnetic energy harvesting system. The significant nonlinearity of the system is stiffness of the resonance mechanism and it causes extending of an operation bandwidth. The harvesting of electrical energy from mechanical vibrations provides electromagnetic damping feedbacks of the coil to moving magnetic circuit. The feedback depends on the current flow through the electronic load and coil. The using of modern power management circuit with optimal power point provides other nonlinear operation.

  2. Fabrication of SU-8 low frequency electrostatic energy harvester

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Khaled S.

    2011-11-01

    A 1500μm × 1500μm × 150μm out-of-plane, gap closing, electrostatic energy harvester is designed and fabricated to harvest low-frequency ambient vibrations. SU-8 is used to fabricate the proof mass (1200μm × 1200μm × 150μm) and the 5 m springs. Different harvesters were designed to harvest at 50, 75 and 110 Hz. At 110 Hz, Simulations show that with an input vibration of 10 μm amplitude at the frequency of resonance of the structure, the energy harvester should generate an average output power density of 0.032μW/mm3. This is the most area-efficient low-frequency electrostatic harvester to-date. © 2011 IEEE.

  3. Wearable energy-smart ribbons for synchronous energy harvest and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Islam, Md. Monirul; Moore, Julian; Sleppy, Joseph; Morrison, Caleb; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Dou, Shi Xue; Renduchintala, Chait; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-11-01

    A promising energy source for many current and future applications is a ribbon-like device that could simultaneously harvest and store energy. Due to the high flexibility and weavable property, a fabric/matrix made using these ribbons could be highly beneficial for powering wearable electronics. Unlike the approach of using two separate devices, here we report a ribbon that integrates a solar cell and a supercapacitor. The electrons generated by the solar cell are directly transferred and stored on the reverse side of its electrode which in turn also functions as an electrode for the supercapacitor. When the flexible solar ribbon is illuminated with simulated solar light, the supercapacitor holds an energy density of 1.15 mWh cm-3 and a power density of 243 mW cm-3. Moreover, these ribbons are successfully woven into a fabric form. Our all-solid-state ribbon unveils a highly flexible and portable self-sufficient energy system with potential applications in wearables, drones and electric vehicles.

  4. Hybrid Nanogenerator for Concurrently Harvesting Biomechanical and Biochemical Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Hansen, Benjamin J.

    2010-07-27

    Harvesting energy from multiple sources available in our personal and daily environments is highly desirable, not only for powering personal electronics, but also for future implantable sensor-transmitter devices for biomedical and healthcare applications. Here we present a hybrid energy scavenging device for potential in vivo applications. The hybrid device consists of a piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofiber nanogenerator for harvesting mechanical energy, such as from breathing or from the beat of a heart, and a flexible enzymatic biofuel cell for harvesting the biochemical (glucose/O2) energy in biofluid, which are two types of energy available in vivo. The two energy harvesting approaches can work simultaneously or individually, thereby boosting output and lifetime. Using the hybrid device, we demonstrate a "self-powered" nanosystem by powering a ZnO nanowire UV light sensor. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Comparison of the dielectric electroactive polymer generator energy harvesting cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Emmanouil; Trintis, Ionut; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The Dielectric ElectroActive Polymer (DEAP) generator energy harvesting cycles have been in the spotlight of the scientific interest for the past few years. Indeed, several articles have demonstrated thorough and comprehensive comparisons of the generator fundamental energy harvesting cycles......, namely Constant Charge (CC), Constant Voltage (CV) and Constant E-field (CE), based on averaged theoretical models. Yet, it has not been possible until present to validate the outcome of those comparisons via respective experimental results. In this paper, all three primary energy harvesting cycles...... are experimentally compared, based upon the coupling of a DEAP generator with a bidirectional non-isolated power electronic converter, by means of energy gain, energy harvesting efficiency and energy conversion efficiency....

  6. Solar energy perspectives for public power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodley, N. H.

    1979-06-01

    Perspectives on the utilization of solar energy for electricity production and thermal energy utilization by the public are briefly discussed. Wind energy conversion, biomass conversion, solar thermal, OTEC, photovoltaics, and solar heating and cooling are discussed. (WHK)

  7. Hybrid nanogenerators for low frequency vibration energy harvesting and self-powered wireless locating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Hulin; Wang, Jie; Xie, Yuhang; Khan, Saeed Ahmed; Jin, Long; Yan, Zhuocheng; Huang, Long; Pan, Taisong; Yang, Weiqing; Lin, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid energy harvesters based on different physical effects is fascinating, but a rational design for multiple energy harvesting is challenging. In this work, a spring-magnet oscillator-based triboelectric-electromagnetic generator (EMG) with a solar cell cap is proposed. A power was produced by a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and an EMG independently or simultaneously by using a shared spring-magnet oscillator. The oscillator configuration enables versatile energy harvesting with the excellent size scalability and self-packaged structure which can perform well at low frequency ranging from 3.5 to 5 Hz. The solar cell cap mounted above the oscillator can harvest solar energy. Under vibrations at the frequency of 4 Hz, the TENG and the EMG produced maximum output power of 5.46 nW cm‑3 and 378.79 μW cm‑3, respectively. The generated electricity by the hybrid nanogenerator can be stored in a capacitor or Li-ion battery, which is capable of powering a wireless locator for real-time locating data reporting to a personal cell phone. The light-weight and handy hybrid nanogenerator can directly light a caution light or play as a portable flashlight by shaking hands at night.

  8. Harvesting renewable energy from Earth’s mid-infrared emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Steven J.; Blanchard, Romain; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    It is possible to harvest energy from Earth's thermal infrared emission into outer space. We calculate the thermodynamic limit for the amount of power available, and as a case study, we plot how this limit varies daily and seasonally in a location in Oklahoma. We discuss two possible ways to make such an emissive energy harvester (EEH): A thermal EEH (analogous to solar thermal power generation) and an optoelectronic EEH (analogous to photovoltaic power generation). For the latter, we propose using an infrared-frequency rectifying antenna, and we discuss its operating principles, efficiency limits, system design considerations, and possible technological implementations. PMID:24591604

  9. A MEMS vibration energy harvester for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaijk, R.; Elfrink, R.; Oudenhoven, J.; Pop, V.; Wang, Z.; Renaud, M.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop MEMS vibration energy harvesters for tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS), they can be located on the rim or on the inner-liner of the car tire. Nowadays TPMS modules are powered by batteries with a limited lifetime. A large effort is ongoing to replace batteries with small and long lasting power sources like energy harvesters [1]. The operation principle of vibration harvesters is mechanical resonance of a seismic mass, where mechanical energy is converted into electrical energy. In general, vibration energy harvesters are of specific interest for machine environments where random noise or repetitive shock vibrations are present. In this work we present the results for MEMS based vibration energy harvesting for applying on the rim or inner-liner. The vibrations on the rim correspond to random noise. A vibration energy harvester can be described as an under damped mass-spring system acting like a mechanical band-pass filter, and will resonate at its natural frequency [2]. At 0.01 g2/Hz noise amplitude the average power can reach the level that is required to power a simple wireless sensor node, approximately 10 μW [3]. The dominant vibrations on the inner-liner consist mainly of repetitive high amplitude shocks. With a shock, the seismic mass is displaced, after which the mass will "ring-down" at its natural resonance frequency. During the ring-down period, part of the mechanical energy is harvested. On the inner-liner of the tire repetitive (one per rotation) high amplitude (few hundred g) shocks occur. The harvester enables an average power of a few tens of μW [4], sufficient to power a more sophisticated wireless sensor node that can measure additional tire-parameters besides pressure. In this work we characterized MEMS vibration energy harvesters for noise and shock excitation. We validated their potential for TPMS modules by measurements and simulation.

  10. Energy Harvesting Cycles of Dielectric ElectroActive Polymer Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Emmanouil; Trintis, Ionut; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2012-01-01

    . Their higher energy density, superior low-speed performance, light-weighted nature as well as their shapely structure have rendered DEAPs candidate solutions for various actuation and energy harvesting applications. In this paper, a thoroughly analysis of all energy harvesting operational cycles of a DEAP...... generator, coupled to a non-isolated power electronics converter, is conducted and for the first time experimental results for each one of them are presented....

  11. An Electromagnetic MEMS Energy Harvester Array with Multiple Vibration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huicong Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design, micromachining and characterization of an array of electromagnetic energy harvesters (EHs with multiple frequency peaks. The authors present the combination of three multi-modal spring-mass structures so as to realize at least nine resonant peaks within a single microelectromechanical systems (MEMS chip. It is assembled with permanent magnet to show an electromagnetic-based energy harvesting capability. This is the first demonstration of multi-frequency MEMS EH existing with more than three resonant peaks within a limited frequency range of 189 to 662 Hz. It provides a more effective approach to harvest energy from the vibration sources of multiple frequency peaks.

  12. Modelling of cantilever based on piezoelectric energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, N. F.; Ong, N. R.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Alcain, J. B.; Haimi, W. M. W. N.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Recent technology allows devices to become smaller and with more functions. However, the battery size remained the same and for some devices, the battery must be larger in order to accommodate the greater power demands by the portable device. Piezoelectric energy harvester has been suggested as a substitute for the batteries in coming future. In this paper, a cantilever based piezoelectric energy harvester was modelled and simulated using COMSOL software. The analysis focused on the mechanical part of the harvesting system such as output power, output voltage and vibration frequency. Results of the simulations proved that flexible piezoelectric energy harvesters using nano-materials had remarkable strength under the large strain. However, although the large strain was induced on the flexible energy harvesters, the output power was still lower than the bulk and MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters that operated at the resonance frequency. The off-resonance operation and very lower packing density of the active piezoelectric materials of the flexible energy harvesters resulted in a low output power.

  13. Modeling of plucking piezoelectric energy harvesters with contact theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinlei; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2017-04-01

    Non-harmonic excitations are widely available in the environment of our daily life. We could make use of these excitations to pluck piezoelectric energy harvesters. Plucking piezoelectric energy harvesting could overcome the frequency gap and achieve frequency-up effect. However, there has not been a thorough analysis on plucking piezoelectric energy harvesting, especially with good understanding on the plucking mechanism. This paper is aimed to develop a model to investigate the plucking mechanism and predict the responses of plucking piezoelectric energy harvesters under different kinds of excitations. In the electromechanical model, Hertzian contact theory is applied to account for the interaction between the plectrum and piezoelectric beam. The plucking mechanism is clarified as a cantilever beam impacted by an infinitely heavy mass, in which the multi-impact process prematurely terminates at separation time. We numerically predict the plucking force, which depends on piezoelectric beam, Hertzian contact stiffness, overlap area and plucking velocity. The energy distribution is investigated with connected resistor.

  14. An Integrated Hybrid Energy Harvester for Autonomous Wireless Sensor Network Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukter Zaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Profiling environmental parameter using a large number of spatially distributed wireless sensor network (WSN NODEs is an extensive illustration of advanced modern technologies, but high power requirement for WSN NODEs limits the widespread deployment of these technologies. Currently, WSN NODEs are extensively powered up using batteries, but the battery has limitation of lifetime, power density, and environmental concerns. To overcome this issue, energy harvester (EH is developed and presented in this paper. Solar-based EH has been identified as the most viable source of energy to be harvested for autonomous WSN NODEs. Besides, a novel chemical-based EH is reported as the potential secondary source for harvesting energy because of its uninterrupted availability. By integrating both solar-based EH and chemical-based EH, a hybrid energy harvester (HEH is developed to power up WSN NODEs. Experimental results from the real-time deployment shows that, besides supporting the daily operation of WSN NODE and Router, the developed HEH is capable of producing a surplus of 971 mA·hr equivalent energy to be stored inside the storage for NODE and 528.24 mA·hr equivalent energy for Router, which is significantly enough for perpetual operation of autonomous WSN NODEs used in environmental parameter profiling.

  15. Light harvesting enhancement in solar cells with quasicrystalline plasmonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christina; Giessen, Harald

    2013-05-06

    Solar cells are important in the area of renewable energies. Since it is expensive to produce solar-grade silicon [Electrochem. Soc. Interface 17, 30 (2008)], especially thin-film solar cells are interesting. However, the efficiency of such solar cells is low. Therefore, it is important to increase the efficiency. The group of Polman has shown that a periodic arrangement of metal particles is able to enhance the absorbance of light [Nano Lett. 11, 1760 (2011)]. However, a quasicrystalline arrangement of the metal particles is expected to enhance the light absorbance independent of the incident polar and azimuthal angles due to the more isotropic photonic bandstructure. In this paper, we compare the absorption enhancement of a quasiperiodic photonic crystal to that of a periodic photonic crystal. We indeed find that the absorption enhancement for the quasicrystalline arrangement shows such an isotropic behavior. This implies that the absorption efficiency of the solar cell is relatively constant during the course of the day as well as the year. This is particularly important with respect to power distribution, power storage requirements, and the stability of the electric grid upon massive use of renewable energy.

  16. Plasmonic harvesting of light energy for Suzuki coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Chuanhao; Chen, Huanjun; Jiang, Ruibin; Sun, Ling-Dong; Li, Quan; Wang, Jianfang; Yu, Jimmy C; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-04-17

    The efficient use of solar energy has received wide interest due to increasing energy and environmental concerns. A potential means in chemistry is sunlight-driven catalytic reactions. We report here on the direct harvesting of visible-to-near-infrared light for chemical reactions by use of plasmonic Au-Pd nanostructures. The intimate integration of plasmonic Au nanorods with catalytic Pd nanoparticles through seeded growth enabled efficient light harvesting for catalytic reactions on the nanostructures. Upon plasmon excitation, catalytic reactions were induced and accelerated through both plasmonic photocatalysis and photothermal conversion. Under the illumination of an 809 nm laser at 1.68 W, the yield of the Suzuki coupling reaction was ~2 times that obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature. Moreover, the yield was also ~2 times that obtained from Au-TiOx-Pd nanostructures under the same laser illumination, where a 25-nm-thick TiOx shell was introduced to prevent the photocatalysis process. This is a more direct comparison between the effect of joint plasmonic photocatalysis and photothermal conversion with that of sole photothermal conversion. The contribution of plasmonic photocatalysis became larger when the laser illumination was at the plasmon resonance wavelength. It increased when the power of the incident laser at the plasmon resonance was raised. Differently sized Au-Pd nanostructures were further designed and mixed together to make the mixture light-responsive over the visible to near-infrared region. In the presence of the mixture, the reactions were completed within 2 h under sunlight, while almost no reactions occurred in the dark.

  17. Joint Resource Allocation of Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in an Energy-Harvesting-Based Cognitive Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Lu, Weidang; Ye, Liang; Li, Feng; Zou, Deyue

    2017-03-16

    The cognitive sensor (CS) can transmit data to the control center in the same spectrum that is licensed to the primary user (PU) when the absence of the PU is detected by spectrum sensing. However, the battery energy of the CS is limited due to its small size, deployment in atrocious environments and long-term working. In this paper, an energy-harvesting-based CS is described, which senses the PU together with collecting the radio frequency energy to supply data transmission. In order to improve the transmission performance of the CS, we have proposed the joint resource allocation of spectrum sensing and energy harvesting in the cases of a single energy-harvesting-based CS and an energy-harvesting-based cognitive sensor network (CSN), respectively. Based on the proposed frame structure, we have formulated the resource allocation as a class of joint optimization problems, which seek to maximize the transmission rate of the CS by jointly optimizing sensing time, harvesting time and the numbers of sensing nodes and harvesting nodes. Using the half searching method and the alternating direction optimization, we have achieved the sub-optimal solution by converting the joint optimization problem into several convex sub-optimization problems. The simulation results have indicated the predominance of the proposed energy-harvesting-based CS and CSN models.

  18. Hierarchical structures consisting of SiO2 nanorods and p-GaN microdomes for efficiently harvesting solar energy for InGaN quantum well photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Han; Lien, Der-Hsien; Chang, Hung-Chih; Lin, Chin-An; Kang, Chen-Fang; Hsing, Meng-Kai; Lai, Kun-Yu; He, Jr-Hau

    2012-12-07

    We experimentally and theoretically demonstrated the hierarchical structure of SiO(2) nanorod arrays/p-GaN microdomes as a light harvesting scheme for InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells. The combination of nano- and micro-structures leads to increased internal multiple reflection and provides an intermediate refractive index between air and GaN. Cells with the hierarchical structure exhibit improved short-circuit current densities and fill factors, rendering a 1.47 fold efficiency enhancement as compared to planar cells.

  19. Energy Harvesting from Aerodynamic Instabilities: Current prospect and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M.; Rajendran, P.; Khan, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper evaluates the layout and advancement of energy harvesting based on aerodynamic instabilities of an aircraft. Vibration and thermoelectric energy harvesters are substantiated as most suitable alternative low-power sources for aerospace applications. Furthermore, the facility associated with the aircraft applications in harvesting the mechanical vibrations and converting it to electric energy has fascinated the researchers. These devices are designed as an alternative to a battery-based solution especially for small aircrafts, wireless structural health monitoring for aircraft systems, and harvester plates employed in UAVs to enhance the endurance and operational flight missions. We will emphasize on various sources of energy harvesting that are designed to come from aerodynamic flow-induced vibrations, specific attention is then given at those technologies that may offer, today or in the near future, a potential benefit to reduce both the cost and emissions of the aviation industry. The advancements achieved in the energy harvesting based on aerodynamic instabilities show very good scope for many piezoelectric harvesters in the field of aerospace, specifically green aviation technology in the future.

  20. Infrared Energy Harvesting for Optoplasmonics from Nanostructured Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcherio, Gregory Thomas

    Metamaterials exhibit unique optical resonance characteristics which permit precise engineering of energy pathways within a device. The ability of plasmonic nanostructures to guide electromagnetism offers a platform to reduce global dependence on fossil fuels by harvesting waste heat, which comprises 60% of generated energy around the world. Plasmonic metamaterials were hypothesized to support an exchange of energy between resonance modes, enabling generation of higher energy photons from waste infrared energy. Infrared irradiation of a metamaterial at the Fano coupling lattice resonance was anticipated to re-emit as higher energy visible light at the plasmon resonance. Photonic signals from harvested thermal energy could be used to power wearable medical monitors or off-grid excursions, for example. This thesis developed the design, fabrication, and characterization methods to realize nanostructured metamaterials which permit resonance exchange for infrared energy harvesting applications.

  1. Solar energy activities in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbensen T.; Kristensen, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Danish solar energy group has about 70 members, and there are about 6 professional manufacturers of solar energy equipment in Denmark. In these years the Danish government subsidizes solar energy installations with 30% of the total expenses. High efficiency hot water systems of 4 m/sup 2/ collector size has been developed and are now available on the Danish market. These systems are tested as the very best in the European Community, and they are competetive to other energy sources in Denmark except for district heating connected to heat and power generation plants. Presently much effort is put in developing Danish solar heating components for use in third world countries, such as solar driven freezers, high efficiency collectors and solar water heating systems especially suited for trophical conditions. On the domestic market, the local communities can now require free expert assistance in order to identify public buildings especially suited for solar water heating systems. Several grants have been given for projects concerned with using large solar collector areas for industrial proposes and for district heating.

  2. The Geography of Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHart, David E.; Allen, Rodney F.

    1984-01-01

    After learning about two promising techniques for generating electricity--photovoltaic cells and wind energy conversion systems--secondary students analyze two maps of the United States showing solar radiation and available wind power to determine which U.S. regions have potential for these solar electric systems. (RM)

  3. Fabrication of Scalable Indoor Light Energy Harvester and Study for Agricultural IoT Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M.; Nakamura, A.; Kunii, A.; Kusano, K.; Futagawa, M.

    2015-12-01

    A scalable indoor light energy harvester was fabricated by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and printing hybrid technology and evaluated for agricultural IoT applications under different environmental input power density conditions, such as outdoor farming under the sun, greenhouse farming under scattered lighting, and a plant factory under LEDs. We fabricated and evaluated a dye- sensitized-type solar cell (DSC) as a low cost and “scalable” optical harvester device. We developed a transparent conductive oxide (TCO)-less process with a honeycomb metal mesh substrate fabricated by MEMS technology. In terms of the electrical and optical properties, we achieved scalable harvester output power by cell area sizing. Second, we evaluated the dependence of the input power scalable characteristics on the input light intensity, spectrum distribution, and light inlet direction angle, because harvested environmental input power is unstable. The TiO2 fabrication relied on nanoimprint technology, which was designed for optical optimization and fabrication, and we confirmed that the harvesters are robust to a variety of environments. Finally, we studied optical energy harvesting applications for agricultural IoT systems. These scalable indoor light harvesters could be used in many applications and situations in smart agriculture.

  4. Nanowire Structured Hybrid Cell for Concurrently Scavenging Solar and Mechanical Energies

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Chen

    2009-04-29

    Conversion cells for harvesting solar energy and mechanical energy are usually separate and independent entities that are designed and built following different physical principles. Developing a technology that harvests multiple-type energies in forms such as sun light and mechanical around the clock is desperately desired for fully utilizing the energies available in our living environment. We report a hybrid cell that is intended for simultaneously harvesting solar and mechanical energies. Using aligned ZnO nanowire arrays grown on surfaces of a flat substrate, a dye-sensitized solar cell is integrated with a piezoelectric nanogenerator. The former harvests solar energy irradiating on the top, and the latter harvests ultrasonic wave energy from the surrounding. The two energy harvesting approaches can work simultaneously or individually, and they can be integrated in parallel and serial for raising the output current and voltage, respectively, as well as power. It is found that the voltage output from the solar cell can be used to raise the output voltage of the nanogenerator, providing an effective approach for effectively storing and utilizing the power generated by the nanogenerator. Our study demonstrates a new approach for concurrently harvesting multiple types of energies using an integrated hybrid cell so that the energy resources can be effectively and complementary utilized whenever and wherever one or all of them is available. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  5. Harvesting under transient conditions: harvested energy as a proxy for optimal resonance frequency detuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Taylor D.; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2015-04-01

    Piezoelectric-based vibration energy harvesting is of interest in a wide range of applications, and a number of harvesting schemes have been proposed and studied { primarily when operating under steady state conditions. However, energy harvesting behavior is rarely studied in systems with transient excitations. This paper will work to develop an understanding of this behavior within the context of a particular vibration reduction technique, resonance frequency detuning. Resonance frequency detuning provides a method of reducing mechanical response at structural resonances as the excitation frequency sweeps through a given range. This technique relies on switching the stiffness state of a structure at optimal times to detune its resonance frequency from that of the excitation. This paper examines how this optimal switch may be triggered in terms of the energy harvested, developing a normalized optimal switch energy that is independent of the open- and short-circuit resistances. Here the open- and short-circuit shunt resistances refer to imposed conditions that approximate the open- and short-circuit conditions, via high and low resistance shunts. These conditions are practically necessary to harvest the small amounts of power needed to switch stiffness states, as open-circuit and closed-circuit refer to infinite resistance and zero resistance, respectively, and therefore no energy passes through the harvesting circuit. The limiting stiffness states are then defined by these open- and short-circuit resistances. The optimal switch energy is studied over a range of sweep rates, damping ratios, and coupling coefficients; it is found to increase with the coupling coefficient and decrease as the sweep rate and damping ratio increase, behavior which is intuitive. Higher coupling means more energy is converted by the piezoelectric material, and therefore more energy is harvested in a given time; an increased sweep rate means resonance is reached sooner, and there will less

  6. Energy harvesting from low frequency applications using piezoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Deng, Z. Daniel, E-mail: zhiqun.deng@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    In an effort to eliminate the replacement of the batteries of electronic devices that are difficult or impractical to service once deployed, harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations or impacts using piezoelectric materials has been researched over the last several decades. However, a majority of these applications have very low input frequencies. This presents a challenge for the researchers to optimize the energy output of piezoelectric energy harvesters, due to the relatively high elastic moduli of piezoelectric materials used to date. This paper reviews the current state of research on piezoelectric energy harvesting devices for low frequency (0–100 Hz) applications and the methods that have been developed to improve the power outputs of the piezoelectric energy harvesters. Various key aspects that contribute to the overall performance of a piezoelectric energy harvester are discussed, including geometries of the piezoelectric element, types of piezoelectric material used, techniques employed to match the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric element to input frequency of the host structure, and electronic circuits specifically designed for energy harvesters.

  7. Energy harvesting from mastication forces via a smart tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Hani, Muath; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    The batteries of the current pacing devices are relatively large and occupy over 60 percent of the size of pulse generators. Therefore, they cannot be placed in the subtle areas of human body. In this paper, the mastication force and the resulting tooth pressure are converted to electricity. The pressure energy can be converted to electricity by using the piezoelectric effect. The tooth crown is used as a power autonomous pulse generator. We refer to this envisioned pulse generator as the smart tooth. The smart tooth is in the form of a dental implant. A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed and modeled for this purpose. The Piezoelectric based energy harvesters investigated and analyzed in this paper initially includes a single degree of freedom piezoelectric based stack energy harvester which utilizes a harvesting circuit employing the case of a purely resistive circuit. The next step is utilizing and investigating a bimorph piezoelectric beam which is integrated/embedded in the smart tooth implant. Mastication process causes the bimorph beam to buckle or return to unbuckled condition. The transitions results in vibration of the piezoelectric beam and thus generate energy. The power estimated by the two mechanisms is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. Both scenarios of the energy harvesters are analytically modeled. The exact analytical solution of the piezoelectric beam energy harvester with Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions is presented. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities have been included in the model for the piezoelectric beam.

  8. Resource management for energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Deyu; Zhou, Haibo; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2017-01-01

    This SpringerBrief offers a comprehensive review and in-depth discussion of the current research on resource management. The authors explain how to best utilize harvested energy and temporally available licensed spectrum. Throughout the brief, the primary focus is energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks (ESHNs) including energy harvesting (EH)-powered spectrum sensing and dynamic spectrum access. To efficiently collect data through the available licensed spectrum, this brief examines the joint management of energy and spectrum. An EH-powered spectrum sensing and management scheme for Heterogeneous Spectrum Harvesting Sensor Networks (HSHSNs) is presented in this brief. The scheme dynamically schedules the data sensing and spectrum access of sensors in ESHSNs to optimize the network utility, while considering the stochastic nature of EH process, PU activities and channel conditions. This brief also provides useful insights for the practical resource management scheme design for ESHSNs and motivates a ne...

  9. Controlling vacancies in chalcogenides as energy harvesting materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Recent years witnessed fruitful results on tailoring properties and application performance, especially in the field of clean energy storage and harvesting materials. Defects, especially elemental vacancies, exist universally and are inevitable in materials. Due to the difficulties to precisely map

  10. Potential sustainable energy source: Pheroid™ with incorporated light harvesting materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The most efficient light harvesting and energy transfer systems are found in nature as part of the photosynthesis process. By extracting these system fragments and maximising their organisational structure, researchers are developing similar...

  11. Effects of springs on a pendulum electromechanical energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Notué Kadjie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a model of energy harvester that consists of an electromechanical pendulum system subjected to nonlinear springs. The output power is analyzed in terms of the intrinsic parameters of the device leading to optimal parameters for energy harvesting. It is found that in an appropriate range of the springs constant, the power attains higher values as compared to the case without springs. The dynamical behavior of the device shows transition to chaos.

  12. Photovoltaic characteristics of natural light harvesting dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, H S; Shenouda, S S; Fadel, M

    2018-03-05

    In this work of research, anthocyanin as a natural dye obtained from raspberry fruits, was used and tested as a photon harvesting/electron donating dye in titanium dioxide nanoparticle-based DSSCs. A working photoelectrode made from TiO 2 nanoparticles with an average particle size (10-40nm) that is coated on Florine doped tin-oxide substrate, was prepared via a simple and low cost hydrothermal method. A detailed structural and morphological analysis of the TiO 2 photoactive electrode was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectrometer, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Complete photovoltaic characteristics including (current, voltage, outpower, and responsivity) of the natural anthocyanin based dye sensitized solar cell have been investigated under different illumination intensity ranging from 10 to 100mW.cm -2 . The cell responsivity and efficiency of the fabricated solar cell under different illumination intensity were found to be in the range (R=15.6-23.8mA.W -1 and η=0.13-0.25) at AM=1.5 conditions. This study is important for enhancing the future applications of the promising DSSC technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Photovoltaic characteristics of natural light harvesting dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, H. S.; Shenouda, S. S.; Fadel, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work of research, anthocyanin as a natural dye obtained from raspberry fruits, was used and tested as a photon harvesting/electron donating dye in titanium dioxide nanoparticle-based DSSCs. A working photoelectrode made from TiO2 nanoparticles with an average particle size (10-40 nm) that is coated on Florine doped tin-oxide substrate, was prepared via a simple and low cost hydrothermal method. A detailed structural and morphological analysis of the TiO2 photoactive electrode was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectrometer, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Complete photovoltaic characteristics including (current, voltage, outpower, and responsivity) of the natural anthocyanin based dye sensitized solar cell have been investigated under different illumination intensity ranging from 10 to 100 mW.cm- 2. The cell responsivity and efficiency of the fabricated solar cell under different illumination intensity were found to be in the range (R = 15.6-23.8 mA.W- 1 and η = 0.13-0.25) at AM = 1.5 conditions. This study is important for enhancing the future applications of the promising DSSC technology.

  14. Biological applications of solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanam, A.; Krishnaswamy, S.; Kahn, J.S. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    Articles presented and discussed during the symposium held at Madurai Kamaraj University in December 1978 are included. The theme of the symposium was to look into the solar option as an alternate source of energy to the traditional commercial forms through photosynthetic means for biomass and biofuel production. The articles are grouped into eight parts: global and regional aspects of solar energy; photosynthesis and productivity; field; nitrogen fixation; biomass; extreme environment; model systems; and biofuels and chemicals. (DC)

  15. MEMS-based thick film PZT vibrational energy harvester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Anders; Xu, Ruichao; Thyssen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We present a MEMS-based unimorph silicon/PZT thick film vibrational energy harvester with an integrated proof mass. We have developed a process that allows fabrication of high performance silicon based energy harvesters with a yield higher than 90%. The process comprises a KOH etch using...... a mechanical front side protection of an SOI wafer with screen printed PZT thick film. The fabricated harvester device produces 14.0 μW with an optimal resistive load of 100 kΩ from 1g (g=9.81 m s-2) input acceleration at its resonant frequency of 235 Hz....

  16. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  17. Airflow energy harvesting with high wind velocities for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Z. J.; Tuddenham, S. B.; Zhu, M.

    2016-11-01

    An airflow energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from vortices at high speed is presented in this paper. The airflow energy harvester is implemented using a modified helical Savonius turbine and an electromagnetic generator. A power management module with maximum power point finding capability is used to manage the harvested energy and convert the low voltage magnitude from the generator to a usable level for wireless sensors. The airflow energy harvester is characterized using vortex generated by air hitting a plate in a wind tunnel. By using an aircraft environment with wind speed of 17 m/s as case study, the output power of the airflow energy harvester is measured to be 126 mW. The overall efficiency of the power management module is 45.76 to 61.2%, with maximum power point tracking efficiency of 94.21 to 99.72% for wind speed of 10 to 18 m/s, and has a quiescent current of 790 nA for the maximum power point tracking circuit.

  18. Multislot Simultaneous Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in Cognitive Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In cognitive radio (CR, the spectrum sensing of the primary user (PU may consume some electrical power from the battery capacity of the secondary user (SU, resulting in a decrease in the transmission power of the SU. In this paper, a multislot simultaneous spectrum sensing and energy harvesting model is proposed, which uses the harvested radio frequency (RF energy of the PU signal to supply the spectrum sensing. In the proposed model, the sensing duration is divided into multiple sensing slots consisting of one local-sensing subslot and one energy-harvesting subslot. If the PU is detected to be present in the local-sensing subslot, the SU will harvest RF energy of the PU signal in the energy-harvesting slot, otherwise, the SU will continue spectrum sensing. The global decision on the presence of the PU is obtained through combining local sensing results from all the sensing slots by adopting “Or-logic Rule”. A joint optimization problem of sensing time and time splitter factor is proposed to maximize the throughput of the SU under the constraints of probabilities of false alarm and detection and energy harvesting. The simulation results have shown that the proposed model can clearly improve the maximal throughput of the SU compared to the traditional sensing-throughput tradeoff model.

  19. A low energy solar town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, Svend; Balocco, Carla

    1998-12-31

    The use of solar energy at large scale is necessary to support the energy savings and a more efficient energy use, like besides the quality of the ambient and the quality of the available energy sources. The solar heating systems with seasonal storage can be combined with heat from refuse incineration plants and other renewable heat sources. These systems combined with district heating are an example of the sustainable energy planning and the reduction of the environmental stress. Strategies for sustainability in the settlements can be defined by and energy model to planning that individuates development and economic and financial supports to. The aim of the work concerns the development of a small sun city with no use of fossil fuels. The new low energy solar town is an idealised urban an energy system. The studied settlement regards one thousand new low-energy houses supplied by a district heating with a central solar heating system with seasonal heat storage. The heating and ventilation demand in the studied low energy buildings are less than 40 kWh/m{sup 2}/year, the electricity demand is less than 2000 kWh per house year. The result of the work is an useful tool to the energy planning of the urban areas and it is also a necessary support to the political and energetic decisions. (EG) 58 refs.

  20. Development of enhanced piezoelectric energy harvester induced by human motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Y; Nakamachi, E

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever and a couple of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the end of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet was set at the end of the pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous presence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric cantilever vibration system. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and the performance of our energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph cantilever with one permanent magnet under a rather high frequency was induced by the artificial low frequency vibration. The counterpart magnet attached on the pendulum. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet pendulum, which was fluctuated under a very low frequency by the human walking, and the piezoelectric cantilever, which had the permanent magnet at the end. The low-to-high frequency convert "hybrid system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvest one. We examined and obtained maximum values of voltage and power in this system, as 1.2V and 1.2 µW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  1. The Energy Impacts of Solar Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Chris

    1980-01-01

    The energy required to build and install solar space- and water-heating equipment is compared to the energy saved under two solar growth paths corresponding to high and low rates of solar technology implementation. (Author/RE)

  2. Survey of energy harvesting and energy scavenging approaches for on-site powering of wireless sensor- and microinstrument-networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Dulai, G.; Karanassios, Vassili

    2013-05-01

    Energy (or power) harvesting can be defined as the gathering and either storing or immediately using energy "freely" available in a local environment. Examples include harvesting energy from obvious sources such as photon-fluxes (e.g., solar), or wind or water waves, or from unusual sources such as naturally occurring pH differences. Energy scavenging can be defined as gathering and storing or immediately re-using energy that has been discarded, for instance, waste heat from air conditioning units, from in-door lights or from everyday actions such as walking or from body-heat. Although the power levels that can be harvested or scavenged are typically low (e.g., from nWatt/cm2 to mWatt/cm2), the key motivation is to harvest or to scavenge energy for a wide variety of applications. Example applications include powering devices in remote weather stations, or wireless Bluetooth headsets, or wearable computing devices or for sensor networks for health and bio-medical applications. Beyond sensors and sensor networks, there is a need to power compete systems, such as portable and energy-autonomous chemical analysis microinstruments for use on-site. A portable microinstrument is one that offers the same functionality as a large one but one that has at least one critical component in the micrometer regime. This paper surveys continuous or discontinuous energy harvesting and energy scavenging approaches (with particular emphasis on sensor and microinstrument networks) and it discusses current trends. It also briefly explores potential future directions, for example, for nature-inspired (e.g., photosynthesis), for human-power driven (e.g., for biomedical applications, or for wearable sensor networks) or for nanotechnology-enabled energy harvesting and energy scavenging approaches.

  3. A triboelectric wind turbine for small-scale energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Matthias; Boisseau, Sebastien; Geisler, Matthias; Despesse, Ghislain; Reboud, Jean Luc

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with a rotational energy harvester including a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT), a cylindrical stator covered by several electrodes, and thin Teflon dielectric membranes hung on the rotor. The sliding contact of the Teflon membranes on the stator provides simultaneously large capacitance variations and a polarization source for the electrostatic converter by exploiting triboelectric phenomena. 1μW has been harvested at 4m/s; 130μW at 10m/s and 550μW at 20m/s with a 40mmØ device. In order to validate the energy harvesting chain, the airflow energy harvester has been connected to a power management circuit implementing Synchronous Electric Charge Extraction (SECE) to supply a wireless sensor node with temperature and acceleration measurements, transmitted to a computer at 868MHz.

  4. Combined Euler column vibration isolation and energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. B.; McDowell, M. D.

    2017-05-01

    A new device that combines vibration isolation and energy harvesting is modeled, simulated, and tested. The vibration isolating portion of the device uses post-buckled beams as its spring elements. Piezoelectric film is applied to the beams to harvest energy from their dynamic flexure. The entire device operates passively on applied base excitation and requires no external power or control system. The structural system is modeled using the elastica, and the structural response is applied as forcing on the electric circuit equation to predict the output voltage and the corresponding harvested power. The vibration isolation and energy harvesting performance is simulated across a large parameter space and the modeling approach is validated with experimental results. Experimental transmissibilities of 2% and harvested power levels of 0.36 μW are simultaneously demonstrated. Both theoretical and experimental data suggest that there is not necessarily a trade-off between vibration isolation and harvested power. That is, within the practical operational range of the device, improved vibration isolation will be accompanied by an increase in the harvested power as the forcing frequency is increased.

  5. Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shi Hyeong; Haines, Carter S; Li, Na; Kim, Keon Jung; Mun, Tae Jin; Choi, Changsoon; Di, Jiangtao; Oh, Young Jun; Oviedo, Juan Pablo; Bykova, Julia; Fang, Shaoli; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Zunfeng; Wang, Run; Kumar, Prashant; Qiao, Rui; Priya, Shashank; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Moon; Lucas, Matthew Steven; Drummy, Lawrence F; Maruyama, Benji; Lee, Dong Youn; Lepró, Xavier; Gao, Enlai; Albarq, Dawood; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H

    2017-08-25

    Mechanical energy harvesters are needed for diverse applications, including self-powered wireless sensors, structural and human health monitoring systems, and the extraction of energy from ocean waves. We report carbon nanotube yarn harvesters that electrochemically convert tensile or torsional mechanical energy into electrical energy without requiring an external bias voltage. Stretching coiled yarns generated 250 watts per kilogram of peak electrical power when cycled up to 30 hertz, as well as up to 41.2 joules per kilogram of electrical energy per mechanical cycle, when normalized to harvester yarn weight. These energy harvesters were used in the ocean to harvest wave energy, combined with thermally driven artificial muscles to convert temperature fluctuations to electrical energy, sewn into textiles for use as self-powered respiration sensors, and used to power a light-emitting diode and to charge a storage capacitor. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  6. High tonnage harvesting and skidding for loblolly pine energy plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Jernigan; Tom Gallagher; Dana Mitchell; Mathew Smidt; Larry Teeter

    2016-01-01

    The southeastern United States has a promising source for renewable energy in the form of woody biomass. To meet the energy needs, energy plantations will likely be utilized. These plantations will contain a high density of small-stem pine trees. Since the stems are relatively small when compared with traditional product removal, the harvesting costs will increase. The...

  7. Integrated harvesting for conventional log and energy wood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the integrated energy wood harvesting plot, 37 m3 ha−1 of energy wood was extracted in addition to the sawlog and pulp log volumes. Extracting the additional energy wood reduced the productivity of the forwarder and increased the cost of extraction (AU$2.7 m−3) compared with the control plot (AU$2.2 m−3).

  8. A Shoe-Embedded Piezoelectric Energy Harvester for Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting mechanical energy from human motion is an attractive approach for obtaining clean and sustainable electric energy to power wearable sensors, which are widely used for health monitoring, activity recognition, gait analysis and so on. This paper studies a piezoelectric energy harvester for the parasitic mechanical energy in shoes originated from human motion. The harvester is based on a specially designed sandwich structure with a thin thickness, which makes it readily compatible with a shoe. Besides, consideration is given to both high performance and excellent durability. The harvester provides an average output power of 1 mW during a walk at a frequency of roughly 1 Hz. Furthermore, a direct current (DC power supply is built through integrating the harvester with a power management circuit. The DC power supply is tested by driving a simulated wireless transmitter, which can be activated once every 2–3 steps with an active period lasting 5 ms and a mean power of 50 mW. This work demonstrates the feasibility of applying piezoelectric energy harvesters to power wearable sensors.

  9. The role of energy losses in photosynthetic light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2017-07-01

    Photosynthesis operates at the bottom of the food chain to convert the energy of light into carbohydrates at a remarkable global rate of about 130 TW. Nonetheless, the overall photosynthetic process has a conversion efficiency of a few percent at best, significantly less than bottom-up photovoltaic cells. The primary photosynthetic steps, consisting of light harvesting and charge separation, are often presented as having near-unity quantum efficiency but this holds only true under ideal conditions. In this review, we discuss the importance of energy loss mechanisms to establish robustness in photosynthetic light harvesting. Thermal energy dissipation of light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in different environments is investigated and the relationships and contrasts between concentration quenching of high pigment concentrations, photoprotection (non-photochemical quenching), quenching due to protein aggregation, and fluorescence blinking are discussed. The role of charge-transfer states in light harvesting and energy dissipation is highlighted and the importance of controlled protein structural disorder to switch the light-harvesting antennae between effective light harvesters and efficient energy quenchers is underscored. The main LHC of plants, LHCII, is used as a prime example.

  10. Wireless energy transmission to supplement energy harvesters in sensor network applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for coupling wireless energy transmission with traditional energy harvesting techniques in order to power sensor nodes for structural health monitoring applications. The goal of this study is to develop a system that can be permanently embedded within civil structures without the need for on-board power sources. Wireless energy transmission is included to supplement energy harvesting techniques that rely on ambient or environmental, energy sources. This approach combines several transducer types that harvest ambient energy with wireless transmission sources, providing a robust solution that does not rely on a single energy source. Experimental results from laboratory and field experiments are presented to address duty cycle limitations of conventional energy harvesting techniques, and the advantages gained by incorporating a wireless energy transmission subsystem. Methods of increasing the efficiency, energy storage medium, target applications and the integrated use of energy harvesting sources with wireless energy transmission will be discussed.

  11. Energy harvesting in a quad-stable harvester subjected to random excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yong Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In response to the defects of bi-stable energy harvester (BEH, we develop a novel quad-stable energy harvester (QEH to improve harvesting efficiency. The device is made up of a bimorph cantilever beam having a tip magnet and three external fixed magnets. By adjusting the positions of the fixed magnets and the distances between the tip magnet and the fixed ones, the quad-stable equilibrium positions can emerge. The potential energy shows that the barriers of the QEH are lower than those of the BEH for the same separation distance. Experiment results reveal that the QEH can realize snap-through easier and make a dense snap-through in response under random excitation. Moreover, its strain and voltage both become large for snap-through between the nonadjacent stable positions. There exists an optimal separation distance for different excitation intensities.

  12. SOLAR ENERGY: A NECESSARY INVESTMENT IN A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    with a high-value service [10]. Solar energy can also be applied in vehicular road transportation system. As noted by Fagbenle [4], three options are open in applying solar energy to vehicular road transport namely: (a) Solar energy to provide 100% motive power of the vehicle. (b) Solar energy to provide only electric power.

  13. Nanomaterials for solar energy

    KAUST Repository

    Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured metal chalcogenides of the elements copper, iron, tin, lead and cadmium have attracted interest in their use as colloidal nanocrystal inks for solar cells. Some of these materials have the advantages of being available in abundance and having low toxicity. Developing methods for the combination of the elements to produce binary, ternary and quaternary compounds has dominated research in the field. This chapter will provide the most recent developments (from year 2012 onwards) for the synthesis and use of colloidal nanocrystal inks for solar cell applications. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  14. Harvesting Energy from the Counterbalancing (Weaving Movement in Bicycle Riding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Priya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bicycles are known to be rich source of kinetic energy, some of which is available for harvesting during speedy and balanced maneuvers by the user. A conventional dynamo attached to the rim can generate a large amount of output power at an expense of extra energy input from the user. However, when applying energy conversion technology to human powered equipments, it is important to minimize the increase in extra muscular activity and to maximize the efficiency of human movements. This study proposes a novel energy harvesting methodology that utilizes lateral oscillation of bicycle frame (weaving caused by user weight shifting movements in order to increase the pedaling force in uphill riding or during quick speed-up. Based on the 3D motion analysis, we designed and implemented the prototype of an electro-dynamic energy harvester that can be mounted on the bicycle’s handlebar to collect energy from the side-to-side movement. The harvester was found to generate substantial electric output power of 6.6 mW from normal road riding. It was able to generate power even during uphill riding which has never been shown with other approaches. Moreover, harvesting of energy from weaving motion seems to increase the economy of cycling by helping efficient usage of human power.

  15. Harvesting energy from the counterbalancing (weaving) movement in bicycle riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yoonseok; Yeo, Jeongjin; Priya, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Bicycles are known to be rich source of kinetic energy, some of which is available for harvesting during speedy and balanced maneuvers by the user. A conventional dynamo attached to the rim can generate a large amount of output power at an expense of extra energy input from the user. However, when applying energy conversion technology to human powered equipments, it is important to minimize the increase in extra muscular activity and to maximize the efficiency of human movements. This study proposes a novel energy harvesting methodology that utilizes lateral oscillation of bicycle frame (weaving) caused by user weight shifting movements in order to increase the pedaling force in uphill riding or during quick speed-up. Based on the 3D motion analysis, we designed and implemented the prototype of an electro-dynamic energy harvester that can be mounted on the bicycle's handlebar to collect energy from the side-to-side movement. The harvester was found to generate substantial electric output power of 6.6 mW from normal road riding. It was able to generate power even during uphill riding which has never been shown with other approaches. Moreover, harvesting of energy from weaving motion seems to increase the economy of cycling by helping efficient usage of human power.

  16. Decentralized Hypothesis Testing in Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarighati, Alla; Gross, James; Jalden, Joakim

    2017-09-01

    We consider the problem of decentralized hypothesis testing in a network of energy harvesting sensors, where sensors make noisy observations of a phenomenon and send quantized information about the phenomenon towards a fusion center. The fusion center makes a decision about the present hypothesis using the aggregate received data during a time interval. We explicitly consider a scenario under which the messages are sent through parallel access channels towards the fusion center. To avoid limited lifetime issues, we assume each sensor is capable of harvesting all the energy it needs for the communication from the environment. Each sensor has an energy buffer (battery) to save its harvested energy for use in other time intervals. Our key contribution is to formulate the problem of decentralized detection in a sensor network with energy harvesting devices. Our analysis is based on a queuing-theoretic model for the battery and we propose a sensor decision design method by considering long term energy management at the sensors. We show how the performance of the system changes for different battery capacities. We then numerically show how our findings can be used in the design of sensor networks with energy harvesting sensors.

  17. An Approach to Increase the Battery Time of a Mobile Phone Using Free Energy Harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard Jensen, Jesper; Jessen, Kasper; Laugesen, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    previous analyses solar cells and electromagnetic generator were found to be the most suitable solution. This paper will give a basic description of the operating conditions of solar cells and an electromagnetic generator. There will also be a short view on the electrical circuit needed for implementing...... the harvested energy. Calculations regarding the power produced by amorphous silicon solar cells in both sun light and light from different light emitting sources will be examined. Furthermore calculations of the spring for the electromagnetic generator and the power produced by this device will be examined....... Through experiments and data processing the energy delivered by the solar cells and the electromagnetic generator is investigated, furthermore an experiment regarding the movement of the phone will be executed....

  18. Wireless Energy Harvesting Using Signals from Multiple Fading Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yunfei

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the average, the probability density function and the cumulative distribution function of the harvested power. In the study, the signals are transmitted from multiple sources. The channels are assumed to be either Rician fading or Gamma-shadowed Rician fading. The received signals are then harvested by using either a single harvester for simultaneous transmissions or multiple harvesters for transmissions at different frequencies, antennas or time slots. Both linear and nonlinear models for the energy harvester at the receiver are examined. Numerical results are presented to show that, when a large amount of harvested power is required, a single harvester or the linear range of a practical nonlinear harvester are more efficient, to avoid power outage. Further, the power transfer strategy can be optimized for fixed total power. Specifically, for Rayleigh fading, the optimal strategy is to put the total power at the source with the best channel condition and switch off all other sources, while for general Rician fading, the optimum magnitudes and phases of the transmitting waveforms depend on the channel parameters.

  19. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam, E-mail: knchoi@inu.ac.kr; Rho, Hee Hyuk, E-mail: rdoubleh0902@inu.ac.kr [Dept. of Information and Telecommunication Engineering Incheon National University Incheon 22012 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17 J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  20. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  1. Practical energy harvesting for microbial fuel cells: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heming; Park, Jae-Do; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-03-17

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology offers sustainable solutions for distributed power systems and energy positive wastewater treatment, but the generation of practically usable power from MFCs remains a major challenge for system scale up and application. Commonly used external resistors will not harvest any usable energy, so energy-harvesting circuits are needed for real world applications. This review summarizes, explains, and discusses the different energy harvesting methods, components, and systems that can extract and condition the MFC energy for direct utilization. This study aims to assist environmental scientists and engineers to gain fundamental understandings of these electronic systems and algorithms, and it also offers research directions and insights on how to overcome the barriers, so the technology can be further advanced and applied in larger scale.

  2. Solar '80s: A Teacher's Handbook for Solar Energy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHart, David E.

    This guide is intended to assist the teacher in exploring energy issues and the technology of solar energy conversion and associated technologies. Sections of the guide include: (1) Rationale; (2) Technology Overview; (3) Sun Day Suggestions for School; (4) Backyard Solar Water Heater; (5) Solar Tea; (6) Biogas; (7) Solar Cells; (8) Economics; (9)…

  3. Statistical-QoS Guaranteed Energy Efficiency Optimization for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Cheng, Wenchi; Zhang, Hailin

    2017-08-23

    Energy harvesting, which offers a never-ending energy supply, has emerged as a prominent technology to prolong the lifetime and reduce costs for the battery-powered wireless sensor networks. However, how to improve the energy efficiency while guaranteeing the quality of service (QoS) for energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks is still an open problem. In this paper, we develop statistical delay-bounded QoS-driven power control policies to maximize the effective energy efficiency (EEE), which is defined as the spectrum efficiency under given specified QoS constraints per unit harvested energy, for energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks. For the battery-infinite wireless sensor networks, our developed QoS-driven power control policy converges to the Energy harvesting Water Filling (E-WF) scheme and the Energy harvesting Channel Inversion (E-CI) scheme under the very loose and stringent QoS constraints, respectively. For the battery-finite wireless sensor networks, our developed QoS-driven power control policy becomes the Truncated energy harvesting Water Filling (T-WF) scheme and the Truncated energy harvesting Channel Inversion (T-CI) scheme under the very loose and stringent QoS constraints, respectively. Furthermore, we evaluate the outage probabilities to theoretically analyze the performance of our developed QoS-driven power control policies. The obtained numerical results validate our analysis and show that our developed optimal power control policies can optimize the EEE over energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks.

  4. Statistical-QoS Guaranteed Energy Efficiency Optimization for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wenchi; Zhang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Energy harvesting, which offers a never-ending energy supply, has emerged as a prominent technology to prolong the lifetime and reduce costs for the battery-powered wireless sensor networks. However, how to improve the energy efficiency while guaranteeing the quality of service (QoS) for energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks is still an open problem. In this paper, we develop statistical delay-bounded QoS-driven power control policies to maximize the effective energy efficiency (EEE), which is defined as the spectrum efficiency under given specified QoS constraints per unit harvested energy, for energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks. For the battery-infinite wireless sensor networks, our developed QoS-driven power control policy converges to the Energy harvesting Water Filling (E-WF) scheme and the Energy harvesting Channel Inversion (E-CI) scheme under the very loose and stringent QoS constraints, respectively. For the battery-finite wireless sensor networks, our developed QoS-driven power control policy becomes the Truncated energy harvesting Water Filling (T-WF) scheme and the Truncated energy harvesting Channel Inversion (T-CI) scheme under the very loose and stringent QoS constraints, respectively. Furthermore, we evaluate the outage probabilities to theoretically analyze the performance of our developed QoS-driven power control policies. The obtained numerical results validate our analysis and show that our developed optimal power control policies can optimize the EEE over energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks. PMID:28832509

  5. Enhanced Charge Separation and FRET at Heterojunctions between Semiconductor Nanoparticles and Conducting Polymer Nanofibers for Efficient Solar Light Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Samim; Kar, Prasenjit; Remita, Hynd; Liu, Bo; Lemmens, Peter; Kumar Pal, Samir; Ghosh, Srabanti

    2015-11-27

    Energy harvesting from solar light employing nanostructured materials offer an economic way to resolve energy and environmental issues. We have developed an efficient light harvesting heterostructure based on poly(diphenylbutadiyne) (PDPB) nanofibers and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) via a solution phase synthetic route. ZnO NPs (~20 nm) were homogeneously loaded onto the PDPB nanofibers as evident from several analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The photoinduced electron transfer from PDPB nanofibers to ZnO NPs has been confirmed by steady state and picosecond-resolved photoluminescence studies. The co-sensitization for multiple photon harvesting (with different energies) at the heterojunction has been achieved via a systematic extension of conjugation from monomeric to polymeric diphenyl butadiyne moiety in the proximity of the ZnO NPs. On the other hand, energy transfer from the surface defects of ZnO NPs (~5 nm) to PDPB nanofibers through Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) confirms the close proximity with molecular resolution. The manifestation of efficient charge separation has been realized with ~5 fold increase in photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants in comparison to polymer nanofibers counterpart under visible light irradiation. Our results provide a novel approach for the development of nanoheterojunctions for efficient light harvesting which will be helpful in designing future solar devices.

  6. Fundamental issues in nonlinear wideband-vibration energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Einar

    2013-04-01

    Mechanically nonlinear energy harvesters driven by broadband vibrations modeled as white noise are investigated. We derive an upper bound on output power versus load resistance and show that, subject to mild restrictions that we make precise, the upper-bound performance can be obtained by a linear harvester with appropriate stiffness. Despite this, nonlinear harvesters can have implementation-related advantages. Based on the Kramers equation, we numerically obtain the output power at weak coupling for a selection of phenomenological elastic potentials and discuss their merits.

  7. Compact electret energy harvester with high power output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, P., E-mail: pondromp@gmail.com [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); System Reliability and Machine Acoustics SzM, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Magdalenenstr. 4, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Sessler, G. M. [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Bös, J.; Melz, T. [System Reliability and Machine Acoustics SzM, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Magdalenenstr. 4, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Compact electret energy harvesters, based on a design recently introduced, are presented. Using electret surface potentials in the 400 V regime and a seismic mass of 10 g, it was possible to generate output power up to 0.6 mW at 36 Hz for an input acceleration of 1 g. Following the presentation of an analytical model allowing for the calculation of the power generated in a load resistance at the resonance frequency of the harvesters, experimental results are shown and compared to theoretical predictions. Finally, the performance of the electret harvesters is assessed using a figure of merit.

  8. Modeling and analysis of a horizontally-aligned energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendame M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse an impact-type vibration energy harvester. In this study, the harvester is positioned so that the electromagnetic transducer moves along a horizontal linear guide when subjected to base excitations. The governing equation is a nonsmooth second order differential equation which cannot be solved analytically. Therefore, the averaging method is used to investigate its response. Experimental results are compared with the analytical solution to validate it. The results show that the existence of the nonlinearity in the system enables harvesting at low frequencies, increase the bandwidth, and enhances the output power significantly.

  9. CMOS indoor light energy harvesting system for wireless sensing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira Carvalho, Carlos Manuel

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the CMOS implementation of energy harvesting.  The authors describe an integrated, indoor light energy harvesting system, based on a controller circuit that dynamically and automatically adjusts its operation to meet the actual light circumstances of the environment where the system is placed.  The system is intended to power a sensor node, enabling an autonomous wireless sensor network (WSN). Although designed to cope with indoor light levels, the system is also able to work with higher levels, making it an all-round light energy harvesting system.  The discussion includes experimental data obtained from an integrated manufactured prototype, which in conjunction with a photovoltaic (PV) cell, serves as a proof of concept of the desired energy harvesting system.  ·         Discusses several energy sources which can be used to power energy harvesting systems and includes an overview of PV cell technologies  ·         Includes an introduction to voltage step-...

  10. Design optimization of PVDF-based piezoelectric energy harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jundong Song

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting is a promising technology that powers the electronic devices via scavenging the ambient energy. Piezoelectric energy harvesters have attracted considerable interest for their high conversion efficiency and easy fabrication in minimized sensors and transducers. To improve the output capability of energy harvesters, properties of piezoelectric materials is an influential factor, but the potential of the material is less likely to be fully exploited without an optimized configuration. In this paper, an optimization strategy for PVDF-based cantilever-type energy harvesters is proposed to achieve the highest output power density with the given frequency and acceleration of the vibration source. It is shown that the maximum power output density only depends on the maximum allowable stress of the beam and the working frequency of the device, and these two factors can be obtained by adjusting the geometry of piezoelectric layers. The strategy is validated by coupled finite-element-circuit simulation and a practical device. The fabricated device within a volume of 13.1 mm3 shows an output power of 112.8 μW which is comparable to that of the best-performing piezoceramic-based energy harvesters within the similar volume reported so far.

  11. Design optimization of PVDF-based piezoelectric energy harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jundong; Zhao, Guanxing; Li, Bo; Wang, Jin

    2017-09-01

    Energy harvesting is a promising technology that powers the electronic devices via scavenging the ambient energy. Piezoelectric energy harvesters have attracted considerable interest for their high conversion efficiency and easy fabrication in minimized sensors and transducers. To improve the output capability of energy harvesters, properties of piezoelectric materials is an influential factor, but the potential of the material is less likely to be fully exploited without an optimized configuration. In this paper, an optimization strategy for PVDF-based cantilever-type energy harvesters is proposed to achieve the highest output power density with the given frequency and acceleration of the vibration source. It is shown that the maximum power output density only depends on the maximum allowable stress of the beam and the working frequency of the device, and these two factors can be obtained by adjusting the geometry of piezoelectric layers. The strategy is validated by coupled finite-element-circuit simulation and a practical device. The fabricated device within a volume of 13.1 mm3 shows an output power of 112.8 μW which is comparable to that of the best-performing piezoceramic-based energy harvesters within the similar volume reported so far.

  12. Energy Harvesting for Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G.; Farrar, C. R.; Todd, M. D.; Hodgkiss, T.; Rosing, T.

    2007-02-26

    This report has been developed based on information exchanges at a 2.5-day workshop on energy harvesting for embedded structural health monitoring (SHM) sensing systems that was held June 28-30, 2005, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The workshop was hosted by the LANL/UCSD Engineering Institute (EI). This Institute is an education- and research-focused collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Jacobs School of Engineering. A Statistical Pattern Recognition paradigm for SHM is first presented and the concept of energy harvesting for embedded sensing systems is addressed with respect to the data acquisition portion of this paradigm. Next, various existing and emerging sensing modalities used for SHM and their respective power requirements are summarized, followed by a discussion of SHM sensor network paradigms, power requirements for these networks and power optimization strategies. Various approaches to energy harvesting and energy storage are discussed and limitations associated with the current technology are addressed. This discussion also addresses current energy harvesting applications and system integration issues. The report concludes by defining some future research directions and possible technology demonstrations that are aimed at transitioning the concept of energy harvesting for embedded SHM sensing systems from laboratory research to field-deployed engineering prototypes.

  13. Throughput of Wireless Networks Powered by Energy Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kaibin

    2011-01-01

    Designing mobile devices for harvesting ambient energy such as kinetic activities or electromagnetic radiation (EMR) will enable mobile networks to self sustain besides alleviate global warming. The throughput of a mobile ad hoc network powered by energy harvesting is analyzed in this paper using a stochastic-geometry approach. The transmitters powered by energy harvesting are modeled as a Poisson point process (PPP); each transmits to a receiver at an unit distance using either a random-access protocol or the time-hopping multiple access (THMA) and satisfying an outage-probability constraint. Consider non-EMR energy harvesting where energy packets of random sizes arrive at a transmitter following a stationary random process. By applying Mapping Theorem, the network (spatial) throughput for random access and in the limit of a long harvesting interval is derived in simple closed-form functions of the energy-arrival rate, transmitter density and coding rate. These results show that the throughput of a sparse ne...

  14. Smart nanocoated structure for energy harvesting at low frequency vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudhanshu

    Increasing demands of energy which is cleaner and has an unlimited supply has led development in the field of energy harvesting. Piezoelectric materials can be used as a means of transforming ambient vibrations into electrical energy that can be stored and used to power other devices. With the recent surge of micro scale devices, piezoelectric power generation can provide a convenient alternative to traditional power sources. In this research, a piezoelectric power generator composite prototype was developed to maximize the power output of the system. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT) composite structure was formed and mounted on a cantilever bar and was studied to convert vibration energy of the low range vibrations at 30 Hz--1000 Hz. To improve the performance of the PZT, different coatings were made using different percentage of Ferrofluid (FNP) and Zinc Oxide nanoparticles (ZnO) and binder resin. The optimal coating mixture constituent percentage was based on the performance of the composite structure formed by applying the coating on the PZT. The fabricated PZT power generator composite with an effective volume of 0.062 cm3 produced a maximum of 44.5 μW, or 0.717mW/cm3 at its resonant frequency of 90 Hz. The optimal coating mixture had the composition of 59.9%FNP + 40% ZnO + 1% Resin Binder. The coating utilizes the opto-magneto-electrical properties of ZnO and Magnetic properties of FNP. To further enhance the output, the magneto-electric (ME) effect was increased by subjecting the composite to magnetic field where coating acts as a magnetostrictive material. For the effective volume of 0.0062 cm 3, the composite produced a maximum of 68.5 μW, or 1.11mW/cm 3 at its resonant frequency of 90 Hz at 160 gauss. The optimal coating mixture had the composition of 59.9% FNP + 40% ZnO + 1% Resin Binder. This research also focused on improving the efficiency of solar cells by utilizing the magnetic effect along with gas plasma etching to improve the internal reflection

  15. A review of vibration-based MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadon, Salem; Sidek, Othman [Collaborative Microelectronic Design Excellence Center (CEDEC), School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    The simplicity associated with the piezoelectric micro-generators makes it very attractive for MEMS applications, especially for remote systems. In this paper we reviewed the work carried out by researchers during the last three years. The improvements in experimental results obtained in the vibration-based MEMS piezoelectric energy harvesters show very good scope for MEMS piezoelectric harvesters in the field of power MEMS in the near future. (author)

  16. Thin film solar energy collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykan, Kamran; Farrauto, Robert J.; Jefferson, Clinton F.; Lanam, Richard D.

    1983-11-22

    A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass, stainless steel or aluminum-containing ferritic alloy; (2) a solar absorptive layer comprising silver, copper oxide, rhodium/rhodium oxide and 0-15% by weight of platinum; (3) an interlayer comprising silver or silver/platinum; and (4) an optional external anti-reflective coating, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of silver or silver/platinum to obtain an improved conductor-dielectric tandem.

  17. Airfoil-based electromagnetic wind energy harvester (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kevin; Wang, Ya S.

    2017-04-01

    Vibration energy is one of the most common sources of energy that can be harvested from. Two vibration-to-energy conversion mechanisms are piezoelectric and electromagnetic [1,3]. The vibration of a cantilever beam is a popular method to harvest energy from piezoelectric and electromagnetics. When a cantilever beam vibrates from an external force the beam deflects back and forth. A piezoelectric material produces energy from the strain the beam is under. An electromagnetic array produces energy as a coil that is attached to the beam moves across the magnetic field of the array. More energy can be produced when a coil moves through a larger and more concentrated magnetic field. We propose a two degree of freedom aeroelastic energy harvester that uses a Halbach electromagnetic array and microfiber composite (MFC) piezoelectric patches, shown in Fig. 1. A Halbach array is a specific arrangement of magnets that focuses the magnetic field onto one side of the array while negating the field on the other side [2] whereas a normal alternating array has its magnetic field even distributed both sides of the array. The microfiber composite (MFC) patch is primarily for increasing the stiffness while negligibly increasing the mass of the cantilever beam. Wind tunnel test results are presented to characterize power output and the flutter speed of the energy harvester at different wind speeds. The harvester reaches the flutter speed at 3.5 m/s and operates up to 5 m/s and produces a power of 300 mW. The harvester is compact and fits inside an 8in square duct.

  18. Selective current collecting design for spring-type energy harvesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongjin; Roh, Hee Seok; Kim, Yeontae; No, Kwangsoo; Hong, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a high performance spring-type piezoelectric energy harvester that selectively collects current from the inner part of a spring shell. We analyzed themain reason behind the low efficiency of the initial design using finite element models and proposed a selective current collecting design that can considerably improve the electrical conversion efficiency of the energy harvester. We found that the newly designed energy harvester increases the output voltage by 8 times leading to an output power of 2.21 mW under an impulsive load of 2.18 N when compared with the conventional design. We envision that selective current collecting design will be used in spring-based self-powered active sensors and energy scavenging devices.

  19. Human-motion energy harvester for autonomous body area sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, M.; Boisseau, S.; Perez, M.; Gasnier, P.; Willemin, J.; Ait-Ali, I.; Perraud, S.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on a method to optimize an electromagnetic energy harvester converting the low-frequency body motion and aimed at powering wireless body area sensors. This method is based on recorded accelerations, and mechanical and transduction models that enable an efficient joint optimization of the structural parameters. An optimized prototype of 14.8 mmØ × 52 mm, weighting 20 g, has generated up to 4.95 mW in a resistive load when worn at the arm during a run, and 6.57 mW when hand-shaken. Among the inertial electromagnetic energy harvesters reported so far, this one exhibits one of the highest power densities (up to 730 μW cm-3). The energy harvester was finally used to power a bluetooth low energy wireless sensor node with accelerations measurements at 25 Hz.

  20. Analytical simulation of the cantilever-type energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Mei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an analytical model of the cantilever-type energy harvester based on Euler–Bernoulli’s beam theory. Starting from the Hamiltonian form of total energy equation, the bending mode shapes and electromechanical dynamic equations are derived. By solving the constitutive electromechanical dynamic equation, the frequency transfer function of output voltage and power can be obtained. Through a case study of a unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester, this analytical modeling method has been validated by the finite element method.

  1. Magnetic flux concentration methods for magnetic energy harvesting module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakiwaka Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents magnetic flux concentration methods for magnetic energy harvesting module. The purpose of this study is to harvest 1 mW energy with a Brooks coil 2 cm in diameter from environmental magnetic field at 60 Hz. Because the harvesting power is proportional to the square of the magnetic flux density, we consider the use of a magnetic flux concentration coil and a magnetic core. The magnetic flux concentration coil consists of an air­core Brooks coil and a resonant capacitor. When a uniform magnetic field crossed the coil, the magnetic flux distribution around the coil was changed. It is found that the magnetic field in an area is concentrated larger than 20 times compared with the uniform magnetic field. Compared with the air­core coil, our designed magnetic core makes the harvested energy ten­fold. According to ICNIRP2010 guideline, the acceptable level of magnetic field is 0.2 mT in the frequency range between 25 Hz and 400 Hz. Without the two magnetic flux concentration methods, the corresponding energy is limited to 1 µW. In contrast, our experimental results successfully demonstrate energy harvesting of 1 mW from a magnetic field of 0.03 mT at 60 Hz.

  2. A nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvester for various mechanical motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Kangqi, E-mail: kangqifan@gmail.com [School of Mechano-Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada); Chang, Jianwei; Liu, Zhaohui; Zhu, Yingmin [School of Mechano-Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Pedrycz, Witold [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    This study presents a nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvester with intent to scavenge energy from diverse mechanical motions. The harvester consists of four piezoelectric cantilever beams, a cylindrical track, and a ferromagnetic ball, with magnets integrated to introduce the magnetic coupling between the ball and the beams. The experimental results demonstrate that the harvester is able to collect energy from various directions of vibrations. For the vibrations perpendicular to the ground, the maximum peak voltage is increased by 3.2 V and the bandwidth of the voltage above 4 V is increased by more than 4 Hz compared to the results obtained when using a conventional design. For the vibrations along the horizontal direction, the frequency up-conversion is realized through the magnetic coupling. Moreover, the proposed design can harvest energy from the sway motion around different directions on the horizontal plane. Harvesting energy from the rotation motion is also achieved with an operating bandwidth of approximately 6 Hz.

  3. Nonlinear metamaterials for electromagnetic energy harvesting (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumbe Tekam, Gabin Thibaut; Ginis, Vincent; Seetharamdoo, Divitha; Danckaert, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Surrounded by electromagnetic radiation coming from wireless power transfer to consumer devices such as mobile phones, computers and television, our society is facing the scientific and technological challenge to recover energy that is otherwise lost to the environment. Energy harvesting is an emerging field of research focused on this largely unsolved problem, especially in the microwave regime. Metamaterials provide a very promising platform to meet this purpose. These artificial materials are made from subwavelength building blocks, and can be designed by resonate at particular frequencies, depending on their shape, geometry, size, and orientation. In this work, we show that an efficient electromagnetic energy harvester can be design by inserting a nonlinear element directly within the metamaterial unit cell, leading to the conversion of RF input power to DC charge accumulation. The electromagnetic energy harvester operating at microwave frequencies is built from a cut-wire metasurface, which operates as a quasistatic electric dipole resonator. Using the equivalent electrical circuit, we design the parameters to tune the resonance frequency of the harvester at the desired frequency, and we compare these results with numerical simulations. Finally, we discuss the efficiency of our metamaterial energy harvesters. This work potentially offers a variety of applications, for example in the telecommunications industry to charge phones, in robotics to power microrobots, and also in medicine to advance pacemakers or health monitoring sensors.

  4. Security challenges for energy-harvesting wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Mauro, Alessio; Papini, Davide; Dragoni, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    With the recent introduction of Energy-Harvesting nodes, security is gaining more and more importance in sensor networks. By exploiting the ability of scavenging energy from the surrounding environment, the lifespan of a node has drastically increased. This is one of the reason why security needs...... networks. Finally, we present and discuss existing security solutions for EH-WSNs....

  5. A MEMS Energy Harvesting Device for Vibration with Low Acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triches, Marco; Wang, Fei; Crovetto, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We propose a polymer electret based energy harvesting device in order to extract energy from vibration sources with low acceleration. With MEMS technology, a silicon structure is fabricated which can resonate in 2D directions. Thanks to the excellent mechanical properties of the silicon material...

  6. Adaptive Media Access Control for Energy Harvesting - Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon; Dragoni, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    ODMAC (On-Demand Media Access Control) is a recently proposed MAC protocol designed to support individual duty cycles for Energy Harvesting — Wireless Sensor Networks (EH-WSNs). Individual duty cycles are vital for EH-WSNs, because they allow nodes to adapt their energy consumption to the ever...

  7. Harvesting Energy from Vibrations of the Underlying Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Vssilaras, S; Papadias, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    The use of wireless sensors for structural health monitoring offers several advantages such as small size, easy installation and minimal intervention on existing structures. However the most significant concern about such wireless sensors is the lifetime of the system, which depends heavily on th...... an improved Maximum Power Point Tracking technique on the conversion circuit, the proposed method is shown to maximize the conversion coefficient from kinetic energy to applicable electrical energy....... emerges as a technique that can harvest energy from the surrounding environment. Among all possible energy harvesting solutions, kinetic energy harvesting seems to be the most convenient, especially for sensors placed on structures that experience regular vibrations. Such micro-vibrations can be harmful...... on the type of power supply. No matter how energy efficient the operation of a battery operated sensor is, the energy of the battery will be exhausted at some point. In order to achieve a virtually unlimited lifetime, the sensor node should be able to recharge its battery in an easy way. Energy harvesting...

  8. Solar Energy-An Everyday Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keister, Carole; Cornell, Lu Beth

    1978-01-01

    Describes a solar energy research project sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration and conducted at Timonium School in Maryland. Elementary student involvement in solar energy studies resulting from the project is noted. (MDR)

  9. Wireless Energy Harvesting Cooperative Communications with Direct Link and Energy Accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ziyi; Chen, He; Li, Yonghui; Vucetic, Branka

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates a wireless energy harvesting cooperative network (WEHCN) consisting of a source, a decode-and-forward (DF) relay and a destination. We consider the relay as an energy harvesting (EH) node equipped with EH circuit and a rechargeable battery. Moreover, the direct link between source and destination is assumed to exist. The relay can thus harvest and accumulate energy from radio-frequency signals ejected by the source and assist its information transmission opportunistica...

  10. Energy harvesting schemes for building interior environment monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylka, Pawel; Pociecha, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    A vision to supply microelectronic devices without batteries making them perpetual or extending time of service in battery-oriented mobile supply schemes is the driving force of the research related to ambient energy harvesting. Energy harnessing aims thus at extracting energy from various ambient energy "pools", which generally are cost- or powerineffective to be scaled up for full-size, power-plant energy generation schemes supplying energy in electric form. These include - but are not limited to - waste heat, electromagnetic hum, vibrations, or human-generated power in addition to traditional renewable energy resources like water flow, tidal and wind energy or sun radiation which can also be exploited at the miniature scale by energy scavengers. However, in case of taking advantage of energy harvesting strategies to power up sensors monitoring environment inside buildings adaptable energy sources are restrained to only some which additionally are limited in spatial and temporal accessibility as well as available power. The paper explores experimentally an energy harvesting scheme exploiting human kinesis applicable in indoor environment for supplying a wireless indoor micro-system, monitoring ambient air properties (pressure, humidity and temperature).

  11. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzberger, Adolf; Hoffmann, Volker U.

    This comprehensive description and discussion of photovoltaics (PV) is presented at a level that makes it accessible to the interested academic. Starting with an historical overview, the text outlines the relevance of photovoltaics today and in the future. Then follows an introduction to the physical background of solar cells and the most important materials and technologies, with particular emphasis placed on future developments and prospects. The book goes beyond technology by also describing the path from the cell to the module to the system, proceeding to important applications such as grid-connected and stand-alone systems.

  12. Solar energy, its conversion and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The work being carried out at the University of Florida Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Laboratory in converting solar energy, our only income, into other needed and useful forms of energy is described. A treatment such as this demonstrates, in proper perspective, how solar energy can benefit mankind with its many problems of shortages and pollution. Descriptions were given of the conversion processes, equipment, and performance. The testing of materials, solar water heating, space heating, cooking and baking, solar distillation, refrigeration and air-conditioning, work with the solar furnace, conversion to mechanical power, hot air engines, solar-heated sewage digestion, conversion to electricity, and other devices will be discussed.

  13. Solar energy engineering processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogirou, Soteris A

    2009-01-01

    As perhaps the most promising of all the renewable energy sources available today, solar energy is becoming increasingly important in the drive to achieve energy independence and climate balance. This new book is the masterwork from world-renowned expert Dr. Soteris Kalogirou, who has championed solar energy for decades. The book includes all areas of solar energy engineering, from the fundamentals to the highest level of current research. The author includes pivotal subjects such as solar collectors, solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, solar desalina

  14. Solar energy engineering processes and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogirou, Soteris A

    2013-01-01

    As perhaps the most promising of all the renewable energy sources available today, solar energy is becoming increasingly important in the drive to achieve energy independence and climate balance. This new book is the masterwork from world-renowned expert Dr. Soteris Kalogirou, who has championed solar energy for decades. The book includes all areas of solar energy engineering, from the fundamentals to the highest level of current research. The author includes pivotal subjects such as solar collectors, solar water heating, solar space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, solar desalina

  15. Solar Energy and Reference Skills. Solar Energy Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Marie Ann

    This language arts learning module offers a structure to teachers for leading junior high school class activities to investigate solar energy, its origin, and effect. The module furnishes a pre-post test, a schedule for library and research work, a basic vocabulary list, and a bibliography. (CP)

  16. Surface morphology effects in a vibration based triboelectric energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafari, A.; Sodano, H. A.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the abundance of ambient mechanical energy in our environment, it is often neglected and left unused. However, recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical vibrations can be harvested and used to power small wireless electronic devices, such as micro electromechanical sensors (MEMS) and actuators. Most commonly, these energy harvesters convert vibration into electrical energy by utilizing piezoelectric, electromagnetic or electrostatic effects. Recently, triboelectric based energy harvesters have shown to be among the simplest and most cost-effective techniques for scavenging mechanical energy. The basis of triboelectric energy harvesters is the periodic contact and separation of two surfaces with opposite triboelectric properties which results in induced charge flow through an external load. Here, a vibration driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is fabricated and the effect of micro/nano scale surface modification is studied. The TENG produces electrical energy on the basis of periodic out-of-plane charge separation between gold and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with opposite triboelectric charge polarities. By introducing micro/nano scale surface modifications to the PDMS and gold, the TENG’s power output is further enhanced. This work demonstrates that the morphology of the surfaces in a TENG device is important and by increasing the effective surface area through micro/nano scale modification, the power output of the device can increase by 118%. Moreover, it is shown that unlike many TENGs proposed in the literature, the fabricated device has a high RMS open circuit voltage and short circuit current and can perform for an extended period of time.

  17. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  18. Energy harvesting from human motion: exploiting swing and shock excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Becker, P.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Modern compact and low power sensors and systems are leading towards increasingly integrated wearable systems. One key bottleneck of this technology is the power supply. The use of energy harvesting techniques offers a way of supplying sensor systems without the need for batteries and maintenance. In this work we present the development and characterization of two inductive energy harvesters which exploit different characteristics of the human gait. A multi-coil topology harvester is presented which uses the swing motion of the foot. The second device is a shock-type harvester which is excited into resonance upon heel strike. Both devices were modeled and designed with the key constraint of device height in mind, in order to facilitate the integration into the shoe sole. The devices were characterized under different motion speeds and with two test subjects on a treadmill. An average power output of up to 0.84 mW is achieved with the swing harvester. With a total device volume including the housing of 21 cm3 a power density of 40 μW cm-3 results. The shock harvester generates an average power output of up to 4.13 mW. The power density amounts to 86 μW cm-3 for the total device volume of 48 cm3. Difficulties and potential improvements are discussed briefly.

  19. Optimized tapered dipole nanoantenna as efficient energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toukhy, Youssef M; Hussein, Mohamed; Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O; Heikal, A M; Abd-Elrazzak, M M; Obayya, S S A

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, a novel design of tapered dipole nanoantenna is introduced and numerically analyzed for energy harvesting applications. The proposed design consists of three steps tapered dipole nanoantenna with rectangular shape. Full systematic analysis is carried out where the antenna impedance, return loss, harvesting efficiency and field confinement are calculated using 3D finite element frequency domain method (3D-FEFD). The structure geometrical parameters are optimized using particle swarm algorithm (PSO) to improve the harvesting efficiency and reduce the return loss at wavelength of 500 nm. A harvesting efficiency of 55.3% is achieved which is higher than that of conventional dipole counterpart by 29%. This enhancement is attributed to the high field confinement in the dipole gap as a result of multiple tips created in the nanoantenna design. Furthermore, the antenna input impedance is tuned to match a wide range of fabricated diode based upon the multi-resonance characteristic of the proposed structure.

  20. Design and developement of energy efficient miniature devices for energy harvesting, thermal management and biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Çıkım, Taha Abdullah; Cikim, Taha Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims to make contributions to the literature in the field of energy efficient miniature devices for energy harvesting, thermal management and biomedical applications. In the first part, experimental results related to energy harvesting capability of a miniature power reclamation device based on external liquid flows are represented. The device’s reclamation principle depends on the conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy. The mechanical energy in the device was gene...

  1. Tailored piezoelectric thin films for energy harvester

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, X.

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are excellent materials to transfer mechanical energy into electrical energy, which can be stored and used to power other devices. PiezoMEMS is a good way to combine silicon wafer processing and piezoelectric thin film technology and lead to a variety of miniaturized and

  2. Harvesting alternate energies from our planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Bhakta B.

    2009-04-01

    Recent price fluctuations have focused attention on the phenomenal increase of global energy consumption in recent years. We have almost reached a peak in global oil production. Total world consumption of oil will rise by nearly 60% between 1999 and 2020. In 1999 consumption was 86 million barrels of oil per day, which has reached a peak of production extracted from most known oil reserves. These projections, if accurate, will present an unprecedented crisis to the global economy and industry. As an example, in the United States, nearly 40% of energy usage is provided by petroleum, of which nearly a third is used in transportation. An aggressive search for alternate energy sources, both renewable and nonrenewable, is vital. This article will review national and international perspectives on the exploration of alternate energies with a focus on energy derivable from the ocean.

  3. Axial Permanent Magnet Generator for Wearable Energy Harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, Stig; Sødahl, Jakob Wagner; Mijatovic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    An increasing demand for battery-free electronics is evident by the rapid increase of wearable devices, and the design of wearable energy harvesters follows accordingly. An axial permanent magnet generator was designed to harvest energy from human body motion and supplying it to a wearable...... application. The design was approached from an lectromagnetic point of view in this article. Two types of axial flux permanent magnet generators were designed: one with an iron yoke, which is commonly used to reduce the machine volume and demand of permanent magnets, and a second without the iron yoke...

  4. Applications of energy harvesting for ultralow power technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Vadean, A.; Pop, P. P.; Barz, C.; Chiver, O.

    2015-06-01

    Ultra-low-power (ULP) technology is enabling a wide range of new applications that harvest ambient energy in very small amounts and need little or no maintenance - self-sustaining devices that are capable of perpetual or nearly perpetual operation. These new systems, which are now appearing in industrial and consumer electronics, also promise great changes in medicine and health. Until recently, the idea of micro-scale energy harvesting, and collecting miniscule amounts of ambient energy to power electronic systems, was still limited to research proposals and laboratory experiments.Today an increasing number of systems are appearing that take advantage of light, vibrations and other forms of previously wasted environmental energy for applications where providing line power or maintaining batteries is inconvenient. In the industrial world, where sensors gather information from remote equipment and hazardous processes; in consumer electronics, where mobility and convenience are served; and in medical systems, with unique requirements for prosthetics and non-invasive monitoring, energy harvesting is rapidly expanding into new applications.This paper serves as a survey for applications of energy harvesting for ultra low power technology based on various technical papers available in the public domain.

  5. Wideband quin-stable energy harvesting via combined nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a wideband quintuple-well potential piezoelectric-based vibration energy harvester using a combined nonlinearity: the magnetic nonlinearity induced by magnetic force and the piecewise-linearity produced by mechanical impact. With extra stable states compared to other multi-stable harvesters, the quin-stable harvester can distribute its potential energy more uniformly, which provides shallower potential wells and results in lower excitation threshold for interwell motion. The mathematical model of this quin-stable harvester is derived and its equivalent piecewise-nonlinear restoring force is measured in the experiment and identified as piecewise polynomials. Numerical simulations and experimental verifications are performed in different levels of sinusoid excitation ranging from 1 to 25 Hz. The results demonstrate that, with lower potential barriers compared with tri-stable counterpart, the quin-stable arrangement can escape potential wells more easily for doing high-energy interwell motion over a wider band of frequencies. Moreover, by utilizing the mechanical stoppers, this harvester can produce significant output voltage under small tip deflections, which results in a high power density and is especially suitable for a compact MEMS approach.

  6. Solar energy and substainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Maria Carmen; Nalin, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    At the dawn of the 21st century, the world population doesn't stop rising. More than ever, energy and environment problems remain at the heart of our society concerns. What will we leave to the future generations ? Therefore, a twenty pupil class of 4e (13 and 14 year old pupils) has made a specific work about this topic, called "solar power and sustainable development". Initially, the pupils participated to the settlement of a meteorological station on the school grounds. This station, which provides readings about temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, sun radiations, wind power and wind heading is fed by photovoltaic cells and thus works independently. The pupils have then come to realize the ecological and practical interests of such a functioning (e.g. : for the latter : neither batteries nor electrical wires are needed). These past few years, in Provence (a highly sunny region), many solar panel installations have been created and many private house roofs have been equipped with photovoltaic cells. Indeed, this energy presents some significant assets : it is free, clean and will never run out. The village of Vinon sur Verdon, where stands our college, is partly fed by a solar panel park, located a few kilometers away. Strongly sensitive to the assets of this energy source, the pupils have made a poster asserting the benefits of solar power. Another side of solar energy has been asserted : the output of hot sanitary water. They have built a miniature on this topic. In order to be thorough, some elements remain in shadow, such as environment impacts done by the making, the transport and the recycling of solar panels that will be brought up in a collaboration with research establishments.

  7. Harvesting Energy from the Counterbalancing (Weaving) Movement in Bicycle Riding

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yoonseok; Yeo, Jeongjin; Priya, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Bicycles are known to be rich source of kinetic energy, some of which is available for harvesting during speedy and balanced maneuvers by the user. A conventional dynamo attached to the rim can generate a large amount of output power at an expense of extra energy input from the user. However, when applying energy conversion technology to human powered equipments, it is important to minimize the increase in extra muscular activity and to maximize the efficiency of human movements. This study p...

  8. Analysis of AC Low-Voltage Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We have seen such efforts in car manufacturing, such as the Prius, that returns energy to the battery through the use of its regenerative brake ... system . Power electronics is the critical technology that makes harvesting this unused energy possible. Piezoelectricity is a material property that...Demo Circuit 1459b quick start guide [user’s guide]. Milpitas, CA: Linear Technology, April 2010. [13] Piezo Systems , “Piezoelectric Energy

  9. Piezoelectric Nanowires in Energy Harvesting Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhao; Pan, Xumin; He, Yahua; Hu, Yongming; Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

      Recently, the nanogenerators which can convert the mechanical energy into electricity by using piezoelectric one-dimensional nanomaterials have exhibited great potential in microscale power supply and sensor systems...

  10. SOLAR ENERGY POLICY DEVELOPMENTS IN EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela PÃCE?ILÃ

    2015-01-01

    Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy sources in Europe offering new possibilities to generate electricity and heat. In this context, the study provides accurate information about researches that characterize the solar resource and investigates the potential of solar energy in European countries. The analysis is also focused on the current status of market development including photovoltaic capacity, electricity production from solar photovoltaic power, solar thermal capa...

  11. Innovative thermal energy harvesting for future autonomous applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfray, Stephane

    2013-12-01

    As communicating autonomous systems market is booming, the role of energy harvesting will be a key enabler. As example, heat is one of the most abundant energy sources that can be converted into electricity in order to power circuits. Harvesting systems that use wasted heat open new ways to power autonomous sensors when the energy consumption is low, or to create systems of power generators when the conversion efficiency is high. The combination of different technologies (low power μ-processors, μ-batteries, radio, sensors...) with new energy harvesters compatible with large varieties of use-cases with allow to address this booming market. Thanks to the conjunction of ultra-low power electronic development, 3D technologies & Systems in Package approaches, the integration of autonomous sensors and electronics with ambient energy harvesting will be achievable. The applications are very wide, from environment and industrial sensors to medical portable applications, and the Internet of things may also represent in the future a several billions units market.

  12. Food dehydration by solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, H R; Salunkhe, D K

    1982-01-01

    Solar driers that are currently being investigated for drying of agricultural products can be divided into two major divisions, depending upon how they transfer the incident solar energy to the product to be dried. These two divisions are direct and indirect drying, with some work also being done on combination drying procedures. In direct solar driers, the product to be dried is usually either inside a tent, greenhouse, or a glass-topped box, where the product to be dried is heated by the direct rays from the sun and the moist air is removed by ambient wind movement. These dryers do accelerate moisture loss rate and the product is usually safe from inclement weather. These dryers usually do not require fans for forced air circulation. With indirect drying, the opposite is true, where most require powered fans for forced air circulation. With this type of dryer, both flatplate and inflated tube solar heat absorbers are used, with each offering certain advantages. Also, combination dryers have been built that utilize both direct and indirect principles. Product evaluation of solar dried foods indicate that in most cases the physical properties, flavor, and vitamin A and C retention were as good as, or better than, conventional dried foods. The economics of the solar systems indicate that most drying procedures are economically feasible for use in small-scale operations only, with the exception of grain drying.

  13. Degradation of bimorph piezoelectric bending beams in energy harvesting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillatsch, P.; Xiao, B. L.; Shashoua, N.; Gramling, H. M.; Yeatman, E. M.; Wright, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is an attractive alternative to battery powering for wireless sensor networks. However, in order for it to be a viable long term solution the fatigue life needs to be assessed. Many vibration harvesting devices employ bimorph piezoelectric bending beams as transduction elements to convert mechanical to electrical energy. This paper introduces two degradation studies performed under symmetrical and asymmetrical sinusoidal loading. It is shown that besides a loss in output power, the most dramatic effect of degradation is a shift in resonance frequency which is highly detrimental to resonant harvester designs. In addition, micro-cracking was shown to occur predominantly in piezoelectric layers under tensile stress. This opens the opportunity for increased life time through compressive operation or pre-loading of piezoceramic layers.

  14. Strain-based energy harvesting for structural health monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debeaux, S.; Masson, P.; Frechette, L. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has been proposed for the maintenance of aircraft fuselage and wings. Wireless sensors and self-powered actuators are recommended in order to avoid extensive wiring of the nodes. One idea is to convert the mechanical energy (vibrations) in an aircraft into electricity using piezoelectric materials. This study investigated the potential of strain-based energy harvesters as opposed to inertial harvesters to supply wireless nodes on typical aircraft structures. In particular, it experimentally compared different piezoelectric energy harvesting devices for use in structural health monitoring. The experimental setup reproduced the simple vibration behaviour of an aircraft wing with respect to frequency and strain level. The study examined 2 distinct groups of piezoelectric harvesting devices, notably piezoelectric harvesting devices polarized in 3-3, and piezoelectric harvesting devices polarized in 3-1. Power dissipation in a resistive load was tested along with energy storage in a capacitance. The optimal voltage was linearly dependent on the strain, but independent of the frequency. The optimal current was linearly dependent on both the frequency and the strain level. The power dissipated in a resistive load was linearly dependent on the frequency but quadratically related to the strain level. The dissipated power in the piezoelectric material was a linear function of the capacitance and inversely proportional to the relative permittivity. The study results were in agreement with literature which indicates that power density in the order of 100 {mu}W/cm{sup 3} is sufficient for many applications, including structural health monitoring. Larger devices will be needed to increase the harvested energy. A simple model was used to describe typical dynamic behaviour of aircraft components, notably a beam representing the whole wing subjected to atmospheric effects, and a plate representing a fuselage panel. Different configurations of

  15. Harvesting the Energy of Multi-Polarized Electromagnetic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoneef, Thamer S; Erkmen, Faruk; Ramahi, Omar M

    2017-11-07

    We present the idea and design of a dual polarized metasurface for electromagnetic energy harvesting. A 4 × 4 super cell with alternating vias between adjacent cells was designed to allow for capturing the energy from various incident angles at an operating frequency of 2.4 GHz. The collected energy is then channeled to a feeding network that collects the AC power and feeds it to a rectification circuitry. The simulation results yielded a radiation to AC and an AC to DC conversion efficiencies of around 90% and 80%, respectively. As a proof of concept, an array consisting of 9 super cells was fabricated and measured. The experimental results show that the proposed energy harvester is capable of capturing up to 70% of the energy from a planewave having various polarizations and converting it to usable DC power.

  16. Communication strategies for two models of discrete energy harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trillingsgaard, Kasper Fløe; Popovski, Petar

    2014-01-01

    in a battery and transmissions are interrupted if the battery runs out of energy. We address communication in slot-based energy harvesting systems, where the transmitter communicates with ON-OFF signaling: in each slot it can either choose to transmit (ON) or stay silent (OFF). Two different models...... of harvesting and communication are addressed. In the first model an energy quantum can arrive, with a certain probability, in each slot. The second model is based on a frame of size F: energy arrives periodically over F slots, in batches containing a random number of energy quanta. We devise achievable...... strategies and compare the slot- with the frame-based model in the case of an errorless transmission channel. Additionally, for the slot-based model and channel with errors, we provide a new proof of the capacity achieved by the save-and-transmit scheme....

  17. Small scale wind energy harvesting with maximum power tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that energy harvesting from wind can be used to power remote monitoring systems. There are several studies that use wind energy in small-scale systems, mainly with wind turbine vertical axis. However, there are very few studies with actual implementations of small wind turbines. This paper compares the performance of horizontal and vertical axis wind turbines for energy harvesting on wireless sensor network applications. The problem with the use of wind energy is that most of the time the wind speed is very low, especially at urban areas. Therefore, this work includes a study on the wind speed distribution in an urban environment and proposes a controller to maximize the energy transfer to the storage systems. The generated power is evaluated by simulation and experimentally for different load and wind conditions. The results demonstrate the increase in efficiency of wind generators that use maximum power transfer tracking, even at low wind speeds.

  18. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  19. Villa Design and Solar Energy Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This paper goes through solar energy and what uses it has. It is also a guide in the choice of solar collectors for the real estate that I have drawn for the thesis work. Solar energy is a renewable source of energy from the Sun's light. Energy can be used to produce both heat and electricity through solar collectors and solar cells. Some of the benefits of solar energy is that it is completely free to extract, environmentally friendly and virtually maintenance-free. Disadvantages are that th...

  20. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  1. Energy harvesting techniques for autonomous WSNs-RFID with a focus on RF energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ping

    2012-04-27

    Supply circuits that harvest energy from surrounding ambient or dedicated sources have drawn much interest recently for providing a possibility of energy-autonomy to the wireless sensing devices. The objective of this thesis is to optimize the power transfer efficiency of the RF/microwave energy transducers in WSN/RFID applications. For this purpose, analysis on the power utilization of the wireless devices at different working states has been done, which implies a space of improving the power transfer efficiency by employing a novel design concept in the RF/microwave energy transducers. In order to observe a deep insight of the charge-pump based energy transducer, an analytical derivation has been implemented based on a compact I/V model for MOSFET working in strong inversion and subthreshold regions. The derivation provides a mathematical direction for the impact of the power consumption of the wireless device on the input impedance of the charge-pump rectifier, which acts as a core element in the energy transducer. With expressing the input impedance of the rectifier into a shunt connection of a resistor and a capacitor, as the load current consumption reduces the shunt resistance increases dramatically while the shunt capacitance holds a relatively constant value. This work proposes a methodology of employing an adaptively adjusted matching network between the rectifier and the antenna in order to optimize the power transfer efficiency according to the instant power consumption of the wireless devices on different working states. For read-only wireless devices with no embedded batteries, like RFID transponders, a tiny storage capacitor of pico-farad which can be charged-up to a certain voltage in microseconds is usually employed as a DC supplier. During the communication between reader and transponder, the reader radiates RF power continuously to supply the transponder. Extra power supply is required to adjust the matching network electrically for optimal power

  2. Energy harvesting from controlled buckling of piezoelectric beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2015-11-01

    A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is presented that can generate electricity from the weight of passing cars or crowds. The energy harvester consists of a piezoelectric beam, which buckles when the device is stepped on. The energy harvester can have a horizontal or vertical configuration. In the vertical (direct) configuration, the piezoelectric beam is vertical and directly sustains the weight of the vehicles or people. In the horizontal (indirect) configuration, the vertical weight is transferred to a horizontal axial force through a scissor-like mechanism. Buckling of the beam results in significant stresses and, thus, large power production. However, if the beam’s buckling is not controlled, the beam will fracture. To prevent this, the axial deformation is constrained to limit the deformations of the beam. In this paper, the energy harvester is analytically modeled. The considered piezoelectric beam is a general non-uniform beam. The natural frequencies, mode shapes, and the critical buckling force corresponding to each mode shape are calculated. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities are included in the model. The design criteria for the device are discussed. It is demonstrated that a device, realized with commonly used piezoelectric patches, can generate tens of milliwatts of power from passing car traffic. The proposed device could also be implemented in the sidewalks or integrated in shoe soles for energy generation. One of the key features of the device is its frequency up-conversion characteristics. The piezoelectric beam undergoes free vibrations each time the weight is applied to or removed from the energy harvester. The frequency of the free vibrations is orders of magnitude larger than the frequency of the load. The device is, thus, both efficient and insensitive to the frequency of the force excitations.

  3. Harvesting vibrational energy due to intermodal systems via nano coated piezo electric devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Vibrational energy resulting from intermodal transport systems can be recovered through the use of energy harvesting system consisting of PZT piezo electric material as the primary energy harvesting component. The ability of traditional PZT piezo ele...

  4. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a self-powered underwater acoustic transmitter using a piezoelectric beam to harvest the mechanical energy from fish swimming. This transmitter does not require a battery and is demonstrated in live fish. It transmits an acoustic waveform as the implanted fish swims. It enables long-term monitoring of aquatic animals.

  5. A batch process micromachined thermoelectric energy harvester: Fabrication and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, J.; Leonov, V.; Goedbloed, M.; Andel, Y. van; Nooijer, M.C.de; Elfrink, R.; Wang, Z.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Micromachined thermopiles are considered as a cost-effective solution for energy harvesters working at a small temperature difference and weak heat flows typical for, e.g., the human body. They can be used for powering autonomous wireless sensor nodes in a body area network. In this paper, a

  6. Development of Vibration-Based Piezoelectric Raindrop Energy Harvesting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin Hong; Dahari, Zuraini

    2017-03-01

    The trend of finding new means to harvest energy has triggered numerous researches to explore the potential of raindrop energy harvesting. This paper presents an investigation on raindrop energy harvesting which compares the performance of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) cantilever and bridge structure transducers and the development of a raindrop energy harvesting system. The parameters which contribute to the output voltage such as droplet size, droplets released at specific heights and dimensions of PVDF transducers are analyzed. Based on the experimental results, the outcomes have shown that the bridge structure transducer generated a higher voltage than the cantilever. Several dimensions have been tested and it was found that the 30 mm × 4 mm × 25 μm bridge structure transducer generated a relatively high AC open-circuit voltage, which is 4.22 V. The power generated by the bridge transducer is 18 μW across a load of 330 kΩ. The transducer is able to drive up a standard alternative current (AC) to direct current (DC) converter (full-wave bridge rectifier). It generated a DC voltage, V DC of 8.7 mV and 229 pW across a 330 kΩ resistor per drop. It is also capable to generate 9.3 nJ in 20 s from an actual rain event.

  7. Amplified energy harvester from footsteps: design, modeling, and experimental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi; Guzman, Plinio; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental analysis of an amplified footstep energy harvester. With the unique design of amplified piezoelectric stack harvester the kinetic energy generated by footsteps can be effectively captured and converted into usable DC power that could potentially be used to power many electric devices, such as smart phones, sensors, monitoring cameras, etc. This doormat-like energy harvester can be used in crowded places such as train stations, malls, concerts, airport escalator/elevator/stairs entrances, or anywhere large group of people walk. The harvested energy provides an alternative renewable green power to replace power requirement from grids, which run on highly polluting and global-warming-inducing fossil fuels. In this paper, two modeling approaches are compared to calculate power output. The first method is derived from the single degree of freedom (SDOF) constitutive equations, and then a correction factor is applied onto the resulting electromechanically coupled equations of motion. The second approach is to derive the coupled equations of motion with Hamilton's principle and the constitutive equations, and then formulate it with the finite element method (FEM). Experimental testing results are presented to validate modeling approaches. Simulation results from both approaches agree very well with experimental results where percentage errors are 2.09% for FEM and 4.31% for SDOF.

  8. Aeroelastic flutter energy harvesters self-polarized by triboelectric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, M.; Boisseau, S.; Geisler, M.; Gasnier, P.; Willemin, J.; Despesse, G.; Reboud, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the performances of several electrostatic flutter energy harvesters tested in a wind tunnel between 0 and 20 m s‑1. The main idea is to use the flutter capability of thin flexible films confined between lateral walls to induce simultaneously the capacitance variations and the electrostatic polarization required by the triboelectric/electrostatic conversion. This technology provides thin and flexible devices and solve the electret’s stability issue (Perez et al 2015 Smart Mater. Struct., Perez et al 2015 New Circuits and Systems). Our prototypes (electrical power-flux density from 0.35 μW cm‑2@3 m s‑1 (light breeze) to 35 μW cm‑2@20 m s‑1 (fresh gale). A Maximum Power Point circuit has been developed to efficiently use the power provided by the energy harvesters. The energy harvester combined with its power management circuit has finally been used to supply an 868 MHz wireless sensor node with temperature and acceleration measurements, validating the complete energy harvesting chain.

  9. Energy harvesting from wood floor vibration using a piezoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiangming Kan; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang; Wenbin Li

    2017-01-01

    Vibration can occur in wood floor systems as a consequence of a variety of human activities, ranging from common daily movements associated with individuals living in homes to high-intensity activities associated with sporting events that are held in large sports arenas. For example, the potential for harvesting energy from a wooden floor system in public buildings...

  10. Experimental investigations on energy harvesting performance of dielectric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongquan; Liu, Xuejing; Xue, Huanhuan; Chen, Hualing; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the emerging technology of energy harvesting based on dielectric elastomers (DE), a new type of functional materials belonging to the family of Electroactive Polymers (EAPs), is presented with emphasis on its performance characteristics and some key influencing factors. At first, on the basic principle of DE energy harvesting, the effects of some control parameters are theoretically analyzed under certain mechanical and electrical constraints. Then, a type of annular DE generator using the commercial elastomers of VHB 4910 (3M, USA), is specially designed and fabricated. A series of experimental tests for the device's energy harvesting performance are implemented at different pre-stretch ratios, stretch amplitudes (displacements), and bias voltages in the constant charge (open-circuit) condition. The experiment results demonstrate the associated influence laws of the above control parameters on the performance of the DE generator, and have good consistent with those obtained from the theoretical analysis. This study is expected to provide a helpful guidance for the design and operation of practical DE energy harvesting devices/systems.

  11. Light harvesting proteins for solar fuel generation in bioengineered photoelectrochemical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihssen, Julian; Braun, Artur; Faccio, Greta; Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The sun is the primary energy source of our planet and potentially can supply all societies with more than just their basic energy needs. Demand of electric energy can be satisfied with photovoltaics, however the global demand for fuels is even higher. The direct way to produce the solar fuel hydrogen is by water splitting in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells, an artificial mimic of photosynthesis. There is currently strong resurging interest for solar fuels produced by PEC cells, but some fundamental technological problems need to be solved to make PEC water splitting an economic, competitive alternative. One of the problems is to provide a low cost, high performing water oxidizing and oxygen evolving photoanode in an environmentally benign setting. Hematite, α-Fe2O3, satisfies many requirements for a good PEC photoanode, but its efficiency is insufficient in its pristine form. A promising strategy for enhancing photocurrent density takes advantage of photosynthetic proteins. In this paper we give an overview of how electrode surfaces in general and hematite photoanodes in particular can be functionalized with light harvesting proteins. Specifically, we demonstrate how low-cost biomaterials such as cyanobacterial phycocyanin and enzymatically produced melanin increase the overall performance of virtually no-cost metal oxide photoanodes in a PEC system. The implementation of biomaterials changes the overall nature of the photoanode assembly in a way that aggressive alkaline electrolytes such as concentrated KOH are not required anymore. Rather, a more environmentally benign and pH neutral electrolyte can be used.

  12. Performance criteria for dynamic window systems using nanostructured behaviors for energy harvesting and environmental comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andow, Brandon C.; Krietemeyer, Bess; Stark, Peter R. H.; Dyson, Anna H.

    2013-04-01

    Contemporary commercial building types continue to incorporate predominantly glazed envelope systems, despite the associated challenges with thermal regulation, visual comfort, and increased energy consumption. The advantage of window systems that could adaptively respond to changes in the environment while meeting variable demands for building energy use and occupant comfort has led to considerable investment towards the advancement of dynamic window technologies. Although these technologies demonstrate cost warranting improvements in building energy performance, they face challenges with visible clarity, color variability and response time. Furthermore, they remain challenged with respect to their ability to adequately control important qualitative criteria for daylighting such as glare and balanced light redistribution within occupied spaces. The material dependent limitations of advanced glazing technologies have initiated a search for new thin film solutions, with new device possibilities emerging across many fields. Idealized window performance has traditionally been defined as the dynamic control of solar transmittance, glare, solar gain and daylighting at any time to manage energy, comfort and view. However, in the context of wider goals towards building energy self-sufficiency through the achievement of on-site net zero energy, emerging material systems point towards other physical phenomena for achieving transparency modulation and energy harvesting, demanding a broader range of criteria for advanced glazing controls that allow the glazed building envelope to exist as a transfer function that can address and potentially accommodate the following five principal criteria: 1. Thermal management; 2. Daylighting harvesting and modulation; 3. Maintenance of views; 4. Active power capture, transfer, storage and redistribution; 5. Information Display. Building upon the existing set of performance requirements for high-performance glazing, this paper prescribes

  13. Near-field thermodynamics: Useful work, efficiency, and energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Ivan; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Lapas, Luciano C.; Miguel Rubi, J.

    2014-03-01

    We show that the maximum work that can be obtained from the thermal radiation emitted between two planar sources in the near-field regime is much larger than that corresponding to the blackbody limit. This quantity, as well as an upper bound, for the efficiency of the process is computed from the formulation of thermodynamics in the near-field regime. The case when the difference of temperatures of the hot source and the environment is small, relevant for energy harvesting, is studied in detail. We also show that thermal radiation energy conversion can be more efficient in the near-field regime. These results open new possibilities for the design of energy converters that can be used to harvest energy from sources of moderate temperature at the nanoscale.

  14. Medium Access Control in Energy Harvesting - Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon

    Control (MAC) protocols that are following the receiver-initiated paradigm of asynchronous communication. According to the receiver-initiated paradigm the communication is initiated by the receiver that states its availability to receive data through beacons. The sender is passively listening...... to the channel until it receives the beacon of interest. In this context, the dissertation begins with an in-depth survey of all the receiverinitiated MAC protocols and presents their unique optimization features, which deal with several challenges of the link layer such as mitigation of the energy consumption......-efficient features that aim to adapt the consumed energy to match the harvested energy, distribute the load with respect to the harvested energy, decrease the overhead of the communication, address the requirements for collision avoidance, prioritize urgent traffic and secure the system against beacon replay attacks...

  15. Energy harvesting for microelectronics. Energy efficient and energy autarkic solutions for wireless sensor systems; Energy Harvesting fuer Mikroelektronik. Energieeffiziente und -autarke Loesungen fuer drahtlose Sensorsysteme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembowski, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy fields promise to be sustainable fields of growth in the coming years. In the case of micro energy harvesting relatively small amounts of energy is 'harvested' from the ambient energy in order to enable energy-efficient and self-sufficient solutions in the field of microelectronics. The book under consideration provides: (a) The necessary fundamentals concerning energy production (e.g., thermal generators, piezoelectric transducers, energy from RF radiation); (b) Energy storage as with batteries, capacitors, voltage converters and converter circuits; (c) Information to sensor/actuator system (types, signal conditioning, signal conversion); (d) Suitable microcontrollers and power saving mechanisms; (e) Wireless communication (transponder systems, wireless standards). In addition, application examples for system monitoring, building automation or in the medical technology are presented in detail.

  16. Parameter identification from frequency response of MEMS energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Binh Duc; Le, Cuong Phu; Halvorsen, Einar

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we present theoretical analysis and numerical results on a simple technique for extracting unknown model parameters for MEMS electrostatic energy harvesters. We show that the frequency response can be utilized in a least-squares minimization scheme to estimate the damping coefficient, mechanical stiffness and transducer/load parasitic capacitances. The accuracy of the method is tested by application to simulated cases of linear and non-linear harvesters. A single data sweep from such a pseudo-experiment suffices to determine the unknown parameters of the electromechanical model with accuracy. The method is shown to work satisfactorily for both linear and nonlinear devices.

  17. Non-tracking solar energy collector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy collector system is described characterized by an improved concentrator for directing incident rays of solar energy on parallel strip-like segments of a flatplate receiver. Individually mounted reflector modules of a common asymmetrical triangular cross-sectional configuration supported for independent orientation are asymmetric included with vee-trough concentrators for deflecting incident solar energy toward the receiver.

  18. Dielectric Elastomers for Actuation and Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Paul A.

    actuators. The fault-tolerance and improved interlayer adhesion was used to fabricate prestrained free-standing silicone actuators capable of stable long life actuation (>30,000 cycles at >20% strain and >500 cycles at ˜40% strain) while driving a load. Issues related to gradual electrode degradation are also addressed through the use of quasi-buckled electrodes. For generator purposes, the primary concerns are ensuring environmental stability, increasing energy density, lowering losses, and determining effective methods to couple the dielectric elastomer to natural energy sources. Using the results of this analysis, two material systems are explored: VHB acrylic elastomers at various prestrains and with various amounts of a stiffening additive, and a high energy density silicone-TiO2 nanocomposite elastomer with various amounts of additive. It is shown that increasing prestrain in the VHB acrylic system increases the energy density, while the stiffening additive has the effect of making the acrylic stiffer but results in increased losses, result in poorer performance. The silicone TiO2 composite demonstrates an increase in permittivity and stiffness with increasing additive while maintaining very high dielectric breakdown strength values. These increases are partially offset by small increases in mechanical and electrical losses. Calculations based on a simple model show that the generator energy density can be improved by a factor of 3 for a 20wt.% TiO2 loading at a strain of 50% in area. The calculated generator energy density values exceed the maximum values measured experimentally for highly prestrained VHB4910 acrylic elastomers. The focus on high energy density materials ignores the fact that not all applications require such a material, and that some applications may, in fact, benefit from the use of a softer material that is less intrusive. However, for lower energy density materials, parasitic losses due to electrode resistance and viscoelasticity play a larger

  19. Improvement of Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Efficiency Through Optimal Patch Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Gosliga, Julian S.; Ganilova, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how to improve the efficiency of a vibrating hybrid energy harvester through changing the patch configuration. The results of this work identify the patch configuration that maximises output while using the same amount of piezoelectric material. Using 6 patches was found to be the most efficient when looking at the energy output from a single cycle. Stress distributions generated using ANSYS show that this was because the patches were all locate...

  20. Design and control approaches for energy harvesting wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Frezzetti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Networks are monitoring infrastructures composed of sensing (measuring), computing, and communication devices used to observe, supervise and monitor environmental phenomena. Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks (EH-WSN) have the additional feature to save energy from the environment in order to ensure long life autonomy of the entire network, without ideally the human intervention over long periods of time. The present work is aimed to address some of the most significant limit...

  1. Multi-source energy harvester to power sensing hardware on rotating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Alexander; Ouellette, Scott; Carlson, Clinton; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R.

    2010-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet 20% of the nation's energy needs through wind power by the year 2030. To accomplish this goal, the industry will need to produce larger (>100m diameter) turbines to increase efficiency and maximize energy production. It will be imperative to instrument the large composite structures with onboard sensing to provide structural health monitoring capabilities to understand the global response and integrity of these systems as they age. A critical component in the deployment of such a system will be a robust power source that can operate for the lifespan of the wind turbine. In this paper we consider the use of discrete, localized power sources that derive energy from the ambient (solar, thermal) or operational (kinetic) environment. This approach will rely on a multi-source configuration that scavenges energy from photovoltaic and piezoelectric transducers. Each harvester is first characterized individually in the laboratory and then they are combined through a multi-source power conditioner that is designed to combine the output of each harvester in series to power a small wireless sensor node that has active-sensing capabilities. The advantages/disadvantages of each approach are discussed, along with the proposed design for a field ready energy harvester that will be deployed on a small-scale 19.8m diameter wind turbine.

  2. Multi-source energy harvester to power sensing hardware on rotating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlichting, Alezander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ouellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet 20% of the nation's energy needs through wind power by the year 2030. To accomplish this goal, the industry will need to produce larger (> 100m diameter) turbines to increase efficiency and maximize energy production. It will be imperative to instrument the large composite structures with onboard sensing to provide structural health monitoring capabilities to understand the global response and integrity of these systems as they age. A critical component in the deployment of such a system will be a robust power source that can operate for the lifespan of the wind turbine. In this paper we consider the use of discrete, localized power sources that derive energy from the ambient (solar, thermal) or operational (kinetic) environment. This approach will rely on a multi-source configuration that scavenges energy from photovoltaic and piezoelectric transducers. Each harvester is first characterized individually in the laboratory and then they are combined through a multi-source power conditioner that is designed to combine the output of each harvester in series to power a small wireless sensor node that has active-sensing capabilities. The advantages/disadvantages of each approach are discussed, along with the proposed design for a field ready energy harvester that will be deployed on a small-scale 19.8m diameter wind turbine.

  3. 25th anniversary article: A soft future: from robots and sensor skin to energy harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Siegfried; Bauer-Gogonea, Simona; Graz, Ingrid; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Keplinger, Christoph; Schwödiauer, Reinhard

    2014-01-08

    Scientists are exploring elastic and soft forms of robots, electronic skin and energy harvesters, dreaming to mimic nature and to enable novel applications in wide fields, from consumer and mobile appliances to biomedical systems, sports and healthcare. All conceivable classes of materials with a wide range of mechanical, physical and chemical properties are employed, from liquids and gels to organic and inorganic solids. Functionalities never seen before are achieved. In this review we discuss soft robots which allow actuation with several degrees of freedom. We show that different actuation mechanisms lead to similar actuators, capable of complex and smooth movements in 3d space. We introduce latest research examples in sensor skin development and discuss ultraflexible electronic circuits, light emitting diodes and solar cells as examples. Additional functionalities of sensor skin, such as visual sensors inspired by animal eyes, camouflage, self-cleaning and healing and on-skin energy storage and generation are briefly reviewed. Finally, we discuss a paradigm change in energy harvesting, away from hard energy generators to soft ones based on dielectric elastomers. Such systems are shown to work with high energy of conversion, making them potentially interesting for harvesting mechanical energy from human gait, winds and ocean waves. © 2013 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 1: Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The utilization of solar energy to meet the energy needs of the U.S. is discussed. Topics discussed include: availability of solar energy, solar energy collectors, heating for houses and buildings, solar water heater, electric power generation, and ocean thermal power.

  5. Internal resonance and low frequency vibration energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Towfighian, Shahrzad

    2017-09-01

    A nonlinear vibration energy harvester with internal resonance is presented. The proposed harvester consists of two cantilevers, each with a permanent magnet on its tip. One cantilever has a piezoelectric layer at its base. When magnetic force is applied this two degrees-of-freedom nonlinear vibration system shows the internal resonance phenomenon that broadens the frequency bandwidth compared to a linear system. Three coupled partial differential equations are obtained to predict the dynamic behavior of the nonlinear energy harvester. The perturbation method of multiple scales is used to solve equations. Results from experiments done at different vibration levels with varying distances between the magnets validate the mathematical model. Experiments and simulations show the design outperforms the linear system by doubling the frequency bandwidth. Output voltage for frequency response is studied for different system parameters. The optimal load resistance is obtained for the maximum power in the internal resonance case. The results demonstrate that a design combining internal resonance and magnetic nonlinearity improves the efficiency of energy harvesting.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of galloping-based piezoaeroelastic energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkefi, A.; Yan, Z.; Hajj, M. R.

    2013-09-01

    The normal form is proposed as a tool to analyze the performance and reliability of galloping-based piezoaeroelastic energy harvesters. Two different harvesting systems are considered. The first system consists of a tip mass prismatic structure (isosceles 30° or square cross-section geometry) attached to a multilayered cantilever beam. The only source of nonlinearity in this system is the aerodynamic nonlinearity. The second system consists of an equilateral triangle cross-section bar attached to two cantilever beams. This system is designed to have structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities. The coupled governing equations for the structure's transverse displacement and the generated voltage are derived and analyzed for both systems. The effects of the electrical load resistance and the type of harvester on the onset speed of galloping are quantified. The results show that the onset speed of galloping is strongly affected by the load resistance for both types of harvesters. The normal form of the dynamic system near the onset of galloping (Hopf bifurcation) is then derived. Based on the nonlinear normal form, it is demonstrated that smaller levels of generated voltage or power are obtained for higher absolute values of the effective nonlinearity. For the first harvesting system, the results show a supercritical Hopf bifurcation for both isosceles 30° or square cross-section geometries. The nonlinear normal form shows that the isosceles triangle section (30°) is more efficient than the square section. For the second harvesting system, the normal form is used to identify the values of the nonlinear torsional spring which changes the harvester's instability. It is demonstrated that this critical value of the nonlinear torsional spring depends strongly on the load resistance.

  7. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Oxides for Energy Harvesting Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Abutaha, Anas I.

    2015-11-24

    As the world strives to adapt to the increasing demand for electrical power, sustainable energy sources are attracting significant interest. Around 60% of energy utilized in the world is wasted as heat. Different industrial processes, home heating, and exhausts in cars, all generate a huge amount of unused waste heat. With such a huge potential, there is also significant interest in discovering inexpensive technologies for power generation from waste heat. As a result, thermoelectric materials have become important for many renewable energy research programs. While significant advancements have been done in improving the thermoelectric properties of the conventional heavy-element based materials (such as Bi2Te3 and PbTe), high-temperature applications of thermoelectrics are still limited to one materials system, namely SiGe, since the traditional thermoelectric materials degrade and oxidize at high temperature. Therefore, oxide thermoelectrics emerge as a promising class of materials since they can operate athigher temperatures and in harsher environments compared to non-oxide thermoelectrics. Furthermore, oxides are abundant and friendly to the environment. Among oxides, crystalline SrTiO3 and ZnO are promising thermoelectric materials. The main objective of this work is therefore to pursue focused investigations of SrTiO3 and ZnO thin films and superlattices grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), with the goal of optimizing their thermoelectric properties by following different strategies. First, the effect of laser fluence on the thermoelectric properties of La doped epitaxial SrTiO3 films is discussed. Films grown at higher laser fluences exhibit better thermoelectric performance. Second, the role of crystal orientation in determining the thermoelectric properties of epitaxial Al doped ZnO (AZO) films is explained. Vertically aligned (c-axis) AZO films have superior thermoelectric properties compared to other films with different crystal orientations. Third

  8. Advances in Photofunctional Dendrimers for Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Yi; Yu, Tianjun; Chen, Jinping; Yang, Guoqiang; Li, Yi

    2014-07-03

    Dendrimers are regularly and hierarchically branched synthetic macromolecules with numerous chain ends all emanating from a single core, which makes them attractive candidates for energy conversion applications. During photosynthesis and photocatalysis, photoinduced electron transfer and energy transfer are the main processes involved. Studies on these processes in dendritic systems are critical for the future applications of dendrimers in photochemical energy conversion and other optoelectronic devices. In this Perspective, the recent advances of photofunctional dendrimers in energy conversion based on light-harvesting systems, solar cells, and photochemical production of hydrogen will be discussed. The electron-transfer and energy-transfer characteristics in light-harvesting photofunctional dendrimers and the regulation of the electron-transfer process and the stabilization of the charge separation state in hydrogen photoproduction are emphasized.

  9. Statistical-QoS Guaranteed Energy Efficiency Optimization for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Gao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting, which offers a never-ending energy supply, has emerged as a prominent technology to prolong the lifetime and reduce costs for the battery-powered wireless sensor networks. However, how to improve the energy efficiency while guaranteeing the quality of service (QoS for energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks is still an open problem. In this paper, we develop statistical delay-bounded QoS-driven power control policies to maximize the effective energy efficiency (EEE, which is defined as the spectrum efficiency under given specified QoS constraints per unit harvested energy, for energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks. For the battery-infinite wireless sensor networks, our developed QoS-driven power control policy converges to the Energy harvesting Water Filling (E-WF scheme and the Energy harvesting Channel Inversion (E-CI scheme under the very loose and stringent QoS constraints, respectively. For the battery-finite wireless sensor networks, our developed QoS-driven power control policy becomes the Truncated energy harvesting Water Filling (T-WF scheme and the Truncated energy harvesting Channel Inversion (T-CI scheme under the very loose and stringent QoS constraints, respectively. Furthermore, we evaluate the outage probabilities to theoretically analyze the performance of our developed QoS-driven power control policies. The obtained numerical results validate our analysis and show that our developed optimal power control policies can optimize the EEE over energy harvesting based wireless sensor networks.

  10. Optimal power allocation based on sum-throughput maximization for energy harvesting cognitive radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Zhu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an optimal power allocation algorithm by maximizing the sum-throughput in energy harvesting cognitive radio networks is proposed. Under the causality constraints of the harvested energy by solar radiation, electromagnetic waves and so on in the two secondary users (SUs), and the interference constraint in the primary user (PU), the sum-throughput maximization problem is formulated. The algorithm decomposes the interference threshold constraint to the power upper bounds of the two SUs. Then, the power allocation problems of the two SUs can be solved by a directional water-filling algorithm (DWA) with the power upper bounds, respectively. The paper gives the algorithm steps and simulation results, and the simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm has obvious advantages over the other two algorithms.

  11. Triboelectric-thermoelectric hybrid nanogenerator for harvesting frictional energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ki; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Jo, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-12-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator, an energy harvesting device that converts external kinetic energy into electrical energy through using a nano-structured triboelectric material, is well known as an energy harvester with a simple structure and high output voltage. However, triboelectric nanogenerators also inevitably generate heat resulting from the friction that arises from their inherent sliding motions. In this paper, we present a hybrid nanogenerator, which integrates a triboelectric generator and a thermoelectric generator (TEG) for harvesting both the kinetic friction energy and the heat energy that would otherwise be wasted. The triboelectric part consists of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film with nano-structures and a movable aluminum panel. The thermoelectric part is attached to the bottom of the PTFE film by an adhesive phase change material layer. We confirmed that the hybrid nanogenerator can generate an output power that is higher than that generated by a single triboelectric nanogenerator or a TEG. The hybrid nanogenerator was capable of producing a power density of 14.98 mW cm-2. The output power, produced from a sliding motion of 12 cm s-1, was capable of instantaneously lighting up 100 commercial LED bulbs. The hybrid nanogenerator can charge a 47 μF capacitor at a charging rate of 7.0 mV s-1, which is 13.3% faster than a single triboelectric generator. Furthermore, the efficiency of the device was significantly improved by the addition of a heat source. This hybrid energy harvester does not require any difficult fabrication steps, relative to existing triboelectric nanogenerators. The present study addresses a method for increasing the efficiency while solving other problems associated with triboelectric nanogenerators.

  12. Electrolysers Powered with Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Y. Nedelchev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast fossil fuel consumption and decreasing oil reserves and natural resources, enforce much more need of finding decision for renewable energies and development of constructions for using the so called green resources. One solution of this problem is combination ofalready established solar based sources and brown gas cell construction. Brown gas cell production is based on electrolysis of pure water and as a result generating a real gas fuel. This production can find large utility in different usages.

  13. Energy Harvesting Based Body Area Networks for Smart Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yixue; Peng, Limei; Lu, Huimin; Hassan, Mohammad Mehedi; Alamri, Atif

    2017-07-10

    Body area networks (BANs) are configured with a great number of ultra-low power consumption wearable devices, which constantly monitor physiological signals of the human body and thus realize intelligent monitoring. However, the collection and transfer of human body signals consume energy, and considering the comfort demand of wearable devices, both the size and the capacity of a wearable device's battery are limited. Thus, minimizing the energy consumption of wearable devices and optimizing the BAN energy efficiency is still a challenging problem. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an energy harvesting-based BAN for smart health and discuss an optimal resource allocation scheme to improve BAN energy efficiency. Specifically, firstly, considering energy harvesting in a BAN and the time limits of human body signal transfer, we formulate the energy efficiency optimization problem of time division for wireless energy transfer and wireless information transfer. Secondly, we convert the optimization problem into a convex optimization problem under a linear constraint and propose a closed-form solution to the problem. Finally, simulation results proved that when the size of data acquired by the wearable devices is small, the proportion of energy consumed by the circuit and signal acquisition of the wearable devices is big, and when the size of data acquired by the wearable devices is big, the energy consumed by the signal transfer of the wearable device is decisive.

  14. Energy Harvesting Based Body Area Networks for Smart Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixue Hao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Body area networks (BANs are configured with a great number of ultra-low power consumption wearable devices, which constantly monitor physiological signals of the human body and thus realize intelligent monitoring. However, the collection and transfer of human body signals consume energy, and considering the comfort demand of wearable devices, both the size and the capacity of a wearable device’s battery are limited. Thus, minimizing the energy consumption of wearable devices and optimizing the BAN energy efficiency is still a challenging problem. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an energy harvesting-based BAN for smart health and discuss an optimal resource allocation scheme to improve BAN energy efficiency. Specifically, firstly, considering energy harvesting in a BAN and the time limits of human body signal transfer, we formulate the energy efficiency optimization problem of time division for wireless energy transfer and wireless information transfer. Secondly, we convert the optimization problem into a convex optimization problem under a linear constraint and propose a closed-form solution to the problem. Finally, simulation results proved that when the size of data acquired by the wearable devices is small, the proportion of energy consumed by the circuit and signal acquisition of the wearable devices is big, and when the size of data acquired by the wearable devices is big, the energy consumed by the signal transfer of the wearable device is decisive.

  15. Beam Flutter and Energy Harvesting in Internal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae

    2017-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter, largely studied for causing engineering failures, has more recently been used as a means of extracting energy from the flow. Particularly, flutter of a cantilever or an elastically mounted plate in a converging-diverging flow passage has shown promise as an energy harvesting concept for internal flow applications. The instability onset is observed as a function of throat velocity, internal wall geometry, fluid and structure material properties. To enable these devices, our work explores features of the fluid-structure coupled dynamics as a function of relevant nondimensional parameters. The flutter boundary is examined through stability analysis of a reduced order model, and corroborated with numerical simulations at low Reynolds number. Experiments for an energy harvester design are qualitatively compared to results from analytical and numerical work, suggesting a robust limit cycle ensues due to a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. Bosch Corporation.

  16. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Steven D [Idaho Falls, ID; Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Pinhero, Patrick J [Columbia, MO

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  17. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novack, Steven D [Idaho Falls, ID; Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Pinhero, Patrick J [Columbia, MO

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  18. Do biomass harvesting guidelines influence herpetofauna following harvests of logging residues for renewable energy?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Sarah; Moorman, Christopher; Grodsky, Steven; Hazel, Dennis; Homyack, Jessica; Farrell, Chris; Castleberry, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Forests are a major supplier of renewable energy; however, gleaning logging residues for use as woody biomass feedstock could negatively alter habitat for species dependent on downed wood. Biomass Harvesting Guidelines (BHGs) recommend retaining a portion of woody biomass on the forest floor following harvest. Despite BHGs being developed to help ensure ecological sustainability, their contribution to biodiversity has not been evaluated experimentally at operational scales. We compared herpetofauanal evenness, diversity, and richness and abundance of Anaxyrus terrestris and Gastrophryne carolinensis among six treatments that varied in volume and spatial arrangement of woody biomass retained after clearcutting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations in North Carolina, USA (n = 4), 2011-2014 and Georgia (n = 4), USA 2011-2013. Treatments were: (1) biomass harvest with no BHGs, (2) 15% retention with biomass clustered, (3) 15% retention with biomass dispersed, (4) 30% retention with biomass clustered, (5) 30% retention with biomass dispersed, and (6) no biomass harvest. We captured individuals with drift fence arrays and compared evenness, diversity, and richness metrics among treatments with repeated-measure, linear mixed-effects models. We determined predictors of A. terrestris and G. carolinensis abundances using a priori candidate N-mixture models with woody biomass volume, vegetation structure, and groundcover composition as covariates. We had 206 captures of 25 reptile species and 8710 captures of 17 amphibian species during 53690 trap nights. Herpetofauna diversity, evenness, and richness were similar among treatments. A. terrestris abundance was negatively related to volume of retained woody biomass in treatment units in North Carolina in 2013. G. carolinensis abundance was positively related with volume of retained woody debris in treatment units in Georgia in 2012. Other relationships between A. terrestris and G. carolinensis abundances and habitat metrics

  19. Performance Analysis of a Magnetorheological Damper with Energy Harvesting Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A magnetorheological (MR damper with energy harvesting ability was proposed based on electromagnetic induction (EMI principle. The energy harvesting part was composed of a permanent magnet array and inducing coils which move vertically. This device could act as a linear power generator when the external excitation was applied, and the kinetic energy could be converted into electrical energy due to the relative linear motion between the magnets array and the inducing coils. Finite element models of both the MR damper part and the linear power generator part were built up separately to address the magnetic flux distributions, the magnetic flux densities, and the power generating efficiency using ANSYS software. The experimental tests were carried out to evaluate the damping performance and power generating efficiency. The results show that the proposed MR damper can produce approximately 750 N damping forces at the current of 0.6 A, and the energy harvesting device can generate about 1.0 V DC voltage at 0.06 m·s−1 excitation.

  20. Solar energy sciences and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Enteria, Napoleon

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is available all over the world in different intensities. Theoretically, the solar energy available on the surface of the earth is enough to support the energy requirements of the entire planet. However, in reality, progress and development of solar science and technology depends to a large extent on human desires and needs. This is due to the various barriers to overcome and to deal with the economics of practical utilization of solar energy.This book will introduce the rapid development and progress in the field of solar energy applications for science and technology: the advanc

  1. Design and experimental evaluation on an advanced multisource energy harvesting system for wireless sensor nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Gaofei; Ma, Rui; You, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    An effective multisource energy harvesting system is presented as power supply for wireless sensor nodes (WSNs). The advanced system contains not only an expandable power management module including control of the charging and discharging process of the lithium polymer battery but also an energy harvesting system using the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) circuit with analog driving scheme for the collection of both solar and vibration energy sources. Since the MPPT and the power management module are utilized, the system is able to effectively achieve a low power consumption. Furthermore, a super capacitor is integrated in the system so that current fluctuations of the lithium polymer battery during the charging and discharging processes can be properly reduced. In addition, through a simple analog switch circuit with low power consumption, the proposed system can successfully switch the power supply path according to the ambient energy sources and load power automatically. A practical WSNs platform shows that efficiency of the energy harvesting system can reach about 75-85% through the 24-hour environmental test, which confirms that the proposed system can be used as a long-term continuous power supply for WSNs.

  2. Design and Experimental Evaluation on an Advanced Multisource Energy Harvesting System for Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective multisource energy harvesting system is presented as power supply for wireless sensor nodes (WSNs. The advanced system contains not only an expandable power management module including control of the charging and discharging process of the lithium polymer battery but also an energy harvesting system using the maximum power point tracking (MPPT circuit with analog driving scheme for the collection of both solar and vibration energy sources. Since the MPPT and the power management module are utilized, the system is able to effectively achieve a low power consumption. Furthermore, a super capacitor is integrated in the system so that current fluctuations of the lithium polymer battery during the charging and discharging processes can be properly reduced. In addition, through a simple analog switch circuit with low power consumption, the proposed system can successfully switch the power supply path according to the ambient energy sources and load power automatically. A practical WSNs platform shows that efficiency of the energy harvesting system can reach about 75–85% through the 24-hour environmental test, which confirms that the proposed system can be used as a long-term continuous power supply for WSNs.

  3. Feasibility of Energy Harvesting Using a Piezoelectric Tire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malotte, Christopher

    While the piezoelectric effect has been around for some time, it has only recently caught interest as a potential sustainable energy harvesting device. Piezoelectric energy harvesting has been developed for shoes and panels, but has yet to be integrated into a marketable bicycle tire. For this thesis, the development and feasibility of a piezoelectric tire was done. This includes the development of a circuit that incorporates piezoceramic elements, energy harvesting circuitry, and an energy storage device. A single phase circuit was designed using an ac-dc diode rectifier. An electrolytic capacitor was used as the energy storage device. A financial feasibility was also done to determine targets for manufacturing cost and sales price. These models take into account market trends for high performance tires, economies of scale, and the possibility of government subsidies. This research will help understand the potential for the marketability of a piezoelectric energy harvesting tire that can create electricity for remote use. This study found that there are many obstacles that must be addressed before a piezoelectric tire can be marketed to the general public. The power output of this device is minuscule compared to an alkaline battery. In order for this device to approach the power output of an alkaline battery the weight of the device would also become an issue. Additionally this device is very costly compared to the average bicycle tire. Lastly, this device is extreme fragile and easily broken. In order for this device to become marketable the issues of power output, cost, weight, and durability must all be successfully overcome.

  4. Wuestite - a solar energy carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidenkaff, A.; Nueesch, P.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Reller, A. [Hamburg Univ., Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Hydrogen is produced when Wuestite (Fe{sub 1-y}O) is oxidised by water. This reaction is part of a two-step thermochemical metal oxide cycle for the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical energy carriers, characterised by a high chemical potential. The reaction was studied in a tubular furnace with on-line gas analysis and further characterised in detail by DTA und high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The influence of non-stoichiometry, morphology and temperature on the mechanism and kinetics of the water-splitting reaction was determined. (author) 3 figs., tabs., 3 refs.

  5. Harvested Energy Prediction Schemes for Wireless Sensor Networks: Performance Evaluation and Enhancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We review harvested energy prediction schemes to be used in wireless sensor networks and explore the relative merits of landmark solutions. We propose enhancements to the well-known Profile-Energy (Pro-Energy model, the so-called Improved Profile-Energy (IPro-Energy, and compare its performance with Accurate Solar Irradiance Prediction Model (ASIM, Pro-Energy, and Weather Conditioned Moving Average (WCMA. The performance metrics considered are the prediction accuracy and the execution time which measure the implementation complexity. In addition, the effectiveness of the considered models, when integrated in an energy management scheme, is also investigated in terms of the achieved throughput and the energy consumption. Both solar irradiance and wind power datasets are used for the evaluation study. Our results indicate that the proposed IPro-Energy scheme outperforms the other candidate models in terms of the prediction accuracy achieved by up to 78% for short term predictions and 50% for medium term prediction horizons. For long term predictions, its prediction accuracy is comparable to the Pro-Energy model but outperforms the other models by up to 64%. In addition, the IPro scheme is able to achieve the highest throughput when integrated in the developed energy management scheme. Finally, the ASIM scheme reports the smallest implementation complexity.

  6. Single-step colloidal quantum dot films for infrared solar harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Kiani, Amirreza

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductors with bandgaps in the near- to mid-infrared can harvest solar light that is otherwise wasted by conventional single-junction solar cell architectures. In particular, colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials since they are cost-effective, processed from solution, and have a bandgap that can be tuned into the infrared (IR) via the quantum size effect. These characteristics enable them to harvest the infrared portion of the solar spectrum to which silicon is transparent. To date, IR CQD solar cells have been made using a wasteful and complex sequential layer-by-layer process. Here, we demonstrate ∼1 eV bandgap solar-harvesting CQD films deposited in a single step. By engineering a fast-drying solvent mixture for metal iodide-capped CQDs, we deposited active layers greater than 200 nm in thickness having a mean roughness less than 1 nm. We integrated these films into infrared solar cells that are stable in air and exhibit power conversion efficiencies of 3.5% under illumination by the full solar spectrum, and 0.4% through a simulated silicon solar cell filter.

  7. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO(2)/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H(2) generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 287 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) are obtained with TiO(2)/Ni(OH)(2) nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application.

  8. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO2/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H2 generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g−1 at 0.5 A g−1 and 287 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 are obtained with TiO2/Ni(OH)2 nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application. PMID:23248745

  9. Comparative analysis of solar pasteurization versus solar disinfection for the treatment of harvested rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, André; Dobrowsky, Penelope Heather; Ndlovu, Thando; Reyneke, Brandon; Khan, Wesaal

    2016-12-09

    Numerous pathogens and opportunistic pathogens have been detected in harvested rainwater. Developing countries, in particular, require time- and cost-effective treatment strategies to improve the quality of this water source. The primary aim of the current study was thus to compare solar pasteurization (SOPAS; 70 to 79 °C; 80 to 89 °C; and ≥90 °C) to solar disinfection (SODIS; 6 and 8 hrs) for their efficiency in reducing the level of microbial contamination in harvested rainwater. The chemical quality (anions and cations) of the SOPAS and SODIS treated and untreated rainwater samples were also monitored. While the anion concentrations in all the samples were within drinking water guidelines, the concentrations of lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) exceeded the guidelines in all the SOPAS samples. Additionally, the iron (Fe) concentrations in both the SODIS 6 and 8 hr samples were above the drinking water guidelines. A >99% reduction in Escherichia coli and heterotrophic bacteria counts was then obtained in the SOPAS and SODIS samples. Ethidium monoazide bromide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (EMA-qPCR) analysis revealed a 94.70% reduction in viable Legionella copy numbers in the SOPAS samples, while SODIS after 6 and 8 hrs yielded a 50.60% and 75.22% decrease, respectively. Similarly, a 99.61% reduction in viable Pseudomonas copy numbers was observed after SOPAS treatment, while SODIS after 6 and 8 hrs yielded a 47.27% and 58.31% decrease, respectively. While both the SOPAS and SODIS systems reduced the indicator counts to below the detection limit, EMA-qPCR analysis indicated that SOPAS treatment yielded a 2- and 3-log reduction in viable Legionella and Pseudomonas copy numbers, respectively. Additionally, SODIS after 8 hrs yielded a 2-log and 1-log reduction in Legionella and Pseudomonas copy numbers, respectively and could be considered as an alternative, cost-effective treatment method for harvested rainwater.

  10. Energy Efficient Solar Milk Chiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneeb Bin Muzzamal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Life stock is the major sector of agriculture which is of great importance for Pakistan. It has a major contribution towards the economy of Pakistan with a 55.9 participation in agriculture sector. Pakistan is fourth largest country in milk production with 50.9 Billion tons per annum out of which only 5 is processed and pasteurized hardly and remaining milk is handled by milk men under non-hygienic conditions which causes milk borne diseases. Milk is perishable food having shelf life of few hours therefore milk processing is done to deactivate the microorganisms in the milk and increase its shelf life for future use. It is an energy intensive process and mostly conventional form of energy is used for this purpose. Solar power is the sustainable source of energy and there is an average solar global radiation of 5.3kWhm2day persist in the country with more than 300 sunny days in a year. The objective of the study was to design and develop a solar assisted milk pasteurizer and to evaluate its performance. The developed solar assisted milk pasteurizer consisted of heating and cooling unit. Heating unit made of shell and tube type coil to heat up the milk up-to 730C for 15 seconds. Cooling unit has a chiller for sudden cool down the milk from 350C to 40C within 2 hours. Solar milk chiller had capacity of 200 liters chiller semicircular pug mill type SS-304 a 2kWp PV system having eight PV modules each of 250Wp a hybrid inverter 3kVA that convert 24V DC current into 220V AC current and two batteries 150Ah each as a backup source to meet weather fluctuations. One ton of vapor compression refrigeration system was filled with R410a refrigerant with inlet pressure of 118psi and the outlet pressure of 300psi was coupled with the chiller through coils at bottom side of the vessel. An agitator was installed with a lid on the tank to stir the milk continuously inside the chiller to make sure that homogeneous milk cooling to avoid freezing of the milk in the

  11. Roles of the Excitation in Harvesting Energy from Vibrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    Full Text Available The study investigated the role of excitation in energy harvesting applications. While the energy ultimately comes from the excitation, it was shown that the excitation may not always behave as a source. When the device characteristics do not perfectly match the excitation, the excitation alternately behaves as a source and a sink. The extent to which the excitation behaves as a sink determines the energy harvesting efficiency. Such contradictory roles were shown to be dictated by a generalized phase defined as the instantaneous phase angle between the velocity of the device and the excitation. An inductive prototype device with a diamagnetically levitated seismic mass was proposed to take advantage of the well established phase changing mechanism of vibro-impact to achieve a broader device bandwidth. Results suggest that the vibro-impact can generate an instantaneous, significant phase shift in response velocity that switches the role of the excitation. If introduced properly outside the resonance zone it could dramatically increase the energy harvesting efficiency.

  12. Advanced model for fast assessment of piezoelectric micro energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardito, Raffaele; Corigliano, Alberto; Gafforelli, Giacomo; Valzasina, Carlo; Procopio, Francesco; Zafalon, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to present recent advances in modelling and design of piezoelectric energy harvesters, in the framework of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). More specifically, the case of inertial energy harvesting is considered, in the sense that the kinetic energy due to environmental vibration is transformed into electrical energy by means of piezoelectric transduction. The execution of numerical analyses is greatly important in order to predict the actual behaviour of MEMS devices and to carry out the optimization process. In the common practice, the results are obtained by means of burdensome 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA). The case of beams could be treated by applying 1D models, which can enormously reduce the computational burden with obvious benefits in the case of repeated analyses. Unfortunately, the presence of piezoelectric coupling may entail some serious issues in view of its intrinsically three-dimensional behaviour. In this paper, a refined, yet simple, model is proposed with the objective of retaining the Euler-Bernoulli beam model, with the inclusion of effects connected to the actual three-dimensional shape of the device. The proposed model is adopted to evaluate the performances of realistic harvesters, both in the case of harmonic excitation and for impulsive loads.

  13. Air curtain development: an energy harvesting solution for hinged doors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Vineed; Lee, Soobum

    2017-04-01

    The paper proposes a fully mechanical air curtain system that will be powered solely by harvested energy from common hinged doors. The average person uses this type of door several times a day with an almost unconscious amount of applied force and effort. This leads to a high potential of energy to be harvested in doorways that see high traffic and frequent operation7 . Frequently opened door entry ways have always been regarded as a major element that causes significant energy loss and contaminated air conditions in buildings6 . Private companies, particularly those with warehouses, have introduced commercial electrical air curtains to block the open entrances from invading cold air11. This project intends to introduce an original design of air curtain which operates fans only when the door opens and closes, by directly converting door motion to fan rotation without any electronic motor or power cable. The air stream created by this device will prevent the transfer of outside air and contaminants. Research will be conducted to determine the most efficient method of harvesting energy from door use, and the prototyping process will be conducted to meet the required performance of current air curtain models.

  14. A rotary electromagnetic microgenerator for energy harvesting from human motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Niroomand

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a rotary electromagnetic microgenerator is analyzed, designed and built. This microgenerator can convert human motions to electrical energy. The small size and use of a pendulum mechanism without gear are two main characteristics of the designed microgenerator. The generator can detect small vibrations and produce electrical energy. The performance of this microgenerator is evaluated by being installed peak-to-peak during normal walking. Also, the maximum harvested electrical energy during normal walking is around 416.6 μW. This power is sufficient for many applications.

  15. A Metamaterial-Inspired Approach to RF Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Clayton; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an RF energy harvesting rectenna design based on a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA). With the embedded Schottky diodes, the rectenna converts captured RF energy to DC currents. The Fabry-Perot cavity resonance of the MPA greatly improves the amount of energy captured and hence improves the rectification efficiency. Furthermore, the FP resonance exhibits a high Q-factor and significantly increases the voltage across the Schottky diodes. This leads to a factor of 16 improvement of RF-DC conversion efficiency at ambient intensity level.

  16. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  17. Broadband Energy Harvester Using Non-linear Polymer Spring and Electromagnetic/Triboelectric Hybrid Mechanism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rahul Kumar Gupta; Qiongfeng Shi; Lokesh Dhakar; Tao Wang; Chun Huat Heng; Chengkuo Lee

    2017-01-01

    .... In this work, we investigate a broadband energy harvester based on combination of non-linear stiffening effect and multimodal energy harvesting to obtain high bandwidth over wide range of accelerations (0.1 g-2.0 g...

  18. Effectiveness Testing of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvester for an Automobile Wheel Using Stochastic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Yunshun; Zheng, Rencheng; Shimono, Keisuke; Kaizuka, Tsutomu; Nakano, Kimihiko

    2016-01-01

    .... For the case of wheel rotation, the present study investigates the effectiveness of a piezoelectric energy harvester, with the application of stochastic resonance to optimize the efficiency of energy harvesting...

  19. Utilization of solar energy in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Whillier, A

    1953-04-01

    Full Text Available -plate solar energy collectors. A brief description of solar collectors and discussion of some of the fundamental aspects of solar energy utilization are included. An example is given to show the design curves may be used to determine the surface area of a...

  20. Incorporating Multiple Energy Relay Dyes in Liquid Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yum, Jun-Ho

    2011-01-05

    Panchromatic response is essential to increase the light-harvesting efficiency in solar conversion systems. Herein we show increased light harvesting from using multiple energy relay dyes inside dye-sensitized solar cells. Additional photoresponse from 400-590 nm matching the optical window of the zinc phthalocyanine sensitizer was observed due to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the two energy relay dyes to the sensitizing dye. The complementary absorption spectra of the energy relay dyes and high excitation transfer efficiencies result in a 35% increase in photovoltaic performance. © 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA.

  1. Piezoelectric energy harvester having planform-tapered interdigitated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Rick A [Tijeras, NM; Sumali, Hartono [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-24

    Embodiments of energy harvesters have a plurality of piezoelectric planform-tapered, interdigitated cantilevered beams anchored to a common frame. The plurality of beams can be arranged as two or more sets of beams with each set sharing a common sense mass affixed to their free ends. Each set thus defined being capable of motion independent of any other set of beams. Each beam can comprise a unimorph or bimorph piezoelectric configuration bonded to a conductive or non-conductive supporting layer and provided with electrical contacts to the active piezoelectric elements for collecting strain induced charge (i.e. energy). The beams are planform tapered along the entirety or a portion of their length thereby increasing the effective stress level and power output of each piezoelectric element, and are interdigitated by sets to increase the power output per unit volume of a harvester thus produced.

  2. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for earth science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    A teaching manual is provided to aid teachers in introducing renewable energy topics to earth science students. The main emphasis is placed on solar energy. Activities for the student include a study of the greenhouse effect, solar gain for home heating, measuring solar radiation, and the construction of a model solar still to obtain fresh water. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate a solar still, the greenhouse effect and measurement of the altitude and azimuth of the sun are included. (BCS)

  3. Solar energy in food processing-a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswara, Amruta R; Ramakrishnarao, M

    2013-04-01

    Increasing population and high cost of fuels have created opportunities for using alternate energies for post-harvest processing of foods. Solar food processing is an emerging technology that provides good quality foods at low or no additional fuel costs. A number of solar dryers, collectors and concentrators are currently being used for various steps in food processing and value addition. Society for Energy, Environment and Development (SEED) developed Solar Cabinet Dryer with forced circulation which has been used for dehydration and development of value added products from locally grown fruits, vegetables, leafy greens and forest produce. Drying under simulated shade conditions using UV-reducing Blue filter helps retain nutrients better. Its simple design and ease of handling makes SEED Solar Dryer an ideal choice for application of food processing in rural settings, closer to where the harvest is produced, eliminating the need for expensive transportation or storage of fresh produce. It also creates employment opportunities among the rural population, especially women. Other gadgets based on solar collectors and concentrators currently being used at various steps of food processing are reviewed.

  4. A volatile fluid assisted thermo-pneumatic liquid metal energy harvester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jianbo, E-mail: zhouyuan@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: jianbotang@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Junjie; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouyuan@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: jianbotang@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-11

    A close-cycle self-driving thermal energy harvester using liquid metal as energy carrier fluid has been proposed. The driving force that pushes the liquid metal against flow resistance and gravity is provided by a resistively heated volatile fluid based on thermo-pneumatic principle. The tested harvester prototype demonstrated its capability to extract thermal energy between small temperature gradient, at a scale of 10 °C. During a 5-h operation, it further demonstrated robust liquid metal recirculating performance at a time-average volume flow rate of 14 ml/min with a 12.25 W heating load. The prototype also managed to self-adjust to variable working conditions which indicated the reliability of this method. Advantages of this method include simple-structural design, rigid-motion free operation, and low-temperature actuation. These advantages make it uniquely suited for solar energy and low-grade heat harvesting, high heat flux electronics cooling, as well as autonomous machines actuating.

  5. Energy Conversion: Nano Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Muhammad; Yap, Chi Chin; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2009-09-01

    Problems of fossil-fuel-induced climate change have sparked a demand for sustainable energy supply for all sectors of economy. Most laboratories continue to search for new materials and new technique to generate clean energy at affordable cost. Nanotechnology can play a major role in solving the energy problem. The prospect for solar energy using Si-based technology is not encouraging. Si photovoltaics can produce electricity at 20-30 c//kWhr with about 25% efficiency. Nanoparticles have a strong capacity to absorb light and generate more electrons for current as discovered in the recent work of organic and dye-sensitized cell. Using cheap preparation technique such as screen-printing and self-assembly growth, organic cells shows a strong potential for commercialization. Thin Films research group at National University Malaysia has been actively involved in these areas, and in this seminar, we will present a review works on nanomaterials for solar cells and particularly on hybrid organic solar cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays. The organic layer consisting of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEHPPV) and [6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid 3-ethylthiophene ester (PCBE) was spin-coated on ZnO nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on FTO glass substrates which were pre-coated with ZnO nanoparticles using a low temperature chemical solution method. A gold electrode was used as the top contact. The device gave a short circuit current density of 2.49×10-4 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.45 V under illumination of a projector halogen light at 100 mW/cm2.

  6. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Huidong Li; Chuan Tian; Jun Lu; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Zhiqun Daniel Deng

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry is the primary method to actively track aquatic animals for behavioral studies. However, the small storage capacities of the batteries used in the transmitters limit the time that the implanted animals can be studied. In this research, we developed and implemented a battery-free acoustic transmitter that uses a flexible piezoelectric beam to harvest energy from fish swimming as the power source. The transmitter sends out a unique identification code with a sufficiently stro...

  7. PDMS/PVA composite ferroelectret for improved energy harvesting performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J.; Luo, Z.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    This paper address the PDMS ferroelectret discharge issue for improved long- term energy harvesting performance. The PDMS/PVA ferroelectret is fabricated using a 3D-printed plastic mould technology and a functional PVA composite layer is introduced. The PDMS/PVA composite ferroelectret achieved 80% piezoelectric coefficient d33 remaining, compared with 40% without the proposed layer over 72 hours. Further, the retained percentage of output voltage is about 73% over 72 hours.

  8. Modeling a Linear Generator for Energy Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    sensors where electrical power is not available (e.g., wireless sensors on train cars ). While piezoelectric harvesters are primarily utilized in...synchronous permanent magnet linear generator with a non-sinusoidal back electromotive force ( EMF ) but could easily be adapted to fit any number of...poles or any back EMF waveform. The emerging technologies related to linear generators such as wave energy converters and free-piston engines are

  9. Energy Guiding and Harvesting through Phonon-Engineered Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Graphene The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the...ABSTRACT Final Report: Energy Guiding and Harvesting through Phonon-Engineered Graphene Report Title The work performed under this proposal was primarily...Justin Wu, Xinran Wang, Kristof Tahy, Debdeep Jena, Hongjie Dai, Eric Pop. Thermally Limited Current Carrying Ability of Graphene Nanoribbons

  10. Toward Wearable Self-Charging Power Systems: The Integration of Energy-Harvesting and Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiong; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2018-01-01

    One major challenge for wearable electronics is that the state-of-the-art batteries are inadequate to provide sufficient energy for long-term operations, leading to inconvenient battery replacement or frequent recharging. Other than the pursuit of high energy density of secondary batteries, an alternative approach recently drawing intensive attention from the research community, is to integrate energy-generation and energy-storage devices into self-charging power systems (SCPSs), so that the scavenged energy can be simultaneously stored for sustainable power supply. This paper reviews recent developments in SCPSs with the integration of various energy-harvesting devices (including piezoelectric nanogenerators, triboelectric nanogenerators, solar cells, and thermoelectric nanogenerators) and energy-storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors. SCPSs with multiple energy-harvesting devices are also included. Emphasis is placed on integrated flexible or wearable SCPSs. Remaining challenges and perspectives are also examined to suggest how to bring the appealing SCPSs into practical applications in the near future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Corrugated Textile based Triboelectric Generator for Wearable Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, A. Young; Lee, Chang Jun; Park, Jiwon; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Youn Tae

    2017-03-01

    Triboelectric energy harvesting has been applied to various fields, from large-scale power generation to small electronics. Triboelectric energy is generated when certain materials come into frictional contact, e.g., static electricity from rubbing a shoe on a carpet. In particular, textile-based triboelectric energy-harvesting technologies are one of the most promising approaches because they are not only flexible, light, and comfortable but also wearable. Most previous textile-based triboelectric generators (TEGs) generate energy by vertically pressing and rubbing something. However, we propose a corrugated textile-based triboelectric generator (CT-TEG) that can generate energy by stretching. Moreover, the CT-TEG is sewn into a corrugated structure that contains an effective air gap without additional spacers. The resulting CT-TEG can generate considerable energy from various deformations, not only by pressing and rubbing but also by stretching. The maximum output performances of the CT-TEG can reach up to 28.13 V and 2.71 μA with stretching and releasing motions. Additionally, we demonstrate the generation of sufficient energy from various activities of a human body to power about 54 LEDs. These results demonstrate the potential application of CT-TEGs for self-powered systems.

  12. Temperature compensation in piezoelectric energy harvesters using shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhimi, Mohamed; Lajnef, Nizar

    2011-04-01

    Harvested vibration energy is typically considered as an alternative power source for sensors' networks for health and usage monitoring in civil and mechanical structures. The longevity, and hence the efficacy, of these sensors is severely limited by the levels of generated power. Piezoelectric vibration harvesters have been widely used given their energy conversion ability and relatively high mechanical to electrical coupling properties. Several techniques can be applied to improve these properties and to cancel external environmental effects such as temperature variations. In this paper, the temperature compensation of the response characteristics of a bimorph cantilever Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric beam, through a combination with shape memory alloys, is studied. A mathematical model, based on onedimensional linear piezoelectricity equations and one dimensional constitutive behavior of shape memory alloys, is derived. The model describes the effect of temperature deviations on the theoretical harvestable energy levels as well as the compensation methodology. Proof of concept experimental results are also presented. The voltage response transfer functions are measured at different temperatures to show the induced effect by shape memory alloys.

  13. Energy harvesting from vibration with cross-linked polypropylene piezoelectrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology & School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Merckstrasse 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Wu, Liming [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology & School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Sessler, Gerhard M., E-mail: g.sessler@nt.tu-darmstadt.de [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Merckstrasse 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectret films are prepared by modification of the microstructure of polypropylene foam sheets cross-linked by electronic irradiation (IXPP), followed by proper corona charging. Young’s modulus, relative permittivity, and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the fabricated films, determined by dielectric resonance spectra, are about 0.7 MPa, 1.6, and 0.08, respectively. Dynamic piezoelectric d{sub 33} coefficients up to 650 pC/N at 200 Hz are achieved. The figure of merit (FOM, d{sub 33} ⋅ g{sub 33}) for a more typical d{sub 33} value of 400 pC/N is about 11.2 GPa{sup −1}. Vibration-based energy harvesting with one-layer and two-layer stacks of these films is investigated at various frequencies and load resistances. At an optimum load resistance of 9 MΩ and a resonance frequency of 800 Hz, a maximum output power of 120 μW, referred to the acceleration g due to gravity, is obtained for an energy harvester consisting of a one-layer IXPP film with an area of 3.14 cm{sup 2} and a seismic mass of 33.7 g. The output power can be further improved by using two-layer stacks of IXPP films in electric series. IXPP energy harvesters could be used to energize low-power electronic devices, such as wireless sensors and LED lights.

  14. Energy harvesting from vibration with cross-linked polypropylene piezoelectrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectret films are prepared by modification of the microstructure of polypropylene foam sheets cross-linked by electronic irradiation (IXPP, followed by proper corona charging. Young’s modulus, relative permittivity, and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the fabricated films, determined by dielectric resonance spectra, are about 0.7 MPa, 1.6, and 0.08, respectively. Dynamic piezoelectric d33 coefficients up to 650 pC/N at 200 Hz are achieved. The figure of merit (FOM, d33 ⋅ g33 for a more typical d33 value of 400 pC/N is about 11.2 GPa−1. Vibration-based energy harvesting with one-layer and two-layer stacks of these films is investigated at various frequencies and load resistances. At an optimum load resistance of 9 MΩ and a resonance frequency of 800 Hz, a maximum output power of 120 μW, referred to the acceleration g due to gravity, is obtained for an energy harvester consisting of a one-layer IXPP film with an area of 3.14 cm2 and a seismic mass of 33.7 g. The output power can be further improved by using two-layer stacks of IXPP films in electric series. IXPP energy harvesters could be used to energize low-power electronic devices, such as wireless sensors and LED lights.

  15. Chaotic control of a piezomagnetoelastic beam for improved energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiyer, Daniel; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2015-04-01

    Linear cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters do not typically operate efficiently through a large span of excitation frequencies. Beam theory dictates optimum displacement at resonance excitation; however, typical environments evolve and vary over time with no clear dominant frequency. Nonlinear, non-resonant harvesting techniques have been implemented, but none so far have embraced chaotic behavior as a desirable property of the system. This work aims to benefit from chaotic phenomena by stabilizing high energy periodic orbits located within a chaotic attractor to improve operating bandwidth. Delay coordinate embedding is used to reconstruct the system states from a single time series measurement of displacement. Orbit selection, local linearization, and control perturbation are all computed from the single time series independent of an explicit system model. Although chaos in non-autonomous systems is typically associated with harmonic inputs, chaotic attractor motion can also exist throughout other excitation sources. Accelerometer data from inside a commercial vehicle and a stochastic excitation signal are used to illustrate the existence of chaos in dynamic environments, allowing such environments to be likely candidates for the proposed bandwidth improving energy harvesting technique.

  16. Human Motion Energy Harvester for Biometric Data Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, D.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present an energy autonomous sensor system fully integrated into the heel of a shoe for biometric data monitoring. For powering the wireless sensor system a pulse-driven energy harvester was developed, which uses the acceleration-impulses from heel-strike during walking. In preparation of the device development acceleration measurements were carried out. The pulse-driven energy harvester is based on the electromagnetic conversion principle and incorporates a 4×4 coil matrix. A beam fixed at both ends is used for suspending the magnetic circuit. The geometric parameters of coil and magnetic circuit were optimized for maximum power output. For an idealized acceleration pulse with a width of 5 ms and a height of 200 m/s2 an average power output of 0.7 mW was generated using a step frequency of 1 Hz. The functionality of the self-sustained sensor system is demonstrated by measuring the temperature and step-frequency of a walking person and transmitting the data to a base station. We also found that the implementation of the suspension can have a significant impact on the harvester performance reducing the power output.

  17. A novel inertial energy harvester using magnetic shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin; Sayyaadi, Hassan; Zakerzadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the output voltage from a novel inertial energy harvester using magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). The MSMA elements are attached to the root of a cantilever beam by means of two steps. In order to get electrical voltage, two coils are wound around the MSMAs and a shock load is applied to a tip mass at the end of the beam to have vibration in it. The beam vibration causes strain in the MSMAs along their longitudinal directions and as a result the magnetic flux alters in the coils. The change of magnetic flux in the surrounding coil produces an AC voltage. In order to predict the output voltage, the nonlinear governing equations of beam motion based on Euler-Bernoulli model and von Kármán theory are derived. A thermodynamics-based constitutive model is used to predict the nonlinear strain and magnetization response of the MSMAs. Also, the induced voltage during martensite variant reorientation in MSMAs is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of induction. Finally, the effect of different parameters including bias magnetic field, pre-strain and number of MSMA elements are investigated in details. The results show that this novel energy harvester has the capability of using as an alternative to the current piezoelectric and magnetostrictive ones for harvesting energy from ambient vibration.

  18. Fiber-shaped energy harvesting and storage devices

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Huisheng

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book covers flexible fiber-shaped devices in the area of energy conversion and storage. The first part of the book introduces recently developed materials, particularly, various nanomaterials and composite materials based on nanostructured carbon such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, metals and polymers for the construction of fiber electrodes. The second part of the book focuses on two typical twisted and coaxial architectures of fiber-shaped devices for energy conversion and storage. The emphasis is placed on dye-sensitized solar cells, polymer solar cells, lithium-ion b

  19. Acrylic interpenetrating polymer network dielectric elastomers for energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Paul; Niu, Xiaofan; Pei, Qibing

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer energy harvesters are an emerging technology that promise high power density, low cost, scalability, and the capability of fitting niche markets that have yet to be exploited. To date, materials issues that limit their overall performance have hampered the full potential of these devices. In order to supplant existing technologies, even in niche markets, dielectric elastomer generators must increase their reliability and energy density. Previous work has indicated that stiffer elastomers should be capable of higher energy densities; the increased stiffness of the elastomer films should results in lower Maxwell pressure induced strains, and thus allow the elastomer to relax further, resulting in a larger swing in capacitance and larger energy gains. In this paper we examine the use of VHB-based acrylic interpenetrating polymer network dielectric elastomers with a trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate additive network for energy harvesting purposes. We test films with varying additive content and compare their performance with highly prestrained VHB acrylic elastomers. We show that by increasing additive content, Maxwell induced strains can be suppressed and larger energy gains can be achieved at higher bias fields. Moreover, the introduction of the additive network stabilizes the highly prestrained acrylic elastomers mechanically, thereby increasing their mechanical robustness. However, the interpenetrating polymer network films suffer from an increase in viscoelastic behavior that hinders their overall performance.

  20. A broadband quad-stable energy harvester and its advantages over bi-stable harvester: Simulation and experiment verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Qin, Weiyang; Zhu, Pei

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel quad-stable energy harvester (QEH) to harvest vibration energy. The QEH is composed of a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam with a tip magnet and three external fixed magnets. The potential energy of the QEH is derived, which has four potential wells and three low barriers. This implies that the QEH needs relatively lower excitation energy to cross the barriers than the bi-stable energy harvester (BEH). Simulations are carried out for the BEH and QEH at different levels of excitations. Results show that the QEH owns a smaller threshold and a wider range of frequencies for occurrence of snap-through than the BEH. Thus the QEH can give out a large output voltage. Corresponding experiments were performed for validation. The experimental results are in agreement with the simulations, which means that the QEH can improve the harvesting efficiency considerably.

  1. Improving Air Quality with Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    This fact sheet series highlights how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can and are being used to reduce air emissions and meet environmental goals, showcasing case studies and technology-specific topics. This one focus on solar energy technologies.

  2. Simulation of Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Based on the Vortex Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Wang, Haifeng; Cui, Yiliang; Sun, Kaili

    2017-10-01

    In this article, numerical research on the fluid-structure interaction between the flexible piezoelectric energy harvester (FPEH) and the Von Karman vortex street forming behind a bluff body is carried out to optimize the oscillation of FPEH to obtain more electrical energy. Using ANSYS Workbench platform, the simulation is performed. The numerical results show that the maximal deformation of the PEH is 1.7428 mm, meanwhile the maximal voltage is 4.6144 V. Besides, these numerical results generated by the ANSYS simulation are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. A Monolithic Oxide-Based Transversal Thermoelectric Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, S.; Bochmann, A.; Reimann, T.; Schulz, T.; Dreßler, C.; Udich, S.; Töpfer, J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication and properties of a monolithic transversal thermoelectric energy harvester based on the combination of a thermoelectric oxide and a metal. The fabrication of the device is done with a ceramic multilayer technology using printing and co-firing processes. Five transversal devices were combined to a meander-like thermoelectric generator. Electrical measurements and finite element calculations were performed to characterize the resulting thermoelectric generator. A maximum experimental electrical power output of 30.2 mW at a temperature difference of {Δ }T = 208 K was found. The prepared monolithic thermoelectric generator provides at {Δ }T = 35 K sufficient energy to drive a simple electronic sensor application.

  4. Piezoelectric ZnO nanostructure for energy harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Leprince-Wang, Yamin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, ZnO as an important II-VI semiconductor has attracted much attention within the scientific community over the world owing to its numerous unique and prosperous properties. This material, considered as a "future material", especially in nanostructural format, has aroused many interesting research works due to its large range of applications in electronics, photonics, acoustics, energy and sensing. The bio-compatibility, piezoelectricity & low cost fabrication make ZnO nanostructure a very promising material for energy harvesting.

  5. Portable triboelectric based wind energy harvester for low power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Puneet; Vaish, Rahul

    2017-06-01

    This article presents conversion of rotational motion into electrical energy using triboelectricity. For this purpose, aluminium and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) films are selected for generating charges during rotational motion. Energy density and power are computed by optimizing various resistors and capacitors. The maximum energy density is found to be 2560 μJ/cm3 across 33 μF. The maximum power is found to be 6.5 μW across 1 MΩ resistor after 400 s. With the availability of such commercially available materials, it is possible to generate a lot of energy, which depends on the size of the system and type of materials. Such portable systems can be used for harvesting wind energy for low power electronic devices.

  6. Array of piezoelectric wires in acoustic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanyan, Edvin

    An acoustic energy harvesting mechanism to harvest a travelling sound wave at a low audible frequency (180 ˜ 200Hz) is further developed and studied both experimentally and numerically. The acoustic energy harvester in this study consists of a quarter-wavelength straight tube resonator and multiple piezoelectric oscillators in wire and plate shapes placed inside the tube. When the tube resonator is excited by an incident sound at its acoustic resonant frequency, the amplified acoustic pressure inside the tube drives the vibration motions of piezoelectric oscillators, resulting in generating electricity. It has been found that a single piezoelectric plate generates more power than a wire, but with placing in multiple-rows piezoelectric wires more power is produced. Parallel and series connections of multiple piezoelectric oscillators have also been studied and expressions for calculating optimum loading resistance have been presented. It has been found that the series connection generates more power than parallel connection. As the number of piezoelectric oscillators increases, the magnitude of the single loading resistance decreases. The decrease of loading resistance is more intense in multiple wires than in multiple plates and in parallel connection than in series connection.

  7. Barium Titanate Film Interfaces for Hybrid Composite Energy Harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowland, Christopher C; Malakooti, Mohammad H; Sodano, Henry A

    2017-02-01

    Energy harvesting utilizing piezoelectric materials has become an attractive approach for converting mechanical energy into electrical power for low-power electronics. Structural composites are ideally suited for energy scavenging due to the large amount of mechanical energy they are subjected to. Here, a multifunctional composite with embedded sensing and energy harvesting is developed by integrating an active interface into carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. By modifying the composite matrix, both rigid and flexible multifunctional composites are fabricated. Through electromechanical testing of a cantilever beam of the rigid composite, it reveals a power density of 217 pW/cc from only 1 g root-mean-square acceleration when excited at its resonant frequency of 47 Hz. Electromechanical sensor testing of the flexible multifunctional composite reveals an average voltage generation of 23.5 mV/g at its resonant frequency of 96 Hz. This research introduces a route for integrating nonstructural functionality into structural fiber composites by utilizing BaTiO3 coated woven carbon fiber fabrics with power scavenging and passive sensing capabilities.

  8. Hybrid energy harvesting systems, using piezoelectric elements and dielectric polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornogolub, Alexandru; Cottinet, Pierre-Jean; Petit, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Interest in energy harvesting applications has increased a lot during recent years. This is especially true for systems using electroactive materials like dielectric polymers or piezoelectric materials. Unfortunately, these materials despite multiple advantages, present some important drawbacks. For example, many dielectric polymers demonstrated high energy densities; they are cheap, easy to process and can be easily integrated in many different structures. But at the same time, dielectric polymer generators require an external energy supply which could greatly compromise their autonomy. Piezoelectric systems, on the other hand, are completely autonomous and can be easily miniaturized. However, most common piezoelectric materials present a high rigidity and are brittle by nature and therefore their integration could be difficult. This paper investigates the possibility of using hybrid systems combining piezoelectric elements and dielectric polymers for mechanical energy harvesting applications and it is focused mainly on the problem of electrical energy transfer. Our objective is to show that such systems can be interesting and that it is possible to benefit from the advantages of both materials. For this, different configurations were considered and the problem of their optimization was addressed. The experimental work enabled us to prove the concept and identify the main practical limitations.

  9. Energy harvesting performance of piezoelectric ceramic and polymer nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Sam; Kar-Narayan, Sohini

    2015-08-28

    Energy harvesting from ubiquitous ambient vibrations is attractive for autonomous small-power applications and thus considerable research is focused on piezoelectric materials as they permit direct inter-conversion of mechanical and electrical energy. Nanogenerators (NGs) based on piezoelectric nanowires are particularly attractive due to their sensitivity to small-scale vibrations and may possess superior mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency when compared to bulk or thin-film devices of the same material. However, candidate piezoelectric nanowires have hitherto been predominantly analyzed in terms of NG output (i.e. output voltage, output current and output power density). Surprisingly, the corresponding dynamical properties of the NG, including details of how the nanowires are mechanically driven and its impact on performance, have been largely neglected. Here we investigate all realizable NG driving contexts separately involving inertial displacement, applied stress T and applied strain S, highlighting the effect of driving mechanism and frequency on NG performance in each case. We argue that, in the majority of cases, the intrinsic high resonance frequencies of piezoelectric nanowires (∼tens of MHz) present no barrier to high levels of NG performance even at frequencies far below resonance (piezoelectric NG performance under strain-driven and stress-driven conditions respectively. These figures of merit permit, for the first time, a general comparison of piezoelectric nanowires for NG applications that takes into account the nature of the mechanical excitation. We thus investigate the energy harvesting performance of prototypical piezoelectric ceramic and polymer nanowires. We find that even though ceramic and polymer nanowires have been found, in certain cases, to have similar energy conversion efficiencies, ceramics are more promising in strain-driven NGs while polymers are more promising for stress-driven NGs. Our work offers a viable means of

  10. Graphene rectenna for efficient energy harvesting at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, Mircea; Aldrigo, Martino

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a graphene rectenna that encompasses two distinct functions in a single device, namely, antenna and rectifier, which till now were two separate components. In this way, the rectenna realizes an efficient energy harvesting technique due to the absence of impedance mismatch between antenna and diode. In particular, we have obtained a maximum conversion efficiency of 58.43% at 897 GHz for the graphene rectenna on n-doped GaAs, which is a very good value, close to the performance of an RF harvesting system. A comparison with a classical metallic antenna with an HfO2-based metal-insulator-metal diode is also provided.

  11. Micro rectennas: Brownian ratchets for thermal-energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Y.; Powell, C. V.; Balocco, C., E-mail: claudio.balocco@durham.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Song, A. M. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-22

    We experimentally demonstrated the operation of a rectenna for harvesting thermal (blackbody) radiation and converting it into dc electric power. The device integrates an ultrafast rectifier, the self-switching nanodiode, with a wideband log-periodic spiral microantenna. The radiation from the thermal source drives the rectenna out of thermal equilibrium, permitting the rectification of the excess thermal fluctuations from the antenna. The power conversion efficiency increases with the source temperatures up to 0.02% at 973 K. The low efficiency is attributed mainly to the impedance mismatch between antenna and rectifier, and partially to the large field of view of the antenna. Our device not only opens a potential solution for harvesting thermal energy but also provides a platform for experimenting with Brownian ratchets.

  12. Micro rectennas: Brownian ratchets for thermal-energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Powell, C. V.; Song, A. M.; Balocco, C.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrated the operation of a rectenna for harvesting thermal (blackbody) radiation and converting it into dc electric power. The device integrates an ultrafast rectifier, the self-switching nanodiode, with a wideband log-periodic spiral microantenna. The radiation from the thermal source drives the rectenna out of thermal equilibrium, permitting the rectification of the excess thermal fluctuations from the antenna. The power conversion efficiency increases with the source temperatures up to 0.02% at 973 K. The low efficiency is attributed mainly to the impedance mismatch between antenna and rectifier, and partially to the large field of view of the antenna. Our device not only opens a potential solution for harvesting thermal energy but also provides a platform for experimenting with Brownian ratchets.

  13. An estimate of spherical impactor energy transfer for mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Corr

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vibration energy harvesters, which use the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, utilize an impactor, which gains kinetic energy from low frequency ambient environmental vibrations, to excite high frequency systems that efficiently convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. To take full advantage of the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, it is prudent to understand the energy transfer from the low frequency excitations, to the impactor, and finally to the high frequency systems. In this work, the energy transfer from a spherical impactor to a multi degree of freedom spring / mass system, due to Hertzian impact, is investigated to gain insight on how best to design impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters. Through this academic work, it is shown that the properties of the contact (or impact area, i.e., radius of curvature and material properties, only play a minor role in energy transfer and that the equivalent mass of the target system (i.e., the spring / mass system dictates the total amount of energy transferred during the impact. The novel approach of utilizing the well-known Hertzian impact methodology to gain an understanding of impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters has made it clear that the impactor and the high frequency energy generating systems must be designed together as one system to ensure maximum energy transfer, leading to efficient ambient vibration energy harvesters.

  14. Teaching Children to Value Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Saker, Salem; Odeh, Saeed; Agbaria, Adnan

    2011-01-01

    In this educational initiative, we suggest to build a real model of solar village inside the school, which uses only solar energy. These educational initiatives emphasize the importance of energy for a technological society and the advantage of alternative energy sources. In this scientific educational initiative, the pupils in three elementary…

  15. Combined solar collector and energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A combined solar energy collector, fluid chiller and energy storage system is disclosed. A movable interior insulated panel in a storage tank is positionable flush against the storage tank wall to insulate the tank for energy storage. The movable interior insulated panel is alternately positionable to form a solar collector or fluid chiller through which the fluid flows by natural circulation.

  16. The thermodynamic solar energy; Le solaire thermodynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivoire, B. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS-IMP), 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2002-04-01

    The thermodynamic solar energy is the technic in the whole aiming to transform the solar radiation energy in high temperature heat and then in mechanical energy by a thermodynamic cycle. These technic are most often at an experimental scale. This paper describes and analyzes the research programs developed in the advanced countries, since 1980. (A.L.B.)

  17. On the Energy Conversion Efficiency of Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvesting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Eun [Catholic University of Daegu, Kyungsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To properly design and assess a piezoelectric vibration energy harvester, it is necessary to consider the application of an efficiency measure of energy conversion. The energy conversion efficiency is defined in this work as the ratio of the electrical output power to the mechanical input power for a piezoelectric vibration energy harvester with an impedance-matched load resistor. While previous research works employed the electrical output power for approximate impedance-matched load resistance, this work derives an efficiency measure considering optimally matched resistance. The modified efficiency measure is validated by comparing it with finite element analysis results for piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters with three different values of the electro-mechanical coupling coefficient. New findings on the characteristics of energy conversion and conversion efficiency are also provided for the two different impedance matching methods.

  18. Energy harvesting and wireless energy transmission for powering SHM sensor nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a feasibility study of using energy harvesting and wireless energy transmission systems to operate SHM sensor nodes. The energy harvesting approach examines the use of kinetic energy harvesters to scavenge energy from the ambient sources. Acceleration measurements were made on a bridge, and serve as the basis for a series of laboratory experiments that replicate these sources using an electromagnetic shaker. We also investigated the use of wireless energy transmission systems to operate SHM sensor nodes. The goal of this investigation is to develop SHM sensing systems which can be permanently embedded in the host structure and do not require on-board power sources. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such systems, experimental procedures and results, and additional issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  19. Energy neutral protocol based on hierarchical routing techniques for energy harvesting wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Umar B.; Ezugwu, Absalom E.; Ofem, Paulinus O.; Rajamäki, Jyri; Aderemi, Adewumi O.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, researchers in the field of wireless sensor networks have resorted to energy harvesting techniques that allows energy to be harvested from the ambient environment to power sensor nodes. Using such Energy harvesting techniques together with proper routing protocols, an Energy Neutral state can be achieved so that sensor nodes can run perpetually. In this paper, we propose an Energy Neutral LEACH routing protocol which is an extension to the traditional LEACH protocol. The goal of the proposed protocol is to use Gateway node in each cluster so as to reduce the data transmission ranges of cluster head nodes. Simulation results show that the proposed routing protocol achieves a higher throughput and ensure the energy neutral status of the entire network.

  20. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.