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Sample records for soil ilmenite combining

  1. Experimental Investigation of Space Radiation Processing in Lunar Soil Ilmenite: Combining Perspectives from Surface Science and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions mostly from the solar wind play a major role in lunar space weathering because they contribute structural and chemical changes to the space-exposed surfaces of lunar regolith grains. In mature mare soils, ilmenite (FeTiO3) grains in the finest size fraction have been shown in transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies to exhibit key differences in their response to space radiation processing relative to silicates [1,2,3]. In ilmenite, solar ion radiation alters host grain outer margins to produce 10-100 nm thick layers that are microstructurally complex, but dominantly crystalline compared to the amorphous radiation-processed rims on silicates [1,2,3]. Spatially well-resolved analytical TEM measurements also show nm-scale compositional and chemical state changes in these layers [1,3]. These include shifts in Fe/Ti ratio from strong surface Fe-enrichment (Fe/Ti >> 1), to Fe depletion (Fe/Ti < 1) at 40-50 nm below the grain surface [1,3]. These compositional changes are not observed in the radiation-processed rims on silicates [4]. Several mechanism(s) to explain the overall relations in the ilmenite grain rims by radiation processing and/or additional space weathering processes were proposed by [1], and remain under current consideration [3]. A key issue has concerned the ability of ion radiation processing alone to produce some of the deeper- penetrating compositional changes. In order to provide some experimental constraints on these questions, we have performed a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field-emission scanning transmission electron (FE-STEM) study of experimentally ion-irradiated ilmenite. A key feature of this work is the combination of analytical techniques sensitive to changes in the irradiated samples at depth scales going from the immediate surface (approx.5 nm; XPS), to deeper in the grain interior (5-100 nm; FE-STEM).

  2. Microstructure, Chemistry, and Origin of Grain Rims on ilmenite from the Lunar Soil Finest Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Roy; Keller, Lindsay P.; McKay, David S.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations reveal that ilmenite grains sampled from the sub-10 micron size fraction of Apollo 11 (10084) and Apollo 16 (61221, 67701) soils have rims 10-300 nm thick that are chemically and microstructurally distinct from the host ilmenite. The rims have a thin outer sublayer 10-50 nm thick that contains the ilmenite-incompatible elements Si, Al, Ca and S. This overlies a relatively thicker (50-250 nm) inner sublayer of nanocrystalline Ti-oxide precipitates in a matrix of single-crystal ilmenite that is structurally continuous with the underlying host grain. Microstructural information, as well as data from x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) analysis of the inner sublayer, suggest that both the inner and outer sublayer assemblages are reduced and that the inner layer is depleted in Fe relative to the underlying ilmenite. The chemistry of the outer sublayer suggests that it is a surface deposit of sputtered or impact-vaporized components from the bulk lunar soil. The inner sublayer is part of the original host grain that has been physically and chemically processed, but not amorphized, by solar ion irradiation and possibly some subsolidus heating. The fact that the deposited outer sublayer is consistently much thinner than the radiation-altered inner sublayer indicates that only a minor fraction of the total rim volume is a product of vapor or sputter deposition. This finding is in contrast to recent descriptions of thick deposited layers on one-third of regolith silicate grains and indicates that ilmenite and silicate rims as a group are different in the fraction of deposited material that they contain.

  3. Combination of soil classification and some selected soil properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The advantage in the combined use of soil classification and top soil analysis for explaining crop yield variation was examined. Soil properties and yields of maize (Zea mays L) on different soil types were measured on farmers' fields for 2 years. Yield prediction improved from 2 per cent at the Order and Association levels to ...

  4. Thermogravimetry studies on ilmenite nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on the possibility of beneficiation of Indian-ilmenite by carbonitrothermic process. The investigations were carried out in two parts. In the first part, thermogravimetric-differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG experiments were conducted using cold pressed pellets of blended mixtures TiO2-C and FeTiO3-C. The TG experiments were carried out up to 1500 °C at the rate of 10 °C/min under flowing nitrogen gas. The formations of TiN in case of TiO2-C mixture and TiN along with Fe in case of FeTiO3-C mixture were observed. In the second part, the experiments were conducted using similar pellets, prepared under identical conditions, in a resistance heating furnace at 1500 °C. By simple operations of crushing and sieving, the products obtained from the ilmenite-carbon mixture were separated into a fraction enriched in titanium and a fraction depleted in titanium.

  5. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  6. Magnetization of exsolution intergrowths of hematite and ilmenite: Mineral chemistry, phase relations, and magnetic properties of hemo-ilmenite ores with micron- to nanometer-scale lamellae from Allard Lake, Quebec

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEnroe, S.A.; Robinson, P.; Langenhorst, F.

    2007-01-01

    . To understand the magnetism and evolution of the exsolution lamellae, the microstructures and nanostructures were studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), phase chemistry, and relations between mineral chemistry and the hematite-ilmenite phase diagram. Cycles...... of exsolution during slow cooling resulted in lamellae down to 1 -2 nm thick. Combined electron microprobe, TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that hematite hosts reached a composition approximately ilmenite (Ilm) 14.4, and ilmenite hosts similar to Ilm 98. The bulk of the very stable NRM, which...... shows thermal unblocking similar to 595 -620 degrees C, was acquired during final exsolution in the two-phase region canted antiferromagnetic R(3) over bar c hematite + R (3) over bar ilmenite. Hysteresis measurements show a very strong anisotropy, with a stronger coercivity normal to, than parallel to...

  7. Iron released from ilmenite mineral sustains a phytoplankton community in microcosms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, C.E.G.; Velip, D.; Mourya, B.S.; Shaikh, S.; Das, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    ilmenite had significantly higher phytoplankton growth compared with controls containing no ilmenite or those containing only ferrous sulfate. Phytoplankton cell numbers in the ilmenite-supplemented treatment were 20X higher than in controls. The later...

  8. Magnetic clusters in ilmenite-hematite solid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Burton, B. P.; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of high-field 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy to resolve the magnetic ordering of ilmenite-hematite [xFeTiO3−(1−x)Fe2O3] solid solutions with x>0.5. We find that nanometer-sized hematite clusters exist within an ilmenite-like matrix. Although both phases are antiferromagnetically...... ordered, the hematite clusters show ferrimagnetic behavior due to superexchange coupling with Fe2+ in ilmenite. For ilmenite-rich samples (x=0.95), the clusters are isolated and superparamagnetic. For more hematite-rich samples with x=0.80 and x=0.70, the clusters interact to form a cluster glass....

  9. Multiferroic properties of Indian natural ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Truptimayee; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2017-03-01

    In this communication, the main results and analysis of extensive studies of electric and magnetic characteristics (relative dielectric constant, tangent loss, electric polarization, electric transport, impedance, magnetic polarization and magneto-electric coupling coefficient) of Indian natural ilmenite (NI) have been presented. Preliminary structural analysis was studied by Rietveld refinement of room temperature XRD data, which suggests the rhombohedral crystal system of NI. Maxwell-Wagner mechanism was used to explain the nature of the frequency dependence of the relative dielectric constant. The impedance analysis reveals that below 270 °C, only the bulk contributes, whereas at higher temperature, both grain boundary and the bulk contribute to the resistive characteristics of the material. The magnitude of the depression angles of the semicircles in the Nyquist plot has been estimated. The correlated barrier hopping model has been used to explain the frequency dependence of ac conductivity of the material. The activation energy of the compound has been estimated using the temperature dependence of dc conductivity plot. The obtained polarization hysteresis loops manifest improper ferroelectric behavior of NI. The existence M-H hysteresis loop supports anti-ferromagnetism in the studied material. The magneto-electric voltage coupling coefficient is found to be 0.7 mV/cm Oe. Hence, other than dielectric constant, electric polarization, magnetization and magneto-electric studies support the existence of multiferroic properties in NI.

  10. Modelling trends in soil solution concentrations under five forest-soil combinations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.; Vries, de W.; Kros, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of forest and soil properties on changes in soil solution concentration upon a reduction deposition was examined for five forest-soil combinations with the dynamic RESAM model. Predicted concentrations decreased in the direction Douglas fir - Scotch pine - oak, due to decreased

  11. Understanding the combined effect of soil properties on gully ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is also known that various interactions between these properties exist, which creates the need for unique investigations into how soil properties influence soil ... Quantile regression showed that a combination of effective cation exchange capacity (CEC), total carbon, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) and free iron ...

  12. Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits - An ideal lunar resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, B. R.; Clark, B.; Coombs, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    With a view of investigating possible economic benefits that a permanent lunar settlement might provide to the near-earth space infrastructures, consideration was given to the ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits as sources of oxygen (for use as a propellant) and He-3 (for nuclear fusion fuel). This paper demonstrates that ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits would be excellent sources of a wide variety of valuable elements besides O and He-3, including Fe, Ti, H2, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb. It is shown that several ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent exist on the lunar surface. The suitability of regional pyroclastic deposits for lunar mining operations, construction activities, and the establishment of permanent lunar settlements is examined.

  13. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar, E-mail: srsivakumar@usm.my; Kwok, Teong Chen, E-mail: ctck@live.com; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul, E-mail: rezanshk@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2{sup k} factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiO{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  14. One atmosphere melting experiments on ilmenite basalt 12008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Lofgren, G. E.; Smith, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    An evaluation of a crystal-fractionation model for Apollo 12 ilmenite basalts with melting experiments under controlled oxygen fugacities is reported. The crystallization sequence including olivine, chromium spinel, and pigeonite phases was determined, showing that the changes in melt composition are dominated by olivine crystallization and the decrease in MgO with a corresponding increase in CaO, Al2O3, and TiO2. It is concluded that the bulk composition of the ilmenite basalts was established by crystallization of olivine and minor spinel prior to the onset of pyroxene and plagioclase.

  15. Characterization and photocatalytic activity of Barkin-Ladi ilmenite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photocatalysis is an advanced oxidation process that can be carried out at room temperature under atmospheric pressure using atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant and the sun as the source of energy. This work focuses on the composition and photocatalytic activity of the raw and calcined samples of ilmenite ore obtained ...

  16. Assessment of combined electro–nanoremediation of molinate contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Helena I., E-mail: hrg@campus.fct.unl.pt [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); CERNAS — Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society, Escola Superior Agraria de Coimbra, Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, Bencanta, 3045-601 Coimbra (Portugal); Fan, Guangping [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ISSCAS), East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Mateus, Eduardo P. [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Dias-Ferreira, Celia [CERNAS — Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society, Escola Superior Agraria de Coimbra, Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, Bencanta, 3045-601 Coimbra (Portugal); Ribeiro, Alexandra B. [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    Molinate is a pesticide widely used, both in space and time, for weed control in rice paddies. Due to its water solubility and affinity to organic matter, it is a contaminant of concern in ground and surface waters, soils and sediments. Previous works have showed that molinate can be removed from soils through electrokinetic (EK) remediation. In this work, molinate degradation by zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) was tested in soils for the first time. Soil is a highly complex matrix, and pollutant partitioning between soil and water and its degradation rates in different matrices is quite challenging. A system combining nZVI and EK was also set up in order to study the nanoparticles and molinate transport, as well as molinate degradation. Results showed that molinate could be degraded by nZVI in soils, even though the process is more time demanding and degradation percentages are lower than in an aqueous solution. This shows the importance of testing contaminant degradation, not only in aqueous solutions, but also in the soil-sorbed fraction. It was also found that soil type was the most significant factor influencing iron and molinate transport. The main advantage of the simultaneous use of both methods is the molinate degradation instead of its accumulation in the catholyte. - Highlights: • Molinate is degraded in soil by zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI). • Higher contact time of nZVI with soil facilitates molinate degradation. • Soil type was the most significant factor influencing iron and molinate transport. • When using nZVI and EK molinate is not only transported to catholyte, but also degraded.

  17. Assessment of combined electro-nanoremediation of molinate contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helena I; Fan, Guangping; Mateus, Eduardo P; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2014-09-15

    Molinate is a pesticide widely used, both in space and time, for weed control in rice paddies. Due to its water solubility and affinity to organic matter, it is a contaminant of concern in ground and surface waters, soils and sediments. Previous works have showed that molinate can be removed from soils through electrokinetic (EK) remediation. In this work, molinate degradation by zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) was tested in soils for the first time. Soil is a highly complex matrix, and pollutant partitioning between soil and water and its degradation rates in different matrices is quite challenging. A system combining nZVI and EK was also set up in order to study the nanoparticles and molinate transport, as well as molinate degradation. Results showed that molinate could be degraded by nZVI in soils, even though the process is more time demanding and degradation percentages are lower than in an aqueous solution. This shows the importance of testing contaminant degradation, not only in aqueous solutions, but also in the soil-sorbed fraction. It was also found that soil type was the most significant factor influencing iron and molinate transport. The main advantage of the simultaneous use of both methods is the molinate degradation instead of its accumulation in the catholyte. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helena I; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero valent iron particles in a two-compartment cell is tested and compared to a more conventional combination of electrokinetic remediation and nZVI in a three-compartment cell. In the new two-compartment cell, the soil is suspended and stirred simultaneously with the addition of zero valent iron nanoparticles. Remediation experiments are made with two different historically PCB contaminated soils, which differ in both soil composition and contamination source. Soil 1 is a mix of soils with spills of transformer oils, while Soil 2 is a superficial soil from a decommissioned school where PCB were used as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two-compartment and the three-compartment cell, respectively. The highest removal with Soil 2 were 58% and 45%, in the two-compartment and the three-compartment cell, respectively, in the experiments without direct current. The pH of the soil suspension in the two-compartment treatment appears to be a determining factor for the PCB dechlorination, and this cell allowed a uniform distribution of the nanoparticles in the soil, while there was iron accumulation in the injection reservoir in the three-compartment cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Tillage and Mulch Combination on Soil Physical Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tillage method and mulching on selected soil physical properties and performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) was studied in rainforest zone of South West Nigeria. Treatments were 4 x 2 factorial combination of tillage methods (zero tillage, manual clearing, heap, ridge), 12t/ha dry plant residue mulch, and ...

  20. Spin orientation in solid solution hematite-ilmenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine; Lefmann, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The spin orientation in synthetic hematite-ilmenite samples and in a sample of natural hematite was studied from room temperature to above the antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition (the Néel temperature; TN ≈ 600–950 K) by neutron powder diffraction and at room temperature by Mössbauer...... spectroscopy. The usually assumed magnetic structure of hematite within this temperature range is antiferromagnetic with the spins confined to the basal plane of the hexagonal structure; however, an out-of-plane spin component is allowed by the symmetry of the system and has been observed in recent studies...... of synthetic hematite samples. We find the spins in the antiferromagnetic sublattices to be rotated out of the basal plane by an angle between 11(2)° and 22.7(5)° in both synthetic hematite-ilmenite samples and in the natural hematite sample. The spin angle remains tilted out of the basal plane in the entire...

  1. Aluminothermic studies of a liquid partial reduced ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, V.M.; Babyuk, V.D.; Zhydkov, Y.A.; Skok, Y.Y. [National Academy of Science Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2008-01-15

    A non-traditional method for ferrotitanium production using aluminothermic reduction of ilmenite was investigated. It included preliminary melting of ilmenite in mixture with lime and anthracite for production of a liquid titanium slag. The liquid phase generated was reacted with Al in a separate reactor. Preliminary thermo-analytical investigations (DTA/TG) of the reduction were performed. These investigations were instrumental for finding out the start temperature of the reactions for different compositions of the charges. These experiments for ferrotitanium production were carried out using the novel application of electroslag crucible remelting (ESCR) furnaces of the portable and the stationary types. The ferrotitanium produced, which had a composition (wt.%) 25-28 Ti, 4 Si, 46-50 Fe, 14 Al and was also of high purity with respect to other detrimental elements, has an industrial application in specialty steels production. The safety and the cost effectiveness of the process were demonstrated as compared to the traditional technologies.

  2. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Helena I.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two......Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero...... valent iron particles in a two-compartment cell is tested and compared to a more conventional combination of electrokinetic remediation and nZVI in a three-compartment cell. In the new two-compartment cell, the soil is suspended and stirred simultaneously with the addition of zero valent iron...

  3. Simulation of Helium-3 Extraction from Lunar Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Schmitt, H. H.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the trapping mechanisms and diffusion characteristics of solar-wind implanted isotopes in the minerals of the lunar regolith will enable the optimization of the processes to extract solar wind gases from regolith particles. Extraction parameters include the temperature and duration of extraction, particle size, and gas yield. Diffusion data will increase the efficiency and profitability of future mining ventures. This data will also assist in optimizing the evaluations of various potential mining sites based on remote sensing data. For instance, if magnesian ilmenite (Mg,Fel.,Ti03) is found to retain He better than stoichiometric ilmenite (FeTi03), remote sensing data for Mg could be considered in addition to Ti and maturity data. The context of the currently discussed work is the mining of helium-3 for potential use as a fuel for fusion energy generation. However, the potential resources deposited by the solar wind include hydrogen (and derived water), helium-4, nitrogen and carbon. Implantation experiments such as those performed for helium isotopes in ilmenite are important for the optimized extraction of these additional resources. These experiments can easily be reproduced for most elements or isotopes of interest.

  4. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Ece; Yigini, Yusuf; Montanarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they're collected from the "Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey" (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and "Soil Transformations in European Catchments" (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960-1990 and 2000-2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas; agricultural

  5. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Aksoy

    Full Text Available Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they're collected from the "Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey" (LUCAS Project (samples from agricultural soil, BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil, and "Soil Transformations in European Catchments" (SoilTrEC Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs in Europe. Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI, CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960-1990 and 2000-2010 were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK, was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas

  6. Ilmenite Nanotubes for High Stability and High Rate Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Litao; Liu, Jun; Xu, Xijun; Zhang, Liguo; Hu, Renzong; Liu, Jiangwen; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Yang, Lichun; Zhu, Min

    2017-05-23

    To solve the problem of large volume change and low electronic conductivity of earth-abundant ilmenite used in rechargeable Na-ion batteries (SIBs), an anode of tiny ilmenite FeTiO3 nanoparticle embedded carbon nanotubes (FTO⊂CNTs) has been successfully proposed. By introducing a TiO2 shell on metal-organic framework (Fe-MOF) nanorods by sol-gel deposition and subsequent solid-state annealing treatment of these core-shell Fe-MOF@TiO2, such well-defined FTO⊂CNTs are obtained. The achieved FTO⊂CNT electrode has several distinct advantages including a hollow interior in the hybrid nanostructure, fully encapsulated ultrasmall electroactive units, flexible conductive carbon matrix, and stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) of FTO in cycles. FTO⊂CNT electrodes present an excellent cycle stability (358.8 mA h g-1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g-1) and remarkable rate capability (201.8 mA h g-1 at 5000 mA g-1) with a high Coulombic efficiency of approximately 99%. In addition, combined with the typical Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode to constitute full SIBs, the assembled FTO⊂CNT//Na3V2(PO4)3 batteries are also demonstrated with superior rate capability and a long cycle life.

  7. A novel collector 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid: Flotation performance and adsorption mechanism to ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haifeng; Zhong, Hong, E-mail: zhongh@csu.edu.cn; Tang, Qing; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Guangyi, E-mail: guangyiliu@csu.edu.cn

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: EHHA's synthesis route, flotation performance and coadsorption molecule–ion mechanism to ilmenite. - Highlights: • 2-Ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was synthesized and characterized. • EHHA showed stronger affinity to ilmenite. • EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. • EHHA might adsorb onto ilmenite surfaces through molecule–ion coadsorption model. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel collector, 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectra. The flotation performance and adsorption mechanism of EHHA to ilmenite were investigated by micro-flotation tests, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, FTIR spectra, zeta potential and solution chemistry analyses. The micro-flotation results indicated that EHHA exhibited superior flotation performance compared to isooctyl hydroximic acid (IOHA) and octyl hydroxamic acid (OHA), and floated out 84.03% ilmenite at pH 8.0 with 250 mg/L dosage. The analyses of FTIR spectra and zeta potential demonstrated that EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. The solution chemistry analyses further inferred that at pH 6.3–10.5, both Fe and Ti species on ilmenite surfaces could chelate EHHA. DFT calculation results implied EHHA owned the strongest affinity to ilmenite among the three C{sub 8} hydroximic acids. To discern the sharply improving floatability of ilmenite at pH 8–10, a schematic co-adsorption molecule–ion model of EHHA on ilmenite surfaces was suggested.

  8. Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles from Ilmenite Through the Mechanism of Vapor-Phase Reaction Process by Thermal Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha

    2017-11-01

    Synthesis of nanoparticles of TiO2 was carried out by non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor using ilmenite as the precursor material. The powder ilmenite was vaporized at high temperature in plasma flame and converted to a gaseous state of ions in the metastable phase. On cooling, chamber condensation process takes place on recombination of ions for the formation of nanoparticles. The top-to-bottom approach induces the disintegration of complex ilmenite phases into simpler compounds of iron oxide and titanium dioxide phases. The vapor-phase reaction mechanism was carried out in thermal plasma zone for the synthesis of nanoparticles from ilmenite compound in a plasma reactor. The easy separation of iron particles from TiO2 was taken place in the plasma chamber with deposition of light TiO2 particles at the top of the cooling chamber and iron particles at the bottom. The dissociation and combination process of mechanism and synthesis are studied briefly in this article. The product TiO2 nanoparticle shows the purity with a major phase of rutile content. TiO2 nanoparticles produced in vapor-phase reaction process shows more photo-induced capacity.

  9. Characterization and x-ray absorption spectroscopy of ilmenite nanoparticles derived from natural ilmenite ore via acid-assisted mechanical ball-milling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoohinkong, Weerachon; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Wannagon, Anucha; Sanguanpak, Samunya; Boonyarattanakalin, Kanokthip; Mekprasart, Wanichaya; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2017-09-01

    In this work activated ilmenite nanoparticles were prepared by chemical-assisted in mechanical ball-milling process from ilmenite ore as starting raw material. The effect of milling process on their phase composition, particle size, surface morphology and local structure were investigated. Phase identification and crystalline structure of ilmenite mineral, milled samples and subsequent leached residues were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Meanwhile, the distorted octahedral structure and the oxidation state of relevant elements in ilmenite ore and activated ilmenite obtained by different process conditions were analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Particle size and morphologies of the samples were monitored by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Three dominant peaks of TiO2 rutile, FeTiO3, and Fe2TiO4 are obviously adulterated in XRD patterns after mechanical milling with water and acid solution when comparing to precursor mineral. However, the contaminated phase of FeTiO3 and Fe2TiO4 was readily decreased by acid-assisted mechanical ball-milling. The enhancement in leaching process of ilmenite residue after milling can be obtained with sulfuric acid. This result suggests that iron contaminated phase could be leached from the sample resulting to the decrease in Fe environment around Ti atom. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  10. Effects of Borax on the Reduction of Pre-oxidized Panzhihua Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufeng; Zheng, Fuqiang; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Feng; Wang, Shuai; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2017-10-01

    The effects of borax (sodium borate) on the enhancement reduction of pre-oxidized Panzhihua ilmenite were investigated. The effects of borax on the mineral phase transformation, microstructures, crystal cell parameter, melting point and Mg distribution were studied to reveal the mechanism of enhancement reduction. Under the constant reduction conditions, the borax could reduce the reduction activation energy of pre-oxidized ilmenite. The reduction kinetics analysis indicated that the reduction rate was controlled by interfacial chemical reaction. The reduction activation energy of the pre-oxidized ilmenite with 4% borax was 80.263 kJ/mol, which was 28.585 kJ/mol less than that of the pre-oxidized ilmenite without borax. Borax could eliminate the migration of Mg into the reduced particle center. The crystal cell parameter of the reduced product was increased by adding borax. Borax could improve the growth of dendritic crystals in the pre-oxidized ilmenite.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of hematite — ilmenite — geikielite solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.

    1990-11-01

    A solution model is developed for rhombohedral oxide solid solutions having compositions within the ternary system ilmenite [(Fe{2+/ s }Ti{4+/1- s }) A (Fe{2+/1- s }Ti{4+/s}) B O3]-geikielite [(Mg{2+/ t }Ti{4+/1- t }) A (Mg{2+/1- t }Ti{4+/ t }) B O3]-hematite [(Fe3+) A (Fe3+) B O3]. The model incorporates an expression for the configurational entropy of solution, which accounts for varying degrees of structural long-range order (0≤s, t≤1) and utilizes simple regular solution theory to characterize the excess Gibbs free energy of mixing within the five-dimensional composition-ordering space. The 13 model parameters are calibrated from available data on: (1) the degree of long-range order and the composition-temperature dependence of theRbar 3c - Rbar 3 transition along the ilmenite-hematite binary join; (2) the compositions of coexisting olivine and rhombohedral oxide solid solutions close to the Mg-Fe2+ join; (3) the shape of the miscibility gap along the ilmenite-hematite join; (4) the compositions of coexisting spinel and rhombohedral oxide solid solutions along the Fe2+-Fe3+ join. In the course of calibration, estimates are obtained for the reference state enthalpy of formation of ulvöspinel and stoichiometric hematite (-1488.5 and -822.0 kJ/mol at 298 K and 1 bar, respectively). The model involves no excess entropies of mixing nor does it incorporate ternary interaction parameters. The formulation fits the available data and represents an internally consistent energetic model when used in conjuction with the standard state thermodynamic data set of Berman (1988) and the solution theory for orthopyroxenes, olivines and Fe-Mg titanomagnetite-aluminate-chromate spinels developed by Sack and Ghiorso (1989, 1990a, b). Calculated activity-composition relations for the end-members of the series, demonstrate the substantial degree of nonideality associated with interactions between the ordered and disordered structures and the dominant influence of the miscibility

  12. Radar-guided radiometer downscaling for combined soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoulis, D.; Haddad, Z. S.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2013-12-01

    Combining the advantages of both active and passive microwave measurements in a soil moisture-retrieval can dramatically increase resolution and sensitivity. Simultaneous remote sensing observations of the normalized radar cross section (σ0) and emissivity (ɛ) will be jointly used to ultimately achieve an improved soil moisture-retrieval algorithm. The σ0 values are derived from the Precipitation Radar (PR) from TRMM (product 2A21 V7) while the ɛ values are derived from the brightness temperatures (BTs) measured by the passive microwave radiometric system TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) (product 1B11 V7). Emissivity values are used instead of BTs because they are more directly related to water content. The coarse-resolution passive measurements (TMI) are first downscaled to match the finer resolution of the active ones (PR) via a Kalman filter, with which the error of the TMI instrument in terms of emissivity is parameterized so that different weights will be given to the PR and TMI measurements. The downscaling is performed over the state of Oklahoma, for 'no-rain' conditions (indicated by PR), for high PR incidence angles, in order to obtain simultaneous measurements of the two instruments (because of different scanning geometries, synchronized measurements of both instruments can only be achieved at high PR incidence angles), for each TMI channel separately (not including the two high-resolution ones and the 21.3 GHz), for the early morning hours only (active and passive sensors retrieve information on soil moisture at different depths and this discrepancy becomes even greater in the late afternoon hours of the day, therefore selecting only the early-morning overpasses will mitigate this effect), and for different regions within Oklahoma. The regions are selected based on land class. Regions with homogeneous vegetation cover are examined separately from regions characterized by heterogeneous vegetation cover. Oklahoma was selected as the area of study, because

  13. A combined process coupling phytoremediation and in situ flushing for removal of arsenic in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiulan; Liu, Qiuxin; Wang, Jianyi; Liao, Xiaoyong

    2017-07-01

    Phytoremediation and soil washing are both potentially useful for remediating arsenic (As)-contaminated soils. We evaluated the effectiveness of a combined process coupling phytoremediation and in situ soil flushing for removal of As in contaminated soil through a pilot study. The results showed that growing Pteris vittata L. (P.v.) accompanied by soil flushing of phosphate (P.v./Flushing treatment) could significantly decrease the total As concentration of soil over a 37day flushing period compared with the single flushing (Flushing treatment). The P.v./Flushing treatment removed 54.04% of soil As from contaminated soil compared to 47.16% in Flushing treatment, suggesting that the growth of P. vittata was beneficial for promoting the removal efficiency. We analyzed the As fractionation in soil and As concentration in soil solution to reveal the mechanism behind this combined process. Results showed that comparing with the control treatment, the percent of labile arsenate fraction significantly increased by 17% under P.v./Flushing treatment. As concentration in soil solution remained a high lever during the middle and later periods (51.26-56.22mg/L), which was significantly higher than the Flushing treatment. Although soil flushing of phosphate for more than a month, P. vittata still had good accumulation and transfer capacity of As of the soil. The results of the research revealed that combination of phytoremediation and in situ soil flushing is available to remediate As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Effect of Pb2+ ions on ilmenite flotation and adsorption of benzohydroxamic acid as a collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longhua; Tian, Jia; Wu, Houqin; Lu, Zhongyuan; Yang, Yaohui; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2017-12-01

    The effects of Pb2+ ions on ilmenite flotation and adsorption of benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) as a collector were investigated using microflotation tests, zeta potential measurements, adsorption analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The microflotation results indicate that the addition of Pb2+ significantly improves the recovery of ilmenite using BHA as a collector. A maximum recovery of 88.46% is obtained at pH 8.12 in the presence of Pb2+; a maximum recovery of 45% is obtained at the same pH using BHA alone. At pHs below 8.0, lead nitrate are mainly present in the solution as Pb2+ and PbOH+, while at pHs above 8.0, the predominant components are Pb(OH)2(s) and Pb(OH)3-. The adsorption of these lead species influences the zeta potential of ilmenite and the number of activated sites on the ilmenite surface. FTIR and XPS analyses reveal that lead species and BHA react with the metal sites on the ilmenite surface. The lead species in solution are either adsorbed onto the ilmenite surface, which increases the surface activity of ilmenite, or react with BHA in solution to form complexes of lead and BHA.

  15. Qualitative Assessment of Ilmenite From Chavara Deposit, Southwest Coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, A. G.; Damodaran, K.; Suresh Babu, D.

    2002-05-01

    The famous Chavara placer deposit of India is known for its huge reserves of heavy minerals (127 MT) particularly ilmenite of industrial grade. In spite of the commercial implications of the deposit due to its high quality ilmenite and its exploitation from the beginning of the twentieth century, a systematic and detailed study on the alteration patterns of ilmenite has not been attempted hitherto, except for limited work on the weathering of bulk ilmenite. The qualitative variation noticed in terms of properties like trace element chemistry, magnetism, mineral phases present and the crystal structure of the mineral from deposit to deposit is dependent on a host of factors like the nature of the source rocks, weathering environments, the age of deposits etc. The assessment of the chemical and physical properties of the ore has an important influence on the quality of the ore and the choice of techniques to be adopted for its industrial processing. The ilmenite from the deposits of Chavara (CH) was split into differently magnetic fractions as such an approach yields ilmenite fractions belonging to the entire spectrum of alteration, ranging from those rich in iron to the leucoxenised varieties and thus is a suitable method to trace out the road map of the alteration patterns in the mineral. The fractions were subjected to mineralogical and compositional analyses to assess the range of their physical and chemical variation with weathering to gauge the quality of the ore. The magnetic fractions of the CH ilmenite separated below 0.4 A forms a high quality grade of titanium ore containing about 64% TiO2. This forms about 32% of the weight of the total fractions of the bulk ilmenite of Chavara deposit. XRD and TGA patterns indicate the progressive dominance of altered phases like pseudorutile and rutile in the low magnetic fractions. Moderately weathered ilmenite fractions are found to be more magnetic than least altered grains of the mineral. No evidence of the

  16. Helium and neon in lunar ilmenites of different antiquities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from individual lunar ilmenite grains, approximately 100 micrometers in diameter, using a pulsed step-heating technique. Grains from lunar samples 71501 and 79035, believed to have been exposed to solar corpuscular radiation at greatly different times, were studied. The results found were consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to solar-wind-implanted gas, a second more deeply implanted component was present in both species of grains. Average isotopic ratios were determined giving equal weight to each of the particles. As found in depth studies employing chemical etching, both the He-3/He-4 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios were lower in the more deeply implanted gas than in the solar wind component. The He-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind component of the more ancient grains was lower than that in the more recently exposed ones, whereas no difference was found for the more deeply embedded He. In the deeply embedded component of the ancient grains, the He-4/Ne-20 ratio was approx. 2x that found in the more recently exposed grains. In the shallowly implanted component, the ratio varied greatly from grain to grain, preventing comparison with the solar wind elemental composition.

  17. The effect of ilmenite viscosity on the dynamics and evolution of an overturned lunar cumulate mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Dygert, Nick; Liang, Yan; Parmentier, E. M.

    2017-07-01

    Lunar cumulate mantle overturn and the subsequent upwelling of overturned mantle cumulates provide a potential framework for understanding the first-order thermochemical evolution of the Moon. Upwelling of ilmenite-bearing cumulates (IBCs) after the overturn has a dominant influence on the dynamics and long-term thermal evolution of the lunar mantle. An important parameter determining the stability and convective behavior of the IBC is its viscosity, which was recently constrained through rock deformation experiments. To examine the effect of IBC viscosity on the upwelling of overturned lunar cumulate mantle, here we conduct three-dimensional mantle convection models with an evolving core superposed by an IBC-rich layer, which resulted from mantle overturn after magma ocean solidification. Our modeling shows that a reduction of mantle viscosity by 1 order of magnitude, due to the presence of ilmenite, can dramatically change convective planform and long-term lunar mantle evolution. Our model results suggest a relatively stable partially molten IBC layer that has surrounded the lunar core to the present day.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThe Moon's mantle is locally ilmenite rich. Previous models exploring the convective evolution of the lunar mantle did not consider the effects of ilmenite viscosity. Recent rock deformation experiments demonstrate that Fe-Ti oxide (ilmenite) is a low viscosity phase compared to olivine and other silicate minerals. Our modeling shows that ilmenite changes the lunar mantle plume process. An ilmenite-rich layer around the lunar core would be highly stable throughout geologic time, consistent with a partially molten, low viscosity layer around the core inferred from seismic attenuation and tidal dissipation.

  18. Can biochar in combination with compost improve degraded soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Zehetner, Franz; Dunst, Gerald; Wagner, Mario; Puschenreiter, Markus; Karer, Jasmin; Soja, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    As global demand for agricultural commodities is growing, the use and improvement of degraded land could at least partly meet this demand. Based on the Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC (RED) which endorses the use of degraded land for biomass production on the one hand, and the emerging conflict of the 4 F's (food, feed, fiber and fuel production) on the other hand, the application of biochar to ameliorate degraded land could be a strategy to improve the productivity of soils on marginal agricultural land. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochar/compost mixtures (w/w; 50/50) on two agricultural soils low in organic matter - one sandy, the other clayey. The suitability of the biochar/compost-amended (BC) soils for renewable biomass production using maize or Miscanthus was tested in the field. We conducted two field experiments with different treatments based on the results of previous pot experiments with the same soils. The following treatments were applied: • Co … Control (no BC but fertilized with (NH4)2SO4 corresponding to T3) • T1 … 1 % BC • T2 … 0.5 % BC + 175 kg N ha-1 • T3 … 1 % BC + 350 kg N ha-1 The treatments influenced water holding capacity (WHC), organic carbon content (Corg) in soil and biomass productivity (BM). WHC increased significantly upon 3 % BC addition in the previous pot experiment, but not significantly upon 1 % addition in the field (T1, T3). Due to heterogeneity in the field Corg did not show significant differences between treatments. The two test soils responded differently for BM productivity. Miscanthus (perennial) grown on sandy Eschenau soil was not influenced by the treatments in 2013 but showed a positive reaction trend in 2014. Miscanthus will need at least one further growing season to show its full yield potential. Maize (annual) grown on clayey Kaindorf soil increased BM significantly 2013 upon T3 but not in 2014 due to erosion events on sloping terrain. Keywords: Soil quality

  19. Thermal modification of hematite-ilmenite intergrowths in the Ecstall pluton, British Columbia, Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownlee, S.J.; Feinberg, J.M.; Harrison, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examine the effects of reheating on finely exsolved hematite-ilmenite intergrowths from the similar to 91 Ma Ecstall pluton using reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result of the emplacement of the you......In this study, we examine the effects of reheating on finely exsolved hematite-ilmenite intergrowths from the similar to 91 Ma Ecstall pluton using reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result of the emplacement...... of the younger adjacent similar to 52 Ma Quottoon pluton, samples closer to a thermal boundary have experienced greater degrees of thermal alteration. Five main microstructural features characterize hematite-ilmenite intergrowths from the Ecstall: (I) exsolution lamellae of hematite and ilmenite; (II) oxidation...... of ilmenite to form hematite, rutile, and other Ti-rich phases; (III) 20-50 nm magnetite precipitates in hematite; (IV) rutile blitz texture; and (V) exsolution of hematite in rutile. Based on spatial relationships, textures I I through V appear to be related to reheating of the Ecstall by the Quottoon...

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Titanium Slag from Ilmenite by Thermal Plasma Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha

    2016-09-01

    Titanium rich slag has emerged as a raw material for alternative titanium source. Ilmenite contains 42-50% TiO2 as the mineralogical composition depending on the geographical resources. Application of titanium in paper, plastic, pigment and other various industries is increasing day by day. Due to the scarcity of natural raw mineral rutile (TiO2), ilmenite is considered as precursor for the extraction of TiO2. Ilmenite is reduced at the initial stage for the conversion of complex iron oxide into simpler form. Therefore, pre-reduction of ilmenite concentrate is essential to minimize the energy consumption during thermal plasma process. Thermal plasma processing of ilmenite for the production of titania rich slag is considered to be the direct route to meet the current demand of industrial needs of titanium. Titania rich slag contains 70-80% TiO2 as the major component with some other minor impurities, like oxide phases of Si, Al, Cr, Mg, Mn, Ca, etc. Usually titanium is present in tetravalent forms with globular metallic iron in the slag. Titania rich slag undergoes leaching for the removal of iron and transforming the slag into synthetic rutile having 85-95% of TiO2.

  1. Testing Single and Combinations of Amendments for Stabilization of Metals in Contrasting Extremely Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebielec G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Metals can be stabilized by soil amendments that increase metals adsorption or alter their chemical forms. Such treatments may limit the risk related to the contamination through reduction of metal transfer to the food chain (reduction of metal uptake by plants and its availability to soil organisms and metals migration within the environment. There is a need for experiments comparing various soil amendments available at reasonable amounts under similar environmental conditions. The other question is whether all components of soil environment or soil functions are similarly protected after remediation treatment. We conducted a series of pot studies to test some traditional and novel amendments and their combinations. The treatments were tested for several highly Zn/Cd/Pb contaminated soils. Among traditional amendments composts were the most effective – they ensured plant growth, increased soil microbial activity, reduced Cd in earthworms, reduced Pb bioaccessibility and increased share of unavailable forms of Cd and Pb.

  2. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) Combined with Soil Solarization for Root-Knot Nematode Control in Vegetable and Ornamental Crops in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) combined with soil solarization continues to be evaluated for management of plant-parasitic nematodes in vegetable and ornamental crops in Florida. ASD combines organic amendments and soil saturation to stimulate microbial activity and create anaerobic conditions...

  3. Synthesis of anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} nanostructures from natural ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahyuingsih, Sayekti, E-mail: sayekti@mipa.uns.ac.id; Ramelan, Ari Handono; Pramono, Edi; Sulistya, Ariantama Djati; Argawan, Panji Rofa; Dharmawan, Frenandha Dwi; Rinawati, Ludfiaastu; Hanif, Qonita Awliya [Inorganic Materials Research Group, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Science, Sebelas Maret University (Indonesia); Sulistiyono, Eko; Firdiyono, Florentinus [Metallurgy Extraction Laboratory, Central of Metallurgy Research LIPI, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Nanostructure anatase and rutile type TiO{sub 2} were synthesized from dissolution roasted ilmenite from natural ilmenite sand as the starting materials. Anatase TiO{sub 2} and rutile TiO{sub 2} (high crystallinity) with the diameters of 20–100 nm were obtained by calcined soluble ilmenite sand produced by leaching process. Calcinations of the xerogel TiO{sub 2} from liquor products were conducted for 4 hours at temperature of 450 °C. The samples were characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), STA (simultant thermal analysis), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy), and BET surface area. Titania Anatase-Rutile form as a mixture were produced by titania slag with the hydrolysis product. While, in another route, complete titania anatase phase was produced through hydrolysis and condensation steps of leach liquors. This synthesis methods provide a simple route to fabricate nanostructure TiO{sub 2} from low cost material.

  4. Experimental evidence for lamellar magnetism in hemo-ilmenite by polarized neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Sales, Morten; Lefmann, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Large local anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field have been observed in Norway, Sweden, and Canada. These anomalies have been attributed to the unusual magnetic properties of naturally occurring hemo-ilmenite, consisting of a paramagnetic ilmenite host (alpha-Fe2O3-bearing FeTiO3) with exsolution...... lamellae (approximate to 3 μm m thick) of canted antiferromagnetic hematite (FeTiO3-bearing α-Fe2O3) and the mutual exsolutions of the same phases on the micron to nanometer scale. The origin of stable natural remanent magnetization (NRM) in this system has been proposed to be uncompensated magnetic...... moments in the contact layers between the exsolution lamellae. This lamellar magnetism hypothesis is tested here by using polarized neutron diffraction to measure the orientation of hematite spins as a function of an applied magnetic field in a natural single crystal of hemo-ilmenite from South Rogaland...

  5. Morphological Characterization Of Titania Slag Obtained From Red Sediment Placer Ilmenite Using Microwave Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikant, S. S.; Mukherjee, P. S.; Bhima Rao, R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the main objective to observe the effect of microwave heat treatment for the production of Titania rich slag and pig iron from placer ilmenite. The experiments carried out in the present investigation on the oxidized ilmenite sample for microwave heat treatment in microwave sintering furnace reveals that a product can be obtained containing Titania rich slag and metalized iron. The in-depth characterisation of these products using SEM-EDAX shows that around 75-85 % of titanium dioxide is formed in terms of titania rich slag by using microwave sintering furnace after reduction of oxidized ilmenite with proper stoichiometric graphitic carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) susceptor. The titania rich slag is considered to be better input material for production of pigment grade titanium dioxide. On the other hand, the pig iron obtained as by product from titania rich slag is also important for automobile and steel industries application.

  6. A combination of biochar-mineral complexes and compost improves soil bacterial processes, soil quality and plant properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUN eYE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers and promises food production with minimal environmental impact, however this farming practice does not often result in the same productivity as conventional farming. In recent years, biochar has received increasing attention as an agricultural amendment and by coating it with minerals to form biochar-mineral complex (BMC carbon retention and nutrient availability can be improved. However, little is known about the potential of BMC in improving organic farming. We therefore investigated here how soil, bacterial and plant properties respond to a combined treatment of BMC and an organic fertilizer, i.e. a compost based on poultry manure. In a pakchoi pot trial, BMC and compost showed synergistic effects on soil properties, and specifically by increasing nitrate content. Soil nitrate has been previously observed to increase leaf size and we correspondingly saw an increase in the surface area of pakchoi leaves under the combined treatment of BMC and chicken manure. The increase in soil nitrate was also correlated with an enrichment of bacterial nitrifiers due to BMC. Additionally, we observed that the bacteria present in the compost treatment had a high turnover, which likely facilitated organic matter degradation and a reduction of potential pathogens derived from the manure. Overall our results demonstrate that a combination of BMC and compost can stimulate microbial process in organic farming that result in better vegetable production and improved soil properties for sustainable farming.

  7. PAH exposure through soil ingestion: Combining digestion models and bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiele, T.R. van de; Verstraete, W. [Ghent University (BE).Laboratory Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET); Siciliano, S.D. [University of Saskatchewan (Canada). Department of Soil Science

    2003-07-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants through soil ingestion is an important issue in current health risk assessment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or their metabolites pose risks to humans due to their toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic or even (anti)estrogenic properties. PAH mobilization from a soil matrix (49.1{+-}1.5 mg PAH/kg DW) was assessed using a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME). PAH GC-MS analysis was performed on the pellet and supernatant of SHIME digests and gave 101, 92, 89 and 97% recovery for water, stomach, duodenal and colon digests, respectively. PAH release was highest for the water extract (0.51%) and the stomach digestion (0.44%). Lower mobilized fractions in the duodenum (0.13%) and colon (0.30%) digests could be attributed to PAH complexation with bile salts, dissolved organic matter or colon microbiota. The digestion model provides us with relevant information to what extent soil bound PAHs are mobilized in the gastrointestinal tract and thus reach the gut wall, prior to absorption. (orig.)

  8. 3-D Modeling and Resources Estimation of Ilmenite Ore Bodies in Jikjeon-Ri, Hadong, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, J.; Choi, J.; Cho, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Hadong area, located in central south of Korea, is famous for well-developed ilmenite ores deposited in the Precambrian anorthositic rocks. Ti ores are several lodes of vein types which discontinuously extend few kilometers along NNE in strike and NW in dip. For efficient exploitation of the mineral resources, 3D modeling of ore bodies are relevantly required to evaluate the exact amount of resources. This study aims at description and 3D representation of ilmenite ore bodies in Jikjeon-Ri, Hadong, using GOCAD software. To facilitate 3D model construction, initial datasets consist of a contour map, well-logging data, and Ti grades of 50 cm interval of wells. Ilmenite shows 1.5~25.1 wt% of Ti in composition. These datasets are imported into GOCAD, where construction of ore bodies are built in 3D. Geostatistics is a common tool for resouces estimation. Kriging method, one of the geostatistics, is applied to 3D modeling and resources estimation of ilmenite ores in the study area, for kriging is very effective in resources. For further calculation, two variogram models (spherical and exponential) are considered and more fitting variogram models are selected to estimate ilmenite resources correctly. The results of 3D construction show five lodes of ilmenite bodies developed in Jikjeon-Ri area as stratiform vein types. Top ilmenite lode (designated as 1st ore body) is estimated 1,393,730 m3 in volume and 2.56 wt% of average Ti grade. The 2nd ore body is smallest and 181,260 m3 in volume and 2.68 wt% in average Ti grade. The others are 186,700 m3 and 4.73 wt%, 209,260 m3 and 3.17 wt%, and 527,180 m3 and 3.81 wt% in volume and average Ti grades, respectively. From these calculations, resources of total ilmenite ores in the study area are estimated 228,261 tons of Ti, which has a value of 1,552.2 million in US (6.8 US/kg).

  9. Natural (Mg,Fe)SiO3-ilmenite and -perovskite in the Tenham meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, N; Fujino, K

    1997-08-22

    The minerals (Mg,Fe)SiO3-ilmenite and -perovskite were identified in the shock-induced veins in the Tenham chondritic meteorite. Both phases are inferred to have transformed from pyroxene at high pressures and temperatures by shock metamorphism. Columnar-shaped ilmenite grains, one of two types of morphologies, have a topotaxial relationship with neighboring pyroxene grains, indicating shear transformation. Granular-shaped perovskite grains showed a diffraction pattern consistent with orthorhombic perovskite, but these grains were not stable under the electron beam irradiation and became amorphous. The higher iron concentration in both phases compared with those experimentally reported may suggest their metastable transition from enstatite because of shock compression.

  10. Valorisation of waste ilmenite mud in the manufacture of sulphur polymer cement

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras Llanes, Manuel; Gázquez González, Manuel Jesús; García Díaz, Irene; Alguacil, Francisco J.; López, Félix A.; Bolívar Raya, Juan Pedro

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of sulphur polymer cements (SPCs) incorporating waste ilmenite mud for use in concrete construction works. The ilmenite mud raw material and the mud-containing SPCs (IMC-SPCs) were characterised physico-chemically and radiologically. The optimal IMC-SPC mixture had a sulphur/mud ratio (w/w) of 1.05 (mud dose 20 wt%); this cement showed the greatest compressive strength (64 MPa) and the lowest water absorption coefficient (0.4 g cm−2 at 28 days). Since ilmeni...

  11. Comparison of energy consumptions between ultrasonic, mechanical, and combined soil washing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Younggyu; Nam, Sanggeon; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2012-05-01

    Vigorous physical effects including micro-jet and micro-streaming can be induced in heterogeneous systems by acoustic cavitation. This can be useful for the removal of pollutants from contaminated soil particles. In this study, the diesel removal efficiencies in ultrasonic, mechanical, and combined soil washing processes have been compared considering the electrical energy consumptions for these processes. The combined process showed synergistic effects for both removal efficiency and effective volume also has the advantage of a short operation time compared to the sequential processes. Thus the ultrasonic soil washing process with mechanical mixing is considered a promising technology for industrial use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of cation disorder on the magnetic properties of ball-milled ilmenite (FeTiO3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the evolution of crystal structure, cation disorder and magnetic properties of ilmenite (FeTiO3) after increasing time of high-energy ball-milling in an inert atmosphere. Refinement of X-ray diffraction data show that the hexagonal crystal structure of ilmenite is maintained ...

  13. Effects of different combinations of “Baoshiling” on soil physical and chemical properties of Huangguogan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. H.; Wang, Z. H.; Xiong, B.; Qiu, X.; Liao, L.; Shun, G. C.; Huang, S. J.; Dong, Z. X.; Liu, X. Y.; Xi, L. J.

    2017-08-01

    The research is done on the Huangguogan (unique citrus breed in Sichuan, China). The experiment setted 27 groups of “Baoshiling” (self-study compound fertilizer) fertilization treatment to explore the “Baoshiling” different combinations on soil physical and chemical properties of Huangguogan. The results showed that all the combinations had improved the soil of Huangguogan orchard. The combination of A3B2C2 had the best effect. The best Fertilization management measures was “Baoshiling” bud flowering fertilizer 2kg, stable fruit fertilizer 2kg, strong fruit fertilizer 2kg. It could reduce the pH of soil and the bulk density of soil, increase the available nitrogen, available phosphorus, available potassium and urease activity.

  14. The application of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy to the study of lamellar magnetism in hematite-ilmenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Asaka, T

    2009-01-01

    Lorentz transmission electron microscopy has been used to study line-scale exsolution microstructures in ilmenite-hematite, as part of a wider investigation of the lamellar magnetism hypothesis. Pronounced asymmetric contrast is visible in out-of-focus Lorentz images of ilmenite lamellae in hemat......Lorentz transmission electron microscopy has been used to study line-scale exsolution microstructures in ilmenite-hematite, as part of a wider investigation of the lamellar magnetism hypothesis. Pronounced asymmetric contrast is visible in out-of-focus Lorentz images of ilmenite lamellae...... in hematite. The likelihood that lamellar magnetism may be responsible for this contrast is assessed using simulations that incorporate interfacial magnetic moments on the (001) basal planes of hematite and ilmenite. The simulations suggest qualitatively that the asymmetric contrast is magnetic in origin...

  15. Ecotoxicological effects of copper and selenium combined pollution on soil enzyme activities in planted and unplanted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Liang, Dongli; Liu, Juanjuan; Xie, Junyu

    2013-04-01

    The present study explored the joint effects of Cu and Se pollution mechanisms on soil enzymes to provide references for the phytoremediation of contaminated areas and agricultural environmental protection. Pot experiments and laboratory analyses were carried out to study the individual and combined influences of Cu and Se on soil enzyme activities. The activities of four soil enzymes (urease, catalase, alkaline phosphatase, and nitrate reductase) were chosen. All soil enzyme activities tested were inhibited by Cu and Se pollution, either individually or combined, in varying degrees, following the order nitrate reductase>urease>catalase>alkaline phosphatase. Growing plants stimulated soil enzyme activity in a similar trend compared with treatments without plants. The joint effects of Cu and Se on catalase activity showed synergism at low concentrations and antagonism at high concentrations, whereas the opposite was observed for urease activity. However, nitrate reductase activity showed synergism both with and without plant treatments. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of exchangeable fractions had a similar trend with the EC50 of total content and was lower than that of total content. The EC50 values of nitrate reductase and urease activities were significantly lower for both Se and Cu (p<0.05), which indicated that they were more sensitive than the other two enzymes. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  16. Pyrene removal from contaminated soil using electrokinetic process combined with surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Enayat Hashemi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrene is one of the stable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that is considered as an important pollutants, because of extensive distribution in the environment and carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Among the various treatment techniques, electrokinetic method is an environmental- friendly process for organic and mineral pollutants adsorbed to soil with fine pore size the same as clay and low hydraulic conductivity soils. For improving the efficiency of pyrene removal from soil, soulobilization of pyrene from soil could be used by surfactants. Materials and Methods : In this study, clay soil was selected as model because of the specific properties. Combined method using surfactant and electrokinetic was applied for pyrene removal from soil. Experiments were designed using response surface methodology (RSM, and effect of three variables includes surfactant concentration, voltage and surfactant type were evaluated for pyrene removal from contaminated soil. Results: Pyrene removal using anionic surfactants(SDS and nonionic surfactants(TX100 as a solubilizing agents has high removal efficiency. In the optimum condition with 95% confidence coefficient, utilizing mixed surfactants of sodium dodecyl sulfate and triton X-100 with the same volume, induced of 18.54 volt and 6.53 percent surfactant concentration have 94.6% pyrene removal efficiency. Conclusion:: Results of this study shows that electrokinetic process combined with surfactant as solubilizing agent could be applied as an efficient method for treating the pyrene-contaminated soils.

  17. Combined Analyses of Bacterial, Fungal and Nematode Communities in Andosolic Agricultural Soils in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhihua; Ikunaga, Yoko; Matsushita, Yuko; Morimoto, Sho; Takada-Hoshino, Yuko; Okada, Hiroaki; Oba, Hirosuke; Takemoto, Shuhei; Niwa, Shigeru; Ohigashi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Chika; Nagaoka, Kazunari; Takenaka, Makoto; Urashima, Yasufumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kushida, Atsuhiko; Toyota, Koki; Saito, Masanori; Tsushima, Seiya

    2012-01-01

    We simultaneously examined the bacteria, fungi and nematode communities in Andosols from four agro-geographical sites in Japan using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and statistical analyses to test the effects of environmental factors including soil properties on these communities depending on geographical sites. Statistical analyses such as Principal component analysis (PCA) and Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that the compositions of the three soil biota communities were strongly affected by geographical sites, which were in turn strongly associated with soil characteristics such as total C (TC), total N (TN), C/N ratio and annual mean soil temperature (ST). In particular, the TC, TN and C/N ratio had stronger effects on bacterial and fungal communities than on the nematode community. Additionally, two-way cluster analysis using the combined DGGE profile also indicated that all soil samples were classified into four clusters corresponding to the four sites, showing high site specificity of soil samples, and all DNA bands were classified into four clusters, showing the coexistence of specific DGGE bands of bacteria, fungi and nematodes in Andosol fields. The results of this study suggest that geography relative to soil properties has a simultaneous impact on soil microbial and nematode community compositions. This is the first combined profile analysis of bacteria, fungi and nematodes at different sites with agricultural Andosols. PMID:22223474

  18. Combined Effects of Biochar and Fertilizer on Cadmium Contaminated Soil Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Qi-kai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The field experiment was employed to study on the combined effects of biochar and chicken manure and N, P and K compound chemical fertilizer on cadmium contaminated soil remediation, and the immobilization mechanism was elucidated through fractionation of cadmium in the tested soil. Results showed that the addition of these ammendments could significantly reduce the edible Cd accumulation in Lactuca sativa L., decreased from 32.6% to 54.8% compared with the control. The application of these additives could also significantly decrease extractable Cd concentration by 7.04%~21.85%. Biochar could significantly improve soil pH value, promote the inactivation of Cd contaminated soil, while the application of chicken manure significantly decreased soil pH value, which showed the effect of activating Cd in soil. Soil pH value had significant positive correlation with root Cd concentration of tested cultivars, but did not reach the significant effect level with the shoot Cd concentration. The research can provide a theoretical basis for the application of biochar combined with chicken manure and N, P and K compound chemical fertilizer on remediation of sewage irrigated Cd contaminated soil.

  19. [Advances of research on combined pollution in soil-plant systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guanlin; Zhou, Qixing

    2003-05-01

    The research on combined pollution in soil-plant systems is a scientific frontier of pollution ecology, and has an important significance in ecological safety of agricultural environment. The origin of combined pollution as a conception and its connotation development were reviewed. Types of combined pollution occurred in soil-plant systems and relevant progresses in this area were summarized. Ecological effects resulted from combined pollution of soil-plant systems and their quantificational tokens were expounded. The interactions of heavy metal-organic pollutant and organic pollutant-pathogenic microorganisms were pointed out to be important combined pollution in soil-plant systems, and the studies on the interactions, sub-products and their aged process, and moletoxicology mechanism of multi-pollutants were suggested to be the future keystone contents in this area. Meanwhile, the prospective studies on the methods and application of the results of combined pollution were put forward to provide a support for the warning and remediation of soil pollution.

  20. Formation and evolution of a lunar core from ilmenite-rich magma ocean cumulates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; van den Berg, A.P.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of comprehensive seismic data coverage, the size, composition and physical state of the lunar core are still debated. It has been suggested that a dense ilmenite-rich layer, which originally crystallised near the top of the lunar magma ocean, may have sunk to the centre of the Moon to

  1. Syntheses of Fe–TiC nanocomposite from ilmenite concentrate via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this paper, the possibility of production of Fe–TiC nanocomposite as a useful ceramic, from ilmenite concentrate, aluminum powder and carbon black has been investigated. Different amounts of FeTiO3, carbon black and Al powder were activated by a high-energy ball mill. Then the mixtures were synthesized by.

  2. Valorisation of waste ilmenite mud in the manufacture of sulphur polymer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Manuel; Gázquez, Manuel Jesús; García-Díaz, Irene; Alguacil, Francisco J; López, Félix A; Bolívar, Juan Pedro

    2013-10-15

    This paper reports the preparation of sulphur polymer cements (SPCs) incorporating waste ilmenite mud for use in concrete construction works. The ilmenite mud raw material and the mud-containing SPCs (IMC-SPCs) were characterised physico-chemically and radiologically. The optimal IMC-SPC mixture had a sulphur/mud ratio (w/w) of 1.05 (mud dose 20 wt%); this cement showed the greatest compressive strength (64 MPa) and the lowest water absorption coefficient (0.4 g cm(-2) at 28 days). Since ilmenite mud is enriched in natural radionuclides, such as radium isotopes (2.0·10(3) Bq kg(-1)(228)Ra and 5.0·10(2) Bq kg(-1)(226)Ra), the IMC-SPCs were subjected to leaching experiments, which showed their environmental impact to be negligible. The activity concentration indices for the different radionuclides in the IMC-SPCs containing 10% and 20% ilmenite mud met the demands of international standards for materials used in the construction of non-residential buildings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance of seven crop combinations in two soils of different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This suggests that it is even disadvantageous to grow cassava as a sole crop in the area. Cassava root yield reduction in 1999 relative to 1998 was higher (70%) in the UNN farm than in the forestland (40%). There was no significant difference due to crop combination on yam tuber yield in both locations in 1998. However ...

  4. Generation of stress-strain state in combined strip pile foundation beds through pressing of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanov Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When erecting high-rise buildings, weak underlying soils cause a number of problems in design and construction. In order to ensure the required non-exceedance of the ultimate limit settlements, the combined strip pile foundation has been developed allowing the soil bed to be pre-stressed. This is achieved by injection of pressurized mortar (pressing. The paper analyzes the effect of soil pre-stressing followed by pressing of foundation with the cement mortar, as applied to existing structures using the Plaxis 3D software package in conditions of volume deformation and the Hardening Soil Model. Variable order of foundation pressing allows the required parameters of soil bed to be achieved in plan and depth, thus improving interaction with the foundation and superstructure.

  5. TiO2 Nanorods Preparation from Titanyl Sulphate Produced by Dissolution of Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Rinawati, L.; Munifa, R. M. I.; Ramelan, A. H.; Sulistyono, Eko

    2017-02-01

    One-dimensional titanium oxides (TiO2) nanorods have substantial applications in photocatalytic, nanoelectronic, and photoelectrochemical solar cells. These applications require large quantities of materials and a production technique suitable for future industry fabrication. We demonstrate here a new method of TiO2 nanorods production from ilmenite sands (FeTiO3). In this process, the roasted ilmenite sand was separated from the iron content and dissolved in the sulphuric acid solution. Separation process of TiO2 from ilmenite has been carried out by roasting, leaching and precipitation processes. The roasting process was conducted by the addition of Na2S at a temperature of 800°C that had been deomposed ilmenite into hematite (Fe2O3), anatase TiO2, rutile TiO2, Na2SO4, NaFeS2 and NaFeO2. Separation TiO2 from titanyl sulfate (TiOSO4) after leaching in H2SO4 solution was conducted by hydrolysis-condensation step and complexation step of Fe2+ content. KCNS solution was used as a complexing agent. The xerogel synthesized TiO2 then was prepared to 1-D nanostructure of TiO2 nanorods by hydrothermal process under alkaline condition. By the two-step method, we finally gain the 1D nanorods TiO2 extracted from ilmenite sand. The characterization using the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) obtained the nanorod morphology at a diameter about 9.6 nm.

  6. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Combined Forms and Transformation of Fluorine in Tea Garden Soil

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Yong-li; LIAO Wan-you; WANG Ye-jun; SU You-jian; LUO Yi; SONG Li; SUN Li

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on combined forms and transformation of fluorine in tea garden soil, soil pot experiment was carried out. The research object was red-yellow soil in Shizipu tea plantation in the south of Anhui Province. Five treatments were N0P0K0 (CK), N0P1K1 (N0), N1P1K1 (N1), N2P1K1 (N2), N3P1K1 (N3). Water-soluble fluorine content, exchangeable fluorine content, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine content, organic matter-bound fluorine content, ammonium ni...

  7. Combining Proximal and Penetrating Soil Electrical Conductivity Sensors for High Resolution Digital Soil Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proximal ground conductivity sensors produce high spatial resolution maps that integrate the bulk electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil profile. Variability in conductivity maps must either be inverted to profile conductivity, or be directly calibrated to profile properties for meaningful interp...

  8. No tillage combined with crop rotation improves soil microbial community composition and metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingjie; Jia, Shuxia; Zhang, Shixiu; McLaughlin, Neil B; Liang, Aizhen; Chen, Xuewen; Liu, Siyi; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbial community can vary with different agricultural managements, which in turn can affect soil quality. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of long-term tillage practice (no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage (CT)) and crop rotation (maize-soybean (MS) rotation and monoculture maize (MM)) on soil microbial community composition and metabolic capacity in different soil layers. Long-term NT increased the soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) mainly at the 0-5 cm depth which was accompanied with a greater microbial abundance. The greater fungi-to-bacteria (F/B) ratio was found in NTMS at the 0-5 cm depth. Both tillage and crop rotation had a significant effect on the metabolic activity, with the greatest average well color development (AWCD) value in NTMS soil at all three soil depths. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that the shift in microbial community composition was accompanied with the changes in capacity of utilizing different carbon substrates. Therefore, no tillage combined with crop rotation could improve soil biological quality and make agricultural systems more sustainable.

  9. Combined Application of QEM-SEM and Hard X-ray Microscopy to Determine Mineralogical Associations and Chemcial Speciation of Trace Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Grafe; M Landers; R Tappero; P Austin; B Gan; A Grabsch; C Klauber

    2011-12-31

    We describe the application of quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy in combination with techniques commonly available at hard X-ray microprobes to define the mineralogical environment of a bauxite residue core segment with the more specific aim of determining the speciation of trace metals (e.g., Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) within the mineral matrix. Successful trace metal speciation in heterogeneous matrices, such as those encountered in soils or mineral residues, relies on a combination of techniques including spectroscopy, microscopy, diffraction, and wet chemical and physical experiments. Of substantial interest is the ability to define the mineralogy of a sample to infer redox behavior, pH buffering, and mineral-water interfaces that are likely to interact with trace metals through adsorption, coprecipitation, dissolution, or electron transfer reactions. Quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy coupled with micro-focused X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence, and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (mXANES) spectroscopy provided detailed insights into the composition of mineral assemblages and their effect on trace metal speciation during this investigation. In the sample investigated, titanium occurs as poorly ordered ilmenite, as rutile, and is substituted in iron oxides. Manganese's spatial correlation to Ti is closely linked to ilmenite, where it appears to substitute for Fe and Ti in the ilmenite structure based on its mXANES signature. Vanadium is associated with ilmenite and goethite but always assumes the +4 oxidation state, whereas chromium is predominantly in the +3 oxidation state and solely associated with iron oxides (goethite and hematite) and appears to substitute for Fe in the goethite structure.

  10. Soil water retention measurements using a combined tensiometer-coiled time domain reflectometry probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, C.M.P.; Hopmans, J.W.; Macedo, A.

    2002-01-01

    0.98. In addition, the mixing model approach, adapted for the tensiometer-coiled TDR probe, was successful in explaining the functional form of the coiled TDR data with about 30% of the coiled-TDR probe measurement explained by the bulk soil dielectric constant. This new TDR development provides......The objective of the presented study was to develop a single probe that can be used to determine soil water retention curves in both laboratory and field conditions, by including a coiled time domain reflectometry (TDR) probe around the porous cup of a standard tensiometer. The combined tensiometer......-silica sand], Columbia [Coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Oxyaquic Xerofluvents], Lincoln sandy loam (sandy, mixed, thermic Typic Ustifluvents), and a washed sand - SR130) was measured with the combined tensiometer-coiled TDR probe (coil) as a function of the soil water content (0...

  11. Remediation of metal polluted soils by phytorremediation combined with biochar addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Ana; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Gómez-Limón, Dulce; César Arranz, Julio; Saa, Antonio; Gascó, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this work is to optimize and quantify the treatment of metal polluted soils through phytoremediation techniques combined with the addition of biochar. Biochar is a carbon rich material obtained by thermal treatment of biomass in inert atmosphere. In recent years, it has been attracted considerable interest due to their positive effect after soil addition. The use of biochar also seems appropriate for the treatment of metal-contaminated soils decreasing their mobility. Biochar properties highly depend on the raw material composition and manufacturing conditions. This paper is based on the use of manure wastes, rich in nutrients and therefore interesting raw materials for biochar production, especially when combined with phytoremediation techniques since the biochar act as conditioner and slow release fertilizer. We are very grateful to Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad (Spain) for financial support under Project CGL2014-58322-R.

  12. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Combined Forms and Transformation of Fluorine in Tea Garden Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yong-li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on combined forms and transformation of fluorine in tea garden soil, soil pot experiment was carried out. The research object was red-yellow soil in Shizipu tea plantation in the south of Anhui Province. Five treatments were N0P0K0 (CK, N0P1K1 (N0, N1P1K1 (N1, N2P1K1 (N2, N3P1K1 (N3. Water-soluble fluorine content, exchangeable fluorine content, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine content, organic matter-bound fluorine content, ammonium nitrogen content and soil pH value in 0~15 cm soil layer were analyzed in 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, 90 days after fertilization. The results showed that compared with CK, in the short term (10 or 20 days after applying NPK, the content of water-soluble fluorine in 0~15 cm soil layer was decreased and the content of exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were increased. After 20 days, the content of soil water-soluble fluorine was increased and the content of soil exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were reduced. The effect on water-soluble fluorine and exchangeable fluorine increased with time and the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine in tea garden soil had a moderately positive correlation with the application rate of nitrogen while the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine had a quite highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01, but the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01. Therefore, nitrogen fertilizer changed the soil pH during its form transformation and thus affected the transformation and the availability of fluorine in soil.

  13. Economic benefits of combining soil and water conservation measures with nutrient management in semiarid Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zougmoré, R.; Mando, A.; Stroosnijder, L.; Ouédraogo, E.

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient limitation is the main cause of per capita decline in crop production in the Sahel, where water shortage also limits an efficient use of available nutrients. Combining soil and water conservation measures with locally available nutrient inputs may optimize crop production and economic

  14. Ecopiling: A combined Phytoremediation and Passive Biopiling System for Remediating Hydrocarbon Impacted Soils at Field Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran J Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopiling is an ex situ bioremediation technology that has been extensively used for remediating a wide range of petrochemical contaminants in soils. Biopiling involves the assembling of contaminated soils into piles and stimulating the biodegrading activity of microbial populations by creating near optimum growth conditions. Phytoremediation is another very successful bioremediation technique and involves the use of plants and their associated microbiomes to degrade, sequester or bio-accumulate pollutants from contaminated soil and water. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined phytoremediation/biopiling system, termed Ecopiling, to remediate hydrocarbon impacted industrial soil. The large scale project was carried out on a sandy loam, petroleum impacted soil (1613 mg Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH kg-1 soil. The contaminated soil was amended with chemical fertilisers, inoculated with TPH degrading bacterial consortia and then used to construct passive biopiles. Finally, a phyto-cap of perennial rye grass (Lolium multiflorum and white clover (Trifolium repens was sown on the soil surface to complete the Ecopile. Monitoring of important physico-chemical parameters was carried out at regular intervals throughout the trial. Two years after construction the TPH levels in the petroleum impacted Ecopiles were below detectable limits in all but 1 subsample (152mg TPH kg-1 soil. The Ecopile system is a multi-factorial bioremediation process involving bio-stimulation, bio-augmentation and phytoremediation. One of the key advantages to this system is the reduced costs of the remediation process, as once constructed, there is little additional cost in terms of labour and maintenance (although the longer process time may incur additional monitoring costs. The other major advantage is that many ecological functions are rapidly restored to the site and the process is aesthetically pleasing.

  15. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Demyan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2 to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem, from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM, mineral fertilizer (NPK, their combination (FYM + NPK and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii Kraichgau; and (iii Swabian Alb (Cambisols areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM, sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A, silt and clay (Si + C, and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm−1 being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min−1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max. Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the

  16. Potential of ilmenite sand application in the iron ore materials agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Findorák

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to asses the concrete ilmenite sand for its application in the process of the fine grain materials aggregation or pelletizing. The above intention was based on the knowledge of the titanium positive effect upon the formation of the protective brush matting in the blast furnace hearth on the base of the titanium carbon – nitrides. The assessment and analysis of the material was carried out for this purpose, as well as the laboratory experiments aimed to the balling properties. Results achieved from this work predicate the possible exploitation of the ilmenite sand in for of the sinter or pellets production with the higher titanium content.

  17. Experimental partitioning of rare earth elements and scandium among armalcolite, ilmenite, olivine and mare basalt liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, A. J.; Merrill, R. B.; Singleton, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to measure partition coefficients for two rare-earth elements (Sm and Tm) and Sc among armalcolite, ilmenite, olivine and liquid coexisting in a system modeled on high-Ti mare basalt 74275. This 'primitive' sample was chosen for study because its major and trace element chemistry as well as its equilibrium phase relations at atmospheric pressure are known from previous studies. Beta-track analytical techniques were used so that partition coefficients could be measured in an environment whose bulk trace element composition is similar to that of the natural basalt. Partition coefficients for Cr and Mn were determined in the same experiments by microprobe analysis. The only equilibrium partial melting model appears to be one in which ilmenite is initially present in the source region but is consumed by melting before segregation of the high-Ti mare basalt liquid from the residue.

  18. Combining mid infrared and total X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for prediction of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towett, Erick; Shepherd, Keith; Sila, Andrew; Aynekulu, Ermias; Cadisch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (MIR) can predict many soil properties but extractable nutrients are often predicted poorly. We evaluated the potential of MIR and total elemental analysis using total X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF), both individually and combined, to predict results of conventional soil tests. Total multi-elemental analysis provides a fingerprint of soil mineralogy and could predict some soil properties and help improve MIR predictions. A set of 700 georeferenced soil samples associated with the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) (www.africasoils.net) from 44 stratified randomly-located 100-km2 sentinel sites distributed across sub-Saharan Africa were analysed for physico-chemical composition using conventional reference methods, and compared to MIR and TXRF spectra using the Random Forests regression algorithm and an internal out-of-bag validation. MIR spectra resulted in good prediction models (R2 >0.80) for organic C and total N, Mehlich-3 Ca and Al, and pH. To test the combined spectroscopic approach, TXRF element concentration data was included as a property predictor along with the first derivative of MIR spectral data using the RF algorithm. Including TXRF did not improve prediction of these properties. TXRF was poorer (R2 0.86) as these elements are not directly determined with TXRF, however the variance explained is still quite high and may be attributable to TXRF signatures relating to mineralogy correlated with protection of soil organic matter. TXRF model for Mehlich-3 Al had excellent prediction capability explaining 81% of the observed variation in extractable Al content and was comparable to that of MIR (R2 = 0.86). However, models for pH and Mehlich-3 exchangeable Ca exhibited R2 values of 0.74 and 0.79 respectively and thus had moderate predictive accuracy, compared to MIR alone with R2 values of 0.82 and 0.84 respectively. Both MIR and TXRF methods predicted soil properties that relate to nutrient

  19. Persistence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in loess soil under different combinations of temperature, soil moisture and light/darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Célia P M; Yang, Xiaomei; Gort, Gerrit; Xue, Sha; van Dam, Ruud; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G J; Ritsema, Coen J; Geissen, Violette

    2016-12-01

    The dissipation kinetics of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were studied in loess soil, under biotic and abiotic conditions, as affected by temperature, soil moisture (SM) and light/darkness. Nonsterile and sterile soil samples were spiked with 16mgkg -1 of glyphosate, subjected to three SM contents (20% WHC, 60% WHC, saturation), and incubated for 30days at 5°C and 30°C, under dark and light regimes. Glyphosate and AMPA dissipation kinetics were fit to single-first-order (SFO) or first-order-multicompartment (FOMC) models, per treatment combination. AMPA kinetic model included both the formation and decline phases. Glyphosate dissipation kinetics followed SFO at 5°C, but FOMC at 30°C. AMPA followed SFO dissipation kinetics for all treatments. Glyphosate and AMPA dissipation occurred mostly by microbial activity. Abiotic processes played a negligible role for both compounds. Under biotic conditions, glyphosate dissipation and AMPA formation/dissipation were primarily affected by temperature, but also by SM. Light regimes didn't play a significant role. Glyphosate DT50 varied between 1.5 and 53.5days, while its DT90 varied between 8.0 and 280days, depending on the treatment. AMPA persisted longer in soil than glyphosate, with its DT50 at 30°C ranging between 26.4 and 44.5days, and its DT90 between 87.8 and 148days. The shortest DT50/DT90 values for both compounds occurred at 30°C and under optimal/saturated moisture conditions, while the largest occurred at 5°C and reaching drought stress conditions. Based on these results, we conclude that glyphosate and AMPA dissipate rapidly under warm and rainy climate conditions. However, repeated glyphosate applications in fallows or winter crops in countries where cold and dry winters normally occur could lead to on-site soil pollution, with consequent potential risks to the environment and human health. To our knowledge, this study is the first evaluating the combined effect of

  20. Development and Characterization of Norite-Based Cementitious Binder from an Ilmenite Mine Waste Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Khalifeh; Arild Saasen; Helge B. Larsen; Helge Hodne

    2017-01-01

    Norite is a major type of solid waste generated during the production of ilmenite. This study focuses on the usability of norite as a solid precursor of alkali-activated cement. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the influence of different alkali types and particle sizes of the source material on polycondensation. Norite was ground and mixed with sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide solutions to produce a binder. Potassium-containing systems were more effective compared to sodium-...

  1. Development and characterization of norite-based cementitious binder from an ilmenite mine waste stream

    OpenAIRE

    M khalifeh; Saasen, A.; Larsen, H.B.; Hodne, H.

    2017-01-01

    Norite is a major type of solid waste generated during the production of ilmenite. This study focuses on the usability of norite as a solid precursor of alkali-activated cement. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the influence of different alkali types and particle sizes of the source material on polycondensation. Norite was ground and mixed with sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide solutions to produce a binder. Potassium-containing systems were more effective compared to sodium-...

  2. Sustainable carbothermal reduction and nitridation of Malaysian ilmenite by polyethylene terephthalate and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Eltefat; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul; Hussin, Hashim; Baharun, Norlia; Ariffin, Kamar Shah; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Fauzi, M. N. Ahmad; Ismail, Hanafi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the carbothermal reduction and nitridation (CTRN) of Malaysian ilmenite has been studied as a part of crucial steps involved in reduction and subsequent chlorination processes for synthesizing titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) from nitrided Malaysian ilmenite concentrates. In CTRN, waste plastics such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) could be utilized as an alternative source of carbon reductant. In this study, titanium oxycarbonitride (TiOxCyNz) separated from iron (Fe) phase was synthesized by non-isothermal CTRN of Malaysian ilmenite under H2-N2 atmosphere by utilizing a mixture of Sarawak Mukah-Balingan coal and PET as reducing agents in a horizontal tube furnace. Experiments have been carried out in the temperature range of 1150-1250°C for 3 hours with various ratios of PET to coal (25 wt.% PET, 50 wt.% PET, and 75 wt.% PET). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) methods of analysis were conducted to assess the microstructures and chemical compositions of the unreduced and reduced samples. The results indicated that utilizing PET had a significant effect on iron separation from titanium oxycarbonitride (TiO0.02C0.13N0.85) at 1250°C with a mixture of 75 wt.% PET. Furthermore, XRD and SEM studies demonstrated that with increasing PET weight ratio in the mixtures, the rate of conversion increased and a low-carbon TiOxCyNz with minimal intermediate titanium sub-oxides was synthesized. The method of applying PET as potential reductant for CTRN of ilmenite has beneficial side effects in sustainable recycling of waste PET.

  3. Environmental and geochemical assessment of surface sediments on irshansk ilmenite deposit area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Олеговна Крюченко

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is revealed the problem of pollution of surface sediments of Irshansk ilmenite deposit area of various chemical elements hazard class (Mn, V, Ba, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn. It is determined its average content in surface sediments of various functional areas (forest and agricultural land, flood deposits, reclaimed land, calculated geochemical criteria, so given ecological and geochemical assessment of area

  4. Change in Microwave-Absorbing Characteristics during the Oxidation Processes of an Ilmenite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Meng, Binfang; Wang, Xinying; Liu, Yuqi; Zhang, Libo

    2017-09-01

    Microwave-absorbing characteristics of the oxidized ilmenite concentrate were measured by the method of microwave cavity perturbation. The effects of particle size, oxidation temperature and oxidation time on the microwave-absorbing characteristics were investigated. The particle size, oxidation temperature and oxidation time have substantial impact on the microwave-absorbing characteristics of the sample and therefore the microwave heating performance during the oxidation processes of the ilmenite concentrate. Results indicated that at the same oxidation time, the microwave absorbing characteristics decreased as the oxidation temperature increased, and at a constant temperature, the microwave absorbing characteristics of the sample decreased as the oxidation time increased. The microwave absorbing characteristics of the ilmenite concentrate with 80-120 mesh particle size was stronger than that of 200 mesh particle size. The microwave absorbing characteristics of products oxidized at 900 °C for 30 min were slightly weaker than those treated at 800 °C for 30 min and 900 °C for 20 min. The sample becomes less efficient in absorbing microwave energy as the oxidation proceeds. It is therefore recommended strong microwave absorbing materials or conventional heating be applied at the late stage of oxidation to aid microwave heating.

  5. Role of ilmenite micro-inclusion on Fe oxidation states of natural sapphires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monarumit, N.; Satitkune, S.; Wongkokua, W.

    2017-09-01

    The blue color of blue sapphire is caused by the Fe-Ti pairs. Recently, the oxidation states of Fe and Ti on high-quality blue sapphire were found as mixed acceptor states of Fe3+ and Ti4+. However, the oxidation states of Fe on natural sapphire with some inclusions were reported as mixing of Fe2+ and Fe3+ using the x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Generally, there are mineral inclusions on natural sapphire related to Fe such as hematite (Fe2O3) and ilmenite (FeTiO3). In this study, we investigated the micro-inclusions on natural sapphires by the electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA). The oxidation states of Fe and Fe-O bond length were analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Fe K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting results focused on the first shell of Fe atoms on high-quality natural sapphires were shown that the Fe-O bond length on α-Al2O3 was fitted well with the Fe-O bond length of Fe2O3 presenting Fe3+. However, the Fe-O bond length on natural sapphires with ilmenite micro-inclusion was fitted with the Fe-O bond length of Fe3O4 showing Fe2+ and Fe3+. As the result, the Fe2+ on natural sapphires was contributed by the ilmenite micro-inclusion.

  6. Combined effect of copper and prolonged summer drought on soil Microarthropods in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrup, Martin [Department of Terrestrial Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 314, Vejlsovej 25, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark)]. E-mail: martin.holmstrup@dmu.dk; Maraldo, Kristine [Department of Terrestrial Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 314, Vejlsovej 25, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark); Krogh, Paul Henning [Department of Terrestrial Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 314, Vejlsovej 25, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark)

    2007-03-15

    Soil microarthropods experience a large range of natural stressors in their natural environment, e.g. variations in temperature and soil moisture, but also anthropogenic stressors such as soil pollutants. In the present study the combined effect of drought stress and copper pollution on microarthropods was investigated in a field study. We hypothesised that microarthropods in copper polluted soil would be more susceptible to drought than animals in control soil. Surprisingly, the abundance of microarthropods in autumn was positively affected by summer drought and copper pollution did not influence the effect of drought in a negative way. The stimulation was mainly seen as an increase of Acari, but also groups of Collembola were positively affected. We suggest that the positive effect of the enforced summer drought could be due to a rapid recovery, which further is accelerated by an increase of food resources (microbes) which have not been utilized during the drought. - Soil contamination with copper does not cause reduced drought tolerance of microarthropods in the field.

  7. A novel combination of anaerobic bioleaching and electrokinetics for arsenic removal from mine tailing soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun-Young; Yoon, In-Ho; Lee, Byung-Tae; Kim, Soon-Oh; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2009-12-15

    This study provides evidence that a hybrid method integrating anaerobic bioleaching and electrokinetics is superior to individual methods for arsenic (As) removal from mine tailing soil. Bioleaching was performed using static reactors in batch tests and flow conditions in column test, and each test was sequentially combined with electrokinetics. In the bioleaching, indigenous bacteria were stimulated by the injection of carbon sources into soil, leading to the mobilization of As with the concurrent release of Fe and Mn. Compared with the batch-type bioleaching process, the combined process showed enhanced removal efficiency in the equivalent time. Although the transport fluid bioleaching conditions were inadequate for As removal, despite long treatment duration, when followed by electrokinetics the combined process achieved 66.5% removal of As from the soil. The improvement of As removal after the combined process was not remarkable, compared with single electrokinetics, whereas a cost reduction of 26.4% was achieved by the reduced duration of electrokinetics. The As removal performance of electrokinetics was significantly dependent on the chemical species of As converted via microbial metal reduction in the anaerobic bioleaching. The synergistic effect of the combined process holds the promise of significant time and cost savings in As remediation.

  8. The effect of Trichoderma harzianum in combination with organicamendment on soil suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADWAN M. BARAKAT

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sheep manure amendment and the biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum Rifai on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. damping off and on fungal activity including Rhizoctonia solani in the soil was investigated over a 24-month period. A combination of T. harzianum and sheep manure at all concentrations tested reduced damping off caused by R. solani after manure incubation in the soil for 0–24 months compared to the control at zero time. Disease reduction was 50% after 24 months with the highest concentration of organic amendment (10%. Disease reduction increased with increasing concentration of organic amendment and with the duration of the incubation time. A combination of T. harzianum and sheep manure reduced both the total fungal population and the R. solani population after 12 and 24 months. However, the population of T. harzianum increased with increasing concentration of sheep manure and duration of incubation. The incubation time had a greater effect on the T. harzianum population than did the concentration of the sheep manure. Sheep manure alone was less effective in reducing bean damping off and improving bean growth than a combination of both manure and T. harzianum. In conclusion, the soil suppressiveness to R. solani damping off was enhanced when T. harzianum isolate Jn14 was added to organically amended soil, and this degree of enhancement increased over time.

  9. Pilot tests of microbe-soil combined treatment of waste drilling sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbe-soil combined treatment is a newly developed technology in view of the defects of the curing process and waste drilling mud slag properties. In particular, 0.3%–0.5% bioremediation reagents were fully mixed with the waste drilling sludge according to its wet and dry degree, and 1.5 folds to twice weight of more finely ground soil was added in the mix, which was covered by soil of 5–15 cm thick and thereby grasses or greeneries were planted on the soil. The process was successfully applied to some fields of Well Danqian 001-8, Well Lianhua 000-X8, etc. After three months of such treatment, the main indexes of the drilling solid waste such as the degradation of COD and the oil-degrading ratio reached more than 90%, the index of leaching solution met the requirement of the first grade in the national “Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard”; heavy metal ion concentration in soil did not change significantly with the indicators meeting the requirement of the third grade in the national “Soil Environmental Quality Standard” (Dry Land; and no harmful effects of heavy metals have ever been found on the planted grasses and greeneries. In conclusion, with this microbe-soil technology, the soil property will recover its background values without any other chemical additives, realizing the ecological restoration and reuse of land covered by wellsite wastes, so it is in line with the energy-saving and environmentally-friendly treatment way.

  10. Combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion in a mollisol area under long-term agricultural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Wu, Yuyang; Hao, Zengchao; Zhang, Qi; Bu, Qingwei; Gao, Xiang

    2018-02-01

    Soil erosion exhibits special characteristics in the process of agricultural development. Understanding the combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion, especially in the area under long-term agricultural cultivations, is vital to watershed agricultural and soil management. This study investigated the temporal-spatial patterns of the soil erosion based on a modified version of Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and conducted a soil erosion contribution analysis. The land use data were interpreted from Landsat series images, and soil properties were obtained from field sampling, laboratory tests and SPAW (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Water) model calculations. Over a long period of agricultural development, the average erosion modulus decreased from 187.7tkm -2 a -1 in 1979 to 158.4tkm -2 a -1 in 2014. The land use types were transformed mainly in the reclamation of paddy fields and the shrinking of wetlands on a large scale. Most of the soils were converted to loam from silty or clay loam and the saturated hydraulic conductivity (K s ) of most soil types decreased by 1.11% to 43.6%. The rapidly increasing area of 49.8km 2 of paddy fields together with the moderate decrease of 14.0km 2 of forests, as well as K s values explained 87.4% of the total variance in soil erosion. Although changes in soil physical and water characteristics indicated that soil erosion loads should have become higher, the upsurge in paddy fields played an important role in mitigating soil erosion in this study area. These results demonstrated that land use changes had more significant impacts than soil property changes on soil erosion. This study suggested that rational measures should be taken to extend paddy fields and control the dry land farming. These findings will benefit watershed agricultural targeting and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Generation of electricity through coal combustion produces huge quantities of fly ash. Sustainable disposal and utilization of these fly ash is a major challenge. Fly ash along with other amendments like biochar could be used for amelioration of soil. In this study, fly ash and biochar were used together for amelioration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil. Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fly ash and biochar on the amelioration of soil PAH, and the yield of Zea mays. The treatments were control, biochar (4 t/ha), fly ash (4 t/ha), ash + biochar ( 2 + 2 t/ha). Soil samples were collected after the harvest of maize crop and analysed for chemical and biological parameters. Thirteen PAHs were analysed in the postharvest soil samples. Soil PAHs were extracted in a microwave oven at 120 °C using hexane : acetone (1:1) mixture. The extracted solutions were concentrated, cleaned and the 13 PAHs [Acenaphthene (Ace), fluorene (Flr), phenanthrene (Phn), anthracene(Ant), pyrene(Pyr), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chy), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene)(Inp)] were analysed using GC-MS. The mean pH increased from 6.09 in control to 6.64 and 6.58 at biochar and fly ash treated soils, respectively. N content was not affected, whereas addition of biochar alone and in combination with fly ash, has significantly increased the soil organic carbon content. P content was almost double in combined (9.06 mg/kg) treatment as compared to control (4.32 mg/kg). The increase in K due to biochar was 118%, whereas char + ash increased soil K by 64%. Soil heavy metals were decreased: Zn (-48.4%), Ni (-41.4%), Co (-36.9%), Cu (-35.7%), Mn (-34.3%), Cd (-33.2%), and Pb (-30.4%). Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by ash and biochar treatments and the maximum activity was observed for the combined

  12. Limiting nitrogen and veterinary pharmaceutical input into groundwater: combining hydrogeophysics and soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Ursula; Stadler, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The EU Interreg project TOPSOIL investigates opportunities to improve surface and groundwater quality as well as water management strategies under the consideration of climate adaptation challenges. Within the framework of the project, we investigate the transport behavior of percolation water in the unsaturated zone, the migration of nitrogen and veterinary pharmaceuticals in soils, and - together with different stakeholders (e.g. farmers, water supply companies) - develop common strategies to minimize the migration of these substances into the groundwater. In our study we focus on distinguishing preferential and diffuse flow using soil scientific and geophysical methods. During the first investigation campaign, we combined soil sampling with radiometry and electrical conductivity overview measurements on the typical sandy soil of the studied area south of Oldenburg, Germany. We used the CMD explorer for the electromagnetic mapping (horizontal and vertical dipoles, intercoil spacing of 1.48/2.82/4.49 m, investigations depths of appr. 0 - 6 m) and the radiometry detector comprised five sodium-iodide crystals each with a volume of 4 litres. The spectral data are evaluated for potassium (1.37 - 1.57 MeV), uranium (Bi-214) (1.66 - 1.86MeV) and thorium (T-208) (2.41 - 2.81MeV) and total counts (0.41-2.81MeV). A total of 292 soil samples were taken from 46 ram coring profiles (depth range: 0 to 3 m) and analyzed for soil chemical parameters and water content. The first evaluation showed a good correlation between conductivity and radiometry measurements. While the uranium and thorium values are generally low, the potassium values possibly reflect higher clay contents as do the higher conductivity values. The geophysical overview measurements were used to select the locations for soil sampling and we specifically targeted presumably clay-rich as well as clay-poor areas for sampling.

  13. Indigenous soil bacteria with the combined potential for hydrocarbon consumption and heavy metal resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nida; Dashti, Narjes; Al-Mailem, Dina; Eliyas, Mohamed; Radwan, Samir

    2012-03-01

    Transconjugant bacteria with combined potential for hydrocarbon utilization and heavy metal resistance were suggested by earlier investigators for bioremediation of soils co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy metals. The purpose of this study was to offer evidence that such microorganisms are already part of the indigenous soil microflora. Microorganisms in pristine and oily soils were counted on nutrient agar and a mineral medium with oil as a sole carbon source, in the absence and presence of either sodium arsenate (As V), sodium arsenite (As III) or cadmium sulfate, and characterized via 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The hydrocarbon-consumption potential of individual strains in the presence and absence of heavy metal salts was measured. Pristine and oil-contaminated soil samples harbored indigenous bacteria with the combined potential for hydrocarbon utilization and As and Cd resistance in numbers up to 4 × 10⁵ CFU g⁻¹. Unicellular bacteria were affiliated to the following species arranged in decreasing order of predominance: Bacillus subtilis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Brevibacterium linens, Alcaligenes faecalis, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Chromobacterium orangum. Filamentous forms were affiliated to Nocardia corallina, Streptomyces flavovirens, Micromonospora chalcea, and Nocardia paraffinea. All these isolates could grow on a wide range of pure aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as sole sources of carbon and energy, and could consume oil and pure hydrocarbons in batch cultures. Low As concentrations, and to a lesser extent Cd concentrations, enhanced the hydrocarbon-consumption potential by the individual isolates. There is no need for molecularly designing microorganisms with the combined potential for hydrocarbon utilization and heavy metal resistance, because they are already a part of the indigenous soil microflora.

  14. Trichoderma harzianum in combination with sheep manure amendment enhances soil suppressiveness of Fusarium wilt of tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Barakat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect that the biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum (isolate Jn14 in combination with an amendment of sheep manure has on the soil suppressiveness of Fusarium wilt of tomato was investigated over a 28-month period. A combination of T. harzianum and organic amendment at concentrations (w:w of 6 and 10% reduced tomato wilt by 21–36 % and 29–36% respectively, after 0–28 months of soil incubation. When the amendment was added at concentration of 2%, the wilt was suppressed only after 18–28 months. A combination of T. harzianum and the amendment at 6% also increased tomato plant fresh weights by 52% after 28 months, and the 10% amendment increased fresh weights by 56, 40, and 63%, after 18, 24, and 28 months respectively, compared to the experimental controls. Organic amendment at the higher concentrations further stimulated T. harzianum populations, enhanced microbial activity against Fusarium oxysporum in the soil and reduced pathogen populations. Without T. harzianum, the organic amendment at a concentration of 10% reduced disease by only 22, 24, and 23% and only after 18, 24 and 28 months of soil incubation respectively, compared with the controls. However, tomato wilt was not reduced at a 2% manure concentration in less than 12 months of incubation. Organic amendment alone at 6 and 10% reduced the pathogen population by 25% and 37% respectively after 28 months of soil incubation compared with the control. T. harzianum produced fungitoxic metabolites that reduced mycelial growth of Fusarium by 37% and conidium germination by 55% when the pathogen was grown on potato dextrose agar amended with a T. harzianum culture filtrate.

  15. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jinzhong; Meng, Die; Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils.

  16. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhong Wan

    Full Text Available This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils.

  17. Toxic effects of oxytetracycline and copper, separately or combined, on soil microbial biomasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lanjun; Wang, Jinhua; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-12

    The production of commercial livestock and poultry often involves using with antibiotics and feed additives, such as oxytetracycline (OTC) and copper (Cu). These are often excreted into the soil by animal feces; hence, combined pollutants may contaminate the soil. To evaluate single and combined toxic effects of OTC and Cu on the soil ecology, changes in quantities of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes in the soil were studied over a 28-d incubation period by a plate count method, microbes numbers counted on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Abundances of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene expression by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in soil samples also were tested by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) on day 21. The results revealed that the numbers of bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes and amoA genes copies of AOA and AOB were reduced seriously by exposure to Cu (1.60 mmol/kg). Similarly, the combined pollution treatments (mole ratios of OTC: Cu was 1:2, 1:8, and 1:32) also had inhibitory effect on bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes numbers and amoA gene copies of AOA and AOB; the inhibitory rate was on obvious growth trend with the increasing mole ratios. Effects from single OTC pollution were found on bacteria (days 7 and 14), fungi (days 7, 14, 21, and 28), and AOA-amoA gene copies (day 21), with promotion at a low concentration (0.05 mmol/kg) and suppression at higher concentrations (0.2 and 0.8 mmol/kg). Also, numbers of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes decreased with longer culture times. Combining OTC and Cu led to a higher inhibition of soil microbes than when either chemical was used alone. However, there was no significant relationship between single and combined toxic chemicals because of their complicated interactions, either antagonistic or synergistic. The results also indicated the sensitivity of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes on toxic chemicals existed difference and that the AOA were more tolerant than

  18. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF), and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment) in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1) respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  19. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chen

    Full Text Available Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF, and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1 respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  20. Combining modelled and remote sensing soil moisture anomalies for an operational global drought monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammalleri, Carmelo; Vogt, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture anomalies (i.e., deviations from the climatology) are often seen as a reliable tool to monitor and quantify the occurrence of drought events and their potential impacts, especially in agricultural and naturally vegetated lands. Soil moisture datasets (or their proxy) can be derived from a variety of sources, including land-surface models and thermal and microwave satellite remote sensing images. However, each data source has different advantages and drawbacks that prevent to unequivocally prefer one dataset over the others, especially in global applications that encompass a wide range of soil moisture regimes. The analysis of the spatial reliability of the different datasets at global scale is further complicated by the lack of reliable long-term soil moisture records for a ground validation over most regions. To overcome this limitation, in recent years the Triple Collocation (TC) technique has been deployed in order to quantify the likely errors associated to three mutually-independent datasets without assuming that one of them represents the "truth". In this study, three global datasets of soil moisture anomalies are investigated: the first one derived from the runs of the Lisflood hydrological model, the second one obtained from the combined active/passive microwave dataset produced in the framework of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI), and the last one derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) observations. A preliminary analysis of the three datasets aimed at detecting the areas where the TC technique can be successfully applied, hence the spatial distribution of the random error variance for each model is evaluated. This study allows providing useful advises for a robust combination of the three datasets into a single product for a more reliable global drought monitoring.

  1. The Effects of Biochar and Its Combination with Compost on Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Growth, Soil Properties, and Soil Microbial Activity and Abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Trupiano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of biochar application in combination with organic fertilizer, such as compost, are not fully understood. In this study, we tested the effects of biochar amendment, compost addition, and their combination on lettuce plants grown in a soil poor in nutrients; soil microbiological, chemical, and physical characteristics were analyzed, together with plant growth and physiology. An initial screening was also done to evaluate the effect of biochar and compost toxicity, using cress plants and earthworms. Results showed that compost amendment had clear and positive effects on plant growth and yield and on soil chemical characteristics. However, we demonstrated that also the biochar alone stimulated lettuce leaves number and total biomass, improving soil total nitrogen and phosphorus contents, as well as total carbon, and enhancing related microbial communities. Nevertheless, combining biochar and compost, no positive synergic and summative effects were observed. Our results thus demonstrate that in a soil poor in nutrients the biochar alone could be effectively used to enhance soil fertility and plant growth and biomass yield. However, we can speculate that the combination of compost and biochar may enhance and sustain soil biophysical and chemical characteristics and improve crop productivity over time.

  2. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyan, M. S.; Rasche, F.; Schütt, M.; Smirnova, N.; Schulz, E.; Cadisch, G.

    2013-05-01

    An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA) in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS) is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM) to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2) to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i) the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem), from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM), mineral fertilizer (NPK), their combination (FYM + NPK) and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii) Kraichgau; and (iii) Swabian Alb (Cambisols) areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM), sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A), silt and clay (Si + C), and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC) to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm-1) being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min-1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS) for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max). Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the Chernozem

  3. Valorisation of ilmenite mud waste in the manufacture of commercial ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras Llanes, Manuel; Martín, M. I.; Gázquez González, Manuel Jesús; Romero, M.; Bolívar Raya, Juan Pedro

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study focused on the production of ceramic tiles from ilmenite mud (MUD), a waste generated by the industry devoted to the TiO2 pigment production. Ceramic tiles were produced from mixtures of a commercial red stoneware mixture (RSM) with different concentrations of mud (3, 5, 7, 10, 30 and 50 wt.%). The samples were sintered to simulate a fast-firing process. The sintering behaviour of the fired samples was evaluated according to ISO methodologies by linea...

  4. Combination of pseudomonas putida and EK method to reduce the amount of mercury on landfill soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, A. T. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurshuhaila, M. S.; Azim, M. A. M.; Amirah, S. N.

    2017-11-01

    Landfills usually lack of environment measures especially on soil. There are no guarantee that the landfill soil is free from being contaminated. It may cause harm for humans, animals and plants at surrounding area. In order to solve this problem, advance remediation technique is essential such as the electrokinetic combined with microorganisms known as electrokinetic bioremediation technique. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of P.putida with 15 volt electric current supply (Ek-bio) and without electric current (Bio) in removal of mercury in landfill soil. Both treatments were running throughout 14 days. The P.putida was placed at anode compartment meanwhile sterile distilled water poured at cathode compartment. According to the both results, Ek-bio was removed mercury up to 48 % but by using standard bioremediation treatment, the removal only 32 %. Besides that, the migration of P.putida react more aggressively during the present of electric current compared with bioremediation. As the results, it was proven that by using Ek-bio technique can increase the activity of bacteria beside and the removal of mercury. Therefore, Ek-bio method can be commercialized to the parties concerned to solve the contaminated soil by mercury.

  5. Combined effect of sequestration and bioremediation in reducing the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Carroquino, M.J.; Robertson, B.K.; Alexander, M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1998-11-15

    A study was conducted to determine the combined effect of sequestration and laboratory-scale bioremediation on the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil. After the compounds had aged for 140--203 days in soil, bacteria capable of degrading the compounds were added, and the availability of the hydrocarbons after bioremediation was determined. Aging decreased the amount of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene available to bacteria as shown by increases in the amount of the compounds remaining after bioremediation and to earthworms (Eisenia foetida) as shown by lower tissue concentrations, percentages assimilated, and bioconcentration factors. Aging also diminished the availability of anthracene to wheat and barley. Bioremediation caused a marked diminution in the amount of phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene taken up by earthworms. The smallest amounts of these three compounds were assimilated from soil in which they had aged and then been subject to biodegradation. The results show that the combined effects of sequestration and bioremediation lead to a more marked reduction in bioavailability than either process alone.

  6. Application of supporting structure combining with basement slab in soft soil excavations engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rencheng; Liu, Le

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, based on the case of a soft soil excavations project in Zhongshan and the field measured data, the ABAQUS, a finite element software for engineering simulation, analyses the system which combines steel cement-soil pile and basement plate. Moreover it can simulate the deformation results and get the supporting stress model. The results show that the supporting effect of this system is remarkable. This simplified model calculation results are conservative. But there exists the problem of varying depth of excavations. As a result, the stress characteristics and design methods of the proposed scheme are less studied and need further research and discussion. The analysis method and the design scheme can provide useful reference for similar projects.

  7. Degradation of 2,4-D in soils by Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles combined with stimulating indigenous microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guodong; Si, Youbin; Tian, Chao; Zhang, Gangya; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-03-01

    Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in soils by Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles combined with soil indigenous microbes was investigated, and the effects of Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles on soil microbial populations and enzyme activities were also studied. The soils contaminated with 2,4-D were treated with Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles. The microbial populations and enzyme activities were analyzed by dilution plate method and chemical assay, respectively, and the concentration of 2,4-D in soil was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles combined with soil indigenous microbes led to a higher degradation efficiency of 2,4-D than the treatments with Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles or indigenous microbes alone. The degradation of 2,4-D in soils followed the pseudo first-order kinetic. The half-lives of 2,4-D degradation (DT₅₀) of the combined treatments were 0.9, 1.9 and 3.1 days in a Red soil, Vertisol and Alfisol, respectively, which implied that the DT₅₀ of the combination treatments were significantly shorter than that of the treatments Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles or indigenous microbes alone. The effects of Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles on soil microbial populations and enzyme activities were also investigated and compared with the α-Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles. The results suggested that the α-Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles had only comparatively small effects on degradation of 2,4-D in soils, while the Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles not only degraded 2,4-D in soils but also increased the soil microbial populations and enzyme activities; the maximum increase in enzyme activities were 67.8% (amylase), 53.8% (acid phosphatase), 26.5% (catalase) and 38.0% (urease), compared with the untreated soil. Moreover, the introduction of Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles at the different dosage resulted in a variable degradation efficiency of 2,4-D in soil. The method of combining Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles with indigenous soil microbes may

  8. Combined climate factors alleviate changes in gross soil nitrogen dynamics in heathlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorsne, Anna-Karin; Rutting, Tobias; Ambus, Per

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing climate change affects biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, but the magnitude and direction of this impact is yet unclear. To shed further light on the climate change impact, we investigated alterations in the soil nitrogen (N) cycling in a Danish heathland after 5 years...... of exposure to three climate change factors, i.e. warming, elevated CO2 (eCO(2)) and summer drought, applied both in isolation and in combination. By conducting laboratory N-15 tracing experiments we show that warming increased both gross N mineralization and nitrification rates. In contrast, gross...... nitrification was decreased by eCO(2), an effect that was more pronounced when eCO(2) was combined with warming and drought. Moreover, there was an interactive effect between the warming and CO2 treatment, especially for N mineralization: rates increased at warming alone but decreased at warming combined with e...

  9. Impacts of Soil Contamination on the Response of Piles Foundation under a Combination of Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Karkush

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of single piles driven into contaminated clayey soil samples subjected to a combination of static axial and cyclic lateral loadings have been studied in this research. A laboratory model was manufactured especially for studying such behavior. A solid circular cross sectional area pile of diameter 19 mm and made from aluminum, the pile was embedded into the soil with an eccentricity to embedded length (e/L ratio of 0.334. The intact soil samples and industrial wastewater were obtained from the center of Iraq. The industrial wastewater is a byproduct disposed from Musayib thermal electric power plant. The intact clayey soil samples were synthetically contaminated with four percentages of 10, 20, 40 and 100% from the weight of water used in the soaking process which continued for a period of 30 days. The different percentages of contaminant concentrations have significant effects on the lateral load-displacement relation of the piles subjected to a combination of axial and lateral loadings. The vertical displacement under the same vertical load increased by 5–95%, the axial strength of piles decreased by 10–34% and the lateral-bearing capacity of the piles decreased by 10–34% with increasing the percentage of contamination from 10 to 100%. The ratio of permanent lateral displacement to the total lateral displacement was increased by 23–27% when the concentration of contaminant increased by 10-100%. Generally, the application of axial loading increases the lateral-bearing capacity of piles, and reduces the total lateral displacement.

  10. Aided phytostabilisation of As- and Cu-contaminated soils using white lupin and combined iron and organic amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresno, Teresa; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Zornoza, Pilar; Peñalosa, Jesús M

    2018-01-01

    An aided phytostabilisation strategy consisting of several composite amendments of iron sulphate and organic materials combined with Lupinus albus L. (white lupin) was evaluated for remediation of an As- and Cu-contaminated soil. Iron sulphate was combined with lime, paper mill sludge (PS), olive mill waste compost (OMWC) or holm oak biochar (BC) and applied to a slightly acidic soil with high concentration of As (∼2200 mg kg-1) and Cu (∼150 mg kg-1). White lupin was grown for 48 days in pots containing amended and non-amended soils and the effect of soil treatments on soluble and extractable trace elements, soil fertility and plant growth and composition was evaluated. The addition of the amendments raised soil pH and reduced soluble As (50-93%) and extractable As and Cu (50-89%). Despite the reduction of As- and Cu-extractable fractions, plant As and Cu uptake was not greatly affected by the amendments. Variations in soil pH and P-Olsen seemed to have influenced As dynamics in the treated soils, although they did not provoke its mobilisation with respect to the non-amended soil. Our results suggest that the freshly formed iron oxides resulting from addition of iron sulphate controlled As dynamics in the treated soils, avoiding its mobilisation due to application of organic materials. The combination of iron sulphate with OMWC and BC is shown as appropriate for aided phytostabilisation of metal(loid)s contaminated soils, as it improved soil fertility and plant nutrition while reduced As and Cu mobility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of titania nanorods from ilmenite for photocatalytic annihilation of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Diptipriya; Jada, Naresh; Kumar, Rohit; Ramasamy, Sakthivel; Pandey, Sony; Das, Trupti; Kalidoss, Jayasankar; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Tiwari, Ashish

    2014-11-01

    Titania nanorod structures have been obtained by thermal plasma reduction of ilmenite (FeTiO₃) followed by chemical treatments. Inherently present iron in the titania nanorods acts as a dopant which results in shifting the absorption edge of titania from ultraviolet to visible region. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study confirms the existence of rutile phase of titania. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the presence of Ti(4+), O(2-), Fe(3+) and surface hydroxyl group. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) confirms the formation of nanorod structure having width of 6 nm and length of 32 nm. Photocatalytic annihilation property of titania nanorods derived from ilmenite (titania-I), rutile titania obtained from titanium(IV) butoxide (titania-A) and Degussa P25 titania was studied under UV and UV-Visible irradiation conditions separately and compared. The time required for complete photocatalytic annihilation of Escherichiacoli cells are 10, 15 and 45 min under UV irradiation whereas it has taken 15, 10-15, 30 min under UV-Visible irradiation for titania-A, Degussa P25 titania and titania-I respectively. It is observed that titania-I shows significantly stronger antibacterial property under UV-Visible irradiation compared to UV alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  13. First-principles investigation of Fe-doped MgSiO{sub 3}-ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stashans, Arvids, E-mail: arvids@utpl.edu.ec [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Rivera, Krupskaya [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Escuela de Geologia y Minas, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Pinto, Henry P. [Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217-0510 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    First principles density functional theory and generalised gradient approximation (GGA) have been exploited to investigate Fe-doped ilmenite-type MgSiO{sub 3} mineral. Strong electron correlation effects not included in a density-functional formalism are described by a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb repulsion (the DFT+U approach). Microstructure of equilibrium geometries, electronic band structures as well as magnetic properties are computed and discussed in detail. Hartree-Fock methodology is used as an extra tool to study optical properties of the same system. For equilibrium state of the doped mineral we find zigzag-type atomic rearrangements around the Fe impurity. The inclusion of correlation effects leads to an improved description of the electronic properties. In particular, it is discovered that Fe incorporation produces local energy levels within the band-gap of the material. Using {Delta}SCF method optical absorption energies are found to be equal to 2.2 and 2.6 eV leading to light absorption at longer wavelengths compared to the undoped MgSiO{sub 3}. Our results provide evidence on the occurrence of local magnetic moment in the region surrounding iron dopant. According to the outcomes, the Fe Rightwards-Double-Arrow Mg reaction can be described as substitutionally labile with Fe{sup 2+} complex being found in the high-spin state at low pressure MgSiO{sub 3}-ilmenite conditions.

  14. Identification and characterization of tebuconazole transformation products in soil by combining suspect screening and molecular typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Veronika; Lucini, Luigi; Mamy, Laure; Ferrari, Federico; Papadopoulou, Evangelia S; Nikolaki, Sofia; Karas, Panagiotis A; Servien, Remi; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Trevisan, Marco; Benoit, Pierre; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides generate transformation products (TPs) when they are released into the environment. These TPs may be of ecotoxicological importance. Past studies have demonstrated how difficult it is to predict the occurrence of pesticide TPs and their environmental risk. The monitoring approaches mostly used in current regulatory frameworks target only known ecotoxicologically relevant TPs. Here, we present a novel combined approach which identifies and categorizes known and unknown pesticide TPs in soil by combining suspect screening time-of-flight mass spectrometry with in silico molecular typology. We used an empirical and theoretical pesticide TP library for compound identification by both non-target and target time-of-flight (tandem) mass spectrometry, followed by structural proposition through a molecular structure correlation program. In silico molecular typology was then used to group TPs according to common molecular descriptors and to indirectly elucidate their environmental parameters by analogy to known pesticide compounds with similar molecular descriptors. This approach was evaluated via the identification of TPs of the triazole fungicide tebuconazole occurring in soil during a field dissipation study. Overall, 22 empirical and 12 yet unknown TPs were detected, and categorized into three groups with defined environmental properties. This approach combining suspect screening time-of-flight mass spectrometry with molecular typology could be extended to other organic pollutants and used to rationalize the choice of TPs to be investigated towards a more comprehensive environmental risk assessment scheme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Persistence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in loess soil under different combinations of temperature, soil moisture and light/darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins Bento, Celia; Yang, Xiaomei; Gort, Gerrit; Xue, Sha; Dam, van Ruud; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G.J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-01-01

    The dissipation kinetics of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were studied in loess soil, under biotic and abiotic conditions, as affected by temperature, soil moisture (SM) and light/darkness. Nonsterile and sterile soil samples were spiked with 16 mg kg

  16. The Effects of Fungicide, Soil Fumigant, Bio-Organic Fertilizer and Their Combined Application on Chrysanthemum Fusarium Wilt Controlling, Soil Enzyme Activities and Microbial Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang; Chen, Xi; Deng, Shiping; Dong, Xuena; Song, Aiping; Yao, Jianjun; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-04-21

    Sustained monoculture often leads to a decline in soil quality, in particular to the build-up of pathogen populations, a problem that is conventionally addressed by the use of either fungicide and/or soil fumigation. This practice is no longer considered to be either environmentally sustainable or safe. While the application of organic fertilizer is seen as a means of combating declining soil fertility, it has also been suggested as providing some control over certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Here, a greenhouse comparison was made of the Fusarium wilt control efficacy of various treatments given to a soil in which chrysanthemum had been produced continuously for many years. The treatments comprised the fungicide carbendazim (MBC), the soil fumigant dazomet (DAZ), the incorporation of a Paenibacillus polymyxa SQR21 (P. polymyxa SQR21, fungal antagonist) enhanced bio-organic fertilizer (BOF), and applications of BOF combined with either MBC or DAZ. Data suggest that all the treatments evaluated show good control over Fusarium wilt. The MBC and DAZ treatments were effective in suppressing the disease, but led to significant decrease in urease activity and no enhancement of catalase activity in the rhizosphere soils. BOF including treatments showed significant enhancement in soil enzyme activities and microbial communities compared to the MBC and DAZ, evidenced by differences in bacterial/fungi (B/F) ratios, Shannon-Wiener indexes and urease, catalase and sucrase activities in the rhizosphere soil of chrysanthemum. Of all the treatments evaluated, DAZ/BOF application not only greatly suppressed Fusarium wilt and enhanced soil enzyme activities and microbial communities but also promoted the quality of chrysanthemum obviously. Our findings suggest that combined BOF with DAZ could more effectively control Fusarium wilt disease of chrysanthemum.

  17. The Effects of Fungicide, Soil Fumigant, Bio-Organic Fertilizer and Their Combined Application on Chrysanthemum Fusarium Wilt Controlling, Soil Enzyme Activities and Microbial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustained monoculture often leads to a decline in soil quality, in particular to the build-up of pathogen populations, a problem that is conventionally addressed by the use of either fungicide and/or soil fumigation. This practice is no longer considered to be either environmentally sustainable or safe. While the application of organic fertilizer is seen as a means of combating declining soil fertility, it has also been suggested as providing some control over certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Here, a greenhouse comparison was made of the Fusarium wilt control efficacy of various treatments given to a soil in which chrysanthemum had been produced continuously for many years. The treatments comprised the fungicide carbendazim (MBC, the soil fumigant dazomet (DAZ, the incorporation of a Paenibacillus polymyxa SQR21 (P. polymyxa SQR21, fungal antagonist enhanced bio-organic fertilizer (BOF, and applications of BOF combined with either MBC or DAZ. Data suggest that all the treatments evaluated show good control over Fusarium wilt. The MBC and DAZ treatments were effective in suppressing the disease, but led to significant decrease in urease activity and no enhancement of catalase activity in the rhizosphere soils. BOF including treatments showed significant enhancement in soil enzyme activities and microbial communities compared to the MBC and DAZ, evidenced by differences in bacterial/fungi (B/F ratios, Shannon–Wiener indexes and urease, catalase and sucrase activities in the rhizosphere soil of chrysanthemum. Of all the treatments evaluated, DAZ/BOF application not only greatly suppressed Fusarium wilt and enhanced soil enzyme activities and microbial communities but also promoted the quality of chrysanthemum obviously. Our findings suggest that combined BOF with DAZ could more effectively control Fusarium wilt disease of chrysanthemum.

  18. Changes to soil water content and biomass yield under combined maize and maize-weed vegetation with different fertilization treatments in loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehoczky Éva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Especially during early developmental stages, competition with weeds can reduce crop growth and have a serious effect on productivity. Here, the effects of interactions between soil water content (SWC, nutrient availability, and competition from weeds on early stage crop growth were investigated, to better understand this problem. Field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using long-term study plots on loam soil in Hungary. Plots of maize (Zea mays L. and a weed-maize combination were exposed to five fertilization treatments. SWC was observed along the 0–80 cm depth soil profile and harvested aboveground biomass (HAB was measured.

  19. Combination of biochar amendment and phytoremediation for hydrocarbon removal in petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Zhao, Zhipeng; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-11-01

    Remediation of soils contaminated with petroleum is a challenging task. Four different bioremediation strategies, including natural attenuation, biochar amendment, phytoremediation with ryegrass, and a combination of biochar and ryegrass, were investigated with greenhouse pot experiments over a 90-day period. The results showed that planting ryegrass in soil can significantly improve the removal rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and the number of microorganisms. Within TPHs, the removal rate of total n-alkanes (45.83 %) was higher than that of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (30.34 %). The amendment of biochar did not result in significant improvement of TPH removal. In contrast, it showed a clear negative impact on the growth of ryegrass and the removal of TPHs by ryegrass. The removal rate of TPHs was significantly lower after the amendment of biochar. The results indicated that planting ryegrass is an effective remediation strategy, while the amendment of biochar may not be suitable for the phytoremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  20. Combining local scaling and global methods to detect soil pore space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Grau, Juan B.; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2017-04-01

    The characterization of the spatial distribution of soil pore structures is essential to obtain different parameters that will influence in several models related to water flow and/or microbial growth processes. The first step in pore structure characterization is obtaining soil images that best approximate reality. Over the last decade, major technological advances in X-ray computed tomography (CT) have allowed for the investigation and reconstruction of natural porous media architectures at very fine scales. The subsequent step is delimiting the pore structure (pore space) from the CT soil images applying a thresholding. Many times we could find CT-scan images that show low contrast at the solid-void interface that difficult this step. Different delimitation methods can result in different spatial distributions of pores influencing the parameters used in the models. Recently, new local segmentation method using local greyscale value (GV) concentration variabilities, based on fractal concepts, has been presented. This method creates singularity maps to measure the GV concentration at each point. The C-A method was combined with the singularity map approach (Singularity-CA method) to define local thresholds that can be applied to binarize CT images. Comparing this method with classical methods, such as Otsu and Maximum Entropy, we observed that more pores can be detected mainly due to its ability to amplify anomalous concentrations. However, it delineated many small pores that were incorrect. In this work, we present an improve version of Singularity-CA method that avoid this problem basically combining it with the global classical methods. References Martín-Sotoca, J.J., A. Saa-Requejo, J.B. Grau, A.M. Tarquis. New segmentation method based on fractal properties using singularity maps. Geoderma, 287, 40-53, 2017. Martín-Sotoca, J.J, A. Saa-Requejo, J.B. Grau, A.M. Tarquis. Local 3D segmentation of soil pore space based on fractal properties using singularity

  1. Combined effects of biocontrol agents and soil amendments on soil microbial populations, plant growth and incidence of charcoal rot of cowpea and wilt of cumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeta SINGH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine the effectiveness of combined use of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus firmus and Aspergillus versicolor for control of Macrophomina phaseolina induced charcoal rot of cowpea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini induced wilt of cumin. The lowest level of plant mortality (3‒4% due to charcoal rot of cowpea was recorded when bacterium coated seeds were sown in radish compost amended soil compared to the non-amended soil (13.8‒20.5%, but this was not significantly better than some other treatments. Cowpea roots from B. firmus coated seeds had better nodulation than any of the individual A. versicolor treatments. Although B. firmus coated seeds + A. versicolor + farmyard manure resulted in maximum nodulation this was not significantly different to B. firmus seed coating. Root colonization by the combined biocontrol agent treatments was better than the individual biocontrol agent treatments. Combining A. versicolor with farmyard manure supported the maximum populations of total fungi and actinomycetes. In both winter seasons, the lowest incidence of wilt (1.0‒5.2% on cumin was recorded when A. versicolor was amended with neem compost compared to the non-amended soil (5.7‒10.5%. Maximum colonization of A. versicolor on roots was observed in B. firmus + A. versicolor + farmyard manure amended plots. During both years, the treatment combination of A. versicolor in neem compost amended plots resulted in maximum populations of fungi, bacteria and A. versicolor in the soil, which was greater than in the non-amended soil. Significant increases in disease control were not recorded after single or repeated delivery of A. versicolor. These results suggest that combining B. firmus as seed coatings with A. versicolor as soil applications gives improved control of M. phaseolina and Fusarium induced diseases on legume and seed spice crops in arid soils.

  2. Considering combined or separated roughness and vegetation effects in soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrens, Marie; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Richaume, Philippe; Al Bitar, Ahmad; Mialon, Arnaud; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Al-Yaari, Amen; O'Neill, Peggy; Kerr, Yann

    2017-03-01

    For more than six years, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has provided multi angular and full-polarization brightness temperature (TB) measurements at L-band. Geophysical products such as soil moisture (SM) and vegetation optical depth at nadir (τnad) are retrieved by an operational algorithm using TB observations at different angles of incidence and polarizations. However, the quality of the retrievals depends on several surface effects, such as vegetation, soil roughness and texture, etc. In the microwave forward emission model used in the retrievals (L-band Microwave Emission Model, L-MEB), soil roughness is modelled with a semi-empirical equation using four main parameters (Qr, Hr, Nrp, with p = H or V polarizations). At present, these parameters are calibrated with data provided by airborne studies and in situ measurements made at a local scale that is not necessarily representative of the large SMOS footprints (43 km on average) at global scale. In this study, we evaluate the impact of the calibrated values of Nrp and Hr on the SM and τnad retrievals based on SMOS TB measurements (SMOS Level 3 product) over the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) network located in North America over five years (2011-2015). In this study, Qr was set equal to zero and we assumed that NrH = NrV. The retrievals were performed by varying Nrp from -1 to 2 by steps of 1 and Hr from 0 to 0.6 by steps of 0.1. At satellite scale, the results show that combining vegetation and roughness effects in a single parameter provides the best results in terms of soil moisture retrievals, as evaluated against the in situ SM data. Even though our retrieval approach was very simplified, as we did not account for pixel heterogeneity, the accuracy we obtained in the SM retrievals was almost systematically better than those of the Level 3 product. Improved results were also obtained in terms of optical depth retrievals. These new results may have key consequences in terms of

  3. Combined effect of temperature and copper pollution on soil bacterial community: climate change and regional variation aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Isabel; Araújo, Susana; Pereira, Anabela; Menezes-Oliveira, Vanessa B; Correia, António; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined effects of temperature and copper (Cu) contamination in the structure of soil bacterial community. For this, contaminated or spiked and control soils from two different geographic origins (PT-Portugal and DK-Denmark) were used. The DK soil was from a historically contaminated study field, representing a long-term exposure to Cu while the PT soil was from a clean site and freshly spiked with Cu. Soil bacterial communities were exposed in mesocosms during 84 days to 3 different temperatures based on values typically found in each geographic region and temperature conditions that simulated a warming scenario. Obtained results indicate that Cu stress alters the structure of bacterial community and that this effect is, to some extent, temperature-dependent. Effects on bacterial diversity for both soils were also observed. Differences in the DK and PT communities' response were apparent, with the community from the historically contaminated soil being more resilient to temperature fluctuations. This study presents evidence to support the hypothesis that temperature alters the effect of metals on soils. Further, our results suggest that the definition of soils quality criteria must be based on studies performed under temperatures selected for the specific geographic region. Studies taking into account temperature changes are needed to model and predict risks, this is important to e.g. future adjustments of the maximum permissible levels for soil metal contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Combined Parameter Scaling and Inverse Technique to Upscale the Unsaturated Hydraulic Parameters for Heterogeneous Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2004-08-01

    Determination of large number of soil hydraulic parameters of heterogeneous soils remains a challenge since inverting for too many parameters can lead to the non-uniqueness of parameter values and may need very long simulation time, for example, months or more. In this research, a combined parameter scaling and inverse technique (CPSIT) was proposed to upscale hydraulic parameters from local scale to field scale. The CPSIT approach includes two steps. Step 1, the number of parameters to be estimated at field scale (FS) is reduced by applying parameter scaling [Zhang et al., 2003]. A heterogeneous soil is treated as a composition of multiple equivalent homogeneous media (EHM) and a reference EHM is chosen. Each parameter is assigned a scaling factor that is defined as the ratio of the parameter of an EHM to the corresponding parameter of the reference EHM. These scaling factors are determined using local-scale parameter values. Step 2, the FS parameters of the reference EHM are determined using the inverse technique and well-designed field experiments. Then, the FS parameters of each of the EHMs is determined by multiplying the FS parameter value by the corresponding scaling factor. The advantages of the CPSIT approach are that the number of parameters to be inverted is reduced by a factor of the number of EHMs (M) and the simulation time is reduced by a factor of about the square of M. The CPSIT approach was tested by upscaling the hydraulic parameter using a field injection experiment in a heterogeneous soil at the Hanford’s Sisson and Lu site, which has the horizontal dimension of 16 m and vertical dimension of 18 m. The results show that, when the CPSIT upscaled parameters were used to simulated flow, the mean squared residual was reduced by 86% relative to that when the local-scale parameters were used.

  5. Ecological effects of combined pollution associated with e-waste recycling on the composition and diversity of soil microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Xin; Lin, Xue-Rui; Chen, Wen-Ce; Zhou, Qi-Xing; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Huang, Li-Nan

    2015-06-02

    The crude processing of electronic waste (e-waste) has led to serious contamination in soils. While microorganisms may play a key role in remediation of the contaminated soils, the ecological effects of combined pollution (heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers) on the composition and diversity of microbial communities remain unknown. In this study, a suite of e-waste contaminated soils were collected from Guiyu, China, and the indigenous microbial assemblages were profiled by 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis. Our data revealed significant differences in microbial taxonomic composition between the contaminated and the reference soils, with Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes dominating the e-waste-affected communities. Genera previously identified as organic pollutants-degrading bacteria, such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Alcanivorax, were frequently detected. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that approximately 70% of the observed variation in microbial assemblages in the contaminated soils was explained by eight environmental variables (including soil physiochemical parameters and organic pollutants) together, among which moisture content, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), and copper were the major factors. These results provide the first detailed phylogenetic look at the microbial communities in e-waste contaminated soils, demonstrating that the complex combined pollution resulting from improper e-waste recycling may significantly alter soil microbiota.

  6. Combining airborne laser scanning and Landsat data for statistical modeling of soil carbon and tree biomass in Tanzanian Miombo woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberth, Mikael; Nyberg, Gert; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Mauya, Ernest; Malimbwi, Rogers; Katani, Josiah; Chamuya, Nurudin; Bulenga, George; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon and biomass depletion can be used to identify and quantify degraded soils, and by using remote sensing, there is potential to map soil conditions over large areas. Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager satellite data and airborne laser scanning data were evaluated separately and in combination for modeling soil organic carbon, above ground tree biomass and below ground tree biomass. The test site is situated in the Liwale district in southeastern Tanzania and is dominated by Miombo woodlands. Tree data from 15 m radius field-surveyed plots and samples of soil carbon down to a depth of 30 cm were used as reference data for tree biomass and soil carbon estimations. Cross-validated plot level error (RMSE) for predicting soil organic carbon was 28% using only Landsat 8, 26% using laser only, and 23% for the combination of the two. The plot level error for above ground tree biomass was 66% when using only Landsat 8, 50% for laser and 49% for the combination of Landsat 8 and laser data. Results for below ground tree biomass were similar to above ground biomass. Additionally it was found that an early dry season satellite image was preferable for modelling biomass while images from later in the dry season were better for modelling soil carbon. The results show that laser data is superior to Landsat 8 when predicting both soil carbon and biomass above and below ground in landscapes dominated by Miombo woodlands. Furthermore, the combination of laser data and Landsat data were marginally better than using laser data only.

  7. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  8. Development and Characterization of Norite-Based Cementitious Binder from an Ilmenite Mine Waste Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Khalifeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Norite is a major type of solid waste generated during the production of ilmenite. This study focuses on the usability of norite as a solid precursor of alkali-activated cement. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the influence of different alkali types and particle sizes of the source material on polycondensation. Norite was ground and mixed with sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide solutions to produce a binder. Potassium-containing systems were more effective compared to sodium-containing systems with respect to strength development. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicated formation of zeolites, albite, and oligoclase based on the type of activator and used additives. The patterns also revealed formation of an amorphous phase in the matrices of the binder that was cured at 87°C. Microstructure analysis revealed some degree of crystallization with different Si : Al ratios, which indicated heterogeneity of the binder matrices.

  9. Simultaneous lead and antimony immobilization in shooting range soil by a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shouhei; Katoh, Masahiko; Sato, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether a combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite could immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil in which the level of lead contamination is markedly higher than that of antimony. In addition, we evaluated the stability of lead and antimony immobilized by the combined application with varying soil pH. The levels of water-soluble lead and antimony for the combined application were lower than those of single applications of hydroxyapatite or ferrihydrite, indicating that the combined application could suppress the levels of water-soluble lead and antimony by 99.9% and 95.5%, respectively, as compared with the levels in shooting range soil without immobilization material. The amounts of residual lead and amorphous Fe/Al oxide-bound antimony fractions in sequential extraction increased with a decrease in the exchangeable and carbonate lead fractions as well as in non-specifically bound and specifically bound antimony fractions. The alteration of lead and antimony phases to chemically more stable ones as a result of the combined application would result in the suppression of their mobility. The stability of immobilized lead and antimony in the combined application was equal to that of lead with a single application of hydroxyapatite and that of antimony with a single application of ferrihydrite within neutral to alkaline pH conditions, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that the combined application of hydroxyapatite and ferrihydrite can simultaneously immobilize lead and antimony in shooting range soil with neutral to alkaline pH.

  10. Comparing soil functions for a wide range of agriculture soils focusing on production for bioenergy using a combined isotope-based observation and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistert, Hannes; Herbstritt, Barbara; Weiler, Markus

    2017-04-01

    sampled locations and to derive the changes in soil functions by altering the land cover among the different bioenergy crops in comparison to the grassland as a reference. We could show that percolation is strongly influenced by the crops and climate, the transit time is influenced by a combination of soil type, climate and land use, but the effect of soil type is very strong and the nitrate leaching is strongly influenced by soil type. The high variability of transit times and nitrate leaching are due to high variability of the temporal distribution of precipitation. Finally, the model was used to regionalized the indicators to a wide range of soils in the state of Baden-Württemberg and to assess if there are locations where bioenergy crops may improve the considered soil function. Our idea behind this was to propose location where specific bioenergy crops may be highly suitable to improve the current soil function to increase for example the protection of groundwater for drinking water, reduce erosion risk or increase water availability. The proposed method allows to assess the influence of different bioenergy crops on soil functions without costly multi-year measurement systems for assessing the soil functions using soil water content measurements or/and soil water suction devices.

  11. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hui, E-mail: yuhui200@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang Guohe, E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); An Chunjiang, E-mail: an209@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Wei Jia, E-mail: jia.wei@iseis.org [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. {yields} Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. {yields} Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. {yields} Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  12. Effects of Cu, Zn and Pb Combined Pollution on Soil Hydrolase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Dan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To study the relations between soil enzyme activities and heavy metal pollution, the combined effects of Cu, Zn and Pb on the three hydrolase activities, including invertase(IN, urease(Uand alkaline phosphatase(ALPwere investigated via an orthogonal experiment. Results showed as the following: When the concentration of Cu was 400 mg·kg-1, the U and ALP activities were decreased 51% and 44%, separately; When Zn was at 500 mg·kg-1, IN and ALP activities were only decreased 3% and 9%, while U activity was increased; When Pb was at 500 mg·kg-1, IN and U activities were increased, while ALP activity was decreased 13%. As a whole, Cu was considered as the most remarkable influence factor for IN, U and ALP activity regardless of interactions among the heavy metals, Zn came second, and Pb mainly showed activation. Considering interactions, Cu×Zn could significantly influence U activity(P<0.05, effects of Cu×Pb and Cu×Zn on ALP activity were remarkable(95% confidence interval. The response of ALP activity was more sensitive than the other two enzymes. Soil ALP activity might be a sensitive tool for assessing the pollution degree of Cu.

  13. Effect of Biochar and Biochar Combined with N-Fertiliser on Soil Organic Carbon Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horák Ján

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment of different application rates of biochar and biochar combined with nitrogen fertiliser was conducted at experimental field on a Haplic Luvisol located in Nitra region of Slovakia during the growing season of spring barley (2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of biochar and biochar combined with nitrogen fertilisation on the soil organic carbon (SOC. The treatments consisted of 0, 10 and 20 t/ha of biochar application (B0, B10 and B20 combined with 0, 40 and 80 kg/ha N of nitrogen fertiliser applied (N0, N40 and N80. The results showed that SOC content at the beginning and end of the trial was always higher at the plots amended with biochar as compared to control plots (B0N0, B0N40 and B0N80; however, statistically significant effects were observed only at the beginning of the trial as well as at the end of trial in B20N40 treatments. Overall, the highest values of SOC contents were obtained at the beginning as well as at the end of the trial when 10 and 20 t/ha of biochar was applied together with 40 kg/ha N.

  14. Combined effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids on mobilization of arsenic and lead from multi-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onireti, Olaronke O; Lin, Chuxia; Qin, Junhao

    2017-03-01

    A batch experiment was conducted to examine the combined effects of three common low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the mobilization of arsenic and lead in different types of multi-contaminated soils. The capacity of individual LMWOAs (at a same molar concentration) to mobilize soil-borne As and Pb varied significantly. The combination of the organic acids did not make a marked "additive" effect on the mobilization of the investigated three elements. An "antagonistic" effect on element mobilization was clear in the treatments involving oxalic acid for some soils. The acid strength of a LMWOA did not play an important role in controlling the mobilization of elements. While the mobilization of As and Pb was closely associated with the dissolution of soil-borne Fe, soil properties such as original soil pH, organic matter contents and the total amount of the element relative to the total Fe markedly complicated the mobility of that element. Aging led to continual consumption of proton introduced from addition of LMWOAs and consequently caused dramatic changes in solution-borne Fe, which in turn resulted in change in As and Pb in the soil solution though different elements behaved differently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of addition of organic and inorganic combinations to soil on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out using a completely randomized design with seven treatments and seven replications. The treatments were perlite‚ date palm waste, soil, perlite + soil (Pe + s, w/w= 5/95), perlite + soil (w/w = 10/90), date palm waste + soil (w/w = 5/95) and date palm waste + soil (Pa+s, w/w= 10/90).

  16. Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-11-01

    Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling

  17. Changes in heavy metal mobility and availability from contaminated wetland soil remediated with combined biochar-compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Yang, Zhaoxue; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Guangming; Yu, Man; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Haipeng; Qian, Yingying; Li, Xuemei; Luo, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The combination of biochar and compost has been proven to be effective in heavy metals contaminated wetland soil restoration. However, the influence of different proportions between biochar and compost on immobilization of heavy metals in soil has been less studied up to date. Therefore, we investigated the effect of different ratios of biochar-compost mixtures on availability and speciation distribution of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in wetland soil. The results showed that applying all amendment combinations into wetland soil increased gradually the total organic carbon (TOC) and water-extract organic carbon (WEOC) as the compost percentage rose in biochar-composts. The higher pH was obtained in a certain biochar addition (20% and 40%) in combinations due to efficient interaction of biochar with compost. All amendments could significantly decrease availability of Cd and Zn mainly from pH change, but increase available Cu concentration as the result of increased water-extract organic carbon and high total Cu content in compost. Moreover, amendments can decrease easily exchangeable fraction and increase reducible of Cd and Zn greatly with increase of compost content in combinations, while amendments containing compost promote transformation of Cu from Fe/Mn oxide and residual fractions to organic bindings. These results demonstrate that different ratios of biochar and compost have a significant effect on availability and speciation of heavy metals in multi-metal-contaminated wetland soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Combining Footwear with Public Health Iconography to Prevent Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Sarah B; Friant, Sagan; Clech, Lucie; Malavé, Carly; Kemigabo, Catherine; Obeti, Richard; Goldberg, Tony L

    2017-01-11

    Shoes are effective for blocking soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) that penetrate the skin. Unfortunately, shoe-wearing is uncommon in many areas where STHs are prevalent, in part because local populations are unaware of the health benefits of wearing shoes. This is especially true in low-literacy populations, where information dissemination through written messages is not possible. We launched a public health intervention that combines a public health image with sandals. The image is a "lenticular image" that combines two alternating pictures to depict the efficacy of shoes for preventing STH infection. This image is adhered to the shoe, such that the message is linked directly to the primary means of prevention. To create a culturally appropriate image, we conducted five focus group discussions, each with a different gender and age combination. Results of focus group discussions reinforced the importance of refining public health messages well in advance of distribution so that cultural acceptability is strong. After the image was finalized, we deployed shoes with the image in communities in western Uganda where hookworm is prevalent. We found that the frequency of shoe-wearing was 25% higher in communities receiving the shoes than in control communities. Microscopic analyses of fecal samples for parasites showed a sustained reduction in infection intensity for parasites transmitted directly through the feet when people received shoes with a public health image. Our results show that combining culturally appropriate images with public health interventions can be effective in low-literacy populations. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Carbon dioxide emissions from semi-arid soils amended with biochar alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José M; Nieto, M Aurora; López-de-Sá, Esther G; Gascó, Gabriel; Méndez, Ana; Plaza, César

    2014-06-01

    Semi-arid soils cover a significant area of Earth's land surface and typically contain large amounts of inorganic C. Determining the effects of biochar additions on CO2 emissions from semi-arid soils is therefore essential for evaluating the potential of biochar as a climate change mitigation strategy. Here, we measured the CO2 that evolved from semi-arid calcareous soils amended with biochar at rates of 0 and 20tha(-1) in a full factorial combination with three different fertilizers (mineral fertilizer, municipal solid waste compost, and sewage sludge) applied at four rates (equivalent to 0, 75, 150, and 225kg potentially available Nha(-1)) during 182 days of aerobic incubation. A double exponential model, which describes cumulative CO2 emissions from two active soil C compartments with different turnover rates (one relatively stable and the other more labile), was found to fit very well all the experimental datasets. In general, the organic fertilizers increased the size and decomposition rate of the stable and labile soil C pools. In contrast, biochar addition had no effects on any of the double exponential model parameters and did not interact with the effects ascribed to the type and rate of fertilizer. After 182 days of incubation, soil organic and microbial biomass C contents tended to increase with increasing the application rates of organic fertilizer, especially of compost, whereas increasing the rate of mineral fertilizer tended to suppress microbial biomass. Biochar was found to increase both organic and inorganic C contents in soil and not to interact with the effects of type and rate of fertilizer on C fractions. As a whole, our results suggest that the use of biochar as enhancer of semi-arid soils, either alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers, is unlikely to increase abiotic and biotic soil CO2 emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Aquifer vulnerability to pesticide pollution - Combining soil, land-use and aquifer properties with molecular descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    This study uses an extensive survey of herbicides in groundwater across the midwest United States to predict occurrences of a range of compounds across the region from a combination of their molecular properties and the properties of the catchment of a borehole. The study covers 100 boreholes and eight pesticides. For each of the boreholes its catchment the soil, land-use and aquifer properties were characterized. Discriminating boreholes where pollution occurred from those where no pollution occurred gave a model that was 74% correct with organic carbon content, percentage sand content and depth to the water table being significant properties of the borehole catchment. Molecular topological descriptors as well as Koc, solubility and half-life were used to characterize each compound included in the study. Inclusion of molecular properties makes it possible to discriminate between occurrence and non-occurrence of each compound in each well. The best-fit model combines: organic carbon content, percentage sand content and depth to the water table with molecular descriptors representing molecular size, molecular branching and functional group composition of the herbicides.

  1. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  2. Automatic detection of regions in spinach canopies responding to soil moisture deficit using combined visible and thermal imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-e-Ahmed Raza

    Full Text Available Thermal imaging has been used in the past for remote detection of regions of canopy showing symptoms of stress, including water deficit stress. Stress indices derived from thermal images have been used as an indicator of canopy water status, but these depend on the choice of reference surfaces and environmental conditions and can be confounded by variations in complex canopy structure. Therefore, in this work, instead of using stress indices, information from thermal and visible light imagery was combined along with machine learning techniques to identify regions of canopy showing a response to soil water deficit. Thermal and visible light images of a spinach canopy with different levels of soil moisture were captured. Statistical measurements from these images were extracted and used to classify between canopies growing in well-watered soil or under soil moisture deficit using Support Vector Machines (SVM and Gaussian Processes Classifier (GPC and a combination of both the classifiers. The classification results show a high correlation with soil moisture. We demonstrate that regions of a spinach crop responding to soil water deficit can be identified by using machine learning techniques with a high accuracy of 97%. This method could, in principle, be applied to any crop at a range of scales.

  3. Combination of biochar amendment and mycoremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons immobilization and biodegradation in creosote-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Alfaro-Barta, Irene; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-21

    Soils impregnated with creosote contain high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). To bioremediate these soils and avoid PAH spread, different bioremediation strategies were tested, based on natural attenuation, biochar application, wheat straw biostimulation, Pleurotus ostreatus mycoremediation, and the novel sequential application of biochar for 21 days and P. ostreatus 21 days more. Soil was sampled after 21 and 42 days after the remediation application. The efficiency and effectiveness of each remediation treatment were assessed according to PAH degradation and immobilization, fungal and bacterial development, soil eco-toxicity and legal considerations. Natural attenuation and biochar treatments did not achieve adequate PAH removal and soil eco-toxicity reduction. Biostimulation showed the highest bacterial development but low PAH degradation rate. Mycoremediation achieved the best PAH degradation rate and the lowest bioavailable fraction and soil eco-toxicity. This bioremediation strategy achieved PAH concentrations below Spanish legislation for contaminated soils (RD 9/2005). Sequential application of biochar and P. ostreatus was the second treatment most effective for PAH biodegradation and immobilization. However, the activity of P. ostreatus was increased by previous biochar application and PAH degradation efficiency was increased. Therefore, the combined strategy for PAH degradation have high potential to increase remediation efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Combining spatial distribution with oral bioaccessibility of metals in smelter-impacted soils: implications for human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrêne, Aurélie; Détriché, Sébastien; Douay, Francis

    2015-02-01

    Geostatistical analysis and GIS-based spatial mapping have been widely used for risk assessment of environmental pollution. The objectives of this study were to: (1) investigate the spatial variability of pseudototal concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn; (2) estimate the degree of contamination on the basis of pollution indexes; and (3) combine geostatistical analysis with oral bioaccessibility to better assess the population's exposure to metals in smelter-impacted soils. Implications for human health risks were assessed by considering soil as a contaminant source, a release mechanism of contaminated soil to the hands, ingestion as an exposure route, and metal bioaccessibility. The bioaccessibility data in the gastric (G) and gastrointestinal (GI) phases were integrated into the standard hazard quotient-based risk assessment method. Using pollution indices showed that the entire area studied was highly polluted in terms of soil metal concentrations. However, the spatial pattern of health risk levels did not coincide with the spatial distribution of the degree of soil contamination. Introducing the bioaccessible fraction of metals from soils into the exposure calculations resulted in a substantial decrease in calculated risk (HI, hazard index) and provided a more realistic estimate of exposure to the three metals. For the highly exposed population, 46% of the soils studied provided an HI-G > 1.0 and 15% provided an HI-GI > 1.0, suggesting probable adverse health effects in children. The present study highlights the importance of conducting studies taking into account metal bioaccessible values in risk assessment.

  5. System of Antioxidant Protection of Corn Roots in Case of Adaptation to Combined Action of Herbicides and Soil Drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Rossihina

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of antioxidant enzymes in the maize root (Kadr 267 MVhybrid to the combined action of herbicides and soil drought was studied. These conditions activated superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase and coused oscillation in the catalase enzymatic activity.

  6. Combined effects of tides, evaporation and rainfall on the soil conditions in an intertidal creek-marsh system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Pei; Zhou, Tingzhang; Lu, Chunhui; Shen, Chengji; Zhang, Chenming; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Li, Ling

    2017-05-01

    Salt marshes, distributed globally at the land-ocean interface, are a highly productive eco-system with valuable ecological functions. While salt marshes are affected by various eco-geo-hydrological processes and factors, soil moisture and salinity affect plant growth and play a key role in determining the structure and functions of the marsh ecosystem. To examine the variations of both soil parameters, we simulated pore-water flow and salt transport in a creek-marsh system subjected to spring-neap tides, evaporation and rainfall. The results demonstrated that within a sandy-loam marsh, the tide-induced pore-water circulation averted salt build-up due to evaporation in the near-creek area. In the marsh interior where the horizontal drainage was weak, density-driven flow was responsible for dissipating salt accumulation in the shallow soil layer. In the sandy-loam marsh, the combined influences of spring-neap tides, rainfall and evaporation led to the formation of three characteristic zones, c.f., a near-creek zone with low soil water saturation (i.e., well-aerated) and low pore-water salinity as affected by the semi-diurnal spring tides, a less well-aerated zone with increased salinity where drainage occurred during the neap tides, and an interior zone where evaporation and rainfall infiltration regulated the soil conditions. These characteristics, however, varied with the soil type. In low-permeability silt-loam and clay-loam marshes, the tide-induced drainage weakened and the soil conditions over a large area became dominated by evaporation and rainfall. Sea level rise was found to worsen the soil aeration condition but inhibit salt accumulation due to evaporation. These findings shed lights on the soil conditions underpinned by various hydrogeological processes, and have important implications for further investigations on marsh plant growth and ecosystem functions.

  7. Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval through Combined Radar/Radiometer Ground Based Simulator with Special Reference to Dielectric Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K., ,, Dr.; O'Neill, Peggy, ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is an important element for weather and climate prediction, hydrological sciences, and applications. Hence, measurements of this hydrologic variable are required to improve our understanding of hydrological processes, ecosystem functions, and the linkages between the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles (Srivastava et al. 2013). The retrieval of soil moisture depends not only on parameterizations in the retrieval algorithm but also on the soil dielectric mixing models used (Behari 2005). Although a number of soil dielectric mixing models have been developed, testing these models for soil moisture retrieval has still not been fully explored, especially with SMAP-like simulators. The main objective of this work focuses on testing different dielectric models for soil moisture retrieval using the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) ground-based L-band simulator developed jointly by NASA/GSFC and George Washington University (O'Neill et al., 2006). The ComRAD system was deployed during a field experiment in 2012 in order to provide long active/passive measurements of two crops under controlled conditions during an entire growing season. L-band passive data were acquired at a look angle of 40 degree from nadir at both horizontal & vertical polarization. Currently, there are many dielectric models available for soil moisture retrieval; however, four dielectric models (Mironov, Dobson, Wang & Schmugge and Hallikainen) were tested here and found to be promising for soil moisture retrieval (some with higher performances). All the above-mentioned dielectric models were integrated with Single Channel Algorithms using H (SCA-H) and V (SCA-V) polarizations for the soil moisture retrievals. All the ground-based observations were collected from test site-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) OPE3, located a few miles away from NASA GSFC. Ground truth data were collected using a theta probe and in situ sensors which were then used for validation. Analysis

  8. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanism of Soda Ash Roasting of Ilmenite Ore for the Extraction of Titanium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Jha, Animesh

    2007-12-01

    Ilmenite by virtue of being rich in iron often has small concentrations of impurities such as Mn3O4, Al2O3, CaO, Cr2O3, and MgO. Removal of iron and other impurities is essential for the production of pigment grade TiO2. An investigation of the removal of iron was undertaken by roasting the mineral ilmenite with soda ash in air above 873 K. A ternary phase was identified, which played an important role in the overall kinetics. The dependence of temperature, time, mixture composition, and the microstructure of the reaction layer were studied in order to establish the reaction mechanism. We report the results of overall kinetics of roasting reaction by analyzing the activation energy in the temperature range of 873-1173 K and also explain the reaction mechanism. The derived value of activation barrier compares well with the diffusion rates of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in the ilmenite lattice.

  9. Preparation of Rutile from Ilmenite Concentrate Through Pressure Leaching with Hydrochloric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junyi; Liu, Songli; Lv, Xuewei; Bai, Chenguang

    2017-04-01

    Take into account the fact that the natural rutile utilized for the production of titanium dioxide pigment through chloride process is desperately lacking worldwide especially in China, an attempt was exploited for extracting synthetic rutile from Yunnan ilmenite concentrate with hydrochloric acid pressure leaching process. The leaching parameters for one step leaching process were investigated. The results shown that the optimum condition is leaching temperature of 413 K (140 °C), acid concentration of 20 pct HCl, leaching time of 4 hours and liquid/solid mass ratio of 8:1. A two steps leaching process was also suggested to reutilize the leaching liquor which with a high content of HCl. The results showed that the content of HCl decreased from 135 to 75 g/L, total iron increased from 44.5 g/L to about 87.6 g/L, and the liquid/solid mass ratio decreased to 5:1 with a two steps leaching process. The leaching product produced through a two steps leaching process shows a pure golden red with a high content of titanium (92.65 pct TiO2), a relatively low content of calcium (0.10 pct CaO) and magnesium (0.12 pct MgO), but high content of silicon (5.72 pct SiO2).

  10. Isothermal reduction kinetics of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate under 30vol% CO-70vol% N2 atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-yi; Lü, Wei; Lü, Xue-wei; Li, Sheng-ping; Bai, Chen-guang; Song, Bing; Han, Ke-xi

    2017-03-01

    The reduction of ilmenite concentrate in 30vol% CO-70vol% N2 atmosphere was characterized by thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG) analysis methods at temperatures from 1073 to 1223 K. The isothermal reduction results show that the reduction process comprised two stages; the corresponding apparent activation energy was obtained by the iso-conversional and model-fitting methods. For the first stage, the effect of temperature on the conversion degree was not obvious, the phase boundary chemical reaction was the controlling step, with an apparent activation energy of 15.55-40.71 kJ·mol-1. For the second stage, when the temperatures was greater than 1123 K, the reaction rate and the conversion degree increased sharply with increasing temperature, and random nucleation and subsequent growth were the controlling steps, with an apparent activation energy ranging from 182.33 to 195.95 kJ·mol-1. For the whole reduction process, the average activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 98.94-118.33 kJ·mol-1 and 1.820-1.816 min-1, respectively.

  11. The combined use of liming and Sarcocornia fruticosa development for phytomanagement of salt marsh soils polluted by mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaraz, María Nazaret; Conesa, Héctor Miguel; Tercero, María del Carmen; Schulin, Rainer; Alvarez-Rogel, José; Egea, Consuelo

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of liming and behaviour of Sarcocornia fruticosa as a strategy of phytomanagement of metal polluted salt marsh soils. Soils were taken from two polluted salt marshes (one with fine texture and pH∼6.4 and the other one with sandy texture and pH∼3.1). A lime amendment derived from the marble industry was added to each soil at a rate of 20 g kg(-1), giving four treatments: neutral soil with/without liming and acidic soil with/without liming. Cuttings of S. fruticosa were planted in pots filled with these substrates and grown for 10 months. The pots were irrigated with eutrophicated water. As expected, lime amendment decreased the soluble metal concentrations. In both soils, liming favoured the growth of S. fruticosa and enhanced the capacity of the plants to phytostabilise metals in roots. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of long and short term irrigation of a sodic soil with distillery effluent in combination with bioamendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, A; Nisha, R; Jagjeeta, K; Kaushik, C P

    2005-11-01

    The study reports the effects of irrigation of a sodic soil with post methanation effluent (PME) of a distillery. Impact of long term effluent irrigation in the field (10 years) and short term effluent irrigation using different doses of PME in the laboratory (30 days) was studied in combination with three bioamendments i.e. farmyard manure, brassica residues and rice husk. Impact on various soil properties like EC, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), available phosphorus, exchangeable K, Na, Ca, Cl, microbial population and soil enzyme activities were studied. Long term application of PME proved useful in significantly increasing TOC, TKN, K, P and soil enzymatic activities in the soil but tended to build up harmful concentration of Na, that could be chelated by bioamendments. In short terms studies, application of 50% PME along with bioamendments proved to be the most useful in improving the properties of sodic soil and also favoured successful germination and improved seedling growth of pearl millet.

  13. A meta-analysis of fertilizer-induced soil NO and combined NO+N2 O emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuwei; Lin, Feng; Wu, Shuang; Ji, Cheng; Sun, Yi; Jin, Yaguo; Li, Shuqing; Li, Zhaofu; Zou, Jianwen

    2017-06-01

    Soils are among the important sources of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2 O), acting as a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. Updated data derived from 114 peer-reviewed publications with 520 field measurements were synthesized using meta-analysis procedure to examine the N fertilizer-induced soil NO and the combined NO+N2 O emissions across global soils. Besides factors identified in earlier reviews, additional factors responsible for NO fluxes were fertilizer type, soil C/N ratio, crop residue incorporation, tillage, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, drought and biomass burning. When averaged across all measurements, soil NO-N fluxes were estimated to be 4.06 kg ha-1  yr-1 , with the greatest (9.75 kg ha-1  yr-1 ) in vegetable croplands and the lowest (0.11 kg ha-1  yr-1 ) in rice paddies. Soil NO emissions were more enhanced by synthetic N fertilizer (+38%), relative to organic (+20%) or mixed N (+18%) sources. Compared with synthetic N fertilizer alone, synthetic N fertilizer combined with nitrification inhibitors substantially reduced soil NO emissions by 81%. The global mean direct emission factors of N fertilizer for NO (EFNO ) and combined NO+N2 O (EFc ) were estimated to be 1.16% and 2.58%, with 95% confidence intervals of 0.71-1.61% and 1.81-3.35%, respectively. Forests had the greatest EFNO (2.39%). Within the croplands, the EFNO (1.71%) and EFc (4.13%) were the greatest in vegetable cropping fields. Among different chemical N fertilizer varieties, ammonium nitrate had the greatest EFNO (2.93%) and EFc (5.97%). Some options such as organic instead of synthetic N fertilizer, decreasing N fertilizer input rate, nitrification inhibitor and low irrigation frequency could be adopted to mitigate soil NO emissions. More field measurements over multiyears are highly needed to minimize the estimate uncertainties and mitigate soil NO emissions, particularly in forests and vegetable croplands. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. COMBINING PROXIMAL AND PENETRATING CONDUCTIVITY SENSORS FOR HIGH RESOLUTION SOIL MAPPING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proximal ground conductivity sensors produce a high spatial resolution map that integrates the bulk electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil profile. Variability in the conductivity map must either be inverted to estimate profile conductivity, or be directly calibrated to soil profile properties fo...

  15. Relationships between Nutrient-Related Plant Traits and Combinations of Soil N and P Fertility Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujita, Y.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Witte, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil fertility and nutrient-related plant functional traits are in general only moderately related, hindering the progress in trait-based prediction models of vegetation patterns. Although the relationships may have been obscured by suboptimal choices in how soil fertility is expressed, there has

  16. Combined effects of zinc and earthworm density on soil ecosystem functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, J.; Kools, S.A.E.; Hout, van der A.; Faber, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    In traditional environmental risk assessment for soils, interactions between biota, contaminants and soil functioning are seldom taken into account. Also, single species toxicity tests are conducted with a fixed number of test animals. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of zinc

  17. Soil washing in combination with homogeneous Fenton-like oxidation for the removal of 2,4,4'-trichlorodiphenyl from soil contaminated with capacitor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Hong; Zhao, Ling; Lin, Zhi-Rong; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Detoxification by chemical oxidation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated soils is very difficult and inefficient because PCBs typically associate with the solid phase or exist as non-aqueous-phase liquids due to their low solubility and slow desorption rates, and thus, they are difficult to remove from soils by using traditional, water-based elution techniques. Surfactant can enhance washing efficiency of PCBs from contaminated soils. This study used Brij 58, Brij 30, Tween 80, and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) to solubilize 2,4,4'-trichlorodiphenyl (PCB28) from soil contaminated with capacitor oil into solution. The feasibility of PCB28 oxidation in soil washing wastewater through a Fe(3+)-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction was subsequently examined. Washing with 10 g L(-1) Brij 58 solution showed the highest extraction efficiency (up to 61.5 %) compared with that of the three other surfactants. The total concentration of PCB28 in contaminated soil at 25 °C after 48-h extraction was 286 mg L(-1). In contrast to conditions in which no washing agent was added, addition of the four washing agents decreased the efficiency of PCB28 degradation by the Fenton-like reaction, with the decrease due to addition of 10 g L(-1) Brij 58 solution being the smallest. The optimal concentration of H2O2 for preventing its useless decomposition was found to be 50 mM. The efficiency of PCB28 removal was lower when the initial concentration of PCB28 treated in the Fenton-like reaction was higher. The degradation efficiencies of PCB28 at initial concentrations of 0.1, 10, and 176 mg L(-1) in 10 g L(-1) Brij 58 solution at 25 °C and pH 3.0 and 9 h of reaction using 50 mM H2O2 were 64.1, 42.0, and 34.6 %, respectively. This result indicates that soil washing combined with Fenton-like oxidation may be a practical approach for the remediation of PCB-contaminated soil.

  18. Removal and attenuation of sewage effluent combined tracer signals of phosphorus, caffeine and saccharin in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Samia; Withers, Paul J A; Paterson, Eric; McRoberts, Colin W; Stutter, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Contaminants in septic tank effluent (STE) are expected to be removed by the soil system before discharging to the environment. However, potential contaminants such as phosphorus (P), caffeine and artificial sweeteners do find their way to watercourses impacting aquatic eco systems. In this study, the attenuation of STE P, caffeine and saccharin were investigated in untreated soil and in soil with reduced microbial activity, in aqueous solutions and in the complex matrix of STE. Time series sorption and desorption experiments using batch equilibrium and a column experiment of STE P attenuation were conducted. The results revealed that the soil distribution coefficients (K d ) were: P 81.57 > caffeine 22.16 > saccharin 5.98 cm 3 /g, suggesting greater soil affinity to P adsorption. The data revealed that 80% of saccharin and 33% of caffeine attenuation was associated with microbial activities rather than adsorption processes. However, a complete removal of saccharin and caffeine did not occur during the equilibration period, suggesting their leaching potential. The dominant mechanism of P attenuation was adsorption (chemical and physical), yielding P retention of >73% and 35% for P in aqueous solution and in STE matrix, respectively, for batch equilibrium. The soil in the column acted as effluent P sink retaining 125 μg P/g soil of effluent P. The attenuation of P, caffeine and saccharin in the aqueous solution was greater than in STE, suggesting that the complex composition of STE reduced soil adsorption ability, and that other substances present in STE may be competing for soil binding sites. The data revealed that caffeine and P had similarities in the interaction with soils and thus caffeine may be considered as a STE tracer of anthropogenic source of P in receiving waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol and Cd from soils by electrokinetic remediation combined with activated bamboo charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian Wei; Wang, Fa Yuan; Huang, Zheng Hong; Wang, Hui

    2010-04-15

    An in situ electrokinetic remediation technique was designed by combining the uniform electrokinetic technology with a new-type of bamboo charcoal as adsorbent. A bench-scale experiment was conducted to investigate the application of this technique for simultaneous removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and Cd from a sandy loam at different periodic polarity-reversals. The contaminated soil was artificially spiked with 100 mg/kg 2,4-DCP and 500 mg/kg Cd. Two modes of polarity-reversal intervals of 12 and 24 h were included. After 10.5 d of operation, about 75.97% of Cd and 54.92% of 2,4-DCP were removed from soil at intervals of 24 h, whilst only 40.13% of Cd and 24.98% of 2,4-DCP were removed at intervals of 12 h. Soil water contents under two operation modes both significantly decreased, but evenly distributed spatially. Soil pH values under two operation modes were all maintained in the range from 7.2 to 7.4, close to the initial value. The electricity consumption per day was 12.24 and 11.61 kWh/m(3)/d, respectively at polarity-reversal intervals of 12 and 24 h. In conclusion, at polarity-reversal interval of 24 h, electroremediation combined with activated bamboo charcoal was effective in simultaneous removal of 2,4-DCP and Cd from soil. Our results indicate a promising potential in in situ electroremediation of soils co-contaminated with organics and heavy metals. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Origin and Constraints on Ilmenite-rich Partial Melt in the Lunar Lower Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, A.; Fuqua, H.; Bremner, P. M.; Panovska, S.; Diamond, M. R.; Lock, S. J.; Nishikawa, Y.; Jiménez-Pérez, H.; Shahar, A.; Panero, W. R.; Lognonne, P. H.; Faul, U.

    2015-12-01

    Existence of a partially molten layer at the lunar core-mantle boundary has been proposed to explain the lack of observed far-side deep moonquakes, the observation of reflected seismic phases from deep moonquakes, and the dissipation of tidal energy within the lunar interior [1,2]. However, subsequent models explored the possibility that dissipation due to elevated temperatures alone can explain the observed dissipation factor (Q) and tidal love numbers [3]. Using thermo-chemical and dynamic modeling (including models of the early lunar mantle convection), we explore the hypothesis that an ilmenite-rich layer forms below crustal anorthosite during lunar magma ocean crystallization and may sink to the base of the mantle to create a partial melt layer at the lunar core-mantle boundary. Self-consistent physical parameters (including gravity, pressure, density, VP and Vs) are forward calculated for a well-mixed mantle with uniform bulk composition versus a mantle with preserved mineralogical stratigraphy from lunar magma ocean crystallization. These parameters are compared against observed mass, moment of inertia, real and imaginary parts of the Love numbers, and seismic travel times to further limit the acceptable models for the Moon. We have performed a multi-step grid search with over twenty thousand forward calculations varying thicknesses of chemically/mineralogically distinct layers within the Moon to evaluate if a partially molten layer at the base of the lunar mantle is well-constrained by the observed data. Furthermore, dynamic mantle modeling was employed on the best-fit model versions to determine the survivability of a partially molten layer at the core-mantle boundary. This work was originally initiated at the CIDER 2014 program. [1] Weber et al. (2011). Science 331(6015), 309-12. [2] Khan et al. (2014). JGR 119. [3] Nimmo et al. (2012). JGR 117, 1-11.

  1. A coherent geostatistical approach for combining choropleth map and field data in the spatial interpolation of soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, P

    2011-06-01

    Information available for mapping continuous soil attributes often includes point field data and choropleth maps (e.g. soil or geological maps) that model the spatial distribution of soil attributes as the juxtaposition of polygons (areas) with constant values. This paper presents two approaches to incorporate both point and areal data in the spatial interpolation of continuous soil attributes. In the first instance, area-to-point kriging is used to map the variability within soil units while ensuring the coherence of the prediction so that the average of disaggregated estimates is equal to the original areal datum. The resulting estimates are then used as local means in residual kriging. The second approach proceeds in one step and capitalizes on: 1) a general formulation of kriging that allows the combination of both point and areal data through the use of area-to-area, area-to-point, and point-to-point covariances in the kriging system, 2) the availability of GIS to discretize polygons of irregular shape and size, and 3) knowledge of the point-support variogram model that can be inferred directly from point measurements, thereby eliminating the need for deconvolution procedures. The two approaches are illustrated using the geological map and heavy metal concentrations recorded in the topsoil of the Swiss Jura. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the new procedures improve prediction over ordinary kriging and traditional residual kriging based on the assumption that the local mean is constant within each mapping unit.

  2. Seepage Study for Suction Installation of Bucket Foundation in Different Soil Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koteras, Aleksandra Katarzyna; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2016-01-01

    around the bucket skirt. The exceedance of critical suction might lead to installation failure due to formation of piping channels, which break the hydraulic seal between the skirt and soil. The excess pore pressure arising due to applied suction changes the effective stress, hence the penetration...... and additionally reduces the soil penetration resistance. This installation process is the most effective in soil with high coefficient of permeability where the flow of pore water is easily induced. However, the technology is still under development and some issues require further investigation and reliable...... resistance of soil. Therefore, both matters are important for the design. The results show that the appearance of the impermeable layer above or below sand affects the excess pore pressure in this layer. Moreover, it has been found that the appearance of impermeable layer increases the allowable suction...

  3. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  4. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil — A combined modelling and experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montelius, Malin, E-mail: malin.montelius@liu.se [Department of Thematic Studies — Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Svensson, Teresia [Department of Thematic Studies — Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz [EDF, Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et Environnement, 78401 Chatou (France); Thiry, Yves [Andra, Research and Development Division, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1/7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Bastviken, David [Department of Thematic Studies — Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Cl{sub org}). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Cl{sub org} are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl{sup −} transformed to Cl{sub org} per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl{sub org} transformed to Cl{sup −} per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d{sup −1} and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01–0.03 d{sup −1} and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Cl{sub org} levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Cl{sub org} compounds, while another Cl{sub org} pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. - Highlights: • Chlorination and dechlorination rates in soil were revealed by a radiotracer method. • Chlorination was hampered by nitrogen addition. • Both Cl{sup −} and many Cl{sub org} compounds are highly reactive in soils. • Some formed Cl{sub org} seem to be refractory.

  5. Electrochemical characterization of mixed matrix heterogeneous cation exchange membranes modified by simultaneous using ilmenite-co-iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Hamidi, Alireza; Moghadassi, Abdolreza [Faculty of Engineering, Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madaeni, Sayed Siavash [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Mixed matrix heterogeneous cation exchange membranes were prepared by solution casting technique. Ilmenite-co-iron oxide nanoparticle was also employed as inorganic filler additive in membrane fabrication. The effect of the used additives on membrane electrochemical properties was studied. Membrane ion exchange capacity, membrane potential, transport number and selectivity all were improved by use of FeTiO{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in membrane matrix. Utilizing FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the casting solution also led to increase in ionic flux obviously. The modified membranes containing FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles showed higher transport number, selectivity and ionic flux compared to modified membrane containing ilmenite. Electrodialysis experiment in laboratory scale also showed higher cation removal for modified membrane containing FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles compared to other modified membranes and pristine ones. Results showed that membrane areal electrical resistance declined sharply by use of FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in membrane matrix. Moreover, modified membrane containing ilmenite showed lower electrical resistance compared to others. Results showed that oxidative stability of membranes was decreased slightly by use of FeTiO{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in membrane matrix. The results revealed that modified membranes in this study are comparable with that of other commercial ones.

  6. Microbial community dynamics of soil mesocosms using Orychophragmus violaceus combined with Rhodococcus ruber Em1 for bioremediation of highly PAH-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guang-Dong; Xu, Yang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2014-12-01

    Understanding of the effects of perturbation strategies on soil microorganisms is helpful in optimizing bioremediation systems and enhancing their efficiency. Four soil mesocosms were constructed for bioremediation of highly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using the flowering plant Orychophragmus violaceus and/or bacterium Rhodococcus ruber Em1. Bacterial community dynamics were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing, and Em1 abundance was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the diversity of the bacterial community increased gradually with time; the degree of increase was in the order mesocosm PE (combination of O. violaceus and Em1), mesocosm WE (Em1), mesocosm PC (O. violaceus only), mesocosm WA (attenuation). Increased diversity may be predictive of PAH degradation. O. violaceus had a marked effect on bacterial community evolution and promoted the growth of Em1. The bacterial community of mesocosm PE gradually separated from the others, as indicated by Venn diagrams and weight-principal component analysis. Abundances of the families Cytophagaceae + Nocardioidaceae + Iamiacaeae (Actinobacteria), and Alcanivoracaceae + Pseodomonadaceae + Xanthomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) were positively correlated with PAH degradation. Our findings help bridge the gap between field bioremediation and laboratory approaches, provide insight into processes of microbial ecological recovery, and will be useful in developing strategies to optimize bioremediation by modifying plant-microbe interaction patterns.

  7. Magnetic properties of ilmenite-hematite single crystals from the Ecstall pluton near Prince Rupert, British Columbia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownlee, Sarah J.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    and hematite, the primary paleomagnetic recorder in the Ecstall pluton. Measurements of hysteresis properties, low-temperature remanence, and room temperature isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition and observations from magnetic force microscopy and off-axis electron holography indicate that samples...... fall into three groups. The groups are defined by the presence of mineral microstructures that are related to distance from the Quotoon plutonic complex. The two groups closest to the Quottoon Pluton contain magnetite within hematite and ilmenite lamellae. Reheating of the Ecstall pluton led...

  8. Transformation of pyroxene to akimotoite (MgSiO3-ilmenite) in NWA 5011 L6 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, S.; Gyollai, I.; Józsa, S.; Bérczi, S.; Gucsik, A.; Veres, M.

    2011-10-01

    The NWA 5011 L6 type chondrite is a heavily shocked meteorite. It contains up to 6mm wide shock melt veins (SMV). The akimotoite was firstly discovered in Tenham chondrite [1]. These shock veins attribute high pressure and high temperature to phase transformation its inside and near by its boundary. We found MgSiO3 ilmenite which clearly distinguish from the pyroxene. This high pressure phase is connecting with ringwoodite and maskelynite environment in the chondritic portion very close to boundary of the shock vein.

  9. Combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant enhanced biodegradation of polycylic armotic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Huang, Guo-He; Xiao, Huining; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2014-09-01

    This study systematically investigated the interactive effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) on the biodegradation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil-water systems. The degradations of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were fitted well with first order kinetic model and the degradation rates were in proportion to the concentration of biosurfactant. In addition, the degradation enhancement of PHE was higher than that of PYR. The addition of soil DOM itself at an environmental level would inhibit the biodegradation of PAHs. However, in the system with co-existence of DOM and biosurfactant, the degradation of PAHs was higher than that in only biosurfactant addition system, which may be attributed to the formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex micelles. Furthermore, under the combined conditions, the degradation of PAH increased with the biosurfactant concentration, and the soil DOM added system showed slightly higher degradation than the compost DOM added system, indicating that the chemical structure and composition of DOM would also affect the bioavailability of PAHs. The study result may broaden knowledge of biosurfactant enhanced bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soil and groundwater.

  10. Seepage Study for Suction Installation of Bucket Foundation in Different Soil Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koteras, Aleksandra Katarzyna; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2016-01-01

    and additionally reduces the soil penetration resistance. This installation process is the most effective in soil with high coefficient of permeability where the flow of pore water is easily induced. However, the technology is still under development and some issues require further investigation and reliable...... and different boundaries. The flow of pore water is studied for homogenous sand, sand overlaid by impermeable layer and sand situated above impermeable layer. In all three cases the seepage analysis gives the required information on the critical suction pressure and on the distribution of excess pore pressure...... around the bucket skirt. The exceedance of critical suction might lead to installation failure due to formation of piping channels, which break the hydraulic seal between the skirt and soil. The excess pore pressure arising due to applied suction changes the effective stress, hence the penetration...

  11. Combining climatic and soil properties better predicts covers of Brazilian biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Daniel M; Fernandes-Filho, Elpídio I; Solar, Ricardo R C; Schaefer, Carlos E G R

    2017-04-01

    Several techniques have been used to model the area covered by biomes or species. However, most models allow little freedom of choice of response variables and are conditioned to the use of climate predictors. This major restriction of the models has generated distributions of low accuracy or inconsistent with the actual cover. Our objective was to characterize the environmental space of the most representative biomes of Brazil and predict their cover, using climate and soil-related predictors. As sample units, we used 500 cells of 100 km2 for ten biomes, derived from the official vegetation map of Brazil (IBGE 2004). With a total of 38 (climatic and soil-related) predictors, an a priori model was run with the random forest classifier. Each biome was calibrated with 75% of the samples. The final model was based on four climate and six soil-related predictors, the most important variables for the a priori model, without collinearity. The model reached a kappa value of 0.82, generating a highly consistent prediction with the actual cover of the country. We showed here that the richness of biomes should not be underestimated, and that in spite of the complex relationship, highly accurate modeling based on climatic and soil-related predictors is possible. These predictors are complementary, for covering different parts of the multidimensional niche. Thus, a single biome can cover a wide range of climatic space, versus a narrow range of soil types, so that its prediction is best adjusted by soil-related variables, or vice versa.

  12. Combining climatic and soil properties better predicts covers of Brazilian biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Daniel M.; Fernandes-Filho, Elpídio I.; Solar, Ricardo R. C.; Schaefer, Carlos E. G. R.

    2017-04-01

    Several techniques have been used to model the area covered by biomes or species. However, most models allow little freedom of choice of response variables and are conditioned to the use of climate predictors. This major restriction of the models has generated distributions of low accuracy or inconsistent with the actual cover. Our objective was to characterize the environmental space of the most representative biomes of Brazil and predict their cover, using climate and soil-related predictors. As sample units, we used 500 cells of 100 km2 for ten biomes, derived from the official vegetation map of Brazil (IBGE 2004). With a total of 38 (climatic and soil-related) predictors, an a priori model was run with the random forest classifier. Each biome was calibrated with 75% of the samples. The final model was based on four climate and six soil-related predictors, the most important variables for the a priori model, without collinearity. The model reached a kappa value of 0.82, generating a highly consistent prediction with the actual cover of the country. We showed here that the richness of biomes should not be underestimated, and that in spite of the complex relationship, highly accurate modeling based on climatic and soil-related predictors is possible. These predictors are complementary, for covering different parts of the multidimensional niche. Thus, a single biome can cover a wide range of climatic space, versus a narrow range of soil types, so that its prediction is best adjusted by soil-related variables, or vice versa.

  13. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC ...

  14. Wood-derived-biochar combined with compost or iron grit for in situ stabilization of Cd, Pb, and Zn in a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustriere, Nadège; Marchand, Lilian; Rosette, Gabriel; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Mench, Michel

    2017-03-01

    In situ stabilization of Cd, Pb, and Zn in an Austrian agricultural soil contaminated by atmospheric depositions from a smelter plant was assessed with a pine bark chip-derived biochar, alone and in combination with either compost or iron grit. Biochar amendment was also trialed in an uncontaminated soil to detect any detrimental effect. The pot experiment consisted in ten soil treatments (% w/w): untreated contaminated soil (Unt); Unt soil amended with biochar alone (1%: B1; 2.5%: B2.5) and in combination: B1 and B2.5 + 5% compost (B1C and B2.5C), B1 and B2.5 + 1% iron grit (B1Z and B2.5Z); uncontaminated soil (Ctrl); Ctrl soil amended with 1 or 2.5% biochar (CtrlB1, CtrlB2.5). After a 3-month reaction period, the soil pore water (SPW) was sampled in potted soils and dwarf beans were grown for a 2-week period. The SPW Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations decreased in all amended-contaminated soils. The biochar effects increased with its addition rate and its combination with either compost or iron grit. Shoot Cd and Zn removals by beans were reduced and shoot Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations decreased to common values in all amended soils except the B1 soil. Decreases in the SPW Cd/Pb/Zn concentrations did not improve the root and shoot yields of plants as compared to the Ctrl soil.

  15. Natural occurrence of MgSiO3-ilmenite and evidence for MgSiO3-perovskite in a shocked L chondrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T. G.; Lingemann, C. M.; Dupas, C.; Stöffler, D.

    1997-07-01

    Shock-induced melt veins in the Acfer 040 L5-6 (S6) chondrite contain a previously unknown set of high pressure phases consisting of amorphous grains similar in composition to majorite, MgSiO3-ilmenite, and ringwoodite. The amorphous grains have compositions that are similar to those of synthetic MgSiO3-perovskites from chemically complex systems and are inferred to be MgSiO3-perovskite that crystallized from the melt at high pressure and temperature and subsequently amorphized after pressure release. The ilmenite represents a natural occurrence of a potentially important mineral in Earth's mantle. The MgSiO3perovskite - MgSiO3-ilmenite-ringwoodite assemblage is not predicted by phase equilibria studies, but appears to result from crystallization of a melt at pressures above 26 GPa.

  16. Combined endophytic inoculants enhance nickel phytoextraction from serpentine soil in the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eVisioli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effects of specific bacterial endophytes on the phytoextraction capacity of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, spontaneously growing in a serpentine soil environment. Five metal-tolerant endophytes had already been selected for their high Ni tolerance (6 mM and plant growth promoting ability. Here we demonstrate that individual bacterial inoculation is ineffective in enhancing Ni translocation and growth of N. caerulescens in serpentine soil, except for specific strains Ncr-1 and Ncr-8, belonging to the Arthrobacter and Microbacterium genera, which showed the highest IAA production and ACC-deaminase activity. Ncr-1 and Ncr-8 co-inoculation was even more efficient in promoting plant growth, soil Ni removal and translocation of Ni, together with that of Fe, Co and Cu. Bacteria of both strains densely colonised the root surfaces and intercellular spaces of leaf epidermal tissue. These two bacterial strains also turned out to stimulate root length, shoot biomass and Ni uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in MS agar medium supplemented with Ni. It is concluded that adaptation of N. caerulescens in highly Ni-contaminated serpentine soil can be enhanced by an integrated community of bacterial endophytes rather than by single strains; of the former, Arthrobacter and Microbacterium may be useful candidates for future phytoremediation trials

  17. Determination of mobile form contents of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in soil extracts by combined stripping voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeltcheva, T. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: nedel@uctm.edu; Atanassova, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dimitrov, J. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stanislavova, L. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2005-01-10

    The amount of mobile forms of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in extracts obtained by treating soil samples with ammonium nitrate were determined by an appropriate combination of anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry with hanging mercury drop electrode. Every analysis required three mercury drops: on the first one, zinc was determined; on the second, cadmium and lead; on the third, copper was determined. Zinc, lead and cadmium were determined by conventional differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. For copper determination, adsorptive differential-pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry with amalgamation using chloride ions as a complexing agent was applied. The standard deviation of the results was from 1 to 10% depending on the metal content in the sample. Voltammetric results were in good agreement with the AAS analysis. No microwave digestion of soil extracts was necessary.

  18. Combined use of a transformed red mud reactive barrier and electrokinetics for remediation of Cr/As contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappai, G; De Gioannis, G; Muntoni, A; Spiga, D; Zijlstra, J J P

    2012-01-01

    A reactive barrier (RB) of transformed red mud (TRM), a by-product of the refinement of bauxite in alumina production, was placed adjacent to the anode of an electrokinetic (EK) system with the aim of enhancing removal of chromium or arsenic, added singly to a low permeability clayey soil, and favouring entrapment. The innovative study focused on evaluation of the synergic interaction between the EK system and the RB, and of the efficiency when compared to traditional EK remediation (control tests). The results obtained underlined the successful outcome of treatment of the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. In presence of the TRM RB, 19.4% wt. of total Cr content was detected in the anolyte and 20.6% wt. trapped in the anodic RB after 6d, versus 6.6% wt. in the anolyte and 8.8% wt. in the soil adjacent to the anode following the control run without RB. On increasing duration of treatment up to 12d, 60.8% wt. of total initial Cr was found in the anolyte and 25.5% wt. trapped in the RB, versus 9.1% wt. and 5.3% wt., respectively, after a control run of the same duration. Finally, on increasing the mass of TRM in the RB, 60.6% wt. of initial Cr content was found to have accumulated in the RB, with Cr being completely absent from the anodic chamber. Conversely, combined treatment was much less effective on As contaminated soil, at least under the operative conditions applied. Low initial As concentration and interference with iron oxides in the soil were likely the reasons underlying low efficiency while attempting As decontamination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural, electronic and optical properties of ilmenite and perovskite CdSnO{sub 3} from DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesion Jr, P D [Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Henriques, J M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Barboza, C A; Albuquerque, E L [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-900 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Freire, V N [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60455-970 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Caetano, E W S, E-mail: ewcaetano@gmail.co [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara, Avenida 13 de Maio, 2081, Benfica, 60040-531 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-11-03

    CdSnO{sub 3} ilmenite and perovskite crystals were investigated using both the local density and generalized gradient approximations, LDA and GGA, respectively, of the density functional theory (DFT). The electronic band structures, densities of states, dielectric functions, optical absorption and reflectivity spectra related to electronic transitions were obtained, as well as the infrared absorption spectra after computing the vibrational modes of the crystals at q = 0. Dielectric optical permittivities and polarizabilities at {omega} = 0 and {infinity} were also calculated. The results show that GGA-optimized geometries are more accurate than LDA ones, and the Kohn-Sham band structures obtained for the CdSnO{sub 3} polymorphs confirm that ilmenite has an indirect band gap, while perovskite has a direct band gap, both being semiconductors. Effective masses for both crystals are obtained for the first time, being highly isotropic for electrons and anisotropic for holes. The optical properties reveal a very small degree of anisotropy of both crystals with respect to different polarization planes of incident light. The phonon calculation at q = 0 for perovskite CdSnO{sub 3} does not show any imaginary frequencies, in contrast to a previous report suggesting the existence of a more stable crystal of perovskite CdSnO{sub 3} with ferroelectric properties.

  20. Production of O2 on the Moon: A lab-top demonstration of ilmenite reduction with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Jerde, Eric A.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.; Kanamori, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    Estimates of the costs of transporting materials from Earth to the Moon are around $25,000 per pound. Therefore, it is imperative that we learn to utilize the resources on the Moon to partially offset these 'astronomical' expenses. The production of oxygen on the Moon utilizing indigenous materials is crucial to the establishment and development of an autonomous lunar colony. Besides obvious biologic needs, this lunar liquid oxygen (LLOX) could result in tremendous cost savings on fuel for effective transportation systems, particularly with its export to low-Earth orbit. Over 20 different process concepts were proposed and evaluated for the production of oxygen from lunar materials. Simplicity, low energy, easily attainable feedstock, and low resupply mass are the keywords for the process(es) which will ultimately be selected for the initial production of oxygen on the Moon. One of these schemes, which has received considerable study to date, is the hydrogen reduction of ilmenite. In fact, Carbotek, Inc. (Houston, TX) patented an ilmenite, hydrogen-reduction technique involving a three-stage, fluidized-bed process for the production of LLOX. A lab-top demonstration unit of the basic concepts of this oxygen generation process that was constructed by our group at the University of Tennessee is explained. It utilizes many of the principles which must be addressed in designing an effective production plant for operation on the Moon.

  1. The combined effects of moss-dominated biocrusts and vegetation on erosion and soil moisture and implications for disturbance on the Loess Plateau, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongfeng Bu

    Full Text Available Biological soil crusts (BSCs, or biocrusts have important positive ecological functions such as erosion control and soil fertility improvement, and they may also have negative effects on soil moisture in some cases. Simultaneous discussions of the two-sided impacts of BSCs are key to the rational use of this resource. This study focused on the contribution of BSCs while combining with specific types of vegetation to erosion reduction and their effects on soil moisture, and it addressed the feasibility of removal or raking disturbance. Twelve plots measuring 4 m × 2 m and six treatments (two plots for each were established on a 15° slope in a small watershed in the Loess Plateau using BSCs, bare land (as a control, BL, Stipa bungeana Trin. (STBU, Caragana korshinskii Kom. (CAKO, STBU planted with BSCs (STBU+BSCs and CAKO planted with BSCs (CAKO+BSCs. The runoff, soil loss and soil moisture to a depth of 3 m were measured throughout the rainy season (from June to September of 2010. The results showed that BSCs significantly reduced runoff by 37.3% and soil loss by 81.0% and increased infiltration by 12.4% in comparison with BL. However, when combined with STBU or CAKO, BSCs only made negligible contributions to erosion control (a runoff reduction of 7.4% and 5.7% and a soil loss reduction of 0.7% and 0.3%. Generally, the soil moisture of the vegetation plots was lower in the upper layer than that of the BL plots, although when accompanied with a higher amount of infiltration, this soil moisture consumption phenomenon was much clearer when combining vegetation with BSCs. Because of the trivial contributions from BSCs to erosion control and the remaining exacerbated consumption of soil water, moderate disturbance by BSCs should be considered in plots with adequate vegetation cover to improve soil moisture levels without a significant erosion increase, which was implied to be necessary and feasible.

  2. The combined effects of moss-dominated biocrusts and vegetation on erosion and soil moisture and implications for disturbance on the Loess Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Chongfeng; Wu, Shufang; Han, Fengpeng; Yang, Yongsheng; Meng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs, or biocrusts) have important positive ecological functions such as erosion control and soil fertility improvement, and they may also have negative effects on soil moisture in some cases. Simultaneous discussions of the two-sided impacts of BSCs are key to the rational use of this resource. This study focused on the contribution of BSCs while combining with specific types of vegetation to erosion reduction and their effects on soil moisture, and it addressed the feasibility of removal or raking disturbance. Twelve plots measuring 4 m × 2 m and six treatments (two plots for each) were established on a 15° slope in a small watershed in the Loess Plateau using BSCs, bare land (as a control, BL), Stipa bungeana Trin. (STBU), Caragana korshinskii Kom. (CAKO), STBU planted with BSCs (STBU+BSCs) and CAKO planted with BSCs (CAKO+BSCs). The runoff, soil loss and soil moisture to a depth of 3 m were measured throughout the rainy season (from June to September) of 2010. The results showed that BSCs significantly reduced runoff by 37.3% and soil loss by 81.0% and increased infiltration by 12.4% in comparison with BL. However, when combined with STBU or CAKO, BSCs only made negligible contributions to erosion control (a runoff reduction of 7.4% and 5.7% and a soil loss reduction of 0.7% and 0.3%). Generally, the soil moisture of the vegetation plots was lower in the upper layer than that of the BL plots, although when accompanied with a higher amount of infiltration, this soil moisture consumption phenomenon was much clearer when combining vegetation with BSCs. Because of the trivial contributions from BSCs to erosion control and the remaining exacerbated consumption of soil water, moderate disturbance by BSCs should be considered in plots with adequate vegetation cover to improve soil moisture levels without a significant erosion increase, which was implied to be necessary and feasible.

  3. Fenton oxidation and combined Fenton-microbial treatment for remediation of crude oil contaminated soil in Assam - India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buragohain, Surabhi; Deka, Dibakar Chandra; Devi, Arundhuti

    2013-10-01

    The study is aimed at the remediation of soil spiked with crude oil (5%) by employing Fenton oxidation, biological treatment and combined Fenton-biological treatment. A spiked concentration of 5% crude oil was selected on the basis of contamination levels of 0-5% as found in the soil of upper Assam oil fields (India). The degradation of the aliphatic fraction (C14-C28) of the crude oil was investigated by gas chromatography. Fenton oxidation was carried out at different pH (3 to 8) in a laboratory batch reactor and maximum oxidative degradation was observed at pH 3-5. At pH 3, single Fenton oxidation resulted in 36 and 57% degradation in 5 and 10 days respectively. Biological treatment (with Fusarium solani) and combined Fenton-biological treatment were carried out with a one month incubation period. Biological treatment alone brought about 61% degradation of the crude oil while the combined process could achieve as much as 75% degradation of the aliphatic fractions of the crude oil.

  4. Combined effects of soil moisture and carbaryl to earthworms and plants: Simulation of flood and drought scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Maria P.R.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M. [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Loureiro, Susana, E-mail: sloureiro@ua.pt [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-07-15

    Studying tolerance limits in organisms exposed to climatic variations is key to understanding effects on behaviour and physiology. The presence of pollutants may influence these tolerance limits, by altering the toxicity or bioavailability of the chemical. In this work, the plant species Brassica rapa and Triticum aestivum and the earthworm Eisenia andrei were exposed to different levels of soil moisture and carbaryl, as natural and chemical stressors, respectively. Both stress factors were tested individually, as well as in combination. Acute and chronic tests were performed and results were discussed in order to evaluate the responses of organisms to the combination of stressors. When possible, data was fitted to widely employed models for describing chemical mixture responses. Synergistic interactions were observed in earthworms exposed to carbaryl and drought conditions, while antagonistic interactions were more representative for plants, especially in relation to biomass loss under flood-simulation conditions. - Highlights: > Climate variations may cause changes on chemicals' toxicity or bioavailability. > Earthworms and plants are exposed simultaneously to carbaryl and flood and drought conditions. > The IA model and possible deviations were used to evaluate combination exposures. > Synergism was observed for earthworms exposed to carbaryl and drought conditions. > Antagonistic interactions were observed for plants, in flood conditions and carbaryl. - Soil moisture can play an important role in carbaryl toxicity towards plants and earthworms.

  5. Validation Tests of a Non-Nuclear Combined Asphalt and Soil Density Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    in this research effort were Quint S. Mason, Jay F. Rowland , Davon A. Mims, and Dr. Jesse D. Doyle. During this study, Dr. Gary L. Anderton was...diagram in Figure 3, the non-contacting sensor in the SDG 200 consists of two rings , a central ring and an outer ring . The central transmit ring ...injects an electric field into the soil, and the response is received by the outer sensing ring . The density, or compaction level, is measured by the

  6. Influence of Modified Zeolite in Combine with Soil on Permeability and Quality of Urban Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hajhashemkhani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, wastewater is one of the water resources for irrigation due to the scarcity of water resources. In this regard, using adsorbents such as zeolites is recommended to improve the characteristics of the wastewater. Although the results show that natural zeolite decrease amount of pollutions but at the same time decreases the permeability of the soil, which could adversely affect the soil. This study was done in 2012 at the Shahrekord University, 27 PVC columns were used to study the effect of modified zeolite particles on permeability and quality of the wastewater. The experiment consisted of two factors the type of the microzeolite (natural zeolite, modified zeolite and application procedure of the micro zeolite (mixed, layer with three replications and in total had 7 treated. Injection of wastewater into the soil was through waterlogging and repeated fifteen times with a weekly frequency. Volume of wastewater used in each injection is equal "nv". In frequency injections of 1,3,5,7,11,15 infiltration was measured using Falling Heads. The results showed that treatment of modified zeolite included mixed, middle layer and layer on the surface had the highest infiltration rate respectively and treatment with natural zeolite included mixed, middle layer, layer on the surface had lowest infiltration rate. Further modified treatments decreased Ca effluent rate 111% with respect to natural Zeolite and therefore caused modified treatments to decrease SAR amount 45% with respect to control treatments and 132% with respect to natural zeolite.

  7. Seepage Study for Suction Installation of Bucket Foundation in Different Soil Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koteras, Aleksandra Katarzyna; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2016-01-01

    Research has proven the bucket foundation to be a feasible and an attractive solution for offshore wind turbines. Its potential derives partly from the cost-effectiveness due to the suction-assisted installation. The suction applied under the bucket lid produces a downward driving force and addit......Research has proven the bucket foundation to be a feasible and an attractive solution for offshore wind turbines. Its potential derives partly from the cost-effectiveness due to the suction-assisted installation. The suction applied under the bucket lid produces a downward driving force...... and additionally reduces the soil penetration resistance. This installation process is the most effective in soil with high coefficient of permeability where the flow of pore water is easily induced. However, the technology is still under development and some issues require further investigation and reliable...... around the bucket skirt. The exceedance of critical suction might lead to installation failure due to formation of piping channels, which break the hydraulic seal between the skirt and soil. The excess pore pressure arising due to applied suction changes the effective stress, hence the penetration...

  8. Combined spatial prediction of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Sierra Leone: a tool for integrated disease control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H Hodges

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A national mapping of Schistosoma haematobium was conducted in Sierra Leone before the mass drug administration (MDA with praziquantel. Together with the separate mapping of S. mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths, the national control programme was able to plan the MDA strategies according to the World Health Organization guidelines for preventive chemotherapy for these diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 52 sites/schools were selected according to prior knowledge of S. haematobium endemicity taking into account a good spatial coverage within each district, and a total of 2293 children aged 9-14 years were examined. Spatial analysis showed that S. haematobium is heterogeneously distributed in the country with significant spatial clustering in the central and eastern regions of the country, most prevalent in Bo (24.6% and 8.79 eggs/10 ml, Koinadugu (20.4% and 3.53 eggs/10 ml and Kono (25.3% and 7.91 eggs/10 ml districts. By combining this map with the previously reported maps on intestinal schistosomiasis using a simple probabilistic model, the combined schistosomiasis prevalence map highlights the presence of high-risk communities in an extensive area in the northeastern half of the country. By further combining the hookworm prevalence map, the at-risk population of school-age children requiring integrated schistosomiasis/soil-transmitted helminth treatment regimens according to the coendemicity was estimated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The first comprehensive national mapping of urogenital schistosomiasis in Sierra Leone was conducted. Using a new method for calculating the combined prevalence of schistosomiasis using estimates from two separate surveys, we provided a robust coendemicity mapping for overall urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis. We also produced a coendemicity map of schistosomiasis and hookworm. These coendemicity maps can be used to guide the decision making for MDA strategies in combination

  9. [Measurement of Soil Total Nitrogen Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy Combined with RCA and SPA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao-rong; Zhang, Hai-liang; Huang, Ling-xia; He, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Visible near spectra tecnnology was adopted to detect soil total nitrogen content. 394 soil samples were collected from Wencheng, Zhejiang province to be used for calibration model (n=263) and independent prediction set (n=131). Raw spectra and wavelength-reduced spectra with five different pretreatment methods (SG smoothing, SNV, MSC, 1st-D and 2nd-D) were compared to determine the optimal wavelength range and pretreatment method for analysis. The results with 5 different pretreatment methods were not improved compared to that both of full spectra PLS model and wavelength reduction spectra model. Spectral variable selection is an important strategy in spectrum modeling analysis, because it tends to parsimonious data representation and can lead to multivariate models with better performance. In order to simply calibration models, the wavelength variables selected by two different variable selection methods (i. e. regression coefficient analysis (RCA) and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were proposed to be the inputs of calibration methods of PLS, MLR and LS-SVM models separately. These calibration models were also compared to select the best model to predict soil TN. In total, 9 different models were built ahd the best results indicated that PLS, MLR and LS-SVM obtained the highest precision with determination coefficient of prediction R2(pre) =0. 81, RMSEP=0. 0031 and RPD=2. 26 based on wavelength variables selected by RCA (0. 0002) and SPA as inputs of models. SPA-MLR model and other three models based on 7 sensitive variables selected by RC using 0. 0002 regression coefficient threshold value obtained the best result with R2(pre), RMSEP and RPD as 0. 81, 0. 0031 and 2. 26. This prediction accuracy is classied to be very good. For all the models, it could be concluded that RCA and SPA could be very useful ways to selected sensitive wavelengths, and the selected wavelengths were effective to estimate soil TN. It is recommended to adopt SPA variable

  10. A combination of electrokinetics and Pd/Fe PRB for the remediation of pentachlorophenol-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhirong; Yuan, Songhu; Wan, Jinzhong; Long, Huayun; Tong, Man

    2011-06-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation of pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated soil is difficult because PCP dissociates at different pH values along soil column and shows different transport behaviors near anode and cathode. In the present study, a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) filled with reactive Pd/Fe particles was installed between anode and cathode to reach the dechlorination of PCP during its EK movement. When PRB was installed at the position of 0.3 (normalized distance from anode), PCP in the section from anode to PRB could transport through PRB, while PCP in the section from cathode to PRB was accumulated near PRB. PCP was hardly dechlorinated by PRB wherein high pH was reached. When PRB was installed at the position of 0.5 and the pH in the PRB was decreased by periodical injection of HAc, 49% of PCP was removed, and 22.9% was recovered as phenol which was mostly collected in catholyte. The mechanism of PCP removal was proposed as the EK movement of PCP into the PRB compartment, the complete dechlorination of PCP to phenol by Pd/Fe in the PRB compartment, and the subsequent removal of phenol by electroosmosis. This study proved that the combination of electrokinetics and Pd/Fe PRB was effective for the remediation of PCP-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined climatic and geochemical controls on stabilizing soil carbon along a large scale transect from the South American tropics to Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetterl, Sebastian; Boeckx, Pascal; Six, Johan; Zagal Venegas, Erick

    2014-05-01

    The importance of climatic variables on biological processes that stabilize versus destabilize soil organic carbon (C), has been long studied and recognized. Also, the importance of geochemical factors controlling C stabilization, namely the composition of the reactive soil phase, has been studied extensively and different physical and geochemical mechanisms of soil C stabilization have been identified. However few studies have considered the combined effect of these two critical controls (climate and geology) on soil C stabilization. We present the concept and the first results of a large scale project that aims to improve our understanding of the linkage between climatic and geochemical controls on soil C dynamics. For this, we study soils formed under grassland vegetation along a geo-climatic transect in Chile, Brazil and the Antarctic Peninsula. We cover in our experiments all major global climate zones under which grasses can thrive, including hot, temperate and cold humid or arid climates, and in each zone we study soils developed from contrasting geochemical substrate. The focus of our study is to determine the physical and geochemical mechanisms which play a role in stabilizing carbon in different soil fractions under these various climates, and to determine the associated turnover times. On exemplary topsoil samples from our transect we combine a series of physical and chemical soil fractionation experiments with a medium-term incubation study using 13C and 15N labelled grass residues. In addition, we also determine the age of the respired C during the incubation using 14C dating on soil C and CO2. This combination of techniques helps trace microbial activity in certain parts of the soil and analyze the reactivity and abundance of various C fractions and, hence, the presence, effectiveness and interaction of different C stabilization mechanisms.

  12. Experimental reduction of lunar mare soil and volcanic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Morris, Richard V.; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    We have reduced high-titanium lunar mare soil and iron-rich lunar volcanic glass with hydrogen at temperatures of 900-1100 C. Ilmenite is the most reactive phase in the soil, exhibiting rapid and complete reduction at all temperatures. Ferrous iron in the glass is extensively reduced concurrent with partial crystallization. In both samples pyroxene and olivine undergo partial reduction along with chemical and mineralogical modifications. High-temperature reduction provides insight into the optical and chemical effects of lunar soil maturation, and places constraints on models of that process. Mare soil and volcanic glass are attractive feedstocks for lunar oxygen production, with achievable yields of 2-5 wt%.

  13. Nitrogen isotopes in Tree-Rings - An approach combining soil biogeochemistry and isotopic long series with statistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Martine M.; Bégin, Christian; Paré, David; Marion, Joëlle; Laganière, Jérôme; Séguin, Armand; Stefani, Franck; Smirnoff, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring atmospheric emissions from industrial centers in North America generally started less than 25 years ago. To compensate for the lack of monitoring, previous investigations have interpreted tree-ring N changes using the known chronology of human activities, without facing the challenge of separating climatic effects from potential anthropogenic impacts. Here we document such an attempt conducted in the oil sands (OS) mining region of Northeastern Alberta, Canada. The reactive nitrogen (Nr)-emitting oil extraction operations began in 1967, but air quality measurements were only initiated in 1997. To investigate if the beginning and intensification of OS operations induced changes in the forest N-cycle, we sampled white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) stands located at various distances from the main mining area, and receiving low, but different N deposition. Our approach combines soil biogeochemical and metagenomic characterization with long, well dated, tree-ring isotopic series. To objectively delineate the natural N isotopic behaviour in trees, we have characterized tree-ring N isotope (15N/14N) ratios between 1880 and 2009, used statistical analyses of the isotopic values and local climatic parameters of the pre-mining period to calibrate response functions and project the isotopic responses to climate during the extraction period. During that period, the measured series depart negatively from the projected natural trends. In addition, these long-term negative isotopic trends are better reproduced by multiple-regression models combining climatic parameters with the proxy for regional mining Nr emissions. These negative isotopic trends point towards changes in the forest soil biogeochemical N cycle. The biogeochemical data and ultimate soil mechanisms responsible for such changes will be discussed during the presentation.

  14. Trace element partitioning between ilmenite, armalcolite and anhydrous silicate melt: Implications for the formation of lunar high-Ti mare basalts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kan, M.; Mason, P.R.D.; van Westrenen, W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments at high pressures and temperatures to determine the partitioning of a wide range of trace elements between ilmenite (Ilm), armalcolite (Arm) and anhydrous lunar silicate melt, to constrain geochemical models of the formation of titanium-rich melts in the Moon.

  15. Effects of Combined Application of Biogas Slurry and Chemical Fertilizer on Soil Aggregation and C/N Distribution in an Ultisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuebo; Fan, Jianbo; Xu, Lei; Zhou, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Unreasonable use of chemical fertilizer (CF) on agricultural soil leads to massive losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in tropical and subtropical areas, where soil conditions are unfavorable for aggregate formation. This study evaluated the effects of combined application of biogas slurry (BS) plus CF on soil aggregation and aggregate-associated C/N concentration and storage in an Ultisol. Six treatments included: no fertilizer (T1), CF only (T2), partial (15% (T3), 30% (T4) and 45% (T5)) substitution of TN with BS and BS only (T6). Soil mechanical-stable aggregates (MSAs) formation and stability as well as MSAs-associated C/N concentration and storage were observed in different aggregate sizes (>5, 5-2, 2-1, 1.0-0.5, 0.50-0.25 and 5 mm significantly increased with BS substitution (T5), while the proportions of MSAs 1.0-0.5 mm, MSAs 0.50-0.25 mm and MSAs soil aggregation stability as well as resulted in significantly higher SOC and TN concentrations and storage in MSAs >0.5 mm that constituted 72-82% of MSAs. Stepwise regression analysis showed that MSAs >5 mm, SOC in MSAs >5 mm and TN in MSAs >5 mm were the dominant variables affecting aggregate stability. Meanwhile SOC in MSAs soils. Therefore, certain rate of combined application of BS plus CF is an effective, eco-friendly way to improve soil quality in an Ultisol.

  16. Effect of CaO addition on preparation of ferrotitanium from ilmenite by electrochemical reduction in CaCl{sub 2}−NaCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Li [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); State Key Lab of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming 650093 (China); Hua, Yixin, E-mail: yxhua@kmust.edu.cn [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); State Key Lab of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Cunying; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Qibo; Zhou, Zhongren; Zhang, Yadong [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); State Key Lab of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming 650093 (China); Ru, Juanjian [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Ferro-titanium (FeTi) alloy was prepared successfully from synthesized ilmenite through electrochemical reduction method in equal-molar CaCl{sub 2}−NaCl molten salt at 973 K and a cell voltage of 3.2 V under inert atmosphere, where molybdenum rod and graphite were used as cathode and anode respectively. It is indicated that the CaO content in the molten salt has an appreciable effect on the phase transformation of reactants occurring in the electrolytic process. The optimized CaO content in the molten salt is 1 mol% and this suitable content of CaO can significantly improve the reduction rate of ilmenite. The micromorphology of the ferrotitanium product is porous with the amount of 1 mol%CaO addition. It is observed that the particles of ferrotitanium had a uniform size in the initial period of time. Along with the electrolysis time extension, however, the particles connected with each other to generate strips and then form a honeycomb structure. These findings provide a basis for scientifically discussion on the optimization of CaO addition amount during the electrochemical reduction of ilmenite and other oxides in molten salts. - Highlights: • Ferro-titanium was prepared from synthesized ilmenite in CaCl{sub 2}−NaCl molten salt. • CaO content has appreciable effect on the phase transformation of ilmenite reactant. • The optimized CaO content is 1 mol% which can significantly improve reaction rate. • The products are connected with each other to form strips as electrolysis time.

  17. Global-scale assessment and combination of SMAP with ASCAT (active) and AMSR2 (passive) soil moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunglok; Parinussa, Robert; Konings, Alexandra G.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Cosh, Michael H.; Lakshmi, Venkat; Zohaib, Muhammad; Choi, Minha

    2018-01-01

    Global-scale surface soil moisture (SSM) products retrieved from active and passive microwave remote sensing provide an effective method for monitoring near-real-time SSM content with nearly daily temporal resolution. In the present study, we first inter-compared global-scale error patterns and combined the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT), and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) SSM products using a triple collocation (TC) analysis and the maximized Pearson correlation coefficient (R) method from April 2015 to December 2016. The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) and global in situ observations were utilized to investigate and to compare the quality of satellite-based SSM products. The average R-values of SMAP, ASCAT, and AMSR2 were 0.74, 0.64, and 0.65 when they compared with in situ networks, respectively. The ubRMSD values were (0.0411, 0.0625, and 0.0708) m3 m- 3; and the bias values were (- 0.0460, 0.0010, and 0.0418) m3 m- 3 for SMAP, ASCAT, and AMSR2, respectively. The highest average R-values from SMAP against the in situ results are very encouraging; only SMAP showed higher R-values than GLDAS in several in situ networks with low ubRMSD (0.0438 m3 m- 3). Overall, SMAP showed a dry bias (- 0.0460 m3 m- 3) and AMSR2 had a wet bias (0.0418 m3 m- 3); while ASCAT showed the least bias (0.0010 m3 m- 3) among all the products. Each product was evaluated using TC metrics with respect to the different ranges of vegetation optical depth (VOD). Under vegetation scarce conditions (VOD Ratio. Over highly vegetated regions (VOD > 0.40) ASCAT showed comparatively better performance than did the other products. Using the maximized R method, SMAP, ASCAT, and AMSR2 products were combined one by one using the GLDAS dataset for reference SSM values. When the satellite products were combined, R-values of the combined products were improved or degraded depending on the VOD ranges produced, when compared with the results

  18. Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils enhanced by complexation: Arsenic extraction by reducing agents and combination of reducing and chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Cheol [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kitae, E-mail: kbaek@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Abiotic reductive extraction of As from contaminated soils was studied. • Oxalate/ascorbate were effective in extracting As bound to amorphous iron oxides. • Reducing agents were not effective in extracting As bound to crystalline oxides. • Reductive As extraction was greatly enhanced by complexation. • Combination of dithionite and EDTA could extract about 90% of the total As. - Abstract: Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils was studied with various reducing agents and combinations of reducing and chelating agents in order to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate and ascorbic acid were effective to extract arsenic from soil in which arsenic was associated with amorphous iron oxides, but they were not effective to extract arsenic from soils in which arsenic was bound to crystalline oxides or those in which arsenic was mainly present as a scorodite phase. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that iron oxides present in soils were transformed to Fe(II,III) or Fe(II) oxide forms such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) by reduction with dithionite. Thus, arsenic extraction by dithionite was not effective due to the re-adsorption of arsenic to the newly formed iron oxide phase. Combination of chelating agents with reducing agents greatly improved arsenic extraction from soil samples. About 90% of the total arsenic could be extracted from all soil samples by using a combination of dithionite and EDTA. Chelating agents form strong complexation with iron, which can prevent precipitation of a new iron oxide phase and also enhance iron oxide dissolution via a non-reductive dissolution pathway.

  19. The Instructional Design of Case Method Combined With Role-Playing in the Soil and Groundwater Training Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yin Hwa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Almost all environmental problems are caused by human. Besides being good at environmental engineering theory and technology, to enhance the ability to solve environmental problems, the environmental practitioners need a closer understanding of the stance of different stakeholders. This study is an instructional design combining both "case method" and "role-playing" into the “Soil and Groundwater Talent Training Courses” in Taipei. The curriculum is based on the hexavalent chromium pollution case in Yunlin County. Each group of students is encouraged to play four roles, inculding leather factory owners, farmers, environmental officials, and soil testing professionals. Each group of students has to propose solution strategies after discussion and consultation. The study adopts a single group posttest design. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The quantitative data were analyzed through proportion and Pearson correlation. Results were as follows: (1 The solution strategies identified by the students include: “mutual communication”, “consensus-building”, and “the formation of an environmental committee". (2 More than 80% of students were satisfied with the instruction, and they found it helpful in terms of knowledge and skills in doing surveying. A moderate positive correlation exists between students’ participation and learning satisfaction. A reflection concerning this instruction design along with some recommendations are provided.

  20. Stress Coefficients for Soil Water Balance Combined with Water Stress Indicators for Irrigation Scheduling of Woody Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Ferreira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several causes for the failure of empirical models to estimate soil water depletion and to calculate irrigation depths, and the problem is particularly critical in tall, uneven, deficit irrigated (DI crops in Mediterranean climates. Locally measured indicators that quantify water status are useful for addressing those causes and providing feed-back information for improving the adequacy of simple models. Because of their high aerodynamic resistance, the canopy conductance of woody crops is an important factor in determining evapotranspiration (ET, and accurate stress coefficient (Ks values are needed to quantify the impact of stomatal closure on ET. A brief overview of basic general principles for irrigation scheduling is presented with emphasis on DI applications that require Ks modelling. The limitations of existing technology related to scheduling of woody crops are discussed, including the shortcomings of plant-based approaches. In relation to soil water deficit and/or predawn leaf water potential, several woody crop Ks functions are presented in a secondary analysis. Whenever the total and readily available water data were available, a simple Ks model was tested. The ultimate aim of this discussion is to illustrate the central concept: that a combination of simple ET models and water stress indicators is required for scheduling irrigation of deep-rooted woody crops.

  1. Combine the soil water assessment tool (SWAT) with sediment geochemistry to evaluate diffuse heavy metal loadings at watershed scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Wei; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Huang, Haobo; Shan, Yushu; Geng, Xiaojun

    2014-09-15

    Assessing the diffuse pollutant loadings at watershed scale has become increasingly important when formulating effective watershed water management strategies, but the process was seldom achieved for heavy metals. In this study, the overall temporal-spatial variability of particulate Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni losses within an agricultural watershed was quantitatively evaluated by combining SWAT with sediment geochemistry. Results showed that the watershed particulate heavy metal loadings displayed strong variability in the simulation period 1981-2010, with an obvious increasing trend in recent years. The simulated annual average loadings were 20.21 g/ha, 21.75 g/ha, 47.35 g/ha and 21.27 g/ha for Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni, respectively. By comparison, these annual average values generally matched the estimated particulate heavy metal loadings at field scale. With spatial interpolation of field loadings, it was found that the diffuse heavy metal pollution mainly came from the sub-basins dominated with cultivated lands, accounting for over 70% of total watershed loadings. The watershed distribution of particulate heavy metal losses was very similar to that of soil loss but contrary to that of heavy metal concentrations in soil, highlighting the important role of sediment yield in controlling the diffuse heavy metal loadings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers plus nitrification inhibitor DMPP on nitrogen runoff loss in vegetable soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaogang; Ma, Junwei; Zou, Ping; Lin, Hui; Sun, Wanchun; Yin, Jianzhen; Fu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The application of nitrogen fertilizers leads to various ecological problems such as large amounts of nitrogen runoff loss causing water body eutrophication. The proposal that nitrification inhibitors could be used as nitrogen runoff loss retardants has been suggested in many countries. In this study, simulated artificial rainfall was used to illustrate the effect of the nitrification inhibitor DMPP (3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate) on nitrogen loss from vegetable fields under combined organic and inorganic nitrogen fertilizer application. The results showed that during the three-time simulated artificial rainfall period, the ammonium nitrogen content in the surface runoff water collected from the DMPP application treatment increased by 1.05, 1.13, and 1.10 times compared to regular organic and inorganic combined fertilization treatment, respectively. In the organic and inorganic combined fertilization with DMPP addition treatment, the nitrate nitrogen content decreased by 38.8, 43.0, and 30.1% in the three simulated artificial rainfall runoff water, respectively. Besides, the nitrite nitrogen content decreased by 95.4, 96.7, and 94.1% in the three-time simulated artificial rainfall runoff water, respectively. A robust decline in the nitrate and nitrite nitrogen surface runoff loss could be observed in the treatments after the DMPP addition. The nitrite nitrogen in DMPP addition treatment exhibited a significant low level, which is near to the no fertilizer application treatment. Compared to only organic and inorganic combined fertilizer treatment, the total inorganic nitrogen runoff loss declined by 22.0 to 45.3% in the organic and inorganic combined fertilizers with DMPP addition treatment. Therefore, DMPP could be used as an effective nitrification inhibitor to control the soil ammonium oxidation in agriculture and decline the nitrogen runoff loss, minimizing the nitrogen transformation risk to the water body and being beneficial for the ecological environment.

  3. Ultra-broad-band electrical spectroscopy of soils and sediments—a combined permittivity and conductivity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewer, M.; Günther, T.; Igel, J.; Kruschwitz, S.; Martin, T.; Wagner, N.

    2017-09-01

    We combined two completely different methods measuring the frequency-dependent electrical properties of moist porous materials in order to receive an extraordinary large frequency spectrum. In the low-frequency (LF) range, complex electrical resistivity between 1 mHz and 45 kHz was measured for three different soils and sandstone, using the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method with a four electrode cell. In the high-frequency (HF) radio to microwave range, complex dielectric permittivity was measured between 1 MHz and 10 GHz for the same samples using dielectric spectroscopy by means of the coaxial transmission line technique. The combined data sets cover 13 orders of magnitude and were transferred into their equivalent expressions: the complex effective dielectric permittivity and the complex effective electrical conductivity. We applied the Kramers-Kronig relation in order to justify the validity of the data combination. A new phenomenological model that consists of both dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity terms in a Debye- and Cole-Cole-type manner was fitted to the spectra. The combined permittivity and conductivity model accounts for the most common representations of the physical quantities with respect to the individual measuring method. A maximum number of four relaxation processes was identified in the analysed frequency range. Among these are the free water and different interfacial relaxation processes, the Maxwell-Wagner effect, the counterion relaxation in the electrical double layer and the direct-current electrical conductivity. There is evidence that free water relaxation does not affect the electrical response in the SIP range. Moreover, direct current conductivity contribution (bulk and interface) dominates the losses in the HF range. Interfacial relaxation processes with relaxations in the HF range are broadly distributed down to the LF range. The slowest observed process in the LF range has a minor contribution to the HF

  4. Applying Limestone or Basalt in Combination with Bio-Fertilizer to Sustain Rice Production on an Acid Sulfate Soil in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of applying ground magnesium limestone (GML or ground basalt in combination with bio-fertilizer to sustain rice production on an acid sulfate soil in Malaysia. Soils from Kelantan Plains, Malaysia, were treated with GML, ground basalt, bio-fertilizer, GML + bio-fertilizer, and ground basalt + bio-fertilizer (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that soil fertility was improved by applying the soil amendments. GML and basalt contain some Zn and Cu; thus, application of these amendments would increase their contents in the soil needed for the healthy growth of rice. Basalt applied in combination with bio-fertilizer appeared to be the best agronomic option to improve the fertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice production in the long run. In addition to increasing Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu reserves in the soil, water pH increased and precipitated Al3+ and/or Fe2+. Ground basalt is cheaper than GML, but basalt dissolution in the acidic soil was slow. As such, its ameliorative effects could only be seen significantly from the second season onwards. The specially-formulated bio-fertilizer for alleviating the infertility of acid sulfate soil could also enhance rice growth. The use of the bio-fertilizer fortified with N2-fixing bacteria is a green technology that would help reduce NO3− and/or NO2− pollution and reduce the cost of rice production. The phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB present in the bio-fertilizer not only increased the available P, but also helped release organic acids that would inactivate Al3+ and/or Fe2+ via the process of chelation.

  5. Combining neural network models to predict spatial patterns of airborne pollutant accumulation in soils around an industrial point emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Ioannis F; Tsiros, Ioannis X; Serelis, Konstantinos; Chronopoulou, Aikaterini

    2004-12-01

    Neural networks (NNs) have the ability to model a wide range of complex nonlinearities. A major disadvantage of NNs, however, is their instability, especially under conditions of sparse, noisy, and limited data sets. In this paper, different combining network methods are used to benefit from the existence of local minima and from the instabilities of NNs. A nonlinear k-fold cross-validation method is used to test the performance of the various networks and also to develop and select a set of networks that exhibits a low correlation of errors. The various NN models are applied to estimate the spatial patterns of atmospherically transported and deposited lead (Pb) in soils around an historical industrial air emission point source. It is shown that the resulting ensemble networks consistently give superior predictions compared with the individual networks because, for the ensemble networks, R2 values were found to be higher than 0.9 while, for the contributing individual networks, values for R2 ranged between 0.35 and 0.85. It is concluded that combining networks can be adopted as an important component in the application of artificial NN techniques in applied air quality studies.

  6. Genetic Performance and General Combining Ability of Oil Palm Deli dura x AVROS pisifera Tested on Inland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, A.; Rafii, M. Y.; Saleh, G.; Kushairi, A.; Latif, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 11 oil palm AVROS (Algemene Vereniging van Rubberplanters ter Oostkust van Sumatra) pisiferas was evaluated based on their 40 dura x pisifera (DxP) progenies tested on inland soils, predominantly of Serdang Series. Fresh fruit bunch (FFB) yield of each pisiferas ranged from 121.93 to 143.9 kg palm−1 yr−1 with trial mean of 131.62 kg palm−1 yr−1. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed low genetic variability among pisifera parents for most of the characters indicating uniformity of the pisifera population. This was anticipated as the AVROS pisiferas were derived from small population and were inbred materials. However, some of the pisiferas have shown good general combining ability (GCA) for certain important economic traits. Three pisiferas (P1 (0.174/247), P3 (0.174/498), P11 (0.182/308)) were identified of having good GCA for FFB yield while pisiferas P1 (0.174/247), P10 (0.182/348), and P11 (0.182/308) were good combiners for oil-to-bunch ratio (O/B). The narrow genetic base of these materials was the main obstacle in breeding and population improvement. However, efforts have been made to introgress this material with the vast oil palm germplasm collections of MPOB for rectifying the problem. PMID:22701095

  7. Combined use of alkane-degrading and plant growth-promoting bacteria enhanced phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara, Nain; Afzal, Muhammad; Ansari, Tariq M; Tahseen, Razia; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Inoculation of plants with pollutant-degrading and plant growth-promoting microorganisms is a simple strategy to enhance phytoremediation activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inoculation of different bacterial strains, possessing alkane-degradation and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1 -carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, on plant growth and phytoremediation activity. Carpet grass (Axonopus affinis) was planted in soil spiked with diesel (1% w/w) for 90 days and inoculated with different bacterial strains, Pseudomonas sp. ITRH25, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Burkholderia sp. PsJN, individually and in combination. Generally, bacterial application increased total numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere ofcarpet grass, plant biomass production, hydrocarbon degradation and reduced genotoxicity. Bacterial strains possessing different beneficial traits affect plant growth and phytoremediation activity in different ways. Maximum bacterial population, plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were achieved when carpet grass was inoculated with a consortium of three strains. Enhanced plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were associated with increased numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of carpet grass. The present study revealed that the combined use of different bacterial strains, exhibiting different beneficial traits, is a highly effective strategy to improve plant growth and phytoremediation activity.

  8. Combination cellulose plate (non-agar solid support) and agar plate method improves isolation of fungi from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Kenichi; Todaka, Nemuri; Ōmura, Satoshi; Masuma, Rokuro

    2014-11-01

    This is the first report describing the improved isolation of common filamentous fungi via a method combining cellulose plate and agar plate system. A cellulose plate is a porous plate made of nanofibrous crystaline cellulose. Isolating fungi from soils using these types of media separately resulted in the number of fungal colonies appearing on cellulose plates being lower than that on agar plates. However, the number of actual fungal species isolated using cellulose plates alone was more or less the same as that found using agar plates. Significantly, the diversity of isolates using a combination of the two media was greater than using each media individually. As a result, numerous new or rare fungal species with potential, including previously proposed new species, were isolated successfully in this way. All fungal colonies, including the Penicillium species, that appeared on the cellulose plate penetrated in potato dextrose were either white or yellow. Cultivation on cellulose plates with added copper ion overcomes the change in coloration, the colonies appearing as they do following cultivation on potato dextrose agar.

  9. Laboratory-scale evaluation of a combined soil amendment for the enhanced biodegradation of propylene glycol-based aircraft de-icing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libisch, Balázs; French, Helen K; Hartnik, Thomas; Anton, Attila; Biró, Borbála

    2012-01-01

    A combined soil amendment was tested in microcosm experiments with an aim to enhance the aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol (PG)-based aircraft de-icing fluids during and following the infiltration of contaminated snowmelt. A key objective under field conditions is to increase degradation of organic pollutants in the surface soil where higher microbial activity and plant rhizosphere effects may contribute to a more efficient biodegradation of PG, compared to subsoil ground layers, where electron acceptors and nutrients are often depleted. Microcosm experiments were set up in Petri dishes using 50 g of soil mixed with appropriate additives. The samples contained an initial de-icing fluid concentration of 10,000 mg/kg soil. A combined amendment using calcium peroxide, activated carbon and 1 x Hoagland solution resulted in significantly higher degradation rates for PG both at 4 and 22 degrees C. Most probable numbers of bacteria capable of utilizing 10,000 mg/kg de-icing fluid as a sole carbon source were about two orders of magnitude higher in the amended soil samples compared to unamended controls at both temperatures. The elevated numbers of such bacteria in surface soil may be a source of cells transported to the subsoil by snowmelt infiltration. The near-surface application of amendments tested here may enhance the growth of plants and plant roots in the contaminated area, as well as microbes to be found at greater depth, and hence increase the degradation of a contaminant plume present in the ground.

  10. Plant tolerance to mercury in a contaminated soil is enhanced by the combined effects of humic matter addition and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, V; De Martino, A; Nebbioso, A; Di Meo, V; Salluzzo, A; Piccolo, A

    2016-06-01

    In a greenhouse pot experiment, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were grown in a Hg-contaminated sandy soil with and without inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (a commercial inoculum containing infective propagules of Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae) amended with different rates of a humic acid (0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1) of soil), with the objective of verifying the synergistic effects of the two soil treatments on the Hg tolerance of lettuce plants. Our results indicated that the plant biomass was significantly increased by the combined effect of AMF and humic acid treatments. Addition of humic matter to soil boosted the AMF effect on improving the nutritional plant status, enhancing the pigment content in plant leaves, and inhibiting both Hg uptake and Hg translocation from the roots to the shoots. This was attributed not only to the Hg immobilization by stable complexes with HA and with extraradical mycorrhizal mycelium in soil and root surfaces but also to an improved mineral nutrition promoted by AMF. This work indicates that the combined use of AMF and humic acids may become a useful practice in Hg-contaminated soils to reduce Hg toxicity to crops.

  11. Interpretation and evaluation of combined measurement techniques for soil CO2 efflux: Discrete surface chambers and continuous soil CO2 concentration probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Brian L. McGlynn; Howard E. Epstein; Daniel L. Welsch

    2008-01-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is a large respiratory flux from terrestrial ecosystems and a critical component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Lack of process understanding of the spatiotemporal controls on soil CO2 efflux limits our ability to extrapolate from fluxes measured at point scales to scales useful for corroboration with other ecosystem level measures of C exchange....

  12. [Effects of different organic manure sources and their combinations with chemical fertilization on soil nematode community structure in a paddy field of East China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Ye, Cheng-Long; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qi-Rong; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-Xin

    2013-12-01

    A comparative study was conducted to investigate the effects of different fertilization modes on the soil nematode community structure in a paddy field with paddy rice and wheat rotation in Jintan County (31 degrees 39'41.8" N, 119 degrees 28'23.5" E) of Jiangsu Province, East China. Six treatments were installed, i. e., no fertilization (CK), 100% chemical NPK fertilization (F), pig manure compost plus 50% chemical fertilization (PF), straw returning plus 100% chemical fertilization (SF), pig manure compost and straw returning plus 50% chemical fertilization (PSF), and application of commercial pig manure-inorganic complex fertilizer (PMF). The soil samples were collected from the field after the paddy rice harvested in autumn. The two continuous years study showed that the soil nematode community structure varied with fertilization treatments and years. The combined application of chemical fertilizers and organic manures increased the total number of soil nematodes, decreased the abundance of soil bacterivorous nematodes, and made the abundance of predator- and omnivore nematodes increased significantly. No significant differences were observed in the abundance of soil fungivorous nematodes among all the treatments. Chemical fertilization alone and the application of commercial pig manure-inorganic complex fertilizer had no obvious suppression effect on the soil phytophagous nematodes. The abundance of soil bacteriavorous nematodes under the combined application of chemical fertilizers and organic manures was relatively increased in the second year, as compared with that in the first year, while the abundance of soil phytophagous nematodes (Hirschmanniella) was relatively decreased in the second year. From the aspect of nematode ecological indices, the Margalef diversity index (H) under the combined application of chemical fertilizers and organic manures in the second year had an increasing trend, while the NCR index had less change. The Wasilewka index had a

  13. Soil base saturation combines with Beech Bark Disease to influence composition and structure of Sugar Maple-Beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Dovciak, Martin; Bailey, Scott W.; Antidormi, Michael; Zarfos, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in influencing stand composition and structure, measurements of soils, canopy, subcanopy, and seedlings were taken in 21 watersheds in the Adirondack region of NY (USA), where sugar maple and beech were the predominant canopy species and base saturation of the upper B horizon ranged from 4.4 to 67%. The base saturation value corresponding to the threshold for Al mobilization (16.8%) helped to define the species composition of canopy trees and seedlings. Canopy vigor and diameter at breast height (DBH) were positively correlated (P soils, soil-Ca depletion and BBD may have created opportunities for gap-exploiting species such as red maple and black cherry, whereas in high-base saturation soils, sugar maple dominated the canopy. Where soils were beginning to recover from acidic deposition effects, sugar maple DBH and basal area increased progressively from 2000 to 2015, whereas for beech, average DBH did not change and basal area did not increase after 2010.

  14. Visible, near infrared, mid infrared or combined diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for simultaneous assessment of various soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viscarra Rossel, R.A.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; McBratney, A.B.; Janik, L.J.; Skjemstad, J.O.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, our understanding of the soil and assessment of its quality and function has been gained through routine soil chemical and physical laboratory analysis. There is a global thrust towards the development of more time- and cost-efficient methodologies for soil analysis as there is a great

  15. Effects of foliar dressing of selenite and silicate alone or combined with different soil ameliorants on the accumulation of As and Cd and antioxidant system in Brassica campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Yongjiu; Zheng, Xiangqun; Cheng, Weimin; Shi, Rongguang; Feng, Renwei

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using a combined technology to synchronously reduce As and Cd accumulation in the edible parts of Brassica campestris. The results showed that a foliar application of selenite (Se) and silicon (Si) combined with soil ameliorants (including Ca-Mg-P fertilizer, sodium silicate and red mud) showed limited effects on the growth of B. campestris. The As concentration in the leaves of B. campestris in all treatments was below the Chinese safety standard. When sodium silicate and Ca-Mg-P fertilizer were added to the soil, the additional foliar application of Se and Si could in some cases help further reduce the concentrations of As and Cd in the leaves of B. campestris. However, when red mud was applied to the soil, the foliar application of Se and Si enhanced the Cd concentration in the leaves of B. campestris. In most cases, high levels of soil ameliorants plus foliar application of Se and Si significantly enhanced the As concentrations in both the soil solution and the roots of B. campestris but reduced the soil solution Cd concentration and the leaf As concentration. Most of the treatments reduced the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration in the leaves of B. campestris, and the foliar application of Se and Si helped the soil ameliorants alleviate the oxidative stress resulting from As and Cd exposure. In this study, several treatments significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). However, the enzymes peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were not induced by most treatments. In summary, the combined treatment of 1gkg-1 Ca-Mg-P fertilizer plus foliar spraying 2mmolL-1 sodium selenite was most effective in reducing the Cd concentration and a rather strong ability to reduce the As concentration and trigger the activities of SOD and APX in the leaves of B. campestris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Green Electrochemical Process Solid-Oxide Oxygen-Ion-Conducting Membrane (SOM): Direct Extraction of Ti-Fe Alloys from Natural Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xionggang; Zou, Xingli; Li, Chonghe; Zhong, Qingdong; Ding, Weizhong; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2012-06-01

    The direct electrochemical extraction of Ti-Fe alloys from natural ilmenite (FeTiO3) in molten CaCl2 is reported in this article. The sintered porous pellet of natural ilmenite acted as the cathode of the electrochemical system, and the carbon-saturated liquid tin contained in a solid-oxide oxygen-ion-conducting membrane (SOM) tube served as the anode of the electrolytic cell. The electrochemical process was carried out at 3.8 V, under 1223 K and 1273 K (950 °C and 1000 °C). Oxygen was ionized continuously from the cathode and discharged at the anode; solid porous Ti-Fe alloys were obtained at the cathode. The electro-deoxidation procedure of the ilmenite was characterized by analyzing partially electro-deoxidized samples taken periodically throughout the electro-deoxidation process. The findings of this study are as follows: (1) The electro-deoxidation process followed these steps: Fe2TiO5 → FeTiO3 → Fe2TiO4 → Fe, Ti (and/or Ti-Fe alloys); and TiO2 → CaTiO3 → Ti; and (2) two types of particle growth pattern are observed in the experiments. The first pattern is characterized with particle fusion and second pattern is interconnection of particles to form porous structure. A microhole oxygen-ion-migration model is suggested based on the experimental evidence.

  17. The combined effects of urea application and simulated acid rain on soil acidification and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmei; Zhou, Jian; Li, Wanlu; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to test the effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) at different pHs, when applied to fertilized and unfertilized soils, on the leaching of soil cations (K, Ca, Mg, Na) and Al. Their effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+) and microbial community structure were also determined. A Paleudalfs soil was incubated for 30 days, with and without an initial application of urea (200 mg N kg(-1)soil) as nitrogen (N) fertilizer. The soil was held in columns and leached with SAR at three pH levels. Six treatments were tested: SAR of pH 2.5, 4.0 and 5.6 leaching on unfertilized soil (T1, T2 and T3), and on soils fertilized with urea (T4, T5 and T6). Increasing acid inputs proportionally increased cation leaching in both unfertilized and fertilized soils. Urea application increased the initial Ca and Mg leaching, but had no effect on the total concentrations of Ca, Mg and K leached. There was no significant difference for the amount of Na leached between the different treatments. The SAR pH and urea application had significant effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+). Urea application, SAR treated with various pH, and the interactions between them all had significant impacts on total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). The highest concentration of total PLFAs occurred in fertilized soils with SAR pH5.6 and the lowest in soils leached with the lowest SAR pH. Soils pretreated with urea then leached with SARs of pH 4.0 and 5.6 had larger total PLFA concentrations than soil without urea. Bacterial, fungal, actinomycete, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs had generally similar trends to total PLFAs.

  18. On the reliability of AMS in ilmenite-type granites: an insight from the Marimanha pluton, central Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Urcia, B.; Casas, A. M.; Ramón, M. J.; Leiss, B.; Mariani, E.; Román-Berdiel, T.

    2012-04-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) at room temperature has been used for decades to obtain the petrofabric orientation in granites as a kinematic marker to establish models explaining the emplacement of plutons. To assess the significance of AMS in terms of mineral orientation, we have performed a multidisciplinary study at five sites of an ilmenite-type pluton (Marimanha, central Pyrenees) with significant facies changes. To test the reliability of AMS measurements at room temperature, the following methods were applied: low temperature AMS; image analyses and X-ray texture goniometry (XTG) of biotites; and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to obtain c-axes directions of quartz. The total (para-, ferro- and dia-)magnetic fabric analysed by AMS is compared with the paramagnetic fabric (low-T AMS), mica orientation (with image analyses and XTG) and the diamagnetic fabric (EBSD). Results indicate that weakly oriented paramagnetic minerals can give well-defined magnetic fabrics (AMS at room and low temperatures). Furthermore, the AMS ellipsoid is the result of composite biotite fabrics resulting from both orientation and spatial distribution of crystals, as demonstrated by 2-D mathematical models presented in this study. AMS is the most effective technique for quickly measuring composite fabrics. In addition, the advantage of using AMS analyses is twofold: (1) it is a fast way of analysing standard samples that can give clues for subsequent image/mineral orientation analysis and (2) it is a volume-related method that gives a picture of the rock fabric as a whole.

  19. Testing of different soil combinations as substrates in slalom slopes and golf courses in the cold climate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2010-05-01

    Testing of different soil combinations as substrates in slalom slopes and golf courses in the cold climate environment Jouni Pihlaja, Geological Survey of Finland, Northern Finland Office, P.O. Box 77, FIN-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland. jouni.pihlaja@gtk.fi, www.gtk.fi The Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is, with some partners, carrying out a cooperative project, POMARA, in the Levi tourist center in northern Finland. The purpose of this applied geology project is to determine which soil combinations work best over the long term as substrates on slalom slopes and golf course areas. Since the tourist center is located in a cold climate area, it gives extra challenges to those landscaping activities. The average temperature in January is about -15°C and in July +14°C. In the Levi area, the slalom slopes have normally been covered by local carex peat during the shaping phase of slopes. The problem has been that on the top part of the fell, the peat has "disappeared" after some years and stones have come up under the peat layer, since these areas are naturally covered by block fields. The main assumption at the beginning of the project was that frost weathering is causing the problems. In this project, test areas have been prepared on the slopes. The most important task is to compare test areas covered by carex peat to areas covered by a combination of sandy till and carex peat. The reason why sandy till was chosen to be the additional material was that it is supposed to stand up better against frost weathering than peat itself. Also, when considering future landscaping, the sandy till is the most economically viable mineral material to be used because of its nearby location . In the golf course areas, a combination of fine sand and sphagnum peat has been used in landscaping. The peat was brought from the Simo area, 300 km south of Levi. In this project, the goal is to determine if the local carex peat is working properly in the green areas of the golf club. The

  20. Monitoring and modeling slope dynamics in an Alpine watershed - a combined approach of soil science, remote sensing and geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugirg, F.; Kaiser, A.; Schindewolf, M.; Becht, M.; Schmidt, J.; Haas, F.

    2015-06-01

    Steep and unvegetated slopes in mountainous areas play an important role in erosion research as they deliver large quantities of sediments to the lowlands. However, their complex hydrological process combinations are challenging for any modelling and forecasting intention. Due to its high morphodynamic activity the Lainbach valley in southern Bavaria, Germany, has repeatedly been subject to studies on erosional processes. We present a further developed approach of physically based erosion modelling on strongly inclined and heavily dissected slopes. Model parameters were spatially and temporally distributed and a statistical model was tested to compare both findings to a previous study in the same catchment on a different slope. High resolution surface models from laser scans served as validation for the modelling results and for monitoring soil loss. Especially an adjustment of hydraulic roughness values improved the results, whereas rill hydraulics demand further investigation for future model development. The study at hand focusses on the summer period and reveals adequate modelling results (98.4% agreement in volume loss) with regard to the slope's non-stationary behaviour but leaves room for improvement for the winter period.

  1. Separation of Aeruginosin-865 from Cultivated Soil Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) by Centrifugal Partition Chromatography combined with Gel Permeation Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheel, José; Minceva, Mirjana; Urajová, Petra; Aslam, Rabya; Hrouzek, Pavel; Kopecký, Jiří

    2015-10-01

    Aeruginosin-865 was isolated from cultivated soil cyanobacteria using a combination of centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and gel permeation chromatography. The solubility of Aer-865 in different solvents was evaluated using the conductor-like screening model for real solvents (COSMO-RS). The CPC separation was performed in descending mode with a biphasic solvent system composed of water-n-BuOH-acetic acid (5:4:1, v/v/v). The upper phase was used as a stationary phase, whereas the lower phase was employed as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 10 mL/min. The revolution speed and temperature of the separation column were 1700 rpm and 25 degrees C, respectively. Preparative CPC separation followed by gel permeation chromatography was performed on 50 mg of crude extract yielding Aer-865 (3.5 mg), with a purity over 95% as determined by HPLC. The chemical identity of the isolated compound was confirmed by comparing its spectroscopic data (UV, HRESI-MS, HRESI-MS/MS) with those of an authentic standard and data available in the literature.

  2. Bacteria in combination with fertilizers promote root and shoot growth of maize in saline-sodic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zafar-ul-Hye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is the leading abiotic stress hampering maize (Zea maysL. growth throughout the world, especially in Pakistan. During salinity stress, the endogenous ethylene level in plants increases, which retards proper root growth and consequent shoot growth of the plants. However, certain bacteria contain the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase, which converts 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (an immediate precursor of ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants into ammonia and α-ketobutyrate instead of ethylene. In the present study, two Pseudomonas bacterial strains containing ACC-deaminase were tested separately and in combinations with mineral fertilizers to determine their potential to minimize/undo the effects of salinity on maize plants grown under saline-sodic field conditions. The data recorded at 30, 50 and 70 days after sowing revealed that both the Pseudomonas bacterial strains improved root and shoot length, root and shoot fresh weight, and root and shoot dry weight up to 34, 43, 35, 71, 55 and 68%, respectively, when applied without chemical fertilizers: these parameter were enhanced up to 108, 95, 100, 131, 100 and 198%, respectively, when the strains were applied along with chemical fertilizers. It can be concluded that ACC-deaminase Pseudomonas bacterial strains applied alone and in conjunction with mineral fertilizers improved the root and shoot growth of maize seedlings grown in saline-sodic soil.

  3. Bacteria in combination with fertilizers promote root and shoot growth of maize in saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar-Ul-Hye, Muhammad; Farooq, Hafiz Muhammad; Hussain, Mubshar

    2015-03-01

    Salinity is the leading abiotic stress hampering maize ( Zea mays L.) growth throughout the world, especially in Pakistan. During salinity stress, the endogenous ethylene level in plants increases, which retards proper root growth and consequent shoot growth of the plants. However, certain bacteria contain the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which converts 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (an immediate precursor of ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants) into ammonia and α-ketobutyrate instead of ethylene. In the present study, two Pseudomonas bacterial strains containing ACC-deaminase were tested separately and in combinations with mineral fertilizers to determine their potential to minimize/undo the effects of salinity on maize plants grown under saline-sodic field conditions. The data recorded at 30, 50 and 70 days after sowing revealed that both the Pseudomonas bacterial strains improved root and shoot length, root and shoot fresh weight, and root and shoot dry weight up to 34, 43, 35, 71, 55 and 68%, respectively, when applied without chemical fertilizers: these parameter were enhanced up to 108, 95, 100, 131, 100 and 198%, respectively, when the strains were applied along with chemical fertilizers. It can be concluded that ACC-deaminase Pseudomonas bacterial strains applied alone and in conjunction with mineral fertilizers improved the root and shoot growth of maize seedlings grown in saline-sodic soil.

  4. INFLUENCE OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR, ORGANIC MATTER, SULFUR OXIDIZING BACTERIA AND CABRONITE ALONE OR IN COMBINATION ON COWPEA PLANTS AND THE USED SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Halfawi M. H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out at the Abis Experimental Farm, Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University. The soil (clay loam was treated with sulfur oxidizing bacteria (S.O.B., municipal refuse compost (O.M, elemental sulfur (E.S and Cabronite, each alone or in combination. Seeds of cowpea were inoculated with the specific root nodule bacteria (Okadin before planting.According to the obtained results the following results could be concluded:All the used treatments i.e E.S; O.M; Cabronite and S.O.B. each alone or in combination significantly increased the dry weights of cowpea plants and also increased the roots, shoots and seeds as well the used soil content of S, P, K, N, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu.The application of elemental sulfur with S.O.B. to the soil improved the availability and plant uptake of macro and micro nutrients by cowpea plants as well nutrients content of the used soil.Application of O.M maximized the role of sulfur and S.O.B.It could be concluded that the best treatment which clearly affected growth, nodulation, seed yield and nutrients content of cowpea plants as well as the elemental content of the used soil was elemental sulfur (E.S + organic matter (O.M and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (S.O.B. treatment.

  5. Combining X-ray computed tomography and visible near-infrared spectroscopy for prediction of soil structural properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Hermansen, Cecilie; Knadel, Maria

    2018-01-01

    squares regression (PLSR) using the vis-NIR data (vis-NIR-PLSR) and multiple linear regression (MLR) based on soil texture and OC. The statistical prediction of macroporosity was poor, with both vis-NIR-PLSR and MLR (R2 ... near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy is a rapid analytical technique used successfully to predict various soil properties. In this study, the potential of using vis-NIR spectroscopy to predict X-ray CT derived soil structural properties was investigated. In this study, 127 soil samples from six...... (19 by 20 cm). Both macroporosity and CTmatix are soil structural properties that affect the degree of preferential transport. Bulk soils from the 127 sampling locations were scanned with a vis-NIR spectrometer (400–2500 nm). Macroporosity and CTmatrix were statistically predicted with partial least...

  6. Spatial distribution of labile and protected fractions of soil organic matter as a combined effect of variable soil texture and forest tree species composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruba, Piotr; Socha, Jarosław; Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    In this investigations we focused on the effects of variable soil texture and forest species composition on: (1) stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the organic horizon (O) and mineral soil (A and B horizons), and (2) content of carbon in physically separated fractions of samples from the A horizon: free light fraction (CfLF), occluded (inside aggregates) free light fraction (CoLF), and mineral associated fraction (CMA). Study area was located in the Swietokrzskie mountains, central Poland. The soils were derived from Triassic claystones and sandstones and Quaternary sandy deposits. The dominant forest species were Silver fir and European beech, with minor admixture of common hornbeam and Scots pine. We set up 275 plots in regular 200x200 m grid. Spatial dependence and correlations were analyzed using multiple regression and geostatistical tools: variogram and cross-variogram. The results demonstrated that the proportion between carbon stored in above ground tree biomass, soil organic horizon and mineral soil is roughly 10:5:5 (kg m-2). A key factor regulating retention of organic matter in soils was the content of fine fractions (FF). The content of FF positively affected the content of SOM in mineral soil and negatively the content of SOM accumulated in the organic horizon. Regarding the fraction of SOC in the A horizons, the content of FF had strong positive effect on the content of CMA (CMA [g kg-1]= 1.4 + 0.40 × FF[%], n=275, R2=0.70), weak positive influence on the CfLF, and no effect on CoLF. The content of labile fraction accumulated as the O horizon and CfLF fraction in the A horizon were negatively correlated. Results of statistical and geostatistical analysis suggest that the increasing share of beech and hornbeam had a positive effect on carbon stores in mineral soil and the opposite was true for the relationship between the FF content and carbon stores in the O horizon. Fir, in the other hand, positively influenced the content of carbon occluded

  7. Simple additive effects are rare: a quantitative review of plant biomass and soil process responses to combined manipulations of CO2 and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieleman, Wouter I.J.; Vicca, Sara; Dijkstra, Feike A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, increased awareness of the potential interactions between rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([ CO2 ]) and temperature has illustrated the importance of multifactorial ecosystem manipulation experiments for validating Earth System models. To address the urgent need for increased...... understanding of responses in multifactorial experiments, this article synthesizes how ecosystem productivity and soil processes respond to combined warming and [ CO2 ] manipulation, and compares it with those obtained in single factor [ CO2 ] and temperature manipulation experiments. Across all combined...... and the [ CO2 ]-only treatments elicited larger stimulation of fine root biomass than of aboveground biomass, consistently stimulated soil respiration, and decreased foliar nitrogen (N) concentration. Nonetheless, mineral N availability declined less in the combined treatment than in the [ CO2 ]-only treatment...

  8. Simple additive effects are rare: a quantitative review of plant biomass and soil process responses to combined manipulations of CO2 and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieleman, Wouter I. J.; Vicca, Sara; Dijkstra, Feike A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, increased awareness of the potential interactions between rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([ CO2 ]) and temperature has illustrated the importance of multifactorial ecosystem manipulation experiments for validating Earth System models. To address the urgent need for increased...... understanding of responses in multifactorial experiments, this article synthesizes how ecosystem productivity and soil processes respond to combined warming and [ CO2 ] manipulation, and compares it with those obtained in single factor [ CO2 ] and temperature manipulation experiments. Across all combined...... and the [ CO2 ]‐only treatments elicited larger stimulation of fine root biomass than of aboveground biomass, consistently stimulated soil respiration, and decreased foliar nitrogen (N) concentration. Nonetheless, mineral N availability declined less in the combined treatment than in the [ CO2 ]‐only treatment...

  9. Variations of trace element concentration of magnetite and ilmenite from the Taihe layered intrusion, Emeishan large igneous province, SW China: Implications for magmatic fractionation and origin of Fe-Ti-V oxide ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Yu-Wei; Song, Xie-Yan; Yu, Song-Yue; He, Hai-Long

    2015-12-01

    In situ LA-ICP-MS trace elemental analysis has been applied to magnetite and ilmenite of the Taihe layered intrusion, Emeishan large igneous province, SW China, in order to understand better fractionation processes of magma and origin of Fe-Ti-V oxide ore deposits. The periodic reversals in Mg, Ti, Mn in magnetite and Mg, Sc in ilmenite are found in the Middle Zone of the intrusion and agree with fractionation trends as recorded by olivine (Fo), plagioclase (An) and clinopyroxene (Mg#) compositions. These suggest the Taihe intrusion formed from open magma chamber processes in a magma conduit with multiple replenishments of more primitive magmas. The V and Cr of magnetite are well correlated with V and Cr of clinopyroxene indicating that they became liquidus phases almost simultaneously at an early stage of magma evolution. Ilmenite from the Middle and Upper Zones shows variable Cr, Ni, V, Mg, Nb, Ta and Sc contents indicating that ilmenite at some stratigraphic levels crystallized slightly earlier than magnetite and clinopyroxene. The early crystallization of magnetite and ilmenite is the result of the high FeOt and TiO2 contents in the parental magma. The ilmenite crystallization before magnetite in the Middle and Upper Zones can be attributed to higher TiO2 content of the magma due to the remelting of pre-existing ilmenite in a middle-level magma chamber. Compared to the coeval high-Ti basalts, the relatively low Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta contents in both magnetite and ilmenite throughout the Taihe intrusion indicate that they crystallized from Fe-Ti-(P)-rich silicate magmas. Positive correlations of Ti with Mg, Mn, Sc and Zr of magnetite, and Zr with Sc, Hf and Nb of ilmenite also suggest that magnetite and ilmenite crystallized continuously from the homogeneous silicate magma rather than an immiscible Fe-rich melt. Therefore, frequent replenishments of Fe-Ti-(P)-rich silicate magma and gravitational sorting and settling are crucial for the formation the massive and

  10. Soil erosion and desertification: a combined approach using RUSLE and ESAs models in the Tusciano basin (southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paola, F.; Ducci, D.; Giugni, M.

    2009-04-01

    To identify the desertification prone areas the ESAs (Environmentally Sensitive Areas) model was developed in 1999 in the framework of MEDALUS (MEditerranean Desertification And Land USe) European project; this method has been used in many Mediterranean Countries (Greece, Portugal Italy, Egypt, etc.). The identification of areas sensitive to desertification by using the ESAs model has been carried out in the Tusciano river basin (261 km2) located in southern Italy (Campania region). All data defining the four groups of parameters related to soil quality, climate quality, vegetation quality, and management quality have been introduced in a geographical database, and overlain using a GIS. Afterwards, a sensitivity analysis highlighted the different impact of the desertification parameters on the mountainous, hilly, and downstream areas of the catchment, strongly different in terms of morphological, geological, climatic and land-use features. The assessment of desertification sensitivity shows a clear vulnerability status in the Tusciano river basin, where more than half of the area is susceptible to desertification risk. The results of the ESAs model have been combined with those of the soil loss, achieved using the RUSLE method, based approximately on the same environmental factors; nevertheless, ESAs model considers a wider range of parameters, allowing to characterize in detail the catchment, from the climatic, geomorphological, vegetational and socio-economical point of view. The comparison between the desertification prone areas map and the potential erosion map of the Tusciano river basin shows fundamental differences. The areas at higher erosion risk are located in the mountain and hilly sectors of the basin, while the downstream areas, at high desertification risk, are characterized by a low erosion risk. The hilly sector is especially prone to both risks, desertification and erosion. Finally, a correlation analysis for the risk classes was developed using

  11. Erosion Control and Recultivation Measures at a Headrace Channel of a Hydroelectric Power Plant using Different Combined Soil Bioengineering Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obriejetan, M.; Florineth, F.; Rauch, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of land use change resulting in an increased number of slope protection constructions and with respect to effects associated with climate change like extremes in temperatures and temperature variations or increased frequency of heavy precipitation, adaptation strategies for sustainable erosion protection systems are needed which meet ecological compatibility and economical requirements. Therefore a wide range of different technical solutions respectively geotextiles and geotextile-related products (blankets, nettings, grids etc.) are available on the market differing considerably in function, material, durability and pricing. Manufacturers usually provide product-specific information pertaining to application field, functional range or (technical) installation features whereas vegetational aspects are frequently neglected while vegetation can contribute substantially to increased near-surface erosion protection respectively slope stability. Though, the success of sustainable erosion control is directly dependent on several vegetational aspects. Adequate development of a functional vegetation layer in combination with geotextiles is closely associated to application aspects such as seeding technique, sowing date and intensity, seed-soil contact or maintenance measures as well as to qualitative aspects like seed quality, germination rates, area of origin, production method or certification. As a general guideline, erosion control within an initial phase is directly related to restoration techniques whereas vegetation specifics with regard to species richness or species composition play a key role in medium to long-term development and slope protection. In this context one of the fundamental objectives of our study is the identification and subsequently the determination of the main interaction processes between technical and biological components of combined slope protection systems. The influence of different geotextile characteristics on specific

  12. Influence of the individual or combined application of biochar and slurry on soil macro-aggregate formation under varying moisture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Michael; Grunwald, Dennis; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Rauber, Rolf; Ludwig, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    The formation of aggregates is of large importance for the structure and the storage of organic matter (OM) in soil. Although positive effects of organic soil additives on the formation of macro-aggregates (> 250 µm) have been reported, the influence of biochar especially applied in combination with other organic amendments remains unclear. Furthermore, studies on the effect of varying soil moisture conditions in form of drying-rewetting cycles on soil aggregate dynamics in the presence of biochar are almost missing. The objectives of this study were to analyze the effects of biochar and slurry applied to the soil individually or in combination on the formation of macro-aggregates under constant and under varying moisture conditions. We sampled four silty loam soils, carefully crushed the soil macro-aggregates, and incubated the soil at 15 °C for 60 days with the following additions: (i) none (control), (ii) biochar (12 % of dry soil mass), (iii) slurry (150 kg N ha-1), (iv) biochar (6 %) + slurry (75 kg N ha-1), (v) biochar (12 %) + slurry (75 kg N ha-1), (vi) biochar (6 %) + slurry (150 kg N ha-1) and (vii) biochar (12 %) + slurry (150 kg N ha-1). The samples were further subdivided into two groups that were incubated under conditions of constant soil moisture and of three drying-rewetting cycles. The CO2 fluxes were continuously measured during the incubation period and the samples were analyzed for microbial biomass C, macro-aggregate yields and macro-aggregate-associated C after finishing the experiment. We found the application of biochar to result in lower macro-aggregate yields with or without slurry compared to the control or the individual slurry application. In contrast, similar or higher C contents in the macro-aggregate fraction of the biochar treatments as compared to the control or slurry treatments were found indicating an occlusion of biochar in macro-aggregates. Due to the sorption characteristics of biochar, we assume the aggregate formation to

  13. Silver nanoparticles in soil: Aqueous extraction combined with single-particle ICP-MS for detection and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahdi, Karrar N.M.; Peters, Ruud J.B.; Klumpp, Erwin; Bohme, Steffi; Ploeg, Van der Martine; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in a growing number of applications and products. Previous studies showed AgNPs can leach from these products to the environment. As a result of AgNPs leaching, sediment, soil and sludge-treated soils may be contaminated with AgNPs. Methods to detect, quantify

  14. Remediation in Situ of Hydrocarbons by Combined Treatment in a Contaminated Alluvial Soil due to an Accidental Spill of LNAPL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Trulli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil contamination represents an environmental issue which has become extremely important in the last decades due to the diffusion of industrial activities. Accidents during transport of dangerous materials and fuels may cause severe pollution. The present paper describes the criteria of the actions which were operated to remediate the potential risk and observed negative effects on groundwater and soil originating from an accidental spill of diesel fuel from a tank truck. With the aim to evaluate the quality of the involved environmental matrices in the “emergency” phase, in the following “safety” operation and during the remediation action, a specific survey on hydrocarbons, light and heavy, was carried out in the sand deposits soil. Elaboration of collected data allows us to observe the movement of pollutants in the unsaturated soil. The remediation action was finalized to improve the groundwater and soil quality. The former was treated by a so called “pump and treat” system coupled with air sparging. A train of three different technologies was applied to the unsaturated soil in a sequential process: soil vapour extraction, bioventing and enhanced bioremediation. Results showed that the application of sequential remediation treatments allowed us to obtain a state of quality in unsaturated soil and groundwater as required by Italian law.

  15. Arctic soil development on a series of marine terraces on central Spitsbergen, Svalbard: a combined geochronology, fieldwork and modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der W.M.; Temme, A.J.A.M.; Kleijn, de Christian; Reimann, T.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Rachlewicz, Grzegorz; Rymer, Krzysztof; Sommer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Soils in Arctic regions currently enjoy attention because of their sensitivity to climate change. It is therefore important to understand the natural processes and rates of development of these soils. Specifically, there is a need to quantify the rates and interactions between various landscape- and

  16. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Kim, P J; Inubushi, K

    2015-10-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK+fly ash, NPK+silicate slag, NPK+phosphogypsum(PG), NPK+blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK+revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK+silicate slag (50%)+RFS (50%), NPK+biochar, NPK+biochar+Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK+silicate slag+Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK+phosphogypsum (PG)+Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH4 emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N2O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions were significantly increased by 9.5-14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0-12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0-30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43-50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Combining in situ and laboratory measurements of soil-atmosphere carbonyl sulfide fluxes from four different biomes across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitz, Florian; Gomez-Brandon, Maria; Hammerle, Albin; Spielmann, Felix M.; Insam, Heribert; Ibrom, Andreas; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moreno, Gerardo; Noe, Steffen M.; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Flux partitioning, the quantification of photosynthesis and respiration, is a major uncertainty in modelling the carbon cycle and in times when robust models are needed to assess future global changes a persistent problem. A promising new approach is to derive gross primary production (GPP) from measurements of the carbonyl sulfide (COS) flux, the most abundant sulfur-containing trace gas in the atmosphere, with a mean concentration of about 500 pptv in the troposphere. This is possible because COS and CO2 enter the leaf via a similar pathway and are processed by the same enzyme (carbonic anhydrase). A prerequisite for using COS as a proxy for photosynthesis is a robust estimation of all non-leaf sources and sinks in an ecosystem. Past studies described soils either as a sink or source, depending on their properties like soil temperature and soil water content. In 2016 we conducted field campaigns in Austria (managed temperate mountain grassland), Spain (savannah), Denmark (temperate beech forest) and Estonia (hemiboreal forest) to estimate the soil-atmosphere COS fluxes under ambient conditions in different biomes. We used self-built fused silica soil chambers to avoid COS emissions from built-in materials and to assess the impact of radiation. At the grassland sites (Austria, Spain) vegetation was removed below the chambers, therefor more radiation reached the soil surface compared to natural conditions. The grassland sites were characterized by highly positive COS fluxes during daytime and COS fluxes around zero during nighttime. In contrast, the soils at the forest sites (Denmark, Estonia), characterized by less radiation on the soil surface, acted as a sink for COS. The impact of other abiotic factors, like soil water content and soil temperature, varied between the ecosystems. In addition to the field measurements soil and litter samples were taken at the study sites and used to measure COS fluxes under controlled conditions in the lab. Results from the

  18. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam, E-mail: litonaslam@yahoo.com [Dept. of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Division of Environmental Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Kim, P.J., E-mail: pjkim@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr [Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Inubushi, K. [Division of Environmental Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK + fly ash, NPK + silicate slag, NPK + phosphogypsum(PG), NPK + blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK + revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK + silicate slag (50%) + RFS (50%), NPK + biochar, NPK + biochar + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + silicate slag + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + phosphogypsum (PG) + Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH{sub 4} emissions were significantly increased by 9.5–14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0–12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0–30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43–50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. - Highlights: • Azolla-cyanobacteria with organic and

  19. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by native microflora and combinations of white-rot fungi in a coal-tar contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canet, R.; Birnstingl, J.G.; Malcolm, D.G.; Lopez-Real, J.M.; Beck, A.J. [Inst. of Valenciano Invest. Agency, Valencia (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Four white-rot fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium IMI 232175, Pleurotus ostreatus from the University of Alberta Microfungus Collection IMI 341687, Coriolus versicolor IMI210866 and Wye isolate No. 7) and all possible combinations of two or more of these fungi, were incubated in microcosms containing wheat straw and non-sterile coal-tar contaminated soil to determine their potential to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biotic and abiotic controls were prepared similarly and PAH concentrations remaining in each microcosm were determined after 8, 16 and 32 weeks by GC-MS following extraction with dichloromethane. The greatest PAH losses were in the biotic control. Soil cultures prepared at the end of the experiment showed that though introduced fungi were still alive, they were unable to thrive and degrade PAH in such a highly contaminated soil and remained in a metabolically inactive form.

  20. Effects of organic fertilizers and biochar/organic fertilizer combinations on fertility and organic matter dynamics of a sandy soil in north-west Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Isabel; Kaiser, Michael; Polifka, Steven; Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; Ludwig, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    Biochar and biochar/organic fertilizer combinations have been recommended as soil amendments to improve plant productivity and soil properties, as well as to increase soil organic C (OC) storage. However, these claims have been largely unverified by field experiments lasting several years. To address these issues, a field experiment was established in 2012 to analyze the effects of organic fertilizers and biochar/organic fertilizer combinations (five field replicates, fully randomized block design) on the fertility and organic matter dynamics of a sandy Cambisol. In 2016, samples were taken from the 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm soil depths of the following treatments: mineral fertilizer and maize digestate that were applied both individually and in combination with 1 t/ha or 40 t/ha biochar. Further treatments were compost and 10 t/ha composted biochar. The treatments were analyzed for the plant yield and the bulk soil samples were analyzed for the pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), OC content, microbial biomass C and the distribution of aggregate-size fractions (i.e. >2 mm, 2 mm - 250 µm, 250 - 53 µm, <53 µm). The latter were also analyzed for OC content and by FTIR. In 2012, the combination of 40 t/ha biochar+digestate accounted for about 42% higher maize (Zea mays) yields (7.9 t/ha) than the mineral fertilization treatment. For winter rye (Secale cereale) in 2013, we detected the highest yield (10.4 t/ha) for the 10 t/ha composted biochar treatment. In 2014, the highest yield for blue lupine (Lupinus angustifolius) (1.84 t/ha) was detected for the 40 t/ha biochar+digestate treatment. The first data for the soil samples indicate that the 10 t/ha composted biochar and the compost treatment are most effective in increasing the CEC, and the microbial biomass C content of the soil, while pH was not significantly affected by any of the treatments. The bulk soil OC content of the treatments receiving 40 t/ha biochar+fertilizer (digestate or mineral), 10 t/ha composted

  1. Environmental Fate of the Herbicide Fluazifop-P-butyl and Its Degradation Products in Two Loamy Agricultural Soils: A Combined Laboratory and Field Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Anette E.; Olsen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    experiments with soil from each field revealed a rapid degradation of FPB to FP. The degradation was almost exclusively microbial, and further biodegradation to TFMP occurred at a slower rate. Both degradation products were sorbed to the two soils to a small extent and were fairly persistent to degradation...... during the two-month incubation period. Together, the field and laboratory results from this study showed that the biodegradation of FPB in loamy soils gave rise to the production of two major degradation products that sorbed to a small extent. In this study, both degradation products leached to drainage......The herbicide fluazifop-P-butyl (FPB) is used against grasses in agricultural crops such as potato, oilseed rape and sugar beet. Limited information is available in Scientific literature on its environmental fate, therefore extensive monitoring at two agricultural test fields was combined...

  2. Synthesis of Nano-Ilmenite (FeTiO3) doped TiO2/Ti Electrode for Photoelectrocatalytic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikmawati; Watoni, A. H.; Wibowo, D.; Maulidiyah; Nurdin, M.

    2017-11-01

    Ilmenite (FeTiO3) doped on Ti and TiO2/Ti electrodes were successfully prepared by using the sol-gel method. The structure, morphology, and optical properties of FeTiO3 are characterized by XRD, UV-Vis DRS, and SEM. The FeTiO3 and TiO2 greatly affect the photoelectrocatalysis performance characterized by Linear Sweep Voltammetry (LSV) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). The characterization result shows a band gap of FeTiO3 is 2.94 eV. XRD data showed that FeTiO3 formed at 2θ were 35.1° (110), 49.9° (024), and 61.2° (214). The morphology of FeTiO3/Ti and FeTiO3.TiO2/Ti using SEM shows that the formation of FeTiO3 thin layer signifies the Liquid Phase Deposition method effectively in the coating process. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) test showed that FeTiO3.TiO2/Ti electrode was highly oxidation responsive under visible light compared to the FeTiO3/Ti electrodes i.e. 7.87×10‑4 A and 9.87×10‑5 A. Degradation test of FeTiO3/Ti and FeTiO3.TiO2/Ti electrodes on titan yellow showed that the percentages of degradation with photoelectrocatalysis at 0.5 mg/L were 41% and 43%, respectively.

  3. In defense of Magnetite-Ilmenite Thermometry in the Bishop Tuff and its implication for gradients in silicic magma reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bernard W; Hildreth, Edward; Bachmann, Olivier; Scaillet, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Despite claims to the contrary, the compositions of magnetite and ilmenite in the Bishop Tuff correctly record the changing conditions of T and fO2 in the magma reservoir. In relatively reduced (∆NNO 1, e.g., Fish Canyon Tuff, Pinatubo), and the d(aTiO2)/dT slope can be negative. Biotite, FeTi-oxides, liquid, and possibly plagioclase largely maintained equilibrium in the Bishop Tuff magma (unlike the pyroxenes, and cores of quartz, sanidine, and zircon) prior ro and during a mixing event triggered by a deeper recharge, which, based on elemental diffusion profiles in minerals, took place at least several decades before eruption. Equilibrating phases and pumice compositions show evolving chemical variations that correlate well with mutually consistent temperatures based on the FeTi-oxides, sanidine-plagioclase, and ∆18O quartz-magnetite pairs. Early Bishop Tuff (EBT) temperatures are lower (700 to ~780‎°C) than temperatures (780 to >820°C) registered in Late Bishop Tuff (LBT), the latter defined here not strictly stratigraphically, but by the presence of orthopyroxene and reverse-zoned rims on quartz and sanidine. The claimed similarity in compositions, Zr-saturation temperatures and thermodynamically calculated temperatures (730-740°C) between EBT and less evolved LBT reflect the use of glass inclusions in quartz cores in LBT that were inherited from the low temperature rhyolitic part of the reservoir characteristic of the EBT. LBT temperatures as high as 820°C, the preservation of orthopyroxene, and the presence of reverse-zoned minerals (quartz, sanidine, zircons) are consistent with magma recharge at the base of the zoned reservoir, heating the cooler rhyolitic melt, partly remelting cumulate mush, and introducing enough CO2 (0.4-1.4 wt%, mostly contained in the exsolved fluid phase) to significantly lower H2O-activity in the system.

  4. A Model for Shear Mechanism in the Pyroxene-Ilmenite Transition in MgSiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, N.

    2003-12-01

    Phase transition mechanisms of silicate minerals under high-pressure play significant roles to the rheological properties and transformation kinetics in the EarthOs mantle. To understand the dynamics of the EarthOs interior, previously, many researchers have studied the transformation mechanisms of olivine, which is the most abundant mineral in the upper mantle, to wadsleyite or ringwoodite structures. Poirier (1981) first proposed a shear-promoted mechanism for the transition from olivine to ringwoodite in Mg2 SiO4 . This diffusionless mechanism forms coherent lamellar intergrowths of product high-pressure phases in the host minerals. Pyroxene is the second major constituent of the upper mantle. However, there is no direct experimental work for the transition mechanism of MgSiO3-rich pyroxene under high pressure. In a natural shocked chondritic meteorite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 ilmenite (akimotoite) (Tomioka and Fujino 1998) was found to be intergrown in the host (Mg,Fe)SiO3 clinopyroxene and they have topotaxial relationships similar to that formed by the shear mechanism. In this study a model of shear mechanism for the MgSiO3 clinoenstatite to akimotoite transition based on their natural occurrences and the topological study on both the structures is proposed. The shear mechanism in the high pressure clinoenstatite (s.g.C2/c)-akimotoite (R-3) transition can be expressed by the sweeping of partial dislocations associating cation shuffling without long-range atomic diffusion. The shortest translation vector [001] of clinoenstatite on (100) plane would dissociate into 1/3[001]+1/6[011]+1/3[001] +1/6[0-11] and the first two partial dislocations bring about the hcp oxygen sublattice for the akimotoite structure. This transition mechanism possibly occurs under high shear stress or under high overstepping pressure at relatively low temperature like that was suggested for the olivine-ringwoodite transition.

  5. Investigating CH4 production in an oxic plant-soil system -a new approach combining isotopic labelling (13C) and inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Katharina; Keppler, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Typically, aerated soil are net sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4), being highest in native ecosystems (pristine forests > managed forests > grasslands > crop fields). However, this does not exclude a simultaneous endogenic CH4 production in the plant-soil system, which cannot be detected simply via CH4 flux measurements. Methanogenic archaea producing CH4 under anoxic conditions were thought to be the only biotic source of CH4 in the soil. However, until recently a non-archaeal pathway of CH4 formation is known where CH4 is produced under oxic conditions in plants (Keppler et al. 2006) and fungi (Lenhart et al. 2012). Additionally, abiotic formation of CH4 from soil organic matter was reported (Jugold et al. 2012) and may be ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The major goal of this project was to determine soil endogenic CH4 sources and to estimate their contribution to the endogenic CH4 production. Especially the effect of plants and fungi on soil CH4 production was investigated. Therefore, a series of experiments was carried out on field fresh soil collected in a grassland and a forest ecosystem under controlled laboratory conditions. By combining selective inhibitors and 13C labelling, CH4 production rates of several CH4 sources were quantified. The major difficulty was to detect the comparatively small flux of CH4 production against the background of the high CH4 consumption rates due to methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we supplemented bare soil and soil with vegetation with selective inhibitors and 13C labelled substrates in a closed chamber system. In a first step, CH4 production was determined by the inhibition of CH4 oxidizing bacteria with Difluoromethane (DFM, 2ml l-1). In the following, a 13C labelled substrate (either CO2, Acetate, or Methionine -S-CH3 labelled) was added in combination with a specific inhibitor -either for archaeal methanogenesis (Bromoethanesulfonate), bacteria (Streptomycin), or fungi (Captan, Cycloheximide). Gas samples were

  6. Selected Apollo 17 soils - Mineralogy and geochemistry of opaque and non-opaque phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L. A.; Sardi, O.; Williams, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    Soil samples 74220 ('orange soil'), 74241 and 75081 were sized, and the compositions of the opaque and silicate phases were determined. The ilmenites, particularly in 74241, contain up to 7.8 wt % MgO and display higher bireflectance than low-Mg ilmenites. They commonly contain exsolution-like chromite and rutile and occasionally are in association with native Fe in an assemblage probably resulting from reduction. The chromian ulvospinels are similar to Apollo 11 spinels in that they contain near-equal amounts of chromite and ulvospinel molecules. No primary chromites were observed. Most native Fe has No and Co contents of less than 1 wt %; some in 74220 contained 5-6% Ni and less than 1% Co in association with schreibersite.

  7. Combining soil and tree-stem flux measurements and soil gas profiles to understand CH4 pathways in Fagus sylvatica forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maier, M.; Macháčová, Kateřina; Lang, F.; Svobodová, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar

    (2017) ISSN 1436-8730 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : ch4 * soil gas profile * gas flux * co2 * methanogenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.102, year: 2016

  8. Long-term diffuse phosphorus pollution dynamics under the combined influence of land use and soil property variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haobo; Ouyang, Wei; Wu, Haotian; Liu, Hongbin; Andrea, Critto

    2017-02-01

    Analyses of the spatial-temporal distribution of diffuse pollution in agricultural regions are essential to the sustained management of water resources. Although nutrients, such as phosphorus fertilizers, can promote crop growth while improving soil fertility, excessive nutrient inputs can produce diffuse pollution, which may results in water quality degradation. The objective of this paper is to employ the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to estimate diffuse P effects on temporal and spatial distributions for a typical agricultural watershed and to identify the conjunct and independent influences of long-term land use and soil properties variation on diffuse P. With the validated model, the four-period simulation results (from 1979 to 2009) indicate that land use changes from agricultural development increased diffuse P yields. However, regarding updated soil properties, no significant differences of P yield were found between 1979 and 2009, demonstrating that impact of the cropland expansion were naturalized with soil property variations. An F-test was employed to assess the essentiality of all of the variables examined during the simulation period, and the test results indicated that diffuse P loading was more sensitive to soil properties than to land use. Before the P pollution control project about the land use optimization planning, it is more effective to distinguish the impacts of land use and soil properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A new grading system for plant-available potassium using exhaustive cropping techniques combined with chemical analyses of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Wang, Huoyan; Zhou, Zijun; Chen, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Jianmin

    2016-11-01

    A new grading system for plant-available potassium (K) in soils based on K release rate from soils and plant growth indices was established. In the study, fourteen different agricultural soils from the southern subtropical to the northern temperate zones in China were analyzed by both chemical extraction methods and exhaustive cropping techniques. Based on the change trends in plant growth indices, relative biomass yields of 70% and 50%, K-deficient coefficients of 35 and 22 under conventional exhaustive experiments, and tissue K concentrations of 40 g kg-1 and 15 g kg-1 under intensive exhaustive experiments were obtained as critical values that represent different change trends. In addition, the extraction method using 0.2 mol L-1 sodium tetraphenylboron (NaTPB) suggested soil K release rates of 12 mg kg-1 min-1 and 0.4 mg kg-1 min-1 as turning points that illustrated three different release trends. Thus, plant-available K in soils was classified into three categories: high available K, medium available K and low available K, and grading criteria and measurement methods were also proposed. This work has increased our understanding of soil K bioavailability and has direct application in terms of routine assessment of agriculture soils.

  10. [Movement-adsorption and its mechanism of Cd in soil under combining effects of electrokinetics and a new type of bamboo charcoal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Luo, Qi-Shi

    2007-08-01

    The characteristics of migration and its influencing factor of cadmium in sandy loam soil by uniform electrokinetics as well as the adsorption property by a new material-bamboo charcoal were investigated through bench-scale experiments, and the feasibility of using electrokinetic technique combined with the newly developed bamboo charcoal for remediation of cadmium contaminated soils was analyzed as well. The results show that the bamboo charcoal is good adsorption material which has comparably strong adsorption effect on Cd, bearing potential in future use, which could be simulated by both Freundlich and Langmuir models (R2 > 0.96). The migration rates of cadmium in sandy loam were high up to 0. 6786 - 0.6875cm/h under an electric gradient of 1.0V/cm, depending upon the concentration of cadmium and the distribution of electric field density. Electrokinetics effectively transported the heavy metal in the soil. In the new electrokinetic tech combining the bamboo charcoal with the same electric gradient above under the polarity reversal period of 48 hours, the cadmium in the soil could be wiped off with high efficiency (removal efficiency 79.6% in 12 days) and the pH together with water content could be well retained. The electric current in the process changed periodically according to the reversal. As a new technique, the electrokinetic movement-bamboo charcoal adsorption holds high potential in future use.

  11. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  12. Assessment of ambient background concentrations of elements in soil using combined survey and open-source data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Hannah G; Clarke, Bradley O; Dasika, Raghava; Wallis, Christian J; Reichman, Suzie M

    2017-02-15

    Understanding ambient background concentrations in soil, at a local scale, is an essential part of environmental risk assessment. Where high resolution geochemical soil surveys have not been undertaken, soil data from alternative sources, such as environmental site assessment reports, can be used to support an understanding of ambient background conditions. Concentrations of metals/metalloids (As, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) were extracted from open-source environmental site assessment reports, for soils derived from the Newer Volcanics basalt, of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. A manual screening method was applied to remove samples that were indicated to be contaminated by point sources and hence not representative of ambient background conditions. The manual screening approach was validated by comparison to data from a targeted background soil survey. Statistical methods for exclusion of contaminated samples from background soil datasets were compared to the manual screening method. The statistical methods tested included the Median plus Two Median Absolute Deviations, the upper whisker of a normal and log transformed Tukey boxplot, the point of inflection on a cumulative frequency plot and the 95th percentile. We have demonstrated that where anomalous sample results cannot be screened using site information, the Median plus Two Median Absolute Deviations is a conservative method for derivation of ambient background upper concentration limits (i.e. expected maximums). The upper whisker of a boxplot and the point of inflection on a cumulative frequency plot, were also considered adequate methods for deriving ambient background upper concentration limits, where the percentage of contaminated samples is background concentrations of metals/metalloids in the Newer Volcanic soils of Melbourne were comparable to ambient background concentrations in Europe and the United States, except for Ni, which was naturally enriched in the basalt-derived soils of Melbourne. Copyright

  13. Assessing the combined hazards of drought, soil erosion and local flooding on agricultural land: a Czech case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Miroslav; Semerádová, Daniela; Novotný, I.; Dumbrovský, M.; Drbal, K.; Pavlík, F.; Vopravil, J.; Štěpánková, P.; Vizina, A.; Balek, Jan; Hlavinka, Petr; Bartošová, Lenka; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, oct (2016), s. 231-249 ISSN 0936-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MZe(CZ) QJ1610072 Grant - others:EHP(CZ) EHP-CZ02-OV-1-014-2014 Program:CZ02 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Soil moisture * Sheet erosion * Ephemeral gully erosion * Fast-drying soil * Critical point * Vulnerability * Climate change Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.578, year: 2016

  14. Time-lapse resistivity measurements combined with soil water sampling to characterize solute movement in the unsaturated zone at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.; Binley, A.; Schotanus, D.; Eggen, G.

    2010-12-01

    out during the monitoring period. We present a selection of results from the infiltration experiments and combination of measurement techniques and illustrate the potential strength of geophysics for mapping the impacts of soil heterogeneity on solute transport.

  15. Natural occurrence of MgSiO3-ilmenite and amorphized (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite in a shocked L5-6 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T. G.; Lingemann, C. M.; Dupas, C.; Soeffler, D.

    1997-03-01

    A new assemblage of (MgFe)SiO3-perovskite (glass), MgSiO3-ilmenite, and ringwoodite in the melt veins of the ACFER 040 L5-6 chondrite. Although perovskite is no longer crystalline, it appears to have been the first mineral to crystallize from the melt, and therefore represents a higher crystallization pressure than the more common majorite-bearing assemblages in the melt veins of other shocked chondrites. Bright-field TEM images of the melt veins matrix in ACFER 040 are shown.

  16. Soil erosion modelling of single precipitation events using TLS and UAV in combination with Be-7 tracer, Andalusia (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Philipp; Eltner, Anette; Faust, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion due to superficial run-off is determined by complex processes. Within this context, high resolution modelling of recent and sub-recent relief changes based on erosive single precipitation events constitutes a great challenge. For non-invasive field measurements, photogrammetric methods such as unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) and terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) are especially suitable. So far, these methods were used for highly resolved erosion modelling mainly within laboratory environments. UAV are economic and flexible to generate aerial images and programmed flight pattern can be repeated almost arbitrarily. TLS has the advantage of high accuracy potential and automation level for digital terrain model generation. Both methods complement each other. To achieve a high accuracy of erosion rates for single precipitation events within the interill sector, the cosmogenic nuclide tracer Beryllium-7 (Be-7) is especially eligible due to the short radioactive half-life. High sorption at topmost soil particles and immobility at given pH-values enable fine-scaled erosion modelling (two millimetre increments). For the presented project, the soil surface is measured before and shortly after strong precipitation events in the research area, located in the fragile marl landscape of Andalusia. Simultaneous investigations on a research section located in the Saxonian Loess Province (Eastern Germany) are performed. Hence, differing factors on soil erosion (e.g. precipitation intensity, slope characteristics, soil cover and soil type) are accounted for. For multi-temporal comparison of measured soil surface a stable local reference system, consisting of signalised points for photogrammetric data acquisition, is defined. Furthermore, undisturbed reference plots for Be-7 sampling are designed. First results and challenges are presented.

  17. Combining Forces - The Use of Landsat TM Satellite Imagery, Soil Parameter Information, and Multiplex PCR to Detect Coccidioides immitis Growth Sites in Kern County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Antje; Talamantes, Jorge; Castañón Olivares, Laura Rosío; Medina, Luis Jaime; Baal, Joe Daryl Hugo; Casimiro, Kayla; Shroff, Natasha; Emery, Kirt W.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease acquired through the inhalation of spores of Coccidioides spp., which afflicts primarily humans and other mammals. It is endemic to areas in the southwestern United States, including the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County, California, our region of interest (ROI). Recently, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, also known as valley fever, has increased significantly, and several factors including climate change have been suggested as possible drivers for this observation. Up to date details about the ecological niche of C. immitis have escaped full characterization. In our project, we chose a three-step approach to investigate this niche: 1) We examined Landsat-5-Thematic-Mapper multispectral images of our ROI by using training pixels at a 750 m×750 m section of Sharktooth Hill, a site confirmed to be a C. immitis growth site, to implement a Maximum Likelihood Classification scheme to map out the locations that could be suitable to support the growth of the pathogen; 2) We used the websoilsurvey database of the US Department of Agriculture to obtain soil parameter data; and 3) We investigated soil samples from 23 sites around Bakersfield, California using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based method to detect the pathogen. Our results indicated that a combination of satellite imagery, soil type information, and multiplex PCR are powerful tools to predict and identify growth sites of C. immitis. This approach can be used as a basis for systematic sampling and investigation of soils to detect Coccidioides spp. PMID:25380290

  18. Combining forces--the use of Landsat TM satellite imagery, soil parameter information, and multiplex PCR to detect Coccidioides immitis growth sites in Kern County, California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Lauer

    Full Text Available Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease acquired through the inhalation of spores of Coccidioides spp., which afflicts primarily humans and other mammals. It is endemic to areas in the southwestern United States, including the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County, California, our region of interest (ROI. Recently, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, also known as valley fever, has increased significantly, and several factors including climate change have been suggested as possible drivers for this observation. Up to date details about the ecological niche of C. immitis have escaped full characterization. In our project, we chose a three-step approach to investigate this niche: 1 We examined Landsat-5-Thematic-Mapper multispectral images of our ROI by using training pixels at a 750 m × 750 m section of Sharktooth Hill, a site confirmed to be a C. immitis growth site, to implement a Maximum Likelihood Classification scheme to map out the locations that could be suitable to support the growth of the pathogen; 2 We used the websoilsurvey database of the US Department of Agriculture to obtain soil parameter data; and 3 We investigated soil samples from 23 sites around Bakersfield, California using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR based method to detect the pathogen. Our results indicated that a combination of satellite imagery, soil type information, and multiplex PCR are powerful tools to predict and identify growth sites of C. immitis. This approach can be used as a basis for systematic sampling and investigation of soils to detect Coccidioides spp.

  19. Combining forces--the use of Landsat TM satellite imagery, soil parameter information, and multiplex PCR to detect Coccidioides immitis growth sites in Kern County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Antje; Talamantes, Jorge; Castañón Olivares, Laura Rosío; Medina, Luis Jaime; Baal, Joe Daryl Hugo; Casimiro, Kayla; Shroff, Natasha; Emery, Kirt W

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease acquired through the inhalation of spores of Coccidioides spp., which afflicts primarily humans and other mammals. It is endemic to areas in the southwestern United States, including the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County, California, our region of interest (ROI). Recently, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, also known as valley fever, has increased significantly, and several factors including climate change have been suggested as possible drivers for this observation. Up to date details about the ecological niche of C. immitis have escaped full characterization. In our project, we chose a three-step approach to investigate this niche: 1) We examined Landsat-5-Thematic-Mapper multispectral images of our ROI by using training pixels at a 750 m × 750 m section of Sharktooth Hill, a site confirmed to be a C. immitis growth site, to implement a Maximum Likelihood Classification scheme to map out the locations that could be suitable to support the growth of the pathogen; 2) We used the websoilsurvey database of the US Department of Agriculture to obtain soil parameter data; and 3) We investigated soil samples from 23 sites around Bakersfield, California using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based method to detect the pathogen. Our results indicated that a combination of satellite imagery, soil type information, and multiplex PCR are powerful tools to predict and identify growth sites of C. immitis. This approach can be used as a basis for systematic sampling and investigation of soils to detect Coccidioides spp.

  20. Removal of pollutants by enhanced coagulation combined PAC with variable charge soils: flocs' properties and effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Wu, Chun-De; Duan, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the properties of flocs and effects of the solution pH on removal of representative pollutants by enhanced coagulation with variable charge soils of South China and polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The results demonstrated that the removal efficiency of turbidity was larger and the aggregated flocs had a faster growth rate, bigger size, denser structure and faster settling rate than those generated by PAC alone, when variable charge soil was used in conjunction with PAC. Additionally, initial solutions pH had meaningful effects on removal of pollutants. With the increase in the pH of the solution, the removal efficiencies of turbidity, algae and heavy metal ions significantly increased. Besides, charge neutralization together with physical entrapment of colloids was the dominant mechanism in enhanced coagulation, and variable charge soil displayed a great adsorption effect.

  1. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  2. Combination of geo- pedo- and technogenic magnetic and geochemical signals in soil profiles - Diversification and its interpretation: A new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszkiewicz, Marcin; Łukasik, Adam; Magiera, Tadeusz; Mendakiewicz, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic and geochemical parameters of soils are determined with respect to geology, pedogenesis and anthropopression. Depending on local conditions these factors affect magnetic and geochemical signals simultaneously or in various configurations. We examined four type of soils (Entic Podzol, Eutric Cambisol, Humic Cambisol and Dystric Cambisol) developed on various bedrock (the Tumlin Sandstone, basaltoid, amphibolite and serpentinite, respectively). Our primary aim was to characterize the origin and diversification of the magnetic and geochemical signal in soils in order to distinguish the most reliable methods for correct interpretation of measured parameters. Presented data include selected parameters, both magnetic (mass magnetic susceptibility - χ, frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility - χfd and thermomagnetic susceptibility measurement - TSM), and geochemical (selected heavy metal contents: Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). Additionally, the enrichment factor (EF) and index of geoaccumulation (Igeo) were calculated. Our results suggest the following: (1) the χ/Fe ratio may be a reliable indicator for determining changes of magnetic signal origin in soil profiles; (2) magnetic and geochemical signals are simultaneously higher (the increment of χ and lead and zinc was noted) in topsoil horizons because of the deposition of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs); (3) EF and Igeo evaluated for lead and zinc unambiguously showed anthropogenic influence in terms of increasing heavy metal contents in topsoil regardless of bedrock or soil type; (4) magnetic susceptibility measurements supported by TSM curves for soil samples of different genetic horizons are a helpful tool for interpreting the origin and nature of the mineral phases responsible for the changes of magnetic susceptibility values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Influence of Mineral Fertilizer Combined With a Nitrification Inhibitor on Microbial Populations and Activities in Calcareous Uzbekistanian Soil Under Cotton Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdiyeva

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of fertilizers combined with nitrification inhibitors affects soil microbial biomass and activity. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of fertilizer application combined with the nitrification inhibitor potassium oxalate (PO on soil microbial population and activities in nitrogen-poor soil under cotton cultivation in Uzbekistan. Fertilizer treatments were N as urea, P as ammophos, and K as potassium chloride. The nitrification inhibitor PO was added to urea and ammophos at the rate of 2%. Three treatments—N200P140K60 (T1, N200 P140 POK60 (T2, and N200 P140 POK60 (T3 mg kg-1 soil—were applied for this study. The control (C was without fertilizer and PO. The populations of oligotrophic bacteria, ammonifying bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, mineral assimilating bacteria, oligonitrophilic bacteria, and bacteria group Azotobacter were determined by the most probable number method. The treatments T2 and T3 increased the number of oligonitrophilic bacteria and utilization mineral forms of nitrogen on the background of reducing number of ammonifying bacteria. T2 and T3 also decreased the number of nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and net nitrification. In conclusion, our experiments showed that PO combined with mineral fertilizer is one of the most promising compounds for inhibiting nitrification rate, which was reflected in the increased availability and efficiency of fertilizer nitrogen to the cotton plants. PO combined with mineral fertilizer has no negative effects on nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azotobacter and oligo-nitrophilic bacteria.

  4. Zirconium, hafnium, and rare earth element partition coefficients for ilmenite and other minerals in high-Ti lunar mare basalts - An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, G.; Wagstaff, J.; Yang, S.-R.

    1986-01-01

    Partition coefficients were determined for Gd, Lu, Hf and Zr among ilmenite, armalcolite, and synthetic high-Ti mare basaltic melts at temperatures from 1122 deg to 1150 deg, and at oxygen fugacities of IW x 10 exp 0.5, by in situ analysis with an electron microprobe, using samples doped to present concentration levels. Coefficients for Zr were also measured for samples containing 600-1600 ppm Zr using this microprobe. In addition, coefficients were determined for Hf and Zr between chromian ulvospinel and melt, for Hf between pigeonite and melt, and for Lu between olivine and melt by microprobe analysis of samples doped to present levels. Values measured using the microprobe were in agreement with the values measured by analyzing mineral separates from the same run products by isotope dilution. Coefficient values for ilmenite are less than 0.01 for the LREE, are around 0.1 for the HREE, and are several times greater than this for Zr and Hf.

  5. Mapping of Cu and Pb Contaminations in Soil Using Combined Geochemistry, Topography, and Remote Sensing: A Case Study in the Le’an River Floodplain, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Gao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution in soil is becoming a widely concerning environmental problem in China. The aim of this study is to integrate multiple sources of data, namely total Cu and Pb contents, digital elevation model (DEM data, remote sensing image and interpreted land-use data, for mapping the spatial distribution of total Cu and Pb contamination in top soil along the Le’an River and its branches. Combined with geographical analyses and watershed delineation, the source and transportation route of pollutants are identified. Regions at high risk of Cu or Pb pollution are suggested. Results reveal that topography is the major factor that controls the spatial distribution of Cu and Pb. Watershed delineation shows evidence that the streamflow resulting from rainfall is the major carrier of metal pollutants.

  6. The assessment of source attribution of soil pollution in a typical e-waste recycling town and its surrounding regions using the combined organic and inorganic dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Qi, Shihua; Xie, Xianming; Gu, X W Sophie; Wang, Jinji

    2017-01-01

    Guiyu is a well-known electronic waste dismantling and recycling town in south China. Concentrations and distribution of the 21 mineral elements and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) collected there were evaluated. Principal component analyses (PCA) applied to the data matrix of PAHs in the soil extracted three major factors explaining 85.7% of the total variability identified as traffic emission, coal combustion, and an unidentified source. By using metallic or metalloid element concentrations as variables, five principal components (PCs) were identified and accounted for 70.4% of the information included in the initial data matrix, which can be denoted as e-waste dismantling-related contamination, two different geological origins, anthropogenic influenced source, and marine aerosols. Combining the 21 metallic and metalloid element datasets with the 16 PAH concentrations can narrow down the coarse source and decrease the unidentified contribution to soil in the present study and therefore effectively assists the source identification process.

  7. Mapping of Cu and Pb contaminations in soil using combined geochemistry, topography, and remote sensing: a case study in the Le'an River floodplain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiyun; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Yanfang; Lin, Aiwen; Kong, Xuesong; Liu, Dianfeng; Li, Xiran; Zhang, Yang; Gao, Yin; Wang, Dun

    2012-05-01

    Heavy metal pollution in soil is becoming a widely concerning environmental problem in China. The aim of this study is to integrate multiple sources of data, namely total Cu and Pb contents, digital elevation model (DEM) data, remote sensing image and interpreted land-use data, for mapping the spatial distribution of total Cu and Pb contamination in top soil along the Le'an River and its branches. Combined with geographical analyses and watershed delineation, the source and transportation route of pollutants are identified. Regions at high risk of Cu or Pb pollution are suggested. Results reveal that topography is the major factor that controls the spatial distribution of Cu and Pb. Watershed delineation shows evidence that the streamflow resulting from rainfall is the major carrier of metal pollutants.

  8. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Jia [Department of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Fu Lingyan; Zhao Xinna; Liu Xiujuan [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang Huili; Wang Xuedong [School of Environmental Science and Public Health, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Dai Liyan, E-mail: dailiyan@zju.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2009-04-27

    In this article, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) were presented for the extraction and determination of five polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil samples. Acetone was used as extraction solvent for the extraction of PCBs from soil samples. In DLLME, the target analytes in the extraction solvent were rapidly transferred from the acetone extract to chlorobenzene when the extraction process began. The main advantages of this method are quick speed, high enrichment factor, high recovery and good repeatability. Under the optimum conditions, the method yields a linear calibration curve in the concentration range from 2 to 2000 {mu}g kg{sup -1}for PCB 52, and 0.4 to 400 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for other target analytes. Coefficients of correlation (r{sup 2}) ranged from 0.9993 to 0.9999. The repeatability was tested by spiking soil samples at a concentration level of 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for PCBs. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 11) varied between 2.2% and 6.4%. The limits of detection (LODs), based on signal-to-noise (S/N) of 3, were between 0.20 and 0.50 {mu}g kg{sup -1}. The relative recoveries of the five PCBs from soil S1, S2 and S3 at spiking levels of 10, 20 and 50 {mu}g kg{sup -1} were in the range of 88.70-103.8%, 82.50-106.3% and 82.30-113.6%, respectively. Therefore, DLLME combined with GC-ECD can be successfully applied for the determination of trace PCB residues in real soil samples.

  9. Using compost and technosol combined with biochar and Brassica juncea L. to decrease the bioavailable metal concentration in soil from a copper mine settling pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forján, Rubén; Rodríguez-Vila, Alfonso; Covelo, Emma F

    2017-10-31

    One of the most important sources of pollution caused by metals, if not the most important, is mining. Metal pollution is covert, persistent and irreversible. For this reason, soil metal pollution has become a severe problem in many parts of the world. The aim of this study was to observe which combination of amendments (compost + biochar or technosol + biochar) combined with Brassica juncea L. was best at reducing the assimilable contents of Cu, and which also increased to a lesser extent the contents of other metals (Ni, Pb, Zn) found in these amendments. We also studied the phytoremediation capacity of brassicas in these amendments. The experiment was carried out using 45-cm-deep cylinders over and 11-month period, with soil from the settling pond in the depleted copper mine located in Touro (Galicia, north-west Spain). At depth 0-15 cm, the settling pond soil (S) had a higher CaCl2-extractable Cu, Pb, and Ni concentration, at the three time periods measured (time 1 = 3 months, time 2 = 7 months, time 3 = 11 months). The settling pond soil + technosol + biochar and vegetated with Brassica juncea L. (STBP) had the highest CaCl2-extractable concentrations of Zn over time. In general terms, the most effective treatment for reducing the phytoavailable contents of Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn was the treatment using compost +b iochar + Brassica juncea L. In the two treatments applied, Brassica juncea L. had a good phytostabilisation capacity.

  10. The effects of a non-woven cover in combination with different soil mulches in strawberry cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. AFLATUNI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a non-woven cover and three different soil mulches on the timing of harvest and on the yield of strawberry were examined in two field experiments in northern Finland during 1989-1993. The non-woven cover was used either in spring or in both autumn and in spring. Non-covered plants served as controls. Depending on the year, plants covered in spring alone gave a significantly earlier (4 to 9 days marketable yield than did uncovered plants. The non-woven cover had no effect on marketable yield at Sotkamo but at Rovaniemi it increased the yield, especially in cold years. The use of cover decreased the amount of mouldy berries. At both experimental sites, a significantly higher yield was obtained from beds covered with soil mulches than from uncovered beds. White-on-black film delayed the yield by 2 to 4 days in comparison with black or Mypex film.

  11. Combined use of remote sensing and GIS for degradation risk assessment in some soils of the Northern Nile Delta, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. El Baroudy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the potential of Remote Sensing (RS and Geographic Information System (GIS to quantify soil degradation risk in some soils of the Northern Nile Delta. Physiographic units were mapped using Landsat ETM+ image (2003 and Digital Elevation Model (DEM. The obtained map showed that the study area comprised two distinct landscapes i.e. fluvial lacustrine and flood plains. The main landforms of the area under consideration are grouped as decantation basins, levees, recent river terraces, overflow basins, man-made terraces, fish ponds and turtle backs. A simple model was designed for assessing risk of land degradation depending on the equations of soil and climatic factors. The study demonstrated that about 48.09% of the study area has undergone very high risk of chemical degradation, whereas 51.91% of the area has undergone low risk of chemical degradation. About 20.12% of the total area was characterized by high risk of physical degradation. The results indicated that the salinity, alkalinity and water logging are the main common degradation hazards.

  12. Enhanced degradation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene by the combined system of zero-valent iron reduction and persulfate oxidation in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Dao-yuan; Li, Yu-jiao; Liu, Pei-ya; Dong, Chang-xun

    2014-04-01

    ortho-Nitrochlorobenzene (o-NCB) in soil poses significant health risks to human because of its persistence and high toxicity. The removal of o-NCB by both zero-valent iron (ZVI) and chemical oxidation (persulfate) was investigated by batch experiments. The o-NCB removal rate increases significantly from 15.1 to 97.3 % with an increase of iron dosage from 0.1 to 1.0 mmol g(-1). The o-NCB removal rate increases with the decrease of the initial solution pH, and a removal efficiency of 90.3 % is obtained at an initial pH value of 6.8 in this combined system. It is found that temperature and soil moisture could also increase the o-NCB removal rate. The o-NCB degradation rate increases from 83.9 to 96.2 % and from 41.5 to 82.4 % with an increase of temperature (15 to 35 °C) and soil moisture (0.25 to 1.50 mL g(-1)), respectively. Compared to the persulfate oxidation system and ZVI system, the persulfate-iron system shows high o-NCB removal capacity. o-NCB removal rates of 41.5 and 62.4 % are obtained in both the persulfate oxidation system and the ZVI system, while the removal rate of o-NCB is 90.3 % in the persulfate-iron system.

  13. Determination of As(III) and As(V) in soils using sequential extraction combined with flow injection hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Jianbo; Tang Zhiyong; Jin Zexiang; Chi Quan; He Bin; Jiang Guibin

    2003-01-27

    An analytical procedure for determination of As(III) and As(V) in soils using sequential extraction combined with flow injection (FI) hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) was presented. The soils were sequentially extracted by water, 0.6 mol l{sup -1} KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution, 1% (v/v) HCl solution and 1% (w/v) NaOH solution. The arsenite (As(III)) in extract was analyzed by HG-AFS in the medium of 0.1 mol l{sup -1} citric acid solution, then the total arsenic in extract was determined by HG-AFS using on-line reduction of arsenate with L-cysteine. The concentration of arsenate (As(V)) was calculated by the difference. The optimum conditions of extraction and determination were studied in detail. The detection limit (3{sigma}) for As(III) and As(V) were 0.11 and 0.07 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.43% (n=11) at the 10 {mu}g l{sup -1} As level. The method was applied in the determination of As(III) and As(V) of real soils and the recoveries of As(III) and As(V) were in the range of 89.3-118 and 80.4-111%, respectively.

  14. Accelerated solvent extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction before gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the sensitive determination of phenols in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Han-Zhu; Wang, Xia; Chen, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Ming-Lin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2015-05-01

    A method combining accelerated solvent extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed for the first time as a sample pretreatment for the rapid analysis of phenols (including phenol, m-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) in soil samples. In the accelerated solvent extraction procedure, water was used as an extraction solvent, and phenols were extracted from soil samples into water. The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique was then performed on the obtained aqueous solution. Important accelerated solvent extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction parameters were investigated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, the new method provided wide linearity (6.1-3080 ng/g), low limits of detection (0.06-1.83 ng/g), and excellent reproducibility (solvent extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a sample pretreatment procedure coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is an excellent method for the rapid analysis of trace levels of phenols in environmental soil samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Environmental Fate of the Herbicide Fluazifop-P-butyl and Its Degradation Products in Two Loamy Agricultural Soils: A Combined Laboratory and Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Annette E; Olsen, Preben; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2015-08-04

    The herbicide fluazifop-P-butyl (FPB) is used against grasses in agricultural crops such as potato, oilseed rape, and sugar beet. Limited information is available in scientific literature on its environmental fate, therefore extensive monitoring at two agricultural test fields was combined with laboratory studies to determine leaching and the underlying degradation and sorption processes. Water samples from drains, suction cups, and groundwater wells showed leaching of the degradation products fluazifop-P (FP) and 2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin (TFMP) following FPB treatment. Laboratory experiments with soil from each field revealed a rapid degradation of FPB to FP. The degradation was almost exclusively microbial, and further biodegradation to TFMP occurred at a slower rate. Both degradation products were sorbed to the two soils to a small extent and were fairly persistent to degradation during the two-month incubation period. Together, the field and laboratory results from this study showed that the biodegradation of FPB in loamy soils gave rise to the production of two major degradation products that sorbed to a small extent. In this study, both degradation products leached to drainage and groundwater during precipitation. It is therefore recommended that these degradation products be included in programs monitoring water quality in areas with FPB use.

  16. Geotechnical properties of peat soil stabilised with shredded waste tyre chips in combination with gypsum, lime or cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saberian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peat has a high content of water and organic substances. These weak components can cause low bearing capacity and high consolidation settlement under load, which means that peat deposits must usually be stabilised if they are to bear constructions such as buildings or roads. In this study we investigated the performance of waste tyre chips (10 % by weight and sand (400 kg m-3 supplemented with a pozzolanic binder (gypsum, lime or cement at a range of dosages (5 %, 10 % or 15 % by weight as a stabiliser for peat soil. Peat samples were taken from a fen peatland at Chaghakhor Wetland in Chahar Mahal and Bakhtiari Province, Iran. In total, 162 test specimens were prepared and subjected to laboratory strength testing (unconfined compression test and direct shear test. Additionally, the pH of each admixture was recorded immediately after mixing, elemental compositions were determined by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF, and structures were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. It was observed that: (1 the total percentage of pozzolanic compounds in the peat soil was well below the minimum of 70 % set by the standard ASTM C 618 (ASTM 2000, so an additive such as cement, lime or gypsum would certainly be required; (2 specimens stabilised with gypsum or lime showed improvements in unconfined compressive strength (UCS, but those stabilised with ordinary Portland cement exhibited the greatest improvement in UCS (up to 12,200 % as well as improvements in the direct shear parameters c and φ; (3 according to the XRF tests, additives such as cement, lime and gypsum introduced considerable amounts of Si, Al, Ca and O, which are important for pozzolanic reactions in peat soils; and (4 on the basis of the results of UCS and direct shear tests, the optimum percentage of the additives tested would be 5 %.

  17. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  18. Partitioning of hexachlorobenzene in a kaolin/humic acid/surfactant/water system: Combined effect of surfactant and soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jinzhong; Wang, Lingling [Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu, Xiaohua, E-mail: hust-esri2009@hotmail.com [Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study HCB partitioning in a kaolin/humic acid/TX100/water system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reveal influence of TX100-HA interaction on TX100 and HA sorption to kaolin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We verify combined effect of TX100 and HA on HCB desorption from clay. - Abstract: Understanding the combined effect of soil organic matter (SOM) and surfactants on the partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil/water systems is important to predict the effectiveness of surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER). In the present study we investigate the partitioning of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) within a humic acid (HA)-coated kaolin/Triton X-100 (TX100)/water system, with special emphasis on the interaction between TX100 and HA, and their combined effect on HCB sorption. HA firstly enhanced then suppressed TX100 sorption to kaolin as the amounts of HA increased, while the addition of TX100 led to a consistent reduction in HA sorption. In the HA-coated kaolin/TX100/water system, TX100 played a primary role in enhancing desorption of HCB, while the role could be suppressed and then enhanced as HA coating amounts increased. Only at HA coating above 2.4%, dissolved HA outcompeted clay-bound HA for HCB partitioning, resulting in dissolved HA enhanced desorption. The presence of dissolved HA at these conditions further promoted the effectiveness of TX100 enhanced desorption. Despite a reduced TX100 sorption to clay was achieved due to the presence of dissolved HA, the effect on HCB desorption was comparatively slight. A reliable cumulative influence of HA and TX100 on HCB desorption was observed, although HCB desorption by HA/TX100 mixed was less than the sum of HA and TX100 individually. Our study suggests that for soils of high organic contents, the combined effect of SOM and surfactants on HOCs desorption can be applied to improve the performance of SER.

  19. Combined efficacy assessment of soil solarization and bio-fungicides for management of Sclerotinia spp. in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Rodrigo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    White mould:Sclerotinia spp., is the lettuce main disease in the Colombian high Andes. It causes yield losses of up to 70% and is primarily managed with chemical fungicides, while alternative control strategies are poorly used. Soil solarization and a set of chemical and bio-fungicides for Sclerotinia management efficacy in lettuce, were determined. Biofungicides included different doses of Allium sativum and Matricaria recutita extracts and Trichoderma koningiopsis suspensions. The fungicide procymidone was also evaluated. Field trials included single or combined treatments application. Non-linear modelling and AUDPC were employed to determine the efficacy of management strategies. Both S. sclerotiorum and S. minor caused white mould, being S. minor the dominant species. Solarization significantly lowered Sclerotia population in the upper soil layers and consequently lowered disease incidence. Highest levels of Sclerotinia control were achieved with solarization, particularly in combination with procymidone or T. Konin giopsis (79.08% and 41.50% disease reduction, respectively. Non-linear modeling of disease epidemic progress curve proved a valuable alternative to AUDPC, which allowed multiple disease development parameters estimation and indirectly the efficacy of management strategies. This work should help the advance of environmentally-sound management of Sclerotina spp. in lettuce, under the highly specific growing conditions of the high Andes.

  20. Combined influence of sedimentation and vegetation on the soil carbon stocks of a coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Chen, Huaipu; Cao, Haobing; Ge, Zhenming; Zhang, Liquan

    2017-07-01

    Coastal wetlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Large quantities of sediment deposited in the Changjiang (Yangtze) estuary by the Changjiang River promote the propagation of coastal wetlands, the expansion of saltmarsh vegetation, and carbon sequestration. In this study, using the Chongming Dongtan Wetland in the Changjiang estuary as the study area, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the influences of sedimentation and vegetation on the SOC stocks of the coastal wetland were examined in 2013. There was sediment accretion in the northern and middle areas of the wetland and in the Phragmites australis marsh in the southern area, and sediment erosion in the Scirpus mariqueter marsh and the bare mudflat in the southern area. More SOC accumulated in sediments of the vegetated marsh than in the bare mudflat. The total organic carbon (TOC) stocks increased in the above-ground biomass from spring to autumn and decreased in winter; in the below-ground biomass, they gradually increased from spring to winter. The TOC stocks were higher in the below-ground biomass than in the above-ground biomass in the P. australis and Spartina alterniflora marshes, but were lower in the below-ground biomass in S. mariqueter marsh. Stocks of SOC showed temporal variation and increased gradually in all transects from spring to winter. The SOC stocks tended to decrease from the high marsh down to the bare mudflat along the three transects in the order: P. australis marsh > S. alterniflora marsh > S. mariqueter marsh > bare mudflat. The SOC stocks of the same vegetation type were higher in the northern and middle transects than in the southern transect. These results suggest that interactions between sedimentation and vegetation regulate the SOC stocks in the coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary.

  1. Combining Geoelectrical Measurements and CO2 Analyses to Monitor the Enhanced Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils: A Field Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers can be successfully remediated through enhanced biodegradation. However, in situ monitoring of the treatment by piezometers is expensive and invasive and might be insufficient as the information provided is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations. An alternative method was tested in order to improve the robustness of the monitoring. Geophysical methods, electrical resistivity (ER and induced polarization (IP, were combined with gas analyses, CO2 concentration, and its carbon isotopic ratio, to develop a less invasive methodology for monitoring enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The field implementation of this monitoring methodology, which lasted from February 2014 until June 2015, was carried out at a BTEX-polluted site under aerobic biotreatment. Geophysical monitoring shows a more conductive and chargeable area which corresponds to the contaminated zone. In this area, high CO2 emissions have been measured with an isotopic signature demonstrating that the main source of CO2 on this site is the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels. Besides, the evolution of geochemical and geophysical data over a year seems to show the seasonal variation of bacterial activity. Combining geophysics with gas analyses is thus promising to provide a new methodology for in situ monitoring.

  2. Fine Structure of Self-reversed Thermo-remanent Magnetization: Effects of Composition Waves Produced by Ordering During Quench and Annealing of Metastable Ferri-ilmenite Solid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnroe, Suzanne; Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; Harrison, Richard; Thomas, Chris; Mukai, Hiroki; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Putnis, Andrew; Svendby, Kathrine

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic experiments on synthetic ferri-ilmenite samples in the bulk composition range Ilm 60-70, quenched and annealed at high temperatures (T), well above any magnetization temperature, throw new light on metastable chemical phenomena leading to fine-structure in the acquisition of thermoremanent magnetization. Growth of Fe-Ti -ordered domains in a disordered host, or growth and shrinking of adjacent Fe-Ti ordered domains against each other in the process of coarsening, lead to Fe-enrichment in some domains relative to others, influencing magnetization temperature. However, additional Fe-enrichment along domain boundaries during these processes produces Fe-enriched waves on the boundaries, where ferrimagnetic material near the wave crests, magnetizes at a higher T than the bulk of the sample. Because the boundaries are antiphase domain boundaries with opposite Fe-Ti ordering, opposite sides must acquire opposite magnetic moments during cooling, at a temperature above that where bulk normal magnetization begins. This is the "magnetic predestination T" or "TPD", because it sets the stage for normal and self-reversed magnetization on opposite sides of the phase domain boundary. The Fe-enrichment waves are not uniform in different parts of a sample; neither are the compositions along the domain walls. This means "TPD" is generally not a single temperature, but a T range, but reflecting only a small volume of the sample. With further cooling in a positive field, slightly less Fe-enriched but more voluminous ferrimagnetic regions begin to magnetize, leading to a positive magnetic peak, "TMAX". Already here, even less Fe-enriched but still more voluminous ferrimagnetic material, influenced by the domain wall, begins to acquire self-reversed magnetization. This dominates in cooling below "TMAX", eventually leading to totally self-reversed magnetization at "TFR". A Curie temperature obviously cannot be measured meaningfully from a cooling curve in this material of varied

  3. Comparing the Heterogeneity of Copper-Binding Characteristics for Two Different-Sized Soil Humic Acid Fractions Using Fluorescence Quenching Combined with 2D-COS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous distributions of copper-binding characteristics were compared for two ultrafiltered size fractions of a soil HA using fluorescence quenching combined with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS. The apparent shapes of the original synchronous fluorescence spectra and the extent of the fluorescence quenching upon the addition of copper were similar for the two fractions. The stability constants calculated at their highest peaks were not significantly different. However, the 2D-COS results revealed that the fluorescence quenching behaviors were strongly affected by the associated wavelengths and the fraction's size. The spectral change preferentially occurred in the wavelength order of 467 nm → 451 nm → 357 nm for the 1–10 K fraction and of 376 nm → 464 nm for the >100 K fraction. The extent of the binding affinities exactly followed the sequential orders interpreted from the 2D-COS, and they exhibited the distinctive ranges of the logarithmic values from 5.86 to 4.91 and from 6.48 to 5.95 for the 1–10 K and the >100 K fractions, respectively. Our studies demonstrated that fluorescence quenching combined with 2D-COS could be successfully utilized to give insight into the chemical heterogeneity associated with metal-binding sites within the relatively homogeneous HA size fractions.

  4. Aspirin, lysine, mifepristone and doxycycline combined can effectively and safely prevent and treat cancer metastasis: prevent seeds from gemmating on soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huo; Ma, Ji; Zhu, Yewei; Lu, Yusheng; Wang, Jichuang; Zhang, Ting; Li, Tao; Xie, Jingjing; Xu, Bo; Xie, Fangwei; Gao, Yu; Shao, Jingwei; Tu, Xiaohuang; Jia, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Recent scientific advances have increased our understanding of the cancer metastatic complexities and provided further impetus for new combination therapies to prevent cancer metastasis. Here, we demonstrated that a combination (HAMPT) of aspirin, lysine, mifepristone and doxycycline can effectively and safely prevent cancer metastasis. The pharmaceutically-formulated HAMPT inhibited adhesion of cancer cells to either endothelial cells or extracellular matrix via down-regulating cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and α4-integrin. HAMPT inhibited the cloak effect by activated platelets on cancer cells, thereby interfering adhesion and invasion of cancer cells to the underlying stroma. At the effective concentration, HAMPT induced cancer cells into dormancy with minor inhibition on cell viability. Four-day pretreatment followed by 30-day oral administration of HAMPT (33.5-134 mg/kg) to the mice inoculated with cancer cells produced significant inhibition on cancer metastasis dose-dependently without marked side effects. Fifty-day rat toxicity study with HAMPT at doses (335-1340 mg/kg) 20-fold higher than its therapeutic dose produced no significant toxicity. Interestingly, the acute toxic death could not be reached at the maximum administrable dose (5 g/kg). This proof-of-concept study provides the first conceptual evidence that cancer metastasis can be controlled by using affordable old drugs to restrain circulating tumor cells from gemmating on the metastatic soil without the need for cytotoxicity. PMID:26459390

  5. [Short-term effects of different tillage modes combined with straw-returning on the soil labile organic carbon components in a farmland with rice-wheat double cropping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Fang; Zhu, Li-Qun; Han, Xin-Zhong; Gu, Ke-Jun; Hu, Nai-Juan; Bian, Xin-Min

    2013-05-01

    A two-year (2009-2011) field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different tillage modes, straw-returning, and their interactions on the soil total organic carbon (TOC) and labile organic carbon (LOC) components (easily oxidizable organic carbon (EOC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC)) at the soil depths of 0-7, 7-14, and 14-21 cm in a farmland with rice-wheat double cropping. In all treatments of straw-returning, the TOC and LOC contents in each soil layer were significantly higher than those without straw-returning. Under plowing tillage, the MBC content in 0-7 cm soil layer was significantly higher than that under rotary tillage, but the EOC content was in adverse. Rotary tillage made the TOC content in 7 - 14 cm soil layer being significantly higher, as compared with plowing tillage. The TOC, WSOC, and MBC contents in 14-21 cm soil layer under plowing tillage were significantly higher than those under rotary tillage. Plowing tillage combined with rice and wheat straws-returning made the soil TOC content being higher than the other treatments.

  6. Evaluation of dielectric mixing models for microwave soil moisture retrieval using data from the Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) ground-based SMAP simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture measurements are required to improve our understanding of hydrological processes, ecosystem functions, and linkages between the Earth’s water, energy, and carbon cycles. The efficient retrieval of soil moisture depends on various factors in which soil dielectric mixing models are consi...

  7. Distribution of YLOID in soil-grapevine system (Vitis vinifera L.) as tool for geographical characterization of agro-food products. A two years case study on different grafting combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Tutone, Livia; Saiano, Filippo

    2017-04-15

    The knowledge of a chemistry relationship between the soil and the agricultural products is an important tool for the quality assessment of food. We studied YLOID (Y, La and lanthanoids), recognized as very useful tracers due their coherent and predictable behavior, to trace and evaluate their distribution from soil to the grape in Vitis vinifera L. Because much of the world's viticulture is based on grafting, and rootstocks have proved affect vine growth, yield, fruit and wine quality, we carried out experimental trials to analyse the YLOID distribution of two different red cultivars, grafted onto six different rootstocks, on the same soil. The YLOID amounts, the relationship Heavy vs Light YLOID and the pattern of YLOID were calculated. The results showed that the different grafting combinations were not able to induce significant differences in YLOID uptake from the soil maintaining the same fingerprint (with the exception of Eu). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of exogenously applied salicylic acid and putrescine alone and in combination with rhizobacteria on the phytoremediation of heavy metals and chickpea growth in sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naeem; Bano, Asghari

    2017-09-21

    The present attempt was made to study the role of exogenously applied salicylic acid (SA) and putrescine (Put) on the phytoremediation of heavy metal and on the growth parameters of chickpea grown in sandy soil. The SA and Put were applied alone as well as in combination with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). The PGPRs, isolated from the rhizosphere of chickpea were characterized on the basis of colony morphology and biochemical traits through gram staining, catalase and oxidase tests, and identified by 16S-rRNA gene sequencing as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus megaterium. The chickpea seeds were soaked in 24 h fresh cultures of isolates for 2-3 h prior to sowing. The growth regulators (PGRs), SA and Put (300 mg/L), were applied to the seedlings as foliar spray at 3-leaf stage. The result revealed that plants treated with SA and Put alone or in combination with PGPRs, significantly enhanced the accumulation of heavy metals in plant shoot. PGPR induces Ni accumulation in sensitive variety and Pb in both the varieties, the PGR in combination augment the bioremediation effects of PGPR and both sensitive and tolerant variety showed significant accumulation of Ni, Cd and Pb. SA was more effective in accumulating Ni and Cd whereas, significant accumulation of Pb was recorded in Put. PGPRs, further augmented the PGRs induced accumulation of heavy metals and macronutrients in chickpea shoot and in rhizosphere. SA increased the proline content of tolerant variety while decreasing the lipid peroxidation and proline content of the sensitive variety but decreased the stimulating effect of PGPR in proline production. Interactive effects of PGPR and PGRs is recommended for inducing phytoremediation in chickpea plants under drought stress.

  9. Direct Evidence of Fe2+-Fe3+ Charge Ordering in the Ferrimagnetic Hematite-Ilmenite Fe1.35Ti0.65O3-δ Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, L.; Popova, E.; Nolan, M.; Gloter, A.; Chikoidze, E.; March, K.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Berini, B.; Stéphan, O.; Keller, N.; Dumont, Y.

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter we highlight direct experimental evidence of Fe2+-Fe3+ charge ordering at room temperature in hematite-ilmenite Fe1.35Ti0.65O3-δ epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition, using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled to high-resolution energy electron-loss spectroscopy. These advanced spectromicroscopy techniques demonstrate a strong modulation of the Fe2+ valence state along the c axis. Density functional theory calculations provide crucial information on the key role of oxygen vacancies in the observed charge distributions. Their presence at significant levels leads to the localization of extra electrons onto reduced Fe2+ sites, while Ti remains solely +4. The magnetic and transport properties of these films are reviewed in the light of the present results regarding their ferrimagnetic character correlated with the Fe2+ modulation and their semiconducting behavior interpreted by an Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping conduction regime via Fe2+ and Fe3+ centers. The experimental evidence of only one type of mixed valence state, i.e., Fe2+ and Fe3+, in the Fe2-xTixO3-δ system will thus help to interpret further the origin of its geomagnetic properties and to illuminate fundamental issues regarding its spintronic potential.

  10. Short-term effect of aniline on soil microbial activity: a combined study by isothermal microcalorimetry, glucose analysis, and enzyme assay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huilun; Zhuang, Rensheng; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Qian, Yiguang; Masakorala, Kanaji; Cai, Minmin; Liu, Haijun

    2014-01-01

    The accidents of aniline spill and explosion happened almost every year in China, whereas the toxic effect of aniline on soil microbial activity remained largely unexplored. In this study, isothermal microcalorimetric technique, glucose analysis, and soil enzyme assay techniques were employed to investigate the toxic effect of aniline on microbial activity in Chinese soil for the first time. Soil samples were treated with aniline from 0 to 2.5 mg/g soil to tie in with the fact of aniline spill. Results from microcalorimetric analysis showed that the introduction of aniline had a significant adverse effect on soil microbial activity at the exposure concentrations ≥0.4 mg/g soil (p aniline significantly decreased the soil microbial respiratory activity at the concentrations ≥0.8 mg/g soil (p aniline had a significant effect (p aniline on soil microbial activity. The proposed methods can provide toxicological information of aniline to soil microbes from the metabolic and biochemical point of views which are consistent with and correlated to each other.

  11. Combined and isolated effects of pCO2 and soil water content on carbon isotope discrimination during C3 photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Biomass produced via C3 photosynthesis dominates the terrestrial organic matter (TOM) found within the geologic record. Our previous work revealed an increase in net discrimination (Δ13C) ≈ +4‰ across an increase in pCO2 level from ambient to RCO2 = 6x within the model C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana, grown to maturity under constant conditions of light, moisture, and nutrient availability (Schubert and Jahren, 2012, GCA), leading us to suggest that changes in ancient pCO2 level can be reconstructed from Δ13C within terrestrial sediments. Others have observed an average change in Δ13C ≈ +4‰ when comparing the δ13C value of herbarium samples collected from cool-cold forests to tropical environments against the MAP recorded (Diefendorf et al., 2010, PNAS), leading those authors to suggest that changes in the Δ13C value of TOM recovered from the geological record can be interpreted as changes in precipitation level and/or water availability. Because decreasing moisture availability and increasing pCO2 level exert control over Δ13C through distinctly different mechanisms (i.e., decreased stomatal conductance vs. inhibition of photorespiration, respectively), a simultaneous change in both pCO2 level and moisture availability could combine to influence carbon isotope fractionation. Here we present experiments in which we grew 230 A. thaliana plants at each of 5 levels of pCO2: 390, 685, 1075, 1585, and 2175 ppmv. Within each growth chamber, soil moisture content (θm) was maintained at 1.50 g g-1 for 11 days following germination. Afterwards, we allowed 170 of the plants to dry to θm = 0.83, 0.44, and 0.38 g g-1. After 3 weeks of total growth, tissues were analyzed for δ13C value. We compare the isolated and combined effects of pCO2 and soil moisture upon carbon isotope fractionation across the total range of pCO2 levels reconstructed for the last 350 million years and across moisture levels associated with a 4.5x change in plant biomass.

  12. Reconstructing late Quaternary palaeosol development and landscape connectivity from combined soil magnetic, geochemical and micromorphological analyses: insights from the Wilgerbosch River, Great Karoo, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldknow, Chris; Hooke, Janet; Oldfield, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The characteristics, spatial and temporal patterns and drivers of Quaternary climate change across South Africa remain contentious principally due to the paucity of dated proxy records. River and fan terrace palaeosols may offer an important addition to analysis of spatially pervasive geomorphological landforms (palaeolake shorelines, terraces, dunes) conventionally used to reconstruct patterns of palaeoenvironmental change. In the Great Karoo, alluvial and colluvial exposures in the Wilgerbosch River and several of its tributaries have revealed up to five late Quaternary terraces of varying thickness, extent and pedogenic overprinting which may be of palaeoenvironmental significance. A combination of geochronology (OSL and radiocarbon), soil micromorphology, geochemistry (XRF, XRD) and soil magnetic proxies on both bulk (0-63 μm) and particle size extracts (0-4 and 32-63 μm) from major terrace palaeosols was used in order to establish: 1) changing sediment fluxes and pathways; 2) the characteristics and drivers of palaeosol formation; and 3) evaluate the suitability of these terrace palaeosols as indicators of palaeoenvironmental change. The results are used to test a conceptual model of landscape connectivity. Colluvial (slopewash, head deposits) sedimentation on the valley floors occurred around the time of the LGM due to enhanced regolith production through physical weathering. Soils overprinting these deposits (T1) are goethite-rich attesting to reducing conditions. Incision into T1 resulted in an extensive channel network forming. High concentrations of mafic minerals (Fe, Cr, Ca, Ti) and enhanced ferrimagnetism (XLF > 80) in the 32-63 μm fraction indicated connectivity with slope colluvium proximal to weathering dolerite tors. Fluvial aggradation (T2) occurred as a complex response to this phase of connectivity and terminated in the Late Glacial period (around 17±2.5 ka). The development of a rhizogenic calcrete overprinting T2 indicated an elevated

  13. HETEROSE E CAPACIDADE COMBINATÓRIA ENTRE VARIEDADES DE MILHO EM SOLO ÁCIDO HETEROSIS AND COMBINING ABILITY AMONG VARIETIES OF MAIZE IN ACID SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Branco de Miranda Filho

    2007-09-01

    for breeding purposes was the objective of this study. Ten maize varieties (populations, previously selected for resistance to Puccinia polysora, Phaeosphaeria maydis, Physopella zeae, Exserohilum turcicum and corn stunt complex, were evaluated under the diallel crossing scheme. Varieties and crosses were evaluated in acid and low fertility soil. Analyzed traits were: ear yield (EY, plant height (PH, and ear height (EH. Varieties PMI 8701, CMS 57NF, PMI 9401 CMS 58ND and AMARILLO DENTADO DMR showed the highest yields (above 3.5 t/ ha per se representing more than 70% in relation to check yield. Heterosis showed significance for all traits, but among the components of heterosis only average heterosis was significant for EY and specific heterosis for EH. General combining ability effects (gi were significant for all traits, and their highest EY estimates (t/ha were for PMI 8701 (0.150, BR 105 (0.120, CMS 59 (0.106. The cross CMS 57NF x PMI 8701, with yield of 5.11 t/ha (above both hybrid checks and heterosis of 23.7% above mid-parent, may be indicated as a potentially useful heterotic group. Varieties PMI 8701, CMS 57NF, PMI 9401 and CMS 58ND were considered the most promising intrapopulation breeding programs, for acid soils.

    KEY-WORDS: Heterosis; acidity stress; combining ability; germplasm.

  14. Single-particle mineralogy of Chinese soil particles by the combined use of low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis and attenuated total reflectance-FT-IR imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Md Abdul; Kim, Bowha; Jung, Hae-Jin; Song, Young-Chul; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-10-15

    Our previous work on the speciation of individual mineral particles of micrometer size by the combined use of attenuated total reflectance FT-IR (ATR-FT-IR) imaging and a quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis technique (EPMA), low-Z particle EPMA, demonstrated that the combined use of these two techniques is a powerful approach for looking at the single-particle mineralogy of externally heterogeneous minerals. In this work, this analytical methodology was applied to characterize six soil samples collected at arid areas in China, in order to identify mineral types present in the samples. The six soil samples were collected from two types of soil, i.e., loess and desert soils, for which overall 665 particles were analyzed on a single particle basis. The six soil samples have different mineralogical characteristics, which were clearly differentiated in this work. As this analytical methodology provides complementary information, the ATR-FT-IR imaging on mineral types, and low-Z particle EPMA on the morphology and elemental concentrations, on the same individual particles, more detailed information can be obtained using this approach than when either low-Z particle EPMA or ATR-FT-IR imaging techniques are used alone, which has a great potential for the characterization of Asian dust and mineral dust particles. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Lunar mineral feedstocks from rocks and soils: X-ray digital imaging in resource evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John G.; Patchen, Allan; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Higgins, Stefan J.; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    The rocks and soils of the Moon provide raw materials essential to the successful establishment of a lunar base. Efficient exploitation of these resources requires accurate characterization of mineral abundances, sizes/shapes, and association of 'ore' and 'gangue' phases, as well as the technology to generate high-yield/high-grade feedstocks. Only recently have x-ray mapping and digital imaging techniques been applied to lunar resource evaluation. The topics covered include inherent differences between lunar basalts and soils and quantitative comparison of rock-derived and soil-derived ilmenite concentrates. It is concluded that x-ray digital-imaging characterization of lunar raw materials provides a quantitative comparison that is unattainable by traditional petrographic techniques. These data are necessary for accurately determining mineral distributions of soil and crushed rock material. Application of these techniques will provide an important link to choosing the best raw material for mineral beneficiation.

  16. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macro-porosity by combining laboratory measurements and X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    from which macropores present in each of the soil column could be reconstructed and quantified after processing of the images. From the images, the total macro-porosity in a soil column and macro-porosity of the restricting layer (limiting quarter) for each sample were quantified and correlated...

  17. Combined effects of antimony and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate on soil microbial activity and speciation change of heavy metals. Implications for contaminated lands hazardous material pollution in nonferrous metal mining areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaozhe; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Yuan, Zhimin; Liu, Jianli; Jordan, Gyozo; Knudsen, Tatjana Šolević; Avdalović, Jelena

    2018-05-05

    The combined effects of antimony (Sb) and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), a common organic flotation reagent, on soil microbial activity and speciation changes of heavy metals were investigated for the first time. The results showed that the exchangeable fraction of Sb was transformed to a stable residual fraction during the incubation period, and the addition of DDTC promoted the transformation compared with single Sb pollution, probably because DDTC can react with heavy metals to form a complex. In addition, the presence of DDTC and Sb inhibited the soil microbial activity to varying degrees. The growth rate constant k of different interaction systems was in the following order on the 28th day: control group ≥ single DDTC pollution > combined pollution > single Sb pollution. A correlation analysis showed that the concentration of exchangeable Sb was the primary factor that affected the toxic reaction under combined pollution conditions, and it significantly affected the characteristics of the soil microorganisms. All the observations provide useful information for a better understanding of the toxic effects and potential risks of combined Sb and DDTC pollution in antimony mining areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Removal of micropollutants, facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria in a full-scale retention soil filter receiving combined sewer overflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Heß, Stefanie; Lüddeke, Frauke; Sacher, Frank; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Combined sewer systems collect surface runoff as well as wastewater of industrial and domestic origin. During periods of heavy rainfall the capacity of the sewer system is exceeded and the overflow is discharged into receiving waters without any treatment. Consequently, combined sewer overflow (CSO) is considered as a major source of water pollution. This study investigates the effectiveness of a retention soil filter (RSF) for the removal of micropollutants as well as facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria from CSO. The removal of organic group parameters like total organic carbon was excellent and the removal efficiency for micropollutants of the RSF and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which treats wastewater of the same origin during dry and normal weather conditions, was comparable. Compounds of high environmental concern like estrogens or certain pharmaceuticals, e.g. diclofenac, were completely eliminated or removed to a high degree during RSF passage. RSF treatment also reduced the number of E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci by 2.7, 2.2 and 2.4 log-units (median values), respectively. Obviously, some Staphylococcus species can better adapt to the conditions of the RSF than others as a shift of the abundance of the different species was observed when comparing the diversity of staphylococci obtained from the RSF influent and effluent. RSF treatment also decreased the absolute number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The percentage of antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci isolates also decreased during passage of the RSF, whereas the percentage of resistant enterococci did not change. For E. coli ampicillin and for enterococci and staphylococci erythromycin determined the antibiotic resistance level. The results demonstrate that RSFs can be considered as an adequate treatment option for CSO. The performance for the removal of micropollutants is comparable with a medium sized WWTP with conventional activated sludge

  19. Thermal and Hydrologic Signatures of Soil Controls on Evaporation: A Combined Energy and Water Balance Approach with Implications for Remote Sensing of Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Guido D.

    2000-01-01

    The overall goal of this research is to examine the feasibility of applying a newly developed diagnostic model of soil water evaporation to large land areas using remotely sensed input parameters. The model estimates the rate of soil evaporation during periods when it is limited by the net transport resulting from competing effects of capillary rise and drainage. The critical soil hydraulic properties are implicitly estimated via the intensity and duration of the first stage (energy limited) evaporation, removing a major obstacle in the remote estimation of evaporation over large areas. This duration, or 'time to drying' (t(sub d)) is revealed through three signatures detectable in time series of remote sensing variables. The first is a break in soil albedo that occurs as a small vapor transmission zone develops near the surface. The second is a break in either surface to air temperature differences or in the diurnal surface temperature range, both of which indicate increased sensible heat flux (and/or storage) required to balance the decrease in latent heat flux. The third is a break in the temporal pattern of near surface soil moisture. Soil moisture tends to decrease rapidly during stage I drying (as water is removed from storage), and then become more or less constant during soil limited, or 'stage II' drying (as water is merely transmitted from deeper soil storage). The research tasks address: (1) improvements in model structure, including extensions to transpiration and aggregation over spatially variable soil and topographic landscape attributes; and (2) applications of the model using remotely sensed input parameters.

  20. Application of portable gas chromatography-photo ionization detector combined with headspace sampling for field analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You-Ya; Yu, Ji-Fang; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Chao-Yan; Xie, Ya-Bo; Ma, Li-Qiang; Gu, Qing-Bao; Li, Fa-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    A method based on headspace (HS) sampling coupling with portable gas chromatography (GC) with photo ionization detector (PID) was developed for rapid determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in soils. Optimal conditions for HS gas sampling procedure were determined, and the influence of soil organic matter on the recovery of BTEX from soil was investigated using five representative Chinese soils. The results showed that the HS-portable-GC-PID method could be effectively operated at ambient temperature, and the addition of 15 ml of saturated NaCl solution in a 40-ml sampling vial and 60 s of shaking time for sample solution were optimum for the HS gas sampling procedure. The recoveries of each BTEX in soils ranged from 87.2 to 105.1 %, with relative standard deviations varying from 5.3 to 7.8 %. Good linearity was obtained for all BTEX compounds, and the detection limits were in the 0.1 to 0.8 μg kg(-1) range. Soil organic matter was identified as one of the principal elements that affect the HS gas sampling of BTEX in soils. The HS-portable-GC-PID method was successfully applied for field determination of benzene and toluene in soils of a former chemical plant in Jilin City, northeast China. Considering its satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility and particular suitability to be operated in ambient environment, HS sampling coupling with portable GC-PID is, therefore, recommended to be a suitable screening tool for rapid on-site determination of BTEX in soils.

  1. Independent and combined effects of soil warming and drought stress during anthesis on seed set and grain yield in two spring wheat varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldearegay, Dawit Fisseha; Yan, F.; Jiang, D.

    2012-01-01

    (Trappe and Alora) to soil warming (H), drought (D) and both (HD) during anthesis. The plants were grown in pots in a climate-controlled glasshouse. In H, the soil temperature was increased by 3 °C compared with the control (C). In both D and HD treatments, the plants were drought-stressed by withholding...... irrigation until all of the transpirable soil water had been depleted in the pots. Results showed that, particularly under D treatment, Alora depleted soil water faster than Trappe. In both varieties, flag leaf relative water content (RWC) was significantly lowered, while spikelet abscisic acid (ABA......) concentration was significantly increased by D and HD treatments. Compared with the C plants, D and HD treatments significantly reduced ear number, ear to tiller ratio, shoot biomass, grain yield, harvest index and seed set but hardly affected tiller number and 1000-kernel weight, whereas H treatment alone only...

  2. Two-region, combined Archie’s Law and Reference-Point model for air permeability and gas diffusivity in variably-saturated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, S; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, K

    2011-01-01

    for structured soils, with the natural field moisture condition (set at −100 cm H2O matric potential [pF 2]) as the reference (spliced) point between the large-pore (drained pore diameter ≥30 μm at pF ≤ 2) and the small-pore (subsequently drained pores 2) regions, and (ii) including a percolation...... threshold, set as 10% of the total porosity for structureless porous media or 10% of the porosity in the large-pore region for structured soils. The resulting extended Archie's law with reference point (EXAR) models for ka and Dp were fitted to the measured data. For both structureless and structured porous......The air permeability (ka) and soil gas diffusion coefficients (Dp) are controlling factors for gas transport and fate in variably saturated soils. We developed a unified model for ka and Dp based on the classical Archie's law, extended by: (i) allowing for two-region gas transport behavior...

  3. A new method combining soil oxygen concentration measurements with the quantification of gross nitrogen turnover rates and associated formation of N2O and N2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, Adrian; Dannenmann, Michael; Sörgel, Christoph; Meier, Rudi; Meyer, Astrid; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and the expansion of land use have led to significant changes in terrestrial ecosystems. These include changes in the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen and therewith implications for biodiversity, water cycle and pedosphere-atmosphere exchange. To understand these impacts detailed research on nitrogen turnover and fluxes are conducted at various (semi-) natural and managed ecosystems in the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. In this context, we execute 15N tracing analyses on soil samples in our stable isotope laboratory including a new experimental setup. The soils were sampled from different forest ecosystems of Mt. Kilimanjaro varying in altitude (1600 - 4500 m) and will be analyzed for gross rates of ammonification and nitrification, gross rates of microbial inorganic N uptake as well as for the gaseous losses of ^15N2 and ^15N2O using ^15NH4+ and ^15NO3- tracing and pool dilution approaches. Since nitrogen turnover of nitrification and denitrification is dependent on soil oxygen concentrations we developed an incubation method which allows to adjust soil samples to different oxygen concentrations. For this purpose, soil is incubated in glass bottles with side tubes to ensure a constant gas flow over the whole incubation time. To adjust the oxygen levels in the laboratory experiment as close as possible to the natural conditions, we started to monitor soil oxygen concentrations with a FirestingO2 Sensor (Pyroscience) connected to a timer and a datalogger (MSR 145 IP 60 E3333) at a Mt. Kilimanjaro rainforest site. The equipment is complemented with soil temperature, moisture and pressure sensors (MSR 145 IP 60). A solar panel connected to an energy source guarantees a working time for over 2 years by a measuring frequency of 20 seconds each 30 minutes. The new laboratory incubation method together with in-situ oxygen concentration measurements in soils will facilitate laboratory incubations with realistic oxygen concentrations and thus will allow for a better

  4. Combination of amplified rDNA restriction analysis and high-throughput sequencing revealed the negative effect of colistin sulfate on the diversity of soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingli; Sun, Yongxue; Peng, Jinju; Wu, Qun; Ma, Yi; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2018-01-01

    Colistin sulfate is widely used in both human and veterinary medicine. However, its effect on the microbial ecologyis unknown. In this study, we determined the effect of colistin sulfate on the diversity of soil microorganisms by amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and high-throughput sequencing.ARDRAshowed that the diversity of DNA from soil microorganisms was reduced after soil was treated with colistin sulfate, with the most dramatic reductionobserved after 35days of treatment. High-throughput sequencing showed that the Chao1 and abundance-based coverage estimators (ACE) were reduced in the soils treated with colistin sulfate for 35 dayscompared to those treated with colistin sulfate for 7days. Furthermore, Chao1 and ACE tended to be lower when higher concentration of colistin sulfate was used, suggesting that the microbial abundance is reduced by colistin sulfate in a dose-dependent manner. Shannon index showed that the diversity of soil microorganism was reduced upon treatment with colistin sulfate compared to the untreated control group. Following 7days of treatment, Bacillus, Clostridiumand Sphingomonas were sensitive to all the concentration of colistin sulfate used in this study. Following 35days of treatment, the abundance of Choroplast, Haliangium, Pseudomonas, Lactococcus, and Clostridium was significantly decreased. Our results demonstrated that colistin sulfate especially at high concentration (≥5mg/kg) could alter the population structure of microorganisms and consequently the microbial community function in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. [Applications of soil metaproteomics in soil pollution assessment: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Li, Feng; Liu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2012-10-01

    Soil microbial indicator is one of the important biological indicators in evaluating the extent of soil contamination. In recent years, with the development of molecular biology, many studies have focused on the ecological functions of soil microorganisms by using metagenomics, metatranscriptome and metaproteomics. Relative to metagenomics and metatranscriptome, soil metaproteomics aims to investigate the spatial and temporal changes of the proteins extracted from soil as well as the functional components of soil microbial genomic expression products, which is more conclusive to explore the ecological functions of soil microbes and their roles in soil pollutants transportation and transformation. Therefore, soil metaproteomics has great potential in soil pollution assessment. Currently, soil metaproteomics is still at its infancy stage, while soil protein extraction method is one of the key factors restraining the potential application of soil metaproteomics. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantage of soil metaproteomics in soil pollution assessment were reviewed, with the focus on the comparison of different soil protein extraction methods. In combining with case studies, the feasibility and limits of soil proteins as an indicator for soil pollution assessment were analyzed. In addition, the future research perspectives on the development of soil metaproteomics were discussed.

  6. NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. A.; Waltman, S. W.; Geng, X.; James, D.; Hernandez, L.

    2009-05-01

    NOAM-SOIL is being created by combining the CONUS-SOIL database with pedon data and soil geographic data coverages from Canada and Mexico. Completion of the in-progress NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) database will provide complete North America coverage comparable to CONUS. Canadian pedons, which number more than 500, have been painstakingly transcribed to a common format, from hardcopy, and key- entered. These data, along with map unit polygons from the 1:1,000,000 Soil Landscapes of Canada, will be used to create the required spatial data coverages. The Mexico data utilizes the INEGI 1:1,000,000 scale soil map that was digitized by U. S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center in the mid 1990's plus about 20,000 pedons. The pedon data were published on the reverse side of the paper 1:250,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico and key entered by USDA and georeferenced by Penn State to develop an attribute database that can be linked to the 1:1,000,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico based on taxonomic information and geographic proximity. The essential properties that will be included in the NOAM-SOIL data base are: layer thickness (depth to bedrock or reported soil depth); available water capacity; sand, silt, clay; rock fragment volume; and bulk density. For quality assurance purposes, Canadian and Mexican soil scientists will provide peer review of the work. The NOAM-SOIL project will provide a standard reference dataset of soil properties for use at 1km resolution by NACP modelers for all of North America. All data resources, including metadata and selected raw data, will be provided through the Penn State web site: Soil Information for Environmental Modeling and Ecosystem Management (www.soilinfo.psu.edu). Progress on database completion is reported.

  7. 14CO2 in combination with root-exclusion can be used to estimate plant-induced decomposition of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonsalo, Jussi; Kulmala, Liisa; Mäkelä, Annikki; Oinonen, Markku; Fontaine, Sebastien; Palonen, Vesa; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2017-04-01

    In ecosystem models, the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is estimated using temperature and moisture as main controlling parameters. However, there is increasing evidence that the decomposition is significantly affected by easily available carbohydrates. The C assimilation by the boreal forest trees will increase in the future due to climate change. As trees allocate large part of assimilated C to roots and soil microorganisms, particularly to ectomycorrhizal fungi, the rhizosphere priming effect (RPE) is assumed to increase. The aim of the experiment was to identify and quantify RPE in the field conditions. We established a three-year long trenching experiment in a boreal Scots pine forest where the belowground C flow from standing pine forest was controlled using root-exclusion with mesh fabrics. The mesh size of 1 μm excluded both tree roots and fungal hyphae and served as priming controls with decreased C supply. The unaltered C input entered the non-trenched field plots. Soil CO2 flux and 14C concentrations were measured. We were able to quantify the RPE in field conditions and show that plant-derived C flow into the soil increases SOM decomposition. Quantification of RPE allows more detailed estimation of soil organic matter decomposition in future changing climate.

  8. Validation of TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS Techniques Combined with Sorption and Desorption Experiments to Check Competitive and Individual Pb2+ and Cd2+ Association with Components of B Soil Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Beatriz; Arenas-Lago, Daniel; Andrade, María Luisa; Vega, Flora A

    2015-01-01

    Sorption and desorption experiments were performed by the batch method on the B horizons of five natural soils: Umbric Cambisol, Endoleptic Luvisol, Mollic Umbrisol, Dystric Umbrisol, and Dystric Fluvisol. Individual and competitive sorption and desorption capacity and hysteresis were determined. The results showed that Pb2+ was sorbed and retained in a greater quantity than Cd2+ and that the hysteresis of the first was greater than that of the second. The most influential characteristics of the sorption and retention of Pb2+ were pH, ECEC, Fe and Mn oxides and clay contents. For Cd2+ they were mainly pH and, to a lesser extent, Mn oxides and clay content. The combined use of TOF-SIMS, FE-SEM/EDS and sorption and desorption analyses was suitable for achieving a better understanding of the interaction between soil components and the two heavy metals. They show the preferential association of Pb2+ with vermiculite, chlorite, Fe and Mn oxides, and of Cd2+ with the same components, although to a much lesser extent and intensity. This was due to the latter's higher mobility as it competed unfavourably with the Pb2+ sorption sites. TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS techniques confirmed the results of the sorption experiments, and also provided valuable information on whether the soil components (individually or in association) retain Cd2+ and/or Pb2+; this could help to propose effective measures for the remediation of contaminated soils.

  9. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for model calibration and validation in a large ungauged catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2010-01-01

    of the ungauged Okavango catchment in Southern Africa: (i) Surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from SAR measurements onboard the Envisat satellite; (ii) Radar altimetry measurements by Envisat providing river stages in the tributaries of the Okavango catchment, down to a minimum width of about one...... hundred meters; and (iii) Temporal changes of the Earth’s gravity field recorded by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) caused by total water storage changes in the catchment. The SSM data are compared to simulated moisture conditions in the top soil layer. They cannot be used for model...... related to channel morphology such as Manning’s roughness. GRACE data are used to validate the model and to condition model parameters related to various storage compartments in the hydrological model (e.g. soil, groundwater, bank storage etc.). As precipitation input the FEWS-Net RFE, TRMM 20 3B42...

  10. Transformation and speciation of typical heavy metals in soil aquifer treatment system during long time recharging with secondary effluent: Depth distribution and combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liangliang; Wang, Kun; Noguera, Daniel R; Jiang, Junqiu; Oyserman, Ben; Zhao, Ningbo; Zhao, Qingliang; Cui, Fuyi

    2016-12-01

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) systems rely on extensive physical and biogeochemical processes in the vadose zone and aquifer for water quality improvement. In this study, the distribution, quantitative changes, as well as the speciation characteristics of heavy metals in different depth of soils of a two-year operated lab-scale SAT was explored. A majority of the heavy metals in the recharged secondary effluent were efficiently trapped by the steady-state operated SAT (removal efficiency ranged from 74.7% to 98.2%). Thus, significant accumulations of 31.7% for Cd, 15.9% for Cu, 15.3% for Zn and 8.6% for Cr were observed for the top soil after 730 d operation, leading to the concentration (in μg g(-1)) of those four heavy metals of the packed soil increased from 0.51, 46.7, 61.0 and 35.7 to 0.66, 54.2, 70.4 and 38.8, respectively. By contrast, the accumulation of Mn and Pb were quite low. The residual species were the predominant fraction of the six heavy metals (ranged for 59.8-82.4%), followed by oxidisable species. Although the Zn, Cr, Cd, Cu and Mn were efficiently bounded onto the oxide components within the soil, the percentage of the labile metal fractions (water-, acid-exchangeable and reducible metal fractions) exhibited a slight increasing after 2 Y operation. Significantly heavy metals accumulation and slightly decreasing of the proportion of the stable fractions indicated a potentially higher environmental hazard for those six heavy metals after long-term SAT operation (especially for Cu, Zn and Cd). Finally, a linear relationship between the accumulation rate of metal species and the variation of soil organic carbon concentration and water extractable organic carbon was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for hydrological model calibration in a large poorly gauged catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2011-01-01

    gauged Okavango catchment in Southern Africa: (i) surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from radar measurements onboard the Envisat satellite; (ii) radar altimetry measurements by Envisat providing river stages in the tributaries of the Okavango catchment, down to a minimum river width of about....... GRACE data are used to validate the model and to condition model parameters related to various storage compartments in the hydrological model (e. g. soil, groundwater, bank storage etc.). As precipitation input the FEWS-Net RFE, TRMM 3B42 and ECMWF ERA-Interim datasets are considered and compared....

  12. Tolerable soil erosion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Frank; Jones, Bob; Rickson, Jane; Smith, Celina

    2010-05-01

    Soil loss by erosion has been identified as an important threat to soils in Europe* and is recognised as a contributing process to soil degradation and associated deterioration, or loss, of soil functioning. From a policy perspective, it is imperative to establish well-defined baseline values to evaluate soil erosion monitoring data against. For this purpose, accurate baseline values - i.e. tolerable soil loss - need to be differentiated at appropriate scales for monitoring and, ideally, should take soil functions and even changing environmental conditions into account. The concept of tolerable soil erosion has been interpreted in the scientific literature in two ways: i) maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of soil quantity, and ii) maintaining biomass production, at a location. The first interpretation ignores soil quality by focusing only on soil quantity. The second approach ignores many soil functions by focusing only on the biomass (particularly crop) production function of soil. Considering recognised soil functions, tolerable soil erosion may be defined as 'any mean annual cumulative (all erosion types combined) soil erosion rate at which a deterioration or loss of one or more soil functions does not occur'. Assumptions and problems of this definition will be discussed. Soil functions can generally be judged not to deteriorate as long as soil erosion does not exceed soil formation. At present, this assumption remains largely untested, but applying the precautionary principle appears to be a reasonable starting point. Considering soil formation rates by both weathering and dust deposition, it is estimated that for the majority of soil forming factors in most European situations, soil formation rates probably range from ca. 0.3 - 1.4 t ha-1 yr-1. Although the current agreement on these values seems relatively strong, how the variation within the range is spatially distributed across Europe and how this may be affected by climate, land use and land management

  13. Weathering Rinds and Soil Development on Basaltic Andesite, Guadeloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, P. B.; Murphy, M.; Ma, L.; Engel, J.; Pereyra, Y.; Gaillardet, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    An oriented clast of basaltic andesite collected from the B horizon of a soil developed in a late Quaternary volcanoclastic debris flow on the eastern, windward side of Basse Terre Island, Guadeloupe exhibits weathering patterns like that observed in many clasts from tropical settings. The sample consists of unweathered core material overlain by a ~19 mm thick weathering rind and a narrow ≤ 2mm thick indurated horizon separating the outer portion of the rind from the overlying >10mm of soil matrix material. Elemental variations are constrained by a seven point bulk ICP-AES vertical transect extending from the core, across the rind and ~15 mm into the overlying soil matix and six parallel electron microprobe transections. The porous-hydrated fraction increases from the core to the rind to the surrounding soil from 7±4% to 45±18% to 60±15%, respectively. Like the well-studied clast from the nearby Bras David watershed (Sak et al., 2010) the isovolumetric transformation from core to rind material is marked by a narrow (Ba>K≈Mn>Mg>Si>Al≈P>Fe»Ti, consistent with the relative reactivity of phases in the clast from plagioclasepyroxeneglass>apatite>ilmenite. Unlike previously studied clasts, the preservation of the rind-soil interface permits characterization of weathering reactions between the weathering clast and surrounding soil matrix. The abrupt (Mn, Ba, Al, Mg and K. The enrichment trends may result from soil waters percolating through atmospherically depositioned dust within the upper few meters of the soil profile, as documented in a deep soil profile in the Bras David watershed. The lack of an enrichment signal within the weathering rind suggests that weathering processes active within clasts are distinct from surrounding soil formation processes.

  14. Development and assessment of transparent soil and particle image velocimetry in dynamic soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    This research combines Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and transparent soil to investigate the dynamic rigid block and soil interaction. In order to get a low viscosity pore fluid for the transparent soil, 12 different types of chemical solvents wer...

  15. Determination of Zinc, Cadmium and Lead Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils at the Single-Cell Level by a Combination of Whole-Cell Biosensors and Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Hurdebise

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc, lead and cadmium are metallic trace elements (MTEs that are widespread in the environment and tend to accumulate in soils because of their low mobility and non-degradability. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the applicability of biosensors as tools able to provide data about the bioavailability of such MTEs in contaminated soils. Here, we tested the genetically-engineered strain Escherichia coli pPZntAgfp as a biosensor applicable to the detection of zinc, lead and cadmium by the biosynthesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP accumulating inside the cells. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the fluorescence induced by the MTEs. A curvilinear response to zinc between 0 and 25 mg/L and another curvilinear response to cadmium between 0 and 1.5 mg/L were highlighted in liquid media, while lead did not produce exploitable results. The response relating to a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 was further investigated. In these conditions, E. coli pPZntAgfp responded to cadmium only. Several contaminated soils with a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 were analyzed with the biosensor, and the metallic concentrations were also measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that E. coli pPZntAgfp could be used as a monitoring tool for contaminated soils being processed.

  16. Matrix solid-phase dispersion with chitosan-zinc oxide nanoparticles combined with flotation-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of 13 n-alkanes in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Yan, Hongyuan; Arefnejad, Esmat; Bohlooli, Mousa

    2014-11-01

    In this study, chitosan-zinc oxide nanoparticles were used as a sorbent of miniaturized matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with flotation-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the simultaneous determination of 13 n-alkanes such as C8 H18 and C20 H42 in soil samples. The solid samples were directly blended with the chitosan nanoparticles in the solid-phase dispersion method. The eluent of solid-phase dispersion was applied as the dispersive solvent for the following flotation-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for further purification and enrichment of the target compounds prior to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Under the optimum conditions, good linearity with correlation coefficients in the range 0.9991 alkanes in complicated soil samples with acceptable recoveries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Growth and cesium uptake responses of Phytolacca americana Linn. and Amaranthus cruentus L. grown on cesium contaminated soil to elevated CO{sub 2} or inoculation with a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54, or in combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shirong, E-mail: tangshir@hotmail.com [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Key Laboratory of Production Environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Liao, Shangqiang; Guo, Junkang; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Ruigang [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Key Laboratory of Production Environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Zhou, Xiaomin [Plant Science Department, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9 (Canada)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly promoted growth of P. americana, and A. cruentus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total tissue Cs in plants was significantly increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two plants had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation can be explored for CO{sub 2}- and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology. - Abstract: Growth and cesium uptake responses of plants to elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, can be explored for clean-up of contaminated soils, and this induced phytoextraction may be better than the natural process. The present study used open-top chambers to investigate combined effects of Burkholderia sp. D54 inoculation and elevated CO{sub 2} (860 {mu}L L{sup -1}) on growth and Cs uptake by Phytolacca americana and Amaranthus cruentus grown on soil spiked with various levels of Cs (0-1000 mg kg{sup -1}). Elevated CO{sub 2} and bacterial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomass production with increased magnitude, ranging from 22% to 139% for P. americana, and 14% to 254% for A. cruentus. Total tissue Cs in both plants was significantly greater for bacterial inoculation treatment singly, and combined treatments of bacterial inoculation and elevated CO{sub 2} than for the control treatment in most cases. Regardless of CO{sub 2} concentrations and bacterial inoculation, A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana, but they had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation with

  18. Forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Michael C. Amacher

    2009-01-01

    Productive soils are the foundation of sustainable forests throughout the United States. Forest soils are generally subjected to fewer disturbances than agricultural soils, particularly those that are tilled, so forest soils tend to have better preserved A-horizons than agricultural soils. Another major contrast between forest and agricultural soils is the addition of...

  19. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Powder Diffraction for Cu (II speciation in soil and mineral phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Minkina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of Cu (II ions with the matrix of soil and mineral phases of layered silicates was assessed by the Miller method of selective sequential fractionation and a set of synchrotron X-ray methods, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES. It was shown that the input of Cu into Calcic Chernozem in the form of monoxide (CuO and salt (Cu(NO32 affected the transformation of Cu compounds and their affinity for metal-bearing phases. It was found that the contamination of soil with a soluble Cu(II salt increased the bioavailability of the metal and the role of organic matter and Fe oxides in the fixation and retention of Cu. During the incubation of soil with Cu monoxide, the content of the metal in the residual fractions increased, which was related to the possible entry of Cu in the form of isomorphic impurities into silicates, as well as to the incomplete dissolution of exogenic compounds at the high level of their input into the soil. A mechanism for the structural transformation of minerals was revealed, which showed that ion exchange processes result in the sorption of Cu (II ions from the saturated solution by active sites on the internal surface of the lattice of dioctahedral aluminosilicates. Surface hydroxyls at the octahedral aluminum atom play the main role. X-ray diagnostics revealed that excess Cu(II ions are removed from the system due to the formation and precipitation of coarsely crystalline Cu(NO3(OH3.

  20. Field Application of Modified In Situ Soil Flushing in Combination with Air Sparging at a Military Site Polluted by Diesel and Gasoline in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan; Lee, Yoonjin; Kim, Jaeyoung; Kim, Choltae

    2014-01-01

    In this study the full-scale operation of soil flushing with air sparging to improve the removal efficiency of petroleum at depths of less than 7 m at a military site in Korea was evaluated. The target area was polluted by multiple gasoline and diesel fuel sources. The soil was composed of heterogeneous layers of granules, sand, silt and clay. The operation factors were systemically assessed using a column test and a pilot study before running the full-scale process at the site. The discharged TPH and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) concentrations in the water were highest at 20 min and at a rate of 350 L/min, which was selected as the volume of air for the full-scale operation in the pilot air sparging test. The surfactant-aid condition was 1.4 times more efficient than the non-surfactant condition in the serial operations of modified soil flushing followed by air sparging. The hydraulic conductivity (3.13 × 10−3 cm/s) increased 4.7 times after the serial operation of both processes relative to the existing condition (6.61 × 10−4 cm/s). The removal efficiencies of TPH were 52.8%, 57.4%, and 61.8% for the soil layers at 6 to 7, 7 to 8 and 8 to 9 m, respectively. Therefore, the TPH removal was improved at depth of less than 7 m by using this modified remediation system. The removal efficiencies for the areas with TPH and BTEX concentrations of more than 500 and 80 mg/kg, were 55.5% and 92.9%, respectively, at a pore volume of 2.9. The total TPH and BTEX mass removed during the full-scale operation was 5109 and 752 kg, respectively. PMID:25166919

  1. Combining a finite mixture distribution model with indicator kriging to delineate and map the spatial patterns of soil heavy metal pollution in Chunghua County, central Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Yupin, E-mail: yplin@ntu.edu.t [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Da-an District, Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China); Cheng Baiyou [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Da-an District, Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China); Shyu, G.-S. [Department of Environmental Management, Tungnan University, 152, Section 3, PeiShen Road, ShenKeng, Taipei 222, Taiwan (China); Chang, T.-K. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Da-an District, Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-15

    This study identifies the natural background, anthropogenic background and distribution of contamination caused by heavy metal pollutants in soil in Chunghua County of central Taiwan by using a finite mixture distribution model (FMDM). The probabilities of contaminated area distribution are mapped using single-variable indicator kriging and multiple-variable indicator kriging (MVIK) with the FMDM cut-off values and regulation thresholds for heavy metals. FMDM results indicate that Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn can be individually fitted by a mixture model representing the background and contamination distributions of the four metals in soil. The FMDM cut-off values for contamination caused by the metals are close to the regulation thresholds, except for the cut-off value of Zn. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve validates that indicator kriging and MVIK with FMDM cut-off values can reliably delineate heavy metals contamination, particularly for areas lacking background information and high heavy metal concentrations in soil. - Effectively determine pollution threshold and map contaminated areas.

  2. Combined effects of long-term salinity and soil drying on growth, water relations, nutrient status and proline accumulation of Sesuvium portulacastrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Inès; Ghnaya, Tahar; Savouré, Arnould; Abdelly, Chedly

    2008-06-01

    The interaction between soil drying and salinity was studied in the perennial halophyte, Sesuvium portulacastrum. Rooted cuttings were individually cultivated for three months in silty-sandy soil under two irrigation modes: 100 and 25% of field capacity (FC). The amount of the evapotranspirated water was replaced by a nutrient solution containing either 0 or 100 mM NaCl. Whole-plant growth, leaf water content, leaf water potential (Psi(w)), and Na+, K+, and proline concentrations in the tissues were measured. When individually applied, both drought and salinity significantly restricted whole-plant growth, with a more marked effect of the former stress. However, the effects of the two stresses were not additive on whole-plant biomass or on leaf expansion. Root growth was more sensitive to salt than to soil drying, the latter being even magnified by the adverse impact of salinity. Leaf water content was significantly reduced following exposure to water-deficit stress, but was less affected in salt-treated plants. When simultaneously submitted to water-deficit stress and salinity, plants displayed higher values of water and potassium use efficiencies, leaf proline and Na+ concentrations, associated with lower leaf water potential (-1.87 MPa), suggesting the ability of S. portulacastrum to use Na+ and proline for osmotic adjustment.

  3. Ligandless surfactant mediated solid phase extraction combined with Fe₃O₄ nano-particle for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium and lead in water and soil samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: multivariate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, N; Soylak, M

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, a microextraction technique combining Fe3O4 nano-particle with surfactant mediated solid phase extraction ((SM-SPE)) was successfully developed for the preconcentration/separation of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. The analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effective variables such as the amount of adsorbent (NPs), the pH, concentration of non-ionic (TX-114) and centrifugation time (min) were investigated by Plackett-Burman (PBD) design. The important variables were further optimized by central composite design (CCD). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (LODs) of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 0.15 and 0.74 µg/L, respectively. The validation of the proposed procedure was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials of TMDA 53.3 fortified water and GBW07425 soil. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stereo- and enantioselective determination of pesticides in soil by using achiral and chiral liquid chromatography in combination with matrix solid-phase dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Zhou, Qi-Lin; Wang, Qing-Min; Gao, Ru-Yu; Wang, Qin-Sun

    2003-01-01

    The separation of enantiomers and diastereomers of 8 commonly used pesticides was investigated by liquid chromatography (LC) using a Chiralcel OD column (cellulose tris-3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate as the chiral stationary phase) and a Pirkle-type Chirex 3020 column (urea derivative from the reaction of (R)-1-(alpha-naphthyl)ethylamine with (S)-tert-leucine, chemically bonded to 3-aminopropylsilanized silica as the chiral stationary phase). The pesticides studied included one organophosphorus insecticide (phenthoate), 3 triazole fungicides (uniconazole, diniconazole, and propiconazole), and 4 pyrethroids (fenpropathrin, beta-cypermethrin, beta-cyfluthrin, and alpha-fenvalerate). The enantiomers were separated within 20 min with a resolution of > or = 1.5 using a mixture of n-hexane and 2-propanol as the mobile phase for all the pesticides studied except propiconazole, for which only the 2 diastereomers were baseline separated. This method allows determination of the enantiomers or stereoisomers of the above pesticides in soil. The strategy was as follows: (1) First, the total concentration(s) of the enantiomer pair(s) of a chiral pesticide in soil was (were) determined by a newly developed matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) procedure, followed by silica-based LC quantification. The recoveries ranged from 76.5 to 93.6% with relative standard deviations of 6.0%. (2) Second, the enantiomeric ratio(s) (ER(s)) of the chiral pesticide was (were) determined by LC with a chiral stationary phase after fractionation of the MSPD extract by silica-based LC. The determined ERs or stereoisomeric ratio(s) (SR(s); for propiconazole, only the SR of the 2 diastereomers was determined) in soil samples spiked with the above 8 racemic pesticides agreed with those of the corresponding standard solutions. (3) Third, based on the total concentrations and the corresponding ERs, the concentration of each enantiomer in soil was calculated. The proposed method is rapid, precise, and

  5. Estimation of surface runoff for calculating recharge in the karstic massif of Ports of Beseit (Tarragona, Spain) combining water balance in the soil and analysis of flow hydrographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa Martinez, S.; Custodio, E.

    2016-07-01

    For the right estimation of aquifer recharge by precipitation surface taking into account runoff is particularly relevant. Non considering it in the estimation of the groundwater resources can overestimate them. In the Baix Ebre aquifer system, in southern Catalonia, the surface and vadose zone runoff produced in the karstified carbonate formations in the Ports de Beseit massif has to be evaluated in order to achieve a better estimation of the resources transferred from this massif to the Plana de La Galera plain. Starting from the conceptual hydrogeological model, the average annual runoff is estimated. It includes the discharge from temporal perched aquifers in the Ports de Beseit massif, in the Matarraña river basin, and in the SE watershed to the Plana de La Galera plain. This is performed by analyzing the river and tributaries hydrographs, the filling and emptying hydrographs of the Ulldecona reservoir, and the soil water balance using the Visual Balan code applied to obtain the runoff in the Ulldecona reservoir watershed. The runoff has been estimated about 105±20 mm·yr−1, which represents 20–30% of average annual recharge in the Ports, estimated with soil water balance and atmospheric chloride deposition balance, about 350–500 mm·yr−1, which is mostly transferred laterally to the Plana de La Galera plain. (Author)

  6. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil < original soil < soil+3 HWE < soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  7. Effect of Combined Application of Organic and Mineral Nitrogen and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mite

    Hordeum ... effect of combined organic and mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) on selected soil physico-chemical ...... soil sealing and crusting, enhances water infiltration, increases CEC and soil moisture retention capacity (Bationo et al., ...

  8. Effects of Ridge-Furrow System Combined with Different Degradable Mulching Materials on Soil Water Conservation and Crop Production in Semi-Humid Areas of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Ren

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In China, the ridge-furrow water conservation planting (RC system is advantageous for improving crop yields and rainwater use efficiency. In RC planting system, plastic film-mulched ridges are employed for water harvesting while the furrows serve as infiltration and planting belts. To optimize the RC system and to overcome problems due to the lack of water in semi-humid areas at risk of drought, we mulched the furrows with 8% biodegradable film (RCSB, liquid film (RCSL, or no mulching in the furrows (RCSN, while conventional flat planting (CF was employed as the control. After 4 year (2007–2010 consecutive field study, the results showed that the soil water storage level in the 0–100 cm layer with four treatments was ranked as follow: RCSB > RCSL > RCSN > CF, while the RCSB and RCSL were 26.3 and 12.2 mm greater than RCSN, respectively. Compared with CF, the average soil temperature was significantly (P < 0.05 higher by 3.1, 1.7, and 1.5°C under the RC planting treatments (RCSB, RCSL, and RCSN during each year, respectively. The average ET rate of RC treatments were all lower than CF in each experimental year, and the average decreased by 8.0% (P < 0.05. The average yields with RCSB, RCSL, and RCSN increased by 2,665, 1,444, and 1,235 kg ha−1, respectively, and the water use efficiency (WUE increased by 51.6, 25.6, and 21.1%, compared with CF. RCSB obtained the highest economic benefit, the average net income was higher than CF by 4,020 Yuan ha−1. In conclusion, we found that RC planting with biodegradable film mulching in the furrows is the best cultivation pattern in the semi-humid areas of China in terms of both environmental and economic benefits.

  9. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms through effective flocculation and sedimentation with combined use of flocculants and phosphorus adsorbing natural soil and modified clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyma, Natalia Pessoa; de Magalhães, Leonardo; Furtado, Luciana Lima; Mucci, Maíra; van Oosterhout, Frank; Huszar, Vera L.M.; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi; Lürling, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eutrophication often results in blooms of toxic cyanobacteria that hamper the use of lakes and reservoirs. In this paper, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of a metal salt (poly-aluminium chloride, PAC) and chitosan, alone and combined with different doses of the lanthanum modified

  10. Relationships between soil physicochemical, microbiological properties, and nutrient release in buffer soils compared to field soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutter, Marc I; Richards, Samia

    2012-01-01

    The retention of nutrients in narrow, vegetated riparian buffer strips (VBS) is uncertain and underlying processes are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that buffer soils are poor at retaining dissolved nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), necessitating management actions if P retention is not to be compromised. We sampled 19 buffer strips and adjacent arable field soils. Differences in nutrient retention between buffer and field soils were determined using a combined assay for release of dissolved P, N, and C forms and particulate P. We then explored these differences in relation to changes in soil bulk density (BD), moisture, organic matter by loss on ignition (OM), and altered microbial diversity using molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [TRFLP]). Buffer soils had significantly greater soil OM (89% of sites), moisture content (95%), and water-soluble nutrient concentrations for dissolved organic C (80%), dissolved organic N (80%), dissolved organic P (55%), and soluble reactive P (70%). Buffer soils had consistently smaller bulk densities than field soils. Soil fine particle release was generally greater for field than buffer soils. Significantly smaller soil bulk density in buffer soils than in adjacent fields indicated increased porosity and infiltration in buffers. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities showed altered diversity between the buffer and field soils, with significant relationships with soil BD, moisture, OM, and increased solubility of buffer nutrients. Current soil conditions in VBS appear to be leading to potentially enhanced nutrient leaching via increasing solubility of C, N, and P. Manipulating soil microbial conditions (by management of soil moisture, vegetation type, and cover) may provide options for increasing the buffer storage for key nutrients such as P without increasing leaching to adjacent streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and

  11. Germplasm-regression-combined (GRC) marker-trait association identification in plant breeding: a challenge for plant biotechnological breeding under soil water deficit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Cheng-Jiang; Xu, Xue-Xuan; Shao, Hong-Bo; Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul

    2010-09-01

    In the past 20 years, the major effort in plant breeding has changed from quantitative to molecular genetics with emphasis on quantitative trait loci (QTL) identification and marker assisted selection (MAS). However, results have been modest. This has been due to several factors including absence of tight linkage QTL, non-availability of mapping populations, and substantial time needed to develop such populations. To overcome these limitations, and as an alternative to planned populations, molecular marker-trait associations have been identified by the combination between germplasm and the regression technique. In the present preview, the authors (1) survey the successful applications of germplasm-regression-combined (GRC) molecular marker-trait association identification in plants; (2) describe how to do the GRC analysis and its differences from mapping QTL based on a linkage map reconstructed from the planned populations; (3) consider the factors that affect the GRC association identification, including selections of optimal germplasm and molecular markers and testing of identification efficiency of markers associated with traits; and (4) finally discuss the future prospects of GRC marker-trait association analysis used in plant MAS/QTL breeding programs, especially in long-juvenile woody plants when no other genetic information such as linkage maps and QTL are available.

  12. A combined school- and community-based campaign targeting all school-age children of Burkina Faso against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis: performance, financial costs and implications for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Albis-Francesco; Touré, Seydou; Sellin, Bertrand; Sellin, Elisabeth; Ky, Césaire; Ouedraogo, Hamado; Yaogho, Malachie; Wilson, Michael D; Thompson, Howard; Sanou, Souleymane; Fenwick, Alan

    2006-10-01

    A combined school- and community-based campaign targeting the entire school-age population of Burkina Faso with drugs against schistosomiasis (praziquantel) and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (albendazole) was implemented in 2004-2005. In total, 3,322,564 children from 5 to 15 years of age were treated, equivalent to a 90.8% coverage of the total school-age population of the country. The total costs of the campaign were estimated to be US 1,067,284 dollars, of which 69.4% was spent on the drugs. Delivery costs per child treated were US 0.098 dollar, in the same range as school-based only interventions implemented in other countries; total costs per child treated (including drugs) were US 0.32 dollar. We conclude that a combined school- and community-based strategy is effective in attaining a high coverage among school-age children in countries where school enrolment is low and where primary schools cannot serve as the exclusive drug distribution points. The challenge for Burkina Faso will now be to ensure the sustainability of these disease control activities.

  13. Digital Soil Mapping - A platform for enhancing soil learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Phillip; Libohova, Zamir; Monger, Curtis; Lindbo, David; Schmidt, Axel

    2017-04-01

    The expansion of digital infrastructure and tools has generated massive data and information as well as a need for reliable processing and accurate interpretations. Digital Soil Mapping is no exception in that it has provided opportunities for professionals and the public to interact at field and training/workshop levels in order to better understand soils and their benefits. USDA-NRCS National Cooperative Soil Survey regularly conducts training and workshops for soil scientists and other professionals in the US and internationally. A combination of field experiences with workshops conducted in a class environment offers ideal conditions for enhancing soil learning experiences. Examples from US, Haiti and Central America show that Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) tools are very effective for understanding and visualizing soils and their functioning at different scales.

  14. [Effects of long-term fertilization on soil enzyme activities and soil physicochemical properties of facility vegetable field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning-ning; Li, Tian-lai; Wu, Chun-cheng; Zhang, En-ping

    2010-07-01

    An investigation was made on a long-term fertilization facility vegetable field at Shenyang Agricultural University to study the effects of long-term fertilization on the soil enzyme activities and soil physicochemical properties. Long term application of organic manure combined with or without nitrogen fertilizer increased the contents of soil organic matter, N, P, and K, and improved the soil physical properties and soil invertase, urease, and neutral phosphatase activities. However, long-term application of nitrogen fertilizer alone decreased soil pH and soil enzymes activities. Significant positive correlations were observed between soil invertase activity and soil organic matter and total P, between soil urease activity and soil organic matter, alkali-hydrolyzable N, total and available P, and available K, and between soil neutral phosphatase activity and soil organic matter, total P, and available K, but less correlation was found between soil dehydrogenase activity and soil nutrients.

  15. Soils as relative-age dating tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, Helaine Walsh; Pavich, Milan J.; Wysocki, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Soils develop at the earth's surface via multiple processes that act through time. Precluding burial or disturbance, soil genetic horizons form progressively and reflect the balance among formation processes, surface age, and original substrate composition. Soil morphology provides a key link between process and time (soil age), enabling soils to serve as both relative and numerical dating tools for geomorphic studies and landscape evolution. Five major factors define the contemporary state of all soils: climate, organisms, topography, parent material, and time. Soils developed on similar landforms and parent materials within a given landscape comprise what we term a soil/landform/substrate complex. Soils on such complexes that differ in development as a function of time represent a soil chronosequence. In a soil chronosequence, time constitutes the only independent formation factor; the other factors act through time. Time dictates the variations in soil development or properties (field or laboratory measured) on a soil/landform/substrate complex. Using a dataset within the chronosequence model, we can also formulate various soil development indices based upon one or a combination of soil properties, either for individual soil horizons or for an entire profile. When we evaluate soil data or soil indices mathematically, the resulting equation creates a chronofunction. Chronofunctions help quantify processes and mechanisms involved in soil development, and relate them mathematically to time. These rigorous kinds of comparisons among and within soil/landform complexes constitute an important tool for relative-age dating. After determining one or more absolute ages for a soil/landform complex, we can calculate quantitative soil formation, and or landform-development rates. Multiple dates for several complexes allow rate calculations for soil/landform-chronosequence development and soil-chronofunction calibration.

  16. Soil properties, soil functions and soil security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Soil plays a crucial role in the ecosystem functioning such as food production, capture and storage of water, carbon and nutrients and in the realisation of a number of UN Sustainable Developments Goals. In this work we present an approach to spatially and jointly assess the multiple contributions of soil to the delivery of ecosystem services within multiple land-use system. We focussed on the modelling of the impact of soil on sediment retention, carbon storage, storing and filtering of nutrients, habitat for soil organisms and water regulation, taking into account examples of land use and climate scenarios. Simplified models were used for the single components. Spatialised Bayesian Belief networks were used for the jointly assessment and mapping of soil contribution to multiple land use and ecosystem services. We integrated continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping approaches covering the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Uncertainty was accounted for and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils and provides an example of integrated study assessing the contributions of soil. The results show the importance of the multi-functional analysis of the contribution of soils to the ecosystem service delivery and UN SDGs.

  17. Combinações entre cultivares, ambientes, preparo e cobertura do solo em características agronômicas de alface Combination of cultivars, environments, tillage and mulching of soil influencing agronomical characteristics of lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lúcia F Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se identificar combinações entre cultivares, ambientes de cultivo e preparo e cobertura de solo capazes de melhorar o desempenho agronômico e aumentar a produtividade da cultura da alface em cultivo orgânico. A pesquisa foi conduzida na Universidade Federal do Acre, utilizando o delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados, com parcelas subdivididas para cada experimento (campo e casa de vegetação, com quatro repetições. Em cada experimento, três cultivares de alface (Simpson, Marisa e Vera, constituindo as sub-parcelas, foram sorteadas nas parcelas, representadas por quatro preparos e cobertura do solo (encanteiramento com cobertura de palha de arroz, polietileno prateado, solo descoberto e plantio direto. A produtividade comercial de alface foi de 12,3 t ha-1 em cultivo protegido e de 7,9 t ha-1 em campo. O cultivo protegido promoveu melhor desenvolvimento das plantas, caracterizado por maior massa da matéria fresca e seca da parte aérea, massa da matéria fresca comercial e melhor classificação comercial, além de promover bom desempenho agronômico e maior produtividade em qualquer um dos preparos de solo. As cultivares Simpson e Marisa apresentaram massa da matéria seca da parte aérea semelhante e superior à 'Vera', porém, o crescimento do caule da 'Simpson' foi elevado, caracterizando pendoamento precoce, fato que reduz sua qualidade comercial. As cultivares Marisa e Vera não alongaram o caule indicando serem tolerantes às condições ambientais de Rio Branco. A cobertura do solo com casca de arroz ou plástico prateado contribuiu para minimizar os efeitos climáticos prejudiciais ao cultivo da alface em campo. O plantio direto orgânico não diferiu do plantio em canteiro descoberto.Combinations among cultivars, environments and soil tillage capable of improving the agronomic performance and to increase the yield of lettuce under organic cultivation were studied. The research was carried out in Rio Branco

  18. Solar wind noble gases and nitrogen in metal from lunar soil 68501

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Noble gases and N were analyzed in handpicked metal separates from lunar soil 68501 by a combination of step-wise combustions and pyrolyses. Helium and Ne were found to be unfractionated with respect to one another when normalized to solar abundances, for both the bulk sample and for all but the highest temperature steps. However, they are depleted relative to Ar, Kr and Xe by at least a factor of 5. The heavier gases exhibit mass-dependent fractionation relative to solar system abundance ratios but appear unfractionated, both in the bulk metal and in early temperature steps, when compared to relative abundances derived from lunar ilmenite 71501 by chemical etching, recently put forward as representing the abundance ratios in solar wind. Estimates of the contribution of solar energetic particles (SEP) to the originally implanted solar gases, derived from a basic interpretation of He and Ne isotopes, yield values of about 10%. Analysis of the Ar isotopes requires a minimum of 20% SEP, and Kr isotopes, using our preferred composition for solar wind Kr, yield a result that overlaps both these values. It is possible to reconcile the data from these gases if significant loss of solar wind Ar, Kr and presumably Xe has occurred relative to the SEP component, most likely by erosive processes that are mass independent, although mass-dependent losses (Ar greater than Kr greater than Xe) cannot be excluded. If such losses did occur, the SEP contribution to the solar implanted gases must have been no more than a few percent. Nitrogen is a mixture of indigenous meteoritic N, whose isotopic composition is inferred to be relatively light, and implanted solar N, which has probably undergone diffusive redistribution and fractionation. If the heavy noble gases have not undergone diffusive loss, then N/Ar in the solar wind can be inferred to be at least several times the accepted solar ratio. The solar wind N appears, even after correction for fractionation effects, to have a minimum

  19. Fast ultrasound-assisted extraction followed by capillary gas chromatography combined with nitrogen-phosphorous selective detector for the trace determination of tebuconazole in garlic, soil and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunil Kumar; Padmaja, P; Pandey, S Y

    2014-06-01

    A fast and an efficient ultrasound-assisted extraction technique using a lower density extraction solvent than water was developed for the trace-level determination of tebuconazole in garlic, soil and water samples followed by capillary gas chromatography combined with nitrogen-phosphorous selective detector (GC-NPD). In this approach, ultrasound radiation was applied to accelerate the emulsification of the ethyl acetate in aqueous samples to enhance the extraction efficiency of tebuconazole without requiring extra partitioning or cleaning, and the use of capillary GC-NPD was a more sensitive detection technique for organonitrogen pesticides. The experimental results indicate an excellent linear relationship between peak area and concentration obtained in the range 1-50 μg/kg or μg/L. The limit of detection (S/N, 3 ± 0.5) and limit of quantification (S/N, 7.5 ± 2.5) were obtained in the range 0.2-3 and 1-10 μg/kg or μg/L. Good spiked recoveries were achieved from ranges 95.55-101.26%, 96.28-99.33% and 95.04-105.15% in garlic, Nanivaliyal soil and Par River water, respectively, at levels 5 and 20 μg/kg or μg/L, and the method precision (% RSD) was ≤5%. Our results demonstrate that the proposed technique is a viable alternative for the determination of tebuconazole in complex samples. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of soil surface management practices on soil and tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects on soil, leaf and fruit element concentrations of organic (compost, straw mulch and hand weeding) and integrated (inorganic fertilisers and herbicide usage; IP) soil surface management practices in the tree rows, in combination with weed covers, cover crops and straw mulch in the work rows, were investigated in a ...

  1. Combination of {sup 13}C/{sup 113}Cd NMR, potentiometry, and voltammetry in characterizing the interactions between Cd and two models of the main components of soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoble, V. [IFRE PMSE 112, CEREGE (UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne), Aix-en-Provence (France); Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire PROTEE, La Garde Cedex (France); Garnier, C. [Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire PROTEE, La Garde Cedex (France); Universite Bordeaux I, ISM-LPTC (UMR CNRS 5255), Talence (France); Masion, A.; Garnier, J.M. [IFRE PMSE 112, CEREGE (UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne), Aix-en-Provence (France); Ziarelli, F. [CNRS, Federation des Sciences Chimiques de Marseille, Spectropole, Marseille cedex 20 (France)

    2008-01-15

    .7-4.0). Therefore the combination of spectroscopic analyses, voltammetry, and fitting allowed the precise characterization of the binding sites of the studied exopolysaccharides, mimicking the main SOM components. Furthermore, the binding parameters obtained by fitting can be used in biogeochemical models to better define the role of key SOM compounds like exudates of roots and of soil bacteria on trace metal transport or assimilation. (orig.)

  2. Soil Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killham, Ken

    1994-04-01

    Soil Ecology is designed to meet the increasing challenge faced by today's environmental scientists, ecologists, agriculturalists, and biotechnologists for an integrated approach to soil ecology. It emphasizes the interrelations among plants, animals, and microbes, by first establishing the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the soil habitat and then functionally characterizing the major components of the soil biota and some of their most important interactions. The fundamental principles underpinning soil ecology are established and this then enables an integrated approach to explore and understand the processes of soil nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) cycling and the ecology of extreme soil conditions such as soil-water stress. Two of the most topical aspects of applied soil ecology are then selected. First, the ecology of soil pollution is examined, focusing on acid deposition and radionuclide pollution. Second, manipulation of soil ecology through biotechnology is discussed, illustrating the use of pesticides and microbial inocula in soils and pointing toward the future by considering the impact of genetically modified inocula on soil ecology.

  3. Soil friability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2011-01-01

    for optimal friability. There is a strong need to get more detailed knowledge about effects of soil water content on soil friability and especially to be able to quantify the least limiting water range for soil friability and therefore soil tillage. A strong relationship between organic matter and friability...... has been found but it is not possible to identify a specific lower critical level of organic matter across soil types. Sustainable management of soil requires continuous and adequate inputs of organic matter to sustain or improve soil friability. Intensive tillage and traffic in unfavorable conditions...... threatens soil friability and may initiate a vicious cycle where increasingly higher intensity of tillage is needed to produce a proper seedbed....

  4. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals,

  5. Linking Carbon Flux Dynamics and Soil Structure in Dryland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, K. F.; Caylor, K. K.

    2016-12-01

    Biological sources in the form of microbes and plants play a fundamental role in determining the magnitude of carbon flux. However, the geophysical structure of the soil (which the carbon must pass through before entering the atmosphere) often serves as a constraining entity, which has the potential to serve as instigators or mitigators of those carbon and hydrologic flux processes. We characterized soil carbon dynamics in three dryland soil systems: bioturbated soils, biocompacted soils, and undisturbed soils. Carbon fluxes were characterized using a closed-system respiration chamber, with CO2 concentration differences measured using an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA). Structure of the soil systems, with a focus on the macro-crack structure, were characterized using a combined resin-casting/X-ray imaging technique. Results show fundamental differences in carbon dynamics between the different soil systems/structures: control soils have gaussian distributions of carbon flux that decrease with progressive drying of the soil, while biocompacted soils exhibit exponentially distributed fluxes that do not regularly decrease with increased drying of the soil. Bioturbated soils also exhibit an exponential distribution of carbon flux, though at a much higher magnitude. These differences are evaluated in the context of the underlying soil structure: while the control soils exhibit a shallow and narrow crack structure, the biocompacted soils exhibit a "systematic" crack network with moderate cracking intensity and large depth. The deep crack networks of the biocompacted soils may serve to physically enhance an otherwise weak source of carbon via advection and/or convection, inducing fluxes that are equal or greater than an otherwise carbon-rich soil. The bioturbated soils exhibit a "surficial" crack network that is shallow but extensive, but additionally have deep holes known to convectively vent carbon, which may explain their periodically large carbon fluxes. Our results

  6. Soil microbiology and soil health assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil scientists have long recognized the importance of soil biology in ecological health. In particular, soil microbes are crucial for many soil functions including decomposition, nutrient cycling, synthesis of plant growth regulators, and degradation of synthetic chemicals. Currently, soil biologis...

  7. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  8. Soils - Volusia County Soils (Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Soils: 1:24000 SSURGO Map. Polygon boundaries of Soils in Volusia County, downloaded from SJRWMD and created by NRCS and SJRWMD. This data set is a digital version...

  9. Evaluation of lunar rocks and soils for resource utilization: Detailed image analysis of raw materials and beneficiated products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Chambers, John G.; Patchen, Allan; Jerde, Eric A.; Mckay, David S.; Graf, John; Oder, Robin R.

    1993-01-01

    The rocks and soils of the Moon will be the raw materials for fuels and construction needs at a lunar base. This includes sources of materials for the generation of hydrogen, oxygen, metals, and other potential construction materials. For most of the bulk material needs, the regolith, and its less than 1 cm fraction, the soil, will suffice. But for specific mineral resources, it may be necessary to concentrate minerals from rocks or soils, and it is not always obvious which is the more appropriate feedstock. Besides an appreciation of site geology, the mineralogy and petrography of local rocks and soils is important for consideration of the resources which can provide feedstocks of ilmenite, glass, agglutinates, anorthite, etc. In such studies, it is very time-consuming and practically impossible to correlate particle counts (the traditional method of characterizing lunar soil petrography) with accurate modal analyses and with mineral associations in multi-mineralic grains. But x ray digital imaging, using x rays characteristic of each element, makes all this possible and much more (e.g., size and shape analysis). An application of beneficiation image analysis, in use in our lab (Oxford Instr. EDS and Cameca SX-50 EMP), was demonstrated to study mineral liberation from lunar rocks and soils. Results of x ray image analysis are presented.

  10. Soil pollution and soil protection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de F.A.M.; Visser-Reijneveld, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    This book was compiled from lecture handouts prepared for the international postgraduate course on soil quality, entitled 'Soil Pollution and Soil Protection' given jointly by the universities of Wageningen (The Netherlands), Gent and Leuven (Belgium), under the auspices of the international

  11. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabała Cezary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessively extended, non-coherent with the other parts and rules of the classification, hard to introduce in soil cartography and poorly correlated with the international soil classifications. One type of clay-illuvial soils (“gleby płowe” was justified and recommended to reintroduce in soil classification in Poland, as well as 10 soil subtypes listed in a hierarchical order. The subtypes may be combined if the soil has diagnostic features of more than one soil subtypes. Clear rules of soil name generalization (reduction of subtype number for one soil were suggested for soil cartography on various scales. One of the most important among the distinguished soil sub-types are the “eroded” or “truncated” clay-illuvial soils.

  12. Organic wastes as soil amendments - Effects assessment towards soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Mathieu; Chelinho, Sónia; Alvarenga, Paula; Mourinha, Clarisse; Palma, Patrícia; Sousa, José Paulo; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago

    2017-05-15

    Using organic wastes, as soil amendments, is an important alternative to landfilling with benefits to soil structure, water retention, soil nutrient and organic matter concentrations. However, this practice should be monitored for its environmental risk due to the frequent presence, of noxious substances to soil organisms. To evaluate the potential of eight organic wastes with different origins, as soil amendments, reproduction tests with four soil invertebrate species (Folsomia candida, Enchytraeus crypticus, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Eisenia fetida) were performed using gradients of soil-waste mixtures. Results obtained demonstrated that contaminant concentrations required by current legislation might not be a protective measure for the soil ecosystem, as they do not properly translate the potential toxicity of wastes to soil invertebrates. Some wastes with contaminant loadings below thresholds showed higher toxicity than wastes with contaminants concentrations above legal limits. Also, test organism reproduction was differently sensitive to the selected wastes, which highlights the need to account for different organism sensitivities and routes of exposure when evaluating the toxicity of such complex mixtures. Finally this study shows that when combining chemical and ecotoxicological data, it is possible to postulate on potential sources of toxicity, contributing to better waste management practices and safer soil organic amendment products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical root–soil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legué, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-12-01

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to aerial organs, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex.

  14. Physical root-soil interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legue, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-10-04

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to shoots, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Quicklime-induced changes of soil properties: Implications for enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated soils via mechanical soil aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Dong, Binbin; He, Xiaosong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Mingyue; He, Xuwen; Du, Xiaoming; Li, Fasheng

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is used for soil remediation at sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds. However, the effectiveness of the method is limited by low soil temperature, high soil moisture, and high soil viscosity. Combined with mechanical soil aeration, quicklime has a practical application value related to reinforcement remediation and to its action in the remediation of soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds. In this study, the target pollutant was trichloroethylene, which is a volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutant commonly found in contaminated soils. A restoration experiment was carried out, using a set of mechanical soil-aeration simulation tests, by adding quicklime (mass ratios of 3, 10, and 20%) to the contaminated soil. The results clearly indicate that quicklime changed the physical properties of the soil, which affected the environmental behaviour of trichloroethylene in the soil. The addition of CaO increased soil temperature and reduced soil moisture to improve the mass transfer of trichloroethylene. In addition, it improved the macroporous cumulative pore volume and average pore size, which increased soil permeability. As soil pH increased, the clay mineral content in the soils decreased, the cation exchange capacity and the redox potential decreased, and the removal of trichloroethylene from the soil was enhanced to a certain extent. After the addition of quicklime, the functional group COO of soil organic matter could interact with calcium ions, which increased soil polarity and promoted the removal of trichloroethylene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Discovering the essence of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, D.

    2012-04-01

    Science, and what it can learn, is constrained by its paradigms and premises. Similarly, teaching and what topics can be addressed are constrained by the paradigms and premises of the subject matter. Modern soil science is founded on the five-factor model of Dokuchaev and Jenny. Combined with Retallack's universal definition of soil as geologic detritus affected by weathering and/or biology, modern soil science emphasizes a descriptive rather than an interpretive approach. Modern soil science however, emerged from the study of plants and the need to improve crop yields in the face of chronic and wide spread famine in Europe. In order to teach that dirt is fascinating we must first see soils in their own right, understand their behavior and expand soil science towards an interpretive approach rather than limited as a descriptive one. Following the advice of James Hutton given over two centuries ago, I look at soils from a physiological perspective. Digestive processes are mechanical and chemical weathering, the resulting constituents reformed into new soil constituents (e.g. clay and humus), translocated to different regions of the soil body to serve other physiological processes (e.g. lamellae, argillic and stone-line horizons), or eliminated as wastes (e.g. leachates and evolved gasses). Respiration is described by the ongoing and diurnal exchange of gasses between the soil and its environment. Circulatory processes are evident in soil pore space, drainage capacity and capillary capability. Reproduction of soil is evident at two different scales: the growth of clay crystals (with their capacity for mutation) and repair of disturbed areas such as result from the various pedo-perturbations. The interactions between biotic and abiotic soil components provide examples of both neurological and endocrine systems in soil physiology. Through this change in perspective, both biotic and abiotic soil processes become evident, providing insight into the possible behavior of

  17. STABILIZATION OF EXPANSIVE SOIL USING BAGASSE ASH & LIME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tekimerry

    (MDD) and plasticity of the soil for all additives. But there was also a tremendous improvement in the CBR value when the soil is stabilized with a combination of lime and bagasse ash. This shows a potential of using bagasse ash as admixture in lime stabilized expansive soil. Keywords: Expansive soil, bagasse ash, lime,.

  18. Harmonized World Soil Database (version 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachtergaele, F.O.; Velthuizen, van H.; Wiberg, D.; Batjes, N.H.; Dijkshoorn, J.A.; Engelen, van V.W.P.; Fischer, G.; Jones, A.; Montanarela, L.; Petri, M.; Prieler, S.; Teixeira, E.; Shi, X.

    2014-01-01

    METIS-ID: 167825 The Harmonized World Soil Database is a 30 arc-second raster database with over 15000 different soil mapping units that combines existing regional and national updates of soil information worldwide (SOTER, ESD, Soil Map of China, ISRIC-WISE) with the information contained within the

  19. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  20. Monitor Soil Degradation or Triage for Soil Security? An Australian Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Australian National Soil Research, Development and Extension Strategy identifies soil security as a foundation for the current and future productivity and profitability of Australian agriculture. Current agricultural production is attenuated by soil degradation. Future production is highly dependent on the condition of Australian soils. Soil degradation in Australia is dominated in its areal extent by soil erosion. We reiterate the use of soil erosion as a reliable indicator of soil condition/quality and a practical measure of soil degradation. We describe three key phases of soil degradation since European settlement, and show a clear link between inappropriate agricultural practices and the resultant soil degradation. We demonstrate that modern agricultural practices have had a marked effect on reducing erosion. Current advances in agricultural soil management could lead to further stabilization and slowing of soil degradation in addition to improving productivity. However, policy complacency towards soil degradation, combined with future climate projections of increased rainfall intensity but decreased volumes, warmer temperatures and increased time in drought may once again accelerate soil degradation and susceptibility to erosion and thus limit the ability of agriculture to advance without further improving soil management practices. Monitoring soil degradation may indicate land degradation, but we contend that monitoring will not lead to soil security. We propose the adoption of a triaging approach to soil degradation using the soil security framework, to prioritise treatment plans that engage science and agriculture to develop practices that simultaneously increase productivity and improve soil condition. This will provide a public policy platform for efficient allocation of public and private resources to secure Australia’s soil resource.

  1. Tedmical Note on Local Adaptations to Soil Erosion and Low Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    digenous soil and water conservation practices in response to soil erosion and low soil moisture. The main indigenous methods used were intercropping, trash lines, stone bunds, minimum tillage, grass strips, ''janyajuu t t terraces and their combinations. The farmers' decision to adapt a particular tech- nique was influenced ...

  2. Soil health: a comparison between organically and conventionally managed arable soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Blok, W.J.; Korthals, G.W.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Ariena, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study of 13 organic and 13 neighboring conventional arable farming systems was conducted in the Netherlands to determine the effect of management practices on chemical and biological soil properties and soil health. Soils were analyzed using a polyphasic approach combining traditional

  3. Soil Mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verruijt, A.

    This book is the text for the introductory course of Soil Mechanics in the Department of Civil Engineering of the Delft University of Technology, as I have given from 1980 until my retirement in 2002. It contains an introduction into the major principles and methods of soil mechanics, such as the

  4. Linking soil biodiversity and agricultural soil management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiele-Bruhn, S.; Bloem, J.; de Vries, F.T.; Kalbitz, K.; Wagg, C.

    2012-01-01

    Soil biodiversity vastly exceeds aboveground biodiversity, and is prerequisite for ecosystem stability and services. This review presents recent findings in soil biodiversity research focused on interrelations with agricultural soil management. Richness and community structure of soil biota depend

  5. Pedotransfer functions estimating soil hydraulic properties using different soil parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions (PTF) are useful in many studies such as hydrochemical modelling and soil mapping. The objective of this study was to calibrate and test parametric PTFs that predict soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity...... conductivity parameters. A larger data set (1618 horizons) with a broader textural range was used in the development of PTFs to predict the van Genuchten parameters. The PTFs using either three or seven textural classes combined with soil organic mater and bulk density gave the most reliable predictions...... of the hydraulic properties of the studied soils. We found that introducing measured water content as a predictor generally gave lower errors for water retention predictions and higher errors for conductivity predictions. The best of the developed PTFs for predicting hydraulic conductivity was tested against PTFs...

  6. Soil Quality Indicator: a new concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barão, Lúcia; Basch, Gottlieb

    2017-04-01

    combined to return a single evaluation of the soil status, using different techniques that are dependent on the final use of the soil quality indicator. Some of the advantages of this new concept include the evaluation of soil quality based on its vulnerability to threats, together with the evaluation of soil properties in a given context while also suggesting soil management practices that are directly capable to mitigate soil vulnerability towards specific threats. Keywords: Soil Quality, Agriculture, Sustainability, Soil threats

  7. Spatial filtering of a legacy dataset to characterize relationships between soil organic carbon and soil texture

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, François; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of soil properties often displays complex and multiscale patterns of variation. It results from multiple soil processes acting simultaneously but at different scales. Hence, characterizing the influence of a given controlling factor on the soil property is made more difficult by the variation due to other controlling factors. In this context, separating the variation of the soil properties by spatial scales could allow disentangling the combined effect of controlling ...

  8. Saline soils spectral library as a tool for digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, María Victoria; Meléndez-Pastor, Ignacio; Navarro-Pedreño, José; Gómez, Ignacio; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Hernández, Encarni

    2013-04-01

    Soil information is needed at regional to global scales for proper land management. Soil scientist has been historically interested in mapping soil classes and properties to represent and explore the spatial distribution of soil characteristics. Fortunately, soil mapping came into the digital era decades ago, enabling the dissemination of computationally intensive techniques (e.g., geostatistics). Digital soil mapping is moving forward in recent decades. Digital soil mapping has evolved from "traditional" studies that employed a set of soils to build soil maps, to more recent approaches that exploit the increasing computing facilities to combine soil databases with ancillary data such as digital elevation models, remote sensing imagery and proximal sensing datasets. The inclusion of VNIR spectroscopy in digital soil mapping approaches is an outstanding research field. VNIR spectroscopy has largely been employed to quantify soil properties with proximal sensor and remote sensor (i.e., imaging spectroscopy). One of the traditional problems in soil mapping is the time needed to compile a soil database large enough to allow for mapping with robustness. Therefore there is a growing interest in using the less time consuming, immutability of the sample and increasing accuracy of soil spectroscopy to obtain accurate enough soil maps but with lower data requirements. This research trend is particularly interesting for the study of highly dynamic soil processes for which is necessary to know the spatial and temporal changes of certain properties for a correct soil assessment. The objective of this work was the study of soil salinity which is a dynamic property responding to seasonal (i.e., vertical upwelling) and inter-annual (i.e., salinization) changes. Soil salinity is a major constraint for agriculture by limiting or excluding certain crops. Thus, a continuous monitoring of soil salinity is needed to select the most suitable crops and to prevent future salinization

  9. Soil physical land degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    According to the European Soil Framework Directive (2006) soil compaction is besides water and wind erosion one of the main physical reasons and threats of soil degradation. It is estimated, that 32% of the subsoils in Europe are highly degraded and 18% moderately vulnerable to compaction. The problem is not limited to crop land or forest areas (especially because of non-site adjusted harvesting machines) but is also prevalent in rangelands and grassland, and even in so called natural non-disturbed systems. The main reasons for an intense increase in compacted agricultural or forested regions are the still increasing masses of the machines as well the increased frequency of wheeling under non favorable site conditions. Shear and vibration induced soil deformation enhances the deterioration of soil properties especially if the soil water content is very high and the internal soil strength very low. The same is true for animal trampling in combination with overgrazing of moist to wet pastures which subsequently causes a denser (i.e. reduced proportion of coarse pores with smaller continuity) but still structured soil horizons and will finally end in a compacted platy structure. In combination with high water content and shearing due to trampling therefore results in a complete muddy homogeneous soil with no structure at all. (Krümmelbein et al. 2013) Site managements of arable, forestry or horticulture soils requires a sufficiently rigid pore system which guarantees water, gas and heat exchange, nutrient transport and adsorption as well as an optimal rootability in order to avoid subsoil compaction. Such pore system also guarantees a sufficient microbial activity and composition in order to also decompose the plant etc. debris. It is therefore essential that well structured horizons dominate in soils with at best subangular blocky structure or in the top A- horizons a crumbly structure due to biological activity. In contrast defines the formation of a platy

  10. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  11. Climate protection, natural resources management and soil improvement by combined Energetic and Material Utilization of lignocellulosic agricultural WAstes and residues (CEMUWA); Klimaschutz, Naturressourcenschutz und Bodenverbesserung durch kombinierte energetische und stoffliche Verwertung lignozelluloser landwirtschaftlicher Abfaelle und Reststoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuech, Andrea; Nelles, Michael; Tscherpel, Burckhard; El Behery, Ahmed; Menanz, Rania; Bahl, Hubert; Scheel, Michael; Nipkow, Mareen

    2015-07-01

    The project Climate protection, natural resources management and soil improvement by combined Energetic and Material Utilization of lignocellulosic agricultural WAstes and residues (CEMUWA) was implemented with long-term partners from Egypt and Germany leaded by the Department Waste Management and Material Flow from September 2011 until October 2013. Aim of the project was the development of technologies for the utilization of agricultural wastes and residues at the example of rice straw, with the focus on the energetic and material use. In the long term a contribution to climate protection and natural resource management could be reached. The focus was on investigations in the field of biogas, ethanol and butanol production including pretreatment as well as the material use in horticulture. The results show that the biogas and ethanol production with adapted pretreatments of rice straws is possible. The technical adaptation of a biogas plant (eo-digestion) would be associated with about 20% higher investment costs and higher operating costs with an approximately 15% higher energy demand. In Germany, however, this may still economically by the substitution of expensive or difficult available energy crops (reduction of substrate costs by 30 to 35% for a 600 kWel-BGP using maize silage). The investigated solutions for material use in Egypt showed good results, which in some cases exceeded the expectations. By the use of rice straw imported peat substrates could be substitute or irrigation water saved, what is ecologically and economically useful. The production of ethanol from rice straw was implemented on laboratory scale and preconditions for investigations in semi-industrial and partly pilot scale were created. The bilateral project'' was funded in the framework of the German-Egypt-Research-Fond (GERF) by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the Egyptian Science and Technology Development Fund in Egypt (STDF). The total budget

  12. Biochar and Tillage Systems Influenced on Soil Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Darusman, Darusman; Syahruddin, Syahruddin; Syakur, Syakur; Manfarizah, Manfarizah

    2017-01-01

    Biochar is known as huge carbon storage in the soil. In the soil, biochar absorbs CO2 from air and keep them for hundred years. In addition to prevention, reducing emission and green house effects, Biochar also contributes to soil productivity such as physical and chemical property improvement of the soil. How biochar amends soil physical properties combined with some tillage systems are imperative to find out. This study aimed to determine the influence of biochar and tillage systems on s...

  13. Agriculture: Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Productive soils, a favorable climate, and clean and abundant water resources are essential for growing crops, raising livestock, and for ecosystems to continue to provide the critical provisioning services that humans need.

  14. Management Options for Contaminated Urban Soils to Reduce Public Exposure and Maintain Soil Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrycki, John F; Basta, Nicholas T; Culman, Steven W

    2017-03-01

    Soil management in urban areas faces dual challenges of reducing public exposure to soil contaminants, such as lead (Pb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and maintaining soil function. This study evaluated three management options for an urban lot in Cleveland, OH, containing 185 to 5197 mg Pb kg and 0.28 to 5.50 mg benzo(a)pyrene kg. Treatment options included: (i) cap the site with a soil blend containing compost and beneficially reused dredged sediments, (ii) mix compost with the soil, and (iii) mix compost and sediments with the soil. The soil blend cap reduced surface soil Pb to 12.4 mg Pb kg and benzo(a)pyrene content to 0.99 ± 0.41 mg kg. Aggregate stability for 2- to 0.25-mm aggregates in the soil blend cap was 13% compared with the 38% aggregate stability in the urban soil. Mixing compost with the soil reduced benzo(a)pyrene content, but sample variability indicated that elevated spots likely remained exposed at the surface. Compost addition diluted soil Pb and increased aggregate stability to 60%. Mixing compost and sediments with the soil was the only management option accomplishing both management goals of reducing surface soil contaminants and maintaining soil health. For this combined mixing option, aggregate stability was 37%, soil Pb was 15 mg kg, and benzo(a)pyrene was 0.99 ± 0.09 mg kg. Food-grade oil addition did not increase benzo(a)pyrene degradation. Future studies should evaluate how incorporating soil blends in different soil types with a range of contaminants may offer a suitable long-term management option for urban soil contaminants. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. The physical properties of some soil profiles and management of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical properties of some soil profiles and management of an erosion prone soil in southwestern Nigeria. ... Minimum tillage will offer great advantage when combined with surface mulch. Strip cropping, use of fertilizer of organic origin and cover crops will improve organic matter of the soil, soil stable aggregates, soil ...

  16. Stochastic Modeling of Soil Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suweis, Samir; Rinaldo, Andrea; van der Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.; Maritan, Amos; Porporato, Amilcare

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of cultivated land worldwide are affected by soil salinity. Estimates report that 10% of arable land in over 100 countries, and nine million km2 are salt affected, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. High salinity causes both ion specific and osmotic stress effects, with important consequences for plant production and quality. Salt accumulation in the root zone may be due to natural factors (primary salinization) or due to irrigation (secondary salinization). Simple (e.g., vertically averaged over the soil depth) coupled soil moisture and salt balance equations have been used in the past. Despite their approximations, these models have the advantage of parsimony, thus allowing a direct analysis of the interplay of the main processes. They also provide the ideal starting point to include external, random hydro-climatic fluctuations in the analysis of long-term salinization trends. We propose a minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The long term probability density functions of salt mass and concentration are found by reducing the coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance equation to a stochastic differential equation driven by multiplicative Poisson noise. The novel analytical solutions provide insight on the interplay of the main soil, plant and climate parameters responsible for long-term soil salinization. In fact, soil salinity statistics are obtained as a function of climate, soil and vegetation parameters. These, in turn, can be combined with soil moisture statistics to obtain a full characterization of soil salt concentrations and the ensuing risk of primary salinization. In particular, the solutions show the existence of two quite distinct regimes, the first one where the mean salt mass remains nearly constant with increasing rainfall frequency, and the

  17. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. [Zoological diagnostics of soils: imperatives, purposes, and place within soil zoology and pedology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordokovich, V G

    2013-01-01

    Zoological diagnostics of soils was conceived by M.S. Ghilarov as a part of soil zoology and intended to be closely related to pedology. He considered zoo-agents as an ecological factor, one among many others, of soil formation. Contemporary soil diagnostics pursues mostly utilitarian goals and is based on conservative properties of the stable part of soil substrate. However, it is admitted that these properties are generated by specific combinations of biological, chemical, and physical phenomena that are called "elementary soil processes" (ESP) and occur nowhere but in soils. Certain ESPs are associated with distinctive combinations of biota, including invertebrates. Pedobionts act as producers of detritus and contribute to humus formation, which is necessary for any ESP starting, thus being its active party. That is why animals, being the most complex and active part of the ESP system, may be treated not only as its indicators but also as its navigators. Monitoring and studying of ESPs in soil is complicated because of inevitable disturbance of soil profile natural composition. Zoo-agents, at the same time, can be registered without habitats changing. Taking into account ecological potency of soil invertebrates that participate in an ESP, spectra of their eco-groups, life forms, and results of their activity, it is possible to diagnose a soil state at different stages of certain ESPs development, with their different combinations, and in different regions or parts of natural environmental gradients.

  19. A method to detect soil carbon degradation during soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Conen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion has been discussed intensively but controversial both as a significant source or a significant sink of atmospheric carbon possibly explaining the gap in the global carbon budget. One of the major points of discussion has been whether or not carbon is degraded and mineralized to CO2 during detachment, transport and deposition of soil material. By combining the caesium-137 (137Cs approach (quantification of erosion rates with stable carbon isotope signatures (process indicator of mixing versus degradation of carbon pools we were able to show that degradation of carbon occurs during soil erosion processes at the investigated mountain grasslands in the central Swiss Alps (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri. Transects from upland (erosion source to wetland soils (erosion sinks of sites affected by sheet and land slide erosion were sampled. Analysis of 137Cs yielded an input of 2 and 4.6 tha−1 yr−1 of soil material into the wetlands sites. Assuming no degradation of soil organic carbon during detachment and transport, carbon isotope signature of soil organic carbon in the wetlands could only be explained with an assumed 500–600 and 350–400 years of erosion input into the wetlands Laui and Spissen, respectively. The latter is highly unlikely with alpine peat growth rates indicating that the upper horizons might have an age between 7 and 200 years. While we do not conclude from our data that eroded soil organic carbon is generally degraded during detachment and transport, we propose this method to gain more information on process dynamics during soil erosion from oxic upland to anoxic wetland soils, sediments or water bodies.

  20. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  1. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    the bacterial soil population. The thesis addresses the effects of different global change manipulations on the soil microbial community composition (climate change in Manuscript 1-4 and unconventional urban fertilizers in Manuscript 5-6). A special emphasis was put on combining molecular techniques like 454...... overall importance for ecosystem function in soil is poorly understood. Global change factors may affect the diversity and functioning of soil prokaryotes and thereby ecosystem functioning. To gain a better understanding of the effects of global changes it is of fundamental importance to classify......-pyrosequencing and qPCR with a range of soil measurements and analyses to provide a better understanding of the drivers in soil microbial communities. The thesis contains a brief introduction where the most important concepts of global change, soil as a habitat, the nitrogen cycle and nitrification are being...

  2. The effects of high metal concentrations in soil-compost mixtures on soil enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warman, P R; Munroe, M D

    2010-10-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the impact of high-metal composts on the activities of four soil enzymes. High concentrations of metal salts (Cr, Cu, Ni or a Co-Mo-Pb combination) were added to feedstocks during the thermophilic stage of composting. These four metal-enriched composts and an unamended control compost were then mixed with soil collected from long-term agriculture plots under organic management or conventional management. The compost-soil mixtures were prepared at two rates (1:1 or 1:3 compost:soil, v/v) and incubated at 20 degrees C for three weeks. These 20 combinations plus the five composts and the two soils were added to pots and incubated for three weeks. Following incubation, soil enzyme activities (acid phosphatase, arysulfatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase) were measured using traditional assay procedures. Compared to the control, none of the high-metal composts inhibited soil enzyme activity. Notably, the Cu compost treatment produced significantly higher activity of all four enzymes in the soil compared to the control. Previous soil management influenced the activity of three enzymes, arysulfatase and dehydrogenase had greater activity in the organic soil while phosphatase activity was greater in the conventional soil. Increasing the proportion of compost in the pot had a positive effect on phosphodiesterase activity only. In conclusion, the high-metal compost treatments either enhanced or caused no adverse effects on soil enzyme activity.

  3. The Effect of Gasification Biochar on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Soil Quality and Crop Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika

    New synergies between agriculture and the energy sector making use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production and recycling recalcitrant residuals to soil may offer climate change mitigation potential through the substitution of fossil fuels and soil carbon sequestration. However, concerns...... and the risk of soil compaction or erosion.......New synergies between agriculture and the energy sector making use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production and recycling recalcitrant residuals to soil may offer climate change mitigation potential through the substitution of fossil fuels and soil carbon sequestration. However, concerns...... have been raised about the potential negative impacts of incorporating bioenergy residuals (biochar) in soil and increasing the removal of crop residues such as straw, possibly reducing important soil functions and services for maintaining soil quality. Therefore, a combination of incubation studies...

  4. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) - Magnesic Soils

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Magnesic soils is a subset of the SSURGO dataset containing soil family selected based on the magnesic content and serpentinite parent material. The following soil...

  5. Combination vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David AG Skibinski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B; and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines.

  6. Assessing the nutritional potential of sodium in combination with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of sodium (Na) in combination with potassium (K) in the growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) was studied in soil culture. Sodium was applied at 0, 5, 10, 20 mg / kg soil as NaCl and K at 0, 20, 40, 80 mg / kg soil as KCl. Records of components of growth and mineral nutrient uptake and ...

  7. Electrodialytic decontamination of heavy metal polluted soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik K.; Karlsmose, Bodil

    1996-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation of heavy metal polluted soil is a newly developed method, which combines the electrokinetic mevement of ions in soil with the principle of electrodialytis. The method has been proven to work in laboratory scale and at present two types of pilot plant tests are made....

  8. Hyperspectral Imaging Analysis for the Classification of Soil Types and the Determination of Soil Total Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyao Jia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil is an important environment for crop growth. Quick and accurately access to soil nutrient content information is a prerequisite for scientific fertilization. In this work, hyperspectral imaging (HSI technology was applied for the classification of soil types and the measurement of soil total nitrogen (TN content. A total of 183 soil samples collected from Shangyu City (People’s Republic of China, were scanned by a near-infrared hyperspectral imaging system with a wavelength range of 874–1734 nm. The soil samples belonged to three major soil types typical of this area, including paddy soil, red soil and seashore saline soil. The successive projections algorithm (SPA method was utilized to select effective wavelengths from the full spectrum. Pattern texture features (energy, contrast, homogeneity and entropy were extracted from the gray-scale images at the effective wavelengths. The support vector machines (SVM and partial least squares regression (PLSR methods were used to establish classification and prediction models, respectively. The results showed that by using the combined data sets of effective wavelengths and texture features for modelling an optimal correct classification rate of 91.8%. could be achieved. The soil samples were first classified, then the local models were established for soil TN according to soil types, which achieved better prediction results than the general models. The overall results indicated that hyperspectral imaging technology could be used for soil type classification and soil TN determination, and data fusion combining spectral and image texture information showed advantages for the classification of soil types.

  9. Effet de la combinaison de la chaux et de la pouzzolane naturelle sur le compactage et la résistance des sols mous argileux Effect of the combination of lime and natural pozzolana on the compaction and strength of soft clayey soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenai S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La stabilisation des sols mous a été pratiquée longtemps en mélangeant des ajouts, tels que le ciment, la chaux et les cendres volantes au sol pour augmenter sa résistance. Cependant, il y a un manque d’investigations sur l’utilisation de la pouzzolane naturelle seule ou combinée avec la chaux pour les applications d’amélioration des sols. Un programme expérimental a été entrepris pour étudier l’effet de la chaux, la pouzzolane naturelle ou leur combinaison sur les caractéristiques géotechniques des sols mous. La chaux ou la pouzzolane naturelle ont été ajoutées aux sols par des teneurs de 0-10% et 0-20% respectivement. Les échantillons préparés ont été soumis aux essais de compactage et de résistance à la compression non confinée. Les échantillons ont subis des périodes de cure de 1, 7, 28 et 90 jours après quoi ils ont été soumis aux essais de la résistance à la compression non confinée. Basé sur les résultats favorables obtenus, ilpeut être conclu que les sols mous argileux peuvent être stabilisés avec succès par l’action combinée de la chaux et de la pouzzolane naturelle. Puisque la pouzzolane naturelle est beaucoup moins chère que la chaux, l’addition de la pouzzolane naturelle dans le mélange chaux-sol peut en particulier devenir attirante et avoir comme conséquence une réduction des coûts de la construction. Soft soil stabilization has been practiced for quite some time by mixing additives, such as cement, lime and fly ash to the soil to increase its strength. However, there is a lack of investigations on the use of natural pozzolana alone or combined with lime for ground improvement applications. An experimental program was undertaken to study the effect of using lime, natural pozzolana or a combination of both on the geotechnical characteristics of soft soils. Lime or natural pozzolana was added to soft soils at ranges of 0-10% and 0-20%, respectively. In addition, combinations of

  10. Comparison of different models for predicting soil bulk density. Case study - Slovakian agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovníková, Jarmila; Širáň, Miloš; Houšková, Beata; Pálka, Boris; Jones, Arwyn

    2017-10-01

    Soil bulk density is one of the main direct indicators of soil health, and is an important aspect of models for determining agroecosystem services potential. By way of applying multi-regression methods, we have created a distributed prediction of soil bulk density used subsequently for topsoil carbon stock estimation. The soil data used for this study were from the Slovakian partial monitoring system-soil database. In our work, two models of soil bulk density in an equilibrium state, with different combinations of input parameters (soil particle size distribution and soil organic carbon content in %), have been created, and subsequently validated using a data set from 15 principal sampling sites of Slovakian partial monitoring system-soil, that were different from those used to generate the bulk density equations. We have made a comparison of measured bulk density data and data calculated by the pedotransfer equations against soil bulk density calculated according to equations recommended by Joint Research Centre Sustainable Resources for Europe. The differences between measured soil bulk density and the model values vary from -0.144 to 0.135 g cm-3 in the verification data set. Furthermore, all models based on pedotransfer functions give moderately lower values. The soil bulk density model was then applied to generate a first approximation of soil bulk density map for Slovakia using texture information from 17 523 sampling sites, and was subsequently utilised for topsoil organic carbon estimation.

  11. Distribution of rock fragments and their effects on hillslope soil erosion in purple soil, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan

    2017-04-01

    influence of rock fragment cover on purple soil slope erosion process were carried on, under different conditions with two kind of rock fragment positions (resting on soil surface and embedded into top soil layer), varied rock fragment coverage (Rc, 0% 40%), two kind of soils with textural porosity or structural porosity, and three kind of rainfall intensities (I, 1 mm/min, 1.5 mm/min and 2 mm/min). Simulated rainfall experiments in situ plots in the field, combined with simulated rainfall experiments in soil pans indoor, were used. The main conclusions of this dissertation are as following: 1. The spatial distribution characteristics of rock fragments in purple soil slope and its effects on the soil physical properties were clarified basically. 2. The mechanism of influence of rock fragments within top soil layer on soil erosion processes was understood and a threshold of rock fragment content on the infiltration was figured out. 3. The relationships between surface rock fragment cover and hillslope soil erosion in purple soil under different conditions with varied rock fragment positions, soil structures and rainfall intensities were obtained and the soil and water conservation function of surface rock fragment cover on reducing soil loss was affirmed.

  12. Soil fertility management: Impacts on soil macrofauna, soil aggregation and soil organic matter allocation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayuke, F.O.; Brussaard, L.; Vanlauwe, B.; Six, J.; Lelei, D.K.; Kibunja, C.N.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of soil organic matter through integrated soil fertility management is important for soil quality and agricultural productivity, and for the persistence of soil faunal diversity and biomass. Little is known about the interactive effects of soil fertility management and soil macrofauna

  13. Expedient Road Construction Over Soft Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santoni, Rosa

    2001-01-01

    This report describes field experiments conducted using a combination of crushed limestone, wood chips, sand, geosynthetics, fiberglass mats, plastic mats, and wood mats for expedient road construction over soft soils...

  14. Uncertainty in soil carbon accounting due to unrecognized soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Chappell, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The movement of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion and deposition events represents a major perturbation to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the recognized impact soil redistribution can have on the carbon cycle, few major carbon accounting models currently allow for soil mass flux. Here, we modified a commonly used SOC model to include a soil redistribution term and then applied it to scenarios which explore the implications of unrecognized erosion and deposition for SOC accounting. We show that models that assume a static landscape may be calibrated incorrectly as erosion of SOC is hidden within the decay constants. This implicit inclusion of erosion then limits the predictive capacity of these models when applied to sites with different soil redistribution histories. Decay constants were found to be 15-50% slower when an erosion rate of 15 t soil ha(-1)  yr(-1) was explicitly included in the SOC model calibration. Static models cannot account for SOC change resulting from agricultural management practices focused on reducing erosion rates. Without accounting for soil redistribution, a soil sampling scheme which uses a fixed depth to support model development can create large errors in actual and relative changes in SOC stocks. When modest levels of erosion were ignored, the combined uncertainty in carbon sequestration rates was 0.3-1.0 t CO2  ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This range is similar to expected sequestration rates for many management options aimed at increasing SOC levels. It is evident from these analyses that explicit recognition of soil redistribution is critical to the success of a carbon monitoring or trading scheme which seeks to credit agricultural activities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Discrimination between aluminium held within vegetation and that contributed by soil contamination using a combination of Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M H; Dong, D; Thornton, I; Watt, J; Giddens, R

    1991-06-01

    Aluminium concentrations in NIST (formally NBS) Standard Reference Material Tomato Leaves and Citrus Leaves were determined by ICP-AES after acid digestion. The normal 'total' acid attack (nitric and perchloric acids) gave very low recovery (40%) of Al in NIST tomato leaves, but not for citrus leaves. The contribution of Al from Al-rich 'soil' particles in both tomato leaves and citrus leaves was estimated semi-quantitatively by computer-controlled EPMA. The Al held in these particles corresponded in approximate concentration to the shortfall between the acid soluble component determined in this study and the certified value. Analysis by EPMA can provide, therefore, a method of estimating Al contributed by soil contamination to plant materials. The limitations of the NIST tomato and citrus leaf reference material for the validation of methods for the determination of Al in vegetation are demonstrated.

  16. Reading the Molecular Code in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, N. J.; Tfaily, M. M.; O'Brien, S. L.; Tolic, N.; Jastrow, J. D.; Amonette, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    There is much that we understand about the relationship between plants, microbes, soil, and water but that understanding is incomplete at the molecular scale. With advent of high throughput genomic sequencing we are beginning to appreciate the diversity of microbial community structure and function and its response to the rhythm of plant function. Through the lens of high-resolution mass spectrometry we are getting our first glimpses of the diversity of soil and pore water organic chemistry at the molecular level. In combination, these diverse data streams are revealing traces of chemical metabolic pathways. This approach promises to reveal many exciting future discoveries, shedding light into the "black box" that exists beneath our feet. In this talk we discuss our experience with the molecular characterization of soils from native prairie to restored prairie to active corn-soybean soils from the DOE funded CSiTE project in Batavia, Illinois. We focus on how common soil separation and fractionation techniques can affect the resulting molecular soil characterization by comparing whole soils to those that have been fractionated into micro- and macro-aggregates and their corresponding silt and clay fractions. When carefully utilized and interpreted these fractionation techniques can be utilized for deepening understanding of the biotic and abiotic chemical pathways effecting the organic chemistry in the different soil fractions. In highly fractionated soils we find significant differences in organic chemistry between silt and clay separates of corresponding hierarchical aggregate fractions. However the most biologically rich information resides in the whole soil. Here we see significant gradients in soil chemistry across to active agricultural to restored to native prairie soils. These results suggest a cautionary note, namely that soil fractionation prior to molecular characterization can reveal much about the "abiotic" interactions between organic molecules and

  17. Soil Management Methods under Rice Cultivation in Ndokwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ... properties in the soil using the most probable instruments and analytical methods. The yield of rice harvested was measured in tons per hectares (He). The results revealed that the application of soil management techniques has enhanced rice yields by. 23.45tons/He. The combination of slash and burn, tillage and soil.

  18. Remediation trials of crude oil contaminated soil using different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was also significant increase in the soil microbial counts in the amended soil as compared to the control. Therefore, detergent and sawdust in single or combinations can be used to restore crude oil polluted soil with the ability to reduce the toxic effect with treatment A (20 g detergent) and C (100 g sawdust) and D ...

  19. Fate and Bioavailability of Engineered Nanoparticles in Soils: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, G.; Hund-Rinke, K.; Kuhlbusch, T.; Brink, van den N.W.; Nickel, C.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions within natural soils have often been neglected when assessing fate and bioavailability of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in soils. This review combines patchwise ENM research using natural soils with the much wider literature on ENM performed in standard tests or on the fate of colloids

  20. Stabilization of expansive soil using bagasse ash & lime | Wubshet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7-5 soil on the AASHTO classification was stabilized using 3% lime, 15% bagasse ash and 15% bagasse ash in combination with 3% lime by dry weight of the soil. The effect of the additives on the soil was investigated with respect to plastcity, ...

  1. The impact of soil degradation on soil functioning in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2010-05-01

    The European Commission has presented in September 2006 its Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection.The Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection consists of a Communication from the Commission to the other European Institutions, a proposal for a framework Directive (a European law), and an Impact Assessment. The Communication (COM(2006) 231) sets the frame. It defines the relevant soil functions for Europe and identifies the major threats. It explains why further action is needed to ensure a high level of soil protection, sets the overall objective of the Strategy and explains what kind of measures must be taken. It establishes a ten-year work program for the European Commission. The proposal for a framework Directive (COM(2006) 232) sets out common principles for protecting soils across the EU. Within this common framework, the EU Member States will be in a position to decide how best to protect soil and how use it in a sustainable way on their own territory. The Impact Assessment (SEC (2006) 1165 and SEC(2006) 620) contains an analysis of the economic, social and environmental impacts of the different options that were considered in the preparatory phase of the strategy and of the measures finally retained by the Commission. Since 2006 a large amount of new evidence has allowed to further document the extensive negative impacts of soil degradation on soil functioning in Europe. Extensive soil erosion, combined with a constant loss of soil organic carbon, have raised attention to the important role soils are playing within the climate change related processes. Other important processes are related to the loss of soil biodiversity, extensive soil sealing by housing and infrastructure, local and diffuse contamination by agricultural and industrial sources, compaction due to unsustainable agricultural practices and salinization by unsustainable irrigation practices. The extended impact assessment by the European Commission has attempted to quantify in monetary terms the

  2. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...

  3. Nigerian Journal of Soil Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Tillage and Mulch Combination on Soil Physical Properties and Sorghum Performance on Alfisol of Southwest Nigeria · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. S Ojeniyi, S Odedina, J Odedina, M Akinola ...

  4. Biochar decelerates soil organic nitrogen cycling but stimulates soil nitrification in a temperate arable field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50-80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies.

  5. Biochar decelerates soil organic nitrogen cycling but stimulates soil nitrification in a temperate arable field trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Prommer

    Full Text Available Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50-80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies.

  6. Biochar Decelerates Soil Organic Nitrogen Cycling but Stimulates Soil Nitrification in a Temperate Arable Field Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50–80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies. PMID:24497947

  7. combination Dictionary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    advanced-level Spanish-speaking EFL learners. 2. Word combinations ... a certain process of segregation as a separate branch of linguistics. While lexi- ... As substantiated by Ilson's investigation of lexicographic practices, most dictionaries ...

  8. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack of quantit...... results suggest that a strategy of leaving residues in the field can alleviate negative effects of reduced tillage on soil structural quality.......Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack...... of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...

  9. Soil tillage

    OpenAIRE

    Dierauer, Hansueli

    2013-01-01

    The web platform offers a compilation of various formats and materials dealing with reduced tillage and its challenges regarding weeds. A selection of short movies about mechanical weeding, green manure and tailor-made machinery is listed. Leaflets and publications on reduced tillage can be downloaded. In there, different treatments and machinery are tested and compared to advice farmers on how to conserve soil while keeping weed under control. For Swiss farmers information on the leg...

  10. Soil C Saturation is Evident in Soils Rich in Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H.; Ngo, K.; Plante, A.; Six, J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that mineral soils have a limit to their soil C stabilization capacity. We reasoned that C saturation will be most evident in soils that are already rich in soil organic C (SOC) and have been exposed to a broad range of C input. Therefore, we determined the modes of soil C saturation in an agricultural experiment located in Ellerslie, Canada, where organic matter-rich soils have been cropped to cereal grain for more than 20 years. In this experiment, soils are subject to a broad range of soil C input due to a combination of straw incorporation, N fertilization, and tillage treatments. We determined if C saturation is taking place in soil size fractions that are functionally different, namely the large macroaggregates (>2000 μm), small macroaggregates (2000-250 μm), microaggregates (250-53 μm), and silt plus clay fraction (structured soil. Our study suggests that soils that are farther away from C saturation potential will have greater C sink capacity than soils that are close to their C saturation capacity.

  11. Soil moisture and texture primarily control the soil nutrient stoichiometry across the Tibetan grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liming; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Xiaodong; Fang, Hongbing; Zhao, Yonghua; Hu, Guojie; Yue, Guangyang; Sheng, Yu; Wu, Jichun; Chen, Ji; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Wangping; Zou, Defu; Ping, Chien-Lu; Shang, Wen; Zhao, Yuguo; Zhang, Ganlin

    2018-05-01

    Soil nutrient stoichiometry and its environmental controllers play vital roles in understanding soil-plant interaction and nutrient cycling under a changing environment, while they remain poorly understood in alpine grassland due to lack of systematic field investigations. We examined the patterns and controls of soil nutrients stoichiometry for the top 10cm soils across the Tibetan ecosystems. Soil nutrient stoichiometry varied substantially among vegetation types. Alpine swamp meadow had larger topsoil C:N, C:P, N:P, and C:K ratios compared to the alpine meadow, alpine steppe, and alpine desert. In addition, the presence or absence of permafrost did not significantly impact soil nutrient stoichiometry in Tibetan grassland. Moreover, clay and silt contents explained approximately 32.5% of the total variation in soil C:N ratio. Climate, topography, soil properties, and vegetation combined to explain 10.3-13.2% for the stoichiometry of soil C:P, N:P, and C:K. Furthermore, soil C and N were weakly related to P and K in alpine grassland. These results indicated that the nutrient limitation in alpine ecosystem might shifts from N-limited to P-limited or K-limited due to the increase of N deposition and decrease of soil P and K contents under the changing climate conditions and weathering stages. Finally, we suggested that soil moisture and mud content could be good predictors of topsoil nutrient stoichiometry in Tibetan grassland. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. First combined flux chamber survey of mercury and CO2 emissions from soil diffuse degassing at Solfatara of Pozzuoli crater, Campi Flegrei (Italy): Mapping and quantification of gas release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, E.; Barra, M.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Parello, F.; Sprovieri, M.

    2014-12-01

    There have been limited studies to date targeting gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) flux from soil emission in enriched volcanic substrates and its relation with CO2 release and tectonic structures. In order to evaluate and understand the processes of soil-air exchanges involved at Solfatara of Pozzuoli volcano, the most active zone of Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy), an intensive field measurement survey has been achieved in September 2013 by using high-time resolution techniques. Soil-air exchange fluxes of GEM and CO2 have been measured simultaneously at 116 points, widely distributed within the crater. Quantification of gas flux has been assessed by using field accumulation chamber method in conjunction with a Lumex®-RA 915 + portable mercury vapor analyzer and a LICOR for CO2 determination, respectively. The spatial distribution of GEM and CO2 emissions correlated quite closely with the hydrothermal and geological features of the studied area. The highest GEM fluxes (from 4.04 to 5.9 × 10- 5 g m- 2 d- 1) were encountered close to the southern part of the crater interested by an intense fumarolic activity and along the SE-SW tectonic fracture (1.26 × 10- 6-6.91 × 10- 5 g GEM m- 2 d- 1). Conversely, the lowest values have been detected all along the western rim of the crater, characterized by a weak gas flux and a lush vegetation on a very sealed clay soil, which likely inhibited mercury emission (range: 1.5 × 10- 7-7.18 × 10- 6 g GEM m- 2 d- 1). Results indicate that the GEM exchange between soil and air inside the Solfatara crater is about 2-3 orders of magnitude stronger than that in the background areas (10- 8-10- 7 g m- 2 d- 1). CO2 soil diffuse degassing exhibited an analogous spatial pattern to the GEM fluxes, with emission rates ranging from about 15 to ~ 20,000 g CO2 m- 2 d- 1, from the outermost western zones to the south-eastern sector of the crater. The observed significant correlation between GEM and CO2 suggested that in volcanic system GEM

  13. Changes in Soil Chemical Properties and Lettuce Yield Response Following Incorporation of Biochar and Cow Dung to Highly Weathered Acidic Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agyei Frimpong, Kwame; Amoakwah, Emmanuel; Osei, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    imposed on two highly weathered, acidic soils from the coastal savanna and tropical rainforest agroecological zones of Ghana, respectively, to elucidate their effect on yield of lettuce. The study showed that application of biochar solely or in combination with cow dung increased soil pH, total organic...... improve soil chemical properties and lettuce yield if applied solely or in combination with cow dung....

  14. Effect of soil type and soil management on soil physical, chemical and biological properties in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Auxiliadora Soriano, Maria; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Navas, Juan Antonio; Landa, Blanca B.

    2014-05-01

    One of the objectives of organic agriculture is to maintain and improve soil quality, while simultaneously producing an adequate yield. A key element in organic olive production is soil management, which properly implemented can optimize the use of rainfall water enhancing infiltration rates and controlling competition for soil water by weeds. There are different soil management strategies: eg. weed mowing (M), green manure with surface tillage in spring (T), or combination with animal grazing among the trees (G). That variability in soil management combined with the large variability in soil types on which organic olive trees are grown in Southern Spain, difficult the evaluation of the impact of different soil management on soil properties, and yield as well as its interpretation in terms of improvement of soil quality. This communications presents the results and analysis of soil physical, chemical and biological properties on 58 soils in Southern Spain during 2005 and 2006, and analyzed and evaluated in different studies since them. Those 58 soils were sampled in 46 certified commercial organic olive orchards with four soil types as well as 12 undisturbed areas with natural vegetation near the olive orchards. The four soil types considered were Eutric Regosol (RGeu, n= 16), Eutric Cambisol (CMeu, n=16), Calcaric Regosol (RGca, n=13 soils sampled) and Calcic Cambisol (CMcc), and the soil management systems (SMS) include were 10 light tillage (LT), 16 sheep grazing (G), 10 tillage (T), 10 mechanical mowing (M), and 12 undisturbed areas covered by natural vegetation (NV-C and NV-S). Our results indicate that soil management had a significant effect on olive yield as well as on key soil properties. Among these soil properties are physical ones, such as infiltration rate or bulk density, chemical ones, especially organic carbon concentration, and biological ones such as soil microbial respiration and bacterial community composition. Superimpose to that soil

  15. Biochar soil application to mitigate climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Ambus, Per

    2009-01-01

    Production of energy carriers (oil, gas) and biochar from pyrolysis of biomass is by many considered a promising technology for combined production of bioenergy and recalcitrant C suitable for sequestration in soil. The mechanism behind biochar-C sequestration is straightforward: Due to its...... term basis in the soil. The experiments presented here illustrate the C sequestration potentials of biochar originating from fast pyrolysis of wheat straw. It is documented that after 47 days in soil 95 % of the added biochar-C is still present in the soil as compared to only 56 % if straw is applied...... untreated to the soil. The type and settings of pyrolysis influence the chemical quality of the biochar produced significantly. Biochar chemical analysis revealed that the degradation of biochar in soil appears to be proportional with the biochar cellulosic and hemicellulosic fraction. Furthermore...

  16. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    ’ of climate change manipulations on soil microorganisms and nutrient availability in a Danish heathland, where the samples were taken shortly after a prolonged pre-summer drought. The major findings in the study are that warming increased measures of fungi and bacteria and drought might shift/change...... the bacterial soil population. The thesis addresses the effects of different global change manipulations on the soil microbial community composition (climate change in Manuscript 1-4 and unconventional urban fertilizers in Manuscript 5-6). A special emphasis was put on combining molecular techniques like 454...... the microbial community towards a higher fungal dominance. That could lead to a change in the carbon and nutrient flow in soil. In Manuscript 2 the impact of climate change manipulations and the seasonal dynamics of soil fungi and bacterial communities are investigated. Our results show that the soil fungal...

  17. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... was therefore to investigate the impact of global environmental changes on soil fungal communities in a temperate and subartic heath ecosystem. The objective was further to determine global change effects on major functional groups of fungi and analyze the influence of fungal community changes on soil carbon...... and nutrient availability and storage. By combining molecular methods such as 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of fungal ITS amplicons with analyses of soil enzymes, nutrient pools of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus we were able to characterize soil fungal communities as well as their impact on nutrient...

  18. Predicting soil organic carbon at field scale using a national soil spectral library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yi; Knadel, Maria; Gislun, Rene

    2013-01-01

    and the spectral library, 2718 samples) and (iii) three sub-sets selected from the spectral library. In an attempt to improve prediction accuracy, sub-sets of the soil spectral library were made using three different sample selection methods: those geographically closest (84 samples), those with the same landscape......Visible and near infrared diffuse reflectance (vis-NIR) spectroscopy is a low-cost, efficient and accurate soil analysis technique and is thus becoming increasingly popular. Soil spectral libraries are commonly constructed as the basis for estimating soil texture and properties. In this study......, partial least squares regression was used to develop models to predict the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of 35 soil samples from one field using (i) the Danish soil spectral library (2688 samples), (ii) a spiked spectral library (a combination of 30 samples selected from the local area...

  19. Collective Impacts of Orography and Soil Moisture on the Soil Moisture-Precipitation Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamovic, Adel; Schlemmer, Linda; Schär, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    Ensembles of convection-resolving simulations with a simplified land surface are conducted to dissect the isolated and combined impacts of soil moisture and orography on deep-convective precipitation under weak synoptic forcing. In particular, the deep-convective precipitation response to a uniform and a nonuniform soil moisture perturbation is investigated both in settings with and without orography. In the case of horizontally uniform perturbations, we find a consistently positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback, irrespective of the presence of low orography. On the other hand, a negative feedback emerges with localized perturbations: a dry soil heterogeneity substantially enhances rain amounts that scale linearly with the dryness of the soil, while a moist heterogeneity suppresses rain amounts. If the heterogeneity is located in a mountainous region, the relative importance of soil moisture heterogeneity decreases with increasing mountain height: A mountain 500 m in height is sufficient to neutralize the local soil moisture-precipitation feedback.

  20. Soil Fertility Status on Organic Paddy Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujiyo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to determine fertility status of the soil after organic paddy experiments using kinds and doses of organic fertilizers. Experiment was conducted at greenhouse laboratory in Faculty of Agriculture Sebelas Maret University Surakarta. Experimental design used completely randomized design with 9 kinds of treatment was replicated 3 times. Experiments were the use of cow manure, Azolla fertilizer, Azolla inoculum and its combinations that are based on fulfilling nutrient requirements of 120 kg N ha-1. Result shows that the use of cow manure, Azolla fertilizers and Azolla inoculum had no effect on changes of soil fertility status. Soil fertility status was not significantly correlated with cow manure (0,16ns, Azolla fertilizer (0,26ns and Azolla inoculum (0,16ns. Average of final soil fertility status included fertile category, which was similar as the initial soil fertility status. Average of final soil properties of treatment but nevertheless was relatively higher than in no treatment, indicating the use of cow manure, Azolla fertilizer, Azolla inoculum and its combinations had greater impact to soil properties. Cow manure despite increased available K2O and dry grain, but it did not significantly increase the soil fertility status from fertile to very fertile. This was presumably due to the relatively short experiment period, only one planting season had not given significant effect to soil properties. Implication of this study is the use of cow manure, Azolla fertilizer, Azolla inoculum and its combinations although did not increase the soil fertility status but could maintain soil fertility status as the initial conditions before planting.

  1. Soil aggregation and slope stability related to soil density, root length, and mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank; Frei, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Eco-engineering measures combine the use of living plants and inert mechanical constructions to protect slopes against erosion and shallow mass movement. Whereas in geotechnical engineering several performance standards and guidelines for structural safety and serviceability of construction exist, there is a lack of comparable tools in the field of ecological restoration. Various indicators have been proposed, including the fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution, microbiological parameters, and soil aggregate stability. We present results of an soil aggregate stability investigation and compare them with literature data of the angle of internal friction ?' which is conventionally used in slope stability analysis and soil failure calculation. Aggregate stability tests were performed with samples of differently treated moraine, including soil at low (~15.5 kN/m³) and high (~19.0 kN/m³) dry unit weight, soil planted with Alnus incana (White Alder) as well as the combination of soil planted with alder and inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Melanogaster variegatus s.l. After a 20 weeks growth period in a greenhouse, a total of 100 samples was tested and evaluated. Positive correlations were found between the soil aggregate stability and the three variables dry unit weight, root length per soil volume, and degree of mycorrhization. Based on robust statistics it turned out that dry unit weight and mycorrhization degree were strongest correlated with soil aggregate stability. Compared to the non-inoculated control plants, mycorrhized White Alder produced significantly more roots and higher soil aggregate stability. Furthermore, the combined biological effect of plant roots and mycorrhizal mycelia on aggregate stability on soil with low density (~15.5 kN/m³) was comparable to the compaction effect of the pure soil from 15.5 to ~19.0 kN/m³. Literature data on the effect of vegetation on the angle of internal friction ?' of the same moraine showed

  2. Effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil hydraulic properties of an artificial sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Biochar, a product of the pyrolysis of biomass, has become an increasingly studied subject of interest as an agricultural soil amendment to address issues of carbon emission, population density, and food scarcity. Biochar has been reported to increase content and retention of nutrients, pH, cation-exchange capacity, vegetative growth, microbial community, and carbon sequestration. A number of studies addressing the usefulness of biochar as a soil amendment have focused on chemical and biological properties, disregarding the effects on soil physical properties of amended soil. Aside from biochar, lime (calcium carbonate) addition to soils has also been utilized in agricultural practices, typically to raise the pH value of acidic soils, increase microbial activity, and enhance soil stability and productivity as a result. Both biochar and lime amendments may be beneficial in increasing the soil physical properties, particularly through the formation of aggregates. In previous studies an increase in soil particle aggregates resulted in higher rates of biological activity, infiltration rates, pore space, and aeration, all of which are a measure of soil quality. While the effectiveness of biochar and lime as soil amendments has been independently documented, their combined effectiveness on soil physical properties is less understood. This study aims to provide a further understanding on the effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil particle aggregation and hydraulic properties of a low reactive pre-limed artificial sandy soil with and without microbial communities. Microbial communities are known to increase soil aggregates by acting as cementing agents. Understanding the impact of biochar addition on soil physical properties will have implications in the development of sustainable agricultural practices, especially in systems undergoing climate stress and intensive agriculture.

  3. Soil residue analysis and degradation of saflufenacil as affected by moisture content and soil characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Edinalvo R; Senseman, Scott A; Haney, Richard L; Guice, John B; McCauley, Garry N

    2013-12-01

    Saflufenacil dissipation in soils under different moisture conditions is not available in the scientific literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate saflufenacil degradation and persistence in soils from rice regions under field capacity (non-flooded) and saturated (flooded) conditions. The accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) residue analytical method developed to conduct the study resulted in recovery greater than 80% for the combinations of soils and moisture conditions. Saflufenacil degradation was faster at field capacity for all soils, except for Morey soil. Herbicide half-life was 28.6, 15.0 and 23.1 days under field capacity treatments and 58.8, 36.9 and 79.7 under saturated conditions for Nada, Crowley and Gilbert soils respectively. A half-life no longer than 80 days was observed for the combination of soils and moisture treatments. An ASE method was developed and used to extract saflufenacil from soil samples. Half-life averaged among soils was 59 and 33 days for saturated and field capacity respectively. Saflufenacil persistence in the environment was 2-3 times longer under flooded conditions for most of the soils studied. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Quantifying soil and critical zone variability in a forested catchment through digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying catchment scale soil property variation yields insights into critical zone evolution and function. The objective of this study was to quantify and predict the spatial distribution of soil properties within a high elevation forested catchment in southern AZ, USA using a combined set of di...

  5. The Soil Model Development and Intercomparison Panel (SoilMIP) of the International Soil Modeling Consortium (ISMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Priesack, Eckart

    2017-04-01

    The Soil Model Development and Intercomparison Panel (SoilMIP) is an initiative of the International Soil Modeling Consortium. Its mission is to foster the further development of soil models that can predict soil functions and their changes (i) due to soil use and land management and (ii) due to external impacts of climate change and pollution. Since soil functions and soil threats are diverse but linked with each other, the overall aim is to develop holistic models that represent the key functions of the soil system and the links between them. These models should be scaled up and integrated in terrestrial system models that describe the feedbacks between processes in the soil and the other terrestrial compartments. We propose and illustrate a few steps that could be taken to achieve these goals. A first step is the development of scenarios that compare simulations by models that predict the same or different soil services. Scenarios can be considered at three different levels of comparisons: scenarios that compare the numerics (accuracy but also speed) of models, scenarios that compare the effect of differences in process descriptions, and scenarios that compare simulations with experimental data. A second step involves the derivation of metrics or summary statistics that effectively compare model simulations and disentangle parameterization from model concept differences. These metrics can be used to evaluate how more complex model simulations can be represented by simpler models using an appropriate parameterization. A third step relates to the parameterization of models. Application of simulation models implies that appropriate model parameters have to be defined for a range of environmental conditions and locations. Spatial modelling approaches are used to derive parameter distributions. Considering that soils and their properties emerge from the interaction between physical, chemical and biological processes, the combination of spatial models with process

  6. Soil use and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.; McBratney, A.B.; White, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    This four-volume set, edited by leading experts in soil science, brings together in one collection a series of papers that have been fundamental to the development of soil science as a defined discipline. Volume 3 on Soil Use and Management covers: - Soil evaluation and land use planning - Soil and

  7. Soil properties and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.; McBratney, A.B.; White, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    This four-volume set, edited by leading experts in soil science, brings together in one collection a series of papers that have been fundamental to the development of soil science as a defined discipline. Tis volume 2 on Soil Properties and Processes covers: - Soil physics - Soil (bio)chemistry -

  8. Biological measurements in a nationwide soil monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Schouten, A.J.; Bloem, J.; Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Jagers op Akkerhuis, G.A.J.M.; Wal, van der A.; Mulder, C.; Brussaard, L.; Breure, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands soil biological measurements are undertaken in a nationwide monitoring programme. The measurements are combined in the Biological Indicator of Soil Quality (BISQ). About 300 locations were selected in a random stratified design comprising stringent combinations of land use and

  9. Visual soil evaluation and soil compaction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M.L. Guimarães, Rachel; Keller, Thomas; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Following on from discussions that took place during the 19th International Conference of the International Soil Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO) in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 2012, the ISTRO working groups “Visual Soil Examination and Evaluation” (VSEE) and “Subsoil Compaction” decided...... to organize a joint workshop. The present special issue is an outcome from the workshop on “Soil structural quality of tropical soils: Visual evaluation methods and soil compaction prevention strategies” that was held 26–29 May 2014 in Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. There has been a long-lasting interest in Visual...... and climatic conditions, as well as in utilizing VSE methods together with qualitative methods to evaluate the impact of soil management (Munkholm et al., 2013). Soil compaction due to agricultural operations is a serious threat to soil productivity and soil ecological functions and has been a key research...

  10. Soil carbon mineralization following biochar addition associated with external nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudong Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has been attracting increasing attention for its potentials of C sequestration and soil amendment. This study aimed to understand the effects of combining biochar with additional external N on soil C mineralization. A typical red soil (Plinthudults was treated with two biochars made from two types of plantation-tree trunks (soil-biochar treatments, and was also treated with external N (soil-biochar-N treatments. All treatments were incubated for 42 d. The CO2-C released from the treatments was detected periodically. After the incubation, soil properties such as pH, microbial biomass C (MBC, and microbial biomass N (MBN were measured. The addition of biochar with external N increased the soil pH (4.31-4.33 compared to the soil treated with external N only (4.21. This was not observed in the comparison of soil-biochar treatments (4.75-4.80 to soil only (4.74. Biochar additions (whether or not they were associated with external N increased soil MBC and MBN, but decreased CO2-C value per unit total C (added biochar C + soil C according to the model fitting. The total CO2-C released in soil-biochar treatments were enhanced compared to soil only (i.e., 3.15 vs. 2.57 mg and 3.23 vs. 2.45 mg, which was attributed to the labile C fractions in the biochars and through soil microorganism enhancement. However, there were few changes in soil C mineralization in soil-biochar-N treatments. Additionally, the potentially available C per unit total C in soil-biochar-N treatments was lower than that observed in the soil-biochar treatments. Therefore, we believe in the short term, that C mineralization in the soil can be enhanced by biochar addition, but not by adding external N concomitantly.

  11. "Lou soil", a fertile anthropogenic soil with thousands of years of cultivating history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Liang, B.; Yan, J.; Zhao, W.

    2012-12-01

    Chinese farmers have a very long history of using manures in their fields. Owing to the long-term addition of manures, an anthropogenic layer was formed on the top of original soil profile (drab soil) in Guanzhong Plains on the south edge of the Loess Plateau, North China. This soil is named the Manural Loessial soil (or Lou soil, "Lou" means the different stories of a building in Chinese). The depth of anthropogenic layer is in range of about 30 to 100 cm depth, which has a close relationship with the soil productivity. This fertile agricultural soil has sustained the agriculture in the region for millenniums. We had determined the organic carbon (SOC) in 7 soil profiles, and found that the depths of anthropogenic layer of were in range of 40 to 71 cm (averaging 59 cm). And the anthropogenic layer became shallower as the profile was far from the village due to less manure application. The organic C stocks in this layer accounted for 69% of organic C stocks in 0-100 cm soil profiles. Organic C stocks in Lou soil was higher than that in the newly cultivated soil developed from loess parent materials. Our 30-day incubation experiment found that addition of synthetic N fertilizer significantly increased the decomposition of SOC in the soils. However, The decomposition rate of SOC in the soil added with manure and inorganic fertilizers for 18-yr (MNPK soil) was significantly lower than in the soils added without fertilizer or inorganic fertilizers (NF soil, and NPK soils). The half-life of the organic C in MNPK soils was also slower than the NF soil, and NPK soil. It indicates that long-term combined application of manure and inorganic fertilizers improves the stabilization of soil organic C. Long-term cultivation has not only increased organic C stocks, but also stabilization of organic C in soil profile. It provides us a unique sample to study the mechanism of accumulation and stabilization of organic C in soil to balance agricultural production and C sequestration

  12. Profile soil property estimation using a VIS-NIR-EC-force probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combining data collected in-field from multiple soil sensors has the potential to improve the efficiency and accuracy of soil property estimates. Optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to estimate many important soil properties, such as soil carbon, water content, and texture. ...

  13. Estimation of soil profile physical and chemical properties using a VIS-NIR-EC-force probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combining data collected in-field from multiple soil sensors has the potential to improve the efficiency and accuracy of soil property estimates. Optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to estimate many important soil properties, such as soil carbon, water content, and texture. ...

  14. Winning Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Criscuolo, Paola; Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke

    2017-01-01

    Searching for the most rewarding sources of innovative ideas remains a key challenge in management of technological innovation. Yet, little is known about which combinations of internal and external knowledge sources are triggers for innovation. Extending theories about searching for innovation, ...

  15. Solarização do solo e incorporação de fontes de matéria orgânica no controle de Pythium spp. Soil solarization in combination with organic matter for the control of Pythium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ghini

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da solarização do solo, associada à incorporação de lodo de esgoto, cama-de-frango e casca de Pinus, no controle de Pythium spp. Foram conduzidos dois ensaios, um em área cultivada comercialmente com crisântemo e outro em área artificialmente infestada com Pythium spp. em cultivo de pepino. A adição de cama-de-frango induziu a supressividade do solo ao patógeno, visto que resultou em maiores temperaturas no solo solarizado, aumento na condutividade elétrica e maior atividade microbiana do solo, avaliada pela hidrólise de diacetato de fluoresceína e desprendimento de CO2. Por outro lado, o lodo de esgoto e a casca de Pinus não induziram a supressividade ao patógeno. A solarização não teve efeito no crescimento da parte aérea e no peso de matéria fresca de raízes de plantas de crisântemo, mas teve efeito significativo no controle do patógeno no ensaio conduzido com pepino.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of soil solarization in combination with sewage sludge, chicken litter and Pinus bark added to soil for the control of Pythium spp. Two field experiments with chrysanthemum and cucumber were carried out in two soils: one commercially cultivated with chrysanthemum and in the other artificially infested with Pythium spp. The effects of the treatments were evaluated by measuring electrical conductivity, pH, microbial activity of soil as well as shoot growth and root fresh weight of chrysanthemum plant. The chicken litter induced suppressiveness to the pathogen due to higher soil temperatures, enhanced electrical conductivity, and increased microbial activity, which was evaluated by diacetate fluorescein hydrolysis and CO2 emission. On the other hand, the sewage sludge and the Pinus bark did not induce pathogen suppressiveness. Solarization did not affect plant shoot growth nor root fresh weight of chrysanthemum plants, but it significantly controlled the

  16. Soil Plasticity Model for Analysis of Collapse Load on Layers Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Nujid Masyitah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural soil consist of soil deposits which is a soil layer overlying a thick stratum of another soil. The bearing capacity of layered soil studies have been conducted using different approach whether theoretical, experimental and combination of both. Numerical method in computer programme has become a powerful tool in solving complex geotechnical problems. Thus in numerical modelling, stress-strain soil behaviour is well predicted, design and interpreted using appropriate soil model. It is also important to identify parameters and soil model involve in prediction real soil problem. The sand layer overlaid clay layer soil is modelled with Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager criterion. The bearing capacity in loaddisplacement analysis from COMSOL Multiphysics is obtained and presented. In addition the stress distribution and evolution of plastic strain for each thickness ratio below centre of footing are investigated. The results indicate the linear relation on load-displacement which have similar trend for both soil models while stress and plastic strain increase as thickness ratio increase.

  17. Soils as records of past and present environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    This contribution reflects selected pedological concepts that are helpful for interpreting soil properties related to past and present environments. These concepts are illustrated by examples from various landscapes, and their combination finally leads to some further conclusions. The concept of Targulian and Gerasimova (2009) distinguishes soil system and soil body. Soil system is defined as "open multiphase system functioning in any solid-phase substrate at its interface with the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biota", and soil body as "solid-phase part of a soil system produced by its long-term functioning and composed of a vertical sequence of genetic horizons". Soil system functioning corresponds to the recent environmental factors and includes heat and moisture dynamics, biomass production, biogeochemical cycles, and other processes. In contrast, a soil body is a record of the long-term functioning of a soil system. It thus provides a record not only of the functioning of the soil system under the present environmental conditions but also under past, possibly different, conditions. Hence, Targulian and Goryachkin (2004) called it the "memory" of the landscape. Richter and Yaalon (2012) argued that most soils comprise both, features that developed under the present environmental conditions and features that reflect different conditions that the soils experienced in the past; they concluded that most soils are polygenetic. Although the current functioning of the soil system in the concept of Targulian and Gerasimova (2009) is mainly controlled by the present-day combination of environmental factors, it should be added that past processes also influence the soil system, because past processes changed the soil properties in a way that also the present-day functioning of the soil system is affected by these changes. Earlier, Yaalon (1971) had categorised soil properties according to the time-span required for their adjustment to the actual environment, distinguishing

  18. Indicators: Soil Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical makeup of the soil can provide information on wetland condition, wetland water quality and services being provided by the wetland ecosystem. Analyzing soil chemistry reveals if the soil is contaminated with a toxic chemical or heavy metal.

  19. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  20. Detailed Soils 24K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital soil survey and is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The information was...

  1. Soil ecology and agricultural technology; An integrated approach towards improved soil management for sustainable farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulleman, Mirjam; Pérès, Guénola; Crittenden, Stephen; Heddadj, Djilali; Sukkel, Wijnand

    2014-05-01

    Intensive arable food production systems are in need of smart solutions that combine ecological knowledge and farm technology to maximize yields while protecting natural resources. The huge diversity of soil organisms and their interactions is of crucial importance for soil functions and ecosystem services, such as organic matter incorporation and break down, nutrient mineralization, soil structure formation, water regulation and disease and pest control. Soil management decisions that take into account the soil biodiversity and associated functions are thus essential to (i) maintain soil productivity in the long term, (ii) reduce the dependency on external inputs and non-renewables such as fossil fuels, and (iii) make agroecosystems more resilient against biotic and abiotic stresses. Organic farming systems and reduced tillage systems are two approaches that aim to increase soil biodiversity and general soil quality, through improved management of organic matter but differ in their emphasis on the use of chemical inputs for crop protection or soil disturbance, respectively. In North-western Europe experience with and knowledge of reduced tillage systems is still scarce, both in conventional and organic farming. Our study targeted both conventional and organic farming and aimed at 1) documenting reduced tillage practices within different agroecological contexts in NW Europe; 2) evaluating the effects of reduced tillage systems on soil biodiversity and soil ecosystem services; 3) increase understanding of agroecological factors that determine trade-offs between different ecosystem services. Earthworm species and nematode taxa were selected as indicator organisms to be studied for their known response to soil management and effects on soil functions. Additionally, soil organic matter, physical soil parameters and processes, and crop yields have been measured across multiple sites. Data have been collected over several cropping seasons in long term field experiments

  2. Near infrared index to assess the effect of soil tillage and fertilizer on soil water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ines; Fouad, Youssef; Michot, Didier; Breger, Pascale; Dubois, Remy; Pichelin, Pascal; Cudennec, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of soil hydraulic properties is important for assessing soil water regime in agricultural fields. In the laboratory, measurements of soil hydrodynamic properties are costly and time consuming. Numerous studies recently demonstrated that reflectance spectroscopy can give a rapid estimation of several soil properties including those related with soil water content. The main objective of this research study was to show that near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a useful tool to study the combined effect of soil tillage and fertilizer input on soil hydrodynamic properties. The study was carried out on soil samples collected from an experimental station located in Brittany, France. In 2000, the field was designed in a split-plot combining three tillage practices and four sources of fertilizers (mineral and organic). Undisturbed soil blocks were sampled in 2012 from three different depths of topsoil (0-7 cm, 7-15 cm and 15-20 cm) at each treatment. From each soil block, four aggregates with 3-4 cm diameter by 5-6 cm height were collected. Soil aggregates were first saturated and were then drained through 10 matric potential, from saturation up to permanent wilting point (pF=4.2), by successively using a suction table and a pressure chamber. Once the desired water pressure head was reached, soil samples were scanned to acquire reflectance spectra between 400-2500 nm using a handheld spectroradiometer equipped with a contact probe. Each spectrum was transformed into continuum removal, and an index based on the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the absorption feature around 1920 nm was calculated. This index showed a linear relationship (R2>0.9) with volumetric water content. Moreover our results showed that the slope of the line was well correlated with the range of treatment. Overall, our findings indicate that the absorption feature of continuum removal spectra around 1900 nm can be useful to study the effect, particularly, of tillage on hydrodynamic

  3. Tropical Soil Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.

    and environmental protection. Tropical Soil Chemistry by Ole K. Borggaard provides an overview of the composition, occurrence, properties, processes, formation, and environmental vulnerability of various tropical soil types (using American Soil Taxonomy for classification). The processes and the external factors...... soil chemical issues are also presented to assess when, why, and how tropical soils differ from soils in other regions. This knowledge can help agricultural specialists in the tropics establish sustainable crop production. Readers are assumed to be familiar with basic chemistry, physics...

  4. Combined homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slović Živana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Combined homicide is a combination of two or more different modes of killing. These homicides occur when multiple perpetrators have different mode of killing, to hide the true manner of death, or when an initially unsuccessful attack with one weapon is abandoned and changed by another mode which is more successful, or due to availability of weapons at the scene of homicide, or unexpected appearance of possible eyewitness, or else. Case report: This case report is about 65-year old woman who was found in her residence on the floor next to the bed lying on her back with two kitchen knives in her neck. Autopsy revealed an abrasion on the frontal part of the neck and a bruise of the soft tissues of the neck with a double fracture of both greater horns of the hyoid bone and a fracture of both superior horns of the thyroid cartilage. The cause of death was exsanguination into right half of the thoracic cavity from the left subclavian artery which was cut, on the spot of stab wound in the neck. Conclusion: Hemorrhage in the soft tissue near broken hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage indicate that the victim was first strangulated and then stabbed with kitchen knives. Combined homicides are caused by one or more killers in order to accelerate the killing, or to be sure to provide the fatal outcome. This case is also interesting because the killer left weapon in the victim's neck.

  5. Phytostabilisation-A Sustainable Remediation Technique for Zinc in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmavathiamma, Prabha [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems (Canada); Li, Loretta, E-mail: lli@civil.ubc.c [University of British Columbia, Department of Civil Engineering (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Two studies were conducted to determine a feasible and practical phytoremediation strategy for Zn-contaminated soils. The aim of the first study was to identify promising plant species capable of Zn remediation for the soils and climatic conditions of British Columbia. The purpose of the second study was to assess the effects of soil amendments in modifying the soil properties and providing the right conditions for the plants to immobilise Zn. Promising plants for phytostabilisation in the first study (Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra and Poa pratensis) were tested in the presence of soil amendments (lime, phosphate and compost, both individually and in combination) in the second study. The efficiency of treatments to stabilise Zn was based on Zn fractionation in the soil and on absorption and partitioning of Zn in plants. Maximum Zn immobilisation was achieved in the soil by a combination of lime, phosphate and compost, in conjunction with growth of P. pratensis.

  6. Estimating soil suction from electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.

    2013-09-01

    Soil suction and resistivity strongly depend on the degree of soil saturation and, therefore, both are used for estimating water content variations. The main difference between them is that soil suction is measured using tensiometers, which give point information, while resistivity is obtained by tomography surveys, which provide distributions of resistivity values in large volumes, although with less accuracy. In this paper, we have related soil suction to electrical resistivity with the aim of obtaining information about soil suction changes in large volumes, and not only for small areas around soil suction probes. We derived analytical relationships between soil matric suction and electrical resistivity by combining the empirical laws of van Genuchten and Archie. The obtained relationships were used to evaluate maps of soil suction values in different ashy layers originating in the explosive activity of the Mt Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy). Our findings provided a further example of the high potential of geophysical methods in contributing to more effective monitoring of soil stress conditions; this is of primary importance in areas where rainfall-induced landslides occur periodically.

  7. Estimating soil suction from electrical resistivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Piegari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil suction and resistivity strongly depend on the degree of soil saturation and, therefore, both are used for estimating water content variations. The main difference between them is that soil suction is measured using tensiometers, which give point information, while resistivity is obtained by tomography surveys, which provide distributions of resistivity values in large volumes, although with less accuracy. In this paper, we have related soil suction to electrical resistivity with the aim of obtaining information about soil suction changes in large volumes, and not only for small areas around soil suction probes. We derived analytical relationships between soil matric suction and electrical resistivity by combining the empirical laws of van Genuchten and Archie. The obtained relationships were used to evaluate maps of soil suction values in different ashy layers originating in the explosive activity of the Mt Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy. Our findings provided a further example of the high potential of geophysical methods in contributing to more effective monitoring of soil stress conditions; this is of primary importance in areas where rainfall-induced landslides occur periodically.

  8. Does soil compaction increase floods? A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Abdallah; Rogger, Magdalena; Peth, Stephan; Blöschl, Günter

    2018-02-01

    Europe has experienced a series of major floods in the past years which suggests that flood magnitudes may have increased. Land degradation due to soil compaction from crop farming or grazing intensification is one of the potential drivers of this increase. A literature review suggests that most of the experimental evidence was generated at plot and hillslope scales. At larger scales, most studies are based on models. There are three ways in which soil compaction affects floods at the catchment scale: (i) through an increase in the area affected by soil compaction; (ii) by exacerbating the effects of changes in rainfall, especially for highly degraded soils; and (iii) when soil compaction coincides with soils characterized by a fine texture and a low infiltration capacity. We suggest that future research should focus on better synthesising past research on soil compaction and runoff, tailored field experiments to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the coupled mechanical and hydraulic processes, new mapping methods of soil compaction that combine mechanical and remote sensing approaches, and an effort to bridge all disciplines relevant to soil compaction effects on floods.

  9. More with thermal energy storage. Report 10. Options for a combination of heat and cold storage with soil sanitation. Overview of techniques and new options. Final report; Meer met bodemenergie. Rapport 10. Mogelijkheden voor combinatie van KWO met bodem-sanering. Overzicht van technieken en nieuwe mogelijkheden. Eindrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, E. [Bioclear, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoekstra, N. [Deltares, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    The project More With Thermal Energy Storage (MMB, abbreviated in Dutch) focuses on knowledge gaps and potential opportunities regarding open systems. The main questions to be answered are: (1) What effects (hydrological, thermal, microbiological and chemical) occur in the soil system by application of thermal energy storage; (2) Which technical options are available for a sustainable integration of thermal energy storage in the water and energy chain?; (3) Is it possible to achieve multiple objectives by using smart combinations? The project is organized in different work packages. In work package 2, the effects of individual and collective thermal energy storage storage systems on subsoils and the environment are determined. In work package 3 the opportunities for thermal energy storage and soil remediation are examined, while in work package 4 the focus is on new sustainable combinations of heat and cold storage. Work package 1 is the umbrella part where communication and policy of and participation in MMB are the main subjects. In this report, an overview is given of available methods and systems for soil remediation. Next, potential combinations of thermal energy storage systems and sanitation systems are assessed taking into account the following criteria: energy efficiency, achieving the remediation target, cost efficiency, lifetime [Dutch] Het project Meer Met Bodemenergie (MMB) richt zich op het invullen van kennisleemtes en mogelijke kansen ten aanzien van open systemen. De belangrijkste vragen waarop het onderzoeksprogramma MMB antwoord geeft zijn: (1) Welke effecten (hydrologisch, thermisch, microbiologisch en chemisch) treden op in het bodemsysteem bij toepassing van bodemenergie?; (2) Welke technische mogelijkheden zijn er voor het duurzaam inpassen van bodem-energie in de water- en energieketen?; (3) Is het mogelijk om meerdere doelstellingen tegelijk te verwezenlijken door slimme combinaties te maken? Het project is ingericht met verschillende

  10. Efeito da solarização e da adubação sobre artrópodes em solo cultivado com alface Solarization, organic and chemical fertilization combined effects on arthropods community in soil cultivated with lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene G da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da solarização e da adubação química e orgânica na comunidade de artrópodes de solo na cultura da alface, cv. Verônica. Foram conduzidos dois experimentos, em blocos ao acaso, um com solarização e o outro sem solarização, em casa de vegetação, ambos com cinco tratamentos: adubação orgânica; nitrogênio na forma amoniacal (NH4; adubação com NPK; adubação orgânica + NPK; testemunha (sem adubação. No experimento solarizado, o solo foi coberto durante 132 dias com plástico transparente. Os artrópodes foram coletados por meio de armadilhas tipo alçapão em três épocas (antes da implantação do experimento, após a solarização e após a colheita. Foram utilizados índices faunísticos e de diversidade em cada experimento, tratamento e épocas. Os principais grupos coletados foram: Collembola (82,8%, Acari (7,1%, Hymenoptera (6,1% Coleoptera (1,3% e outros (2,7%. A classe Collembola foi a mais abundante, mesmo na colheita, quando a subordem Acari aumentou substancialmente. As espécies de Collembola predominantes foram: Proisotoma tenella (Reuter (34,3%; Seira atrolutea (Arlé (29%; Folsomides centralis (Denis (7,2%; Isotomurus sp. 161 (2,4% e Sminthurides sp. 98 (1,6%. Observou-se que a diversidade e abundância da comunidade de artrópodes não foi influenciada pela solarização ou adubação.To evaluate the effect of solarization, chemical and organic fertilization on soil arthropods community in lettuce, two blocks plots trials were carried out in Brasília, Brazil. One research was conducted with solarization and the other without solarization in a soil cultivated with lettuce, cv Veronica, under protected cultivation. Each trial consisted of five fertilization treatments: T1= organic fertilization; T2= amoniacal nitrogen (ammonium sulphate; T3= chemical fertilization; T4= organic and chemical fertilization; T5= control (without fertilization. In the solarized trial, the soil was covered for 132

  11. Transfer model of lead in soil-carrot (Daucus carota L.) system and food safety thresholds in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changfeng; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2015-09-01

    Reliable empirical models describing lead (Pb) transfer in soil-plant systems are needed to improve soil environmental quality standards. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to develop soil-plant transfer models to predict Pb concentrations in carrot (Daucus carota L.). Soil thresholds for food safety were then derived inversely using the prediction model in view of the maximum allowable limit for Pb in food. The 2 most important soil properties that influenced carrot Pb uptake factor (ratio of Pb concentration in carrot to that in soil) were soil pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC), as revealed by path analysis. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were based on soil properties and the pseudo total (aqua regia) or extractable (0.01 M CaCl2 and 0.005 M diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) soil Pb concentrations. Carrot Pb contents were best explained by the pseudo total soil Pb concentrations in combination with soil pH and CEC, with the percentage of variation explained being up to 93%. The derived soil thresholds based on added Pb (total soil Pb with the geogenic background part subtracted) have the advantage of better applicability to soils with high natural background Pb levels. Validation of the thresholds against data from field trials and literature studies indicated that the proposed thresholds are reasonable and reliable. © 2015 SETAC.

  12. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  13. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on

  14. Spatial prediction of topsoil texture in Region Centre (France) combining regression and area-to-point kriging

    OpenAIRE

    Roman Dobarco, Mercedes; Orton, Thomas G; Saby, Nicolas; Mulder, Vera Laetitia; Drufin, Sébastien; Lemercier, Blandine; Arrouays, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Land use and agricultural practices, in interaction with soil texture, influence soil fauna and soil microbial community, water holding capacity, and C and nutrient cycling among other agroecosystem properties. Detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil texture can improve land-use planning and crop management. Our objective was to predict soil texture in agricultural land for the Region Centre (France), combining regression models and area-to-point kriging. The French soil-test d...

  15. [Effects of chlorimuron-ethyl and urea on soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and soil inorganic nitrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huan-Bo; Li, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Hui-Wen; Li, Xu; Xu, Ming-Kai

    2012-08-01

    A microcosm experiment was conducted to study the effects of different concentration chlorimuron-ethyl (20, 200, and 2000 microg x kg(-1) soil) and its combination with urea (120 mg x kg(-1) soil) on the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and soil nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen. Applying chlorimuron-ethyl alone decreased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen throughout the experiment period (60 days), and the decrement increased with increasing chlorimuron-ethyl concentration. Chlorimuron-ethyl had little effects on the soil ammonium nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen in the early period of the experiment, but increased the soil ammonium nitrogen in the mid-period (15 d) and the soil nitrate nitrogen in the late period (after 30 days) significantly. Both urea addition and its combination with chlorimuron-ethyl increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen obviously in a short time, but the effect of combined addition of urea and chlorimuron-ethyl weakened then. Applying urea and its combination with chlorimuron-ethyl resulted in a lasting increase of soil nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen.

  16. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P amendments in an urban soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obrycki, John F.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Basta, Nicholas T. (OSU); (EPA)

    2017-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg-1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm-1, potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. More research is needed to characterize soil solutions in Pb contaminated urban soils to identify where P treatments might be effective and when competing cations, such as Ca, Fe, and Zn may limit low rate P applications for treating Pb soils.

  17. Soil and soil cover changes in spruce forests after final logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Lapteva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil cover transformation and changes of morphological and chemical properties of Albeluvisols in clear-cuttings of middle taiga spruce forests were studied. The observed changes in structure and properties of podzolic texturally-differentiated soils at cuttings of spruce forests in the middle taiga subzone do not cause their transition to any other soil type. Soil cover of secondary deciduous-coniferous forests which replace cut forests are characterized with a varied soil contour and a combination of the main type of podzolic soils under undisturbed spruce forests. The increased surface hydromorphism in cut areas causes formation of complicated sub-types of podzolic texturally differentiated soils (podzolic surface-gley soils with microprofile of podzol and enlarges their ratio (up to 35–38 % in soil cover structure. Temporary soil over-wetting at the initial (5–10 years stage of after-cutting self-restoring vegetation succession provides for soil gleyzation, improves yield and segregation of iron compounds, increases the migratory activity of humic substances. Low content and resources of total nitrogen in forest litters mark anthropogenic transformation processes of podzolic soils at this stage. Later (in 30–40 years after logging, soils in cut areas still retain signs of hydromorphism. Forest litters are denser, less acidic and thick with a low weight ratio of organic carbon as compared with Albeluvisols of undisturbed spruce forest. The upper mineral soil horizons under secondary deciduous-coniferous forests contain larger amounts of total iron, its mobile (oxalate-dissolvable components, and Fe-Mn-concretions.

  18. Measuring soil sustainability via soil resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marie; Wilmes, Paul; Schrader, Stefan

    2017-10-17

    Soils are the nexus of water, energy and food, which illustrates the need for a holistic approach in sustainable soil management. The present study therefore aimed at identifying a bioindicator for the evaluation of soil management sustainability in a cross-disciplinary approach between soil science and multi-omics research. For this purpose we first discuss the remaining problems and challenges of evaluating sustainability and consequently suggest one measurable bioindicator for soil management sustainability. In this concept, we define soil sustainability as the maintenance of soil functional integrity. The potential to recover functional and structural integrity after a disturbance is generally defined as resilience. This potential is a product of the past and the present soil management, and at the same time prospect of possible soil responses to future disturbances. Additionally, it is correlated with the multiple soil functions and hence reflecting the multifunctionality of the soil system. Consequently, resilience can serve as a bioindicator for soil sustainability. The measurable part of soil resilience is the response diversity, calculated from the systematic contrasting of multi-omic markers for genetic potential and functional activity, and referred to as potential Maximum Ecological Performance (MEPpot) in this study. Calculating MEPpot will allow to determine the thresholds of resistance and resilience and potential tipping points for a regime shift towards irreversible or permanent unfavorable soil states for each individual soil considered. The calculation of such ecosystem thresholds is to our opinion the current global cross-disciplinary challenge. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Linking soil systems to societal value systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Katharina; Daedlow, Katrin; Techen, Anja; Kaiser, David Brian

    2017-04-01

    Sustainable management of soils is needed to avoid soil degradation and to maintain soil functions. This requires the assessment of how human activities drive soil management, how soil management affect soil functions and soil degradation, which trade-offs occur and how they compromise sustainable development targets. In the frame of the German research programme "Soils as a sustainable resource for the bio-economy - BonaRes", we developed an enhanced approach of the DPSIR (driver-pressure-state-impact-response) cycle which helps to assess these interrelations. Because not all soil functions can be maximized simultaneously in space and time and trade-offs are inevitable, it depends on the societal value system to decide which management practices and respective soil functional performances are valued sustainably. We analysed the applicability of three valuation concepts being prominent in research about social-ecological systems, namely resource efficiency, ecosystem services, and ethics and equity. The concept of resource efficiency is based in the life-cycle thinking and is often applied at the level of the farming systems and in the context of bio-economy strategies. It covers the use of natural (water, energy, nutrients, land) and economic resources. At the landscape level, the concept of ecosystem services is prominent. Here, the contribution of soils to the provisioning, regulating and cultural services of the natural ecosystems is considered. Ethical considerations include the intrinsic values of nature as well as issues of local and global equity between different societal groups, generations, and localities. The three concepts cover different problem dimensions and complexity levels of soil management and decision making. Alone, none of them are capable to discover complex questions of sustainable soil management and development. Rather, the exact spatial and temporal framing of the sustainability problem at stake determines which combination of the value

  20. Soil Tillage Conservation and its Effect on Soil Properties Bioremediation and Sustained Production of Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Ioana Moraru, Paula; Muresan, Liliana; Andriuca, Valentina; Cojocaru, Olesea

    2017-04-01

    soil features resulted in a positive impact on the water permeability of the soil. Availability of soil moisture during the crop growth resulted in better plant water status. Subsequent release of conserved soil water regulated proper plant water status, soil structure, and lowered soil penetrometer resistance. Productions obtained at STC did not have significant differences for the wheat and maize crop but were higher for soybean. The advantages of minimum soil tillage systems for Romanian pedo-climatic conditions can be used to improve methods in low producing soils with reduced structural stability on sloped fields, as well as measures of water and soil conservation on the whole agroecosystem. Presently, it is necessary to make a change concerning the concept of conservation practices and to consider a new approach regarding the good agricultural practice. We need to focus on an upper level concerning conservation by focusing on soil quality. Carbon management is necessary for a complexity of matters including soil, water management, field productivity, biological fuel and climatic change. In conclusion a Sustainable Agriculture includes a range of complementary agricultural practices: (i) minimum soil tillage (through a system of reduced tillage or no-tillage) to preserve the structure, fauna and soil organic matter; (ii) permanent soil cover (cover crops, residues and mulches) to protect the soil and help to remove and control weeds; (iii) various combinations and rotations of the crops which stimulate the micro-organisms in the soil and controls pests, weeds and plant diseases. Acknowledgements: This paper was performed under the frame of the Partnership in priority domains - PNII, developed with the support of MEN-UEFISCDI, project no. PN-II-PT-PCCA-2013-4-0015: Expert System for Risk Monitoring in Agriculture and Adaptation of Conservative Agricultural Technologies to Climate Change, and International Cooperation Program - Sub-3.1. Bilateral AGROCEO c. no. 21BM

  1. Six phase soil heating. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Six Phase Soil Heating (SPSH) was developed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. SPSH is designed to enhance the removal of contaminates from the subsurface during soil vapor extraction. The innovation combines an emerging technology, six-phase electric heating, with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation systems for difficult soil and/or contaminate applications. This document describes the technology and reports on field demonstrations conducted at Savannah River and the Hanford Reservation.

  2. Diffusion probe for gas sampling in undisturbed soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O

    2014-01-01

    Soil-atmosphere fluxes of trace gases such as methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are determined by complex interactions between biological activity and soil conditions. Soil gas concentration profiles may, in combination with other information about soil conditions, help to understand emission...... controls. This note describes a simple and robust diffusion probe for soil gas sampling as part of flux monitoring programs. It can be deployed with minimum disturbance of in-situ conditions, also at sites with a high or fluctuating water table. Separate probes are used for each sampling depth...

  3. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - biomass production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Fank, J.

    2012-04-01

    The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the mentioned procedure with a focus on process modelling. It deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences. A soil function modelling with an adapted model parameterisation based on data of ground penetration radar (GPR) and conductivity (EM38) was realized. This study shows an approach to handle heterogeneity of soil properties with geophysical data used for biomass production modelling. The Austrian field site Wagna is characterised by highly heterogenic soil with fluvioglacial gravel sediments. The variation of thickness of topsoil above a sandy subsoil with gravels strongly influences the soil water balance. EM38, mounted on a mobile platform, enables to rapidly scan large areas whereas GPR requires a greater logistical effort. However, GPR can detect exact soil horizon depth between topsoil and subsoil, the combination of both results in a detailed large scale soil map. The combined plot-specific GPR and field site EM38 measurements extends the soil input data and improves the model performance of CANDY PLUS for plant biomass production (Krüger et al. 2011). The example demonstrates how geophysics provides a surplus of data for agroecosystem modelling which identifies and contributes alternative options for agricultural management decisions. iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission

  4. Fundamentals of soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study guide provides comments and references for professional soil scientists who are studying for the soil science fundamentals exam needed as the first step for certification. The performance objectives were determined by the Soil Science Society of America's Council of Soil Science Examiners...

  5. Hot fire, cool soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, C.R.; Moore, D.; Fernandes, P.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Fernandes, R.; Ferreira, A.J.D.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfires greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events by removing vegetation and changing soils. Fire damage to soil increases with increasing soil temperature, and, for fires where smoldering combustion is absent, the current understanding is that soil temperatures

  6. Restoring Soil Quality to Mitigate Soil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan Lal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Feeding the world population, 7.3 billion in 2015 and projected to increase to 9.5 billion by 2050, necessitates an increase in agricultural production of ~70% between 2005 and 2050.