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Sample records for soil ilmenite combining

  1. Experimental Investigation of Space Radiation Processing in Lunar Soil Ilmenite: Combining Perspectives from Surface Science and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions mostly from the solar wind play a major role in lunar space weathering because they contribute structural and chemical changes to the space-exposed surfaces of lunar regolith grains. In mature mare soils, ilmenite (FeTiO3) grains in the finest size fraction have been shown in transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies to exhibit key differences in their response to space radiation processing relative to silicates [1,2,3]. In ilmenite, solar ion radiation alters host grain outer margins to produce 10-100 nm thick layers that are microstructurally complex, but dominantly crystalline compared to the amorphous radiation-processed rims on silicates [1,2,3]. Spatially well-resolved analytical TEM measurements also show nm-scale compositional and chemical state changes in these layers [1,3]. These include shifts in Fe/Ti ratio from strong surface Fe-enrichment (Fe/Ti >> 1), to Fe depletion (Fe/Ti < 1) at 40-50 nm below the grain surface [1,3]. These compositional changes are not observed in the radiation-processed rims on silicates [4]. Several mechanism(s) to explain the overall relations in the ilmenite grain rims by radiation processing and/or additional space weathering processes were proposed by [1], and remain under current consideration [3]. A key issue has concerned the ability of ion radiation processing alone to produce some of the deeper- penetrating compositional changes. In order to provide some experimental constraints on these questions, we have performed a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field-emission scanning transmission electron (FE-STEM) study of experimentally ion-irradiated ilmenite. A key feature of this work is the combination of analytical techniques sensitive to changes in the irradiated samples at depth scales going from the immediate surface (approx.5 nm; XPS), to deeper in the grain interior (5-100 nm; FE-STEM).

  2. Space Plasma Ion Processing of Ilmenite in the Lunar Soil: Insights from In-Situ TEM Ion Irradiation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.

    2007-01-01

    Space weathering on the moon and asteroids results largely from the alteration of the outer surfaces of regolith grains by the combined effects of solar ion irradiation and other processes that include deposition of impact or sputter-derived vapors. Although no longer considered the sole driver of space weathering, solar ion irradiation remains a key part of the space weathering puzzle, and quantitative data on its effects on regolith minerals are still in short supply. For the lunar regolith, previous transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies performed by ourselves and others have uncovered altered rims on ilmenite (FeTiO3) grains that point to this phase as a unique "witness plate" for unraveling nanoscale space weathering processes. Most notably, the radiation processed portions of these ilmenite rims consistently have a crystalline structure, in contrast to radiation damaged rims on regolith silicates that are characteristically amorphous. While this has tended to support informal designation of ilmenite as a "radiation resistant" regolith mineral, there are to date no experimental data that directly and quantitatively compare ilmenite s response to ion radiation relative to lunar silicates. Such data are needed because the radiation processed rims on ilmenite grains, although crystalline, are microstructurally and chemically complex, and exhibit changes linked to the formation of nanophase Fe metal, a key space weathering process. We report here the first ion radiation processing study of ilmenite performed by in-situ means using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope- Tandem Irradiation facility (IVEM-Tandem) at Argonne National Laboratory. The capability of this facility for performing real time TEM observations of samples concurrent with ion irradiation makes it uniquely suited for studying the dose-dependence of amorphization and other changes in irradiated samples.

  3. Ilmenite Mineral's Recovery from Beach Sand Tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulaba-Bafubiandi, Antoine F.; Mukendi-Ngalula, David; Waanders, Frans B.

    2002-01-01

    The mineral ilmenite is the major source of rutile for industrial use and is of interest to paint and fertiliser industries. Enormous unutilised tailing dams lie on the eastern coast of the South Africa. Although covered by a simulation of the original indigenous vegetation, these tailings are still ilmenite bearing and of economic value. Tailings emanating from beach sand mineral slimes dams of the Kwazulu-Natal area (South Africa) have been processed. Screening, flotation, spiral concentration and magnetic separation methods were used either separately or successively. The present work sheds light on alternative routes for the extraction of the ilmenite, from these tailings. It moreover points out the usefulness of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in the mineral processing product monitoring. Tailings from the beach sands were used in the present study after the economic industrial minerals zirconia, ilmenite and rutile had been extracted in previous mining operations. About 61% natural ilmenite recovery was observed in the flotation concentrate of a Humphrey Spiral concentrate while a 62% recovery of hematite was found in the flotation tailings. The combination of screening, spiral concentration and magnetic separation, and flotation yielded a product with the highest ilmenite and hematite concentration being 71% and 19%, respectively. A natural ilmenite mineral, containing 87% ilmenite and 13% hematite, could be produced and extracted from the tailings of the flotation process, collected subsequently to the spiral concentration and the initial screening.

  4. Surface modification and column flotation of a massive ilmenite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, X.; Rowson, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    The main problems with ilmenite flotation in impeller-type flotation machines are the poor flotation behaviour of ilmenite and the negative effect of slimes. These cause high ilmenite losses in tailings even when a large dosage of fatty acid and fuel oil is consumed. In this study, microwave radiation pre-treatment and ilmenite surface activation were used to modify the surface properties of a massive ilmenite ore sample from Norway to improve ilmenite flotability. A column cell was used to minimize the negative effect of slimes on ilmenite separation efficiency. When ilmenite flotation was performed in a 1 litre Denver cell, the flotation recovery of titanium dioxide from the ilmenite ore sample was only 68.5% (31.1% TiO 2 ) under conventional flotation conditions. After microwave radiation pre-treatment for three minutes at 2600 W and 2.45 GHz, the ferrous ions on ilmenite particle surfaces were converted into ferric ions; hence, the recovery increased from 68.5% to 86.8%. The concentrate grade increased from 31.1% TiO 2 to 32.1% TiO 2 . In ilmenite activation flotation, Pb 2+ ions can be selectively adsorbed on to ilmenite particle surfaces as active sites and therefore enhance the adsorption of oleate ions on ilmenite surfaces. With the addition of 60 g/ton Pb(NO 3 ) 2 , ilmenite flotation recovery increased from 68.5% to 85.1%. However, the quality of ilmenite concentrates was not improved due to the negative effect of slimes. After a two stage cleaning, the grade of ilmenite concentrates was only about 31% TiO 2 . The combination of microwave radiation pre-treatment and the application of a column cell overcame both problems of poor flotability and the negative effect of slimes. When the Denver cell was replaced by a column cell and the massive ilmenite ore sample was pre-treated using microwave radiation for three minutes, the ilmenite concentrate grade increased from 31.1% TiO 2 to 42.9% TiO 2 and the titanium dioxide recovery increased from 68.5% to 90

  5. Beneficiation of lunar ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Joaquin

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important commodities lacking in the moon is free oxygen which is required for life and used extensively for propellent. Free oxygen, however, can be obtained by liberating it from the oxides and silicates that form the lunar rocks and regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is considered one of the leading candidates for production of oxygen because it can be reduced with a reasonable amount of energy and it is an abundant mineral in the lunar regolith and many mare basalts. In order to obtain oxygen from ilmenite, a method must be developed to beneficiate ilmenite from lunar material. Two possible techniques are electrostatic or magnetic methods. Both methods have complications because lunar ilmenite completely lacks Fe(3+). Magnetic methods were tested on eucrite meteorites, which are a good chemical simulant for low Ti mare basalts. The ilmenite yields in the experiments were always very low and the eucrite had to be crushed to xxxx. These data suggest that magnetic separation of ilmenite from fine grain lunar basalts would not be cost effective. Presently, experiments are being performed with electrostatic separators, and lunar regolith is being waited for so that simulants do not have to be employed.

  6. Soil treatment technologies combined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, K.J.; Russell, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) presents a legislative mandate to select effective and long-term remediation options. SARA has spurred the development of innovative technologies and other remedial alternatives that can be applied to the diverse contaminated media at hazardous waste sites. Even though many treatment technologies have been investigated for use at hazardous waste sites, only a few have been used successfully. Soil vapor extraction and soil composting have achieved cleanup goals at sites with soils contaminated with solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum derivatives. With the increased use of innovative on-site technologies, the integration of multiple technologies to remediate sites with complex contaminants becomes a viable and cost-effective remedial alternative. Soil vapor extraction and composting have been applied successfully as individual technologies at hazardous waste sites. An integration of these two technologies also has been used to remediate a complex contaminated site

  7. Thermodynamics of lunar ilmenite reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenberg, B. H.; Franklin, H. A.; Jones, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    With the prospect of returning to the moon, the development of a lunar occupation would fulfill one of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of the late 1980's. Processing lunar resources into useful products, such as liquid oxygen for fuel and life support, would be one of many aspects of an active lunar base. ilmenite (FeTiO3) is found on the lunar surface and can be used as a feed stock to produce oxygen. Understanding the various ilmenite-reduction reactions elucidates many processing options. Defining the thermodynamic chemical behavior at equilibrium under various conditions of temperature and pressures can be helpful in specifying optimal operating conditions. Differences between a previous theoretical analysis and experimentally determined results has sparked interest in trying to understand the effect of operating pressure on the hydrogen-reduction-of-ilmenite reaction. Various aspects of this reduction reaction are discussed.

  8. Combination of soil classification and some selected soil properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The advantage in the combined use of soil classification and top soil analysis for explaining crop yield variation was examined. Soil properties and yields of maize (Zea mays L) on different soil types were measured on farmers' fields for 2 years. Yield prediction improved from 2 per cent at the Order and Association levels to ...

  9. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, J.J.; van Vuuren, D.S.; Heydenrych, M.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200°C) chlorination reaction will not react with chlorine. It is therefore necessary to remove as much iron as possible from the nitrided ilmenite. Hydrochloric acid leaching is a possible process route to remove metallic iron from nitrided ilmenite without excessive dissolution o...

  10. Recovery TiO2 by leaching process of carbothermic reduced Kalimantan ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Sari, P. P.; Ramelan, A. H.

    2018-05-01

    Ilmenite naturally occurred in iron titanate (FeTiO3) minerals. The separation of natural ilmenite into TiO2 and Fe2O3 need to be explored to gain the high purity separation product. A new combination method named of carbothermic reduction, acidic-leaching and complexation by EDTA were proposed for separation TiO2 from Ilmenite. Roasting of ilmenite was carried out at 950 °C for 1 h by the addition of activated carbon with mass ratio of ilmenite : activated carbon =4:3. The carbothermic reduction was carried out to yield a high separation of initial content of ilmenite that will be easily to dissolve within hydrochloric acid solution in leaching process. The composition of ilmenite observed by X-Ray Fluoresences (XRF) changed after the carbothermic reduction process and the dominant content is TiO2 (57.56%). X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) of roasted ilmenite composed of decomposed product of ilmenite i.e. hematite (Fe2O3), TiO2 anatase, TiO2 rutile, and inorganic salt. The leaching of the roasted ilmenite has been done by sulphuric acid solution (6 M) to gain the titanyl sulphate solution. Separation of iron impurities of TiO2 gel from titanyl sulphate (TiOSO4) solution was conducted by complexation method using EDTA as a complexation agent. The characteristic of TiO2 obtained using XRD showed that TiO2 is anatase type and the percentage of TiO2 using XRF showed that TiO2 content of 86,03%.

  11. Thermogravimetry studies on ilmenite nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on the possibility of beneficiation of Indian-ilmenite by carbonitrothermic process. The investigations were carried out in two parts. In the first part, thermogravimetric-differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG experiments were conducted using cold pressed pellets of blended mixtures TiO2-C and FeTiO3-C. The TG experiments were carried out up to 1500 °C at the rate of 10 °C/min under flowing nitrogen gas. The formations of TiN in case of TiO2-C mixture and TiN along with Fe in case of FeTiO3-C mixture were observed. In the second part, the experiments were conducted using similar pellets, prepared under identical conditions, in a resistance heating furnace at 1500 °C. By simple operations of crushing and sieving, the products obtained from the ilmenite-carbon mixture were separated into a fraction enriched in titanium and a fraction depleted in titanium.

  12. Biopiles and biofilters combined for soil cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, J.; Sansregret, J.L.; Cyr, B.

    1994-01-01

    Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils can be completed using a combination of biopile and biofiltration technologies. Target contaminants, such as gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel and other petroleum-derived products are removed from the soil by biodegradation and volatilization in the biopile. Air emissions from the biopile containing volatile hydrocarbons are treated subsequently in a biofilter, where the pollutants are degraded and mineralized by heterotrophic aerobic microorganisms. In the biopile process, contaminated soil is excavated and stockpiled in a treatment area. Remediation of the soil relies on microbial degradation and volatilization of hydrocarbons under controlled treatment conditions

  13. Remediation of soils combining soil vapor extraction and bioremediation: benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, António Alves; Albergaria, José Tomás; Domingues, Valentina Fernandes; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria da Conceição M; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2010-08-01

    This work reports the study of the combination of soil vapor extraction (SVE) with bioremediation (BR) to remediate soils contaminated with benzene. Soils contaminated with benzene with different water and natural organic matter contents were studied. The main goals were: (i) evaluate the performance of SVE regarding the remediation time and the process efficiency; (ii) study the combination of both technologies in order to identify the best option capable to achieve the legal clean up goals; and (iii) evaluate the influence of soil water content (SWC) and natural organic matter (NOM) on SVE and BR. The remediation experiments performed in soils contaminated with benzene allowed concluding that: (i) SVE presented (a) efficiencies above 92% for sandy soils and above 78% for humic soils; (b) and remediation times from 2 to 45 h, depending on the soil; (ii) BR showed to be an efficient technology to complement SVE; (iii) (a) SWC showed minimum impact on SVE when high airflow rates were used and led to higher remediation times for lower flow rates; (b) NOM as source of microorganisms and nutrients enhanced BR but hindered the SVE due the limitation on the mass transfer of benzene from the soil to the gas phase. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  15. Zircon-rutile-ilmenite froth flotation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Denham, D.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for separating a mixture of minerals comprising at least zircon, ilmenite and rutile. It comprises adding an acid solution to the mixture to acidify to a pH of between about 2.0 and 6.0; adding starch to the mixture to depress the ilmenite and the rutile; adding a source of fluoride ions to the mixture to provide a negative surface charge on the zircon surface to activate the zircon; adding an amine cationic collector to the mixture to float the activated zircon; subjecting the mixture containing the added acid solution, the fluoride ions, the starch and the cationic collector, to froth flotation; and withdrawing a float product comprising the zircon and a sink product comprising the ilmenite and rutile

  16. Determination of lunar ilmenite abundances from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Stephen M.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Singer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    The mineral ilmenite (FeTiO3) was found in abundance in lunar mare soils returned during the Apollo project. Lunar ilmenite often contains greater than 50 weight-percent titanium dioxide (TiO2), and is a primary potential resource for oxygen and other raw materials to supply future lunar bases. Chemical and spectroscopic analysis of the returned lunar soils produced an empirical function that relates the spectral reflectance ratio at 400 and 560 nm to the weight percent abundance of TiO2. This allowed mapping of the lunar TiO2 distribution using telescopic vidicon multispectral imaging from the ground; however, the time variant photometric response of the vidicon detectors produced abundance uncertainties of at least 2 to 5 percent. Since that time, solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector technology capable of much improved photometric response has become available. An investigation of the lunar TiO2 distribution was carried out utilizing groundbased telescopic CCD multispectral imagery and spectroscopy. The work was approached in phases to develop optimum technique based upon initial results. The goal is to achieve the best possible TiO2 abundance maps from the ground as a precursor to lunar orbiter and robotic sample return missions, and to produce a better idea of the peak abundances of TiO2 for benefaction studies. These phases and the results are summarized.

  17. Mechanisms of ilmenite reduction and their impact on the design of effective reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, R. A.; Sacco, A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the first activities at a lunar base could be oxygen recovery from ilmenite (FeTiO3). Oxygen produced from lunar soils could be used to fuel transportation vehicles operating in near-earth space. The first step in developing a suitable reactor system for lunar operation is to determine the mechanisms and rates of oxygen removal from ilmenite. In-situ gravimetric measurements and microscopic examinations were used to determine the hydrogen reduction mechanisms of synthetic ilmenite discs between 823 to 1353 K. A shrinking core reaction model, modified to account for the growth of an iron film on the surface of discs, was capable of predicting experimentally observed conversion-time relationships. The observed reduction mechanism, kinetic rates, and associated activation energy established a base line from which comparisons could be made to improve oxygen yield and removal rates. One proposed technique to improve the rate and extent of oxygen removal was to preoxidize ilmenite. Preoxidation is commonly used during the reduction of ilmenite ores in the iron industry and has been employed for many years to lower operating temperatures and increase reduction rates. This technology could prove beneficial for oxygen production facilities on the Moon as less massive reactor vessels and/or less energy could be associated with a process including preoxidation. X ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy were utilized to follow the progression of ilmenite oxidation at 1123 and 1140 K and the reduction of pseudobrookite (Fe2TiO5) at 873 and 973 K. Structures formed during the progress of oxidation were related to the system's phase diagrams. Results indicated that after initially producing ilmenite-hematite solutions and rutile (TiO2), pseudobrookite was the end product of oxidation at all temperatures examined (1049 to 1273 K). Initial results from the reduction of pseudobrookite indicate a series of phases are produced including ferropseudobrookite (FeTi2O5

  18. Ilmenite placer deposits in the bays of Jaigad, Ambwah and Varvada, Maharashtra, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajamanickam, G.V.; Varma, O.P.; Gujar, A.R.

    Growing demand for ilmenite owing to very limited resources of rutile and technological advancements in the industrial utilisation of ilmenite in place of rutile have excited interest in large-scale exploration for ilmenite resources. Out of a 130...

  19. Ferrian Ilmenites: Investigating the Magnetic Phase Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagroix, F.

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the magnetic phase changes within the hematite-ilmenite solid solution, yFeTiO3·(1-y)·Fe2O3. Two sets of synthetic ferrian ilmenites of y-values equal to 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, and 1.0 were available for this study. As currently drawn, the magnetic phase diagram, proposed by Ishikawa et al. [1985, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. v.54, 312-325], predicts for increasing y values (0.5Ilmenite, y=1.0, is antiferromagnetic. Various low tempreature experiments including temperature dependance of remanence and induced magnetizations and AC susceptibility were conducted in order to characterize the magnetic behaviour and changes of magnetic states. In general, the data confirms the predicted phase changes for the different compositions investigated. The y=1.0 sample, pure ilmenite, is antiferromagnetic below 57K, the measured Néel temperature. The y=0.9 sample magnetically orders at about 100K in a superparamagnetic state. Hysteresis loops remain effectively closed down to 60K below which an antiferromagnetic order prior to reaching the spin glass state is ambiguous. The y=0.8 sample magnetically orders at about 270K in an initially superparamagnetic states before entering a ferrimagnetic state below about 250K. Lastly, as previously demonstrated in Lagroix et al. [2004, JGR-B, v.109, doi:10.1029/2004JB003076], the y=0.7 samples order ferrimagnetically at 380K. However, like the y=0.7 samples which also demonstrated an antiferromagnetic state at temperature above the Curie temperature, hysteresis loops for y=0.9 and y=0.8 only achieve perfect linearity at 190K and 340K respectively. All samples (except y=1.0) show a frequency dependent amplitude non

  20. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  1. Modelling trends in soil solution concentrations under five forest-soil combinations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.; Vries, de W.; Kros, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of forest and soil properties on changes in soil solution concentration upon a reduction deposition was examined for five forest-soil combinations with the dynamic RESAM model. Predicted concentrations decreased in the direction Douglas fir - Scotch pine - oak, due to decreased

  2. Magnetic clusters in ilmenite-hematite solid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Burton, B. P.; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of high-field 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy to resolve the magnetic ordering of ilmenite-hematite [xFeTiO3−(1−x)Fe2O3] solid solutions with x>0.5. We find that nanometer-sized hematite clusters exist within an ilmenite-like matrix. Although both phases are antiferromagnetically...

  3. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Helena I.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero...... nanoparticles. Remediation experiments are made with two different historically PCB contaminated soils, which differ in both soil composition and contamination source. Soil 1 is a mix of soils with spills of transformer oils, while Soil 2 is a superficial soil from a decommissioned school where PCB were used...... as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two...

  4. ON THE REACTIONS IN ILMENITE, ALUMINUM AND GRAPHITE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Khoshhal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3/TiC composites are used as cutting tools for machining gray cast iron and steels. The addition of iron improves the toughness of Al2O3/TiC composites. Ilmenite, aluminum and graphite can be used to produce in-situ Al2O3/TiC–Fe composites. However, the formation mechanism and reaction sequences of this system are not clear enough. Therefore, the present research is designed to determine the reactions mechanism of the first step of reactions that may be occurred between raw materials. In this research, pure ilmenite was synthesized to eliminate the effects of impurities available in the natural ilmenite in the system. The milled and pressed samples, prepared from the synthesized ilmenite, aluminum and graphite mixture with a molar ratio of 1:2:1, were heat treated at 720°C for 48h. In addition, two samples one containing ilmenite and aluminum with a molar ratio of 1:2 and ilmenite and graphite with a molar ratio of 1:1 were heat treated at 720°C for 48h. The final products were analyzed with XRD. It was found that at 720°C, aluminum reacts with FeTiO3, forming Fe, TiO2 and Al2O3. Since the aluminum content used in the mixture was more than the stoichiometry for reaction of ilmenite and aluminum, some unreacted aluminum remains. Therefore, the residual aluminum reacts with the reduced Fe to form Fe2Al5.

  5. Assessment of combined electro–nanoremediation of molinate contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Helena I., E-mail: hrg@campus.fct.unl.pt [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); CERNAS — Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society, Escola Superior Agraria de Coimbra, Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, Bencanta, 3045-601 Coimbra (Portugal); Fan, Guangping [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ISSCAS), East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Mateus, Eduardo P. [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Dias-Ferreira, Celia [CERNAS — Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society, Escola Superior Agraria de Coimbra, Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, Bencanta, 3045-601 Coimbra (Portugal); Ribeiro, Alexandra B. [CENSE, Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    Molinate is a pesticide widely used, both in space and time, for weed control in rice paddies. Due to its water solubility and affinity to organic matter, it is a contaminant of concern in ground and surface waters, soils and sediments. Previous works have showed that molinate can be removed from soils through electrokinetic (EK) remediation. In this work, molinate degradation by zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) was tested in soils for the first time. Soil is a highly complex matrix, and pollutant partitioning between soil and water and its degradation rates in different matrices is quite challenging. A system combining nZVI and EK was also set up in order to study the nanoparticles and molinate transport, as well as molinate degradation. Results showed that molinate could be degraded by nZVI in soils, even though the process is more time demanding and degradation percentages are lower than in an aqueous solution. This shows the importance of testing contaminant degradation, not only in aqueous solutions, but also in the soil-sorbed fraction. It was also found that soil type was the most significant factor influencing iron and molinate transport. The main advantage of the simultaneous use of both methods is the molinate degradation instead of its accumulation in the catholyte. - Highlights: • Molinate is degraded in soil by zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI). • Higher contact time of nZVI with soil facilitates molinate degradation. • Soil type was the most significant factor influencing iron and molinate transport. • When using nZVI and EK molinate is not only transported to catholyte, but also degraded.

  6. Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits - An ideal lunar resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, B. R.; Clark, B.; Coombs, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    With a view of investigating possible economic benefits that a permanent lunar settlement might provide to the near-earth space infrastructures, consideration was given to the ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits as sources of oxygen (for use as a propellant) and He-3 (for nuclear fusion fuel). This paper demonstrates that ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits would be excellent sources of a wide variety of valuable elements besides O and He-3, including Fe, Ti, H2, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb. It is shown that several ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent exist on the lunar surface. The suitability of regional pyroclastic deposits for lunar mining operations, construction activities, and the establishment of permanent lunar settlements is examined.

  7. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar, E-mail: srsivakumar@usm.my; Kwok, Teong Chen, E-mail: ctck@live.com; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul, E-mail: rezanshk@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2{sup k} factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiO{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  8. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helena I; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero valent iron particles in a two-compartment cell is tested and compared to a more conventional combination of electrokinetic remediation and nZVI in a three-compartment cell. In the new two-compartment cell, the soil is suspended and stirred simultaneously with the addition of zero valent iron nanoparticles. Remediation experiments are made with two different historically PCB contaminated soils, which differ in both soil composition and contamination source. Soil 1 is a mix of soils with spills of transformer oils, while Soil 2 is a superficial soil from a decommissioned school where PCB were used as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two-compartment and the three-compartment cell, respectively. The highest removal with Soil 2 were 58% and 45%, in the two-compartment and the three-compartment cell, respectively, in the experiments without direct current. The pH of the soil suspension in the two-compartment treatment appears to be a determining factor for the PCB dechlorination, and this cell allowed a uniform distribution of the nanoparticles in the soil, while there was iron accumulation in the injection reservoir in the three-compartment cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of microscopy methods to the understanding of mechanisms involved in ilmenite reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, M.; Grey, I.; Fitzgerald, J.

    2003-01-01

    faster along grain boundaries than laterally into the grains leaving each grain as a single topochemical reaction. Bands of iron metal are observed in each grain indicating preferential reaction along crystal planes, confirmed from TEM results to be normal to the c-axis of ilmenite. At the surface there is a confused array of crystallinity arrangements of the products, whereas inwards from the surface there is a definite correlation of crystallinity alignment of the product rutile to the parent ilmenite indicating diffusion mechanisms taking place. These include any one of or a combination of many diffusion mechanisms possible such as gaseous diffusion of the product water through the microporous iron metal leading to Knudsen diffusion, chemical or self diffusion of iron through the rutile to nucleate away from the parent ilmenite. From the TEM results the reaction products, iron metal and rutile, showed dense formation in their individual crystals. The reduced sample overall did not reduce in size. The theoretical volume decrease of 18 % for equation, hence leading to an increase in porosity, is incorporated in the original porosity or by forming new pores along grain boundaries as the reaction front proceeds. From the microscopy analysis of reduced ilmenite samples, it appears strongly that chemical reaction is not the main driving force except initially at the surface. As reaction proceeds inwards diffusion mechanisms are increasing their control. Copyright (2003) Australian Microbeam Analysis Society

  10. The thermal equation of state of FeTiO3 ilmenite based on in situ X-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronche, E.J.; Van Kan Parker, M.; De Vries, J.; Wang, Y.; Sanehire, T.; Li, J.; Chen, B.; Gao, L.; Klemme, S.; McCammon, C.A.; Van Westerenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    We present in situ measurements of the unit-cell volume of a natural terrestrial ilmenite (Jagersfontein mine, South Africa) and a synthetic reduced ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ) at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature up to 16 GPa and 1273 K. Unit-cell volumes were determined using energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a multi-anvil press. Moessbauer analyses show that the synthetic sample contained insignificant amounts of Fe 3+ both before and after the experiment. Results were fit to Birch-Murnaghan thermal equations of state, which reproduce the experimental data to within 0.5 and 0.7 GPa for the synthetic and natural samples, respectively. At ambient conditions, the unit-cell volume of the natural sample (V 0 = 314.75 ± 0.23 (1σ) (angstrom) 3 ) is significantly smaller than that of the synthetic sample (V 0 = 319.12 ± 0.26 (angstrom) 3 ). The difference can be attributed to the presence of impurities and Fe 3+ in the natural sample. The 1 bar isothermal bulk moduli K T0 for the reduced ilmenite is slightly larger than for the natural ilmenite (181 ± 7 and 165 ± 6 GPa, respectively), with pressure derivatives K(prime) 0 = 3 ± 1. Our results, combined with literature data, suggest that the unit-cell volume of reduced ilmenite is significantly larger than that of oxidized ilmenite, whereas their thermoelastic parameters are similar. Our data provide more appropriate input parameters for thermo-chemical models of lunar interior evolution, in which reduced ilmenite plays a critical role.

  11. Combined Radar-Radiometer Surface Soil Moisture and Roughness Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Ruzbeh; Cosh, Michael H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Entekhabi, Dara; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2017-01-01

    A robust physics-based combined radar-radiometer, or Active-Passive, surface soil moisture and roughness estimation methodology is presented. Soil moisture and roughness retrieval is performed via optimization, i.e., minimization, of a joint objective function which constrains similar resolution radar and radiometer observations simultaneously. A data-driven and noise-dependent regularization term has also been developed to automatically regularize and balance corresponding radar and radiometer contributions to achieve optimal soil moisture retrievals. It is shown that in order to compensate for measurement and observation noise, as well as forward model inaccuracies, in combined radar-radiometer estimation surface roughness can be considered a free parameter. Extensive Monte-Carlo numerical simulations and assessment using field data have been performed to both evaluate the algorithms performance and to demonstrate soil moisture estimation. Unbiased root mean squared errors (RMSE) range from 0.18 to 0.03 cm3cm3 for two different land cover types of corn and soybean. In summary, in the context of soil moisture retrieval, the importance of consistent forward emission and scattering development is discussed and presented.

  12. Combined soil washing and CDEO for the removal of atrazine from soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira dos Santos, Elisama [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova CEP 59078-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Sáez, Cristina [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de Castilla – La Mancha, Enrique Costa Building, Campus Universitario s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova CEP 59078-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel Andres [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de Castilla – La Mancha, Enrique Costa Building, Campus Universitario s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Sequential soil washing-waste electrolysis is an efficient treatment for removing atrazine. • Ratio surfactant/soil influences on the size of micelles and organic load. • Electrolysis with diamond anodes oxidizes pollutants from soils washing wastes. • Electrolysis of soil washing fluids promotes the reduction in size of micelles. • Sulphate ions release from the oxidation of SDS participates in the oxidation process. - Abstract: In this work, it is studied the removal of atrazine from spiked soils by soil washing using surfactant fluids, followed by the treatment of the resulting washing waste by electrolysis with boron doped diamond (BDD) anode. Results confirm that combination of both technologies is efficient for the removal and total mineralization of atrazine. Ratio surfactant/soil is a key parameter for the removal of atrazine from soil and influences significantly in the characteristic of the wastewater produced, affecting not only to the total organic load but also to the mean size of micelles. The higher the ratio surfactant soil, the lower is the size of the particles. Electrolyses of this type of waste attain the complete mineralization. TOC and COD are removed from the start of the treatment but the key of the treatment is the reduction in size of the micelles, which lead to a higher negative charge in the surface and to the faster depletion of the surfactant as compared with the pesticide.

  13. Characterization and photocatalytic activity of Barkin-Ladi ilmenite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photocatalysis is an advanced oxidation process that can be carried out at room temperature under atmospheric pressure using atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant and the sun as the source of energy. This work focuses on the composition and photocatalytic activity of the raw and calcined samples of ilmenite ore obtained ...

  14. Assessment of Activity Concentration of Ilmenite and its Contribution to Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Asraf Fahlawi Wafa Syed Mohd Ghazi; Ismail Sulaiman; Mohd Rodzi Ali; Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Noraisyah Yusof; Juliana Mahamad Napiah

    2014-01-01

    Ferum Titanium Oxide (FeTiO 3 ) is the Natural Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). This mineral contains radionuclides from uranium decay series like Radium-226 ( 226 Ra) and from thorium decay series nuclide like Radium-228 ( 228 Ra) and also from Potassium-40 ( 40 K). This radionuclide in large quantities will increase the radiation exposure risk to mankind and environment. In-situ measurement using scintillation survey meter show that external dose rate at 1 and 0.05 meter from soil surface was 97.0 ± 23.3 and 117 ± 26 nSv/ hour. This figure nearly the same with the average dose rate for Malaysia but higher than world average (UNSCEAR 2000). Monitoring of U and Th concentration from the air show that the result was below detection limit of < 0.0001 Bq/ m 3 . It show that's no radionuclide transfer or migrate to environment. Activity concentration of natural radionuclide of 40 K, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 238 U from the soil was 573 ± 184 Bqkg -1 , 30.6 ± 10.2 Bqkg -1 , 18.8 ± 6.4 Bqkg -1 , and 64.0 ± 34.3 Bqkg -1 . For ilmenite, the activity concentration was 39.0 ± 10.0 Bqkg -1 , 28.0 ± 6.7 Bqkg -1 , 84.0 ± 6.9 Bqkg -1 dan 50.0 ± 7.4 Bqkg -1 for the same natural radionuclide. Effective dose for the public show that the value of 0.17 mSv/ year was lower than the world average effective dose from the natural radioactivity. Radium equivalent for ilmenite and soil was 173 ± 77 and 42.7 ± 0.4 respectively. External Hazard Index is 0.47 ± 0.21 dan 0.36 ± 0.12 for ilmenite and soil. The external radiation hazard index is less than 1, which means it is safe for human to carry out their activities in the area. The estimated cancer risk value was 4.25 x 10 -4 . The probability of increase of cancer risk from the industry is a minor fraction of ICRP values. Event though the result show that the activity from the industry was insignificant to increase the radiation exposure, but all the safety precautions must be follow as per standards and the legislation

  15. Remediation of Nitrobenzene Contaminated Soil by Combining Surfactant Enhanced Soil Washing and Effluent Oxidation with Persulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingchun; Gao, Weiguo; Qian, Linbo; Han, Lu; Chen, Yun; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and degradation of nitrobenzene (NB) in effluent with persulfate was investigated to remediate NB contaminated soil. Aqueous solution of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS, 24.0 mmol L-1) was used at a given mass ratio of solution to soil (20:1) to extract NB contaminated soil (47.3 mg kg-1), resulting in NB desorption removal efficient of 76.8%. The washing effluent was treated in Fe2+/persulfate and Fe2+/H2O2 systems successively. The degradation removal of NB was 97.9%, being much higher than that of SDBS (51.6%) with addition of 40.0 mmol L-1 Fe2+ and 40.0 mmol L-1 persulfate after 15 min reaction. The preferential degradation was related to the lone pair electron of generated SO4•−, which preferably removes electrons from aromatic parts of NB over long alkyl chains of SDBS through hydrogen abstraction reactions. No preferential degradation was observed in •OH based oxidation because of its hydrogen abstraction or addition mechanism. The sustained SDBS could be reused for washing the contaminated soil. The combination of the effective surfactant-enhanced washing and the preferential degradation of NB with Fe2+/persulfate provide a useful option to remediate NB contaminated soil. PMID:26266532

  16. The kinetics of titanium leaching of ilmenite using HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MV Purwani; Herry Poernomo

    2015-01-01

    The research of ilmenite leaching of tailings processing zircon sand has been done. Tailings of processing zircon sand contain Zr, Ti, Nb and Fe. Determination of leaching kinetics of Ti on ilmenite using HCl was done on this research. Determination of reaction rate consist the influence of weight ratio of HCl to ilmenite, HCl molarity and temperature reaction. The experiment of kinetics was done by varying the temperature reaction from 70°C to 108°C and time parameter range 0 to 200 minutes. From data of research can be concluded that the greater of weight ratio of HCl with ilmenite, M HCl and reaction temperature, the faster rate of reaction. On weight ratio of HCl with ilmenite varied 4 - 20, average reaction rate along 50 minutes and instantaneous reaction rate in the first 50 minutes ranged from 0.0021 to 0.0032 gmol/(l.minute). Average reaction rate along 250 minutes ranged from 0.0005 to 0.0007 gmol/(l.minute) and instantaneous reaction rate at 50 minutes latest ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0001 gmol/(l.minute). For M HCl = 8 to 12.23 M, average reaction rate and instantaneous reaction rate in the first 50 minutes ranged from 0.0012 to 0.0026 gmol/(l.minute). Average reaction rate along 250 minutes ranged from 0.0004 to 0.0006 gmol/(l.minute) and instantaneous reaction rate at 50 minutes latest ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0001 gmol/(l.minute). On reaction temperature = 70 - 108°C, average reaction rate along 50 minutes and instantaneous reaction rate in the first 50 minutes ranged from 0.0012 to 0.0032 gmol/(l.minute). Average reaction rate along 250 minutes ranged from 0.0002 to 0.0006 gmol/(l.minute) and instantaneous reaction rate at 50 minutes latest ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0001 gmol/(l.minute). The leaching reaction of Ti in ilmenite was second order reaction. The relationship between temperature (T) with the reaction rate constant (k) are - ln k = 3333.2/T - 1.3685 or k = 1.3685. e-3333,2/T , frequency factor A = 1446 and activation energy E = 27.712 k

  17. Soft x-ray absorption spectra of ilmenite family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, A; Mizumaki, M; Saitoh, Y; Matsushita, T; Nakatani, T; Fukaya, A; Torikai, E

    2001-03-01

    We have carried out soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of ilmenite family, such as MnTiO3, FeTiO3, and CoTiO3 at the soft x-ray beamline, BL23SU, at the SPring-8. The Ti and M L2,3 absorption spectra of MTiO3 (M=Mn, Fe, and Co) show spectra of Ti4+ and M2+ electron configurations, respectively. Except the Fe L2,3 spectrum, those spectra were understood within the O(h) symmetry around the transition metal ions. The Fe L3-edge spectrum clearly shows a doublet peak at the L3 edge, which is attributed to Fe2+ state, moreover the very high-resolution the L-edge spectra of transition metals show fine structures. The spectra of those ilmenites are compared.

  18. Effect of microwave irradiation on selective heating behavior and magnetic separation characteristics of Panzhihua ilmenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Jin; Chang, Xiaodong; Guo, Shenghui; Srinivasakannan, C.; Chen, Guo; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave irradiation can be applied effectively and efficiently to the irradiation processes of Panzhihua ilmenite. • The mineral processing properties of microwave treated ilmenite were generally as good as or better than that of initial ilmenite. • The microwave selective heating characteristics of the different minerals and compounds, and the thermal stresses were caused by the uniform heat rate disturbed under microwave irradiation. - Abstract: The influences of microwave irradiation on the surface characteristics of Panzhihua ilmenite were systematically investigated. The crystal structures, surface morphology and surface chemical functional groups of ilmenite were characterized before and after microwave irradiation and magnetic separation for different microwave treatment times by using various methods, such as XRD, SEM, and FT-IR, respectively. XRD analysis showed that the microwave treated ilmenite has the strongest peaks of phase more than that of raw samples, indicates that the crystalline compound of ilmenite increased with the microwave irradiation time. SEM analysis showed the micro-cracking appeared at many grain boundaries of ilmenite after being pretreated by microwave treatment. The separations of ilmenite from gangue minerals were completed and the micro-fissure within ilmenite minerals were also formed, which could be attributed to the microwave selective heating characteristics of the different minerals and compounds, and the thermal stresses were caused by the uniform heat rate disturbed under microwave irradiation. The mineral processing results showed that the magnetic separation characteristics and properties of microwave treated ilmenite samples were better than that of microwave untreated ilmenite samples. It was concluded that microwave irradiation can be applied effectively and efficiently to the irradiation processes of Panzhihua ilmenite

  19. Titanium Analysis of Ilmenite Bangka by Spectrophotometric Method Using Perhidrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusydi-S

    2004-01-01

    Determination of titanium by spectrofotometric method using perhydrol has been done. The purpose of experiment is to find out the condition of titanium analysis of ilmenite by spectrophotometric method. The experiment parameter e c. analysis condition include the Ti-perhydrol complex spectrum, acidity of complex, perhydrol concentration, linearity, influence of anion, limit detection, interfere elements, application of the method using 40 SRM Standard and analysis for ilmenite samples. Result of experiments are spectrum of Ti-perhydrol complex at 410 nm, acidity of complex is the H 2 SO 4 2 M, perhydrol concentration is 0,24 %, the curve calibration is linier at 1-80 ppm, anion of PO 4 , NO 3 , Cl, CO 3 not be influence until 2000 ppm, limit detection is 0,30 ppm and Mo, V is interfere. The method which was aplicated to 40 SRM standard, shown that the content of Ti is 1580 ppm while the standard is 1600 ppm, and the content of Ti from ilmenite high grade samples is 31,46 % and low grade is 13,55 %. (author)

  20. Phase Evolution During the Carbothermic Reduction Process of Ilmenite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2015-02-01

    The phase evolution during the carbothermic reduction process of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate was investigated under argon atmosphere. The Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate briquette with graphite powder was reduced at 1473 K, 1573 K, 1673 K, and 1773 K (1200 °C, 1300 °C, 1400 °C, and 1500 °C) respectively, with the molar ratios of C to FeTiO3 being 4:1 and 5:1. The phase transformation of the briquette reduced at different temperatures was investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. During the carbothermic reduction process from 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C), it was found that main phases were Fe, Ti3O5, Ti2O3, and TiC x O y . The lowest temperature for the generation of TiC x O y was 1573 K (1300 °C) for both kinds of briquettes with different C contents. The rate controlling step for the carbothermic reduction above 1573 K (1300 °C) obeyed the diffusion model. The reduction degree of the ilmenite was increased by increasing the temperature. With the increase of reaction temperature and reaction time, TiC x O y phase would be reduced to TiC phase.

  1. Fast neutron fluxes distribution in Egyptian ilmenite concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, R.M.; Abou El-Nasr, T.Z.; Bashter, I.I.

    1978-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the distribution of fast neutron fluxes in a new type of heavy concrete made from Egyptian ilmenite ores. The neutron source used was a collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. Measurements were carried-out using phosphorous activation detectors. Iso-flux curves were represented which give directly the shape and thickness required to attenuate the emitted fast neutron flux to a certain value. The relaxation lengths were also evaluated from the measured data for both disc monodirectional source and infinite plane monodirectional source. The obtained values were compared with that calculated using the derived values of relative number densities and microscopic removal cross-sections of the different constituents. The obtained data show that ilmenite concrete attenuates fast neutron flux more strongly than ordinary concrete. A semiemperical formula was derived to calculate the fast neutron flux at different thicknesses along the beam axis. Another semiemperical formula was also derived to calculate the fast neutron flux in ordinary concrete along the beam axis using the corresponding value in ilmenite concrete

  2. The heat-capacity of ilmenite and phase equilibria in the system Fe-T-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Treiman, A.H.; Essene, E.J.; Hemingway, B.S.; Westrum, E.F.; Wall, V.J.; Burriel, R.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Low temperature adiabatic calorimetry and high temperature differential scanning calorimetry have been used to measure the heat-capacity of ilmenite (FeTiO3) from 5 to 1000 K. These measurements yield S2980 = 108.9 J/(mol ?? K). Calculations from published experimental data on the reduction of ilmenite yield ??2980(I1) = -1153.9 kJ/(mol ?? K). These new data, combined with available experimental and thermodynamic data for other phases, have been used to calculate phase equilibria in the system Fe-Ti-O. Calculations for the subsystem Ti-O show that extremely low values of f{hook}O2 are necessary to stabilize TiO, the mineral hongquiite reported from the Tao district in China. This mineral may not be TiO, and it should be re-examined for substitution of other elements such as N or C. Consideration of solid-solution models for phases in the system Fe-Ti-O allows derivation of a new thermometer/oxybarometer for assemblages of ferropseudobrookite-pseudobrookitess and hematite-ilmenitess. Preliminary application of this new thermometer/oxybarometer to lunar and terrestrial lavas gives reasonable estimates of oxygen fugacities, but generally yields subsolidus temperatures, suggesting re-equilibration of one or more phases during cooling. ?? 1985.

  3. Ilmenite Nanotubes for High Stability and High Rate Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Litao; Liu, Jun; Xu, Xijun; Zhang, Liguo; Hu, Renzong; Liu, Jiangwen; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Yang, Lichun; Zhu, Min

    2017-05-23

    To solve the problem of large volume change and low electronic conductivity of earth-abundant ilmenite used in rechargeable Na-ion batteries (SIBs), an anode of tiny ilmenite FeTiO 3 nanoparticle embedded carbon nanotubes (FTO⊂CNTs) has been successfully proposed. By introducing a TiO 2 shell on metal-organic framework (Fe-MOF) nanorods by sol-gel deposition and subsequent solid-state annealing treatment of these core-shell Fe-MOF@TiO 2 , such well-defined FTO⊂CNTs are obtained. The achieved FTO⊂CNT electrode has several distinct advantages including a hollow interior in the hybrid nanostructure, fully encapsulated ultrasmall electroactive units, flexible conductive carbon matrix, and stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) of FTO in cycles. FTO⊂CNT electrodes present an excellent cycle stability (358.8 mA h g -1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g -1 ) and remarkable rate capability (201.8 mA h g -1 at 5000 mA g -1 ) with a high Coulombic efficiency of approximately 99%. In addition, combined with the typical Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 cathode to constitute full SIBs, the assembled FTO⊂CNT//Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 batteries are also demonstrated with superior rate capability and a long cycle life.

  4. Electrochemistry and dissolution kinetics of magnetite and ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Hochella, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Natural samples of magnetite and ilmenite were experimentally weathered in pH 1-7 anoxic solutions at temperatures of 2-65 ??C. Reaction of magnetite is described as [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 2H+ ??? ??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + H2O. Dynamic polarization experiments using magnetite electrodes confirmed that this reaction is controlled by two electrochemical half cells, 3[Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) ??? 4??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2e- and [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 8 H+ + 2e- ??? 3Fe2+ + 4H2O, which result in solid state Fe3+ reduction, formation of an oxidized layer and release of Fe(II) to solution. XPS data revealed that iron is present in the ferric state in the surfaces of reacted magnetite and ilmenite and that the Ti Fe ratio increased with reaction pH for ilmenite. Short-term (<36 h) release rates of Fe(II) were linear with time. Between pH 1 and 7, rates varied between 0.3 and 13 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for magnetite and 0.05 and 12.3 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for ilmenite. These rates are two orders of magnitude slower than electrochemical rates determined by Tafel and polarization resistance measurements. Discrepancies are due to both differences in geometric and BET surface area estimates and in the oxidation state of the mineral surface. In long-term closed-system experiments (<120 days), Fe(II) release slowed with time due to the passivation of the surfaces by increasing thicknesses of oxide surface layers. A shrinking core model, coupling surface reaction and diffusion transport, predicted that at neutral pH, the mean residence time for sand-size grains of magnetite and ilmenite will exceed 107 years. This agrees with long-term stability of these oxides in the geologic record. ?? 1994.

  5. Parameter estimation of a two-horizon soil profile by combining crop canopy and surface soil moisture observations using GLUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelash, K.; Sekhar, M.; Ruiz, L.; Tomer, S. K.; Guérif, M.; Buis, S.; Durand, P.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryEstimation of soil parameters by inverse modeling using observations on either surface soil moisture or crop variables has been successfully attempted in many studies, but difficulties to estimate root zone properties arise when heterogeneous layered soils are considered. The objective of this study was to explore the potential of combining observations on surface soil moisture and crop variables - leaf area index (LAI) and above-ground biomass for estimating soil parameters (water holding capacity and soil depth) in a two-layered soil system using inversion of the crop model STICS. This was performed using GLUE method on a synthetic data set on varying soil types and on a data set from a field experiment carried out in two maize plots in South India. The main results were (i) combination of surface soil moisture and above-ground biomass provided consistently good estimates with small uncertainity of soil properties for the two soil layers, for a wide range of soil paramater values, both in the synthetic and the field experiment, (ii) above-ground biomass was found to give relatively better estimates and lower uncertainty than LAI when combined with surface soil moisture, especially for estimation of soil depth, (iii) surface soil moisture data, either alone or combined with crop variables, provided a very good estimate of the water holding capacity of the upper soil layer with very small uncertainty whereas using the surface soil moisture alone gave very poor estimates of the soil properties of the deeper layer, and (iv) using crop variables alone (else above-ground biomass or LAI) provided reasonable estimates of the deeper layer properties depending on the soil type but provided poor estimates of the first layer properties. The robustness of combining observations of the surface soil moisture and the above-ground biomass for estimating two layer soil properties, which was demonstrated using both synthetic and field experiments in this study, needs now to

  6. A novel collector 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid: Flotation performance and adsorption mechanism to ilmenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Haifeng; Zhong, Hong; Tang, Qing; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Guangyi

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: EHHA's synthesis route, flotation performance and coadsorption molecule–ion mechanism to ilmenite. - Highlights: • 2-Ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was synthesized and characterized. • EHHA showed stronger affinity to ilmenite. • EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. • EHHA might adsorb onto ilmenite surfaces through molecule–ion coadsorption model. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel collector, 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, "1H NMR, "1"3C NMR and mass spectra. The flotation performance and adsorption mechanism of EHHA to ilmenite were investigated by micro-flotation tests, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, FTIR spectra, zeta potential and solution chemistry analyses. The micro-flotation results indicated that EHHA exhibited superior flotation performance compared to isooctyl hydroximic acid (IOHA) and octyl hydroxamic acid (OHA), and floated out 84.03% ilmenite at pH 8.0 with 250 mg/L dosage. The analyses of FTIR spectra and zeta potential demonstrated that EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. The solution chemistry analyses further inferred that at pH 6.3–10.5, both Fe and Ti species on ilmenite surfaces could chelate EHHA. DFT calculation results implied EHHA owned the strongest affinity to ilmenite among the three C_8 hydroximic acids. To discern the sharply improving floatability of ilmenite at pH 8–10, a schematic co-adsorption molecule–ion model of EHHA on ilmenite surfaces was suggested.

  7. Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles from Ilmenite Through the Mechanism of Vapor-Phase Reaction Process by Thermal Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha

    2017-11-01

    Synthesis of nanoparticles of TiO2 was carried out by non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor using ilmenite as the precursor material. The powder ilmenite was vaporized at high temperature in plasma flame and converted to a gaseous state of ions in the metastable phase. On cooling, chamber condensation process takes place on recombination of ions for the formation of nanoparticles. The top-to-bottom approach induces the disintegration of complex ilmenite phases into simpler compounds of iron oxide and titanium dioxide phases. The vapor-phase reaction mechanism was carried out in thermal plasma zone for the synthesis of nanoparticles from ilmenite compound in a plasma reactor. The easy separation of iron particles from TiO2 was taken place in the plasma chamber with deposition of light TiO2 particles at the top of the cooling chamber and iron particles at the bottom. The dissociation and combination process of mechanism and synthesis are studied briefly in this article. The product TiO2 nanoparticle shows the purity with a major phase of rutile content. TiO2 nanoparticles produced in vapor-phase reaction process shows more photo-induced capacity.

  8. Remediation of multiple heavy metal-contaminated soil through the combination of soil washing and in situ immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiuqing; Li, Zhongwu; Huang, Bin; Luo, Ninglin; Huang, Mei; Zhang, Qiu; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-09-01

    The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils is a great challenge for global environmental sciences and engineering. To control the ecological risks of heavy metal-contaminated soil more effectively, the present study focused on the combination of soil washing (with FeCl 3 ) and in situ immobilization (with lime, biochar, and black carbon). The results showed that the removal rate of Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu was 62.9%, 52.1%, 30.0%, and 16.7%, respectively, when washed with FeCl 3 . After the combined remediation (immobilization with 1% (w/w) lime), the contaminated soils showed 36.5%, 73.6%, 70.9%, and 53.4% reductions in the bioavailability of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn (extracted with 0.11M acetic acid), respectively, than those of the soils washed with FeCl 3 only. However, the immobilization with 1% (w/w) biochar or 1% (w/w) carbon black after washing exhibited low effects on stabilizing the metals. The differences in effects between the immobilization with lime, biochar, and carbon black indicated that the soil pH had a significant influence on the lability of heavy metals during the combined remediation process. The activity of the soil enzymes (urease, sucrase, and catalase) showed that the addition of all the materials, including lime, biochar, and carbon black, exhibited positive effects on microbial remediation after soil washing. Furthermore, lime was the most effective material, indicating that low soil pH and high acid-soluble metal concentrations might restrain the activity of soil enzymes. Soil pH and nutrition were the major considerations for microbial remediation during the combined remediation. These findings suggest that the combination of soil washing and in situ immobilization is an effective method to amend the soils contaminated with multiple heavy metals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A combined process coupling phytoremediation and in situ flushing for removal of arsenic in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiulan; Liu, Qiuxin; Wang, Jianyi; Liao, Xiaoyong

    2017-07-01

    Phytoremediation and soil washing are both potentially useful for remediating arsenic (As)-contaminated soils. We evaluated the effectiveness of a combined process coupling phytoremediation and in situ soil flushing for removal of As in contaminated soil through a pilot study. The results showed that growing Pteris vittata L. (P.v.) accompanied by soil flushing of phosphate (P.v./Flushing treatment) could significantly decrease the total As concentration of soil over a 37day flushing period compared with the single flushing (Flushing treatment). The P.v./Flushing treatment removed 54.04% of soil As from contaminated soil compared to 47.16% in Flushing treatment, suggesting that the growth of P. vittata was beneficial for promoting the removal efficiency. We analyzed the As fractionation in soil and As concentration in soil solution to reveal the mechanism behind this combined process. Results showed that comparing with the control treatment, the percent of labile arsenate fraction significantly increased by 17% under P.v./Flushing treatment. As concentration in soil solution remained a high lever during the middle and later periods (51.26-56.22mg/L), which was significantly higher than the Flushing treatment. Although soil flushing of phosphate for more than a month, P. vittata still had good accumulation and transfer capacity of As of the soil. The results of the research revealed that combination of phytoremediation and in situ soil flushing is available to remediate As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Experimental evidence for lamellar magnetism in hemo-ilmenite by polarized neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Sales, Morten; Lefmann, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Large local anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field have been observed in Norway, Sweden, and Canada. These anomalies have been attributed to the unusual magnetic properties of naturally occurring hemo-ilmenite, consisting of a paramagnetic ilmenite host (alpha-Fe2O3-bearing FeTiO3) with exsoluti...

  11. Geological and geophysical exploration for offshore ilmenite placers off the Konkan coast, Maharashtra, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Siddiquie, H.N.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Gujar, A.R.; Ramana, M.V.

    total area of 436 km2. The offshore reserves and ilmenite are estimated to be about 12.5 million tons whereas estimates based on the 2 to 10 m thickness and spread of ilmenite bearing sands over an area of 436 km2, total reserves appears to be very large...

  12. Studies Involving Immobilization Of Hazardous Wastes In Cement-ilmenite Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dakrory, A.M.; Sayed, M.S.; Adham, K.

    1999-01-01

    Ilmenite was added to Ordinary Portland Cement to Modify the characteristic properties of the matrix as density, compressive strength and thermal stability . Coal tar and radiocesium were solidified as hazardous waste in cement-ilmenite matrix. The physical properties as density, sitting times and porosity were studied. The mechanical properties as compressive strength values and the chemical properties as leaching were measured

  13. Effects of Borax on the Reduction of Pre-oxidized Panzhihua Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufeng; Zheng, Fuqiang; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Feng; Wang, Shuai; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2018-01-01

    The effects of borax (sodium borate) on the enhancement reduction of pre-oxidized Panzhihua ilmenite were investigated. The effects of borax on the mineral phase transformation, microstructures, crystal cell parameter, melting point and Mg distribution were studied to reveal the mechanism of enhancement reduction. Under the constant reduction conditions, the borax could reduce the reduction activation energy of pre-oxidized ilmenite. The reduction kinetics analysis indicated that the reduction rate was controlled by interfacial chemical reaction. The reduction activation energy of the pre-oxidized ilmenite with 4% borax was 80.263 kJ/mol, which was 28.585 kJ/mol less than that of the pre-oxidized ilmenite without borax. Borax could eliminate the migration of Mg into the reduced particle center. The crystal cell parameter of the reduced product was increased by adding borax. Borax could improve the growth of dendritic crystals in the pre-oxidized ilmenite.

  14. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite under cryogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar 2+ . Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He + ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 x 10 15 Ar 2+ cm -2 , considerable near-surface He + ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 mm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO 3 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides

  15. Ilmenite exploration on the Senegal continental shelf. Methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.; Le Lann, F.; Scolari, G.; Tixeront, M.

    1975-01-01

    From the results of a study based on geomorphology, geophysics and sedimentology, it has been possible to point out, South of Dakar, the existence of a fossil lagoon (peat dated 8400 years BP) partly isolated from the open sea by a littoral sand bar at -25m and strongly eroded. To the North of Dakar, the unconsolidated sediments, with a thickness over 40m, are thinning out seawards and from North of Dakar, the unconsolidated sediments, with a thickness over 40m, are thinning out seawards and from North to South. This pattern reflect the action of the longshore current which overstates the drainage effect to the Cayar canyon. The distribution of ilmenites in the sediments is studied in terms of a possible exploitation however, the grades are too low in the present economic conditions [fr

  16. Spin orientation in solid solution hematite-ilmenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine; Lefmann, Kim

    2017-01-01

    temperature range below the Néel temperature and does not depend systematically on Ti-content. The results indicate that the out-of-plane spin component is an intrinsic feature of hematite itself, with an origin not yet fully understood, but consistent with group theory. This represents a major shift...... spectroscopy. The usually assumed magnetic structure of hematite within this temperature range is antiferromagnetic with the spins confined to the basal plane of the hexagonal structure; however, an out-of-plane spin component is allowed by the symmetry of the system and has been observed in recent studies......The spin orientation in synthetic hematite-ilmenite samples and in a sample of natural hematite was studied from room temperature to above the antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition (the Néel temperature; TN ≈ 600–950 K) by neutron powder diffraction and at room temperature by Mössbauer...

  17. Effect of Pb2+ ions on ilmenite flotation and adsorption of benzohydroxamic acid as a collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longhua; Tian, Jia; Wu, Houqin; Lu, Zhongyuan; Yang, Yaohui; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2017-12-01

    The effects of Pb2+ ions on ilmenite flotation and adsorption of benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) as a collector were investigated using microflotation tests, zeta potential measurements, adsorption analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The microflotation results indicate that the addition of Pb2+ significantly improves the recovery of ilmenite using BHA as a collector. A maximum recovery of 88.46% is obtained at pH 8.12 in the presence of Pb2+; a maximum recovery of 45% is obtained at the same pH using BHA alone. At pHs below 8.0, lead nitrate are mainly present in the solution as Pb2+ and PbOH+, while at pHs above 8.0, the predominant components are Pb(OH)2(s) and Pb(OH)3-. The adsorption of these lead species influences the zeta potential of ilmenite and the number of activated sites on the ilmenite surface. FTIR and XPS analyses reveal that lead species and BHA react with the metal sites on the ilmenite surface. The lead species in solution are either adsorbed onto the ilmenite surface, which increases the surface activity of ilmenite, or react with BHA in solution to form complexes of lead and BHA.

  18. Combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and electro-Fenton process for the treatment of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenot, David; Mousset, Emmanuel; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the efficiency of soil washing treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils, an innovative combination of this soil treatment technique with an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (i.e. electro-Fenton (EF)) has been proposed. An ex situ soil column washing experiment was performed on a genuinely diesel-contaminated soil. The washing solution was enriched with surfactant Tween 80 at different concentrations, higher than the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The impact of soil washing was evaluated on the hydrocarbons concentration in the leachates collected at the bottom of the soil columns. These eluates were then studied for their degradation potential by EF treatment. Results showed that a concentration of 5% of Tween 80 was required to enhance hydrocarbons extraction from the soil. Even with this Tween 80 concentration, the efficiency of the treatment remained very low (only 1% after 24 h of washing). Electrochemical treatments performed thereafter with EF on the collected eluates revealed that the quasi-complete mineralization (>99.5%) of the hydrocarbons was achieved within 32 h according to a linear kinetic trend. Toxicity was higher than in the initial solution and reached 95% of inhibition of Vibrio fischeri bacteria measured by Microtox method, demonstrating the presence of remaining toxic compounds even after the complete degradation. Finally, the biodegradability (BOD₅/COD ratio) reached a maximum of 20% after 20 h of EF treatment, which is not enough to implement a combined treatment with a biological treatment process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A shrinking particle model at leaching of titanium in ilmenite use HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MV Purwani; Suyanti

    2016-01-01

    The research of ilmenite leaching has conducted. Ilmenite was tailings of zircon sand processing. Zircon sand processing tailings containing Zr, Ti, Nb and Fe. This research will be conducted to determine the kinetic leaching of Ti in HCl based shrinking core models. From the research results ilmenite leaching of Ti in HCl wear, it can be concluded that the 50 grams of ilmenite leaching wear 11 M HCl leaching, the higher temperature was conducted the greater of the Ti conversion. The mechanism of the leaching process was controlled by Sphere Reaction with formula equation 1- (1-α)1/3 = "k"."C"/"r"_o"ρ t = klt, the relationship between temperature (T) with the reaction rate constant (k), k = 61.744.e- 4553.3 / T or ln k = - 4553.3 / T + 4.123, the frequency factor A = 61.744, the activation energy E = 37.856 kJ/mol. (author)

  20. Identification of minority compounds in natural ilmenites by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepka, M.T.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Wolska, A.; Jablonski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → White pigment TiO 2 production process. → The principal component analysis using XANES. → Ilmenite accompanying chemical compounds identification. → Chemical binding of Mg in ilmenite depends on the climatic and geological conditions. -- Abstract: Natural ilmenites are used all over the world as raw materials in white pigment (TiO 2 ) production. Besides the FeTiO 3 in the raw material many other compounds are present. The chemical compounds based on the minority elements influence quality of the final product and are difficult to identify. The knowledge about chemical bonding of the minor elements enables to properly adjust chemical reactions during production processes and to improve quality of the final product. In this paper the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) identification of the chemical compounds formed by Mg, Mn and Cr in natural ilmenites originating from different places is presented.

  1. Iron released from ilmenite mineral sustains a phytoplankton community in microcosms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, C.E.G.; Velip, D.; Mourya, B.S.; Shaikh, S.; Das, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Natural biotic communities from Kalbadevi Bay were monitored in microcosms (1-l glass flasks) to test the hypothesis that iron released from ilmenite through microbial action contributes to proliferation of phytoplankton. Microcosms containing...

  2. Selective depression of titanaugite in the ilmenite flotation with carboxymethyl starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyou; Yuan, Zhitao; Yu, Li; Xu, Yuankai; Du, Yusheng; Zhang, Chen

    2018-05-01

    In order to intensify the flotation separation of ilmenite from titanaugite, surface modification of mineral particles was carried out using carboxymethyl starch (CMS) by microflotation experiments, zeta potential measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Microflotation results showed that CMS was a selective depressant, and it effectively enhanced the floatability difference between ilmenite and titanaugite in the pH range from 6.0 to 10.0. As it was revealed by the zeta potential, FTIR and AFM analysis, the CMS adsorption occurred onto mineral surfaces through chemisorption and hydrogen bonding, while CMS exhibited a stronger interaction with titanaugite than ilmenite. After that, the CMS adsorption impeded the adsorption of sodium oleate collector on titanaugite surfaces, giving rise to a concomitant decrease in the floatability of titanaugite. These findings exhibit great potential for CMS application in the selective flotation of ilmenite.

  3. Analysis of Sulfidation Routes for Processing Weathered Ilmenite Concentrates Containing Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sazzad; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Pownceby, Mark I.; Bruckard, Warren J.

    Rutile is the preferred feedstock for producing high-grade TiO2 pigment but due to decreasing resources, alternative materials such as ilmenite is now used to produce a synthetic rutile (SR) feedstock. This requires removal of impurities (e.g. Fe, Mg, Mn) which, for a primary ilmenite is straightforward process. Processing of weathered ilmenite however, is complex, especially when chrome-bearing impurities are present since minor chromium downgrades the SR market value as it imparts color to the final TiO2 pigment, Chrome-bearing spinels are a problem in weathered ilmenites from the Murray Basin, Australia as their physical and chemical properties overlap with ilmenite making separation difficult. In this paper, different sulfidation process routes for weathered ilmenites are analyzed for their applicability to Murray Basin deposits as a mean of remove chrome spinel impurities. Thermodynamic and experimental studies indicated that selective sulfidation of chrome-bearing spinel can be achieved under controlled pO2 and pS2 processing conditions thereby making them amenable to separation.

  4. Testing Single and Combinations of Amendments for Stabilization of Metals in Contrasting Extremely Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebielec G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Metals can be stabilized by soil amendments that increase metals adsorption or alter their chemical forms. Such treatments may limit the risk related to the contamination through reduction of metal transfer to the food chain (reduction of metal uptake by plants and its availability to soil organisms and metals migration within the environment. There is a need for experiments comparing various soil amendments available at reasonable amounts under similar environmental conditions. The other question is whether all components of soil environment or soil functions are similarly protected after remediation treatment. We conducted a series of pot studies to test some traditional and novel amendments and their combinations. The treatments were tested for several highly Zn/Cd/Pb contaminated soils. Among traditional amendments composts were the most effective – they ensured plant growth, increased soil microbial activity, reduced Cd in earthworms, reduced Pb bioaccessibility and increased share of unavailable forms of Cd and Pb.

  5. Combining phytoextraction and biochar addition improves soil biochemical properties in a soil contaminated with Cd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Fu, Shenglei; Méndez, Ana; Gascó, Gabriel; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of phytoremediation is to improve ecosystem functioning. Soil biochemical properties are considered as effective indicators of soil quality and are sensitive to various environmental stresses, including heavy metal contamination. The biochemical response in a soil contaminated with cadmium was tested after several treatments aimed to reduce heavy metal availability including liming, biochar addition and phytoextraction using Amaranthus tricolor L. Two biochars were added to the soil: eucalyptus pyrolysed at 600 °C (EB) and poultry litter at 400 °C (PLB). Two liming treatments were chosen with the aim of bringing soil pH to the same values as in the treatments EB and PLB. The properties studied included soil microbial biomass C, soil respiration and the activities of invertase, β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase, urease and phosphomonoesterase. Both phytoremediation and biochar addition improved soil biochemical properties, although results were enzyme specific. For biochar addition these changes were partly, but not exclusively, mediated by alterations in soil pH. A careful choice of biochar must be undertaken to optimize the remediation process from the point of view of metal phytoextraction and soil biological activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite at 100 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ) was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar 2+ . Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with MeV He + ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 x 10 15 Ar 2+ cm -2 , considerable near-surface He + ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 nm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO 3 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides

  7. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite at 100 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.; Nord, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite (FeTiO3) was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar2+. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He+ ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 ?? 1015 Ar2+/cm2, considerable near-surface He+ ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 nm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO3) and spinel (MgAl2O4) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides.

  8. Studying of the combined salts effect on the engineering properties of clayey soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Obaidi Anwar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of studies had been performed to investigate the effect of pore water chemistry on the strength and compressibility characteristics of soil. Although the effect of chloride and sulfates salts separately in pore fluids on the geotechnical properties of soil seems to be well understood, but the influence of combined effect of sulfates and chlorides in pore water on the behavior of soil is still unclear mostly due to the limited numbers of studies as well as the complexity of processes that may occur in soil (with the presence of salts in pore water-soil interaction. Southern regions of Iraq, especially Basra suffers from low water levels in the summer season in addition to the lack of rain water, which causes a significant increase of salt in the Shatt al Arab. Water salinity continues to increase with time. To investigate the combined impacts of water salinity on the behavior of clayey soils, the basic characteristics of the soil brought from Al-Nahrawan site was studied. Chemical methods were done with three types of water (distilled, water of highly saline as Shatt Al-Arab water and water of Tarmiya as moderate saline water. The effect of water salinity on the geotechnical properties of fine grain soil was investigated. Different laboratory tests such as Atterberg limits, standard compaction, consolidation and shear strength of soil .Results showed that the presence of perceptible amounts of dissolved salts in water can lead to changes in the engineering properties of the soil.

  9. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) Combined with Soil Solarization for Root-Knot Nematode Control in Vegetable and Ornamental Crops in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) combined with soil solarization continues to be evaluated for management of plant-parasitic nematodes in vegetable and ornamental crops in Florida. ASD combines organic amendments and soil saturation to stimulate microbial activity and create anaerobic conditions...

  10. Pilot tests of microbe-soil combined treatment of waste drilling sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Lirong Chen; Min Huang; Xuebin Jiang; Hui Li; Qiang Chen; Min Zhang; Shenglin Li

    2015-01-01

    Microbe-soil combined treatment is a newly developed technology in view of the defects of the curing process and waste drilling mud slag properties. In particular, 0.3%–0.5% bioremediation reagents were fully mixed with the waste drilling sludge according to its wet and dry degree, and 1.5 folds to twice weight of more finely ground soil was added in the mix, which was covered by soil of 5–15 cm thick and thereby grasses or greeneries were planted on the soil. The process was successfully app...

  11. Combining land use data acquired from Landsat with soil map data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, F. C.; Brandner, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    A method currently used to derive agrophysical units (APUs), i.e., geographical areas having definable/comparable agronomic and physical parameters which reflect a range in agricultural use and management, is discussed with reference to results obtained for South Dakota and an area in China. The method consists of combining agricultural land use data acquired from Landsat with soil map data. The resulting map units are soil associations characterized by cropland use intensity, and they can be used to identify major cropland areas and to develop a rating reflecting the relative potential of the soils in the delineated area for crop production, as well as to update small-scale soil maps.

  12. PAH exposure through soil ingestion: Combining digestion models and bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiele, T.R. van de; Verstraete, W. [Ghent University (BE).Laboratory Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET); Siciliano, S.D. [University of Saskatchewan (Canada). Department of Soil Science

    2003-07-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants through soil ingestion is an important issue in current health risk assessment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or their metabolites pose risks to humans due to their toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic or even (anti)estrogenic properties. PAH mobilization from a soil matrix (49.1{+-}1.5 mg PAH/kg DW) was assessed using a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME). PAH GC-MS analysis was performed on the pellet and supernatant of SHIME digests and gave 101, 92, 89 and 97% recovery for water, stomach, duodenal and colon digests, respectively. PAH release was highest for the water extract (0.51%) and the stomach digestion (0.44%). Lower mobilized fractions in the duodenum (0.13%) and colon (0.30%) digests could be attributed to PAH complexation with bile salts, dissolved organic matter or colon microbiota. The digestion model provides us with relevant information to what extent soil bound PAHs are mobilized in the gastrointestinal tract and thus reach the gut wall, prior to absorption. (orig.)

  13. Immobilization of soil cadmium using combined amendments of illite/smectite clay with bone chars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Ou, Jieyong; Wang, Xuedong; Yan, Zengguang; Zhou, Youya

    2018-05-12

    The widespread use of cadmium (Cd)-containing organic fertilizers is a source of heavy metal inputs to agricultural soils in suburban areas. Therefore, the research and development of new materials and technologies for the remediation of Cd-contaminated soil is of great significance and has the potential to guarantee the safety of agricultural products and the protection of human health. We performed pot experiments to determine the potential of combined amendments of illite/smectite (I/S) clay with bone chars for the remediation of Cd-contaminated agricultural soils in a suburban area of Beijing, China. The results showed that both diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cd in soil and the Cd in Brassica chinensis were significantly decreased by the application of 1, 2, or 5% combined amendments with various I/S and bone char (BC) ratios. The higher proportions of BC used in the combined amendments resulted in a better immobilization of soil Cd. The application of the 5% amendment that combined I/S with either pig or cattle BC resulted in the best immobilization. All of the combined amendments, regardless of the composition and ratio of the components, had no negative effects on the growth of B. chinensis. Therefore, it was concluded that combined amendments of I/S and BC have a good potential for remediating Cd-contaminated soils.

  14. A Combination of Biochar-Mineral Complexes and Compost Improves Soil Bacterial Processes, Soil Quality, and Plant Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jun; Zhang, Rui; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen D; Huang, Danfeng; Thomas, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Organic farming avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers and promises food production with minimal environmental impact, however this farming practice does not often result in the same productivity as conventional farming. In recent years, biochar has received increasing attention as an agricultural amendment and by coating it with minerals to form biochar-mineral complex (BMC) carbon retention and nutrient availability can be improved. However, little is known about the potential of BMC in improving organic farming. We therefore investigated here how soil, bacterial and plant properties respond to a combined treatment of BMC and an organic fertilizer, i.e., a compost based on poultry manure. In a pakchoi pot trial, BMC and compost showed synergistic effects on soil properties, and specifically by increasing nitrate content. Soil nitrate has been previously observed to increase leaf size and we correspondingly saw an increase in the surface area of pakchoi leaves under the combined treatment of BMC and composted chicken manure. The increase in soil nitrate was also correlated with an enrichment of bacterial nitrifiers due to BMC. Additionally, we observed that the bacteria present in the compost treatment had a high turnover, which likely facilitated organic matter degradation and a reduction of potential pathogens derived from the manure. Overall our results demonstrate that a combination of BMC and compost can stimulate microbial process in organic farming that result in better vegetable production and improved soil properties for sustainable farming.

  15. A combination of biochar-mineral complexes and compost improves soil bacterial processes, soil quality and plant properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUN eYE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers and promises food production with minimal environmental impact, however this farming practice does not often result in the same productivity as conventional farming. In recent years, biochar has received increasing attention as an agricultural amendment and by coating it with minerals to form biochar-mineral complex (BMC carbon retention and nutrient availability can be improved. However, little is known about the potential of BMC in improving organic farming. We therefore investigated here how soil, bacterial and plant properties respond to a combined treatment of BMC and an organic fertilizer, i.e. a compost based on poultry manure. In a pakchoi pot trial, BMC and compost showed synergistic effects on soil properties, and specifically by increasing nitrate content. Soil nitrate has been previously observed to increase leaf size and we correspondingly saw an increase in the surface area of pakchoi leaves under the combined treatment of BMC and chicken manure. The increase in soil nitrate was also correlated with an enrichment of bacterial nitrifiers due to BMC. Additionally, we observed that the bacteria present in the compost treatment had a high turnover, which likely facilitated organic matter degradation and a reduction of potential pathogens derived from the manure. Overall our results demonstrate that a combination of BMC and compost can stimulate microbial process in organic farming that result in better vegetable production and improved soil properties for sustainable farming.

  16. The effect of ilmenite viscosity on the dynamics and evolution of an overturned lunar cumulate mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Dygert, Nick; Liang, Yan; Parmentier, E. M.

    2017-07-01

    Lunar cumulate mantle overturn and the subsequent upwelling of overturned mantle cumulates provide a potential framework for understanding the first-order thermochemical evolution of the Moon. Upwelling of ilmenite-bearing cumulates (IBCs) after the overturn has a dominant influence on the dynamics and long-term thermal evolution of the lunar mantle. An important parameter determining the stability and convective behavior of the IBC is its viscosity, which was recently constrained through rock deformation experiments. To examine the effect of IBC viscosity on the upwelling of overturned lunar cumulate mantle, here we conduct three-dimensional mantle convection models with an evolving core superposed by an IBC-rich layer, which resulted from mantle overturn after magma ocean solidification. Our modeling shows that a reduction of mantle viscosity by 1 order of magnitude, due to the presence of ilmenite, can dramatically change convective planform and long-term lunar mantle evolution. Our model results suggest a relatively stable partially molten IBC layer that has surrounded the lunar core to the present day.Plain Language SummaryThe Moon's mantle is locally ilmenite rich. Previous models exploring the convective evolution of the lunar mantle did not consider the effects of ilmenite viscosity. Recent rock deformation experiments demonstrate that Fe-Ti oxide (ilmenite) is a low viscosity phase compared to olivine and other silicate minerals. Our modeling shows that ilmenite changes the lunar mantle plume process. An ilmenite-rich layer around the lunar core would be highly stable throughout geologic time, consistent with a partially molten, low viscosity layer around the core inferred from seismic attenuation and tidal dissipation.

  17. Recycling of organic wastes in burnt soils: combined application of poultry manure and plant cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, M C; Petrikova, V; Díaz-Raviña, M; Carballas, T

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the efficacy of a post-fire land management practice, including plant cultivation (Lolium perenne) combined with poultry manure addition, for restoring the protective vegetation cover in soils degraded by high intensity wildfires. The greenhouse experiment was performed with three burnt pine forest soils with added poultry manure at two doses of application and comparing the data with those obtained using NPK fertilizer. A significant effect of the amendment, soil properties and the interaction between amendment and soil properties on vegetation cover (phytomass production, nutrient content) was detected, but often the amendment treatment explained most of the variance. Changes induced by the organic amendment were more marked than those induced by inorganic fertilization. The increase of phytomass and nutrient uptake with poultry manure addition indicated the beneficial effects of this soil management practice. These findings can serve to develop field experiments and burnt soils reclamation technology.

  18. Ecotoxicological effects of copper and selenium combined pollution on soil enzyme activities in planted and unplanted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Liang, Dongli; Liu, Juanjuan; Xie, Junyu

    2013-04-01

    The present study explored the joint effects of Cu and Se pollution mechanisms on soil enzymes to provide references for the phytoremediation of contaminated areas and agricultural environmental protection. Pot experiments and laboratory analyses were carried out to study the individual and combined influences of Cu and Se on soil enzyme activities. The activities of four soil enzymes (urease, catalase, alkaline phosphatase, and nitrate reductase) were chosen. All soil enzyme activities tested were inhibited by Cu and Se pollution, either individually or combined, in varying degrees, following the order nitrate reductase>urease>catalase>alkaline phosphatase. Growing plants stimulated soil enzyme activity in a similar trend compared with treatments without plants. The joint effects of Cu and Se on catalase activity showed synergism at low concentrations and antagonism at high concentrations, whereas the opposite was observed for urease activity. However, nitrate reductase activity showed synergism both with and without plant treatments. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of exchangeable fractions had a similar trend with the EC50 of total content and was lower than that of total content. The EC50 values of nitrate reductase and urease activities were significantly lower for both Se and Cu (p<0.05), which indicated that they were more sensitive than the other two enzymes. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  19. Thermal modification of hematite-ilmenite intergrowths in the Ecstall pluton, British Columbia, Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownlee, S.J.; Feinberg, J.M.; Harrison, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examine the effects of reheating on finely exsolved hematite-ilmenite intergrowths from the similar to 91 Ma Ecstall pluton using reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result of the emplacement of the you......In this study, we examine the effects of reheating on finely exsolved hematite-ilmenite intergrowths from the similar to 91 Ma Ecstall pluton using reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result of the emplacement...... of the younger adjacent similar to 52 Ma Quottoon pluton, samples closer to a thermal boundary have experienced greater degrees of thermal alteration. Five main microstructural features characterize hematite-ilmenite intergrowths from the Ecstall: (I) exsolution lamellae of hematite and ilmenite; (II) oxidation....... Higher temperatures also enhanced oxidation in ilmenite. The formation of magnetite altered the bulk magnetic properties of these samples, increasing NRM intensity. This study underscores the need to consider a pluton's post-emplacement thermal history before making tectonic interpretations based...

  20. Utilization of ilmenite/epoxy composite for neutrons and gamma rays attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Abdo, A. E-mail: attiaabdo11@hotmail.com; El-Sarraf, M.A.; Gaber, F.A

    2003-01-01

    This work deals with the study of ilmenite/epoxy composite as an injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, as well as, neutrons and gamma rays attenuation. Effects of the particle size on the mechanical strengths have been studied for epoxy resin filled with crushed ilmenite with different maximum particle sizes ranging from 32 to 500 {mu}m. Thermal neutrons and gamma rays attenuation in ilmenite/epoxy composites with 75 and 80 wt.% of ilmenite concentration have been investigated. The total mass attenuation coefficients {mu}/{rho} (cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of gamma ray for five ilmenite/epoxy composites have been calculated using the XCOM program (version 3.1) at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. Also, the total mass attenuation coefficients ({mu}/{rho}) have estimated based on the measured total linear attenuation coefficients ({mu}) and compared with the calculated results where, a reasonable agreement was found.

  1. Fabrication of mesoporus TiO_2 from TiOSO_4 from leached ilmenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahyuningsih S; Ramelan AH; Rinawati L; Munifa RMI; Saputri LNMZ; Hanif QA; Pranata HP; Ismoyo YA

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of mesoporous TiO_2 from TiOSO_4 precursor through roasted process, leaching, and homogeneous hydrolysis of ilmenite had been done. Analysis of X-ray Diffraction (XRD) showed the characteristics of ilmenite, hematite and rutile. After roasting the mineral ilmenite with the addition of Na_2S at a temperature of 800°C the XRD characterization showed peaks characteristic for hematite, TiO_2 anatase, TiO_2 rutile, Na_2SO_4, NaFeS_2, and NaFeO_2. Leaching processes of roasted ilmenite which maintained with an addition of strong acid H_2SO_4 6; 7.2; 9; 12, and 18 N were obtained TiOSO_4 filtrate. The results indicated that the more concentration of H_2SO_4 the more solubility of ilmenite, where optimum solubility was achieved when H_2SO_4 concentration was 12 N. The fabrication of mesoporous TiO_2 from TiOSO_4 was conducted with homogeneous hydrolysis method used urea and surfactant template F-127. XRD characterization results indicated the dominant peak of TiO_2 anatase. Crystallite size of 3.2 nm was obtained and the results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that the presence of urea and surfactant be able to arrange porosity. (author)

  2. Combined effects of leaf litter and soil microsite on decomposition process in arid rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Analía Lorena; Bertiller, Mónica Beatriz

    2013-01-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the combined effects of leaf litter quality and soil properties on litter decomposition and soil nitrogen (N) mineralization at conserved (C) and disturbed by sheep grazing (D) vegetation states in arid rangelands of the Patagonian Monte. It was hypothesized that spatial differences in soil inorganic-N levels have larger impact on decomposition processes of non-recalcitrant than recalcitrant leaf litter (low and high concentration of secondary compounds, respectively). Leaf litter and upper soil were extracted from modal size plant patches (patch microsite) and the associated inter-patch area (inter-patch microsite) in C and D. Leaf litter was pooled per vegetation state and soil was pooled combining vegetation state and microsite. Concentrations of N and secondary compounds in leaf litter and total and inorganic-N in soil were assessed at each pooled sample. Leaf litter decay and soil N mineralization at microsites of C and D were estimated in 160 microcosms incubated at field capacity (16 month). C soils had higher total N than D soils (0.58 and 0.41 mg/g, respectively). Patch soil of C and inter-patch soil of D exhibited the highest values of inorganic-N (8.8 and 8.4 μg/g, respectively). Leaf litter of C was less recalcitrant and decomposed faster than that of D. Non-recalcitrant leaf litter decay and induced soil N mineralization had larger variation among microsites (coefficients of variation = 25 and 41%, respectively) than recalcitrant leaf litter (coefficients of variation = 12 and 32%, respectively). Changes in the canopy structure induced by grazing disturbance increased leaf litter recalcitrance, and reduced litter decay and soil N mineralization, independently of soil N levels. This highlights the importance of the combined effects of soil and leaf litter properties on N cycling probably with consequences for vegetation reestablishment and dynamics, rangeland resistance and resilience with implications

  3. Combined analyses of bacterial, fungal and nematode communities in andosolic agricultural soils in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhihua; Ikunaga, Yoko; Matsushita, Yuko; Morimoto, Sho; Takada-Hoshino, Yuko; Okada, Hiroaki; Oba, Hirosuke; Takemoto, Shuhei; Niwa, Shigeru; Ohigashi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Chika; Nagaoka, Kazunari; Takenaka, Makoto; Urashima, Yasufumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kushida, Atsuhiko; Toyota, Koki; Saito, Masanori; Tsushima, Seiya

    2012-01-01

    We simultaneously examined the bacteria, fungi and nematode communities in Andosols from four agro-geographical sites in Japan using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and statistical analyses to test the effects of environmental factors including soil properties on these communities depending on geographical sites. Statistical analyses such as Principal component analysis (PCA) and Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that the compositions of the three soil biota communities were strongly affected by geographical sites, which were in turn strongly associated with soil characteristics such as total C (TC), total N (TN), C/N ratio and annual mean soil temperature (ST). In particular, the TC, TN and C/N ratio had stronger effects on bacterial and fungal communities than on the nematode community. Additionally, two-way cluster analysis using the combined DGGE profile also indicated that all soil samples were classified into four clusters corresponding to the four sites, showing high site specificity of soil samples, and all DNA bands were classified into four clusters, showing the coexistence of specific DGGE bands of bacteria, fungi and nematodes in Andosol fields. The results of this study suggest that geography relative to soil properties has a simultaneous impact on soil microbial and nematode community compositions. This is the first combined profile analysis of bacteria, fungi and nematodes at different sites with agricultural Andosols.

  4. Pyrene removal from contaminated soil using electrokinetic process combined with surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Enayat Hashemi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrene is one of the stable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that is considered as an important pollutants, because of extensive distribution in the environment and carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Among the various treatment techniques, electrokinetic method is an environmental- friendly process for organic and mineral pollutants adsorbed to soil with fine pore size the same as clay and low hydraulic conductivity soils. For improving the efficiency of pyrene removal from soil, soulobilization of pyrene from soil could be used by surfactants. Materials and Methods : In this study, clay soil was selected as model because of the specific properties. Combined method using surfactant and electrokinetic was applied for pyrene removal from soil. Experiments were designed using response surface methodology (RSM, and effect of three variables includes surfactant concentration, voltage and surfactant type were evaluated for pyrene removal from contaminated soil. Results: Pyrene removal using anionic surfactants(SDS and nonionic surfactants(TX100 as a solubilizing agents has high removal efficiency. In the optimum condition with 95% confidence coefficient, utilizing mixed surfactants of sodium dodecyl sulfate and triton X-100 with the same volume, induced of 18.54 volt and 6.53 percent surfactant concentration have 94.6% pyrene removal efficiency. Conclusion:: Results of this study shows that electrokinetic process combined with surfactant as solubilizing agent could be applied as an efficient method for treating the pyrene-contaminated soils.

  5. Combined Effects of Biochar and Fertilizer on Cadmium Contaminated Soil Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Qi-kai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The field experiment was employed to study on the combined effects of biochar and chicken manure and N, P and K compound chemical fertilizer on cadmium contaminated soil remediation, and the immobilization mechanism was elucidated through fractionation of cadmium in the tested soil. Results showed that the addition of these ammendments could significantly reduce the edible Cd accumulation in Lactuca sativa L., decreased from 32.6% to 54.8% compared with the control. The application of these additives could also significantly decrease extractable Cd concentration by 7.04%~21.85%. Biochar could significantly improve soil pH value, promote the inactivation of Cd contaminated soil, while the application of chicken manure significantly decreased soil pH value, which showed the effect of activating Cd in soil. Soil pH value had significant positive correlation with root Cd concentration of tested cultivars, but did not reach the significant effect level with the shoot Cd concentration. The research can provide a theoretical basis for the application of biochar combined with chicken manure and N, P and K compound chemical fertilizer on remediation of sewage irrigated Cd contaminated soil.

  6. Monitoring Soil Microbial Activities in Different Cropping Systems Using Combined Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhimin; LIU Haijun; HAN Jun; SUN Jingjing; WU Xiaoying; YAO Jun

    2017-01-01

    Cropping activities may affect soil microbial activities and biomass,which would affect C and N cycling in soil and thus the crop yields and quality.In the present study,a combination of microcalorimetric,enzyme activity (sucrase,urease,catalase,and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis),and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses was used to investigate microbial status of farmland soils,collected from 5 different sites in Huazhong Agriculture University,China.Our results showed that among the 5 sites,both positive and negative impacts of cropping activities on soil microbial activity were observed.Enzyme activity analysis showed that cropping activities reduced soil sucrase and urease activities,which would influence the C and N cycles in soil.Much more attentions should be given to microbial status affected by cropping activities in future.According to the correlation analysis,fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis showed a significantly (P < 0.05) negative correlation with the time to reach the maximum power output (R =--0.898),but a significantly (P < 0.05) positive correlation with bacterial gene copy number (R =0.817).Soil catalase activity also showed a significantly (P < 0.05) positive correlation with bacterial gene copy number (R =0.965).Using combined methods would provide virtual information of soil microbial status.

  7. Use of a combined penetrometer-TDR moisture probe for soil compaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedro Vaz, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    measurement technique, we have developed a combined cone penetrometer-TDR moisture probe by wrapping two TDR wires around the penetrometer rod (combined rod TDR) as a double helix, so that both soil water content and penetration resistance can be measured simultaneously and at approximately the same location within the soil profile. The main advantage of the coiled design is that relative long travel times can be obtained, allowing accurate water content measurements for small-sized TDR probes. The objective of this lecture is to present the combined penetrometer-TDR probe as a new tool to study soil compaction. The presentation will cover the following topics: Theory of the dynamic cone penetrometer; Laboratory calibration of a coiled TDR moisture probe and application of the mixing model; Field calibration and use of the combined penetrometer-coiled TDR moisture probe; Penetration resistance, bulk density, water content and potential relationships; Practical applications of the combined penetrometer-coiled TDR moisture probe

  8. Synthesis of anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} nanostructures from natural ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahyuingsih, Sayekti, E-mail: sayekti@mipa.uns.ac.id; Ramelan, Ari Handono; Pramono, Edi; Sulistya, Ariantama Djati; Argawan, Panji Rofa; Dharmawan, Frenandha Dwi; Rinawati, Ludfiaastu; Hanif, Qonita Awliya [Inorganic Materials Research Group, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Science, Sebelas Maret University (Indonesia); Sulistiyono, Eko; Firdiyono, Florentinus [Metallurgy Extraction Laboratory, Central of Metallurgy Research LIPI, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Nanostructure anatase and rutile type TiO{sub 2} were synthesized from dissolution roasted ilmenite from natural ilmenite sand as the starting materials. Anatase TiO{sub 2} and rutile TiO{sub 2} (high crystallinity) with the diameters of 20–100 nm were obtained by calcined soluble ilmenite sand produced by leaching process. Calcinations of the xerogel TiO{sub 2} from liquor products were conducted for 4 hours at temperature of 450 °C. The samples were characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), STA (simultant thermal analysis), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy), and BET surface area. Titania Anatase-Rutile form as a mixture were produced by titania slag with the hydrolysis product. While, in another route, complete titania anatase phase was produced through hydrolysis and condensation steps of leach liquors. This synthesis methods provide a simple route to fabricate nanostructure TiO{sub 2} from low cost material.

  9. Characterizing Surfaces of the Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Ilmenite with Scanning Probe Microcopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, R.; Powell, Kirk St. A.

    1997-01-01

    Ilmenite (FeTiO3) is a wide bandgap semiconductor with an energy gap of about 2.5eV. Initial radiation studies indicate that ilmenite has properties suited for radiation tolerant applications, as well as a variety of other electronic applications. Two scanning probe microscopy methods have been used to characterize the surface of samples taken from Czochralski grown single crystals. The two methods, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), are based on different physical principles and therefore provide different information about the samples. AFM provides a direct, three-dimensional image of the surface of the samples, while STM give a convolution of topographic and electronic properties of the surface. We will discuss the differences between the methods and present preliminary data of each method for ilmenite samples.

  10. Generation of stress-strain state in combined strip pile foundation beds through pressing of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanov Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When erecting high-rise buildings, weak underlying soils cause a number of problems in design and construction. In order to ensure the required non-exceedance of the ultimate limit settlements, the combined strip pile foundation has been developed allowing the soil bed to be pre-stressed. This is achieved by injection of pressurized mortar (pressing. The paper analyzes the effect of soil pre-stressing followed by pressing of foundation with the cement mortar, as applied to existing structures using the Plaxis 3D software package in conditions of volume deformation and the Hardening Soil Model. Variable order of foundation pressing allows the required parameters of soil bed to be achieved in plan and depth, thus improving interaction with the foundation and superstructure.

  11. Removal of phenanthrene in contaminated soil by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuguang; Zeng, Defang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of phenanthrene by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms in soil. A 60-day experiment was conducted. Inoculation with earthworms and/or white-rot fungus increased alfalfa biomass and phenanthrene accumulation in alfalfa. However, inoculations of alfalfa and white-rot fungus can significantly decrease the accumulation of phenanthrene in earthworms. The removal rates for phenanthrene in soil were 33, 48, 66, 74, 85, and 93% under treatments control, only earthworms, only alfalfa, earthworms + alfalfa, alfalfa + white-rot fungus, and alfalfa + earthworms + white-rot fungus, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the combination of alfalfa, earthworms, and white-rot fungus is an effective way to remove phenanthrene in the soil. The removal is mainly via stimulating both microbial development and soil enzyme activity.

  12. Combinational effects of sulfomethoxazole and copper on soil microbial community and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiju; Cao, Huansheng; Yang, Yan; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Sulfonamides and Cu are largely used feed additives in poultry farm. Subsequently, they are spread onto agricultural soils together with contaminated manure used as fertilizer. Both sulfonamides and Cu affect the soil microbial community. However, an interactive effect of sulfonamides and Cu on soil microorganisms is not well understood. Therefore, a short-time microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the interaction of veterinary antibiotic sulfomethoxazole (SMX) and Cu on soil microbial structure composition and functions. To this end, selected concentrations of SMX (0, 5, and 50 mg kg(-1)) and Cu (0, 300, and 500 mg kg(-1)) were combined, respectively. Clear dose-dependent effects of SMX on microbial biomass and basal respiration were determined, and these effects were amplified in the presence of additional Cu. For activities of soil enzymes including β-glucosidase, urease, and protease, clear reducing effects were determined in soil samples containing 5 or 50 mg kg(-1) of SMX, and the interaction of SMX and Cu was significant, particularly in soil samples containing 50 mg kg(-1) SMX or 500 mg kg(-1) Cu. SMX amendments, particularly in combination with Cu, significantly reduced amounts of the total, bacterial, and fungal phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soil. Moreover, the derived ratio of bacteria to fungi decreased significantly with incremental SMX and Cu, and principal component analysis of the PLFAs showed that soil microbial composition was significantly affected by SMX interacted with Cu at 500 mg kg(-1). All of these results indicated that the interaction of SMX and Cu was synergistic to amplify the negative effect of SMX on soil microbial biomass, structural composition, and even the enzymatic function.

  13. Combined Effects of Biochar and Fertilizer on Cadmium Contaminated Soil Remediation

    OpenAIRE

    WANG Qi-kai; GUO Wen-juan; SUN Guo-hong; LIN Da-song; XU Ying-ming; LIU Jing-ru; YU Shi-lei

    2015-01-01

    The field experiment was employed to study on the combined effects of biochar and chicken manure and N, P and K compound chemical fertilizer on cadmium contaminated soil remediation, and the immobilization mechanism was elucidated through fractionation of cadmium in the tested soil. Results showed that the addition of these ammendments could significantly reduce the edible Cd accumulation in Lactuca sativa L., decreased from 32.6% to 54.8% compared with the control. The application of these a...

  14. Combination of biochar amendment and phytoremediation for hydrocarbon removal in petroleum-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Tao; Zhao, Zhipeng; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Remediation of soils contaminated with petroleum is a challenging task. Four different bioremediation strategies, including natural attenuation, biochar amendment, phytoremediation with ryegrass, and a combination of biochar and ryegrass, were investigated with greenhouse pot experiments over a 90-day period. The results showed that planting ryegrass in soil can significantly improve the removal rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and the number of microorganisms. Within TPHs, the rem...

  15. Influence of cation disorder on the magnetic properties of ball-milled ilmenite (FeTiO3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the evolution of crystal structure, cation disorder and magnetic properties of ilmenite (FeTiO3) after increasing time of high-energy ball-milling in an inert atmosphere. Refinement of X-ray diffraction data show that the hexagonal crystal structure of ilmenite is maintained...

  16. XPS studies of water and oxygen on iron-sputtered natural ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, P. D.; Neil, T. E.; Shaffer, S. L.; Smith, R. W.; Mckay, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption of D2O and O2 on polycrystalline FeTiO3 (natural ilmenite) has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Oxygen was found to absorb reactively with Fe(0) on Ar(+)-sputtered surfaces at and above 150 K while D2O was found to adsorb molecularly or in ice layers below 170 K on both Ar(+) and O2(+) ion-bombarded ilmenite. The D2O desorbs at 170 K with either the formation of an OD complex or a strongly bound molecular layer of water.

  17. Nano-ilmenite FeTiO3 : synthesis and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavender, A. T.; Hoa Hong, Nguyen; Lee, Kyu Joon; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Skoko, Z.; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail; Cerqueira, M. F.; Samantilleke, A. P.

    2013-01-01

    In general, ilmenite FeTiO3 is synthesized by solid-state reaction at very high pressure and high temperature. Synthesis of FeTiO3 is not an easy task as the Fe2+ ions are not stable. Therefore, it is really challenging to prepare this material. In this work nano-ilmenite FeTiO3 was synthesized by the sol-gel method. Structural, optical and magnetic characterizations were performed. The bandgap of FeTiO3 was determined to be 2.8 eV showing FeTiO3 as suitable wide bandgap material for technolo...

  18. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils. PMID:27113269

  19. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils.

  20. Amelioration of soil PAH and heavy metals by combined application of fly ash and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masto, Reginald; George, Joshy; Ansari, Md; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Generation of electricity through coal combustion produces huge quantities of fly ash. Sustainable disposal and utilization of these fly ash is a major challenge. Fly ash along with other amendments like biochar could be used for amelioration of soil. In this study, fly ash and biochar were used together for amelioration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil. Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of fly ash and biochar on the amelioration of soil PAH, and the yield of Zea mays. The treatments were control, biochar (4 t/ha), fly ash (4 t/ha), ash + biochar ( 2 + 2 t/ha). Soil samples were collected after the harvest of maize crop and analysed for chemical and biological parameters. Thirteen PAHs were analysed in the postharvest soil samples. Soil PAHs were extracted in a microwave oven at 120 °C using hexane : acetone (1:1) mixture. The extracted solutions were concentrated, cleaned and the 13 PAHs [Acenaphthene (Ace), fluorene (Flr), phenanthrene (Phn), anthracene(Ant), pyrene(Pyr), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (Chy), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene)(Inp)] were analysed using GC-MS. The mean pH increased from 6.09 in control to 6.64 and 6.58 at biochar and fly ash treated soils, respectively. N content was not affected, whereas addition of biochar alone and in combination with fly ash, has significantly increased the soil organic carbon content. P content was almost double in combined (9.06 mg/kg) treatment as compared to control (4.32 mg/kg). The increase in K due to biochar was 118%, whereas char + ash increased soil K by 64%. Soil heavy metals were decreased: Zn (-48.4%), Ni (-41.4%), Co (-36.9%), Cu (-35.7%), Mn (-34.3%), Cd (-33.2%), and Pb (-30.4%). Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by ash and biochar treatments and the maximum activity was observed for the combined

  1. Combined effects of traveling seismic waves and soil nonlinearity on nuclear power plant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.H.; Charman, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ground motion nonuniformity on the seismic input have been actively studied in recent years by considering the passage of traveling seismic waves. These studies gave rise to a new class of soil-structure interaction problems in which the seismic input is modified as a result of the spatial variations of ground motion. The phenomena were usually studied by using the elastic half-space simulation or discrete spring-models for modeling the soil medium. Finite element methods were also used recently on a limited scope. Results obtained from these investigations are often manifested by an attenuation of translational excitation along with an addition of rotational ground motion input. The decrease in structural response resulting from the input loss in the translational component was often insignificant since the response reduction tends to be offset by the effects from rotational input. The traveling wave effects have, so far, been investigated within the framework of linear theory with soil nonlinearity ignored. Conversely, the incorporation of soil nonlinearity in soil-structure interaction analyses has been done without including wave effect. Seismic analyses considering the hysteretic behavior of soil have been performed using highly idealized models for steady-state solution. More elaborate nonlinear seismic models deal with only the strain-dependent soil modulus rather than the transient unloading-reloading type of hysteretic characteristics of soil under a time-function input of earthquake trace. Apparently, the traveling wave effect and soil nonlinearity have been separately treated in the past. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that these two major effects can be combined in one model such that the influence of wave passage is reflected through the hysteretic behavior of soil particles, and thereby achieving significant reduction in seismic loads. (orig./RW)

  2. Syntheses of Fe–TiC nanocomposite from ilmenite concentrate via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this paper, the possibility of production of Fe–TiC nanocomposite as a useful ceramic, from ilmenite concentrate, aluminum powder and carbon black has been investigated. ... The Fe–TiC composite is one of the special composites that was first ..... many applications such as master alloys, coating and sin-.

  3. Flotability Improvement of Ilmenite Using Attrition-Scrubbing as a Pretreatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flotation technology of the recovery and utilization of ilmenite from tailings of iron beneficiated in Panzhihua was investigated based on mineralogical study. The results of mineralogical study show that the main occurrence of the valuable mineral are liberated grains of ilmenite. Experimental results of flotation conditions show that attrition-scrubbing raw ores exhibit good flotability with higher recoveries and a slight decrease in grade compared to ores without attrition-scrubbing. Further, open-circuit experiments also prove the superiority of attrition-scrubbing raw ores. The results of closed-circuit experiments show that qualified ilmenite concentrate can be obtained and the yield, grade, and recovery are 22.26%, 47.06%, and 60.73%, respectively. Theoretical study and analysis show that there are two contributions to superior flotability for attrition-scrubbing samples. The first is that the attrition-scrubbing samples can uncover more ferrous ions on the newly-produced fresh ilmenite surface, resulting in the increase in active sites. The other is that in the process of attrition-scrubbing, the transformation of ferrous ions to ferric ions can be promoted.

  4. High-resolution EELS investigation of the electronic structure of ilmenites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, G.; Lazar, S.; Botton, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of a series of compounds belonging to the ilmenite family is investigated using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The energy loss near edge structure (ELNES) of the O-K, Ti-L23 and transition metal L23 edges have been recorded in MnTiO3, FeTiO3,

  5. Synthesis of high purity rutile nanoparticles from medium-grade Egyptian natural ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed G. Shahien

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Egyptian magmatic ilmenite is classified as a medium-grade ore. The present work is an attempt to produce a high-quality TiO2 that can be used in several industries from this medium-grade raw material using the mechanical activation, carbothermic reduction, hydrochloric acid leaching and calcination. A mixture from the ilmenite (FeTiO3 and activated carbon was milled for 30 h. This mixture was annealed at 1200 °C for one hour and the product was leached by hydrochloric acid and calcined at 600 °C for two hours. The role of the ball milling was to grind the raw ilmenite to obtain the nano size, and the carbothermic reduction was to reduce all the Fe-Ti phases to a mixture from Fe metal and TiO2. Leaching procedure was carried out to remove all the Fe metal and obtain a high-grade TiO2. After leaching and calcination of the milled and annealed mixture of FeTiO3/C under the optimal conditions, TiO2 nanoparticles with a size of 10–100 nm and purity more than 95% were obtained. The qualifications of the synthesized high purity rutile nanoparticles from the Egyptian natural ilmenite match the conditions of many industrial applications.

  6. Ilmenit z dvojslídných granitů klenovského plutonu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, Prosinec (2013), s. 224-227 ISSN 0514-8057 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME10083 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : ilmenite * two-mica granite * Moldanubian Zone * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geology.cz/zpravy/obsah/2012/Zpravy_2012-45.pdf

  7. Formation and evolution of a lunar core from ilmenite-rich magma ocean cumulates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; van den Berg, A.P.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of comprehensive seismic data coverage, the size, composition and physical state of the lunar core are still debated. It has been suggested that a dense ilmenite-rich layer, which originally crystallised near the top of the lunar magma ocean, may have sunk to the centre of the Moon to

  8. Valorisation of waste ilmenite mud in the manufacture of sulphur polymer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Manuel; Gázquez, Manuel Jesús; García-Díaz, Irene; Alguacil, Francisco J; López, Félix A; Bolívar, Juan Pedro

    2013-10-15

    This paper reports the preparation of sulphur polymer cements (SPCs) incorporating waste ilmenite mud for use in concrete construction works. The ilmenite mud raw material and the mud-containing SPCs (IMC-SPCs) were characterised physico-chemically and radiologically. The optimal IMC-SPC mixture had a sulphur/mud ratio (w/w) of 1.05 (mud dose 20 wt%); this cement showed the greatest compressive strength (64 MPa) and the lowest water absorption coefficient (0.4 g cm(-2) at 28 days). Since ilmenite mud is enriched in natural radionuclides, such as radium isotopes (2.0·10(3) Bq kg(-1)(228)Ra and 5.0·10(2) Bq kg(-1)(226)Ra), the IMC-SPCs were subjected to leaching experiments, which showed their environmental impact to be negligible. The activity concentration indices for the different radionuclides in the IMC-SPCs containing 10% and 20% ilmenite mud met the demands of international standards for materials used in the construction of non-residential buildings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the combined risks of PAHs and metals in urban soils by urbanization indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Chi; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping; Li, Xiaoma; Crittenden, John C.

    2013-01-01

    We quantitatively describe the impacts of urbanization on the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals (HMs) in urban soils as well as their health risks to residents. Residential building age, population density, road density, and distance from urban center were used as urbanization level indicators. Significant correlations were found between those urbanization indicators and the amounts of PAHs, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn and As in residential soils. The exposure time of soils to urban air was the primary factor affecting soil pollution, followed by local road density and population density. Factor analysis suggested that 59.0% of the elevated pollutant concentrations were caused by citywide uniform deposition, and 15.3% were resulted from short-range deposition and/or non-combustion processes. The combined health risks posed by soil PAHs and HMs were aggravated with time and can be expressed as functions of residence age, road density, and other urbanization indicators. Highlights: •The soil PAH and HM contents were closely related to urbanization progression. •The PAH and HM contents were primarily affected by soil exposure time. •Local input loads of pollutants correlated with road density and population density. •The combined risks of PAHs and HMs increased with the urban development level. •The carcinogenic risks of PAHs and As were above 10 −5 and increased over time. -- The health risks of PAHs and HMs in residential soils were connected to building age, population density and road density of the community as well as its distance from urban center

  10. Remediation of metal polluted soils by phytorremediation combined with biochar addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Ana; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Gómez-Limón, Dulce; César Arranz, Julio; Saa, Antonio; Gascó, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this work is to optimize and quantify the treatment of metal polluted soils through phytoremediation techniques combined with the addition of biochar. Biochar is a carbon rich material obtained by thermal treatment of biomass in inert atmosphere. In recent years, it has been attracted considerable interest due to their positive effect after soil addition. The use of biochar also seems appropriate for the treatment of metal-contaminated soils decreasing their mobility. Biochar properties highly depend on the raw material composition and manufacturing conditions. This paper is based on the use of manure wastes, rich in nutrients and therefore interesting raw materials for biochar production, especially when combined with phytoremediation techniques since the biochar act as conditioner and slow release fertilizer. We are very grateful to Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad (Spain) for financial support under Project CGL2014-58322-R.

  11. Economic benefits of combining soil and water conservation measures with nutrient management in semiarid Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zougmoré, R.; Mando, A.; Stroosnijder, L.; Ouédraogo, E.

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient limitation is the main cause of per capita decline in crop production in the Sahel, where water shortage also limits an efficient use of available nutrients. Combining soil and water conservation measures with locally available nutrient inputs may optimize crop production and economic

  12. Combined Application of QEM-SEM and Hard X-ray Microscopy to Determine Mineralogical Associations and Chemcial Speciation of Trace Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Grafe; M Landers; R Tappero; P Austin; B Gan; A Grabsch; C Klauber

    2011-12-31

    We describe the application of quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy in combination with techniques commonly available at hard X-ray microprobes to define the mineralogical environment of a bauxite residue core segment with the more specific aim of determining the speciation of trace metals (e.g., Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) within the mineral matrix. Successful trace metal speciation in heterogeneous matrices, such as those encountered in soils or mineral residues, relies on a combination of techniques including spectroscopy, microscopy, diffraction, and wet chemical and physical experiments. Of substantial interest is the ability to define the mineralogy of a sample to infer redox behavior, pH buffering, and mineral-water interfaces that are likely to interact with trace metals through adsorption, coprecipitation, dissolution, or electron transfer reactions. Quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy coupled with micro-focused X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence, and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (mXANES) spectroscopy provided detailed insights into the composition of mineral assemblages and their effect on trace metal speciation during this investigation. In the sample investigated, titanium occurs as poorly ordered ilmenite, as rutile, and is substituted in iron oxides. Manganese's spatial correlation to Ti is closely linked to ilmenite, where it appears to substitute for Fe and Ti in the ilmenite structure based on its mXANES signature. Vanadium is associated with ilmenite and goethite but always assumes the +4 oxidation state, whereas chromium is predominantly in the +3 oxidation state and solely associated with iron oxides (goethite and hematite) and appears to substitute for Fe in the goethite structure.

  13. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Combined Forms and Transformation of Fluorine in Tea Garden Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yong-li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on combined forms and transformation of fluorine in tea garden soil, soil pot experiment was carried out. The research object was red-yellow soil in Shizipu tea plantation in the south of Anhui Province. Five treatments were N0P0K0 (CK, N0P1K1 (N0, N1P1K1 (N1, N2P1K1 (N2, N3P1K1 (N3. Water-soluble fluorine content, exchangeable fluorine content, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine content, organic matter-bound fluorine content, ammonium nitrogen content and soil pH value in 0~15 cm soil layer were analyzed in 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, 90 days after fertilization. The results showed that compared with CK, in the short term (10 or 20 days after applying NPK, the content of water-soluble fluorine in 0~15 cm soil layer was decreased and the content of exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were increased. After 20 days, the content of soil water-soluble fluorine was increased and the content of soil exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were reduced. The effect on water-soluble fluorine and exchangeable fluorine increased with time and the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine in tea garden soil had a moderately positive correlation with the application rate of nitrogen while the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine had a quite highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01, but the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01. Therefore, nitrogen fertilizer changed the soil pH during its form transformation and thus affected the transformation and the availability of fluorine in soil.

  14. Ecopiling: A combined Phytoremediation and Passive Biopiling System for Remediating Hydrocarbon Impacted Soils at Field Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran J Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopiling is an ex situ bioremediation technology that has been extensively used for remediating a wide range of petrochemical contaminants in soils. Biopiling involves the assembling of contaminated soils into piles and stimulating the biodegrading activity of microbial populations by creating near optimum growth conditions. Phytoremediation is another very successful bioremediation technique and involves the use of plants and their associated microbiomes to degrade, sequester or bio-accumulate pollutants from contaminated soil and water. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined phytoremediation/biopiling system, termed Ecopiling, to remediate hydrocarbon impacted industrial soil. The large scale project was carried out on a sandy loam, petroleum impacted soil (1613 mg Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH kg-1 soil. The contaminated soil was amended with chemical fertilisers, inoculated with TPH degrading bacterial consortia and then used to construct passive biopiles. Finally, a phyto-cap of perennial rye grass (Lolium multiflorum and white clover (Trifolium repens was sown on the soil surface to complete the Ecopile. Monitoring of important physico-chemical parameters was carried out at regular intervals throughout the trial. Two years after construction the TPH levels in the petroleum impacted Ecopiles were below detectable limits in all but 1 subsample (152mg TPH kg-1 soil. The Ecopile system is a multi-factorial bioremediation process involving bio-stimulation, bio-augmentation and phytoremediation. One of the key advantages to this system is the reduced costs of the remediation process, as once constructed, there is little additional cost in terms of labour and maintenance (although the longer process time may incur additional monitoring costs. The other major advantage is that many ecological functions are rapidly restored to the site and the process is aesthetically pleasing.

  15. Ecopiling: a combined phytoremediation and passive biopiling system for remediating hydrocarbon impacted soils at field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, Kieran J; Byrne, John; Liu, Xuemei; Keohane, Jer; Culhane, John; Lally, Richard D; Kiwanuka, Samuel; Ryan, David; Dowling, David N

    2014-01-01

    Biopiling is an ex situ bioremediation technology that has been extensively used for remediating a wide range of petrochemical contaminants in soils. Biopiling involves the assembling of contaminated soils into piles and stimulating the biodegrading activity of microbial populations by creating near optimum growth conditions. Phytoremediation is another very successful bioremediation technique and involves the use of plants and their associated microbiomes to degrade, sequester or bio-accumulate pollutants from contaminated soil and water. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined phytoremediation/biopiling system, termed Ecopiling, to remediate hydrocarbon impacted industrial soil. The large scale project was carried out on a sandy loam, petroleum impacted soil [1613 mg total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) kg(-1) soil]. The contaminated soil was amended with chemical fertilizers, inoculated with TPH degrading bacterial consortia and then used to construct passive biopiles. Finally, a phyto-cap of perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) and white clover (Trifolium repens) was sown on the soil surface to complete the Ecopile. Monitoring of important physico-chemical parameters was carried out at regular intervals throughout the trial. Two years after construction the TPH levels in the petroleum impacted Ecopiles were below detectable limits in all but one subsample (152 mg TPH kg(-1) soil). The Ecopile system is a multi-factorial bioremediation process involving bio-stimulation, bio-augmentation and phytoremediation. One of the key advantages to this system is the reduced costs of the remediation process, as once constructed, there is little additional cost in terms of labor and maintenance (although the longer process time may incur additional monitoring costs). The other major advantage is that many ecological functions are rapidly restored to the site and the process is esthetically pleasing.

  16. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Demyan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2 to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem, from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM, mineral fertilizer (NPK, their combination (FYM + NPK and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii Kraichgau; and (iii Swabian Alb (Cambisols areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM, sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A, silt and clay (Si + C, and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm−1 being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min−1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max. Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the

  17. Combining mid infrared and total X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for prediction of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towett, Erick; Shepherd, Keith; Sila, Andrew; Aynekulu, Ermias; Cadisch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (MIR) can predict many soil properties but extractable nutrients are often predicted poorly. We evaluated the potential of MIR and total elemental analysis using total X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF), both individually and combined, to predict results of conventional soil tests. Total multi-elemental analysis provides a fingerprint of soil mineralogy and could predict some soil properties and help improve MIR predictions. A set of 700 georeferenced soil samples associated with the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) (www.africasoils.net) from 44 stratified randomly-located 100-km2 sentinel sites distributed across sub-Saharan Africa were analysed for physico-chemical composition using conventional reference methods, and compared to MIR and TXRF spectra using the Random Forests regression algorithm and an internal out-of-bag validation. MIR spectra resulted in good prediction models (R2 >0.80) for organic C and total N, Mehlich-3 Ca and Al, and pH. To test the combined spectroscopic approach, TXRF element concentration data was included as a property predictor along with the first derivative of MIR spectral data using the RF algorithm. Including TXRF did not improve prediction of these properties. TXRF was poorer (R2 0.86) as these elements are not directly determined with TXRF, however the variance explained is still quite high and may be attributable to TXRF signatures relating to mineralogy correlated with protection of soil organic matter. TXRF model for Mehlich-3 Al had excellent prediction capability explaining 81% of the observed variation in extractable Al content and was comparable to that of MIR (R2 = 0.86). However, models for pH and Mehlich-3 exchangeable Ca exhibited R2 values of 0.74 and 0.79 respectively and thus had moderate predictive accuracy, compared to MIR alone with R2 values of 0.82 and 0.84 respectively. Both MIR and TXRF methods predicted soil properties that relate to nutrient

  18. Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J.; Grant, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd 3 . Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek's advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation

  19. Combination of magnetic parameters: an efficient way to discriminate soil-contamination sources (south France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoanet, H.; Leveque, F.; Ambrosi, J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Biplots combining magnetic parameters allow identification of different pollutant emission sources. - Biplots combining magnetic parameters allow to identification and differentiation different pollutant emission sources. A major problem in soil pollution is the characterization of the relative contributions of different anthropogenic particles sources. This paper demonstrates the efficiency of magnetic techniques to provide identification and differentiation of contaminating emission sources. About 100 soil samples were collected across a mixed agricultural and industrial area (Crau plain/Berre-Fos basin) in southern France. Nine soil profiles were realized. They are aligned along a transect, from the Mediterranean cost to the north. Measurements of initial magnetic susceptibility (χ) and remanent magnetization (ARM, IRM) have been carried out at room temperature. Several ratios of magnetic parameters were calculated and tested. Bivariate analyses allow to characterize different pollution sources and graphic results suggest three dominant contributions originated from road traffic, airport and steel industry. Moreover, magnetic grain-size discrimination between surface-soil samples and bottom-soil samples is obtained. An increase of hard magnetic components from topsoil towards the bottom of the profiles is evidenced

  20. An Approach to Flooding Inundation Combining the Streamflow Prediction Tool (SPT) and Downscaled Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterman, K. A.; Follum, M. L.; Pradhan, N. R.; Niemann, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Flooding impacts numerous aspects of society, from localized flash floods to continental-scale flood events. Many numerical flood models focus solely on riverine flooding, with some capable of capturing both localized and continental-scale flood events. However, these models neglect flooding away from channels that are related to excessive ponding, typically found in areas with flat terrain and poorly draining soils. In order to obtain a holistic view of flooding, we combine flood results from the Streamflow Prediction Tool (SPT), a riverine flood model, with soil moisture downscaling techniques to determine if a better representation of flooding is obtained. This allows for a more holistic understanding of potential flood prone areas, increasing the opportunity for more accurate warnings and evacuations during flooding conditions. Thirty-five years of near-global historical streamflow is reconstructed with continental-scale flow routing of runoff from global land surface models. Elevation data was also obtained worldwide, to establish a relationship between topographic attributes and soil moisture patterns. Derived soil moisture data is validated against observed soil moisture, increasing confidence in the ability to accurately capture soil moisture patterns. Potential flooding situations can be examined worldwide, with this study focusing on the United States, Central America, and the Philippines.

  1. Kinetics of acid leaching of ilmenite decomposed by KOH part 1: decomposition by KOH and leaching by HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayl, A.A; Aly, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    Decomposition of ilmenite by KOH solutions, to convert titanium to potassium titanate, was first studied . This was followed by leaching titanium from the ilmenite paste using HCl solutions in the temperature range 50-150 degree C for different periods up to 3 hr. The significant factors affecting the leaching process were studied. The experimental data of the decomposition rate of ilmenite by KOH and of the formed KOH paste by HCl under the relevant operating variables were interpreted with the shrinking core model under chemically controlled process. The apparent activation energy for leaching of titanium in both cases bas been evaluated and discussed.

  2. Combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion in a mollisol area under long-term agricultural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Wu, Yuyang; Hao, Zengchao; Zhang, Qi; Bu, Qingwei; Gao, Xiang

    2018-02-01

    Soil erosion exhibits special characteristics in the process of agricultural development. Understanding the combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion, especially in the area under long-term agricultural cultivations, is vital to watershed agricultural and soil management. This study investigated the temporal-spatial patterns of the soil erosion based on a modified version of Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and conducted a soil erosion contribution analysis. The land use data were interpreted from Landsat series images, and soil properties were obtained from field sampling, laboratory tests and SPAW (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Water) model calculations. Over a long period of agricultural development, the average erosion modulus decreased from 187.7tkm -2 a -1 in 1979 to 158.4tkm -2 a -1 in 2014. The land use types were transformed mainly in the reclamation of paddy fields and the shrinking of wetlands on a large scale. Most of the soils were converted to loam from silty or clay loam and the saturated hydraulic conductivity (K s ) of most soil types decreased by 1.11% to 43.6%. The rapidly increasing area of 49.8km 2 of paddy fields together with the moderate decrease of 14.0km 2 of forests, as well as K s values explained 87.4% of the total variance in soil erosion. Although changes in soil physical and water characteristics indicated that soil erosion loads should have become higher, the upsurge in paddy fields played an important role in mitigating soil erosion in this study area. These results demonstrated that land use changes had more significant impacts than soil property changes on soil erosion. This study suggested that rational measures should be taken to extend paddy fields and control the dry land farming. These findings will benefit watershed agricultural targeting and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Combining different frequencies for electrical heating of saturated and unsaturated soil zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.D. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Engineering, Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    In situ electrical heating of soil was studied applying different frequencies: low-frequency energy for resistive heating and radio-frequency energy for dielectric heating. Steep temperature gradients were observed for each heating mode under the condition of the coexistence of saturated and unsaturated soil zones. By combining the two heating modes, this undesired effect can be avoided, thus allowing efficient soil remediation especially when organic phases are accumulated at the capillary fringe. A parallel application of both frequencies was demonstrated as the most suitable method to reduce temperature gradients. By using electronic filters, both electric fields can be established by only one electrode array. This innovative concept is especially applicable for optimizing thermal remediation of light non-aqueous phase liquid contaminations or realizing thermally-enhanced electrokinetic removal of heavy metals. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Identification and characterization of tebuconazole transformation products in soil by combining suspect screening and molecular typology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storck, Veronika; Lucini, Luigi; Mamy, Laure; Ferrari, Federico; Papadopoulou, Evangelia S.; Nikolaki, Sofia; Karas, Panagiotis A.; Servien, Remi; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G.; Trevisan, Marco; Benoit, Pierre; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides generate transformation products (TPs) when they are released into the environment. These TPs may be of ecotoxicological importance. Past studies have demonstrated how difficult it is to predict the occurrence of pesticide TPs and their environmental risk. The monitoring approaches mostly used in current regulatory frameworks target only known ecotoxicologically relevant TPs. Here, we present a novel combined approach which identifies and categorizes known and unknown pesticide TPs in soil by combining suspect screening time-of-flight mass spectrometry with in silico molecular typology. We used an empirical and theoretical pesticide TP library for compound identification by both non-target and target time-of-flight (tandem) mass spectrometry, followed by structural proposition through a molecular structure correlation program. In silico molecular typology was then used to group TPs according to common molecular descriptors and to indirectly elucidate their environmental parameters by analogy to known pesticide compounds with similar molecular descriptors. This approach was evaluated via the identification of TPs of the triazole fungicide tebuconazole occurring in soil during a field dissipation study. Overall, 22 empirical and 12 yet unknown TPs were detected, and categorized into three groups with defined environmental properties. This approach combining suspect screening time-of-flight mass spectrometry with molecular typology could be extended to other organic pollutants and used to rationalize the choice of TPs to be investigated towards a more comprehensive environmental risk assessment scheme. - Highlights: • Combined method to detect and categorize pesticide transformation products in soil. • Detection by QTOF-MS of new tebuconazole transformation products without standards. • Estimation by in silico molecular typology of their environmental parameters. • Method to rationally choose relevant transformation products to be studied. • The

  5. Sand-RAPG combination simulating fertile clayey soil (Part I to IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, R.; El-Hady, O.A.; Lotfy, A.A.; Hegela, M.

    1983-01-01

    I. Radiation Preparation of RAPG. Sites of co-ordination and reinforcement are dominated in reclaimer ameliorator polymeric gel (RAPG). It is a modified acrylonitrile base multifunction polymer grafted upon a binder of worthless cellulosic agricultural discard. It varies chemically from non-ionic through anionic and cationic to ampholite. The hydroproperty of the gel is similarly controlled. Thus, RAPG can be tailored for any soil texture under various climatic conditions. II. Structure Stability and Maintenance. Sinai dune sand is treated with non-ionic and anionic RAPGs at rates varying from 0.05 to 0.2 wt.%. The stability increased with RAPG anionicity and application rate. The structure formed maintained three cycles of complete destruction and re-formation without significant changes in erosion index. The resistance of sand-RAPG combination to breakdown by tillage, as well as to wind and water erosion, is practically proved. This is in addition to the beneficial changes in bulk density, void ratio and microporosity, which were also achieved. III. Water Preservation. Inshas sandy soil treated by RAPG is compared with fertile clayey soil. The water-holding capacity and retention at different suctions are increased. The available water to plants in treated sand has reached 15 times that of the control, and even exceeded clay by 11%. Water losses by evaporation and leaching as well as deep percolation are all reduced to a minimum. IV. Plantation and Nutritional Status. Pepper seed germination, growth and dry matter are increased in the sand-RAPG combination relative to fertile clayey soil. The optimum rate and anionicity of RAPG are determined. This increases water-use efficiency to twice that of the fertile clayey soil. Macro- and micro-nutrient uptake have also increased. Thus, fertilizer use efficiency is increased by almost three times over that of clay. These factors lead convincingly to the conclusion that RAPG furnishes adequate conditions for sandy soil

  6. Trichoderma harzianum in combination with sheep manure amendment enhances soil suppressiveness of Fusarium wilt of tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Barakat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect that the biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum (isolate Jn14 in combination with an amendment of sheep manure has on the soil suppressiveness of Fusarium wilt of tomato was investigated over a 28-month period. A combination of T. harzianum and organic amendment at concentrations (w:w of 6 and 10% reduced tomato wilt by 21–36 % and 29–36% respectively, after 0–28 months of soil incubation. When the amendment was added at concentration of 2%, the wilt was suppressed only after 18–28 months. A combination of T. harzianum and the amendment at 6% also increased tomato plant fresh weights by 52% after 28 months, and the 10% amendment increased fresh weights by 56, 40, and 63%, after 18, 24, and 28 months respectively, compared to the experimental controls. Organic amendment at the higher concentrations further stimulated T. harzianum populations, enhanced microbial activity against Fusarium oxysporum in the soil and reduced pathogen populations. Without T. harzianum, the organic amendment at a concentration of 10% reduced disease by only 22, 24, and 23% and only after 18, 24 and 28 months of soil incubation respectively, compared with the controls. However, tomato wilt was not reduced at a 2% manure concentration in less than 12 months of incubation. Organic amendment alone at 6 and 10% reduced the pathogen population by 25% and 37% respectively after 28 months of soil incubation compared with the control. T. harzianum produced fungitoxic metabolites that reduced mycelial growth of Fusarium by 37% and conidium germination by 55% when the pathogen was grown on potato dextrose agar amended with a T. harzianum culture filtrate.

  7. Limiting nitrogen and veterinary pharmaceutical input into groundwater: combining hydrogeophysics and soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Ursula; Stadler, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The EU Interreg project TOPSOIL investigates opportunities to improve surface and groundwater quality as well as water management strategies under the consideration of climate adaptation challenges. Within the framework of the project, we investigate the transport behavior of percolation water in the unsaturated zone, the migration of nitrogen and veterinary pharmaceuticals in soils, and - together with different stakeholders (e.g. farmers, water supply companies) - develop common strategies to minimize the migration of these substances into the groundwater. In our study we focus on distinguishing preferential and diffuse flow using soil scientific and geophysical methods. During the first investigation campaign, we combined soil sampling with radiometry and electrical conductivity overview measurements on the typical sandy soil of the studied area south of Oldenburg, Germany. We used the CMD explorer for the electromagnetic mapping (horizontal and vertical dipoles, intercoil spacing of 1.48/2.82/4.49 m, investigations depths of appr. 0 - 6 m) and the radiometry detector comprised five sodium-iodide crystals each with a volume of 4 litres. The spectral data are evaluated for potassium (1.37 - 1.57 MeV), uranium (Bi-214) (1.66 - 1.86MeV) and thorium (T-208) (2.41 - 2.81MeV) and total counts (0.41-2.81MeV). A total of 292 soil samples were taken from 46 ram coring profiles (depth range: 0 to 3 m) and analyzed for soil chemical parameters and water content. The first evaluation showed a good correlation between conductivity and radiometry measurements. While the uranium and thorium values are generally low, the potassium values possibly reflect higher clay contents as do the higher conductivity values. The geophysical overview measurements were used to select the locations for soil sampling and we specifically targeted presumably clay-rich as well as clay-poor areas for sampling.

  8. [Effects of combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers on the available phosphorus content of upland red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yan; Chen, Xiao-min; Liu, Zu-xiang; Huang, Qian-ru; LiI, Qiu-xia; Chen, Chen; Lu, Shao-shan

    2013-04-01

    Aiming at the low content of available phosphorus in upland red soil of Southern China, this paper studied the effects of combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers on the available phosphorus and organic carbon contents and the pH of this soil. With the combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers, the soil physical and chemical properties improved to different degrees. As compared with the control, the soil pH and the soil organic carbon and available phosphorus contents at different growth stages of oil rape after the combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers all had an improvement, with the increments at bolting stage, flowering stage, and ripening stage being 16%, 24% and 26%, 23%, 34% and 38%, and 100%, 191% and 317% , respectively. The soil pH and the soil organic carbon and available phosphorus contents were increased with the increasing amount of applied biochar. Under-the application of biochar, the soil available phosphorus had a significant correlation with the soil pH and soil organic carbon content. This study could provide scientific basis to improve the phosphorus deficiency and the physical and chemical properties of upland red soil.

  9. Assessing the combined risks of PAHs and metals in urban soils by urbanization indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chi; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping; Li, Xiaoma; Crittenden, John C

    2013-07-01

    We quantitatively describe the impacts of urbanization on the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals (HMs) in urban soils as well as their health risks to residents. Residential building age, population density, road density, and distance from urban center were used as urbanization level indicators. Significant correlations were found between those urbanization indicators and the amounts of PAHs, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn and As in residential soils. The exposure time of soils to urban air was the primary factor affecting soil pollution, followed by local road density and population density. Factor analysis suggested that 59.0% of the elevated pollutant concentrations were caused by citywide uniform deposition, and 15.3% were resulted from short-range deposition and/or non-combustion processes. The combined health risks posed by soil PAHs and HMs were aggravated with time and can be expressed as functions of residence age, road density, and other urbanization indicators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils. PMID:26087302

  11. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kany, A.M.I.; El-Gohary, M.I.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barriers of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure. (Author)

  12. Geophysical studies of ilmenite and monazite placers in Itaparica island - Bahia State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira Neto, J.X.

    1976-01-01

    A ground scintillometric survey along the southern shores of the island of Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil, discovered numerous anomalies. Detailed geophysical and sedimentological studies proved that the major anomaly is due to an ilmenite placer deposit. A comparison of the field geophysical measurements (ground scintillometry, magnetics and induced polarization) with the laboratory samples suggests the following: i) Ground scintillometry is suitable for locating and delineating such placer deposits. ii) Induced polarization is useful to investigate the deposit at depth. iii) Magnetic surveys were not particularly useful in spite of the high ilmenite concentration, thus they do not appear to be a helpful survey tool in this case. A more extensive prospecting program in the Brazilian coastal areas particularly in the State of Bahia are also proposed. (author)

  13. IMPROVEMENT OF FATIGUE STRENGTH OF TIN BABBITT BY REINFORCING WITH NANO ILMENITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. S. BABU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tin Babbitt is an idle journal bearing material, its fatigue strength limits and its usage. To enhance its fatigue strength, in this paper a Tin Babbitt metal matrix is reinforced with nano Ilmenite. The metal matrix nanocomposite was fabricated by using ultrasonic assisted stir casting technique. ASTM standards in statistical planning for fatigue testing were employed in planning the fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were conducted at three stress levels, i.e., 0.9 UTS, 0.7 UTS and 0.5 UTS. Tests were conducted on a rotating-beam type fatigue testing machine. It was observed that the nano Ilmenite reinforcement enhanced the fatigue strength of Tin Babbitt.

  14. Environmental and geochemical assessment of surface sediments on irshansk ilmenite deposit area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Олеговна Крюченко

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is revealed the problem of pollution of surface sediments of Irshansk ilmenite deposit area of various chemical elements hazard class (Mn, V, Ba, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn. It is determined its average content in surface sediments of various functional areas (forest and agricultural land, flood deposits, reclaimed land, calculated geochemical criteria, so given ecological and geochemical assessment of area

  15. Sustainable carbothermal reduction and nitridation of Malaysian ilmenite by polyethylene terephthalate and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Eltefat; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul; Hussin, Hashim; Baharun, Norlia; Ariffin, Kamar Shah; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Fauzi, M. N. Ahmad; Ismail, Hanafi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the carbothermal reduction and nitridation (CTRN) of Malaysian ilmenite has been studied as a part of crucial steps involved in reduction and subsequent chlorination processes for synthesizing titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) from nitrided Malaysian ilmenite concentrates. In CTRN, waste plastics such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) could be utilized as an alternative source of carbon reductant. In this study, titanium oxycarbonitride (TiOxCyNz) separated from iron (Fe) phase was synthesized by non-isothermal CTRN of Malaysian ilmenite under H2-N2 atmosphere by utilizing a mixture of Sarawak Mukah-Balingan coal and PET as reducing agents in a horizontal tube furnace. Experiments have been carried out in the temperature range of 1150-1250°C for 3 hours with various ratios of PET to coal (25 wt.% PET, 50 wt.% PET, and 75 wt.% PET). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) methods of analysis were conducted to assess the microstructures and chemical compositions of the unreduced and reduced samples. The results indicated that utilizing PET had a significant effect on iron separation from titanium oxycarbonitride (TiO0.02C0.13N0.85) at 1250°C with a mixture of 75 wt.% PET. Furthermore, XRD and SEM studies demonstrated that with increasing PET weight ratio in the mixtures, the rate of conversion increased and a low-carbon TiOxCyNz with minimal intermediate titanium sub-oxides was synthesized. The method of applying PET as potential reductant for CTRN of ilmenite has beneficial side effects in sustainable recycling of waste PET.

  16. Measurement of 238U and 232Th radionuclides in ilmenite and synthetic rutile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, M. I.; Siong, K. K.; Fadzil, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    The only factory that currently processes ilmenite to produce synthetic rutile is Tor Minerals in Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia. These two minerals contain radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium. Furthermore, this factory was built close to the residential areas. Thus, the primary issues are radiation exposure attributed to the decay of the radionuclides. Hence, the objectives of this study are to measure the dose and to evaluate activity levels of uranium and thorium. Dose rates from surrounding area of factory indicate the normal range for both on the surface and 1 meter above the ground (0.3-0.7 μSv/hr) lower than the global range of 0.5-1.3 μSv/hr set by UNSCEAR. The mean activity levels of uranium and thorium for ilmenite are 235 Bq/kg and 503 Bq/kg while for synthetic rutile are 980 Bq/kg and 401 Bq/kg, respectively. The result shows that uranium activity levels of synthetic rutile is 4 times higher than ilmenite but it is still lower than the regulatory exemption limit of 1000 Bq/kg set by IAEA Basic Safety Standards. Even though the dose rates at the factory and the activity levels are within safe limits, safety precautions must be followed by the factory management to prevent any unwanted accident to occur.

  17. The Effects of Leaching Process to the TiO2 Synthesis from Bangka Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Ramelan, A. H.; Pramono, E.; Argawan, P.; Djatisulistya, A.; Firdiyono, F.; Sulistiyono, E.; Sari, P. P.

    2018-03-01

    Ilmenite mineral is a naturally occurring iron titanate (FeTiO3) and is abundant in nature. The separation of components into TiO2 and Fe2O3 must be expand. The purpose of this research is to synthesis TiO2 nanoparticles from the filtrate of Bangka ilmenite leaching process. Leaching of ilmenite was done with H2SO4 and HCl at various concentrations. The formation of TiO2 crystal determined by hydrolysis conditions and condensation reaction. TiO2 synthesized from the filtrate of sulfuric acid leaching that produced from TiO2 anatase phase when hydrolyzed in an aquaregia solvent and low concentrations of HCl (0.1M). Hydrolysis conditions at higher concentrations of HCl (1M) was produced TiO2 anatase-rutile phase. The synthesis of TiO2 from the filtrate of hydrochloric acid leaching was produced anatase phase. While the condition under the alcoholic solvent (2-propanol: H2O (v/v) = 9: 1) anatase phase crystallites grow in the temperature range up to 550 °C, above this temperature, TiO2 transform into rutile phase.

  18. The Effects of Biochar and Its Combination with Compost on Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Growth, Soil Properties, and Soil Microbial Activity and Abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Trupiano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of biochar application in combination with organic fertilizer, such as compost, are not fully understood. In this study, we tested the effects of biochar amendment, compost addition, and their combination on lettuce plants grown in a soil poor in nutrients; soil microbiological, chemical, and physical characteristics were analyzed, together with plant growth and physiology. An initial screening was also done to evaluate the effect of biochar and compost toxicity, using cress plants and earthworms. Results showed that compost amendment had clear and positive effects on plant growth and yield and on soil chemical characteristics. However, we demonstrated that also the biochar alone stimulated lettuce leaves number and total biomass, improving soil total nitrogen and phosphorus contents, as well as total carbon, and enhancing related microbial communities. Nevertheless, combining biochar and compost, no positive synergic and summative effects were observed. Our results thus demonstrate that in a soil poor in nutrients the biochar alone could be effectively used to enhance soil fertility and plant growth and biomass yield. However, we can speculate that the combination of compost and biochar may enhance and sustain soil biophysical and chemical characteristics and improve crop productivity over time.

  19. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyan, M. S.; Rasche, F.; Schütt, M.; Smirnova, N.; Schulz, E.; Cadisch, G.

    2013-05-01

    An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA) in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS) is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM) to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2) to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i) the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem), from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM), mineral fertilizer (NPK), their combination (FYM + NPK) and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii) Kraichgau; and (iii) Swabian Alb (Cambisols) areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM), sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A), silt and clay (Si + C), and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC) to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm-1) being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min-1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS) for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max). Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the Chernozem

  20. Combination of pseudomonas putida and EK method to reduce the amount of mercury on landfill soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, A. T. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurshuhaila, M. S.; Azim, M. A. M.; Amirah, S. N.

    2017-11-01

    Landfills usually lack of environment measures especially on soil. There are no guarantee that the landfill soil is free from being contaminated. It may cause harm for humans, animals and plants at surrounding area. In order to solve this problem, advance remediation technique is essential such as the electrokinetic combined with microorganisms known as electrokinetic bioremediation technique. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of P.putida with 15 volt electric current supply (Ek-bio) and without electric current (Bio) in removal of mercury in landfill soil. Both treatments were running throughout 14 days. The P.putida was placed at anode compartment meanwhile sterile distilled water poured at cathode compartment. According to the both results, Ek-bio was removed mercury up to 48 % but by using standard bioremediation treatment, the removal only 32 %. Besides that, the migration of P.putida react more aggressively during the present of electric current compared with bioremediation. As the results, it was proven that by using Ek-bio technique can increase the activity of bacteria beside and the removal of mercury. Therefore, Ek-bio method can be commercialized to the parties concerned to solve the contaminated soil by mercury.

  1. Simultaneous heat and moisture transfer in soils combined with building simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G. H. dos; Mendes, N. [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR/CCET, Thermal Systems Laboratory (LST), Curitiba (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In order to precisely predict ground heat transfer, room air temperature and humidity, a combined model has been developed and conceived to calculate both the coupled heat and moisture transfer in soil and floor and the psychrometrics condition of indoor air. The present methodology for the soil is based on the theory of Philip and De Vries, using variable thermophysical properties for different materials. The governing equations were discretized using the finite-volume method and a three-dimensional model for describing the physical phenomena of heat and mass transfer in unsaturated moist porous soils and floor. Additionally, a lumped transient approach for a building room and a finite-volume multi-layer model for the building envelope have been developed to integrate with the soil model. Results are presented in terms of temperature, humidity and heat flux at the interface between room air and the floor, showing the importance of the approach presented and the model robustness for long-term simulations with a high time step. (author)

  2. X-ray fluorescence and gamma-ray spectrometry combined with multivariate analysis for topographic studies in agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilhos, Natara D.B. de; Melquiades, Fábio L.; Thomaz, Edivaldo L.; Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of soils play a major role in the evaluation of different geochemical signature, soil quality, discrimination of land use type, soil provenance and soil degradation. The objectives of the present study are the soil elemental characterization and soil differentiation in topographic sequence and depth, using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as well as gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The study area is an agricultural region of Boa Vista catchment which is located at Guamiranga municipality, Brazil. PCA analysis was performed with four different data sets: spectral data from EDXRF, spectral data from gamma-ray spectrometry, concentration values from EDXRF measurements and concentration values from gamma-ray spectrometry. All PCAs showed similar results, confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis, allowing the data grouping into top, bottom and riparian zone samples, i.e. the samples were separated due to its landscape position. The two hillslopes present the same behavior independent of the land use history. There are distinctive and characteristic patterns in the analyzed soil. The methodologies presented are promising and could be used to infer significant information about the region to be studied. - Highlights: • Characterization of topographic sequence of two hillslopes from agricultural soil. • Employment of EDXRF and gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with PCA. • The combination of green analytical methodologies with chemometric studies allowed soil differentiation. • The innovative methodology is promising for direct characterization of agricultural catchments

  3. Degradation of 2,4-D in soils by Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles combined with stimulating indigenous microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guodong; Si, Youbin; Tian, Chao; Zhang, Gangya; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-03-01

    Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in soils by Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles combined with soil indigenous microbes was investigated, and the effects of Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles on soil microbial populations and enzyme activities were also studied. The soils contaminated with 2,4-D were treated with Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles. The microbial populations and enzyme activities were analyzed by dilution plate method and chemical assay, respectively, and the concentration of 2,4-D in soil was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles combined with soil indigenous microbes led to a higher degradation efficiency of 2,4-D than the treatments with Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles or indigenous microbes alone. The degradation of 2,4-D in soils followed the pseudo first-order kinetic. The half-lives of 2,4-D degradation (DT₅₀) of the combined treatments were 0.9, 1.9 and 3.1 days in a Red soil, Vertisol and Alfisol, respectively, which implied that the DT₅₀ of the combination treatments were significantly shorter than that of the treatments Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles or indigenous microbes alone. The effects of Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles on soil microbial populations and enzyme activities were also investigated and compared with the α-Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles. The results suggested that the α-Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles had only comparatively small effects on degradation of 2,4-D in soils, while the Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles not only degraded 2,4-D in soils but also increased the soil microbial populations and enzyme activities; the maximum increase in enzyme activities were 67.8% (amylase), 53.8% (acid phosphatase), 26.5% (catalase) and 38.0% (urease), compared with the untreated soil. Moreover, the introduction of Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles at the different dosage resulted in a variable degradation efficiency of 2,4-D in soil. The method of combining Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles with indigenous soil microbes may

  4. The EDTA effect on phytoextraction of single and combined metals-contaminated soils using rainbow pink (Dianthus chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2005-08-01

    Rainbow pink (Dianthus chinensis), a potential phytoextraction plant, can accumulate high concentrations of Cd from metal-contaminated soils. The soils used in this study were artificially added with different metals including (1) CK: original soil, (2) Cd-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1), (3) Zn-treated soil: 100 mg Zn kg(-1), (4) Pb-treated soil: 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), (5) Cd-Zn-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1) and 100 mg Zn kg(-1), (6) Cd-Pb-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1) and 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), (7) Zn-Pb-treated soil: 100 mg Zn kg(-1) and 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), and (8) Cd-Zn-Pb-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1), 100 mg Zn kg(-1), and 1000 mg Pb kg(-1). Three concentrations of 2Na-EDTA solutions (0 (control), 2, and 5 mmol kg(-1) soil) were added to the different metals-treated soils to study the influence of applied EDTA on single and combined metals-contaminated soils phytoextraction using rainbow pink. The results showed that the Cd, Zn, Pb, Fe, or Mn concentrations in different metals-treated soil solutions significantly increased after applying 5 mmol EDTA kg(-1) (p<0.05). The metal concentrations in different metals-treated soils extracted by deionized water also significantly increased after applying 5 mmol EDTA kg(-1) (p<0.05). Because of the high extraction capacity of both 0.005 M DTPA (pH 5.3) and 0.05 M EDTA (pH 7.0), applying EDTA did not significantly increase the Cd, Zn, or Pb concentration in both extracts for most of the treatments. Applying EDTA solutions can significantly increase the Cd and Pb concentrations in the shoots of rainbow pink (p<0.05). However, this was not statistically significant for Zn because of the low Zn concentration added into the contaminated soils. The results from this study indicate that applying 5 mmol EDTA kg(-1) can significantly increase the Cd, Zn, or Pb concentrations both in the soil solution or extracted using deionized water in single or combined metals-contaminated soils, thus increasing the accumulated metals concentrations in

  5. Persistence of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in loess soil under different combinations of temperature, soil moisture and light/darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins Bento, Celia; Yang, Xiaomei; Gort, Gerrit; Xue, Sha; Dam, van Ruud; Zomer, Paul; Mol, Hans G.J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-01-01

    The dissipation kinetics of glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were studied in loess soil, under biotic and abiotic conditions, as affected by temperature, soil moisture (SM) and light/darkness. Nonsterile and sterile soil samples were spiked with 16 mg kg

  6. Organics removal of combined wastewater through shallow soil infiltration treatment: a field and laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyin; Lei, Zhongfang; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio; Xu, Xiaotian; Yin, Didi

    2007-11-19

    Soil infiltration treatment (SIT) was proved to be an effective and low-cost treatment technique for decentralized effluents in the areas without perfect sewage systems. Field-scale experiments were conducted under several conditions to assess organics removals through a shallow soil infiltration treatment (SSIT, with effective depth 0.3m) of combined wastewater (discharge from toilets, restaurants and a gas station), while bench-scale soil column experiments were performed in laboratory in parallel to investigate biological and abiological effects of this kind of system. From the start-up to the 10th month, the field SSIT trenches experienced the lowest and highest temperatures of the operation period in Shanghai and exhibited effective organics removals after maturation, with the highest removal rate 75.8% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), highest ultraviolet absorption at 254 nm (UV(254)) decrease by 67.2% and 35.2-100% removals of phenolic and phthalate pollutants. The laboratory results indicated that more organics could be removed in room-temperatured (25+/-2 degrees C) SSIT systems under different influent COD concentrations from 45 mg/l to 406 mg/l, and the highest total COD removal rate could reach 94.0%, in which biological effect accounted for 57.7-71.9%. The results showed that temperature and hydraulic loading rate were the most important factors influencing the removals of COD and organic pollutants in SSIT.

  7. Combination of biochar amendment and phytoremediation for hydrocarbon removal in petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Zhao, Zhipeng; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-11-01

    Remediation of soils contaminated with petroleum is a challenging task. Four different bioremediation strategies, including natural attenuation, biochar amendment, phytoremediation with ryegrass, and a combination of biochar and ryegrass, were investigated with greenhouse pot experiments over a 90-day period. The results showed that planting ryegrass in soil can significantly improve the removal rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and the number of microorganisms. Within TPHs, the removal rate of total n-alkanes (45.83 %) was higher than that of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (30.34 %). The amendment of biochar did not result in significant improvement of TPH removal. In contrast, it showed a clear negative impact on the growth of ryegrass and the removal of TPHs by ryegrass. The removal rate of TPHs was significantly lower after the amendment of biochar. The results indicated that planting ryegrass is an effective remediation strategy, while the amendment of biochar may not be suitable for the phytoremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  8. The Effects of Fungicide, Soil Fumigant, Bio-Organic Fertilizer and Their Combined Application on Chrysanthemum Fusarium Wilt Controlling, Soil Enzyme Activities and Microbial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustained monoculture often leads to a decline in soil quality, in particular to the build-up of pathogen populations, a problem that is conventionally addressed by the use of either fungicide and/or soil fumigation. This practice is no longer considered to be either environmentally sustainable or safe. While the application of organic fertilizer is seen as a means of combating declining soil fertility, it has also been suggested as providing some control over certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Here, a greenhouse comparison was made of the Fusarium wilt control efficacy of various treatments given to a soil in which chrysanthemum had been produced continuously for many years. The treatments comprised the fungicide carbendazim (MBC, the soil fumigant dazomet (DAZ, the incorporation of a Paenibacillus polymyxa SQR21 (P. polymyxa SQR21, fungal antagonist enhanced bio-organic fertilizer (BOF, and applications of BOF combined with either MBC or DAZ. Data suggest that all the treatments evaluated show good control over Fusarium wilt. The MBC and DAZ treatments were effective in suppressing the disease, but led to significant decrease in urease activity and no enhancement of catalase activity in the rhizosphere soils. BOF including treatments showed significant enhancement in soil enzyme activities and microbial communities compared to the MBC and DAZ, evidenced by differences in bacterial/fungi (B/F ratios, Shannon–Wiener indexes and urease, catalase and sucrase activities in the rhizosphere soil of chrysanthemum. Of all the treatments evaluated, DAZ/BOF application not only greatly suppressed Fusarium wilt and enhanced soil enzyme activities and microbial communities but also promoted the quality of chrysanthemum obviously. Our findings suggest that combined BOF with DAZ could more effectively control Fusarium wilt disease of chrysanthemum.

  9. Changes to soil water content and biomass yield under combined maize and maize-weed vegetation with different fertilization treatments in loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehoczky Éva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Especially during early developmental stages, competition with weeds can reduce crop growth and have a serious effect on productivity. Here, the effects of interactions between soil water content (SWC, nutrient availability, and competition from weeds on early stage crop growth were investigated, to better understand this problem. Field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using long-term study plots on loam soil in Hungary. Plots of maize (Zea mays L. and a weed-maize combination were exposed to five fertilization treatments. SWC was observed along the 0–80 cm depth soil profile and harvested aboveground biomass (HAB was measured.

  10. Electrochemical reactivity of ilmenite FeTiO3, its nanostructures and oxide-carbon nanocomposites with lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Tao; Glushenkov, Alexey M.; Rahman, Md Mokhlesur; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical reactivity of the ball-milled ilmenite FeTiO 3 and ilmenite nanoflowers with lithium has been investigated. The electrode assembled with the ilmenite nanoflowers delivers better electrochemical performance than that of the milled material during charging and discharging in the potential range of 0.01 and 3 V vs. Li/Li + . The ilmenite nanoflowers demonstrate the capacity of ca. 650 mAh g −1 during the first discharge, and a reversible capacity of approximately 200 mAh g −1 in the course of the first 50 cycles. The possible reaction mechanism between ilmenite and lithium was studied using cyclic voltammetry and transmission electron microscopy. The first discharge involves the formation of an irreversible phase, which is either LiTiO 2 or LiFeO 2 . Subsequently, the extraction–insertion of lithium happens in a reversible manner. It was also observed that the lithium storage might be significantly improved if the electrode was prepared in the form of a nanocomposite of FeTiO 3 with carbon

  11. Combined effects of biocontrol agents and soil amendments on soil microbial populations, plant growth and incidence of charcoal rot of cowpea and wilt of cumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeta SINGH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine the effectiveness of combined use of two biocontrol agents, Bacillus firmus and Aspergillus versicolor for control of Macrophomina phaseolina induced charcoal rot of cowpea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cumini induced wilt of cumin. The lowest level of plant mortality (3‒4% due to charcoal rot of cowpea was recorded when bacterium coated seeds were sown in radish compost amended soil compared to the non-amended soil (13.8‒20.5%, but this was not significantly better than some other treatments. Cowpea roots from B. firmus coated seeds had better nodulation than any of the individual A. versicolor treatments. Although B. firmus coated seeds + A. versicolor + farmyard manure resulted in maximum nodulation this was not significantly different to B. firmus seed coating. Root colonization by the combined biocontrol agent treatments was better than the individual biocontrol agent treatments. Combining A. versicolor with farmyard manure supported the maximum populations of total fungi and actinomycetes. In both winter seasons, the lowest incidence of wilt (1.0‒5.2% on cumin was recorded when A. versicolor was amended with neem compost compared to the non-amended soil (5.7‒10.5%. Maximum colonization of A. versicolor on roots was observed in B. firmus + A. versicolor + farmyard manure amended plots. During both years, the treatment combination of A. versicolor in neem compost amended plots resulted in maximum populations of fungi, bacteria and A. versicolor in the soil, which was greater than in the non-amended soil. Significant increases in disease control were not recorded after single or repeated delivery of A. versicolor. These results suggest that combining B. firmus as seed coatings with A. versicolor as soil applications gives improved control of M. phaseolina and Fusarium induced diseases on legume and seed spice crops in arid soils.

  12. Combined climate factors alleviate changes in gross soil nitrogen dynamics in heathlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorsne, Anna-Karin; Rutting, Tobias; Ambus, Per

    2014-01-01

    of exposure to three climate change factors, i.e. warming, elevated CO2 (eCO(2)) and summer drought, applied both in isolation and in combination. By conducting laboratory N-15 tracing experiments we show that warming increased both gross N mineralization and nitrification rates. In contrast, gross......The ongoing climate change affects biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, but the magnitude and direction of this impact is yet unclear. To shed further light on the climate change impact, we investigated alterations in the soil nitrogen (N) cycling in a Danish heathland after 5 years......CO(2). In the full treatment combination, simulating the predicted climate for the year 2075, gross N transformations were only moderately affected compared to control, suggesting a minor alteration of the N cycle due to climate change. Overall, our study confirms the importance of multifactorial field...

  13. Soil Carbon Mapping in Low Relief Areas with Combined Land Use Types and Percentages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. L.; Wu, Z. H.; Chen, Y. Y.; Wang, B. Z.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate mapping of soil carbon in low relief areas is of great challenge because of the defect of conventional "soil-landscape" model. Efforts have been made to integrate the land use information in the modelling and mapping of soil organic carbon (SOC), in which the spatial context was ignored. With 256 topsoil samples collected from Jianghan Plain, we aim to (i) explore the land-use dependency of SOC via one-way ANOVA; (ii) investigate the "spillover effect" of land use on SOC content; (iii) examine the feasibility of land use types and percentages (obtained with a 200-meter buffer) for soil mapping via regression Kriging (RK) models. Results showed that the SOC of paddy fields was higher than that of woodlands and irrigated lands. The land use type could explain 20.5 % variation of the SOC, and the value increased to 24.7 % when the land use percentages were considered. SOC was positively correlated with the percentage of water area and irrigation canals. Further research indicated that SOC of irrigated lands was significantly correlated with the percentage of water area and irrigation canals, while paddy fields and woodlands did not show similar trends. RK model that combined land use types and percentages outperformed the other models with the lowest values of RMSEC (5.644 g/kg) and RMSEP (6.229 g/kg), and the highest R2C (0.193) and R2P (0.197). In conclusions, land use types and percentages serve as efficient indicators for the SOC mapping in plain areas. Additionally, irrigation facilities contributed to the farmland SOC sequestration especially in irrigated lands.

  14. Multipurpose units: combining of technological operations of a soil cultivating and seeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Petukhov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern domestic market of technique for grain crops seeding differs variety of machines brands and types. The intensive type technologies combining technological operations of a soil cultivating and grain crops seeding in one pass are more widely used. The authors have established that one-operational units in new machine park have to be replaced multipurpose, universal and combined machines. Such approach will reduce number of machines in grain production from 20-30 to 5-6 name titles. Possibilities of multipurpose sowing units for simultaneous fertilizers application, soil cultivating and weeds destruction were analyzed. It was specified that nowadays there are several technologies types with two, four or six operations overlapping. Operational performance, technological and economical efficiency of the best multipurpose and also efficiency of technological operations overlapping at grain crops cultivating in the conditions of their real operation and at a trial establishment in the Kuban research institute of information and technical and economic studies of agro-industrial complex engineering and technical services were studied. Tit was defined that use of multipurpose sowing units and also studied efficiency of decreases operational costs by 48-71 percent, fuel consumption - by 41-76 percent and reduces labor input by 72-80 percent. Thus grain crops seeding is possible in optimal agrotime because of 4-6 technological operations overlapping in one pass.

  15. Studies on Thorium Adsorption Characteristics upon Activated Titanium Hydroxide Prepared from Rosetta Ilmenite Concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M; Zaki, S

    2016-01-01

    The titanium hydroxide prepared from Rosetta ilmenite concentrate has been applied for Th (IV) adsorption from its acid aqueous solutions. The prepared hydroxide is first characterized by both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis. The relevant factors affecting the adsorption process have been studied. The obtained equilibrium data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm rather than Freundlich isotherm, while the adsorption kinetic data follow the pseudo-second order model. The different thermodynamic parameters have also been calculated and indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous

  16. Ecological effects of combined pollution associated with e-waste recycling on the composition and diversity of soil microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Xin; Lin, Xue-Rui; Chen, Wen-Ce; Zhou, Qi-Xing; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Huang, Li-Nan

    2015-06-02

    The crude processing of electronic waste (e-waste) has led to serious contamination in soils. While microorganisms may play a key role in remediation of the contaminated soils, the ecological effects of combined pollution (heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers) on the composition and diversity of microbial communities remain unknown. In this study, a suite of e-waste contaminated soils were collected from Guiyu, China, and the indigenous microbial assemblages were profiled by 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis. Our data revealed significant differences in microbial taxonomic composition between the contaminated and the reference soils, with Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes dominating the e-waste-affected communities. Genera previously identified as organic pollutants-degrading bacteria, such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Alcanivorax, were frequently detected. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that approximately 70% of the observed variation in microbial assemblages in the contaminated soils was explained by eight environmental variables (including soil physiochemical parameters and organic pollutants) together, among which moisture content, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), and copper were the major factors. These results provide the first detailed phylogenetic look at the microbial communities in e-waste contaminated soils, demonstrating that the complex combined pollution resulting from improper e-waste recycling may significantly alter soil microbiota.

  17. Combination of microbial oxidation and biogenic schwertmannite immobilization: A potential remediation for highly arsenic-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihui; Wu, Zijian; Liao, Yingping; Liao, Qi; Yang, Weichun; Chai, Liyuan

    2017-08-01

    Here, a novel strategy that combines microbial oxidation by As(III)-oxidizing bacterium and biogenic schwertmannite (Bio-SCH) immobilization was first proposed and applied for treating the highly arsenic-contaminated soil. Brevibacterium sp. YZ-1 isolated from a highly As-contaminated soil was used to oxidize As(III) in contaminated soils. Under optimum culture condition for microbial oxidation, 92.3% of water-soluble As(III) and 84.4% of NaHCO 3 -extractable As(III) in soils were removed. Bio-SCH synthesized through the oxidation of ferrous sulfate by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans immobilize As(V) in the contaminated soil effectively. Consequently, the combination of microbial oxidation and Bio-SCH immobilization performed better in treating the highly As-contaminated soil with immobilization efficiencies of 99.3% and 82.6% for water-soluble and NaHCO 3 -extractable total As, respectively. Thus, the combination can be considered as a green remediation strategy for developing a novel and valuable solution for As-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reducibility study of Rossetta ilmenite ore briquettes and powder with coke breeze at 800-1100°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd el Gawad Hala H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite ore fine and coke breeze as reduced material were briquetted with different amounts of organic materials such as molasses or pitch were studied in this investigation. The produced briquettes at reasonable condition were reduced in nitrogen atmosphere at temperature range 800 - 1100oC to determine the factors controlling the reduction and to determine the controlling mechanism. Also ilmenite ore fine with coke breeze were reduced at the same temperature range in nitrogen atmosphere without briquetting process, for the sake of comparison.

  19. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution in cylindrical ilmenite (FeTiO3) due to microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Mas Irfan P.; Fellicia, Dian Mughni; Rafandi, Ferdiansyah Iqbal

    2018-04-01

    Microwave assisted heating has been extensively used in materials processing particularly in extraction of TiO2 from Ilmenite (FeTiO3) minerals. Nevertheless, this method could generate non-uniform temperature distribution during the heating process. The observation of this phenomena in cylindrical ilmenite has been conducted by numerical simulation using finite element method according to the Poynthing's theorem. Four different cylinders with variation on its height were simulated in ANSYS 17 with input microwave power of 5.5 Kw. The results indicated that height of heated object could vigorously influence the uniformity of temperature inside the body.

  20. Alkali roasting of bomar ilmenite: rare earths recovery and physico-chemical changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Segado Sergio

    2014-11-01

    (FeTiO3 is presented as a process route for integrated beneficiation of the mineral for rutile-rich phase and rare earth oxides; the latter is released as a consequence of physical changes in the ilmenite matrix, during the water leaching after roasting. The oxidative alkali roasting transforms ilmenite mineral into water-insoluble alkali titanate and water-soluble ferrite. After roasting the insoluble alkali titanate is separated from rare-earth oxide mixture in colloidal form and water-soluble ferrite. Further leaching of alkali titanate is carried out with oxalic (0.3M and ascorbic (0.01M acid solution which removes the remaining Fe2+ ions into the leachate and allows precipitation of high-purity synthetic rutile containing more than 95% TiO2. Iron is removed as iron oxalate. The physico-chemical changes occurred during the roasting and leaching processes are reported by comparing the role of alkali on the roasting process and product morphologies formed.

  1. First-principles investigation of Fe-doped MgSiO3-ilmenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stashans, Arvids; Rivera, Krupskaya; Pinto, Henry P.

    2012-01-01

    First principles density functional theory and generalised gradient approximation (GGA) have been exploited to investigate Fe-doped ilmenite-type MgSiO 3 mineral. Strong electron correlation effects not included in a density-functional formalism are described by a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb repulsion (the DFT+U approach). Microstructure of equilibrium geometries, electronic band structures as well as magnetic properties are computed and discussed in detail. Hartree-Fock methodology is used as an extra tool to study optical properties of the same system. For equilibrium state of the doped mineral we find zigzag-type atomic rearrangements around the Fe impurity. The inclusion of correlation effects leads to an improved description of the electronic properties. In particular, it is discovered that Fe incorporation produces local energy levels within the band-gap of the material. Using ΔSCF method optical absorption energies are found to be equal to 2.2 and 2.6 eV leading to light absorption at longer wavelengths compared to the undoped MgSiO 3 . Our results provide evidence on the occurrence of local magnetic moment in the region surrounding iron dopant. According to the outcomes, the Fe⇒Mg reaction can be described as substitutionally labile with Fe 2+ complex being found in the high-spin state at low pressure MgSiO 3 -ilmenite conditions.

  2. First-principles investigation of Fe-doped MgSiO{sub 3}-ilmenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stashans, Arvids, E-mail: arvids@utpl.edu.ec [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Rivera, Krupskaya [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Escuela de Geologia y Minas, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Pinto, Henry P. [Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217-0510 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    First principles density functional theory and generalised gradient approximation (GGA) have been exploited to investigate Fe-doped ilmenite-type MgSiO{sub 3} mineral. Strong electron correlation effects not included in a density-functional formalism are described by a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb repulsion (the DFT+U approach). Microstructure of equilibrium geometries, electronic band structures as well as magnetic properties are computed and discussed in detail. Hartree-Fock methodology is used as an extra tool to study optical properties of the same system. For equilibrium state of the doped mineral we find zigzag-type atomic rearrangements around the Fe impurity. The inclusion of correlation effects leads to an improved description of the electronic properties. In particular, it is discovered that Fe incorporation produces local energy levels within the band-gap of the material. Using {Delta}SCF method optical absorption energies are found to be equal to 2.2 and 2.6 eV leading to light absorption at longer wavelengths compared to the undoped MgSiO{sub 3}. Our results provide evidence on the occurrence of local magnetic moment in the region surrounding iron dopant. According to the outcomes, the Fe Rightwards-Double-Arrow Mg reaction can be described as substitutionally labile with Fe{sup 2+} complex being found in the high-spin state at low pressure MgSiO{sub 3}-ilmenite conditions.

  3. The removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil by a combination of sulfidisation and flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanthuyne, Mathias; Maes, André

    2002-05-06

    The possibility of removing cadmium, copper, lead and zinc from Belgian loamy soil by a combination of sulfidisation pre-treatment and Denver flotation was investigated. The potentially available--sulfide convertible--metal content of the metal polluted soil was estimated by EDTA (0.1 M, pH 4.65) extraction and BCR sequential extraction. EDTA extraction is better at approximating the metal percentage that is expected to be convertible into a metal sulfide phase, in contrast to the sequential extraction procedure of 'Int. J. Environ. Anal. Chem. 51 (1993) pp. 135-151' in which transition metals present as iron oxide co-precipitates are dissolved by hydroxylammoniumchloride in the second extraction step. To compare the surface characteristics of metal sulfides formed by sulfidisation with those of crystalline metal sulfides, two types of synthetic sediments were prepared and extracted with 0.1 M EDTA (pH 4.65) in anoxic conditions. Separate metal sulfides or co-precipitates with iron sulfide were formed by sulfide conditioning. The Denver flotation of both types of synthetic sediments (kerosene as collector at high background electrolyte concentrations) resulted in similar concentrating factors for freshly formed metal sulfides as for fine-grained crystalline metal sulfides. The selective flotation of metal sulfides after sulfide conditioning of a polluted soil, using kerosene or potassium ethyl xanthate as collectors and MIBC as frother, was studied at high background electrolyte concentrations. The sulfidisations were made in ambient air and inside an anoxic glove box. The concentrating factors corrected by the potentially available metal percentage, determined by 0.1 M EDTA extraction, lie between 2 and 3. The selective flotation of these finely dispersed, amorphous, metal sulfides can possibly be improved by optimising the bubble-particle interaction.

  4. Effects of Cu, Zn and Pb Combined Pollution on Soil Hydrolase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Dan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To study the relations between soil enzyme activities and heavy metal pollution, the combined effects of Cu, Zn and Pb on the three hydrolase activities, including invertase(IN, urease(Uand alkaline phosphatase(ALPwere investigated via an orthogonal experiment. Results showed as the following: When the concentration of Cu was 400 mg·kg-1, the U and ALP activities were decreased 51% and 44%, separately; When Zn was at 500 mg·kg-1, IN and ALP activities were only decreased 3% and 9%, while U activity was increased; When Pb was at 500 mg·kg-1, IN and U activities were increased, while ALP activity was decreased 13%. As a whole, Cu was considered as the most remarkable influence factor for IN, U and ALP activity regardless of interactions among the heavy metals, Zn came second, and Pb mainly showed activation. Considering interactions, Cu×Zn could significantly influence U activity(P<0.05, effects of Cu×Pb and Cu×Zn on ALP activity were remarkable(95% confidence interval. The response of ALP activity was more sensitive than the other two enzymes. Soil ALP activity might be a sensitive tool for assessing the pollution degree of Cu.

  5. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hui, E-mail: yuhui200@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang Guohe, E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); An Chunjiang, E-mail: an209@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Wei Jia, E-mail: jia.wei@iseis.org [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. {yields} Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. {yields} Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. {yields} Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  6. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Huang Guohe; An Chunjiang; Wei Jia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. → Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. → Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. → Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  7. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  8. Do shallow soil, low water availability, or their combination increase the competition between grasses with different root systems in karst soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yajie; Li, Zhou; Zhang, Jing; Song, Haiyan; Liang, Qianhui; Tao, Jianping; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Liu, Jinchun

    2017-04-01

    Uneven soil depth and low water availability are the key limiting factors to vegetation restoration and reconstruction in limestone soils such as in vulnerable karst regions. Belowground competition will possibly increase under limited soil resources. Here, we investigate whether low resource availability (including shallow soil, low water availability, and shallow soil and low water availability combined) stimulates the competition between grasses with different root systems in karst soil, by assessing their growth response, biomass allocation, and morphological plasticity. In a full three-way factorial blocked design of soil depth by water availability by neighbor identity, we grew Festuca arundinacea (deep-rooted) and Lolium perenne (shallow-rooted) under normal versus shallow soil depth, high versus low water availability, and in monoculture (conspecific neighbor) versus mixture (neighbor of the other species). The key results were as follows: (1) total biomass and aboveground biomass in either of the species decreased with reduction of resources but were not affected by planting patterns (monoculture or mixture) even at low resource levels. (2) For F. arundinacea, root biomass, root mass fraction, total root length, and root volume were higher in mixture than in monoculture at high resource level (consistent with resource use complementarity), but lower in mixture than in monoculture at low resource levels (consistent with interspecific competition). In contrast for L. perenne, either at high or low resource level, these root traits had mostly similar values at both planting patterns. These results suggest that deep-rooted and shallow-rooted plant species can coexist in karst regions under current climatic regimes. Declining resources, due to shallow soil, a decrease in precipitation, or combined shallow soil and karst drought, increased the root competition between plants of deep-rooted and shallow-rooted species. The root systems of deep-rooted plants may be

  9. A combined approach of physicochemical and biological methods for the characterization of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masakorala, Kanaji; Yao, Jun; Chandankere, Radhika; Liu, Haijun; Liu, Wenjuan; Cai, Minmin; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-01-01

    Main physicochemical and microbiological parameters of collected petroleum-contaminated soils with different degrees of contamination from DaGang oil field (southeast of Tianjin, northeast China) were comparatively analyzed in order to assess the influence of petroleum contaminants on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of soil. An integration of microcalorimetric technique with urease enzyme analysis was used with the aim to assess a general status of soil metabolism and the potential availability of nitrogen nutrient in soils stressed by petroleum-derived contaminants. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of contaminated soils varied from 752.3 to 29,114 mg kg(−1). Although the studied physicochemical and biological parameters showed variations dependent on TPH content, the correlation matrix showed also highly significant correlation coefficients among parameters, suggesting their utility in describing a complex matrix such as soil even in the presence of a high level of contaminants. The microcalorimetric measures gave evidence of microbial adaptation under highest TPH concentration; this would help in assessing the potential of a polluted soil to promote self-degradation of oil-derived hydrocarbon under natural or assisted remediation. The results highlighted the importance of the application of combined approach in the study of those parameters driving the soil amelioration and bioremediation.

  10. [Effects of straw returning combined with medium and microelements application on soil organic carbon sequestration in cropland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen Hui; Shi, Jiang Lan; Jia, Zhou; Ding, Ting Ting; Tian, Xiao Hong

    2016-04-22

    A 52-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of maize straw decomposition with combined medium element (S) and microelements (Fe and Zn) application on arable soil organic carbon sequestration. During the straw decomposition, the soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) content and CO 2 -C mineralization rate increased with the addition of S, Fe and Zn, respectively. Also, the cumulative CO 2 -C efflux after 52-day laboratory incubation significantly increased in the treatments with S, or Fe, or Zn addition, while there was no significant reduction of soil organic carbon content in the treatments. In addition, Fe or Zn application increased the inert C pools and their proportion, and apparent balance of soil organic carbon, indicating a promoting effect of Fe or Zn addition on soil organic carbon sequestration. In contrast, S addition decreased the proportion of inert C pools and apparent balance of soil organic carbon, indicating an adverse effect of S addition on soil organic carbon sequestration. The results suggested that when nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers were applied, inclusion of S, or Fe, or Zn in straw incorporation could promote soil organic carbon mineralization process, while organic carbon sequestration was favored by Fe or Zn addition, but not by S addition.

  11. Changes in heavy metal mobility and availability from contaminated wetland soil remediated with combined biochar-compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Yang, Zhaoxue; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Guangming; Yu, Man; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Haipeng; Qian, Yingying; Li, Xuemei; Luo, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The combination of biochar and compost has been proven to be effective in heavy metals contaminated wetland soil restoration. However, the influence of different proportions between biochar and compost on immobilization of heavy metals in soil has been less studied up to date. Therefore, we investigated the effect of different ratios of biochar-compost mixtures on availability and speciation distribution of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in wetland soil. The results showed that applying all amendment combinations into wetland soil increased gradually the total organic carbon (TOC) and water-extract organic carbon (WEOC) as the compost percentage rose in biochar-composts. The higher pH was obtained in a certain biochar addition (20% and 40%) in combinations due to efficient interaction of biochar with compost. All amendments could significantly decrease availability of Cd and Zn mainly from pH change, but increase available Cu concentration as the result of increased water-extract organic carbon and high total Cu content in compost. Moreover, amendments can decrease easily exchangeable fraction and increase reducible of Cd and Zn greatly with increase of compost content in combinations, while amendments containing compost promote transformation of Cu from Fe/Mn oxide and residual fractions to organic bindings. These results demonstrate that different ratios of biochar and compost have a significant effect on availability and speciation of heavy metals in multi-metal-contaminated wetland soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combining Footwear with Public Health Iconography to Prevent Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Sarah B; Friant, Sagan; Clech, Lucie; Malavé, Carly; Kemigabo, Catherine; Obeti, Richard; Goldberg, Tony L

    2017-01-11

    Shoes are effective for blocking soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) that penetrate the skin. Unfortunately, shoe-wearing is uncommon in many areas where STHs are prevalent, in part because local populations are unaware of the health benefits of wearing shoes. This is especially true in low-literacy populations, where information dissemination through written messages is not possible. We launched a public health intervention that combines a public health image with sandals. The image is a "lenticular image" that combines two alternating pictures to depict the efficacy of shoes for preventing STH infection. This image is adhered to the shoe, such that the message is linked directly to the primary means of prevention. To create a culturally appropriate image, we conducted five focus group discussions, each with a different gender and age combination. Results of focus group discussions reinforced the importance of refining public health messages well in advance of distribution so that cultural acceptability is strong. After the image was finalized, we deployed shoes with the image in communities in western Uganda where hookworm is prevalent. We found that the frequency of shoe-wearing was 25% higher in communities receiving the shoes than in control communities. Microscopic analyses of fecal samples for parasites showed a sustained reduction in infection intensity for parasites transmitted directly through the feet when people received shoes with a public health image. Our results show that combining culturally appropriate images with public health interventions can be effective in low-literacy populations. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Toxicokinetics of Zn and Cd in the earthworm Eisenia andrei exposed to metal-contaminated soils under different combinations of air temperature and soil moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaraz, M Nazaret; Loureiro, Susana; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated how different combinations of air temperature (20 °C and 25 °C) and soil moisture content (50% and 30% of the soil water holding capacity, WHC), reflecting realistic climate change scenarios, affect the bioaccumulation kinetics of Zn and Cd in the earthworm Eisenia andrei. Earthworms were exposed for 21 d to two metal-contaminated soils (uptake phase), followed by 21 d incubation in non-contaminated soil (elimination phase). Body Zn and Cd concentrations were checked in time and metal uptake (k 1 ) and elimination (k 2 ) rate constants determined; metal bioaccumulation factor (BAF) was calculated as k 1 /k 2 . Earthworms showed extremely fast uptake and elimination of Zn, regardless of the exposure level. Climate conditions had no major impacts on the bioaccumulation kinetics of Zn, although a tendency towards lower k 1 and k 2 values was observed at 25 °C + 30% WHC. Earthworm Cd concentrations gradually increased with time upon exposure to metal-contaminated soils, especially at 50% WHC, and remained constant or slowly decreased following transfer to non-contaminated soil. Different combinations of air temperature and soil moisture content changed the bioaccumulation kinetics of Cd, leading to higher k 1 and k 2 values for earthworms incubated at 25 °C + 50% WHC and slower Cd kinetics at 25 °C + 30% WHC. This resulted in greater BAFs for Cd at warmer and drier environments which could imply higher toxicity risks but also of transfer of Cd within the food chain under the current global warming perspective. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon dioxide emissions from semi-arid soils amended with biochar alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José M; Nieto, M Aurora; López-de-Sá, Esther G; Gascó, Gabriel; Méndez, Ana; Plaza, César

    2014-06-01

    Semi-arid soils cover a significant area of Earth's land surface and typically contain large amounts of inorganic C. Determining the effects of biochar additions on CO2 emissions from semi-arid soils is therefore essential for evaluating the potential of biochar as a climate change mitigation strategy. Here, we measured the CO2 that evolved from semi-arid calcareous soils amended with biochar at rates of 0 and 20tha(-1) in a full factorial combination with three different fertilizers (mineral fertilizer, municipal solid waste compost, and sewage sludge) applied at four rates (equivalent to 0, 75, 150, and 225kg potentially available Nha(-1)) during 182 days of aerobic incubation. A double exponential model, which describes cumulative CO2 emissions from two active soil C compartments with different turnover rates (one relatively stable and the other more labile), was found to fit very well all the experimental datasets. In general, the organic fertilizers increased the size and decomposition rate of the stable and labile soil C pools. In contrast, biochar addition had no effects on any of the double exponential model parameters and did not interact with the effects ascribed to the type and rate of fertilizer. After 182 days of incubation, soil organic and microbial biomass C contents tended to increase with increasing the application rates of organic fertilizer, especially of compost, whereas increasing the rate of mineral fertilizer tended to suppress microbial biomass. Biochar was found to increase both organic and inorganic C contents in soil and not to interact with the effects of type and rate of fertilizer on C fractions. As a whole, our results suggest that the use of biochar as enhancer of semi-arid soils, either alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers, is unlikely to increase abiotic and biotic soil CO2 emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combining hyperspectral imagery and legacy measured soil profiles to map subsurface soil properties in a Mediterranean area (Cap-Bon, Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagacherie, Philippe; Sneep, Anne-Ruth; Gomez, Cécile

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Visible Near InfraRed (Vis-NIR) Hyperspectral imagery is a cost-efficient way for mapping soil properties at fine resolutions (~5m) over large areas. However, such mapping is only feasible for soil surface since the effective penetration depths of optical sensors do not exceed several millimetres. This study aimed to extend the use of Vis-NIR hyperspectral imagery to the mapping of subsurface properties at three intervals of depth (15-30 cm, 30-60 cm and 60-100 cm) as specified by the GlobalSoilMap project. To avoid additional data collection, our basic idea was to develop an original Digital Soil Mapping approach that combines the digital maps of surface soil properties obtained from Vis-NIR hyperspectral imagery with legacy soil profiles of the region and with easily available images of DEM-derived parameters. The study was conducted in a pedologically-contrasted 300km² cultivated area located in the Cap Bon region (Northern Tunisia). AISA-Dual Vis-NIR hyperspectral airborne data were acquired over the studied area with a fine spatial resolution (5 m) and fine spectral resolution (260 spectral bands from 450 to 2500nm). Vegetated surfaces were masked to conserve only bare soil surface which represented around 50% of the study area. Three soil surface properties (clay and sand contents, Cation Exchange Capacity) were successfully mapped over the bare soils, from these data using Partial Least Square Regression models (R2 > 0.7). We used as additional data a set of images of landscape covariates derived from a 30 meter DEM and a local database of 152 legacy soil profiles from which soil properties values at the required intervals of depths were computed using an equal-area-spline algorithm. Our Digital Soil Mapping approach followed two steps: i) the development of surface-subsurface functions - linear models and random forests - that estimates subsurface property values from surface ones and landscape covariates and that

  16. Kajian Konsep Teknologi Pengolahan Pasir Zirkon Lokal yang Mengandung Monasit, Senotim dan Ilmenit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Poernomo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of zircon (ZrSiO4 in the nature is mostly associated with some of the valuable oxide compounds (VOC, such as TiO2 and rare earth oxides (REO. The existence of natural minerals in Indonesia containing zirconium (Zr and REO lies in 13 regions, ranging from Aceh to West Papua province. Based on those aforementioned aspects, the goal of this research is to conduct the study of integrated technology of local zircon sand processing containing TiO2 and REO. The study was conducted by analyzing the content of VOC in zircon sand samples from the areas of Landak and Tumbang Titi West Kalimantan and Bangka by using XRF. Based on the content of VOC in this zircon sand, it can be predicted that the zircon sand from the area of Landak and Tumbang Titi West Kalimantan and Bangka contains mineral zircon (ZrSiO4, ilmenite (FeTiO3, monazite (LREE, ThPO4, and xenotime (HREE, ThPO4. Based on these types of mineral, the flow chart of beneficiation technology process to increase the concentration of each mineral and the flow chart of zircon concentrate process into ZrO2(zirconia and ZrOCl2.8H2O (zirconium oxychloride industrial grade and zirconia and zirconium chemicals nuclear grade, ilmenite into TiO2, monazite into Nd2O3, and Th(OH4 concentrate, xenotime into Y2O3, Gd2O3, and Th(OH4 concentrate are obtained in one area of pilot plant or an integrated factory. The results of the study concluded that the concept of local processing of zircon sands containing monazite, xenotime, and ilmenite can be either integrated in the region with the results of multi-product plant. If it can be realized in Indonesia with the addition of an integrated waste water treatment system, then in addition to safe for the environment can also save on production costs and give economic added value for shareholders zircon mining permit

  17. Ion bombardment and adsorption studies on ilmenite (FeTiO3) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of 5 KeV argon and oxygen ion bombardment on FeTiO3 (ilmenite) at low temperatures have been studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Also, using this same technique, the adsorption of O 2 , NO, N 2 O, and CO at 300 K and the adsorption of O 2 and D 2 O at 150K have been studied. Argon and oxygen ion bombardment of ilmenite have confirmed earlier studies on metal oxides that argon ions generally reduce the anion species while oxygen ions generally oxidize the anion species. The two iron states involved were Fe sup +2 and Fe sup O. The reduction of Ti sup +4 was not verified although a significant shift in the Ti(2p1,3) binding energies toward the metallic state was observed after oxygen ion bombardment at low temperatures. At temperatures above 150K, O 2 adsorbs dissociatively on ilmenite while D 2 O adsorbs molecularly below 170K. Above 300 K NO, N 2 O, and CO do not appear to adsorb dissociatively. Low temperature adsorption of D 2 O was found to be inhibited by predosing the ilmenite with O 2

  18. Ion bombardment and adsorption studies on ilmenite (FeTiO3) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of 5 KeV argon and oxygen ion bombardment on FeTiO3 (ilmenite) at low temperatures have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Also, using this same technique, the adsorption of O2, NO, N2O, and CO at 300 K and the adsorption of O2 and D2O at 150K have been studied. Argon and oxygen ion bombardment of ilmenite have confirmed earlier studies on metal oxides that argon ions generally reduce the anion species while oxygen ions generally oxidize the anion species. The two iron states involved were Fe sup +2 and Fe sup O. The reduction of Ti sup +4 was not verified although a significant shift in the Ti(2p1,3) binding energies toward the metallic state was observed after oxygen ion bombardment at low temperatures. At temperatures above 150K, O2 adsorbs dissociatively on ilmenite while D2O adsorbs molecularly below 170K. Above 300 K No, N2O, and CO do not appear to adsorb dissociatively. Low temperature adsorption of D2O was found to be inhibited by predosing the ilmenite with O2.

  19. AN ACTIVE-PASSIVE COMBINED ALGORITHM FOR HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION RETRIEVAL OF SOIL MOISTURE FROM SATELLITE SENSORS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V.; Mladenova, I. E.; Narayan, U.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an essential factor in controlling the partitioning of rainfall into surface runoff and infiltration and solar energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. Remote sensing has long proven its capability to obtain soil moisture in near real-time. However, at the present time we have the Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board NASA’s AQUA platform is the only satellite sensor that supplies a soil moisture product. AMSR-E coarse spatial resolution (~ 50 km at 6.9 GHz) strongly limits its applicability for small scale studies. A very promising technique for spatial disaggregation by combining radar and radiometer observations has been demonstrated by the authors using a methodology is based on the assumption that any change in measured brightness temperature and backscatter from one to the next time step is due primarily to change in soil wetness. The approach uses radiometric estimates of soil moisture at a lower resolution to compute the sensitivity of radar to soil moisture at the lower resolution. This estimate of sensitivity is then disaggregated using vegetation water content, vegetation type and soil texture information, which are the variables on which determine the radar sensitivity to soil moisture and are generally available at a scale of radar observation. This change detection algorithm is applied to several locations. We have used aircraft observed active and passive data over Walnut Creek watershed in Central Iowa in 2002; the Little Washita Watershed in Oklahoma in 2003 and the Murrumbidgee Catchment in southeastern Australia for 2006. All of these locations have different soils and land cover conditions which leads to a rigorous test of the disaggregation algorithm. Furthermore, we compare the derived high spatial resolution soil moisture to in-situ sampling and ground observation networks

  20. In vitro suppression of fungi caused by combinations of apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Wagenaar, A.M.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria may contribute to suppression of fungi during competitive interactions with other bacteria. Four soil bacteria (Brevundimonas sp., Luteibacter sp., Pedobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp.) that exhibited little or no visible antifungal

  1. Mycoextraction by Clitocybe maxima combined with metal immobilization by biochar and activated carbon in an aged soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Cheng, Guanglei; Jiao, Kai; Shi, Wenjin; Wang, Can; Xu, Heng

    2016-08-15

    To develop an eco-friendly and efficient route to remediate soil highly polluted with heavy metals, the idea of mycoextraction combined with metal immobilization by carbonaceous sorbents (biochar and activated carbon) was investigated in this study. Results showed that the application of carbonaceous amendments decreased acid soluble Cd and Cu by 5.13-14.06% and 26.86-49.58%, respectively, whereas the reducible and oxidizable fractions increased significantly as the amount of carbonaceous amendments added increased. The biological activities (microbial biomass, soil enzyme activities) for treatments with carbonaceous sorbents were higher than those of samples without carbonaceous amendments. Clitocybe maxima (C. maxima) simultaneously increased soil enzyme activities and the total number of microbes. Biochar and activated carbon both showed a positive effect on C. maxima growth and metal accumulation. The mycoextraction efficiency of Cd and Cu in treatments with carbonaceous amendments enhanced by 25.64-153.85% and 15.18-107.22%, respectively, in response to that in non-treated soil, which showed positive correlation to the augment of biochar and activated carbon in soil. Therefore, this work suggested the effectiveness of mycoextraction by C. maxima combined the application of biochar and activated carbon in immobilising heavy metal in contaminated soil. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  3. Removal of heavy metals and arsenic from a co-contaminated soil by sieving combined with washing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Li, You; Yan, Xiulan

    2016-03-01

    Batch experiments were conducted with a heavy metals and arsenic co-contaminated soil from an abandoned mine to evaluate the feasibility of a remediation technology that combines sieving with soil washing. Leaching of the arsenic and heavy metals from the different particle size fractions was found to decrease in the order: 2mm. With increased contact time, the concentration of heavy metals in the leachate was significantly decreased for small particles, probably because of adsorption by the clay soil component. For the different particle sizes, the removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were 75%-87%, and 61%-77% for Zn and Cu, although the extent of removal was decreased for As and Cr at 2mm, although good metal removal efficiencies were also achieved in the small particle size fractions. Through SEM-EDS observations and correlation analysis, the leaching regularity of the heavy metals and arsenic was found to be closely related to Fe, Mn, and Ca contents of the soil fractions. The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil by sieving combined with soil washing was proven to be efficient, and practical remediation parameters were also recommended. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Combined Effects of Nutrient and Pesticide Management on Soil Microbial Activity in Hybrid Rice Double Annual Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEXiao-mei; LIAOMin; LIUWei-ping; SusanneKLOSE

    2004-01-01

    Combined effects on soil microbial activity of nutrient and pesticide management in hybrid rice double annual cropping system were studied. Results of field experiment demonstrated significant changes in soil microbial biomass phospholipid contents,abundance of heterotrophic bacteria and proteolytic bacteria, electron transport system (ETS)/dehydrogenase activity, soil protein contents under different management practices and at various growth stages. Marked depletions in the soil microbial biomass phospholipid contents were found with the advancement of crop growth stages, while the incorporation of fertilizers and/or pesticides also induced slight changes, and the lowest microbial biomass phospholipid content was found with pesticides application alone. A decline in the bacterial abundance of heterotrophic bacteria and proteolytic bacteria was observed during the continuance of crop growth, while the lowest abundance of heterotrophic bacteria and proteolyrJc bacteria was found with pesticides application alone, which coincided with the decline of soil microbial biomass. A consistent increase in the electron transport svstem activit), was measured during the different crop growth stages of rice. The use of fertilizers (NPK) alone or combined with pesticides increased it, while a decline was noticed with pesticides application alone as compared with the control.The soil protein content was found to be relatively stable with fertilizers and/or pesticides application at various growth stages in both crops undertaken, but notable changes were detected at different growrh stages

  5. Combined Effects of Nutrient and Pesticide Management on Soil Microbial Activity in Hybrid Rice Double Annual Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiao-mei; LIAO Min; LIU Wei-ping; Susanne KLOSE

    2004-01-01

    Combined effects on soil microbial activity of nutrient and pesticide management in hybrid rice double annual cropping system were studied. Results of field experiment demonstrated significant changes in soil microbial biomass phospholipid contents,abundance of heterotrophic bacteria and proteolytic bacteria, electron transport system (ETS)/dehydrogenase activity, soil protein contents under different management practices and at various growth stages. Marked depletions in the soil microbial biomass phospholipid contents were found with the advancement of crop growth stages, while the incorporation of fertilizers and/or pesticides also induced slight changes, and the lowest microbial biomass phospholipid content was found with pesticides application alone. A decline in the bacterial abundance of heterotrophic bacteria and proteolytic bacteria was observed during the continuance of crop growth, while the lowest abundance of heterotrophic bacteria and proteolytic bacteria was found with pesticides application alone, which coincided with the decline of soil microbial biomass. A consistent increase in the electron transport system activity was measured during the different crop growth stages of rice. The use of fertilizers (NPK) alone or combined with pesticides increased it, while a decline was noticed with pesticides application alone as compared with the control.The soil protein content was found to be relatively stable with fertilizers and/or pesticides application at various growth stages in both crops undertaken, but notable changes were detected at different growth stages.

  6. Investigations of effective porosity of till by means of a combined soil-moisture/density gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, L.; Modig, S.

    1974-01-01

    Effective porosity and processes of saturation and dewatering in till have been investigated. The study was performed in undisturbed till columns, surrounded by ring-shaped excavations filled with sand. The procedure allowed for a raising and lowering of an artificial groundwater level in the till under controlled conditions, which in turn made possible controlled processes of saturation and dewatering. A combined gamma-neutron soil moisture /density gauge was used. The water content was recorded during a period in which water was added to a specially prepared, undisturbed in-situ soil column until a state of saturation was reached. This was followed by a period of induced dewatering by gravity drainage. The drainage was recorded until a steady state> approximately equalling field capacity, was approached (5-16 d). Water contents at saturation are assumed approximately to equal total porosity, having a range of 17.9-32.0% in the investigated till. The intensity of drainage was highest on the first day of dewatering and then diminished with time. A perfectly steady state was never reached. Therefore field capacity is used with indices, indicating the length of time of drainage. Consequently, effective porosity is qualified by the corresponding indices. After 15-16 days of gravity drainage, effective porosity was calculated to be on the average 7.4% at one test plot and 3.4% at another. The difference has been attributed to a corresponding difference in depth to the natural groundwater level; because of the method used a higher groundwater level and capillary fringe may have hampered the complete drainage, resulting in a relatively low value of effective porosity. The investigation is most likely to be applicable in water balance studies, groundwater discharge predictions and various construction and waste-water projects in moraine terrain. (author)

  7. Electrokinetic-Enhanced Remediation of Phenanthrene-Contaminated Soil Combined with Sphingomonas sp. GY2B and Biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weijia; Guo, Chuling; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xujun; Wei, Yanfu; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Electrokinetic-microbial remediation (EMR) has emerged as a promising option for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to enhance degradation of phenanthrene (Phe)-contaminated soils using EMR combined with biosurfactants. The electrokinetic (EK) remediation, combined with Phe-degrading Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, and biosurfactant obtained by fermentation of Pseudomonas sp. MZ01, degraded Phe in the soil with an efficiency of up to 65.1 % at the anode, 49.9 % at the cathode after 5 days of the treatment. The presence of biosurfactants, electricity, and a neutral electrolyte stimulated the growth of the degrading bacteria as shown by a rapid increase in microbial biomass with time. The electrical conductivity and pH changed little during the course of the treatment, which benefitted the growth of microorganisms and the remediation of Phe-contaminated soil. The EMR system with the addition of biosurfactant had the highest Phe removal, demonstrating the biosurfactant may enhance the bioavailability of Phe and the interaction with the microorganism. This study suggests that the EMR combined with biosurfactants can be used to enhance in situ bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils.

  8. Combined Amendments of Nano-hydroxyapatite Immobilized Cadmium in Contaminated Soil-Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Lei; Yin, Jiang; Qi, Lipan; Feng, Yan

    2018-04-01

    The toxicity of cadmium (Cd) has posed major public health concern in crops grown in the Cd-contaminated soils. The effects of five amendments, nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and it combined with lime, zeolite, bone mill and fly ash on Cd immobilization in soils and uptake in potatoes, were investigated in a contaminated soil by pot experiments. The result showed that the applications of combined amendments significantly decreased the bioavailable Cd concentrations extracted by TCLP, DTPA-TEA and MgCl 2 in the contaminated soils, and changed the soluble and exchangeable and specifically sorbed fractions to oxide-bound and organic-bound fractions. Compared to the control group, the concentrations of Cd in the potato tubers grown in n-HA, n-HA + Fly ash, n-HA + Lime, n-HA + Bone mill and n-HA + Zeolite soil were reduced 17.4%, 20.7%, 15.2%, 32.6% and 39.1%, respectively. Nano-hydroxyapatite combined amendments was more effective in reducing bioavailable Cd concentrations and Cd accumulations in potatoes, especially for n-HA + Z.

  9. Paramagnetic resonance and susceptibility of ilmenite, FeTiO3 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, P. F.; Parasiris, A.; Pandey, R. K.; Gries, B. L.; Kirk, W. P.

    1991-01-01

    Large high-purity single crystals of FeTiO3 with ilmenite structure have been grown from a stoichiometric melt of Fe2O3 and TiO2 under an inert atmosphere using the modified Czochralski technique. Susceptibility and X-band paramagnetic resonance studies have been performed. Susceptibility measurements indicate a Neel temperature of about 59 K. The paramagnetic resonance spectrum for magnetic field perpendicular to the crystal c axis consists of a portion of a single, very intense approximately Lorentzian absorption line with its peak at about 600 G and half width at half maximum almost 1200 G. The absorption extends to zero magnetic field. For magnetic field approximately parallel to the c axis, the paramagnetic absorption is much smaller and may be considered a superposition of two approximately Lorentzian line shapes. The magnetic resonance measurements indicate a weak temperature dependence and large angular anisotropy.

  10. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes--a transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S M C; Ferreira Jorge, R M; Castro, P M L

    2009-10-30

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the most common sources of soil pollution. However, the major drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, thus leading to the treatment of the off-gas resulting from volatilisation. As such, a combination of an air-injection bioventing system and a biotrickling filter was applied for the treatment of contaminated soil, the latter aiming at the treatment of the emissions resulting from the bioventing process. With a moisture content of 10%, soil contaminated with toluene at two different concentrations, namely 2 and 14 mg g soil(-1), were treated successfully using an air-injection bioventing system at a constant air flow rate of ca. 0.13 dm(3) min(-1), which led to the removal of ca. 99% toluene, after a period of ca. 5 days of treatment. A biotrickling filter was simultaneously used to treat the outlet gas emissions, which presented average removal efficiencies of ca. 86%. The proposed combination of biotechnologies proved to be an efficient solution for the decontamination process, when an excessive air flow rate was applied, reducing both the soil contamination and the outlet gas emissions, whilst being able to reduce the treatment time required by bioventing only.

  11. System of Antioxidant Protection of Corn Roots in Case of Adaptation to Combined Action of Herbicides and Soil Drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Rossihina

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of antioxidant enzymes in the maize root (Kadr 267 MVhybrid to the combined action of herbicides and soil drought was studied. These conditions activated superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase and coused oscillation in the catalase enzymatic activity.

  12. Effect of soil washing with only chelators or combining with ferric chloride on soil heavy metal removal and phytoavailability: Field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofang; Wei, Zebin; Wu, Qitang; Li, Chunping; Qian, Tianwei; Zheng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In a field experiment on multi-metal contaminated soil, we investigated the efficiency of Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu removal by only mixture of chelators (MC) or combining with FeCl3. After washing treatment, a co-cropping system was performed for heavy metals to be extracted by Sedum alfredii and to produce safe food from Zea mays. We analyzed the concentration of heavy metals in groundwater to evaluate the leashing risk of soil washing with FeCl3 and MC. Results showed that addition of FeCl3 was favorable to the removal of heavy metals in the topsoil. Metal leaching occurred mainly in rain season during the first co-cropping. The removal rates of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Cu in topsoil were 28%, 53%, 41%, and 21% with washing by FeCl3+MC after first harvest. The application of FeCl3 reduced the yield of S. alfredii and increased the metals concentration of Z. mays in first harvest. However, after amending soil, the metals concentration of Z. mays in FeCl3+MC treatment were similar to that only washing by MC. The grains and shoots of Z. mays were safe for use in feed production. Soil washing did not worsen groundwater contamination during the study period. But the concentration of Cd in groundwater was higher than the limit value of Standard concentrations for Groundwater IV. This study suggests that soil washing using FeCl3 and MC for the remediation of multi-metal contaminated soil is potential feasibility. However, the subsequent measure to improve the washed soil environment for planting crop is considered. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. A practical approach for deriving all-weather soil moisture content using combined satellite and meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Pei; Li, Zhao-Liang; Duan, Si-Bo; Gao, Mao-Fang; Huo, Hong-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    Soil moisture has long been recognized as one of the essential variables in the water cycle and energy budget between Earth's surface and atmosphere. The present study develops a practical approach for deriving all-weather soil moisture using combined satellite images and gridded meteorological products. In this approach, soil moisture over the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) clear-sky pixels are estimated from the Vegetation Index/Temperature (VIT) trapezoid scheme in which theoretical dry and wet edges were determined pixel to pixel by China Meteorological Administration Land Data Assimilation System (CLDAS) meteorological products, including air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed and specific humidity. For cloudy pixels, soil moisture values are derived by the calculation of surface and aerodynamic resistances from wind speed. The approach is capable of filling the soil moisture gaps over remaining cloudy pixels by traditional optical/thermal infrared methods, allowing for a spatially complete soil moisture map over large areas. Evaluation over agricultural fields indicates that the proposed approach can produce an overall generally reasonable distribution of all-weather soil moisture. An acceptable accuracy between the estimated all-weather soil moisture and in-situ measurements at different depths could be found with an Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) varying from 0.067 m3/m3 to 0.079 m3/m3 and a slight bias ranging from 0.004 m3/m3 to -0.011 m3/m3. The proposed approach reveals significant potential to derive all-weather soil moisture using currently available satellite images and meteorological products at a regional or global scale in future developments.

  14. Combining position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis: first steps towards soil fluxomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in soil science. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass this stage during their decomposition and 2) only LMWOS will be taken up by microorganisms. Previous studies on LMWOS were focused on determining net fluxes through the LMWOS pool, but they rarely identified transformations. As LMWOS are the preferred C and energy source for microorganisms, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools. Up to now, studies on LMWOS were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled organic substances i.e. all C atoms in the molecules were labeled with 13C or 14C. However, this classical approach did not allow the differentiation between use of intact initial substances in any process, or whether they were transformed to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of LMWOS and quantification of 13CO2 and 13C in bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms. However, only the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites allowed 1) tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils and 2) identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups. So, these are the prerequisites for soil fluxomics. Our studies combining position-specific labeled glucose with amino

  15. SEP-Kr and SEP-Xe in Lunar Ilmenite and the Ar/Kr/Xe Ratio in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieler, R.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.

    1992-07-01

    We analyzed all five noble gases in an ilmenite sample from lunar soil 71501 by closed system stepped etching (CSSE), thus extending our CSSE studies of solar noble gases (Wieler et al., 1986; Benkert et al., 1988) to Kr and Xe. He, Ne, Ar isotopes: We observe the familiar presence of two solar noble gas components: step 1 shows ^4He/^3He = 2250, ^20Ne/^22Ne = 13.8, and ^36Ar/^38Ar=5.46. The first two ratios are essentially identical to modern solar wind values (SWC; Geiss, 1973), indicating an isotopically unfractionated SW noble gas reservoir in lunar ilmenite. The Ne data-points of later steps fall on a straight line and reach the SEP-Ne point (^20Ne/^22Ne = 11.3). The slope of this line indicates mass dependent fractionation between SW-Ne and SEP-Ne. SEP-He (^4He/^3He = 4650 +-100) and SEP-Ar (^36Ar/^38Ar = 4.89+-0.05) are also observed (latter two numbers slightly revised compared to Wieler et al., 1992). Kr, Xe isotopes: Kr in those two steps that release pure SW-Ne is very slightly lighter than atmospheric Kr (^86Kr/^84Kr = 0.3041; see also Wieler et al., 1992). We interpret this to be SW-Kr in soil 71501. Steps containing (isotopically heavier) SEP-Ne likewise release heavier Kr, interpreted accordingly as SEP-Kr (^86Kr/^84Kr = 0.323). Similarly, a light Xe component is released first (SW-Xe, ^136Xe/^132Xe = 0.3003), followed by heavier SEP-Xe (^136Xe/^132Xe = 0.319). The data are consistent with both Kr and Xe in SW and SEP components to be related by mass fractionation. The relation first proposed by Benkert et al. (1988) between a ratio R(m(sub)2,m(sub)1) of two isotopes with masses m(sub)2>m(sub)1 in SW and SEP now holds for all five noble gases: (R(sub)SW-R(sub)SEP)/R(sub)SW = (2+-0.13)*(m(sub)2- m(sub)1)/m(sub)2. Since m(sub)2~m(sub)1, this relation may also be written as: R(sub)SEP/R(sub)SW ~ (m(sub)1/m(sub)2)^2 (Geiss and Bochsler, 1991). Element ratios: ^4He/^36Ar and ^20Ne/^36Ar rise from values several times below SWC to essentially SWC ratios in

  16. Combining emission inventory and isotope ratio analyses for quantitative source apportionment of heavy metals in agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lian; Zhou, Shenglu; Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Baojie; Li, Yan; Wang, Junxiao

    2018-08-01

    Two quantitative methods (emission inventory and isotope ratio analysis) were combined to apportion source contributions of heavy metals entering agricultural soils in the Lihe River watershed (Taihu region, east China). Source apportionment based on the emission inventory method indicated that for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, the mean percentage input from atmospheric deposition was highest (62-85%), followed by irrigation (12-27%) and fertilization (1-14%). Thus, the heavy metals were derived mainly from industrial activities and traffic emissions. For Ni the combined percentage input from irrigation and fertilization was approximately 20% higher than that from atmospheric deposition, indicating that Ni was mainly derived from agricultural activities. Based on isotope ratio analysis, atmospheric deposition accounted for 57-93% of Pb entering soil, with the mean value of 69.3%, which indicates that this was the major source of Pb entering soil in the study area. The mean contributions of irrigation and fertilization to Pb pollution of soil ranged from 0% to 10%, indicating that they played only a marginally important role. Overall, the results obtained using the two methods were similar. This study provides a reliable approach for source apportionment of heavy metals entering agricultural soils in the study area, and clearly have potential application for future studies in other regions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combining 137Cs and topographic surveys for measuring soil erosion/deposition patterns in a rapidly accreting area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Narrow, stiff grass hedges are biological barriers designed to slow runoff and capture soils carried in runoff water. This study was designed to measure quantitatively the deposition of soil up slope of a narrow, stiff grass hedge using topographic and 137 Cs surveys. Topographic surveys made in 1991, 1995, and 1998 measured 1 to 2 cm yr -1 of recent sediment deposited up slope of the grass hedge. 137 Cs analyses of soil samples were used to determine the medium-term (45 years) soil redistribution patterns. Erosion rates and patterns determined using 137 Cs measured medium-term erosion near the hedge do not reflect the recent deposition patterns near the grass hedge measured by topographic surveys. Using the combination of topographic and 137 Cs surveys allows a better understanding of the role of grass hedges as barriers for capturing eroding soils and suggest that the recent deposition is associated with the grass hedge but that there is still a net loss of soil near the hedge position over the past 45 years. (author)

  18. Enhancing the fertility of an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using lime in combination with bio-organic fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhana, A.; Shamshuddin, J.; Fauziah, C.I.; Panhwar, Q.A.

    2017-01-01

    The acid sulfate soils contain pyrite (FeS/sub 2/) which is due to oxidation results in the production of high amount of acidity, aluminum and iron significantly affecting rice growth. A glasshouse study was arranged to determine the effect of ground magnesium limestone (GML) in combination with bio-organic fertilizer (JITUTM) application on the chemical properties of soils and rice yield. Three rice seedlings were transplanted in pots which were previously amended with 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 t/ha GML with or without bio-organic fertilizer. The common rice varieties (MR 219 and MR 253) were cultivated for two seasons in the same pots. The critical Fe2+ and Al3+ activities for MR 219 were 14.45 and 4.23 mu M, while for MR 253 were 7.45 and 5.53 mu M, respectively. However, without applying the amendments, rice grown on the soils was affected severely by the high acidity (Fe2+ and Al3+ toxicity). The soil pH increased to 5 and the higher grain yield of MR 219 (99.77 and 121.38 g/pot) and MR253 (98.63 and 112.60 g/pot) was in first and second season with the application of 2 t GML application combined with 0.25 t JITUTM/ha respectively. In addition, 1000 grain weight, number of panicle, number of spikelets panicle-1 and the percentage of filled spikelet, were also higher than without the soil amendments. Hence, the infertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice cultivation in Malaysia can be improved by applying 2 t GML/ha combined with 0.25 t JITUTM/ha for two seasons in long run. (author)

  19. Combined effects of zinc and earthworm density on soil ecosystem functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, J.; Kools, S.A.E.; Hout, van der A.; Faber, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    In traditional environmental risk assessment for soils, interactions between biota, contaminants and soil functioning are seldom taken into account. Also, single species toxicity tests are conducted with a fixed number of test animals. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of zinc

  20. Adsorption, transformation, and bioavailability of the fungicides carbendazim and iprodione in soil, alone and in combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Matser, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    When studying the effect of mixtures of toxic substances on soil organisms, attention must be paid to peculiarities in exposure to mixtures as opposed to that of single toxicants. The fungicides carbendazim and iprodione compete in the adsorption to soil. The presence of iprodione reduced the

  1. Soil washing in combination with homogeneous Fenton-like oxidation for the removal of 2,4,4'-trichlorodiphenyl from soil contaminated with capacitor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Hong; Zhao, Ling; Lin, Zhi-Rong; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Detoxification by chemical oxidation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated soils is very difficult and inefficient because PCBs typically associate with the solid phase or exist as non-aqueous-phase liquids due to their low solubility and slow desorption rates, and thus, they are difficult to remove from soils by using traditional, water-based elution techniques. Surfactant can enhance washing efficiency of PCBs from contaminated soils. This study used Brij 58, Brij 30, Tween 80, and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) to solubilize 2,4,4'-trichlorodiphenyl (PCB28) from soil contaminated with capacitor oil into solution. The feasibility of PCB28 oxidation in soil washing wastewater through a Fe(3+)-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction was subsequently examined. Washing with 10 g L(-1) Brij 58 solution showed the highest extraction efficiency (up to 61.5 %) compared with that of the three other surfactants. The total concentration of PCB28 in contaminated soil at 25 °C after 48-h extraction was 286 mg L(-1). In contrast to conditions in which no washing agent was added, addition of the four washing agents decreased the efficiency of PCB28 degradation by the Fenton-like reaction, with the decrease due to addition of 10 g L(-1) Brij 58 solution being the smallest. The optimal concentration of H2O2 for preventing its useless decomposition was found to be 50 mM. The efficiency of PCB28 removal was lower when the initial concentration of PCB28 treated in the Fenton-like reaction was higher. The degradation efficiencies of PCB28 at initial concentrations of 0.1, 10, and 176 mg L(-1) in 10 g L(-1) Brij 58 solution at 25 °C and pH 3.0 and 9 h of reaction using 50 mM H2O2 were 64.1, 42.0, and 34.6 %, respectively. This result indicates that soil washing combined with Fenton-like oxidation may be a practical approach for the remediation of PCB-contaminated soil.

  2. Estimating soil hydrological response by combining precipitation-runoff modeling and hydro-functional soil homogeneous units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca-Jimenez, Estefania; Bodoque, Jose Maria; Diez-Herrero, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Flash floods constitute one of the natural hazards better able to generate risk, particularly with regard to Society. The complexity of this process and its dependence on various factors related to the characteristics of the basin and rainfall make flash floods are difficult to characterize in terms of their hydrological response.To do this, it is essential a proper analysis of the so called 'initial abstractions'. Among all of these processes, infiltration plays a crucial role in explaining the occurrence of floods in mountainous basins.For its characterization the Green-Ampt model , which depends on the characteristics of rainfall and physical properties of soil has been used in this work.This is a method enabling to simulate floods in mountainous basins where hydrological response is sub-daily. However, it has the disadvantage that it is based on physical properties of soil which have a high spatial variability. To address this difficulty soil mapping units have been delineated according to the geomorphological landforms and elements. They represent hydro-functional mapping units that are theoretically homogeneous from the perspective of the pedostructure parameters of the pedon. So the soil texture of each homogeneous group of landform units was studied by granulometric analyses using standarized sieves and Sedigraph devices. In addition, uncertainty associated with the parameterization of the Green-Ampt method has been estimated by implementing a Monte Carlo approach, which required assignment of the proper distribution function to each parameter.The suitability of this method was contrasted by calibrating and validating a hydrological model, in which the generation of runoff hydrograph has been simulated using the SCS unit hydrograph (HEC-GeoHMS software), while flood wave routing has been characterized using the Muskingum-Cunge method. Calibration and validation of the model was from the use of an automatic routine based on the employ of the search algorithm

  3. Combining Sequential Extractions and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Quantitative and Qualitative Zinc Speciation in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Tatiana; Minkina, Tatiana; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Nevidomskaya, Dina; Burachevskaya, Marina; Tsitsuashvili, Viktoriya; Urazgildieva, Kamilya

    2017-04-01

    The combined use of X-ray absorption spectrometry and extractive fractionation is an effective approach for studying the interaction of metal ions with soil compounds and identifying the phases-carriers of metals in soil and their stable fixation. These studies were carried out using the technique of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and chemical extractive fractionation. In a model experiment the samples taken in Calcic Chernozem were artificially contaminated with higher portion of Zn(NO3)2 (2000 mg/kg). The metal were incubated in soil samples for 2 year. The samples of soil mineral and organic phases (calcite, kaolinite, bentonite, humic acids) were saturated with Zn2+ from a solution of nitrate salts of metal. The total content of Zn in soil and soil various phases was determined using the X-ray fluorescence method. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) Zn was measured at the Structural Materials Science beamline of the Kurchatov Center for Synchrotron Radiation. Sequential fractionation of Zn in soil conducted by Tessier method (Tessier et al., 1979) which determining 5 fractions of metals in soil: exchangeable, bound to Fe-Mn oxide, bound to carbonate, bound to the organic matter, and bound to silicate (residual). This methodology has so far more than 4000 citations (Web of Science), which demonstrates the popularity of this approach. Much Zn compounds are contained in uncontaminated soils in stable primary and secondary silicates inherited from the parental rocks (67% of the total concentrations in all fractions), which is a regional trait of soils in the fore-Caucasian plain. Extracted fractionation of metal compounds in soil samples, artificially contaminated with Zn salts, indicates the priority holding of Zn2+ ions by silicates, carbonates and Fe-Mn oxides. The Zn content significantly increases in the exchangeable fraction. Atomic structure study of the soil various phases saturated with Zn2+ ion by using (XANES) X-ray absorption spectroscopy

  4. Stabilization of Pb and As in soils by applying combined treatment with phosphates and ferrous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenidis, Anthimos; Stouraiti, Christina; Papassiopi, Nymphodora

    2010-05-15

    The chemical immobilization of Pb and As in contaminated soil from Lavrion, Greece, using monocalcium phosphate and ferrous sulfate as stabilizing agents was investigated. Monocalcium phosphate was added to contaminated soil at PO(4) to Pb molar ratios equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.5, whereas ferrous sulfate was added at Fe to As molar ratios equal to 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20. Phosphates addition to contaminated soil decreased Pb leachability, but resulted in significant mobilization of As. Simultaneous immobilization of Pb and As was obtained only when soil was treated with mixtures of phosphates and ferrous sulfate. Arsenic uptake by plants was also seen to increase when soil was treated only with phosphates, but co-addition of ferrous sulfate was efficient in maintaining As phytoaccumulation at low levels. The addition of at least 1.5M/M phosphates and 10M/M iron sulfate to soil reduced the dissolved levels of Pb and As in the water extracts to values in compliance with the EU drinking water standards. However, both additives contributed in the acidification of soil, decreasing pH from 7.8 to values as low as 5.6 and induced the mobilization of pH sensitive elements, such as Zn and Cd. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Topographic soil wetness index derived from combined Alaska-British Columbia datasets for the Gulf of Alaska region

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, D. V.; Biles, F. E.

    2016-12-01

    The flow of water is often highlighted as a priority in land management planning and assessments related to climate change. Improved measurement and modeling of soil moisture is required to develop predictive estimates for plant distributions, soil moisture, and snowpack, which all play important roles in ecosystem planning in the face of climate change. Drainage indexes are commonly derived from GIS tools with digital elevation models. Soil moisture classes derived from these tools are useful digital proxies for ecosystem functions associated with the concentration of water on the landscape. We developed a spatially explicit topographically derived soil wetness index (TWI) across the perhumid coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR) of Alaska and British Columbia. Developing applicable drainage indexes in complex terrain and across broad areas required careful application of the appropriate DEM, caution with artifacts in GIS covers and mapping realistic zones of wetlands with the indicator. The large spatial extent of the model has facilitated the mapping of forest habitat and the development of water table depth mapping in the region. A key element of the TWI is the merging of elevation datasets across the US-Canada border where major rivers transect the international boundary. The unified TWI allows for seemless mapping across the international border and unified ecological applications. A python program combined with the unified DEM allows end users to quickly apply the TWI to all areas of the PCTR. This common platform can facilitate model comparison and improvements to local soil moisture conditions, generation of streamflow, and ecological site conditions. In this presentation we highlight the application of the TWI for mapping risk factors related to forest decline and the development of a regional water table depth map. Improved soil moisture maps are critical for deriving spatial models of changes in soil moisture for both plant growth and streamflow across

  6. Remediation of PAH-contaminated soil by the combination of tall fescue, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and epigeic earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan-Fei; Lu, Mang

    2015-03-21

    A 120-day experiment was performed to investigate the effect of a multi-component bioremediation system consisting of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) (Glomus caledoniun L.), and epigeic earthworms (Eisenia foetida) for cleaning up polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soil. Inoculation with AMF and/or earthworms increased plant yield and PAH accumulation in plants. However, PAH uptake by tall fescue accounted for a negligible portion of soil PAH removal. Mycorrhizal tall fescue significantly enhanced PAH dissipation, PAH degrader density and polyphenol oxidase activity in soil. The highest PAH dissipation (93.4%) was observed in the combination treatment: i.e., AMF+earthworms+tall fescue, in which the soil PAH concentration decreased from an initial value of 620 to 41 mg kg(-1) in 120 days. This concentration is below the threshold level required for Chinese soil PAH quality (45 mg kg(-1) dry weight) for residential use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The combined effect of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and copper (Cu) on soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Meng; An, Shuai; Lin, Kuangfei; Li, Hui; Cui, Changzheng; Fu, Rongbing; Zhu, Jiang

    2012-09-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (e-waste) is now the fastest growing waste stream in the world. It is reported that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and heavy metals were main contaminants in e-waste recycling site. Among these contaminants BDE-209 and Cu were widespread, yet their combined effect on soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure are not well understood. In this study, the ecotoxicological effects of both combined and single pollution of BDE-209 and Cu at different concentration levels were studied under laboratory conditions. The activities of soil catalase, urease and saccharase were sensitive to BDE-209 and Cu pollution. Although the enzyme activities varied over time, the concentration effects were obvious. Statistical analyses revealed that, at the same incubation time, as the concentration of BDE-209 or Cu increased, the enzyme activities were decreased. Combined effects of both BDE-209 and Cu were different from that of BDE-209 or Cu alone. Enzyme activities data were essentially based on the multiple regression technique. The results showed that the action and interaction between BDE-209 and Cu were strongly dependent on the exposure time, as the combined effects of BDE-209 and Cu were either synergistic or antagonistic at different incubation times. Soil catalase and saccharase were more comfortable used as indicators of BDE-209 and Cu combined pollution, as the variation trends were similar to the single contaminant treatments, and the responses were quick and significant. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial 16S rDNA gene showed that BDE-209 and Cu pollution altered the bacterial community structure by promoting changes in species composition and species richness. The existence of BDE-209 and Cu in soils reduced the microbial diversity, and the concentration effects were obvious. Overall, microbial diversity in the combined treatments were lower than the single ones, and when the

  8. Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental soil surveys in each province of Austria have been performed, soils of about 5,000 sites were described and analyzed for nutrients and pollutants, the majority of these data are recorded in the soil information system of Austria (BORIS) soil database, http://www.ubavie.gv.at/umweltsituation/boden/boris), which also contains a soil map of Austria, data from 30 specific investigations mainly in areas with industry and results from the Austria - wide cesium investigation. With respect to the environmental state of soils a short discussion is given, including two geographical charts, one showing which sites have soil data (2001) and the other the cadmium distribution in top soils according land use (forest, grassland, arable land, others). Information related to the soil erosion, Corine land cover (Europe-wide land cover database), evaluation of pollutants in soils (reference values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Pb, Tl, Va, Zn, AOX, PAH, PCB, PCDD/pcdf, dioxin), and relevant Austrian and European standards and regulations is provided. Figs. 2, Tables 4. (nevyjel)

  9. Modeling of flow and mass transport processes in unsaturated soils in combination with technical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Issa

    2014-01-01

    The modelling of complex systems such as the underground is a means to describe the processes occurring in the reality. The conducting of experiments on a model to obtain qualitative evidence about a real system is referred to as a simulation. Thereby, various models (e.g. physical and mathematical models) can be used. The unsaturated zone (vadose zone) is the region between the land surface and the water table, in which the water content is less than full saturation, and the pressure is lower than the atmospheric pressure. The unsaturated zone is very significant for agriculture, geobiology, aerobic degradation processes and groundwater recharge. The processes of water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone can be described by means of numerical simulation programs. The aim of the present work is a comprehensive validation of the simulation program PCSiWaPro registered (developed at the TU-Dresden, Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment) for different applications. Another aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the current version of PCSiWaPro registered for different cases of a combination between the unsaturated zone and technical facilities. Four application cases with different objectives were investigated within the present work, which are: the simulation of decentralized wastewater infiltration with corresponding column and field experiments, the computation of groundwater recharge by means of lysimeters, the water balance of earth dams and the modelling of landfill covering systems. The application cases differ from each other by the objective of the simulation, the geometry, the size, the specified initial and boundary conditions, the simulation time, the applied materials, the coordinate system, the input and output data. The simulation results clearly showed that PCSiWaPro registered is applicable for all investigated cases under consideration of different flow and solute transport regimes, parameters

  10. Overturn of magma ocean ilmenite cumulate layer: Implications for lunar magmatic evolution and formation of a lunar core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    We explore a model for the chemical evolution of the lunar interior that explains the origin and evolution of lunar magmatism and possibly the existence of a lunar core. A magma ocean formed during accretion differentiates into the anorthositic crust and chemically stratified cumulate mantle. The cumulative mantle is gravitationally unstable with dense ilmenite cumulate layers overlying olivine-orthopyroxene cumulates with Fe/Mg that decreases with depth. The dense ilmenite layer sinks to the center of the moon forming the core. The remainder of the gravitationally unstable cumulate pile also overturns. Any remaining primitive lunar mantle rises to its level of neutral buoyancy in the cumulate pile. Perhaps melting of primitive lunar mantle due to this decompression results in early lunar Mg-rich magmatism. Because of its high concentration of incompatible heat producing elements, the ilmenite core heats the overlying orthopyroxene-bearing cumulates. As a conductively thickening thermal boundary layer becomes unstable, the resulting mantle plumes rise, decompress, and partially melt to generate the mare basalts. This model explains both the timing and chemical characteristics of lunar magmatism.

  11. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil — A combined modelling and experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montelius, Malin, E-mail: malin.montelius@liu.se [Department of Thematic Studies — Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Svensson, Teresia [Department of Thematic Studies — Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz [EDF, Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et Environnement, 78401 Chatou (France); Thiry, Yves [Andra, Research and Development Division, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1/7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Bastviken, David [Department of Thematic Studies — Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Cl{sub org}). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Cl{sub org} are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl{sup −} transformed to Cl{sub org} per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl{sub org} transformed to Cl{sup −} per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d{sup −1} and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01–0.03 d{sup −1} and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Cl{sub org} levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Cl{sub org} compounds, while another Cl{sub org} pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. - Highlights: • Chlorination and dechlorination rates in soil were revealed by a radiotracer method. • Chlorination was hampered by nitrogen addition. • Both Cl{sup −} and many Cl{sub org} compounds are highly reactive in soils. • Some formed Cl{sub org} seem to be refractory.

  12. Ecopiling: a combined phytoremediation and passive biopiling system for remediating hydrocarbon impacted soils at field scale

    OpenAIRE

    Germaine, Kieran J.; Byrne, John; Liu, Xuemei; Keohane, Jer; Culhane, John; Lally, Richard D.; Kiwanuka, Samuel; Ryan, David; Dowling, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Biopiling is an ex situ bioremediation technology that has been extensively used for remediating a wide range of petrochemical contaminants in soils. Biopiling involves the assembling of contaminated soils into piles and stimulating the biodegrading activity of microbial populations by creating near optimum growth conditions. Phytoremediation is another very successful bioremediation technique and involves the use of plants and their associated microbiomes to degrade, sequester or bio-accumu...

  13. Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2001-01-01

    For Austria there exists a comprehensive soil data collection, integrated in a GIS (geographical information system). The content values of pollutants (cadmium, mercury, lead, copper, mercury, radio-cesium) are given in geographical charts and in tables by regions and by type of soil (forests, agriculture, greenland, others) for the whole area of Austria. Erosion effects are studied for the Austrian region. Legal regulations and measures for an effective soil protection, reduction of soil degradation and sustainable development in Austria and the European Union are discussed. (a.n.)

  14. Clusters and holes: Exchange networks in hematite-ilmenite solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, K.; McEnroe, S. A.; Robinson, P.

    2009-04-01

    Holes and clusters of exchange networks dominate the low-temperature, metastable phase diagram of the system (1 - x)Fe2O3 xF eTiO3 (Ilmx ). By our measurements we have probed and extended the phase diagram of Ishikawa et al. (1985) in the light of magnetic influences of the random exchange links, which originate either by replacing random pairs of Fe2+ and Ti4+ ions in the ordered ilmenite lattice by two Fe3+ions (ordered Ilmx phase), or by randomly replacing two Fe3+ ions in the hematite lattice by a pair of Fe2+ and Ti4+ ions (disordered Ilmx phase). Now a large dataset is available from these measurements, and we propose several new ideas to interpret the sometimes unexpected results. By refining a method of Ishikawa (1967), we analyze the PM' region of the phase diagram in terms of a mean field theory of interacting clusters. This allows to determine cluster sizes and interaction field distribution by inverting hysteresis measurements of Ilm92 and Ilm97. To understand the relation between ordered and disordered phases we design a mean field theory to determine Neel and Curie temperatures of both. An especially interesting finding is that the experimentally observed intersection of PM-PM' crossover with the AF phase boundary close to Ilm97 can be explained by analyzing average exchange interaction strengths.

  15. Combination of bioleaching by gross bacterial biosurfactants and flocculation: A potential remediation for the heavy metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihui; Shi, Wei; Yang, Weichun; Liang, Lifen; Yao, Wenbin; Chai, Liyuan; Gao, Shikang; Liao, Qi

    2018-09-01

    Combining bioleaching by the gross biosurfactants of Burkholderia sp. Z-90 and flocculation by poly aluminium chloride (PAC) was proposed to develop a potential environment-friendly and cost-effective technique to remediate the severely contaminated soils by heavy metals. The factors affecting soil bioleaching by the gross biosurfactants of Burkholderia sp. Z-90 were optimized. The results showed the optimal removing efficiencies of Zn, Pb, Mn, Cd, Cu, and As by the Burkholderia sp. Z-90 leachate were 44.0, 32.5, 52.2, 37.7, 24.1 and 31.6%, respectively at soil liquid ratio of 1:20 (w/v) for 5 d, which were more efficient than that by 0.1% of rhamnolipid. The amounts of the bioleached heavy metals by the Burkholderia sp. Z-90 leachate were higher than that by other biosurfactants in the previous studies, although the removal efficiencies of the metals by the leachate were relatively lower. It was suggested that more heavy metals caused more competitive to chelate with function groups of the gross biosurfactants and the metal removal efficiencies by biosurfactants in natural soils were lower than in the artificially contaminated soils. Moreover, the Burkholderia sp. Z-90 leachate facilitated the metals to be transformed to the easily migrating speciation fractions. Additional, the results showed that PAC was efficient in the following flocculation to remove heavy metals in the waste bio-leachates. Our study will provide support for developing a bioleaching technique model to remediate the soils extremely contaminated by heavy metals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined effect of microwave and activated carbon on the remediation of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xitao; Yu, Gang

    2006-04-01

    The application of microwave and activated carbon for the treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated soil was explored in this study with a model compound of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB29). PCB-contaminated soil was treated in a quartz reactor by microwave irradiation at 2450MHz with the addition of granular activated carbon (GAC). In this procedure, GAC acted as microwave absorbent for reaching high temperature and reductant for dechlorination. A sheltered type-K thermocouple was applied to record the temperature rising courses. It was shown that the addition of GAC could effectively promote the temperature rising courses. The determination of PCB residues in soil by gas chromatography (GC) revealed that rates of PCB removal were highly dependent on microwave power, soil moisture content, and the amount of GAC added. GC with mass spectrum (MS) detector and ion chromatography were employed for the analysis of degradation intermediates and chlorine ions, respectively. It was suggested that microwave irradiation with the assistance of activated carbon might be a potential technology for the remediation of PCB-contaminated soil.

  17. Albendazole versus combined pyrantel pamoate-mebendazole in the treatment of mixed infection of soil-transmitted helminthiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiangsa Sembiring

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Soil transmitted helminthiasis is still highly prevalent in Indonesia, especially in rural area and among poor socio-economic population. Helminthiasis is frequently found as a single or mixed infection. It is difficult to get a medication with better efficacy, low cost, and simple administration for all types of worms. Objective The aim of this sudy was to compare the effectiveness of albendazole and pyrantel pamoate-mebendazole combination in treating soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Methods A randomized clinical trial was perionned in September until November 1995 on students of a primary school in Tanjung Anom Village whose stool examinations showed mixed infection of helminthiasis. Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups. The A group was treated with 400 mg oral albendazole as a single dose, while the B group was treated with the combination of pyrantel pamoate 10 mg/kg body weight as a single dose and mebendazole 100 mg twice a day for three consecutive days. Cure was considered if in the stool examination, no wonn eggs were found. Statistical analysis was periormed by Chi-square test with confidence interval of 95% and p value of < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Out of 541 children, mixed infection of soil-transmitted helminthiasis was found in 374 children (69%. Three hundreds sixty-six children completed the study, consisted of 182 children in group A and 184 in group B. At 3 weeks after treatment, the cure rate in the A group was significantly better compared to that in B group. Conclusions Albendazole was more effective than the combination of pyrantel pamoate - mebendazole for treating mixed infection of soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Besides the administration was simpler and caused minimal side effect.

  18. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation in combination with different organic fertilizers on maize crop in eroded soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.; Saud, S.; Khan, F.

    2012-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of inoculating maize (Zea mays L. Azam) with Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in 2 different series of North West Pakistan during the year 2007. Data showed significant increase in shoots and roots yield of maize with the inoculation of AM fungi alone and in combination with farm yard manure (FYM), poultry manure (PM) and humic acid (HA) over control and N-P-K treatments. Accumulation of N by maize shoots increased significantly by the addition of HA, PM and FYM plus N-P-K with or without inoculation of AM fungi over the treatments of N-P-K and control. Plants P accumulation increased significantly over control and N-P-K treatments with the inoculation of AM fungi alone and in combination with FYM, PM and HA in missa soil series. In missa gullied soil series, significantly increased plants P accumulation was noted by the treatments of AM inoculation with PM followed by HA. Accumulation of Mn by maize shoots increased significantly with AM inoculation with HA and PM over all other treatments, Fe increased with PM, HA and FYM. Plants Cu accumulation in missa series increased significantly over control and N-P-K treatments by AM alone and in combination with PM, FYM and HA and by AM fungi with PM, FYM and HA in missa gullied series. Maximum Mycorrhizal root infection rate of 51 % was recorded in the treatment of AM fungal inoculation with HA followed by the treatment inoculated with AM fungi with FYM. In missa gullied soil series, Maximum (59 %) and significantly increased roots infection rates over all treatments were observed in the treatment of AM fungal inoculation with HA followed by PM. Spores concentrations of AM fungi increased significantly with AM inoculation alone and with FYM, PM and HA. Maximum spores numbers of 50 in 20 g soil were recorded by the inoculation of AM fungi alone and with HA. (author)

  19. Relationships between nutrient-related plant traits and combinations of soil N and P fertility measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; van Bodegom, Peter M; Witte, Jan-Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Soil fertility and nutrient-related plant functional traits are in general only moderately related, hindering the progress in trait-based prediction models of vegetation patterns. Although the relationships may have been obscured by suboptimal choices in how soil fertility is expressed, there has never been a systematic investigation into the suitability of fertility measures. This study, therefore, examined the effect of different soil fertility measures on the strength of fertility-trait relationships in 134 natural plant communities. In particular, for eight plot-mean traits we examined (1) whether different elements (N or P) have contrasting or shared influences, (2) which timescale of fertility measures (e.g. mineralization rates for one or five years) has better predictive power, and (3) if integrated fertility measures explain trait variation better than individual fertility measures. Soil N and P had large mutual effects on leaf nutrient concentrations, whereas they had element-specific effects on traits related to species composition (e.g. Grime's CSR strategy). The timescale of fertility measures only had a minor impact on fertility-trait relationships. Two integrated fertility measures (one reflecting overall fertility, another relative availability of soil N and P) were related significantly to most plant traits, but were not better in explaining trait variation than individual fertility measures. Using all fertility measures together, between-site variations of plant traits were explained only moderately for some traits (e.g. 33% for leaf N concentrations) but largely for others (e.g. 66% for whole-canopy P concentration). The moderate relationships were probably due to complex regulation mechanisms of fertility on traits, rather than to a wrong choice of fertility measures. We identified both mutual (i.e. shared) and divergent (i.e. element-specific and stoichiometric) effects of soil N and P on traits, implying the importance of explicitly

  20. Quality evaluation of soil-cement-plant residue bricks by the combination of destructive and non-destructive tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis de C. Ferreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Residues from agricultural activity can be used to improve the quality of soil-based bricks, constituting an interesting alternative for their destination. The technical quality of soil-cement-plant residue bricks was evaluated by the combination of non-destructive and destructive methods. A predominant clayey soil, Portland cement and residues of husks of both rice and Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40%, in mass, in substitution to the 10% cement content were used. The bricks were submitted to destructive (water absorption and compressive strength and nondestructive (ultrasound tests for their physical and mechanical characterization. Results from both destructive and non-destructive tests were combined to determine the quantitative parameter named “anisotropic resistance” in order to evaluate the quality of the bricks. The addition that promoted best technical quality was 10% residue content, regardless of the residue type. The anisotropic resistance proved to be adequate for the technical quality evaluation of the bricks.

  1. Wood-derived-biochar combined with compost or iron grit for in situ stabilization of Cd, Pb, and Zn in a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustriere, Nadège; Marchand, Lilian; Rosette, Gabriel; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Mench, Michel

    2017-03-01

    In situ stabilization of Cd, Pb, and Zn in an Austrian agricultural soil contaminated by atmospheric depositions from a smelter plant was assessed with a pine bark chip-derived biochar, alone and in combination with either compost or iron grit. Biochar amendment was also trialed in an uncontaminated soil to detect any detrimental effect. The pot experiment consisted in ten soil treatments (% w/w): untreated contaminated soil (Unt); Unt soil amended with biochar alone (1%: B1; 2.5%: B2.5) and in combination: B1 and B2.5 + 5% compost (B1C and B2.5C), B1 and B2.5 + 1% iron grit (B1Z and B2.5Z); uncontaminated soil (Ctrl); Ctrl soil amended with 1 or 2.5% biochar (CtrlB1, CtrlB2.5). After a 3-month reaction period, the soil pore water (SPW) was sampled in potted soils and dwarf beans were grown for a 2-week period. The SPW Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations decreased in all amended-contaminated soils. The biochar effects increased with its addition rate and its combination with either compost or iron grit. Shoot Cd and Zn removals by beans were reduced and shoot Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations decreased to common values in all amended soils except the B1 soil. Decreases in the SPW Cd/Pb/Zn concentrations did not improve the root and shoot yields of plants as compared to the Ctrl soil.

  2. Remediation of electronic waste polluted soil using a combination of persulfate oxidation and chemical washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Luo, Zhanbin; Liu, Gangjun; Yang, Yongjun; Zhang, Shaoliang; Ma, Jing

    2017-12-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of a simultaneous chemical extraction and oxidation for removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and toxic metals from an actual soil polluted by the recycling activity of electronic waste. Various chemicals, including hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD), citric acid (CA) and sodium persulfate (SP) were applied synchronously with Fe 2+ activated oxidation to enhance the co-removal of both types of pollutants. It is found that the addition of HPCD can enhance POPs removal through solubilization of POPs and iron chelation; while the CA-chelated Fe 2+ activation process is effective for extracting metals and degrading residual POPs. Under the optimized reagent conditions, 69.4% Cu, 78.1% Pb, 74.6% Ni, 97.1% polychlorinated biphenyls, 93.8% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 96.4% polybrominated diphenylethers were removed after the sequential application of SP-HPCD-Fe 2+ and SP-CA-Fe 2+ processes with a duration of 180 and 240 min, respectively. A high dehalogenation efficiency (84.8% bromine and 86.2% chlorine) is observed, suggesting the low accumulation of halogen-containing organic intermediates. The remediated soil can satisfy the national soil quality standard of China. Collectively, co-contaminated soil can be remediated with reasonable time and capital costs through simultaneous application of persulfate oxidation and chemical extraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Soil water retention measurements using a combined tensiometer-coiled time domain reflectometry probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, C.M.P.; Hopmans, J.W.; Macedo, A.

    2002-01-01

    -coiled TDR probe was constructed by wrapping two copper wires (0.8 mm diam. and 35.5 cm long) along a 5-cm long porous cup of a standard tensiometer. The dielectric constant of five different soils (Oso Flaco [coarse-loamy, mixed Typic Cryorthod-fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Ustollic Haplargid], Ottawa sand [F-50...

  4. In vitro suppression of fungi caused by combinations of apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Wietse; Wagenaar, Anne-Marieke; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J A; van Veen, Johannes A

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria may contribute to suppression of fungi during competitive interactions with other bacteria. Four soil bacteria (Brevundimonas sp., Luteibacter sp., Pedobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp.) that exhibited little or no visible antifungal activity on different agar media were prescribed. Single and mixed strains of these species were tested for antagonism on a nutrient-poor agar medium against the plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium culmorum and Rhizoctonia solani and the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum. Single bacterial strains caused little to moderate growth reduction of fungi (quantified as ergosterol), most probably due to nutrient withdrawal from the media. Growth reduction of fungi by the bacterial mixture was much stronger than that by the single strains. This appeared to be mostly due to competitive interactions between the Pseudomonas and Pedobacter strains. We argue that cohabitation of these strains triggered antibiotic production via interspecific interactions and that the growth reduction of fungi was a side-effect caused by the sensitivity of the fungi to bacterial secondary metabolites. Induction of gliding behavior in the Pedobacter strain by other strains was also observed. Our results indicate that apparently non-antagonistic soil bacteria may be important contributors to soil suppressiveness and fungistasis when in a community context.

  5. Combined endophytic inoculants enhance nickel phytoextraction from serpentine soil in the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioli, Giovanna; Vamerali, Teofilo; Mattarozzi, Monica; Dramis, Lucia; Sanangelantoni, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the effects of specific bacterial endophytes on the phytoextraction capacity of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, spontaneously growing in a serpentine soil environment. Five metal-tolerant endophytes had already been selected for their high Ni tolerance (6 mM) and plant growth promoting ability. Here we demonstrate that individual bacterial inoculation is ineffective in enhancing Ni translocation and growth of N. caerulescens in serpentine soil, except for specific strains Ncr-1 and Ncr-8, belonging to the Arthrobacter and Microbacterium genera, which showed the highest indole acetic acid production and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid-deaminase activity. Ncr-1 and Ncr-8 co-inoculation was even more efficient in promoting plant growth, soil Ni removal, and translocation of Ni, together with that of Fe, Co, and Cu. Bacteria of both strains densely colonized the root surfaces and intercellular spaces of leaf epidermal tissue. These two bacterial strains also turned out to stimulate root length, shoot biomass, and Ni uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in MS agar medium supplemented with Ni. It is concluded that adaptation of N. caerulescens in highly Ni-contaminated serpentine soil can be enhanced by an integrated community of bacterial endophytes rather than by single strains; of the former, Arthrobacter and Microbacterium may be useful candidates for future phytoremediation trials in multiple metal-contaminated sites, with possible extension to non-hyperaccumulator plants.

  6. Combined endophytic inoculants enhance nickel phytoextraction from serpentine soil in the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eVisioli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effects of specific bacterial endophytes on the phytoextraction capacity of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, spontaneously growing in a serpentine soil environment. Five metal-tolerant endophytes had already been selected for their high Ni tolerance (6 mM and plant growth promoting ability. Here we demonstrate that individual bacterial inoculation is ineffective in enhancing Ni translocation and growth of N. caerulescens in serpentine soil, except for specific strains Ncr-1 and Ncr-8, belonging to the Arthrobacter and Microbacterium genera, which showed the highest IAA production and ACC-deaminase activity. Ncr-1 and Ncr-8 co-inoculation was even more efficient in promoting plant growth, soil Ni removal and translocation of Ni, together with that of Fe, Co and Cu. Bacteria of both strains densely colonised the root surfaces and intercellular spaces of leaf epidermal tissue. These two bacterial strains also turned out to stimulate root length, shoot biomass and Ni uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in MS agar medium supplemented with Ni. It is concluded that adaptation of N. caerulescens in highly Ni-contaminated serpentine soil can be enhanced by an integrated community of bacterial endophytes rather than by single strains; of the former, Arthrobacter and Microbacterium may be useful candidates for future phytoremediation trials

  7. Effect of addition of organic and inorganic combinations to soil on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ComputerCity

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... and compost with soil for tomato plant investigated by. Javanpour et al. (2005) showed that quality and ... peat, coco peat and perlite on some tomatoes growing indices were studied by Mohammadi ... date palm trees can be used as culture media for soilless systems in greenhouse or it can be applied to ...

  8. Determination of mobile form contents of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in soil extracts by combined stripping voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeltcheva, T. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: nedel@uctm.edu; Atanassova, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dimitrov, J. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stanislavova, L. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2005-01-10

    The amount of mobile forms of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in extracts obtained by treating soil samples with ammonium nitrate were determined by an appropriate combination of anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry with hanging mercury drop electrode. Every analysis required three mercury drops: on the first one, zinc was determined; on the second, cadmium and lead; on the third, copper was determined. Zinc, lead and cadmium were determined by conventional differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. For copper determination, adsorptive differential-pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry with amalgamation using chloride ions as a complexing agent was applied. The standard deviation of the results was from 1 to 10% depending on the metal content in the sample. Voltammetric results were in good agreement with the AAS analysis. No microwave digestion of soil extracts was necessary.

  9. Determination of mobile form contents of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in soil extracts by combined stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedeltcheva, T.; Atanassova, M.; Dimitrov, J.; Stanislavova, L.

    2005-01-01

    The amount of mobile forms of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in extracts obtained by treating soil samples with ammonium nitrate were determined by an appropriate combination of anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry with hanging mercury drop electrode. Every analysis required three mercury drops: on the first one, zinc was determined; on the second, cadmium and lead; on the third, copper was determined. Zinc, lead and cadmium were determined by conventional differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. For copper determination, adsorptive differential-pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry with amalgamation using chloride ions as a complexing agent was applied. The standard deviation of the results was from 1 to 10% depending on the metal content in the sample. Voltammetric results were in good agreement with the AAS analysis. No microwave digestion of soil extracts was necessary

  10. The combined effect of fertiliser nitrogen and phosphorus on herbage yield and change in soil nutrients of a grass/clover and grass-only sward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The combined effect of reduced nitrogen ( N ) and phosphorus ( P ) application on the production of grass- only and grass/ clover swards was studied in a five- year cutting experiment on a marine clay soil, established on newly sown swards. Furthermore, changes in soil N, P and carbon ( C ) were

  11. Soil base saturation combines with beech bark disease to influence composition and structure of sugar maple-beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory B. Lawrence; Todd C. McDonnell; Timothy J. Sullivan; Martin Dovciak; Scott W. Bailey; Michael R. Antidormi; Michael R. Zarfos

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in...

  12. The Combination of DGT Technique and Traditional Chemical Methods for Evaluation of Cadmium Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils with Organic Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu; Sun, Qin; Wang, Chao; Wang, Pei-Fang; Miao, Ling-Zhan; Ding, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Organic amendments have been proposed as a means of remediation for Cd-contaminated soils. However, understanding the inhibitory effects of organic materials on metal immobilization requires further research. In this study colza cake, a typical organic amendment material, was investigated in order to elucidate the ability of this material to reduce toxicity of Cd-contaminated soil. Available concentrations of Cd in soils were measured using an in situ diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique in combination with traditional chemical methods, such as HOAc (aqua regia), EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid), NaOAc (sodium acetate), CaCl2, and labile Cd in pore water. These results were applied to predict the Cd bioavailability after the addition of colza cake to Cd-contaminated soil. Two commonly grown cash crops, wheat and maize, were selected for Cd accumulation studies, and were found to be sensitive to Cd bioavailability. Results showed that the addition of colza cake may inhibit the growth of wheat and maize. Furthermore, the addition of increasing colza cake doses led to decreasing shoot and root biomass accumulation. However, increasing colza cake doses did lead to the reduction of Cd accumulation in plant tissues, as indicated by the decreasing Cd concentrations in shoots and roots. The labile concentration of Cd obtained by DGT measurements and the traditional chemical extraction methods, showed the clear decrease of Cd with the addition of increasing colza cake doses. All indicators showed significant positive correlations (p soil solution decreased with increasing colza cake doses. This was reflected by the decreases in the ratio (R) value of CDGT to Csol. Our study suggests that the sharp decrease in R values could not only reflect the extremely low capability of labile Cd to be released from its solid phase, but may also be applied to evaluate the abnormal growth of the plants. PMID:27314376

  13. The Combination of DGT Technique and Traditional Chemical Methods for Evaluation of Cadmium Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils with Organic Amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu; Sun, Qin; Wang, Chao; Wang, Pei-Fang; Miao, Ling-Zhan; Ding, Shi-Ming

    2016-06-15

    Organic amendments have been proposed as a means of remediation for Cd-contaminated soils. However, understanding the inhibitory effects of organic materials on metal immobilization requires further research. In this study colza cake, a typical organic amendment material, was investigated in order to elucidate the ability of this material to reduce toxicity of Cd-contaminated soil. Available concentrations of Cd in soils were measured using an in situ diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique in combination with traditional chemical methods, such as HOAc (aqua regia), EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid), NaOAc (sodium acetate), CaCl₂, and labile Cd in pore water. These results were applied to predict the Cd bioavailability after the addition of colza cake to Cd-contaminated soil. Two commonly grown cash crops, wheat and maize, were selected for Cd accumulation studies, and were found to be sensitive to Cd bioavailability. Results showed that the addition of colza cake may inhibit the growth of wheat and maize. Furthermore, the addition of increasing colza cake doses led to decreasing shoot and root biomass accumulation. However, increasing colza cake doses did lead to the reduction of Cd accumulation in plant tissues, as indicated by the decreasing Cd concentrations in shoots and roots. The labile concentration of Cd obtained by DGT measurements and the traditional chemical extraction methods, showed the clear decrease of Cd with the addition of increasing colza cake doses. All indicators showed significant positive correlations (p soil solution decreased with increasing colza cake doses. This was reflected by the decreases in the ratio (R) value of CDGT to Csol. Our study suggests that the sharp decrease in R values could not only reflect the extremely low capability of labile Cd to be released from its solid phase, but may also be applied to evaluate the abnormal growth of the plants.

  14. The combined effects of moss-dominated biocrusts and vegetation on erosion and soil moisture and implications for disturbance on the Loess Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Chongfeng; Wu, Shufang; Han, Fengpeng; Yang, Yongsheng; Meng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs, or biocrusts) have important positive ecological functions such as erosion control and soil fertility improvement, and they may also have negative effects on soil moisture in some cases. Simultaneous discussions of the two-sided impacts of BSCs are key to the rational use of this resource. This study focused on the contribution of BSCs while combining with specific types of vegetation to erosion reduction and their effects on soil moisture, and it addressed the feasibility of removal or raking disturbance. Twelve plots measuring 4 m × 2 m and six treatments (two plots for each) were established on a 15° slope in a small watershed in the Loess Plateau using BSCs, bare land (as a control, BL), Stipa bungeana Trin. (STBU), Caragana korshinskii Kom. (CAKO), STBU planted with BSCs (STBU+BSCs) and CAKO planted with BSCs (CAKO+BSCs). The runoff, soil loss and soil moisture to a depth of 3 m were measured throughout the rainy season (from June to September) of 2010. The results showed that BSCs significantly reduced runoff by 37.3% and soil loss by 81.0% and increased infiltration by 12.4% in comparison with BL. However, when combined with STBU or CAKO, BSCs only made negligible contributions to erosion control (a runoff reduction of 7.4% and 5.7% and a soil loss reduction of 0.7% and 0.3%). Generally, the soil moisture of the vegetation plots was lower in the upper layer than that of the BL plots, although when accompanied with a higher amount of infiltration, this soil moisture consumption phenomenon was much clearer when combining vegetation with BSCs. Because of the trivial contributions from BSCs to erosion control and the remaining exacerbated consumption of soil water, moderate disturbance by BSCs should be considered in plots with adequate vegetation cover to improve soil moisture levels without a significant erosion increase, which was implied to be necessary and feasible.

  15. Combined effects of soil moisture and carbaryl to earthworms and plants: Simulation of flood and drought scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Maria P.R.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M. [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Loureiro, Susana, E-mail: sloureiro@ua.pt [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-07-15

    Studying tolerance limits in organisms exposed to climatic variations is key to understanding effects on behaviour and physiology. The presence of pollutants may influence these tolerance limits, by altering the toxicity or bioavailability of the chemical. In this work, the plant species Brassica rapa and Triticum aestivum and the earthworm Eisenia andrei were exposed to different levels of soil moisture and carbaryl, as natural and chemical stressors, respectively. Both stress factors were tested individually, as well as in combination. Acute and chronic tests were performed and results were discussed in order to evaluate the responses of organisms to the combination of stressors. When possible, data was fitted to widely employed models for describing chemical mixture responses. Synergistic interactions were observed in earthworms exposed to carbaryl and drought conditions, while antagonistic interactions were more representative for plants, especially in relation to biomass loss under flood-simulation conditions. - Highlights: > Climate variations may cause changes on chemicals' toxicity or bioavailability. > Earthworms and plants are exposed simultaneously to carbaryl and flood and drought conditions. > The IA model and possible deviations were used to evaluate combination exposures. > Synergism was observed for earthworms exposed to carbaryl and drought conditions. > Antagonistic interactions were observed for plants, in flood conditions and carbaryl. - Soil moisture can play an important role in carbaryl toxicity towards plants and earthworms.

  16. [Effects of combined pollution of lead and benzo[a] pyrene on seed growth of wheat in soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Qi; Wang, Shuai; Ning, Shao-Wei; Sun, Yan-Ling; Hou, Ze-Qing

    2011-03-01

    Seed germination, root elongation, shoot elongation and ratio of shoot to root of wheat in soils polluted by lead (Pb) and benzo (a)pyrene (B[a] P) with medium-low concentrations were studied to reveal the ecological effects of combined pollution and screen the indicative markers. Results indicated that seed germination was not sensitive to single or combined pollution of Pb or B[a] P. Root elongation was inhibited by single pollution of Pb or B[a]P to different extents. Extensive interactions between Pb and B[a]P occurred to root elongation of wheat, including synergistic-stimulatory effect and antagonistic-inhibitory effect. The joint action was mainly antagonistic. Single pollution of B [a] P had an inhibitory effect on shoot elongation. Under combined pollution conditions, the shoot elongation of wheat correlated well with Pb contents (p pollutants had little effect on shoot elongation of wheat. The joint action on shoot elongation was consistently antagonistic. The response pattern of the ratio of shoot to root was similar to the response pattern of shoot elongation. However, the former had better correlation than the latter, indicating it as a more suitable indicative marker for Pb pollution. If lead acetate was employed instead of lead nitrate, longer root elongation, shorter shoot elongation and no effect on ratio of shoot to root were found. Therefore, the forms of Pb salt had significant influence on seed growth of wheat in soils.

  17. Combined effects of soil moisture and carbaryl to earthworms and plants: Simulation of flood and drought scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Maria P.R.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Loureiro, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Studying tolerance limits in organisms exposed to climatic variations is key to understanding effects on behaviour and physiology. The presence of pollutants may influence these tolerance limits, by altering the toxicity or bioavailability of the chemical. In this work, the plant species Brassica rapa and Triticum aestivum and the earthworm Eisenia andrei were exposed to different levels of soil moisture and carbaryl, as natural and chemical stressors, respectively. Both stress factors were tested individually, as well as in combination. Acute and chronic tests were performed and results were discussed in order to evaluate the responses of organisms to the combination of stressors. When possible, data was fitted to widely employed models for describing chemical mixture responses. Synergistic interactions were observed in earthworms exposed to carbaryl and drought conditions, while antagonistic interactions were more representative for plants, especially in relation to biomass loss under flood-simulation conditions. - Highlights: → Climate variations may cause changes on chemicals' toxicity or bioavailability. → Earthworms and plants are exposed simultaneously to carbaryl and flood and drought conditions. → The IA model and possible deviations were used to evaluate combination exposures. → Synergism was observed for earthworms exposed to carbaryl and drought conditions. → Antagonistic interactions were observed for plants, in flood conditions and carbaryl. - Soil moisture can play an important role in carbaryl toxicity towards plants and earthworms.

  18. Combining Partial Least Squares and the Gradient-Boosting Method for Soil Property Retrieval Using Visible Near-Infrared Shortwave Infrared Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfa Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil spectroscopy has experienced a tremendous increase in soil property characterisation, and can be used not only in the laboratory but also from the space (imaging spectroscopy. Partial least squares (PLS regression is one of the most common approaches for the calibration of soil properties using soil spectra. Besides functioning as a calibration method, PLS can also be used as a dimension reduction tool, which has scarcely been studied in soil spectroscopy. PLS components retained from high-dimensional spectral data can further be explored with the gradient-boosted decision tree (GBDT method. Three soil sample categories were extracted from the Land Use/Land Cover Area Frame Survey (LUCAS soil library according to the type of land cover (woodland, grassland, and cropland. First, PLS regression and GBDT were separately applied to build the spectroscopic models for soil organic carbon (OC, total nitrogen content (N, and clay for each soil category. Then, PLS-derived components were used as input variables for the GBDT model. The results demonstrate that the combined PLS-GBDT approach has better performance than PLS or GBDT alone. The relative important variables for soil property estimation revealed by the proposed method demonstrated that the PLS method is a useful dimension reduction tool for soil spectra to retain target-related information.

  19. Comparative study of remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil using electrokinetics combined with bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaying; He, Chiquan; Chen, Xueping; Liang, Xia; Huang, Tongli; Yang, Xuecheng; Shang, Hai

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to design a new bioremediation-electrokinetic (Bio-EK) remediation process to increase treatment efficiency of chromium contamination in soil. Upon residual chromium analysis, it is shown that traditional electrokinetic-PRB system (control) does not have high efficiency (80.26%) to remove Cr(VI). Bio-electrokinetics of exogenous add with reduction bacteria Microbacterium sp. Y2 and electrokinetics can enhance treatment efficiency Cr(VI) to 90.67% after 8 days' remediation. To optimize the overall performance, integrated bio-electrokinetics were designed by synergy with 200 g humic substances (HS) into the systems. According to our results, Cr(VI) (98.33%) was effectively removed via electrokinetics. Moreover, bacteria and humic substances are natural, sustainable, and economical enhancement agents. The research results indicated that the use of integrated bio-electrokinetics is an effective method to remediate chromium-contaminated soils.

  20. Drainage water management combined with cover crop enhances reduction of soil phosphorus loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T Q; Tan, C S; Zheng, Z M; Welacky, T; Wang, Y T

    2017-05-15

    Integrating multiple practices for mitigation of phosphorus (P) loss from soils may enhance the reduction efficiency, but this has not been studied as much as individual ones. A four-year study was conducted to determine the effects of cover crop (CC) (CC vs. no CC, NCC) and drainage water management (DWM) (controlled drainage with sub-irrigation, CDS, vs. regular free tile drainage, RFD) and their interaction on P loss through both surface runoff (SR) and tile drainage (TD) water in a clay loam soil of the Lake Erie region. Cover crop reduced SR flow volume by 32% relative to NCC, regardless of DWM treatment. In contrast, CC increased TD flow volume by 57 and 9.4% with CDS and RFD, respectively, compared to the corresponding DWM treatment with NCC. The total (SR+TD) field water discharge volumes were comparable amongst all the treatments. Cover crop reduced flow-weighted mean (FWM) concentrations of particulate P (PP) by 26% and total P (TP) by 12% in SR, while it didn't affect the FWM dissolved reactive P (DRP) concentration, regardless of DWM treatments. Compared with RFD, CDS reduced FWM DRP concentration in TD water by 19%, while CC reduced FWM PP and TP concentrations in TD by 21 and 17%, respectively. Total (SR+TD) soil TP loss was the least with CDS-CC followed by RFD-CC, CDS-NCC, and RFD-NCC. Compared with RFD-NCC, currently popular practice in the region, total TP loss was reduced by 23% with CDS-CC. The CDS-CC system can be an effective practice to ultimately mitigate soil P loading to water resource. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical combination for nonlinear analysis of structures coupled to layered soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Queiroz Silva

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative coupling strategy between the Boundary Element Method (BEM and the Finite Element Method (FEM in order to create a computational code for the analysis of geometrical nonlinear 2D frames coupled to layered soils. The soil is modeled via BEM, considering multiple inclusions and internal load lines, through an alternative formulation to eliminate traction variables on subregions interfaces. A total Lagrangean formulation based on positions is adopted for the consideration of the geometric nonlinear behavior of frame structures with exact kinematics. The numerical coupling is performed by an algebraic strategy that extracts and condenses the equivalent soil's stiffness matrix and contact forces to be introduced into the frame structures hessian matrix and internal force vector, respectively. The formulation covers the analysis of shallow foundation structures and piles in any direction. Furthermore, the piles can pass through different layers. Numerical examples are shown in order to illustrate and confirm the accuracy and applicability of the proposed technique.

  2. Combined spatial prediction of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Sierra Leone: a tool for integrated disease control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H Hodges

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A national mapping of Schistosoma haematobium was conducted in Sierra Leone before the mass drug administration (MDA with praziquantel. Together with the separate mapping of S. mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths, the national control programme was able to plan the MDA strategies according to the World Health Organization guidelines for preventive chemotherapy for these diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 52 sites/schools were selected according to prior knowledge of S. haematobium endemicity taking into account a good spatial coverage within each district, and a total of 2293 children aged 9-14 years were examined. Spatial analysis showed that S. haematobium is heterogeneously distributed in the country with significant spatial clustering in the central and eastern regions of the country, most prevalent in Bo (24.6% and 8.79 eggs/10 ml, Koinadugu (20.4% and 3.53 eggs/10 ml and Kono (25.3% and 7.91 eggs/10 ml districts. By combining this map with the previously reported maps on intestinal schistosomiasis using a simple probabilistic model, the combined schistosomiasis prevalence map highlights the presence of high-risk communities in an extensive area in the northeastern half of the country. By further combining the hookworm prevalence map, the at-risk population of school-age children requiring integrated schistosomiasis/soil-transmitted helminth treatment regimens according to the coendemicity was estimated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The first comprehensive national mapping of urogenital schistosomiasis in Sierra Leone was conducted. Using a new method for calculating the combined prevalence of schistosomiasis using estimates from two separate surveys, we provided a robust coendemicity mapping for overall urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis. We also produced a coendemicity map of schistosomiasis and hookworm. These coendemicity maps can be used to guide the decision making for MDA strategies in combination

  3. Combined spatial prediction of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Sierra Leone: a tool for integrated disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary H; Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J; Paye, Jusufu; Koroma, Joseph B; Sonnie, Mustapha; Clements, Archie; Zhang, Yaobi

    2012-01-01

    A national mapping of Schistosoma haematobium was conducted in Sierra Leone before the mass drug administration (MDA) with praziquantel. Together with the separate mapping of S. mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths, the national control programme was able to plan the MDA strategies according to the World Health Organization guidelines for preventive chemotherapy for these diseases. A total of 52 sites/schools were selected according to prior knowledge of S. haematobium endemicity taking into account a good spatial coverage within each district, and a total of 2293 children aged 9-14 years were examined. Spatial analysis showed that S. haematobium is heterogeneously distributed in the country with significant spatial clustering in the central and eastern regions of the country, most prevalent in Bo (24.6% and 8.79 eggs/10 ml), Koinadugu (20.4% and 3.53 eggs/10 ml) and Kono (25.3% and 7.91 eggs/10 ml) districts. By combining this map with the previously reported maps on intestinal schistosomiasis using a simple probabilistic model, the combined schistosomiasis prevalence map highlights the presence of high-risk communities in an extensive area in the northeastern half of the country. By further combining the hookworm prevalence map, the at-risk population of school-age children requiring integrated schistosomiasis/soil-transmitted helminth treatment regimens according to the coendemicity was estimated. The first comprehensive national mapping of urogenital schistosomiasis in Sierra Leone was conducted. Using a new method for calculating the combined prevalence of schistosomiasis using estimates from two separate surveys, we provided a robust coendemicity mapping for overall urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis. We also produced a coendemicity map of schistosomiasis and hookworm. These coendemicity maps can be used to guide the decision making for MDA strategies in combination with the local knowledge and programme needs.

  4. Effect of combined N applied at low level on the nitrogen fixation by grasses and contribution to nitrogen fertility in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yunyin; Chen Ming; Ma Changlin

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the study on the effect of combined N applied at low level on teh nitrogen fixation by alfalfa in monoculture and mixed culture with meadow fescue, and the effect on the absorption and utilization of indigenous soil nitrogen and nitrogen fertilizer. Amount of nitrogen fixed by alfalfa could be raised and duration of high peak of symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity could be extended when nitrogen fertilizer was applied reasonably. It was especially important for the early pastures or pastures with low supporting nitrogen capacity. Transfer of nitrogen fixed by alfalfa to meadow fescue occured in mixed culture. Nitrogen fixed from alfalfa was uptaken more easily than indigenous nitrogen in soil. Planting alfalfa could raise soil fertility significantly. Meadow fescue may be able to fix nitrogen from the air in some way. When combined N was appropriately applied to soil, on which alfalfa and meadow fescue had been planted, it could promote increasing nitrogen fertility in soil

  5. Long-term impact of farm management and crops on soil microorganisms assessed by combined DGGE and PLFA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnari, Fabio; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Campanelli, Gabriele; Leteo, Fabrizio; Della Vella, Umberto; Schirone, Maria; Suzzi, Giovanna; Pisante, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, long-term organic and conventional managements were compared at the experimental field of Monsampolo del Tronto (Marche region, Italy) with the aim of investigating soil chemical fertility and microbial community structure. A polyphasic approach, combining soil fertility indicators with microbiological analyses (plate counts, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE] and phospholipid fatty acid analysis [PLFA]) was applied. Organic matter, N as well as some important macro and micronutrients (K, P, Mg, Mn, Cu, and Zn) for crop growth, were more available under organic management. Bacterial counts were higher in organic management. A significant influence of management system and management x crop interaction was observed for total mesophilic bacteria, nitrogen fixing bacteria and actinobacteria. Interestingly, cultivable fungi were not detected in all analyzed samples. PLFA biomass was higher in the organic and Gram positive bacteria dominated the microbial community in both systems. Even if fungal biomass was higher in organic management, fungal PCR-DGGE fingerprinting revealed that the two systems were very similar in terms of fungal species suggesting that 10 years were not enough to establish a new dynamic equilibrium among ecosystem components. A better knowledge of soil biota and in particular of fungal community structure will be useful for the development of sustainable management strategies.

  6. The combined effect of the Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Programme and the Schistosomiasis and Soil-transmitted Helminthiasis Control Programme on soil-transmitted helminthiasis in schoolchildren in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Khalid; Magnussen, Pascal; Sheshe, Amir; Ntakamulenga, Robert; Ndawi, Benedict; Olsen, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The combined effect of the Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Programme (LFEP) and the National Schistosomiasis and Soil-transmitted Helminthiasis Control Programme (NSSCP) on soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) was evaluated. In September 2004, before mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin and albendazole by the LFEP in October, the prevalence and intensity of STH were recorded in 228 pupils in one primary school. After 8 months, all available pupils were re-examined, and the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm had decreased from 0.9 to 0.7% (P=0.84), from 4.8 to 0.7% (P=0.004) and from 45.6 to 11.9% (P<0.001), respectively. Overall, 81.2% of the schoolchildren stated that they were treated by the LFEP in October 2004. After the 8 months follow-up, pupils were treated with praziquantel and albendazole by the present project (substitute for the NSSCP). After another 4 months (at 12 months follow-up), the prevalence of hookworm infection was reduced to 4.8% (P=0.003), while the prevalence of T. trichiura was reduced to 0.3% (P=0.54) and the prevalence of A. lumbricoides remained unchanged. Mass co-administration of ivermectin and albendazole by the LFEP had a significant effect on STH, which was further amplified by treatment with praziquantel and albendazole 4 months later.

  7. The application of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy to the study of lamellar magnetism in hematite-ilmenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Asaka, T

    2009-01-01

    . However, the magnitude of the experimental contrast is higher than that in the simulations, suggesting that an alternative origin for the observed asymmetry cannot be ruled out. Electron tomography was used to show that the lamellae have lens-like shapes and that (001) planes make up a significant...... in hematite. The likelihood that lamellar magnetism may be responsible for this contrast is assessed using simulations that incorporate interfacial magnetic moments on the (001) basal planes of hematite and ilmenite. The simulations suggest qualitatively that the asymmetric contrast is magnetic in origin...

  8. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite ore by solvent extraction with trioctylamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Olanipekun

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The selective removal of chromium, a trace impurity that degrades the whiteness of titanium(IV oxide pigments, from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite, was investigated by solvent extraction with xylene solutions of trioctylamine. Important factors of commercial significance affecting the extraction operation have been examined. More than 99% of the chromium was selectively removed in multiple batch extractions from the leach liquor and titanium losses were minimal (< 1%. The chromium content of extracted solutions was reduced to less than 1 ppm and thermal hydrolysis of these solutions yielded white titanium(IV oxide pigments that are suitable for use in the coatings pigment industry.

  9. Investigation On Natural Background Radioactivity At TanLong, Lagi, BinhThuan Residential Area On Ilmenite Deposit Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Thi Kim Loan; Tran Van Luyen; Thai Khac Dinh

    2008-01-01

    An Ilmenite deposit zone located at TanLong, Lagi, Binh Thuan province. After the year of 2000, a new village of population has set up at this place. To estimate the effect on the human health of radioactivity accompanying with the deposit, the sand samples were collected and natural radioactive analyzed at center for nuclear techniques. The average year doses D annual , hazard radiation exposed index H ex and Radium equivalence Ra eq were calculated based on the natural radioactivities. The results show that these factors are overcome the international average as well as southern Vietnam values. (author)

  10. Transport of uranium in water and soil: colloidal-isotopic combined approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harguindeguy, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of interaction between uranium and colloids were studied by samples taken from a site of interest for the 'French Nuclear Agency' (CEA). The mobilization of uranium from soils was apprehended by static and dynamic leaching experiments. The transfer and transport have been studied by considering pond waters and drain waters. Results confirm that anthropogenic uranium is more mobile than natural uranium. However mechanisms of mobilization and distribution of uranium, does not differ depending on its origin. The colloidal fraction plays an important role on the migration in soil and the transfer into water by representing from 10 to 90 % uranium depending on samples. The colloidal fractions of uranium are in a continuum of size up to about 200 nm hydrodynamic diameter. They are mainly composed of organic material, iron and aluminum. Along the drain, from the upstream to the downstream of the site, rearrangement of colloidal associations between uranium and organic material occurs in disfavor of colloidal associations between uranium and iron, the proportion of colloidal uranium bound to aluminum remains unchanged. (author) [fr

  11. Study of temperature effect on the physical properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete radiation shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kany, A.M.I.; EL-Fouly, M.M.; EL-Gohary, M.I.; Makatious, A.S.; Kamal, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental studies have been carried out to determine the change in unit weigh, compressive strength, water content and neutron macroscopic cross section of a new type of concrete shields made from egyptian ilmenite and serpentine ores when heated for long period at temperatures up to 600 degree C. Results show that the unit weight of the cure concrete has a value of 2.98 Ton/M 3 and decreases with increasing temperature, while the compressive strength reaches a maximum value of 19 Ton/M 2 at 100 degree C. The differential thermal analysis (D.T.A.) of this concrete shows three endothermic peaks at 100 degree C, 48 degree C and 740 degree C. Also, the thermogravimetry analysis (T.G.A.) shows that the cure concrete retains about 11% water content of the total sample weigh and still retains 4.5% of its initial value when heated for long period at 600 degree C. Results also show that the neutron macroscopic cross section (for neutrons of energies < 1 MeV) of the ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete decreases to 18.6% of its initial value after heating to 600 degree C

  12. Quenching ilmenite with a high-temperature and high-pressure phase using super-high-energy ball milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashishin, Takeshi; Tan, Zhenquan; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Kim, Jungeum; Numako, Chiya; Naka, Takashi; Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Ohara, Satoshi

    2014-04-25

    The mass production of highly dense oxides with high-temperature and high-pressure phases allows us to discover functional properties that have never been developed. To date, the quenching of highly dense materials at the gramme-level at ambient atmosphere has never been achieved. Here, we provide evidence of the formation of orthorhombic Fe2TiO4 from trigonal FeTiO3 as a result of the high-temperature (>1250 K) and high-pressure (>23 GPa) condition induced by the high collision energy of 150 gravity generated between steel balls. Ilmenite was steeply quenched by the surrounding atmosphere, when iron-rich ilmenite (Fe2TiO4) with a high-temperature and high-pressure phase was formed by planetary collisions and was released from the collision points between the balls. Our finding allows us to infer that such intense planetary collisions induced by high-energy ball milling contribute to the mass production of a high-temperature and high-pressure phase.

  13. Seepage Study for Suction Installation of Bucket Foundation in Different Soil Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koteras, Aleksandra Katarzyna; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2016-01-01

    Research has proven the bucket foundation to be a feasible and an attractive solution for offshore wind turbines. Its potential derives partly from the cost-effectiveness due to the suction-assisted installation. The suction applied under the bucket lid produces a downward driving force and addit......Research has proven the bucket foundation to be a feasible and an attractive solution for offshore wind turbines. Its potential derives partly from the cost-effectiveness due to the suction-assisted installation. The suction applied under the bucket lid produces a downward driving force...... around the bucket skirt. The exceedance of critical suction might lead to installation failure due to formation of piping channels, which break the hydraulic seal between the skirt and soil. The excess pore pressure arising due to applied suction changes the effective stress, hence the penetration...

  14. Remediation of highly contaminated soils from an industrial site by employing a combined treatment with exogeneous humic substances and oxidative biomimetic catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannino, Filomena; Spaccini, Riccardo; Savy, Davide; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Remediation of two polluted soils from a highly contaminated industrial site in Italy. • Restoration of soil quality by introducing additional carbon into polluted soil with humic matter amendments. • Detoxification of contaminants by covalent binding to humic molecules. • Prevention of environmental transport of pollutants. -- Abstract: Remediation of two polluted soils from a northern Italian industrial site heavily contaminated with organic contaminants was attempted here by subjecting soils first to addition with an exogenous humic acid (HA), and, then, to an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a water-soluble iron-porphyrin (FeP). An expected decrease of detectable organic pollutants (>50%) was already observed when soils were treated only with the H 2 O 2 oxidant. This reduction was substantially enhanced when oxidation was catalyzed by iron-porphyrin (FeP + H 2 O 2 ) and the largest effect was observed for the most highly polluted soil. Even more significant was the decrease in detectable pollutants (70–90%) when soils were first amended with HA and then subjected to the FeP + H 2 O 2 treatment. This reduction in extractable pollutants after the combined HA + FeP + H 2 O 2 treatment was due to formation of covalent C-C and C-O-C bonds between soil contaminants and amended humic molecules. Moreover, the concomitant detection of condensation products in soil extracts following FeP addition confirmed the occurrence of free-radical coupling reactions catalyzed by FeP. These findings indicate that a combined technique based on the action of both humic matter and a metal-porhyrin catalyst, may become useful to quantitatively reduce the toxicity of heavily contaminated soils and prevent the environmental transport of pollutants

  15. Remediation of highly contaminated soils from an industrial site by employing a combined treatment with exogeneous humic substances and oxidative biomimetic catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannino, Filomena, E-mail: fsannino@unina.it [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Spaccini, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sulla Risonanza Magnetica Nucleare per l’Ambiente, l’Agro-Alimentare ed i Nuovi Materiali (CERMANU), Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Savy, Davide [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Piccolo, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sulla Risonanza Magnetica Nucleare per l’Ambiente, l’Agro-Alimentare ed i Nuovi Materiali (CERMANU), Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Remediation of two polluted soils from a highly contaminated industrial site in Italy. • Restoration of soil quality by introducing additional carbon into polluted soil with humic matter amendments. • Detoxification of contaminants by covalent binding to humic molecules. • Prevention of environmental transport of pollutants. -- Abstract: Remediation of two polluted soils from a northern Italian industrial site heavily contaminated with organic contaminants was attempted here by subjecting soils first to addition with an exogenous humic acid (HA), and, then, to an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a water-soluble iron-porphyrin (FeP). An expected decrease of detectable organic pollutants (>50%) was already observed when soils were treated only with the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidant. This reduction was substantially enhanced when oxidation was catalyzed by iron-porphyrin (FeP + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and the largest effect was observed for the most highly polluted soil. Even more significant was the decrease in detectable pollutants (70–90%) when soils were first amended with HA and then subjected to the FeP + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. This reduction in extractable pollutants after the combined HA + FeP + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment was due to formation of covalent C-C and C-O-C bonds between soil contaminants and amended humic molecules. Moreover, the concomitant detection of condensation products in soil extracts following FeP addition confirmed the occurrence of free-radical coupling reactions catalyzed by FeP. These findings indicate that a combined technique based on the action of both humic matter and a metal-porhyrin catalyst, may become useful to quantitatively reduce the toxicity of heavily contaminated soils and prevent the environmental transport of pollutants.

  16. The Combination of DGT Technique and Traditional Chemical Methods for Evaluation of Cadmium Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils with Organic Amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic amendments have been proposed as a means of remediation for Cd-contaminated soils. However, understanding the inhibitory effects of organic materials on metal immobilization requires further research. In this study colza cake, a typical organic amendment material, was investigated in order to elucidate the ability of this material to reduce toxicity of Cd-contaminated soil. Available concentrations of Cd in soils were measured using an in situ diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT technique in combination with traditional chemical methods, such as HOAc (aqua regia, EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, NaOAc (sodium acetate, CaCl2, and labile Cd in pore water. These results were applied to predict the Cd bioavailability after the addition of colza cake to Cd-contaminated soil. Two commonly grown cash crops, wheat and maize, were selected for Cd accumulation studies, and were found to be sensitive to Cd bioavailability. Results showed that the addition of colza cake may inhibit the growth of wheat and maize. Furthermore, the addition of increasing colza cake doses led to decreasing shoot and root biomass accumulation. However, increasing colza cake doses did lead to the reduction of Cd accumulation in plant tissues, as indicated by the decreasing Cd concentrations in shoots and roots. The labile concentration of Cd obtained by DGT measurements and the traditional chemical extraction methods, showed the clear decrease of Cd with the addition of increasing colza cake doses. All indicators showed significant positive correlations (p < 0.01 with the accumulation of Cd in plant tissues, however, all of the methods could not reflect plant growth status. Additionally, the capability of Cd to change from solid phase to become available in a soil solution decreased with increasing colza cake doses. This was reflected by the decreases in the ratio (R value of CDGT to Csol. Our study suggests that the sharp decrease in R values could not only

  17. Zeolite Combined with Alum and Polyaluminum Chloride Mixed with Agricultural Slurries Reduces Carbon Losses in Runoff from Grassed Soil Boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, J G; Brennan, R B; Fenton, O; Healy, M G

    2016-11-01

    Carbon (C) losses from agricultural soils to surface waters can migrate through water treatment plants and result in the formation of disinfection by-products, which are potentially harmful to human health. This study aimed to quantify total organic carbon (TOC) and total inorganic C losses in runoff after application of dairy slurry, pig slurry, or milk house wash water (MWW) to land and to mitigate these losses through coamendment of the slurries with zeolite (2.36-3.35 mm clinoptilolite) and liquid polyaluminum chloride (PAC) (10% AlO) for dairy and pig slurries or liquid aluminum sulfate (alum) (8% AlO) for MWW. Four treatments under repeated 30-min simulated rainfall events (9.6 mm h) were examined in a laboratory study using grassed soil runoff boxes (0.225 m wide, 1 m long; 10% slope): control soil, unamended slurries, PAC-amended dairy and pig slurries (13.3 and 11.7 kg t, respectively), alum-amended MWW (3.2 kg t), combined zeolite and PAC-amended dairy (160 and 13.3 kg t zeolite and PAC, respectively) and pig slurries (158 and 11.7 kg t zeolite and PAC, respectively), and combined zeolite and alum-amended MWW (72 and 3.2 kg t zeolite and alum, respectively). The unamended and amended slurries were applied at net rates of 31, 34, and 50 t ha for pig and dairy slurries and MWW, respectively. Significant reductions of TOC in runoff compared with unamended slurries were measured for PAC-amended dairy and pig slurries (52 and 56%, respectively) but not for alum-amended MWW. Dual zeolite and alum-amended MWW significantly reduced TOC in runoff compared with alum amendment only. We conclude that use of PAC-amended dairy and pig slurries and dual zeolite and alum-amended MWW, although effective, may not be economically viable to reduce TOC losses from organic slurries given the relatively low amounts of TOC measured in runoff from unamended slurries compared with the amounts applied. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of

  18. Release of three iceberg lettuce populations that combined resistance to two soil borne diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture and the University of California, Davis, announce the release of three F2:4 breeding populations of iceberg lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). The breeding populations combine the cor and Verticillium resistance 1 (Vr1) loci to co...

  19. Rational Application of Fertilizer Nitrogen to Soil in Combination With Foliar Zn Spraying Improved Zn Nutritional Quality of Wheat Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyong Xia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To alleviate human zinc (Zn deficiency, it is worthy to develop rational agronomic managements to achieve high yielding and high resource-use efficiency wheat (Triticum aestivum L. grains biofortified with Zn. Effects of application of three rates of nitrogen (N fertilizer (75,200 and 275 kg·ha−1 to soil in combination with three foliar applications (deionized water, Zn alone, and a combination of Zn and sucrose on grain yield, yield components, grain Zn concentration, protein, phytic acid (PA, phosphorus (P, calcium (Ca, and carbon (C, as well as on Zn bioavailability, were investigated in four wheat cultivars (“Jinan 17,” “Jimai 20,” “Jimai 22,” and “Luyuan 502” under field conditions. Enhanced N increased Zn and protein concentrations as well as bioavailability; excessive N input did not result in further improvements. Zinc spraying was more effective than soil fertilizer N application, the spray of Zn (with or without sucrose increased grain Zn concentrations by 11.1–15.6 mg·kg−1 (27.1–38.1%, and increased grain Zn bioavailability, estimated using total daily absorbed Zn (TAZ and molar ratios of PA/Zn and PA × Ca/Zn, by 0.4–0.6 mg d−1 (28.6–42.9%, 23.1–27.4% and 24.0–28.0%, respectively. Remarkably, increases caused by ‘Zn + sucrose’ were higher than spraying Zn alone. Grain Zn bioavailability was more sensitive to the selection of cultivar than Zn concentrations. Among cultivars, the higher the grain yields and concentrations of antinutritional compounds, the lower the grain Zn nutritional quality would be. 200 kg N ha−1 application rate in combination with foliar spraying of “Zn + sucrose” maximized grain Zn concentrations of “Jinan 17,” “Jimai 20,” “Jimai 22,” and “Luyuan 502” to be 59.4, 56.9, 55.8, and 60.9 mg kg−1, respectively, achieving the target value for biofortification. Additionally, PA/Zn and PA × Ca/Zn of “Jinan 17,” “Jimai 20,” and “Luyuan 502” were

  20. Global-scale assessment and combination of SMAP with ASCAT (active) and AMSR2 (passive) soil moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunglok; Parinussa, Robert; Konings, Alexandra G.; Wagner, Wolfgang; Cosh, Michael H.; Lakshmi, Venkat; Zohaib, Muhammad; Choi, Minha

    2018-01-01

    Global-scale surface soil moisture (SSM) products retrieved from active and passive microwave remote sensing provide an effective method for monitoring near-real-time SSM content with nearly daily temporal resolution. In the present study, we first inter-compared global-scale error patterns and combined the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT), and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) SSM products using a triple collocation (TC) analysis and the maximized Pearson correlation coefficient (R) method from April 2015 to December 2016. The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) and global in situ observations were utilized to investigate and to compare the quality of satellite-based SSM products. The average R-values of SMAP, ASCAT, and AMSR2 were 0.74, 0.64, and 0.65 when they compared with in situ networks, respectively. The ubRMSD values were (0.0411, 0.0625, and 0.0708) m3 m- 3; and the bias values were (- 0.0460, 0.0010, and 0.0418) m3 m- 3 for SMAP, ASCAT, and AMSR2, respectively. The highest average R-values from SMAP against the in situ results are very encouraging; only SMAP showed higher R-values than GLDAS in several in situ networks with low ubRMSD (0.0438 m3 m- 3). Overall, SMAP showed a dry bias (- 0.0460 m3 m- 3) and AMSR2 had a wet bias (0.0418 m3 m- 3); while ASCAT showed the least bias (0.0010 m3 m- 3) among all the products. Each product was evaluated using TC metrics with respect to the different ranges of vegetation optical depth (VOD). Under vegetation scarce conditions (VOD 0.40) ASCAT showed comparatively better performance than did the other products. Using the maximized R method, SMAP, ASCAT, and AMSR2 products were combined one by one using the GLDAS dataset for reference SSM values. When the satellite products were combined, R-values of the combined products were improved or degraded depending on the VOD ranges produced, when compared with the results from the original products alone. The

  1. Potential use of lime combined with additives on (im)mobilization and phytoavailability of heavy metals from Pb/Zn smelter contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain Lahori, Altaf; Zhang, Zengqiang; Guo, Zhanyu; Mahar, Amanullah; Li, Ronghua; Kumar Awasthi, Mukesh; Ali Sial, Tanveer; Kumbhar, Farhana; Wang, Ping; Shen, Feng; Zhao, Junchao; Huang, Hui

    2017-11-01

    This explorative study was aimed to assess the efficiency of lime alone and in combined with additives to immobilize Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn in soil and reduce their phytoavailability for plant. A greenhouse pot experiment was performed by using low and heavily contaminated top soils viz. Tongguan contaminated (TG-C); Fengxian heavily contaminated (FX-HC) and Fengxian low contaminated (FX-LC). The contaminated soils were treated with lime (L) alone and in combined with Ca-bentonite (CB), Tobacco biochar (TB) and Zeolite (Z) at 1% and cultivated by Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L). Results revealed that all amendments (plime alone and in combined with additives were drastically decreased the dry biomass yield of Brassica campestris L. as compared with control. Thus, these feasible amendments potentially maximum reduced the uptake by plant shoots upto Pb 53.47 and Zn 67.93% with L+Z and L+TB in FX-LC soil, while Cd 68.58 and Cu 60.29% with L+TB, L+CB in TG-C soil but Cu uptake in plant shoot was observed 27.26% and 30.17% amended with L+TB and L+Z in FX-HC and FX-LC soils. On the other hand, these amendments were effectively reduced the potentially toxic metals (PTMs) in roots upto Pb77.77% L alone in FX-HC, Cd 96.76% with L+TB in TG-C, while, Cu 66.70 and Zn 60.18% with L+Z in FX-LC. Meanwhile, all amendments were responsible for increasing soil pH and CEC but decreased soils EC level. Based on this result, these feasible soil amendments were recommended for long term-study under field condition to see the response of another hyper accumulator crop. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Evaluating the importance of surface soil contributions to reservoir sediment in alpine environments: a combined modelling and fingerprinting approach in the Posets-Maladeta Natural Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazón, L.; Gaspar, L.; Latorre, B.; Blake, W. H.; Navas, A.

    2014-09-01

    Soil in alpine environments plays a key role in the development of ecosystem services and in order to maintain and preserve this important resource, information is required on processes that lead to soil erosion. Similar to other mountain alpine environments, the Benasque catchment is characterised by temperatures below freezing that can last from November to April, intense rainfall events, typically in spring and autumn, and rugged topography which makes assessment of erosion challenging. Indirect approaches to soil erosion assessment, such as combined model approaches, offer an opportunity to evaluate soil erosion in such areas. In this study (i) the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) hydrological and erosion model and (ii) sediment fingerprinting procedures were used in parallel to assess the viability of a combined modelling and tracing approach to evaluate soil erosion processes in the area of the Posets-Maladeta Natural Park (central Spanish Pyrenees). Soil erosion rates and sediment contribution of potential sediment sources defined by soil type (Kastanozems/Phaeozems; Fluvisols and Cambisols) were assessed. The SWAT model suggested that, with the highest specific sediment yields, Cambisols are the main source of sediment in the Benasque catchment and Phaeozems and Fluvisols were identified as the lowest sediment contributors. Spring and winter model runs gave the highest and lowest specific sediment yield, respectively. In contrast, sediment fingerprinting analysis identified Fluvisols, which dominate the riparian zone, as the main sediment source at the time of sampling. This indicates the importance of connectivity as well as potential differences in the source dynamic of material in storage versus that transported efficiently from the system at times of high flow. The combined approach enabled us to better understand soil erosion processes in the Benasque alpine catchment, wherein SWAT identified areas of potential high sediment yield in large flood

  3. Biodegradation of RDX within soil-water slurries using a combination of differing redox incubation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waisner, S.; Hansen, L.; Fredrickson, H.; Nestler, C.; Zappi, M.; Banerji, S.; Bajpai, R.

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradation of 14 C-tagged hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was studied in aerobic, anaerobic, and anaerobic/aerobic slurries to identify the conditions maximizing RDX-mineralization in Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CAAP, NE) groundwater. Supplementation with phosphate and adequate quantities of acetate caused 25% mineralization of RDX in 3 weeks by microorganisms native to CAAP. Under anaerobic conditions, the same supplementation resulted in 20% mineralization in 3 weeks and 30% mineralization in 6 weeks. The highest degree of mineralization (50%) was obtained under aerobic conditions when the contaminated groundwater was augmented with a consortium of three microbes isolated from another RDX contaminated soil (Hastings, NE) in addition to supplemented with phosphate and acetic acid. Use of complex organic sources (potato or corn starch) slowed down the rates of mineralization under anaerobic conditions, but rapid mineralization ensued as soon as the aerobic conditions were created. Final RDX concentrations in aqueous phase were below detection limit under most conditions. Assimilation of RDX by the cells was negligible

  4. Effects of combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers plus nitrification inhibitor DMPP on nitrogen runoff loss in vegetable soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaogang; Ma, Junwei; Zou, Ping; Lin, Hui; Sun, Wanchun; Yin, Jianzhen; Fu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The application of nitrogen fertilizers leads to various ecological problems such as large amounts of nitrogen runoff loss causing water body eutrophication. The proposal that nitrification inhibitors could be used as nitrogen runoff loss retardants has been suggested in many countries. In this study, simulated artificial rainfall was used to illustrate the effect of the nitrification inhibitor DMPP (3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate) on nitrogen loss from vegetable fields under combined organic and inorganic nitrogen fertilizer application. The results showed that during the three-time simulated artificial rainfall period, the ammonium nitrogen content in the surface runoff water collected from the DMPP application treatment increased by 1.05, 1.13, and 1.10 times compared to regular organic and inorganic combined fertilization treatment, respectively. In the organic and inorganic combined fertilization with DMPP addition treatment, the nitrate nitrogen content decreased by 38.8, 43.0, and 30.1% in the three simulated artificial rainfall runoff water, respectively. Besides, the nitrite nitrogen content decreased by 95.4, 96.7, and 94.1% in the three-time simulated artificial rainfall runoff water, respectively. A robust decline in the nitrate and nitrite nitrogen surface runoff loss could be observed in the treatments after the DMPP addition. The nitrite nitrogen in DMPP addition treatment exhibited a significant low level, which is near to the no fertilizer application treatment. Compared to only organic and inorganic combined fertilizer treatment, the total inorganic nitrogen runoff loss declined by 22.0 to 45.3% in the organic and inorganic combined fertilizers with DMPP addition treatment. Therefore, DMPP could be used as an effective nitrification inhibitor to control the soil ammonium oxidation in agriculture and decline the nitrogen runoff loss, minimizing the nitrogen transformation risk to the water body and being beneficial for the ecological environment.

  5. Stress Coefficients for Soil Water Balance Combined with Water Stress Indicators for Irrigation Scheduling of Woody Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Ferreira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several causes for the failure of empirical models to estimate soil water depletion and to calculate irrigation depths, and the problem is particularly critical in tall, uneven, deficit irrigated (DI crops in Mediterranean climates. Locally measured indicators that quantify water status are useful for addressing those causes and providing feed-back information for improving the adequacy of simple models. Because of their high aerodynamic resistance, the canopy conductance of woody crops is an important factor in determining evapotranspiration (ET, and accurate stress coefficient (Ks values are needed to quantify the impact of stomatal closure on ET. A brief overview of basic general principles for irrigation scheduling is presented with emphasis on DI applications that require Ks modelling. The limitations of existing technology related to scheduling of woody crops are discussed, including the shortcomings of plant-based approaches. In relation to soil water deficit and/or predawn leaf water potential, several woody crop Ks functions are presented in a secondary analysis. Whenever the total and readily available water data were available, a simple Ks model was tested. The ultimate aim of this discussion is to illustrate the central concept: that a combination of simple ET models and water stress indicators is required for scheduling irrigation of deep-rooted woody crops.

  6. The Instructional Design of Case Method Combined With Role-Playing in the Soil and Groundwater Training Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yin Hwa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Almost all environmental problems are caused by human. Besides being good at environmental engineering theory and technology, to enhance the ability to solve environmental problems, the environmental practitioners need a closer understanding of the stance of different stakeholders. This study is an instructional design combining both "case method" and "role-playing" into the “Soil and Groundwater Talent Training Courses” in Taipei. The curriculum is based on the hexavalent chromium pollution case in Yunlin County. Each group of students is encouraged to play four roles, inculding leather factory owners, farmers, environmental officials, and soil testing professionals. Each group of students has to propose solution strategies after discussion and consultation. The study adopts a single group posttest design. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The quantitative data were analyzed through proportion and Pearson correlation. Results were as follows: (1 The solution strategies identified by the students include: “mutual communication”, “consensus-building”, and “the formation of an environmental committee". (2 More than 80% of students were satisfied with the instruction, and they found it helpful in terms of knowledge and skills in doing surveying. A moderate positive correlation exists between students’ participation and learning satisfaction. A reflection concerning this instruction design along with some recommendations are provided.

  7. Combined mild soil washing and compost-assisted phytoremediation in treatment of silt loams contaminated with copper, nickel, and chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Menghau; Lee, Chi-Yi; Lee, Suen-Zone

    2011-06-15

    A new soil remediation option, combining the soil washing process using pure water followed by the compost-assisted phytoextraction, is evaluated using silt loams contaminated with plating wastewater containing Cu, Ni, and Cr. Plants utilized in this study are the rapeseeds, sunflowers, tomatoes, and soapworts. Phytoextraction operation was carried out in pot experiments over a period of 4 months. Metal concentrations in roots and shoots of plants were analyzed upon completion of each pot experiment. Hypothesis testing was employed in assessing the significance of difference in the experimental data. Results indicated that the rapeseed, a hyperaccumulator, is most effective in extracting metals from the compost-amended silt loams. The fast-growing sunflowers and tomatoes are comparable to rapeseeds in accumulating metals despite their relatively low metal concentrations in tissues. Bioaccumulation coefficients obtained for all plants are less than one, indicating that phytostabilization rather than phytoextraction is the dominant mechanism at this simulated final-phase condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined in-situ and ex-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils by closed-loop soil vapor extraction and air injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.S.; Buckler, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Treatment and restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils at a bulk petroleum above-ground storage tank (AST) site in Michigan is being conducted through in-situ and ex-situ closed-loop soil vapor extraction (SVE), soil vapor treatment, and treated air injection (AI) processes. The soil vapor extraction process applies a vacuum through the petroleum hydrocarbon affected soils in the ex-situ bio-remediation pile (bio-pile) and along the perimeter of excavated area (in-situ area) to remove the volatile or light petroleum hydrocarbons. This process also draws ambient air into the ex-situ bio-pile and in-situ vadose zone soil along the perimeter of excavated area to enhance biodegradation of light and heavy petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil. The extracted soil vapor is treated using a custom-designed air bio-remediation filter (bio-filter) to degrade the petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in the soil vapor extraction air streams. The treated air is then injected into a flush grade soil bed in the backfill area to perform final polishing of the air stream, and to form a closed-loop air flow with the soil vapor extraction perforated pipes along the perimeter of the excavated area

  9. Combined effect of diuron and simazine on photosystem II photochemistry in a sandy soil and soil amended with solid olive-mill waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Cox, Lucía; Cornejo, Juan; Figueroa, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)- = 1,1-dimethylurea) and simazine (6-chloro-N(2), N(4)-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) are soil-applied herbicides used in olive crops. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of these herbicides on Photosystem II photochemistry of Olea europaea L., and whether the amendment of soil with an organic waste (OW) from olive oil production industry modifies this effect. For this purpose, herbicide soil adsorption studies, with unamended and OW-amended soil, and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements in adult olive leaves, after one, two and three weeks of soil herbicide treatment and/or OW amendment, were performed. Soil application of these herbicides reduced the efficiency of Photosystem II photochemistry of olive trees due to chronic photoinhibition, and this effect is counterbalanced by the addition of OW to the soil. OW reduces herbicide uptake by the plant due to an increase in herbicide adsorption.

  10. Influence of biochars, compost and iron grit, alone and in combination, on copper solubility and phytotoxicity in a Cu-contaminated soil from a wood preservation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustriere, Nadège; Marchand, Lilian; Galland, William; Gabbon, Lunel; Lottier, Nathalie; Motelica, Mikael; Mench, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Two biochars, a green waste compost and iron grit were used, alone and in combination, as amendment to improve soil properties and in situ stabilize Cu in a contaminated soil (964mgCukg(-1)) from a wood preservation site. The pot experiment consisted in 9 soil treatments (% w/w): untreated Cu-contaminated soil (Unt); Unt soil amended respectively with compost (5%, C), iron grit (1%, Z), pine bark-derived biochar (1%, PB), poultry-manure-derived biochar (1%, AB), PB or AB+C (5%, PBC and ABC), and PB or AB+Z (1%, PBZ and ABZ). After a 3-month reaction period, the soil pore water (SPW) was sampled in potted soils and dwarf beans were grown for a 2-week period. In the SPW, all amendments decreased the Cu(2+) concentration, but total Cu concentration increased in all AB-amended soils due to high dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration. No treatment improved root and shoot DW yields, which even decreased in the ABC and ABZ treatments. The PBZ treatment decreased total Cu concentration in the SPW while reducing the gap with common values for root and shoot yields of dwarf bean plants. A field trial is underway before any recommendation for the PB-based treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ilmenit z dvojslídných granitů šumavské větve moldanubického batolitu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2011, podzim (2012), s. 193-196 ISSN 0514-8057 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME10083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : ilmenite * two-mica granite * Moldanubian Zone * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geology.cz/zpravy/obsah/2011/zpravy_2011-44.pdf

  12. Immiscible melt droplets in garnet, as represented by ilmenite-magnetite-spinel spheroids in an eclogite-garnet peridotite association, Blanský les Granulite Massif, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, S.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Erban, V.; Halodová, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 1 (2016), s. 82-92 ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : eclogite * Fe-Ti-rich melt * garnet peridotite * garnetite * Ilmenite-magnetite-spinel * Invited Centennial article * Moldanubian Zone * UHP crystallization Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2016

  13. Trace element partitioning between ilmenite, armalcolite and anhydrous silicate melt: Implications for the formation of lunar high-Ti mare basalts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan Parker, M. van; Mason, P.R.D.; Westrenen, W. van

    2011-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments at high pressures and temperatures to determine the partitioning of a wide range of trace elements between ilmenite (Ilm), armalcolite (Arm) and anhydrous lunar silicate melt, to constrain geochemical models of the formation of titanium-rich melts in the Moon.

  14. Applying Limestone or Basalt in Combination with Bio-Fertilizer to Sustain Rice Production on an Acid Sulfate Soil in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of applying ground magnesium limestone (GML or ground basalt in combination with bio-fertilizer to sustain rice production on an acid sulfate soil in Malaysia. Soils from Kelantan Plains, Malaysia, were treated with GML, ground basalt, bio-fertilizer, GML + bio-fertilizer, and ground basalt + bio-fertilizer (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that soil fertility was improved by applying the soil amendments. GML and basalt contain some Zn and Cu; thus, application of these amendments would increase their contents in the soil needed for the healthy growth of rice. Basalt applied in combination with bio-fertilizer appeared to be the best agronomic option to improve the fertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice production in the long run. In addition to increasing Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu reserves in the soil, water pH increased and precipitated Al3+ and/or Fe2+. Ground basalt is cheaper than GML, but basalt dissolution in the acidic soil was slow. As such, its ameliorative effects could only be seen significantly from the second season onwards. The specially-formulated bio-fertilizer for alleviating the infertility of acid sulfate soil could also enhance rice growth. The use of the bio-fertilizer fortified with N2-fixing bacteria is a green technology that would help reduce NO3− and/or NO2− pollution and reduce the cost of rice production. The phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB present in the bio-fertilizer not only increased the available P, but also helped release organic acids that would inactivate Al3+ and/or Fe2+ via the process of chelation.

  15. Effect of CaO addition on preparation of ferrotitanium from ilmenite by electrochemical reduction in CaCl_2−NaCl molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Li; Hua, Yixin; Xu, Cunying; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Qibo; Zhou, Zhongren; Zhang, Yadong; Ru, Juanjian

    2016-01-01

    Ferro-titanium (FeTi) alloy was prepared successfully from synthesized ilmenite through electrochemical reduction method in equal-molar CaCl_2−NaCl molten salt at 973 K and a cell voltage of 3.2 V under inert atmosphere, where molybdenum rod and graphite were used as cathode and anode respectively. It is indicated that the CaO content in the molten salt has an appreciable effect on the phase transformation of reactants occurring in the electrolytic process. The optimized CaO content in the molten salt is 1 mol% and this suitable content of CaO can significantly improve the reduction rate of ilmenite. The micromorphology of the ferrotitanium product is porous with the amount of 1 mol%CaO addition. It is observed that the particles of ferrotitanium had a uniform size in the initial period of time. Along with the electrolysis time extension, however, the particles connected with each other to generate strips and then form a honeycomb structure. These findings provide a basis for scientifically discussion on the optimization of CaO addition amount during the electrochemical reduction of ilmenite and other oxides in molten salts. - Highlights: • Ferro-titanium was prepared from synthesized ilmenite in CaCl_2−NaCl molten salt. • CaO content has appreciable effect on the phase transformation of ilmenite reactant. • The optimized CaO content is 1 mol% which can significantly improve reaction rate. • The products are connected with each other to form strips as electrolysis time.

  16. Effect of CaO addition on preparation of ferrotitanium from ilmenite by electrochemical reduction in CaCl{sub 2}−NaCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Li [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); State Key Lab of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming 650093 (China); Hua, Yixin, E-mail: yxhua@kmust.edu.cn [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); State Key Lab of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Cunying; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Qibo; Zhou, Zhongren; Zhang, Yadong [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); State Key Lab of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming 650093 (China); Ru, Juanjian [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Ferro-titanium (FeTi) alloy was prepared successfully from synthesized ilmenite through electrochemical reduction method in equal-molar CaCl{sub 2}−NaCl molten salt at 973 K and a cell voltage of 3.2 V under inert atmosphere, where molybdenum rod and graphite were used as cathode and anode respectively. It is indicated that the CaO content in the molten salt has an appreciable effect on the phase transformation of reactants occurring in the electrolytic process. The optimized CaO content in the molten salt is 1 mol% and this suitable content of CaO can significantly improve the reduction rate of ilmenite. The micromorphology of the ferrotitanium product is porous with the amount of 1 mol%CaO addition. It is observed that the particles of ferrotitanium had a uniform size in the initial period of time. Along with the electrolysis time extension, however, the particles connected with each other to generate strips and then form a honeycomb structure. These findings provide a basis for scientifically discussion on the optimization of CaO addition amount during the electrochemical reduction of ilmenite and other oxides in molten salts. - Highlights: • Ferro-titanium was prepared from synthesized ilmenite in CaCl{sub 2}−NaCl molten salt. • CaO content has appreciable effect on the phase transformation of ilmenite reactant. • The optimized CaO content is 1 mol% which can significantly improve reaction rate. • The products are connected with each other to form strips as electrolysis time.

  17. Genetic Performance and General Combining Ability of Oil Palm Deli dura x AVROS pisifera Tested on Inland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, A.; Rafii, M. Y.; Saleh, G.; Kushairi, A.; Latif, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 11 oil palm AVROS (Algemene Vereniging van Rubberplanters ter Oostkust van Sumatra) pisiferas was evaluated based on their 40 dura x pisifera (DxP) progenies tested on inland soils, predominantly of Serdang Series. Fresh fruit bunch (FFB) yield of each pisiferas ranged from 121.93 to 143.9 kg palm−1 yr−1 with trial mean of 131.62 kg palm−1 yr−1. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed low genetic variability among pisifera parents for most of the characters indicating uniformity of the pisifera population. This was anticipated as the AVROS pisiferas were derived from small population and were inbred materials. However, some of the pisiferas have shown good general combining ability (GCA) for certain important economic traits. Three pisiferas (P1 (0.174/247), P3 (0.174/498), P11 (0.182/308)) were identified of having good GCA for FFB yield while pisiferas P1 (0.174/247), P10 (0.182/348), and P11 (0.182/308) were good combiners for oil-to-bunch ratio (O/B). The narrow genetic base of these materials was the main obstacle in breeding and population improvement. However, efforts have been made to introgress this material with the vast oil palm germplasm collections of MPOB for rectifying the problem. PMID:22701095

  18. Genetic Performance and General Combining Ability of Oil Palm Deli dura x AVROS pisifera Tested on Inland Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Noh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of 11 oil palm AVROS (Algemene Vereniging van Rubberplanters ter Oostkust van Sumatra pisiferas was evaluated based on their 40 dura x pisifera (DxP progenies tested on inland soils, predominantly of Serdang Series. Fresh fruit bunch (FFB yield of each pisiferas ranged from 121.93 to 143.9 kg palm−1 yr−1 with trial mean of 131.62 kg palm−1 yr−1. Analysis of variance (ANOVA showed low genetic variability among pisifera parents for most of the characters indicating uniformity of the pisifera population. This was anticipated as the AVROS pisiferas were derived from small population and were inbred materials. However, some of the pisiferas have shown good general combining ability (GCA for certain important economic traits. Three pisiferas (P1 (0.174/247, P3 (0.174/498, P11 (0.182/308 were identified of having good GCA for FFB yield while pisiferas P1 (0.174/247, P10 (0.182/348, and P11 (0.182/308 were good combiners for oil-to-bunch ratio (O/B. The narrow genetic base of these materials was the main obstacle in breeding and population improvement. However, efforts have been made to introgress this material with the vast oil palm germplasm collections of MPOB for rectifying the problem.

  19. Combined use of alkane-degrading and plant growth-promoting bacteria enhanced phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara, Nain; Afzal, Muhammad; Ansari, Tariq M; Tahseen, Razia; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Inoculation of plants with pollutant-degrading and plant growth-promoting microorganisms is a simple strategy to enhance phytoremediation activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inoculation of different bacterial strains, possessing alkane-degradation and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1 -carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, on plant growth and phytoremediation activity. Carpet grass (Axonopus affinis) was planted in soil spiked with diesel (1% w/w) for 90 days and inoculated with different bacterial strains, Pseudomonas sp. ITRH25, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Burkholderia sp. PsJN, individually and in combination. Generally, bacterial application increased total numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere ofcarpet grass, plant biomass production, hydrocarbon degradation and reduced genotoxicity. Bacterial strains possessing different beneficial traits affect plant growth and phytoremediation activity in different ways. Maximum bacterial population, plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were achieved when carpet grass was inoculated with a consortium of three strains. Enhanced plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were associated with increased numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of carpet grass. The present study revealed that the combined use of different bacterial strains, exhibiting different beneficial traits, is a highly effective strategy to improve plant growth and phytoremediation activity.

  20. Magnetic properties of ilmenite-hematite single crystals from the Ecstall pluton near Prince Rupert, British Columbia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownlee, Sarah J.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of the 91 Ma Ecstall pluton and other Cretaceous plutons of British Columbia imply large northward tectonic movements (>2000 km) may have occurred during the tectonic evolution of western North America. However, more recent studies have shown that the eastern edge...... of the Ecstall pluton experienced considerable mineralogical changes as younger Eocene plutons, such as the ∼58 Ma Quottoon Pluton, were emplaced along its margins. We investigated changes in the rock magnetic properties associated with this reheating event by examining isolated grains of intergrown ilmenite...... and hematite, the primary paleomagnetic recorder in the Ecstall pluton. Measurements of hysteresis properties, low-temperature remanence, and room temperature isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition and observations from magnetic force microscopy and off-axis electron holography indicate that samples...

  1. Combining X-ray computed tomography and visible near-infrared spectroscopy for prediction of soil structural properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Hermansen, Cecilie; Knadel, Maria

    2018-01-01

    agricultural fields within Denmark with a wide range of textural properties and organic C (OC) contents were studied. Macroporosity (>1.2 mm in diameter) and CTmatrix (the density of the field-moist soil matrix devoid of large macropores and stones) were determined from X-ray CT scans of undisturbed soil cores...... (19 by 20 cm). Both macroporosity and CTmatix are soil structural properties that affect the degree of preferential transport. Bulk soils from the 127 sampling locations were scanned with a vis-NIR spectrometer (400–2500 nm). Macroporosity and CTmatrix were statistically predicted with partial least......Soil structure is a key soil property affecting a soil’s flow and transport behavior. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used to quantify soil structure. However, the availability, cost, time, and skills required for processing are still limiting the number of soils studied. Visible...

  2. Plant tolerance to mercury in a contaminated soil is enhanced by the combined effects of humic matter addition and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, V; De Martino, A; Nebbioso, A; Di Meo, V; Salluzzo, A; Piccolo, A

    2016-06-01

    In a greenhouse pot experiment, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were grown in a Hg-contaminated sandy soil with and without inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (a commercial inoculum containing infective propagules of Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae) amended with different rates of a humic acid (0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1) of soil), with the objective of verifying the synergistic effects of the two soil treatments on the Hg tolerance of lettuce plants. Our results indicated that the plant biomass was significantly increased by the combined effect of AMF and humic acid treatments. Addition of humic matter to soil boosted the AMF effect on improving the nutritional plant status, enhancing the pigment content in plant leaves, and inhibiting both Hg uptake and Hg translocation from the roots to the shoots. This was attributed not only to the Hg immobilization by stable complexes with HA and with extraradical mycorrhizal mycelium in soil and root surfaces but also to an improved mineral nutrition promoted by AMF. This work indicates that the combined use of AMF and humic acids may become a useful practice in Hg-contaminated soils to reduce Hg toxicity to crops.

  3. Interpretation and evaluation of combined measurement techniques for soil CO2 efflux: Discrete surface chambers and continuous soil CO2 concentration probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Brian L. McGlynn; Howard E. Epstein; Daniel L. Welsch

    2008-01-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is a large respiratory flux from terrestrial ecosystems and a critical component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Lack of process understanding of the spatiotemporal controls on soil CO2 efflux limits our ability to extrapolate from fluxes measured at point scales to scales useful for corroboration with other ecosystem level measures of C exchange....

  4. Combining Organic and Mineral Fertilizers for Integrated Soil Fertility Management in Smallholder Farming Systems of Kenya: Explorations Using the Crop-Soil Model FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tittonell, P.A.; Corbeels, M.; Wijk, van M.T.; Vanlauwe, B.; Giller, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) technologies for African smallholders should consider (i) within-farm soil heterogeneity; (ii) long-term dynamics and variability; (iii) manure quality and availability; (iv) access to fertilizers; and (v) competing uses for crop residues. We used the

  5. Distribution of Artificial Radioisotopes in Granulometric and Organic Fractions of Alluvial Soils Downstream the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobova, Elena M.; Linnik, Vitaly G. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, 117991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Brown, Justin E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    A study of some artificial radionuclides discharged by the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine (KMCC) in different granulometric and organic fractions of alluvial soils was performed in the near and remote impact zones of the enterprise. Radionuclides were shown to concentrate in fine fractions enriched in hydro-mica and smectites. However in natural conditions the dominating size fraction associated with radionuclide accumulation at the study sites appeared to be made up of silt (0.010 mm) to clay (0.001 mm) sizes. Therefore due to radionuclide sorption and natural aggregation the peaks of a relatively high radionuclide mass accumulation were associated with three granulometric fractions: <0.001 mm, 0.063-0.010 mm and 0.25-0.125 mm. Soil granulometry was shown to reflect specificity of sedimentation at different landscape positions downstream from the KMCC. At the Balchug site a coarser fraction was accumulated close to the channel while finer fractions are deposited at a higher level. The portion of the clay fraction corresponded to the elevation level increasing from the river bank to the terrace. At the Mikhin Island the tendency was different. A coarser fraction was deposited on higher levels while the portion of clay fraction was at a minimum compared to the lower levels. To study the relationship between radionuclide activity concentrations and organic matter content, selected soil samples were subjected to extraction of the humic and fulvic acid fractions with a subsequent determination of radionuclides in the separated phases and the residue component. The air-dry sample was saturated with 0.1 M NaOH, humic acid was precipitated by 1 M HCl at pH=1. The separation resulted in three fractions of the fulvic acids, humic acids, and the residue containing the denuded mineral phase and the refractory organic residue. Radionuclides measured in the first fraction were believed to be the most mobile, those in the second fraction - subjected to the complexation

  6. Towards the development of multifunctional molecular indicators combining soil biogeochemical and microbiological variables to predict the ecological integrity of silvicultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Vincent; Quiza, Liliana; Buffet, Jean-Philippe; Khdhiri, Mondher; Durand, Audrey-Anne; Paquette, Alain; Thiffault, Nelson; Messier, Christian; Beaulieu, Nadyre; Guertin, Claude; Constant, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The impact of mechanical site preparation (MSP) on soil biogeochemical structure in young larch plantations was investigated. Soil samples were collected in replicated plots comprising simple trenching, double trenching, mounding and inverting site preparation. Unlogged natural mixed forest areas were used as a reference. Analysis of soil nutrients, abundance of bacteria and gas exchanges unveiled no significant difference among the plots. However, inverting site preparation resulted in higher variations of gas exchanges when compared with trenching, mounding and unlogged natural forest. A combination of the biological and physicochemical variables was used to define a multifunctional classification of the soil samples into four distinct groups categorized as a function of their deviation from baseline ecological conditions. According to this classification model, simple trenching was the approach that represented the lowest ecological risk potential at the microsite level. No relationship was observed between MSP method and soil bacterial community structure as assessed by high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene; however, indicator genotypes were identified for each multifunctional soil class. This is the first identification of multifunctional molecular indicators for baseline and disturbed ecological conditions in soil, demonstrating the potential of applied microbial ecology to guide silvicultural practices and ecological risk assessment. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Soil base saturation combines with Beech Bark Disease to influence composition and structure of Sugar Maple-Beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Dovciak, Martin; Bailey, Scott W.; Antidormi, Michael; Zarfos, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in influencing stand composition and structure, measurements of soils, canopy, subcanopy, and seedlings were taken in 21 watersheds in the Adirondack region of NY (USA), where sugar maple and beech were the predominant canopy species and base saturation of the upper B horizon ranged from 4.4 to 67%. The base saturation value corresponding to the threshold for Al mobilization (16.8%) helped to define the species composition of canopy trees and seedlings. Canopy vigor and diameter at breast height (DBH) were positively correlated (P soils, soil-Ca depletion and BBD may have created opportunities for gap-exploiting species such as red maple and black cherry, whereas in high-base saturation soils, sugar maple dominated the canopy. Where soils were beginning to recover from acidic deposition effects, sugar maple DBH and basal area increased progressively from 2000 to 2015, whereas for beech, average DBH did not change and basal area did not increase after 2010.

  8. Effect of chemically processed bonemeal alone and in combination with organic materials on plant growth. [Part] I : Rice-wheat rotation in an alluvial soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasami, S.; Vimal, O.P.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of chemically processed bonemeal added 60 kg P 2 O /ha alone and in combination with various organic materials viz., wheat straw and rice straw 3 tons/hs, starch 500 kg/ha and EDTA 250 kg/ha was studied on rice in an alluvial soil. The residual effect was studied on wheat using 32 P as a tracer. The results showed that in the first crop(rice) bonemeal organic matter combination had a significant effect both on dry matter yield and nutrient uptake. In the second crop (wheat) except chemically processed honemeal in combination with EDTA, all other combinations showed a marked positive effect on yield, total P-uptake and 'A' values. Comparison of P-uptake from soil and fertilizer indicated that there was a marked residual effect on the subsequent wheat crop. (author)

  9. Effects of foliar dressing of selenite and silicate alone or combined with different soil ameliorants on the accumulation of As and Cd and antioxidant system in Brassica campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Yongjiu; Zheng, Xiangqun; Cheng, Weimin; Shi, Rongguang; Feng, Renwei

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using a combined technology to synchronously reduce As and Cd accumulation in the edible parts of Brassica campestris. The results showed that a foliar application of selenite (Se) and silicon (Si) combined with soil ameliorants (including Ca-Mg-P fertilizer, sodium silicate and red mud) showed limited effects on the growth of B. campestris. The As concentration in the leaves of B. campestris in all treatments was below the Chinese safety standard. When sodium silicate and Ca-Mg-P fertilizer were added to the soil, the additional foliar application of Se and Si could in some cases help further reduce the concentrations of As and Cd in the leaves of B. campestris. However, when red mud was applied to the soil, the foliar application of Se and Si enhanced the Cd concentration in the leaves of B. campestris. In most cases, high levels of soil ameliorants plus foliar application of Se and Si significantly enhanced the As concentrations in both the soil solution and the roots of B. campestris but reduced the soil solution Cd concentration and the leaf As concentration. Most of the treatments reduced the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration in the leaves of B. campestris, and the foliar application of Se and Si helped the soil ameliorants alleviate the oxidative stress resulting from As and Cd exposure. In this study, several treatments significantly increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). However, the enzymes peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were not induced by most treatments. In summary, the combined treatment of 1gkg -1 Ca-Mg-P fertilizer plus foliar spraying 2mmolL -1 sodium selenite was most effective in reducing the Cd concentration and a rather strong ability to reduce the As concentration and trigger the activities of SOD and APX in the leaves of B. campestris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Combination of a Fast Cleanup Procedure and a DR-CALUX® Bioassay for Dioxin Surveillance in Taiwanese Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ding-Yan; Lee, Yi-Pin; Li, Chiu-Ping; Chi, Kai-Hsien; Liang, Bo-Wei P.; Liu, Wen-Yao; Wang, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Susana; Chen, Ting-Chien; Yeh, Kuei-Jyum C.; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Chyun; Chao, How-Ran; Tsou, Tsui-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to determine dioxin levels in 800 soil samples collected from Taiwan. An in vitro DR-CALUX® assay was carried out with the help of an automated Soxhlet system and fast cleanup column. The mean dioxin level of 800 soil samples was 36.0 pg-bioanalytical equivalents (BEQs)/g dry weight (d.w.). Soil dioxin-BEQs were higher in northern Taiwan (61.8 pg-BEQ/g d.w.) than in central, southern, and eastern Taiwan (22.2, 24.9, and 7.80 pg-BEQ/g d.w., respectively). Analysis of multiple linear regression models identified four major predictors of dioxin-BEQs including soil sampling location (β = 0.097, p contamination. Soil samples collected in northern Taiwan, and especially in Bade City, soils near industrial areas, and soils with darker color may contain higher dioxin-BEQ levels. PMID:24806195

  11. Application of UV-visible absorption spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation for insight into DOM fractions from native halophyte soils in a larger estuarine delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huaibin; Yu, Huibin; Pan, Hongwei; Gao, Hongjie

    2018-05-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation (2D correlation) is used to trace components of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from soils in a larger estuarine delta and to investigate spatial variations of DOM fractions. Soil samples of different depths were collected from native halophyte soils along a saline gradient, i.e., Suaeda salsa Comm. (SSC), Chenopodium album Comm. (CAC), Phragmites australis Comm. (PAC), and Artemisia selengensis Comm. (ASC). Molecular weights of DOM within the SSC soil profile were the lowest, followed by the CAC, PAC, and ASC soil profiles. Humification degree of DOM within the ASC soil profile was the highest, followed by the PAC, SSC, and CAC soil profiles. DOM within the soil profiles mainly contained phenolic, carboxylic, microbial products, and aromatic and alkyl groups through the PCA, which presented the significant differentiation among the four native halophyte soil profiles. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the SSC soil profile indicated that the variations of the phenolic groups were the largest, followed by the carboxylic groups, microbial products, and humified organic materials according to the band changing order of 285 → 365 → 425 → 520 nm. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the CAC soil profiles determined that the decreasing order of the variations was phenolic groups > carboxylic groups > microbial products according the band changing order of 285 → 365 → 425 nm. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the PAC soil profile proved that the variations of the phenolic groups were larger than those of the carboxylic groups according to the band changing order of 285 → 365 nm. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the ASC soil profile demonstrated that the variations of the phenolic groups were larger than those of the other DOM fractions according to the broad cross-peak at

  12. The combined effects of urea application and simulated acid rain on soil acidification and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmei; Zhou, Jian; Li, Wanlu; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to test the effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) at different pHs, when applied to fertilized and unfertilized soils, on the leaching of soil cations (K, Ca, Mg, Na) and Al. Their effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+) and microbial community structure were also determined. A Paleudalfs soil was incubated for 30 days, with and without an initial application of urea (200 mg N kg(-1)soil) as nitrogen (N) fertilizer. The soil was held in columns and leached with SAR at three pH levels. Six treatments were tested: SAR of pH 2.5, 4.0 and 5.6 leaching on unfertilized soil (T1, T2 and T3), and on soils fertilized with urea (T4, T5 and T6). Increasing acid inputs proportionally increased cation leaching in both unfertilized and fertilized soils. Urea application increased the initial Ca and Mg leaching, but had no effect on the total concentrations of Ca, Mg and K leached. There was no significant difference for the amount of Na leached between the different treatments. The SAR pH and urea application had significant effects on soil pH, exchangeable H(+) and Al(3+). Urea application, SAR treated with various pH, and the interactions between them all had significant impacts on total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). The highest concentration of total PLFAs occurred in fertilized soils with SAR pH5.6 and the lowest in soils leached with the lowest SAR pH. Soils pretreated with urea then leached with SARs of pH 4.0 and 5.6 had larger total PLFA concentrations than soil without urea. Bacterial, fungal, actinomycete, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs had generally similar trends to total PLFAs.

  13. Separation of Aeruginosin-865 from Cultivated Soil Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) by Centrifugal Partition Chromatography combined with Gel Permeation Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheel, José; Minceva, Mirjana; Urajová, Petra; Aslam, Rabya; Hrouzek, Pavel; Kopecký, Jiří

    2015-10-01

    Aeruginosin-865 was isolated from cultivated soil cyanobacteria using a combination of centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and gel permeation chromatography. The solubility of Aer-865 in different solvents was evaluated using the conductor-like screening model for real solvents (COSMO-RS). The CPC separation was performed in descending mode with a biphasic solvent system composed of water-n-BuOH-acetic acid (5:4:1, v/v/v). The upper phase was used as a stationary phase, whereas the lower phase was employed as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 10 mL/min. The revolution speed and temperature of the separation column were 1700 rpm and 25 degrees C, respectively. Preparative CPC separation followed by gel permeation chromatography was performed on 50 mg of crude extract yielding Aer-865 (3.5 mg), with a purity over 95% as determined by HPLC. The chemical identity of the isolated compound was confirmed by comparing its spectroscopic data (UV, HRESI-MS, HRESI-MS/MS) with those of an authentic standard and data available in the literature.

  14. Response of three soils in the derived savanna zone of southwestern Nigeria to combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizer as affecting phosphorus fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail O. Ojo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus inputs to the soil are primarily from the application of fertilizer P and organic resources. A ten week incubation study was carried out to determine the effects of organic and inorganic P sources on phosphorus fractions in three derived savanna soils. Poultry manure was applied at 0, 0.75g, 1.5g, 2.25g and 3g per 300g weight of soil while single superphosphate was applied at 0.0023g, 0.0046g, 0.0069g and 0.0092g per 300g of soil. Sampling was done at two weeks interval. At 0 week of the incubation study, Ekiti series had the largest amount of P fractions i.e. Fe-P, Al-P, residual P, reductant soluble P, occluded P, organic P and occluded P while Ca-P was high in Apomu series. However, increases in Fe-P, Al-P, Ca-P and organic P were observed in the three soil series evaluated and poultry manure was notably effective in reducing P occlusion. In conclusion, it was observed that irrespective of the soil series at different stages of the incubation studies, poultry manure and the combined application of poultry manure and Single superphosphate was highly effective in increasing P fractions.

  15. Effects of Combined Application of Biogas Slurry and Chemical Fertilizer on Soil Aggregation and C/N Distribution in an Ultisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuebo; Fan, Jianbo; Xu, Lei; Zhou, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Unreasonable use of chemical fertilizer (CF) on agricultural soil leads to massive losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in tropical and subtropical areas, where soil conditions are unfavorable for aggregate formation. This study evaluated the effects of combined application of biogas slurry (BS) plus CF on soil aggregation and aggregate—associated C/N concentration and storage in an Ultisol. Six treatments included: no fertilizer (T1), CF only (T2), partial (15% (T3), 30% (T4) and 45% (T5)) substitution of TN with BS and BS only (T6). Soil mechanical—stable aggregates (MSAs) formation and stability as well as MSAs—associated C/N concentration and storage were observed in different aggregate sizes (>5, 5–2, 2–1, 1.0–0.5, 0.50–0.25 and 5 mm significantly increased with BS substitution (T5), while the proportions of MSAs 1.0–0.5 mm, MSAs 0.50–0.25 mm and MSAs 0.5 mm that constituted 72–82% of MSAs. Stepwise regression analysis showed that MSAs >5 mm, SOC in MSAs >5 mm and TN in MSAs >5 mm were the dominant variables affecting aggregate stability. Meanwhile SOC in MSAs <0.25 mm and TN in MSAs 2–1 mm were independent variables affecting SOC and TN concentrations in bulk soils. Therefore, certain rate of combined application of BS plus CF is an effective, eco—friendly way to improve soil quality in an Ultisol. PMID:28125647

  16. Combined effects of rainfall regime and plot length on runoff and soil loss in the Loess Plateau of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Gao, G.; Wang, S.; Fu, B.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study the interaction effects of rainfall regime and slope length on runoff and soil loss under different land uses. Event runoff and soil loss of forest, shrub and grass were measured in plots with length of 5, 9, or 13 m in the Loess Plateau from 2008 to 2016. Fifty-nine erosive rainfall events were recorded and classified into three rainfall regimes. The results firstly showed that the runoff coefficient was grass > shrub > forest, and soil loss was grass > forest > shrub, but the differences between forest and shrub in runoff and between grass and forest in soil loss didn't reach significant level. Secondly, rainfall regimes had important effect on runoff and soil loss of different land uses. The lowest runoff coefficients and the highest soil loss in regime 2 were found in shrub and forest land, respectively, which differed from that of regime 1. In total, rainfall regime 1 had the highest runoff coefficient of 0.84-2.06%, followed by regime 3 with 0.33-0.88%, and regime 2 with 0.04-0.06%. Soil loss in forest and grass land had a different order of regime 3 > regime 1 > regime 2. Thirdly, both the runoff coefficient and soil loss decreased with increasing plot length, while the effect of slope length on runoff/soil loss were influenced by land use type and rainfall regimes.

  17. Geophysical surveys combined with laboratory soil column experiments to identify and explore risk areas for soil and water pollution in feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Pérez, Antonio Jesus; Sainato, Claudia Mabel; Jairo Márquez-Molina, John; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use without a correct planning may produce its deterioration with their social, economical and environmental irreversible consequences over short to medium time range. In Argentina, the expansion of soybean fields induced a reduction of the area of pastures dedicated to stockbreeding. As cattle activity is being progressively concentrated on small pens, at feedlots farms, problems of soil and water pollution, mainly by nitrate, have been detected. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content is very important because the mostly advective transport of solutes. To avoid intensive soil samplings, very expensive, one has to recur to geophysical exploration methods. The objective of this work was to identify risk areas within a feedlot of the NW zone of Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina through geophysical methods. The surveys were carried out with an electromagnetic induction profiler EMI-400 (GSSI) and a Time domain Reflectometry (TDR) survey of depth 0-0.10 m with soil sampling and measurement of moisture content with gravimetric method (0-1.0 m). Several trenches were dug inside the pens and also at a test site, where texture, apparent density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract and organic matter content (OM) were measured. The water retention curves for these soils were also determined. At one of the pens undisturbed soil columns were extracted at 3 locations. Laboratory analysis for 0-1.0 m indicated that soil texture was classified as sandy loam, average organic matter content (OM) was greater than 2.3% with low values of apparent density in the first 10 cm. The range of spatial dependence of data suggested that the number of soil samples could be reduced. Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and soil moisture were well correlated and indicated a clear spatial pattern in the corrals. TDR performance was acceptable to identify the spatial

  18. Erosion Control and Recultivation Measures at a Headrace Channel of a Hydroelectric Power Plant using Different Combined Soil Bioengineering Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obriejetan, M.; Florineth, F.; Rauch, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of land use change resulting in an increased number of slope protection constructions and with respect to effects associated with climate change like extremes in temperatures and temperature variations or increased frequency of heavy precipitation, adaptation strategies for sustainable erosion protection systems are needed which meet ecological compatibility and economical requirements. Therefore a wide range of different technical solutions respectively geotextiles and geotextile-related products (blankets, nettings, grids etc.) are available on the market differing considerably in function, material, durability and pricing. Manufacturers usually provide product-specific information pertaining to application field, functional range or (technical) installation features whereas vegetational aspects are frequently neglected while vegetation can contribute substantially to increased near-surface erosion protection respectively slope stability. Though, the success of sustainable erosion control is directly dependent on several vegetational aspects. Adequate development of a functional vegetation layer in combination with geotextiles is closely associated to application aspects such as seeding technique, sowing date and intensity, seed-soil contact or maintenance measures as well as to qualitative aspects like seed quality, germination rates, area of origin, production method or certification. As a general guideline, erosion control within an initial phase is directly related to restoration techniques whereas vegetation specifics with regard to species richness or species composition play a key role in medium to long-term development and slope protection. In this context one of the fundamental objectives of our study is the identification and subsequently the determination of the main interaction processes between technical and biological components of combined slope protection systems. The influence of different geotextile characteristics on specific

  19. Bioleaching of ilmenite and basalt in the presence of iron-oxidizing and iron-scavenging bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Jesica U.; Cappelle, Ian J.; Schnittker, Kimberlin; Borrok, David M.

    2013-04-01

    Bioleaching has been suggested as an alternative to traditional mining techniques in extraterrestrial environments because it does not require extensive infrastructure and bulky hardware. In situ bioleaching of silicate minerals, such as those found on the moon or Mars, has been proposed as a feasible alternative to traditional extraction techniques that require either extreme heat and/or substantial chemical treatment. In this study, we investigated the biotic and abiotic leaching of basaltic rocks (analogues to those found on the moon and Mars) and the mineral ilmenite (FeTiO3) in aqueous environments under acidic (pH ˜ 2.5) and circumneutral pH conditions. The biological leaching experiments were conducted using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, an iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria, and Pseudomonas mendocina, an Fe-scavenging bacteria. We found that both strains were able to grow using the Fe(II) derived from the tested basaltic rocks and ilmenite. Although silica leaching rates were the same or slightly less in the bacterial systems with A. ferrooxidans than in the abiotic control systems, the extent of Fe, Al and Ti released (and re-precipitated in new solid phases) was actually greater in the biotic systems. This is likely because the Fe(II) leached from the basalt was immediately oxidized by A. ferrooxidans, and precipitated into Fe(III) phases which causes a change in the equilibrium of the system, i.e. Le Chatelier's principle. Iron(II) in the abiotic experiment was allowed to build up in solution which led to a decrease in its overall release rate. For example, the percentage of Fe, Al and Ti leached (dissolved + reactive mineral precipitates) from the Mars simulant in the A. ferrooxidans experimental system was 34, 41 and 13% of the total Fe, Al and Ti in the basalt, respectively, while the abiotic experimental system released totals of only 11, 25 and 2%. There was, however, no measurable difference in the amounts of Fe and Ti released from ilmenite in the

  20. Combined use of stable isotopes and fallout radionuclides as soil erosion indicators in a forested mountain site, South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meusburger, K.; Mabit, L.; Alewell, C.; Park, J.H.; Sandor, T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and to validate the suitability of the stable nitrogen and carbon isotope signature as soil erosion indicators in a mountain forest site in South Korea. Our approach is based on the comparison of the isotope signature of ''stable'' landscape positions (reference sites), which are neither affected by erosion nor deposition, with eroding sites. For undisturbed soils we expect that the enrichment of δ 15 N and δ 13 C with soil depth, due to fractionation during decomposition, goes in parallel with a decrease in nitrogen and carbon content. Soil erosion processes potentially weaken this correlation. The 137 Cs method and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) were applied for the soil erosion quantification. Erosion rates obtained with the 137 Cs method range from 0.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to 7 t ha -1 yr -1 . Considering the steep slopes of up to 40 and the erosive monsoon events (R factor of 6600 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 ), the rates are plausible and within the magnitude of the RUSLE-modeled soil erosion rates, varying from 0.02 t ha -1 yr -1 to 5.1 t ha -1 yr -1 . The soil profiles of the reference sites showed significant (p < 0.0001) correlations between nitrogen and carbon content and its corresponding δ 15 N and δ 13 C signatures. In contrast, for the eroding sites this relationship was weaker and for the carbon not significant. These results confirm the usefulness of the stable carbon isotope signature as a qualitative indicator for soil disturbance. We could show further that the δ 15 N isotope signature can be used similarly for uncultivated sites. We thus propose that the stable δ 15 N and δ 13 C signature of soil profiles could serve as additional indicators confirming the accurate choice of the reference site in soil erosion studies using the 137 Cs method.

  1. Combined Use Of Cs-137 And Be-7 To Assess The Effectiveness Of Soil Conservation For Vetiver Grass Strips In Coffee Crop Lands In The Central Highlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Son Hai; Nguyen Dao; Tran Van Hoa; Tran Dinh Khoa; Nguyen Thi Mui; Trinh Cong Tu

    2007-01-01

    The combined use of 137 Cs and 7 Be for assessment of medium- and short-term soil erosion rates for sloping lands with and without soil conservation technologies in the Central Highlands of Vietnam has been carried out. Studies were performed at five 128 m 2 runoff plots and two 0.5 ha coffee plots with the slope gradient of about 25%. Experiments carried out at runoff plots showed that: (i) In the case of low erosion rates (less than 30 t ha -1 y -1 ), soil erosion rates estimated by 7 Be technique using the Profile-Distribution Model were consistent with net soil erosion rates obtained by runoff plots when particle size correction factor P is taken into account; (ii) In the case of high erosion rates (greater than 30 t ha -1 y -1 ), the conversion model overestimated soil erosion rates when P was not allowed for, and underestimated erosion rate when P factor was taken into account. Studies carried out at two 0.5 ha coffee plots showed that: (i) For the plot without soil conservation, soil erosion occurred for all sampling points with medium-term erosion rates ranging between 1.2 t ha -1 y -1 and 35 t ha -1 y -1 (the average erosion rate was 22.7 ± 1.2 t ha -1 y -1 ). The short term soil erosion rate estimated by 7 Be technique was 32.7 ± 6.1 t ha -1 y -1 for this plot; (ii) For the plot with the last seven year presence of Vetiver strips, about 93% of the area suffered from medium term erosion with erosion rates varying from 3 t ha -1 y -1 to 33 t ha -1 y -1 (the mean is 22.2 t ha -1 y -1 ), and medium term deposition occurred for only 7% of the area with the deposition rates ranging between 1.3 and 1.4 t ha -1 y -1 , resulting in the net erosion rate of 20.4 ± 0.6 t ha -1 y -1 . The short term soil erosion rate at this plot estimated by 7 Be technique was 2.3 t ha -1 y -1 . By using Vetiver strips as a soil conservation technology, soil erosion was almost controlled and the net erosion rate was reduced from 32.7 t ha -1 y -1 to 2.3 t ha -1 y -1 . (author)

  2. Precipitation of Oriented Rutile and Ilmenite Needles in Garnet, Northeastern Connecticut, USA: Evidence for Extreme Metamorphic Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ague, J. J.; Eckert, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of oriented needles of rutile and, less commonly, ilmenite in the cores of garnets from northeastern CT, USA. The rocks preserve granulite facies mineral assemblages, form part of the Merrimack Synclinorium, and underwent metamorphism and deformation during the Acadian orogeny. The needles appear identical to those reported from a number of extreme P-T environments worldwide, including UHP metamorphic rocks, high-P granulites, and garnet peridotites. The needles are predominantly oriented along directions in garnet. The long axes of the rutile needles commonly do not go extinct parallel to the cross hairs under cross-polarized light (e.g., Griffin et al., 1971). This anomalous extinction indicates that the needles do not preserve a specific crystallographic relationship with their garnet hosts (e.g., Hwang et al., 2007). The needles range from a few hundred nm to a few um in diameter, and can be mm-scale in length. Micrometer-scale plates of rutile, srilankite and crichtonite have also been observed in some garnets together with the Fe-Ti oxide needles. Several origins for the needles have been proposed in the literature; we investigate the hypothesis that they precipitated in situ from originally Ti-rich garnet. Chemical profiles across garnets indicate that some retain Ti zoning, with elevated-Ti concentrations in the cores dropping to low values in the rims. For these zoned garnets, high-resolution, 2-D chemical mapping using the JEOL JXA-8530F field emission gun electron microprobe at Yale University reveals that the needles are surrounded by well-defined Ti-depletion halos. Chemical profiles also document strong depletions of Cr (which is present in both rutile and ilmenite) directly adjacent to needles. The observed Ti-depletions demonstrate that the needles precipitated from Ti-bearing garnet, probably during cooling and/or decompression associated with exhumation. The rutile precipitates must be largely incoherent with respect to the

  3. Remediation in Situ of Hydrocarbons by Combined Treatment in a Contaminated Alluvial Soil due to an Accidental Spill of LNAPL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Trulli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil contamination represents an environmental issue which has become extremely important in the last decades due to the diffusion of industrial activities. Accidents during transport of dangerous materials and fuels may cause severe pollution. The present paper describes the criteria of the actions which were operated to remediate the potential risk and observed negative effects on groundwater and soil originating from an accidental spill of diesel fuel from a tank truck. With the aim to evaluate the quality of the involved environmental matrices in the “emergency” phase, in the following “safety” operation and during the remediation action, a specific survey on hydrocarbons, light and heavy, was carried out in the sand deposits soil. Elaboration of collected data allows us to observe the movement of pollutants in the unsaturated soil. The remediation action was finalized to improve the groundwater and soil quality. The former was treated by a so called “pump and treat” system coupled with air sparging. A train of three different technologies was applied to the unsaturated soil in a sequential process: soil vapour extraction, bioventing and enhanced bioremediation. Results showed that the application of sequential remediation treatments allowed us to obtain a state of quality in unsaturated soil and groundwater as required by Italian law.

  4. Singular and combined effects of blowdown, salvage logging, and wildfire on forest floor and soil mercury pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl P.J. Mitchell; Randall K. Kolka; Shawn. Fraver

    2012-01-01

    A number of factors influence the amount of mercury (Hg) in forest floors and soils, including deposition, volatile emission, leaching, and disturbances such as fire. Currently the impact on soil Hg pools from other widespread forest disturbances such as blowdown and management practices like salvage logging are unknown. Moreover, ecological and biogeochemical...

  5. Combining in situ and laboratory measurements of soil-atmosphere carbonyl sulfide fluxes from four different biomes across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitz, Florian; Gomez-Brandon, Maria; Hammerle, Albin; Spielmann, Felix M.; Insam, Heribert; Ibrom, Andreas; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moreno, Gerardo; Noe, Steffen M.; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Flux partitioning, the quantification of photosynthesis and respiration, is a major uncertainty in modelling the carbon cycle and in times when robust models are needed to assess future global changes a persistent problem. A promising new approach is to derive gross primary production (GPP) from measurements of the carbonyl sulfide (COS) flux, the most abundant sulfur-containing trace gas in the atmosphere, with a mean concentration of about 500 pptv in the troposphere. This is possible because COS and CO2 enter the leaf via a similar pathway and are processed by the same enzyme (carbonic anhydrase). A prerequisite for using COS as a proxy for photosynthesis is a robust estimation of all non-leaf sources and sinks in an ecosystem. Past studies described soils either as a sink or source, depending on their properties like soil temperature and soil water content. In 2016 we conducted field campaigns in Austria (managed temperate mountain grassland), Spain (savannah), Denmark (temperate beech forest) and Estonia (hemiboreal forest) to estimate the soil-atmosphere COS fluxes under ambient conditions in different biomes. We used self-built fused silica soil chambers to avoid COS emissions from built-in materials and to assess the impact of radiation. At the grassland sites (Austria, Spain) vegetation was removed below the chambers, therefor more radiation reached the soil surface compared to natural conditions. The grassland sites were characterized by highly positive COS fluxes during daytime and COS fluxes around zero during nighttime. In contrast, the soils at the forest sites (Denmark, Estonia), characterized by less radiation on the soil surface, acted as a sink for COS. The impact of other abiotic factors, like soil water content and soil temperature, varied between the ecosystems. In addition to the field measurements soil and litter samples were taken at the study sites and used to measure COS fluxes under controlled conditions in the lab. Results from the

  6. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Kim, P J; Inubushi, K

    2015-10-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK+fly ash, NPK+silicate slag, NPK+phosphogypsum(PG), NPK+blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK+revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK+silicate slag (50%)+RFS (50%), NPK+biochar, NPK+biochar+Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK+silicate slag+Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK+phosphogypsum (PG)+Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH4 emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N2O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions were significantly increased by 9.5-14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0-12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0-30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43-50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Kim, P.J.; Inubushi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK + fly ash, NPK + silicate slag, NPK + phosphogypsum(PG), NPK + blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK + revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK + silicate slag (50%) + RFS (50%), NPK + biochar, NPK + biochar + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + silicate slag + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + phosphogypsum (PG) + Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH 4 emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N 2 O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH 4 emissions were significantly increased by 9.5–14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0–12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0–30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43–50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. - Highlights: • Azolla-cyanobacteria with organic and inorganic amendments

  8. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam, E-mail: litonaslam@yahoo.com [Dept. of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Division of Environmental Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Kim, P.J., E-mail: pjkim@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr [Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Inubushi, K. [Division of Environmental Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK + fly ash, NPK + silicate slag, NPK + phosphogypsum(PG), NPK + blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK + revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK + silicate slag (50%) + RFS (50%), NPK + biochar, NPK + biochar + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + silicate slag + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + phosphogypsum (PG) + Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH{sub 4} emissions were significantly increased by 9.5–14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0–12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0–30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43–50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. - Highlights: • Azolla-cyanobacteria with organic and

  9. Reduction of bacteria and somatic coliphages in constructed wetlands for the treatment of combined sewer overflow (retention soil filters).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppelt, Jan P; Tondera, Katharina; Schreiber, Christiane; Kistemann, Thomas; Pinnekamp, Johannes

    2018-05-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) introduce numerous pathogens from fecal contamination, such as bacteria and viruses, into surface waters, thus endangering human health. In Germany, retention soil filters (RSFs) treat CSOs at sensitive discharge points and can contribute to reducing these hygienically relevant microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the extent of how dry period, series connection and filter layer thickness influence the reduction efficiency of RSFs for Escherichia coli (E. coli), intestinal enterococci (I. E.) and somatic coliphages. To accomplish this, we had four pilot scale RSFs built on a test field at the wastewater treatment plant Aachen-Soers. While two filters were replicates, the other two filters were installed in a series connection. Moreover, one filter had a thinner filtration layer than the other three. Between April 2015 and December 2016, the RSFs were loaded in 37 trials with pre-conditioned CSO after dry periods ranging from 4 to 40 days. During 17 trials, samples for microbial analysis were taken and analyzed. The series connection of two filters showed that the removal increases when two systems with a filter layer of the same height are operated in series. Since the microorganisms are exposed twice to the environmental conditions on the filter surface and in the upper filter layers, there is a greater chance for abiotic adsorption increase. The same effect could be shown when filters with different depths were compared: the removal efficiency increases as filter thickness increases. This study provides new evidence that regardless of seasonal effects and dry period, RSFs can improve hygienic situation significantly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of the soil water balance by the combination of cosmic ray neutron sensing and eddy covariance technique in an irrigated citrus orchard (Marrakesh, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroos, Katja; Baroni, Gabriele; Er-Raki, Salah; Francke, Till; Khabba, Said; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation water requirement plays a crucial role in many agricultural areas and especially in arid and semi-arid landscapes. Improvements in the water management and the performance of the irrigation systems require a correct evaluation of the hydrological processes involved. However, some difficulties can arise due to the heterogeneity of the soil-plant system and of the irrigation scheme. To overcome these limitations, in this study, the soil water balance is analyzed by the combination of the Eddy Covariance technique (EC) and Cosmic Ray neutron Sensing (CRS). EC provides the measurement of the actual evapotranspiration over the area as it was presented in many field conditions. Moreover CRS showed to be a valuable approach to measure the root zone soil moisture integrated in a footprint of ~30 ha. In this way, the combination of the two methodologies should provide a better analysis of the soil water balance at field scale, as opposed to point observations, e.g. by TDR, evaporimeter and fluxmeter. Then, this could increase the capability to assess the irrigation efficiency and the agricultural water management. The study is conducted in a citrus orchard situated in a semi-arid region, 30 km southwest of Marrakesh (Morocco). The site is flat and planted with trees of same age growing in parallel rows with drip irrigation lines and application of fertilizer and pesticides. The original soil seems modified on the surface by the agricultural use, creating differences between trees, rows and lines. In addition, the drip irrigation creates also a spatial variability of the water flux distribution in the field, making this site an interesting area to test the methodology. Particular attention is given to the adaptation of the standard soil sampling campaign used for the calibration of the CRS and the introduction of a weighing function. Data were collected from June to December 2013, which corresponds to the high plant transpiration. Despite the intention of the

  11. Preparation of Ferrotitanium Alloys by Electrolysis-Assisted Calciothermic Reduction of Ilmenite in Equimolar CaCl2-NaCl Electrolyte: Effect of Calcium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongren; Zhang, Yingjie; Hua, Yixin; Xu, Cunying; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Qibo; Wang, Ding

    2018-04-01

    The effect of CaO content on the preparation of ferrotitanium alloys from ilmenite with the method of the electrolysis-assisted calciothermic reduction has been investigated by use of ilmenite powders as raw materials that positions them next to the cathodic molybdenum plate, equimolar CaCl2-NaCl molten salt with 2-7 mol.% CaO as electrolyte and graphite as anode at 700°C with cell voltage of 2.8 V under argon atmosphere. It is demonstrated that increasing the reactant CaO content is beneficial to the calciothermic reduction of ilmenite and the intermediate CaTiO3. Experimental results also show that after 14 h of calciothermic reduction process, the products are ferrotitanium alloys and the specific energy consumption is only about 10.21 kWh kg-1 when adding 5 mol.% CaO into equimolar CaCl2-NaCl molten salt and approximately 14.40 kWh kg-1 when CaO content is increased to 7 mol.%.

  12. Electronic structure and magnetism of new ilmenite compounds for spintronic devices: FeBO{sub 3} (B = Ti, Hf, Zr, Si, Ge, Sn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, R.A.P. [Department of Chemistry, State University of Ponta Grossa, Av. General Carlos Cavalcanti, 4748, 84030-900 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Camilo, A. [Department of Physics, State University of Ponta Grossa, Av. General Carlos Cavalcanti, 4748, 84030-900 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Lazaro, S.R. de, E-mail: srlazaro@uepg.br [Department of Chemistry, State University of Ponta Grossa, Av. General Carlos Cavalcanti, 4748, 84030-900 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    First-principles calculations were performed in the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) within hybrid functional (B3LYP) to study the electronic structure and magnetic properties of new ilmenite FeBO{sub 3} (B=Ti, Hf, Zr, Si, Ge, Sn) materials. In particular, the magnetic exchange interaction between Fe{sup 2+} layers is dependent on the interlayer distance and it can be controlled by ionic radius of B-site cation. Thus, Fe(Ti, Si, Ge)O{sub 3} are antiferromagnetic materials, while Fe(Zr, Hf, Sn)O{sub 3} are ferromagnetic. We also argue that antiferromagnetic materials and FeZrO{sub 3} are convectional semiconductors, whereas FeHfO{sub 3} and FeSnO{sub 3} exhibit intrinsic half-metallic behavior, making them promising candidates for spintronic devices. - Highlights: • We study electronic structure and magnetism of new FeBO{sub 3} (B=Ti, Hf, Zr, Si, Ge, Sn) ilmenite materials. • We found that magnetic ordering of Fe-based ilmenite materials can be controlled by size of B-site cation. • Fe(Ti, Zr, Si, Ge)O{sub 3} are convectional semiconductors. • FeHfO{sub 3} and FeSnO{sub 3} exhibit intrinsic half-metallic behavior with potential application for spintronic devices.

  13. Investigating CH4 production in an oxic plant-soil system -a new approach combining isotopic labelling (13C) and inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Katharina; Keppler, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Typically, aerated soil are net sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4), being highest in native ecosystems (pristine forests > managed forests > grasslands > crop fields). However, this does not exclude a simultaneous endogenic CH4 production in the plant-soil system, which cannot be detected simply via CH4 flux measurements. Methanogenic archaea producing CH4 under anoxic conditions were thought to be the only biotic source of CH4 in the soil. However, until recently a non-archaeal pathway of CH4 formation is known where CH4 is produced under oxic conditions in plants (Keppler et al. 2006) and fungi (Lenhart et al. 2012). Additionally, abiotic formation of CH4 from soil organic matter was reported (Jugold et al. 2012) and may be ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The major goal of this project was to determine soil endogenic CH4 sources and to estimate their contribution to the endogenic CH4 production. Especially the effect of plants and fungi on soil CH4 production was investigated. Therefore, a series of experiments was carried out on field fresh soil collected in a grassland and a forest ecosystem under controlled laboratory conditions. By combining selective inhibitors and 13C labelling, CH4 production rates of several CH4 sources were quantified. The major difficulty was to detect the comparatively small flux of CH4 production against the background of the high CH4 consumption rates due to methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we supplemented bare soil and soil with vegetation with selective inhibitors and 13C labelled substrates in a closed chamber system. In a first step, CH4 production was determined by the inhibition of CH4 oxidizing bacteria with Difluoromethane (DFM, 2ml l-1). In the following, a 13C labelled substrate (either CO2, Acetate, or Methionine -S-CH3 labelled) was added in combination with a specific inhibitor -either for archaeal methanogenesis (Bromoethanesulfonate), bacteria (Streptomycin), or fungi (Captan, Cycloheximide). Gas samples were

  14. Combining soil and tree-stem flux measurements and soil gas profiles to understand CH4 pathways in Fagus sylvatica forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maier, M.; Macháčová, Kateřina; Lang, F.; Svobodová, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 181, č. 1 (2018), s. 31-35 ISSN 1436-8730 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : ch4 * soil gas profile * gas flux * co2 * methanogenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.102, year: 2016

  15. Combined effect of soil amendment with oil cakes and seed priming in the control of root rot fungi of leguminous and non-leguminous crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafi, H.; Dawar, S.; Tariq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Organic amendments of soil help in proper aeration, rising of temperature and water holding capacity which results in better uptake of nutrients with root system gets extensive establishment. In this study, effects of soil amendment with oil seed cakes including mustard (Brassica campestris L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), almond (Prunus amygdalus L.) and black seed (Nigella sativa L.) cakes at the rate of 0.1 and 1% w/w and priming of seeds with Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. ex Delile and Sapindus mukorossi (L.) leaves extracts and microbial antagonists (Trichoderma harzianum and Rhizobium melilotii) was observed on the growth of plants and in the suppression of root infecting fungi. The results obtained showed that combined effect of bio-priming of seeds with T. harzianum spore suspension and amendment of soil with mustard cake at the rate of 1% was found to be most effective for the growth of leguminous and non-leguminous crop plants (peanut, chickpea, okra and sunflower) and for the reduction of root infecting fungi like Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium spp followed by R. meliloti primed seeds in combination with cotton, almond and black seed cakes amendment respectively as compared to control (non treated seeds and soil). (author)

  16. Preparation of Fe-Al Intermetallic / TiC-Al2O3 Ceramic Composites from Ilmenite by SHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Fe-Al intermetallic/TiC-Al2O3 ceramic composites were successfully prepared by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) from natural ilmenite, aluminium and carbon as the raw materials. The effects of carbon sources, preheating time and heat treatment temperature on synthesis process and products were investigated in detail, and the reaction process of the FeTiO3-Al-C system was also discussed.It is shown that the temperature and velocity of the combustion wave are higher when graphite is used as the carbon source, which can reflect the effect of the carbon source structure on the combustion synthesis;Prolonging the preheating time or heat treatment temperature is beneficial to the formation of the ordered intermetallics; The temperature and velocity of the combustion wave arc improved, but the disordered alloys are difficult to eliminate with the preheating time prolonged. The compound powders mainly containing ordered Fe3Al intermetallic can be prepared through heat treatment at 750 ℃.

  17. Structural changes induced by lattice-electron interactions: SiO2 stishovite and FeTiO3 ilmenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takamitsu

    2005-09-01

    The bright source and highly collimated beam of synchrotron radiation offers many advantages for single-crystal structure analysis under non-ambient conditions. The structure changes induced by the lattice-electron interaction under high pressure have been investigated using a diamond anvil pressure cell. The pressure dependence of electron density distributions around atoms is elucidated by a single-crystal diffraction study using deformation electron density analysis and the maximum entropy method. In order to understand the bonding electrons under pressure, diffraction intensity measurements of FeTiO3 ilmenite and gamma-SiO2 stishovite single crystals at high pressures were made using synchrotron radiation. Both diffraction studies describe the electron density distribution including bonding electrons and provide the effective charge of the cations. In both cases the valence electrons are more localized around the cations with increasing pressure. This is consistent with molecular orbital calculations, proving that the bonding electron density becomes smaller with pressure. The thermal displacement parameters of both samples are reduced with increasing pressure.

  18. Soil remediation: New strategy by the combine of F.I.S. H. and Geo-Radar Tele detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbi, C.; Mengs, G.; Gonzalez Motalvo, D.; Martin, M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important targets in bioremediation to treat contaminated soils is the developing of new technologies. In this project we have developed a new strategy to eliminate in situ pollutants from hydrocarbons contaminated soils, supported with two specific techniques: FISH and Geo-Radar tele detection. With these techniques we try to delimit the pollutants distribution is oil, and to develop DNA and PNA biosensors with high specificity to evaluate the natural attenuation soil capacity using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). (Author)

  19. Soil remediation: New strategy by the combine of F.I.S. H. and Geo-Radar Tele detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbi, C.; Mengs, G.; Gonzalez Motalvo, D.; Martin, M.

    2009-07-01

    One of the most important targets in bioremediation to treat contaminated soils is the developing of new technologies. In this project we have developed a new strategy to eliminate in situ pollutants from hydrocarbons contaminated soils, supported with two specific techniques: FISH and Geo-Radar tele detection. With these techniques we try to delimit the pollutants distribution is oil, and to develop DNA and PNA biosensors with high specificity to evaluate the natural attenuation soil capacity using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). (Author)

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Drug Interaction Study of Two Lead Combinations, Oxantel Pamoate plus Albendazole and Albendazole plus Mebendazole, for the Treatment of Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Noemi; Vargas, Mireille; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The current treatments against Trichuris trichiura, albendazole and mebendazole, are only poorly efficacious. Therefore, combination chemotherapy was recommended for treating soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Albendazole-mebendazole and albendazole-oxantel pamoate have shown promising results in clinical trials. However, in vitro and in vivo drug interaction studies should be performed before their simultaneous treatment can be recommended. Inhibition of human recombinant cytochromes P450 (CYPs...

  1. Effect of long-term combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers on soil nematode communities within aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaoke; Mahamood, Md; Zhang, Shuiqing; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Wenju

    2016-08-09

    A long-term fertilization experiment was conducted to examine the effects of different fertilization practices on nematode community composition within aggregates in a wheat-maize rotation system. The study was a randomized complete block design with three replicates. The experiment involved the following four treatments: no fertilizer, inorganic N, P and K fertilizer (NPK), NPK plus manure (NPKM) and NPK plus maize straw (NPKS). Soil samples were taken at 0-20 cm depth during the wheat harvest stage. Based on our results, NPKS contributed to soil aggregation and moisture retention, with a positive effect on soil total nitrogen accumulation, particularly within small macroaggregates (0.25-1 mm) and microaggregates (fertilizer application effectively improved soil physicochemical properties and were also beneficial for nematode survival within small aggregate size fractions.

  2. Combined use of stable isotopes and fallout radionuclides as soil erosion indicators in a forested mountain site, South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meusburger, K.; Mabit, L.; Alewell, C. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Environmental Geosciences; Park, J.H. [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering; Sandor, T. [Central Agricultural Office Food and Feed Safety Directorate (Hungary). Radioanalytical Reference Lab.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and to validate the suitability of the stable nitrogen and carbon isotope signature as soil erosion indicators in a mountain forest site in South Korea. Our approach is based on the comparison of the isotope signature of ''stable'' landscape positions (reference sites), which are neither affected by erosion nor deposition, with eroding sites. For undisturbed soils we expect that the enrichment of δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C with soil depth, due to fractionation during decomposition, goes in parallel with a decrease in nitrogen and carbon content. Soil erosion processes potentially weaken this correlation. The {sup 137}Cs method and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) were applied for the soil erosion quantification. Erosion rates obtained with the {sup 137}Cs method range from 0.9 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} to 7 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Considering the steep slopes of up to 40 and the erosive monsoon events (R factor of 6600 MJ mm ha{sup -1} h{sup -1} yr {sup -1}), the rates are plausible and within the magnitude of the RUSLE-modeled soil erosion rates, varying from 0.02 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} to 5.1 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The soil profiles of the reference sites showed significant (p < 0.0001) correlations between nitrogen and carbon content and its corresponding δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C signatures. In contrast, for the eroding sites this relationship was weaker and for the carbon not significant. These results confirm the usefulness of the stable carbon isotope signature as a qualitative indicator for soil disturbance. We could show further that the δ{sup 15}N isotope signature can be used similarly for uncultivated sites. We thus propose that the stable δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C signature of soil profiles could serve as additional indicators confirming the accurate choice of the reference site in soil erosion studies using the {sup 137}Cs method.

  3. Assessing the combined hazards of drought, soil erosion and local flooding on agricultural land: a Czech case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Miroslav; Semerádová, Daniela; Novotný, I.; Dumbrovský, M.; Drbal, K.; Pavlík, F.; Vopravil, J.; Štěpánková, P.; Vizina, A.; Balek, Jan; Hlavinka, Petr; Bartošová, Lenka; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, oct (2016), s. 231-249 ISSN 0936-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MZe(CZ) QJ1610072 Grant - others:EHP(CZ) EHP-CZ02-OV-1-014-2014 Program:CZ02 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Soil moisture * Sheet erosion * Ephemeral gully erosion * Fast-drying soil * Critical point * Vulnerability * Climate change Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.578, year: 2016

  4. Effect of Curing Conditions and Freeze-Thaw Cycles on the Strength of an Expansive Soil Stabilized with a Combination of Lime, Jaggery, and Gallnut Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijo James

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation involved the utilization of the combination of lime, jaggery, and gallnut powder, adopted in South India traditionally. This combination of materials, used for the manufacture of lime-based mortars, was adopted in stabilization of an expansive soil. Three combinations of lime, jaggery, and gallnut powder (LJG in the ratios of 8 : 2 : 2, 8 : 2 : 1, and 8 : 1 : 2 were put into use. The effect of subjecting the combinations to alternate cycles of freeze-thaw (up to 3 cycles and three different curing conditions of air, moisture, and heat was also investigated. In addition, a mineralogical investigation for studying the reaction products was also carried out. The investigation proceeded with the determination of the unconfined compression strength (UCS of stabilized specimens of dimensions 38 mm × 76 mm, cured for periods of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. The results of the investigation revealed that the addition of LJG resulted in an increase in the strength of the stabilized soil. Freeze-thaw cycles resulted in a reduction in strength with LJG821 proving to be the most optimal combination developing the maximum strength and least strength loss due to freeze-thaw cycles. Thermal curing proved to be the most optimal curing condition out of all curing conditions evaluated.

  5. Concentration of metals in surface soil around Orissa Sands Complex (OSCOM), IREL, Orissa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Raghunath, R.; Tripathi, R.M.; Vidya Sagar, D.; Khan, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Indian Rare Earth Limited (IREL) has been carrying beach-sand mineral separation (Monazite, Ilmenite, Zircon etc.) in Bay of Bengal. Since last decade thorium plant at OSCOM processes thorium oxalate to produce mantle grade thorium nitrate and nuclear grade thorium oxide by solvent extraction process. A study has been initiated to check the environmental impact of the operating plants on the soil contamination in the surrounding areas. The results of preliminary survey are discussed

  6. Combined effect of capillary barrier and layered slope on water, solute and nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated soil at lysimeter scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Coutinho, Artur Paiva; Lassabatere, Laurent; Bien, Le Binh; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    It is well recognized that colloidal nanoparticles are highly mobile in soils and can facilitate the transport of contaminants through the vadose zone. This work presents the combined effect of the capillary barrier and soil layer slope on the transport of water, bromide and nanoparticles through an unsaturated soil. Experiments were performed in a lysimeter (1×1×1.6m(3)) called LUGH (Lysimeter for Urban Groundwater Hydrology). The LUGH has 15 outputs that identify the temporal and spatial evolution of water flow, solute flux and nanoparticles in relation to the soil surface conditions and the 3D system configuration. Two different soil structures were set up in the lysimeter. The first structure comprises a layer of sand (0-0.2cm, in diameter) 35cm thick placed horizontally above a layer of bimodal mixture also 35cm thick to create a capillary barrier at the interface between the sand and bimodal material. The bimodal material is composed of a mixture 50% by weight of sand and gravel (0.4-1.1cm, in diameter). The second structure, using the same amount of sand and bimodal mixture as the first structure represents an interface with a 25% slope. A 3D numerical model based on Richards equation for flow and the convection dispersion equations coupled with a mechanical module for nanoparticle trapping was developed. The results showed that under the effect of the capillary barrier, water accumulated at the interface of the two materials. The sloped structure deflects flow in contrast to the structure with zero slope. Approximately 80% of nanoparticles are retained in the lysimeter, with a greater retention at the interface of two materials. Finally, the model makes a good reproduction of physical mechanisms observed and appears to be a useful tool for identifying key processes leading to a better understanding of the effect of capillary barrier on nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated heterogeneous soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial variability of soil pH based on GIS combined with geostatistics in Panzhihua tobacco area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Wei; Wang Changquan; Li Bing; Li Qiquan; Du Qian; Hu Jianxin; Liu Chaoke

    2012-01-01

    GIS and geostatistics were utilized to study the spatial variability of soil pH in Panzhihua tobacco area. Results showed that pH values in this area ranged from 4.5 to 8.3, especially 5.5 to 6.5, and in few areas were lower than 5.0 or higher than 7.0 which can meet the need of high-quality tobacco production. The best fitting model of variogram was exponential model with the nugget/sill of soil pH in 13.61% indicating strong spatial correlation. The change process was 5.40 km and the coefficient of determination was 0.491. The spatial variability of soil pH was mainly caused by structural factors such as cane, topography and soil type. The soil pH in Panzhihua tobacco area also showed a increasing trend of northwest to southeast trend. The pH of some areas in Caochang, Gonghe and Yumen were lower, and in Dalongtan were slightly higher. (authors)

  8. Monitoring snowmelt and solute transport at Oslo airport by combining time-lapse electrical resistivity, soil water sampling and tensiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring contaminant transport at contaminated sites requires optimization of the configuration of a limited number of samplings points combined with heterogeneous flow and preferential flowpaths. Especially monitoring processes in the unsaturated zone is a major challenge due to the limited volume monitored by for example suction cups and their risk to clog in a highly active degradation zone. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate field-sale extensively instrumented tools, with non-invasive (geophysical) methods which provide spatially integrated measurements also in the unsaturated zone. Examples of sites that might require monitoring activities in the unsaturated zone are airports with winter frost where large quantities of de-icing chemicals are used each winter; salt and contaminant infiltration along roads; constructed infiltration systems for treatment of sewerage or landfill seepage. Electrical resistivity methods have proved to be useful as an indirect measurement of subsurface properties and processes at the field-scale. The non-uniqueness of the interpretation techniques can be reduced by constraining the inversion through the addition of independent geophysical measurements along the same profile. Or interpretation and understanding of geophysical images can be improved by the combination with classical measurements of soil physical properties, soil suction, contaminant concentration and temperatures. In our experiment, at the research field station at Gardermoen, Oslo airport, we applied a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer to the snow cover prior to snowmelt. To study the solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone time-lapse cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements were conducted at the same time as soil water samples were extracted at multiple depths with suction cups. Measurements of soil temperature, and soil tension were

  9. Combined remediation of Cd-phenanthrene co-contaminated soil by Pleurotus cornucopiae and Bacillus thuringiensis FQ1 and the antioxidant responses in Pleurotus cornucopiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Juan; Liu, Hongying; Li, Qiao; Gao, Ni; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Heng

    2015-10-01

    Remediation of soil co-contaminated with heavy metals and PAHs by mushroom and bacteria is a novel technique. In this study, the combined remediation effect of mushroom (Pleurotus cornucopiae) and bacteria (FQ1, Bacillus thuringiensis) on Cd and phenanthrene co-contaminated soil was investigated. The effect of bacteria (B. thuringiensis) on mushroom growth, Cd accumulation, phenanthrene degradation by P. cornucopiae and antioxidative responses of P. cornucopiae were studied. P. cornucopiae could adapt easily and grow well in Cd-phenanthrene co-contaminated soil. It was found that inoculation of FQ1 enhanced mushroom growth (biomass) and Cd accumulation with the increment of 26.68-43.58% and 14.29-97.67% respectively. Up to 100% and 95.07% of phenanthrene were removed in the bacteria-mushroom (B+M) treatment respectively spiked with 200mg/kg and 500mg/kg phenanthrene. In addition, bacterial inoculation alleviated oxidative stress caused by co-contamination with relative decreases in lipid peroxidation and enzyme activity, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD). This study demonstrated that the integrated remediation strategy of bacteria and mushroom is an effective and promising method for Cd-phenanthrene co-contaminated soil bioremediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  11. Combination of geo- pedo- and technogenic magnetic and geochemical signals in soil profiles - Diversification and its interpretation: A new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszkiewicz, Marcin; Łukasik, Adam; Magiera, Tadeusz; Mendakiewicz, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic and geochemical parameters of soils are determined with respect to geology, pedogenesis and anthropopression. Depending on local conditions these factors affect magnetic and geochemical signals simultaneously or in various configurations. We examined four type of soils (Entic Podzol, Eutric Cambisol, Humic Cambisol and Dystric Cambisol) developed on various bedrock (the Tumlin Sandstone, basaltoid, amphibolite and serpentinite, respectively). Our primary aim was to characterize the origin and diversification of the magnetic and geochemical signal in soils in order to distinguish the most reliable methods for correct interpretation of measured parameters. Presented data include selected parameters, both magnetic (mass magnetic susceptibility - χ, frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility - χfd and thermomagnetic susceptibility measurement - TSM), and geochemical (selected heavy metal contents: Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). Additionally, the enrichment factor (EF) and index of geoaccumulation (Igeo) were calculated. Our results suggest the following: (1) the χ/Fe ratio may be a reliable indicator for determining changes of magnetic signal origin in soil profiles; (2) magnetic and geochemical signals are simultaneously higher (the increment of χ and lead and zinc was noted) in topsoil horizons because of the deposition of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs); (3) EF and Igeo evaluated for lead and zinc unambiguously showed anthropogenic influence in terms of increasing heavy metal contents in topsoil regardless of bedrock or soil type; (4) magnetic susceptibility measurements supported by TSM curves for soil samples of different genetic horizons are a helpful tool for interpreting the origin and nature of the mineral phases responsible for the changes of magnetic susceptibility values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  13. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  14. Decontamination of soil containing POPs by the combined action of solid Fenton-like reagents and microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ondruschka, Bernd; Tumiatti, Vander; Roggero, Carlo Maria

    2007-10-01

    The effect on halogenated aromatics of solid, non-toxic oxidants such as sodium percarbonate and the urea/hydrogen peroxide complex (Fenton-like reagents) was investigated. A microwaves-assisted, solvent-free method for soil decontamination is presented. It marks a considerable advance in the search of more efficient, environment-friendly procedures for the degradative oxidation of persistent organic pollutants. Residual pollutants in treated soil samples were determined by GC/MS analysis after solvent extraction or direct thermal desorption. Results showed that 4-chloronaphthol, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and p-nonylphenol had been degraded completely, 2,4-dibromophenol to a large extent.

  15. Synthesis of Nano-Ilmenite (FeTiO3) doped TiO2/Ti Electrode for Photoelectrocatalytic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikmawati; Watoni, A. H.; Wibowo, D.; Maulidiyah; Nurdin, M.

    2017-11-01

    Ilmenite (FeTiO3) doped on Ti and TiO2/Ti electrodes were successfully prepared by using the sol-gel method. The structure, morphology, and optical properties of FeTiO3 are characterized by XRD, UV-Vis DRS, and SEM. The FeTiO3 and TiO2 greatly affect the photoelectrocatalysis performance characterized by Linear Sweep Voltammetry (LSV) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). The characterization result shows a band gap of FeTiO3 is 2.94 eV. XRD data showed that FeTiO3 formed at 2θ were 35.1° (110), 49.9° (024), and 61.2° (214). The morphology of FeTiO3/Ti and FeTiO3.TiO2/Ti using SEM shows that the formation of FeTiO3 thin layer signifies the Liquid Phase Deposition method effectively in the coating process. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) test showed that FeTiO3.TiO2/Ti electrode was highly oxidation responsive under visible light compared to the FeTiO3/Ti electrodes i.e. 7.87×10-4 A and 9.87×10-5 A. Degradation test of FeTiO3/Ti and FeTiO3.TiO2/Ti electrodes on titan yellow showed that the percentages of degradation with photoelectrocatalysis at 0.5 mg/L were 41% and 43%, respectively.

  16. Phase-dependent space weathering effects and spectroscopic identification of retained helium in a lunar soil grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, K. D.; Stroud, R. M.

    2018-03-01

    The solar wind is an important driver of space weathering on airless bodies. Over time, solar wind exposure alters the physical, chemical, and optical properties of exposed materials and can also impart a significant amount of helium into the surfaces of these bodies. However, common materials on the surface of the Moon, such as glass, crystalline silicates, and oxides, have highly variable responses to solar wind irradiation. We used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to examine the morphology and chemistry of a single grain of lunar soil that includes silicate glass, chromite and ilmenite, all present and exposed along the same surface. The exposure of the silicate glass and oxides to the same space weathering conditions allows for direct comparisons of the responses of natural materials to the complex lunar surface environment. The silicate glass shows minimal effects of solar wind irradiation, whereas both the chromite and ilmenite exhibit defect-rich rims that currently contain trapped helium. Only the weathered rim in ilmenite is rich in nanophase metallic iron (npFe0) and larger vesicles that retain helium at a range of internal pressures. The multiple exposed surfaces of the single grain of ilmenite demonstrate strong crystallographic controls of planar defects and non-spherical npFe0. The direct spectroscopic identification of helium in the vesicles and planar defects in the oxides provides additional evidence of the central role of solar wind irradiation in the formation of some common space weathering features.

  17. Global-scale assessment and combination of SMAP with ASCAT (Active) and AMSR2 (Passive) soil moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global-scale surface soil moisture (SSM) products retrieved from active and passive microwave remote sensing provide an effective method for monitoring near-real-time SSM content with nearly daily temporal resolution. In the present study, we first inter-compared global-scale error patterns and comb...

  18. Single and Combined Effects of Pesticide Seed Dressings and Herbicides on Earthworms, Soil Microorganisms, and Litter Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoesel, Willem; Tiefenbacher, Alexandra; König, Nina; Dorn, Verena M; Hagenguth, Julia F; Prah, Urša; Widhalm, Theresia; Wiklicky, Viktoria; Koller, Robert; Bonkowski, Michael; Lagerlöf, Jan; Ratzenböck, Andreas; Zaller, Johann G

    2017-01-01

    Seed dressing, i.e., the treatment of crop seeds with insecticides and/or fungicides, aiming to protect seeds from pests and diseases, is widely used in conventional agriculture. During the growing season, those crop fields often receive additional broadband herbicide applications. However, despite this broad utilization, very little is known on potential side effects or interactions between these different pesticide classes on soil organisms. In a greenhouse pot experiment, we studied single and interactive effects of seed dressing of winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L. var. Capo ) with neonicotinoid insecticides and/or strobilurin and triazolinthione fungicides and an additional one-time application of a glyphosate-based herbicide on the activity of earthworms, soil microorganisms, litter decomposition, and crop growth. To further address food-web interactions, earthworms were introduced to half of the experimental units as an additional experimental factor. Seed dressings significantly reduced the surface activity of earthworms with no difference whether insecticides or fungicides were used. Moreover, seed dressing effects on earthworm activity were intensified by herbicides (significant herbicide × seed dressing interaction). Neither seed dressings nor herbicide application affected litter decomposition, soil basal respiration, microbial biomass, or specific respiration. Seed dressing did also not affect wheat growth. We conclude that interactive effects on soil biota and processes of different pesticide classes should receive more attention in ecotoxicological research.

  19. Mapping of Cu and Pb Contaminations in Soil Using Combined Geochemistry, Topography, and Remote Sensing: A Case Study in the Le’an River Floodplain, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Gao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution in soil is becoming a widely concerning environmental problem in China. The aim of this study is to integrate multiple sources of data, namely total Cu and Pb contents, digital elevation model (DEM data, remote sensing image and interpreted land-use data, for mapping the spatial distribution of total Cu and Pb contamination in top soil along the Le’an River and its branches. Combined with geographical analyses and watershed delineation, the source and transportation route of pollutants are identified. Regions at high risk of Cu or Pb pollution are suggested. Results reveal that topography is the major factor that controls the spatial distribution of Cu and Pb. Watershed delineation shows evidence that the streamflow resulting from rainfall is the major carrier of metal pollutants.

  20. The assessment of source attribution of soil pollution in a typical e-waste recycling town and its surrounding regions using the combined organic and inorganic dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Qi, Shihua; Xie, Xianming; Gu, X W Sophie; Wang, Jinji

    2017-01-01

    Guiyu is a well-known electronic waste dismantling and recycling town in south China. Concentrations and distribution of the 21 mineral elements and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) collected there were evaluated. Principal component analyses (PCA) applied to the data matrix of PAHs in the soil extracted three major factors explaining 85.7% of the total variability identified as traffic emission, coal combustion, and an unidentified source. By using metallic or metalloid element concentrations as variables, five principal components (PCs) were identified and accounted for 70.4% of the information included in the initial data matrix, which can be denoted as e-waste dismantling-related contamination, two different geological origins, anthropogenic influenced source, and marine aerosols. Combining the 21 metallic and metalloid element datasets with the 16 PAH concentrations can narrow down the coarse source and decrease the unidentified contribution to soil in the present study and therefore effectively assists the source identification process.

  1. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for model calibration and validation in a large ungauged catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The availability of data is a major challenge for hydrological modelling in large parts of the world. Remote sensing data can be exploited to improve models of ungauged or poorly gauged catchments. In this study we combine three datasets for calibration and validation of a rainfall-runoff model...... of the ungauged Okavango catchment in Southern Africa: (i) Surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from SAR measurements onboard the Envisat satellite; (ii) Radar altimetry measurements by Envisat providing river stages in the tributaries of the Okavango catchment, down to a minimum width of about one...... hundred meters; and (iii) Temporal changes of the Earth’s gravity field recorded by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) caused by total water storage changes in the catchment. The SSM data are compared to simulated moisture conditions in the top soil layer. They cannot be used for model...

  2. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jia; Fu Lingyan; Zhao Xinna; Liu Xiujuan; Wang Huili; Wang Xuedong; Dai Liyan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) were presented for the extraction and determination of five polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil samples. Acetone was used as extraction solvent for the extraction of PCBs from soil samples. In DLLME, the target analytes in the extraction solvent were rapidly transferred from the acetone extract to chlorobenzene when the extraction process began. The main advantages of this method are quick speed, high enrichment factor, high recovery and good repeatability. Under the optimum conditions, the method yields a linear calibration curve in the concentration range from 2 to 2000 μg kg -1 for PCB 52, and 0.4 to 400 μg kg -1 for other target analytes. Coefficients of correlation (r 2 ) ranged from 0.9993 to 0.9999. The repeatability was tested by spiking soil samples at a concentration level of 10 μg kg -1 for PCBs. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 11) varied between 2.2% and 6.4%. The limits of detection (LODs), based on signal-to-noise (S/N) of 3, were between 0.20 and 0.50 μg kg -1 . The relative recoveries of the five PCBs from soil S1, S2 and S3 at spiking levels of 10, 20 and 50 μg kg -1 were in the range of 88.70-103.8%, 82.50-106.3% and 82.30-113.6%, respectively. Therefore, DLLME combined with GC-ECD can be successfully applied for the determination of trace PCB residues in real soil samples.

  3. Briquetting of Egyptian ilmenite ore with different organic binder and reduced its in hydrogen in temperature range 800-1200°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Gawad H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite ore fine was briquetted with different amounts of molasses or pitch pressed under different pressure was studied in this investigation. The results show at optimum amount of molasses added was 1.5 % and pitch, the pressure was 294.3 M.Pa.. Also the characterizations of raw materials were studied by different methods of analyses such as Xray and screen analyses. The produced briquettes were reduced by different amounts of hydrogen at different temperatures, and the reduction kinetics was determined.

  4. Investigation of Hg uptake and transport between paddy soil and rice seeds combining Hg isotopic composition and speciation

    OpenAIRE

    C. Feng; Z. Pedrero; P. Li; B. Du; X. Feng; M. Monperrus; E. Tessier; S. Berail; D. Amouroux

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human consumption of rice constitutes a potential toxicological risk in mercury (Hg) polluted areas such as Hg mining regions in China. It is recognized to be an important source of Hg for the local human diet considering the efficient bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in rice seed. To assess Hg sources and uptake pathways to the rice plants, Hg speciation and isotopic composition were investigated in rice seeds and their corresponding paddy soils from different locations withi...

  5. Molecular investigations of the soil, rhizosphere and transgenic glufosinate-resistant rape and maize plants in combination with herbicide (Basta) application under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Dieter; Rosenbrock-Krestel, Hilkea; Kirchhof, Gudrun; Bieber, Evi; Giunaschwili, Nathela; Müller, Rüdiger; Fischbeck, Gerhard; Wagner, Tobias; Sandermann, Heinrich; Hartmann, Anton

    2008-01-01

    A field study was conducted during 1994 to 1998 on the Experimental Farm Roggenstein, near Fürstenfeldbruck, Bavaria, Germany to determine the effect of transgenic glufosinate-resistant rape in combination with the herbicide Basta [glufosinate-ammonium, phosphinothricin, ammonium (2RS)-2-amino-4-(methylphosphinato) butyric acid] application on soil microorganisms and the behaviour of the synthetic transgenic DNA in response to normal agricultural practice. No influence of Basta on microbial biomass could be detected. The phospholipid fatty acid analysis of soil extracts showed no difference between Basta application and mechanical weed control, whereas conventional herbicide application revealed a different pattern. Basta application resulted in a changed population of weeds with a selective effect for Viola arvensis. During senescence, transgenic rape DNA was degraded similar to endogenous control DNA. After ploughing the chopped plant material in the soil, transgenic as well as endogenous control DNA sequences could be detected for up to 4 weeks for rape and up to 7 months for maize, whereas PCR analysis of composted transgenic maize revealed the presence of the transgene over a period of 22 months.

  6. In defense of Magnetite-Ilmenite Thermometry in the Bishop Tuff and its implication for gradients in silicic magma reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bernard W; Hildreth, Edward; Bachmann, Olivier; Scaillet, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Despite claims to the contrary, the compositions of magnetite and ilmenite in the Bishop Tuff correctly record the changing conditions of T and fO2 in the magma reservoir. In relatively reduced (∆NNO magmas (e.g., Bishop Tuff, Taupo units), Ti behaves compatibly (DTi ≈ 2-3.5), leading to a decrease in TiO2 activity in the melt with cooling and fractionation. In contrast, FeTi-oxides are poorer in TiO2 in more oxidized magmas (∆NNO > 1, e.g., Fish Canyon Tuff, Pinatubo), and the d(aTiO2)/dT slope can be negative. Biotite, FeTi-oxides, liquid, and possibly plagioclase largely maintained equilibrium in the Bishop Tuff magma (unlike the pyroxenes, and cores of quartz, sanidine, and zircon) prior ro and during a mixing event triggered by a deeper recharge, which, based on elemental diffusion profiles in minerals, took place at least several decades before eruption. Equilibrating phases and pumice compositions show evolving chemical variations that correlate well with mutually consistent temperatures based on the FeTi-oxides, sanidine-plagioclase, and ∆18O quartz-magnetite pairs. Early Bishop Tuff (EBT) temperatures are lower (700 to ~780‎°C) than temperatures (780 to >820°C) registered in Late Bishop Tuff (LBT), the latter defined here not strictly stratigraphically, but by the presence of orthopyroxene and reverse-zoned rims on quartz and sanidine. The claimed similarity in compositions, Zr-saturation temperatures and thermodynamically calculated temperatures (730-740°C) between EBT and less evolved LBT reflect the use of glass inclusions in quartz cores in LBT that were inherited from the low temperature rhyolitic part of the reservoir characteristic of the EBT. LBT temperatures as high as 820°C, the preservation of orthopyroxene, and the presence of reverse-zoned minerals (quartz, sanidine, zircons) are consistent with magma recharge at the base of the zoned reservoir, heating the cooler rhyolitic melt, partly remelting cumulate mush, and introducing

  7. Full Scale Model Test of Consolidation Acceleration on Soft Soil deposition with Combination of Timber Pile and PVD (Hybrid Pile)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandyutama, Y.; Samang, L.; Imran, A. M.; Harianto4, T.

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the effect of composite pile-PVD (hybrid pile) as the reinforcement in embankment on soft soil by the means of numerical simulation and Full-Scale Trial Embankment. The first phase cunducted by numerical analysis and obtained 6-8 meters hybrid pile length effective. Full-Scale trial embankment. was installed hybrid pile of 6 m and preloading of 4,50 height. Full-scale tests were performed to investigate the performances of Hybrid pile reinforcement. This research...

  8. Sequential extraction combined with isotope analysis as a tool for the investigation of lead mobilisation in soils: Application to organic-rich soils in an upland catchment in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, Jeffrey R.; Farmer, John G.; Dunn, Sarah M.; Graham, Margaret C.; Vinogradoff, Susan I.

    2006-01-01

    Sequential extraction (modified BCR procedure) combined with isotope analysis has been investigated as a tool for assessing mobilisation of lead into streams at an upland catchment in NE Scotland. The maximum lead concentrations (up to 110 mg kg -1 in air-dried soil) occurred not at the surface but at about 10 cm depth. The lowest 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in any profile occurred, with one exception, at 2.5-5 cm depth. In the one exception, closest to the only road in the area, significantly lower 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in the surface soil together with much increased chloride concentrations (in comparison to other surface waters) indicated the possible mobilisation of roadside lead and transfer to the stream. The 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in extractable fractions tended at depth towards the ratio measured in the residual phase but the ratios in the oxidizable fraction increased to a value higher than that of the residual phase. - Sequential extraction combined with isotope analysis was used as a tool to assess mobilisation of lead into streams

  9. At last! The single-crystal X-ray structure of a naturally occurring sample of the ilmenite-type oxide FeCrO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cruz, María Ana; Elizalde-González, María de la Paz; Escudero, Roberto; Bernès, Sylvain; Silva-González, Rutilo; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2015-10-01

    A natural single crystal of the ferrimagnetic oxide FeCrO3, which was found in an opencast mine situated in the San Luis Potosí State in Mexico, has been characterized in order to elucidate some outstanding issues about the actual structure of this material. The single-crystal X-ray analysis unambiguously shows that transition metal cations are segregated in alternating layers normal to the threefold crystallographic axis, affording a structure isomorphous to that of ilmenite (FeTiO3), in the space group R3̅. The possible occurrence of cation antisite and vacancy defects is below the limit of detection available from X-ray data. Structural and magnetic results are in agreement with the coherent slow intergrowth of magnetic phases provided by the two antiferromagnetic corundum-type parent oxides Fe2O3 (hematite) and Cr2O3 (eskolaite). Our results are consistent with the most recent density functional theory (DFT) studies carried out on digital FeCrO3 [Sadat Nabi & Pentcheva (2011). Phys. Rev. B, 83, 214424], and suggest that synthetic samples of FeCrO3 might present a cation distribution different to that of the ilmenite structural type.

  10. A Novel Combination of Surfactant Addition and Persulfate-assisted Electrokinetic Oxidation for Remediation of Pyrene-Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abtahi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of surfactant addition on persulfate-assisted electrokinetic remediation of pyrene-spiked soil was studied. The influence of effective factors including voltage, surfactant addition, moisture content, and persulfate concentration on the removal of initial pyrene concentration of 200 mg kg–1 were investigated. A complete pyrene removal was observed for voltage of 1 V cm–1, saturated conditions, Tween 80 concentration of 20 mL kg–1, and persulfate concentration of 100 mg kg–1 after 24 h, corresponding to pyrene mineralization of 61 %, based on TPH analysis. The experimental results were best fitted with pseudo-first-order kinetic model with correlation coefficient of 0.968 and rate constant of 0.191 min−1. The main intermediates of pyrene degradation were benzene o-toluic acid, acetic, azulene, naphthalene and decanoic acid. Finally, an unwashed hydrocarbon-contaminated soil was subjected to persulfate-assisted electrokinetic remediation, and a TPH removal of 38 % was observed for the initial TPH content of 912 mg kg–1, under the selected conditions.

  11. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  12. Partitioning of hexachlorobenzene in a kaolin/humic acid/surfactant/water system: Combined effect of surfactant and soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jinzhong; Wang, Lingling [Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu, Xiaohua, E-mail: hust-esri2009@hotmail.com [Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study HCB partitioning in a kaolin/humic acid/TX100/water system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reveal influence of TX100-HA interaction on TX100 and HA sorption to kaolin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We verify combined effect of TX100 and HA on HCB desorption from clay. - Abstract: Understanding the combined effect of soil organic matter (SOM) and surfactants on the partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil/water systems is important to predict the effectiveness of surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER). In the present study we investigate the partitioning of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) within a humic acid (HA)-coated kaolin/Triton X-100 (TX100)/water system, with special emphasis on the interaction between TX100 and HA, and their combined effect on HCB sorption. HA firstly enhanced then suppressed TX100 sorption to kaolin as the amounts of HA increased, while the addition of TX100 led to a consistent reduction in HA sorption. In the HA-coated kaolin/TX100/water system, TX100 played a primary role in enhancing desorption of HCB, while the role could be suppressed and then enhanced as HA coating amounts increased. Only at HA coating above 2.4%, dissolved HA outcompeted clay-bound HA for HCB partitioning, resulting in dissolved HA enhanced desorption. The presence of dissolved HA at these conditions further promoted the effectiveness of TX100 enhanced desorption. Despite a reduced TX100 sorption to clay was achieved due to the presence of dissolved HA, the effect on HCB desorption was comparatively slight. A reliable cumulative influence of HA and TX100 on HCB desorption was observed, although HCB desorption by HA/TX100 mixed was less than the sum of HA and TX100 individually. Our study suggests that for soils of high organic contents, the combined effect of SOM and surfactants on HOCs desorption can be applied to improve the performance of SER.

  13. Combined and Relative Effect Levels of Perceived Risk, Knowledge, Optimism, Pessimism, and Social Trust on Anxiety among Inhabitants Concerning Living on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongjun; Guo, Zengli; Zhou, Li; Xue, Shengguo; Zhu, Qinfeng; Zhu, Huike

    2016-11-02

    This research aims at combined and relative effect levels on anxiety of: (1) perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust; and (2) four sub-variables of social trust among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil. On the basis of survey data from 499 Chinese respondents, results suggest that perceived risk, pessimism, optimism, and social trust have individual, significant, and direct effects on anxiety, while knowledge does not. Knowledge has significant, combined, and interactive effects on anxiety together with social trust and pessimism, respectively, but does not with perceived risk and optimism. Social trust, perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism have significantly combined effects on anxiety; the five variables as a whole have stronger predictive values than each one individually. Anxiety is influenced firstly by social trust and secondly by perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism. Each of four sub-variables of social trust has an individual, significant, and negative effect on anxiety. When introducing four sub-variables into one model, trust in social organizations and in the government have significantly combined effects on anxiety, while trust in experts and in friends and relatives do not; anxiety is influenced firstly by trust in social organization, and secondly by trust in the government.

  14. Characteristics of the soil-like substrates produced with a novel technique combining aerobic fermentation and earthworm treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wenli; He, Wenting; Li, Leyuan; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    The soil-like substrate (SLS) technique is key for improving the closure of bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) by recycling the inedible biomass of higher plants. In this study, a novel SLS technique (NSLST) was proposed: aerobic fermentations at 35 °C for 1 day, then 60 °C for 6 days, finally 30 °C for 3 days, followed by earthworm treatment for 70 days. Comparing with the original SLS technique (OSLST), its process cycle was 13 days shorter, and the dry weight loss rate (81.1%) was improved by 24.77%. The cellulose and lignin degradation rates were 96.6% and 94.6%. The concentrations of available N, P and K in mature SLS were respectively 776.1 mg/L, 348.0 mg/L and 7943.0 mg/L. Low CH4 and NH3 production was observed, but no accumulation. According to the seed germination test, the SLSs were feasible for plant growth. This investigation will provide a preliminary foundation for BLSS design.

  15. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for hydrological model calibration in a large poorly gauged catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Milzow

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of data is a major challenge for hydrological modelling in large parts of the world. Remote sensing data can be exploited to improve models of ungauged or poorly gauged catchments. In this study we combine three datasets for calibration of a rainfall-runoff model of the poorly gauged Okavango catchment in Southern Africa: (i surface soil moisture (SSM estimates derived from radar measurements onboard the Envisat satellite; (ii radar altimetry measurements by Envisat providing river stages in the tributaries of the Okavango catchment, down to a minimum river width of about one hundred meters; and (iii temporal changes of the Earth's gravity field recorded by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE caused by total water storage changes in the catchment. The SSM data are shown to be helpful in identifying periods with over-respectively underestimation of the precipitation input. The accuracy of the radar altimetry data is validated on gauged subbasins of the catchment and altimetry data of an ungauged subbasin is used for model calibration. The radar altimetry data are important to condition model parameters related to channel morphology such as Manning's roughness. GRACE data are used to validate the model and to condition model parameters related to various storage compartments in the hydrological model (e.g. soil, groundwater, bank storage etc.. As precipitation input the FEWS-Net RFE, TRMM 3B42 and ECMWF ERA-Interim datasets are considered and compared.

  16. Combination of magnetic parameters and heavy metals to discriminate soil-contamination sources in Yinchuan--a typical oasis city of Northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunsheng; Wang, Bo; Yu, Ye; Jia, Jia; Nie, Yan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Shujing

    2014-07-01

    Various industrial processes and vehicular traffic result in harmful emissions containing both magnetic minerals and heavy metals. In this study, we investigated the levels of magnetic and heavy metal contamination of topsoils from Yinchuan city in northwestern China. The results demonstrate that magnetic mineral assemblages in the topsoil are dominated by pseudo-single domain (PSD) and multi-domain (MD) magnetite. The concentrations of anthropogenic heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) and the magnetic properties of χlf, SIRM, χARM, and 'SOFT' and 'HARD' remanence are significantly correlated, suggesting that the magnetic minerals and heavy metals have common sources. Combined use of principal components and fuzzy cluster analysis of the magnetic and chemical data set indicates that the magnetic and geochemical properties of the particulates emitted from different sources vary significantly. Samples from university campus and residential areas are mainly affected by crustal material, with low concentrations of magnetic minerals and heavy metals, while industrial pollution sources are characterized by high concentrations of coarse magnetite and Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. Traffic pollution is characterized by Pb and Zn, and magnetite. Magnetic measurements of soils are capable of differentiating sources of magnetic minerals and heavy metals from industrial processes, vehicle fleets and soil parent material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Srivastava, Vipul J; Dombrowski, Frank J; Lingle, James W

    2015-10-30

    Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for hydrological model calibration in a large poorly gauged catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The availability of data is a major challenge for hydrological modelling in large parts of the world. Remote sensing data can be exploited to improve models of ungauged or poorly gauged catchments. In this study we combine three datasets for calibration of a rainfall-runoff model of the poorly...... gauged Okavango catchment in Southern Africa: (i) surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from radar measurements onboard the Envisat satellite; (ii) radar altimetry measurements by Envisat providing river stages in the tributaries of the Okavango catchment, down to a minimum river width of about...... one hundred meters; and (iii) temporal changes of the Earth's gravity field recorded by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) caused by total water storage changes in the catchment. The SSM data are shown to be helpful in identifying periods with over-respectively underestimation...

  19. Combined influence of sedimentation and vegetation on the soil carbon stocks of a coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Chen, Huaipu; Cao, Haobing; Ge, Zhenming; Zhang, Liquan

    2017-07-01

    Coastal wetlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Large quantities of sediment deposited in the Changjiang (Yangtze) estuary by the Changjiang River promote the propagation of coastal wetlands, the expansion of saltmarsh vegetation, and carbon sequestration. In this study, using the Chongming Dongtan Wetland in the Changjiang estuary as the study area, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the influences of sedimentation and vegetation on the SOC stocks of the coastal wetland were examined in 2013. There was sediment accretion in the northern and middle areas of the wetland and in the Phragmites australis marsh in the southern area, and sediment erosion in the Scirpus mariqueter marsh and the bare mudflat in the southern area. More SOC accumulated in sediments of the vegetated marsh than in the bare mudflat. The total organic carbon (TOC) stocks increased in the above-ground biomass from spring to autumn and decreased in winter; in the below-ground biomass, they gradually increased from spring to winter. The TOC stocks were higher in the below-ground biomass than in the above-ground biomass in the P. australis and Spartina alterniflora marshes, but were lower in the below-ground biomass in S. mariqueter marsh. Stocks of SOC showed temporal variation and increased gradually in all transects from spring to winter. The SOC stocks tended to decrease from the high marsh down to the bare mudflat along the three transects in the order: P. australis marsh > S. alterniflora marsh > S. mariqueter marsh > bare mudflat. The SOC stocks of the same vegetation type were higher in the northern and middle transects than in the southern transect. These results suggest that interactions between sedimentation and vegetation regulate the SOC stocks in the coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary.

  20. Effects of Biofertilizers Combined with Different Soil Amendments on Potted Rice Plants Efecto de Biofertilizantes Combinado con Enmiendas del Suelo sobre Plantas de Arroz en Macetas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Javaid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This pot study investigated the effect of the combined application of two commercial biofertilizers viz. Biopower and EM (Effective Microorganisms on rice (Oryza sativa L. growth and yield in soils amended with farmyard manure, green manure, and NPK fertilizers. Biopower is a product of the Nuclear Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE, Pakistan, which contains species of associative and endophytic diazotrophs. EM (effective microorganisms, a product developed by Japanese scientists, consists of co-existing beneficial microorganisms, mainly species of photosynthetic and lactic acid bacteria, as well as yeast. Applying Biopower adversely affected plant growth and yield in NPK fertilizer amendment. Conversely, this biofertilizer markedly enhanced plant growth and yield in green manure amended soil while its effect was not significant in farmyard manure amendment. In green manure amendment, applying EM enhanced grain yield by 46%. Co-inoculation of Biopower and EM evidently improved root and shoot growth in farmyard manure amended soil. This study concludes that the two biofertilizers clearly enhanced shoot biomass and grain yield in green manure amended soils.El presente estudio en macetas fue realizado para investigar el efecto de la aplicación combinada de dos biofertilizantes comerciales, Biopower y EM (Effective Microorganisms, en el crecimiento y producción de arroz (Oryza sativa L. en suelos enmendados con estiércol de granja, abono verde y fertilizantes NPK. Biopower es un producto del Nuclear Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE, Pakistán, que contiene especies de diazótrofos asociativos y endofíticos. Effective Microorganisms es un producto desarrollado por científicos japoneses que consiste en microorganismos benéficos co-existentes, principalmente especies de bacterias fotosintéticas y ácido lácticas, y levadura. La aplicación de Biopower afectó adversamente el crecimiento y

  1. Comparing and combining terrestrial laser scanning with ground-and UAV-based imaging for national-level assessment of soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Gareth; James, Mike R.; Quinton, John; Anderson, Karen; DeBell, Leon; Evans, Martin; Farrow, Luke; Glendell, Miriam; Jones, Lee; Kirkham, Matthew; Lark, Murray; Rawlins, Barry; Rickson, Jane; Quine, Tim; Wetherelt, Andy; Brazier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    3D topographic or surface models are increasingly being utilised for a wide range of applications and are established tools in geomorphological research. In this pilot study 'a cost effective framework for monitoring soil erosion in England and Wales', funded by the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), we compare methods of collecting topographic measurements via remote sensing for detailed studies of dynamic processes such as erosion and mass movement. The techniques assessed are terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photography and ground-based photography, processed using structure-from-motion (SfM) 3D reconstruction software. The methods will be applied in regions of different land use, including arable and horticultural, upland and semi natural habitats, and grassland, to quantify visible erosion pathways at the site scale. Volumetric estimates of soil loss will be quantified using the digital surface models (DSMs) provided by each technique and a modelled pre-erosion surface. Visible erosion and severity will be independently established through each technique, with their results compared and combined effectiveness assessed. A fixed delta-wing UAV (QuestUAV, http://www.questuav.com/) captures photos from a range of altitudes and angles over the study area, with automated SfM-based processing enabling rapid orthophoto production to support ground-based data acquisition. At sites with suitable scale erosion features, UAV data will also provide a DSM for volume loss measurement. Terrestrial laser scanning will provide detailed, accurate, high density measurements of the ground surface over long (100s m) distances. Ground-based photography is anticipated to be most useful for characterising small and difficult to view features. By using a consumer-grade digital camera and an SfM-based approach (using Agisoft Photoscan version 1.0.0, http://www.agisoft.ru/products/photoscan/), less expertise and fewer control

  2. Combining Geoelectrical Measurements and CO2 Analyses to Monitor the Enhanced Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils: A Field Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers can be successfully remediated through enhanced biodegradation. However, in situ monitoring of the treatment by piezometers is expensive and invasive and might be insufficient as the information provided is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations. An alternative method was tested in order to improve the robustness of the monitoring. Geophysical methods, electrical resistivity (ER and induced polarization (IP, were combined with gas analyses, CO2 concentration, and its carbon isotopic ratio, to develop a less invasive methodology for monitoring enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The field implementation of this monitoring methodology, which lasted from February 2014 until June 2015, was carried out at a BTEX-polluted site under aerobic biotreatment. Geophysical monitoring shows a more conductive and chargeable area which corresponds to the contaminated zone. In this area, high CO2 emissions have been measured with an isotopic signature demonstrating that the main source of CO2 on this site is the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels. Besides, the evolution of geochemical and geophysical data over a year seems to show the seasonal variation of bacterial activity. Combining geophysics with gas analyses is thus promising to provide a new methodology for in situ monitoring.

  3. Combined quantification of faecal sterols, stanols, stanones and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Jago Jonathan; Dippold, Michaela; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Glaser, Bruno

    2012-06-15

    in combination with and without saponification of the TLE showed that high amounts of faecal biomarkers occur bound to other lipids and were liberated by saponification. The method was evaluated by standard addition. The standard contained 5β-stanols, 5β-stanones and their 5α-isomers together with Δ(5)-sterols and bile acids (19 substances). The standard addition revealed mean recoveries of individual substances ≥85%. The recoveries of biomarkers within each biomarker group did not differ significantly. Precisions were ≤0.22 (RSD) and quantification limits were between 1.3 and 10 ng g(-1) soil. These data showed that the method can be applied for quantification of trace amounts of faecal steroids and for the analyses of steroid patterns to detect enhanced faeces deposition in soils and sediments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Daniel P., E-mail: daniel.cassidy@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Srivastava, Vipul J., E-mail: vipul.srivastava@ch2m.com [CH2M HILL, 125S Wacker, Ste 3000, Chicago, IL 60606 (United States); Dombrowski, Frank J., E-mail: frank.dombrowski@we-energies.com [We Energies, 333W Everett St., A231, Milwaukee, WI 53203 (United States); Lingle, James W., E-mail: jlingle@epri.com [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 4927W Willow Road, Brown Deer, WI 53223 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks.

  5. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, Daniel P.; Srivastava, Vipul J.; Dombrowski, Frank J.; Lingle, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks

  6. Découverte et signification d'une paragenèse à ilménite zincifère dans les métapélites des Jebilet centrales (Maroc)Occurrence and significance of zincian ilmenite in low-pressure metapelites from central Jebilet (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaifi, Abderrahim; Ballèvre, Michel; Marignac, Christian; Capdevila, Ramon

    2001-10-01

    A zincian ilmenite paragenesis is found in metapelites from a contact metamorphic zone (central Jebilet, Morocco) induced by the emplacement of microgranitic intrusions. The zincian ilmenite is mainly preserved in syntectonic andalusite porphyroblasts. The growth of zincian ilmenite is related either to sphalerite breakdown during prograde metamorphism, or to the pervasive flow of a mineralizing fluid within the metapelites. The chlorine-rich fluid carried zinc and other metals leached in the microgranites, during its flow to discharge zones which were probably the Jebilet sulfide deposits.

  7. The Distribution of Titanium in Lunar Soils on the Basis of Sensor and In Situ Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Evans, L.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of remote-sensing measurements have been used to map the distribution of elements on the Moon as a means of providing constraints on the processes from which its crust and major terranes originated. Discussed here is Ti, which is incorporated into refractory minerals such as ilmenite during the latter stages of differentiation, and is thus a most useful element for understanding mare basalt petrogenesis. One of the earliest Ti maps showed Ti variations in nearside maria on the basis of groundbased spectral reflectance measurements. A map of Ti derived from gamma-ray measurements on Apollo 15 and 16 was produced at about the same time, and was improved upon considerably by Davis and coworkers, who effectively removed sources of spurious variation from Fe and Al or REE (e.g., Th) interference, and calibrated Ti on the bases of landing-site soil averages. In recent years, spectral reflectance measurements from Clementine have been used by Lucey and coworkers to produce global Ti distribution maps as well. As we indicated previously, the Lucey and Davis maps agree to first order. Meanwhile, we are using the concept of sensor data fusion to combine measurements from the AGR (Apollo gamma-ray) and CSR (Clementine Spectral Reflectance) techniques with ground truth from lunar soils to utilize the differences between the two maps to understand the distribution of Ti within lunar soil components, as we have done with Fe. This technique should be verified and applied on Lunar Prospector gamma-ray measurements of Ti, as the calibrated data become available within the next couple of years. Lunar Ti is found principally in the mineral ilmenite, and is associated with certain components of lunar soil: crystalline Ilmenite mineral fragments and high Ti-bearing glass. All data indicate that Ti is associated with maria and mafic minerals. In AGR and CSR datasets, Ti is highest on the nearside and in the maria, particularly in southern Serenitatis/northern Tranquillitatis

  8. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macro-porosity by combining laboratory measurements and X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    -porosity (R2 = 0.80 for air permeability: R2= 0.61 for 5% arrival time) and macro-porosity of the restricting layer (R2=0.83 for air permeability: R2= 0.71 for 5% arrival time) over air-filled porosity and all the correlations were positive. The high positive correlation these air and water transport...... functions with macro-porosity stressed the importance of continuity and tortuosity of pores in air, water and solute flow and transport through the soils. Negative correlations of air permeability, 5% arrival time of tracer and macro-porosity were obtained with bulk density whereas with other soil physical......With an objective to link the hydraulic properties of soil with the soil structural properties, air permeability and 5% arrival time of a conservative tracer was measured for large undisturbed soil columns from the same agricultural field. The same soil columns were scanned with a medical scanner...

  9. Growth and cesium uptake responses of Phytolacca americana Linn. and Amaranthus cruentus L. grown on cesium contaminated soil to elevated CO2 or inoculation with a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54, or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shirong; Liao, Shangqiang; Guo, Junkang; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Ruigang; Zhou, Xiaomin

    2011-12-30

    Growth and cesium uptake responses of plants to elevated CO(2) and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, can be explored for clean-up of contaminated soils, and this induced phytoextraction may be better than the natural process. The present study used open-top chambers to investigate combined effects of Burkholderia sp. D54 inoculation and elevated CO(2) (860 μL L(-1)) on growth and Cs uptake by Phytolacca americana and Amaranthus cruentus grown on soil spiked with various levels of Cs (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Elevated CO(2) and bacterial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomass production with increased magnitude, ranging from 22% to 139% for P. americana, and 14% to 254% for A. cruentus. Total tissue Cs in both plants was significantly greater for bacterial inoculation treatment singly, and combined treatments of bacterial inoculation and elevated CO(2) than for the control treatment in most cases. Regardless of CO(2) concentrations and bacterial inoculation, A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana, but they had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that combined effects of elevated CO(2) and microbial inoculation with regard to plant ability to grow and remove radionuclides from soil can be explored for CO(2)- and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined Study of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Transport and Toxicity on Microbial Nitrifying Communities under Single and Repeated Exposures in Soil Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Martins, Jean M F; Uzu, Gaëlle; Vince, Erwann; Richaume, Agnès

    2016-10-04

    Soils are exposed to nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of their increasing use in many commercial products. Adverse effects of NPs on soil microorganisms have been reported in several ecotoxicological studies using microcosms. Although repeated exposures are more likely to occur in soils, most of these previous studies were performed as a single exposure to NPs. Contrary to single contamination, the study of multiple NP contaminations in soils requires the use of specialized setups. Using a soil column experiment, we compared the influence of single and repeated exposures (one, two, or three exposures that resulted in the same final concentration applied) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) NPs through soil and the effect of these different exposure scenarios on the abundance and activity of soil nitrifying microbial communities after a 2 month incubation. The transport of TiO 2 NPs was very limited under both single and repeated exposures and was highest for the lowest concentration injected during the first application. Significant decreases in nitrification activity and ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria populations were observed only for the repeated exposure scenario (three TiO 2 NP contaminations). These results suggest that, under repeated exposures, the transport of TiO 2 NPs to deep soil layers and groundwater is limited and that a chronic contamination is more harmful for the soil microbiological functioning than a single exposure.

  11. Independent and combined effects of soil warming and drought stress during anthesis on seed set and grain yield in two spring wheat varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldearegay, Dawit Fisseha; Yan, F.; Jiang, D.

    2012-01-01

    irrigation until all of the transpirable soil water had been depleted in the pots. Results showed that, particularly under D treatment, Alora depleted soil water faster than Trappe. In both varieties, flag leaf relative water content (RWC) was significantly lowered, while spikelet abscisic acid (ABA...

  12. Combined effects of antimony and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate on soil microbial activity and speciation change of heavy metals. Implications for contaminated lands hazardous material pollution in nonferrous metal mining areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaozhe; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Yuan, Zhimin; Liu, Jianli; Jordan, Gyozo; Knudsen, Tatjana Šolević; Avdalović, Jelena

    2018-05-05

    The combined effects of antimony (Sb) and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), a common organic flotation reagent, on soil microbial activity and speciation changes of heavy metals were investigated for the first time. The results showed that the exchangeable fraction of Sb was transformed to a stable residual fraction during the incubation period, and the addition of DDTC promoted the transformation compared with single Sb pollution, probably because DDTC can react with heavy metals to form a complex. In addition, the presence of DDTC and Sb inhibited the soil microbial activity to varying degrees. The growth rate constant k of different interaction systems was in the following order on the 28th day: control group ≥ single DDTC pollution > combined pollution > single Sb pollution. A correlation analysis showed that the concentration of exchangeable Sb was the primary factor that affected the toxic reaction under combined pollution conditions, and it significantly affected the characteristics of the soil microorganisms. All the observations provide useful information for a better understanding of the toxic effects and potential risks of combined Sb and DDTC pollution in antimony mining areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined use of GIS and environmental indicators for assessment of chemical, physical and biological soil degradation in a Spanish Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paz, José-Miguel; Sánchez, Juan; Visconti, Fernando

    2006-04-01

    Soil is one of the main non-renewable natural resources in the world. In the Valencian Community (Mediterranean coast of Spain), it is especially important because agriculture and forest biomass exploitation are two of the main economic activities in the region. More than 44% of the total area is under agriculture and 52% is forested. The frequently arid or semi-arid climate with rainfall concentrated in few events, usually in the autumn and spring, scarcity of vegetation cover, and eroded and shallow soils in several areas lead to soil degradation processes. These processes, mainly water erosion and salinization, can be intense in many locations within the Valencian Community. Evaluation of soil degradation on a regional scale is important because degradation is incompatible with sustainable development. Policy makers involved in land use planning require tools to evaluate soil degradation so they can go on to develop measures aimed at protecting and conserving soils. In this study, a methodology to evaluate physical, chemical and biological soil degradation in a GIS-based approach was developed for the Valencian Community on a 1/200,000 scale. The information used in this study was obtained from two different sources: (i) a soil survey with more than 850 soil profiles sampled within the Valencian Community, and (ii) the environmental information implemented in the Geo-scientific map of the Valencian Community digitised on an Arc/Info GIS. Maps of physical, chemical and biological soil degradation in the Valencian Community on a 1/200,000 scale were obtained using the methodology devised. These maps can be used to make a cost-effective evaluation of soil degradation on a regional scale. Around 29% of the area corresponding to the Valencian Community is affected by high to very high physical soil degradation, 36% by high to very high biological degradation, and 6% by high to very high chemical degradation. It is, therefore, necessary to draw up legislation and to

  14. Removal of micropollutants, facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria in a full-scale retention soil filter receiving combined sewer overflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Heß, Stefanie; Lüddeke, Frauke; Sacher, Frank; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Combined sewer systems collect surface runoff as well as wastewater of industrial and domestic origin. During periods of heavy rainfall the capacity of the sewer system is exceeded and the overflow is discharged into receiving waters without any treatment. Consequently, combined sewer overflow (CSO) is considered as a major source of water pollution. This study investigates the effectiveness of a retention soil filter (RSF) for the removal of micropollutants as well as facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria from CSO. The removal of organic group parameters like total organic carbon was excellent and the removal efficiency for micropollutants of the RSF and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which treats wastewater of the same origin during dry and normal weather conditions, was comparable. Compounds of high environmental concern like estrogens or certain pharmaceuticals, e.g. diclofenac, were completely eliminated or removed to a high degree during RSF passage. RSF treatment also reduced the number of E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci by 2.7, 2.2 and 2.4 log-units (median values), respectively. Obviously, some Staphylococcus species can better adapt to the conditions of the RSF than others as a shift of the abundance of the different species was observed when comparing the diversity of staphylococci obtained from the RSF influent and effluent. RSF treatment also decreased the absolute number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The percentage of antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci isolates also decreased during passage of the RSF, whereas the percentage of resistant enterococci did not change. For E. coli ampicillin and for enterococci and staphylococci erythromycin determined the antibiotic resistance level. The results demonstrate that RSFs can be considered as an adequate treatment option for CSO. The performance for the removal of micropollutants is comparable with a medium sized WWTP with conventional activated sludge

  15. Growth and cesium uptake responses of Phytolacca americana Linn. and Amaranthus cruentus L. grown on cesium contaminated soil to elevated CO2 or inoculation with a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54, or in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Shirong; Liao, Shangqiang; Guo, Junkang; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Ruigang; Zhou, Xiaomin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Elevated CO 2 and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly promoted growth of P. americana, and A. cruentus. ► Total tissue Cs in plants was significantly increased. ► A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana. ► The two plants had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. ► Combined effects of elevated CO 2 and microbial inoculation can be explored for CO 2 - and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology. - Abstract: Growth and cesium uptake responses of plants to elevated CO 2 and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, can be explored for clean-up of contaminated soils, and this induced phytoextraction may be better than the natural process. The present study used open-top chambers to investigate combined effects of Burkholderia sp. D54 inoculation and elevated CO 2 (860 μL L −1 ) on growth and Cs uptake by Phytolacca americana and Amaranthus cruentus grown on soil spiked with various levels of Cs (0–1000 mg kg −1 ). Elevated CO 2 and bacterial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomass production with increased magnitude, ranging from 22% to 139% for P. americana, and 14% to 254% for A. cruentus. Total tissue Cs in both plants was significantly greater for bacterial inoculation treatment singly, and combined treatments of bacterial inoculation and elevated CO 2 than for the control treatment in most cases. Regardless of CO 2 concentrations and bacterial inoculation, A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana, but they had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that combined effects of elevated CO 2 and microbial inoculation with regard to plant ability to grow and remove radionuclides from soil can be explored for CO 2 - and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology.

  16. Predicting Key Agronomic Soil Properties with UV-Vis Fluorescence Measurements Combined with Vis-NIR-SWIR Reflectance Spectroscopy: A Farm-Scale Study in a Mediterranean Viticultural Agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Cerovic, Zoran G; Ebengo, Dav M; Latouche, Gwendal

    2018-04-10

    For adequate crop and soil management, rapid and accurate techniques for monitoring soil properties are particularly important when a farmer starts up his activities and needs a diagnosis of his cultivated fields. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of fluorescence measured directly on 146 whole soil solid samples, for predicting key soil properties at the scale of a 6 ha Mediterranean wine estate with contrasting soils. UV-Vis fluorescence measurements were carried out in conjunction with reflectance measurements in the Vis-NIR-SWIR range. Combining PLSR predictions from Vis-NIR-SWIR reflectance spectra and from a set of fluorescence signals enabled us to improve the power of prediction of a number of key agronomic soil properties including SOC, N tot , CaCO₃, iron, fine particle-sizes (clay, fine silt, fine sand), CEC, pH and exchangeable Ca 2+ with cross-validation RPD ≥ 2 and R² ≥ 0.75, while exchangeable K⁺, Na⁺, Mg 2+ , coarse silt and coarse sand contents were fairly predicted (1.42 ≤ RPD < 2 and 0.54 ≤ R² < 0.75). Predictions of SOC, N tot , CaCO₃, iron contents, and pH were still good (RPD ≥ 1.8, R² ≥ 0.68) when using a single fluorescence signal or index such as SFR_R or FERARI, highlighting the unexpected importance of red excitations and indices derived from plant studies. The predictive ability of single fluorescence indices or original signals was very significant for topsoil: this is very important for a farmer who wishes to update information on soil nutrient for the purpose of fertility diagnosis and particularly nitrogen fertilization. These results open encouraging perspectives for using miniaturized fluorescence devices enabling red excitation coupled with red or far-red fluorescence emissions directly in the field.

  17. Predicting Key Agronomic Soil Properties with UV-Vis Fluorescence Measurements Combined with Vis-NIR-SWIR Reflectance Spectroscopy: A Farm-Scale Study in a Mediterranean Viticultural Agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Vaudour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available For adequate crop and soil management, rapid and accurate techniques for monitoring soil properties are particularly important when a farmer starts up his activities and needs a diagnosis of his cultivated fields. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of fluorescence measured directly on 146 whole soil solid samples, for predicting key soil properties at the scale of a 6 ha Mediterranean wine estate with contrasting soils. UV-Vis fluorescence measurements were carried out in conjunction with reflectance measurements in the Vis-NIR-SWIR range. Combining PLSR predictions from Vis-NIR-SWIR reflectance spectra and from a set of fluorescence signals enabled us to improve the power of prediction of a number of key agronomic soil properties including SOC, Ntot, CaCO3, iron, fine particle-sizes (clay, fine silt, fine sand, CEC, pH and exchangeable Ca2+ with cross-validation RPD ≥ 2 and R² ≥ 0.75, while exchangeable K+, Na+, Mg2+, coarse silt and coarse sand contents were fairly predicted (1.42 ≤ RPD < 2 and 0.54 ≤ R² < 0.75. Predictions of SOC, Ntot, CaCO3, iron contents, and pH were still good (RPD ≥ 1.8, R² ≥ 0.68 when using a single fluorescence signal or index such as SFR_R or FERARI, highlighting the unexpected importance of red excitations and indices derived from plant studies. The predictive ability of single fluorescence indices or original signals was very significant for topsoil: this is very important for a farmer who wishes to update information on soil nutrient for the purpose of fertility diagnosis and particularly nitrogen fertilization. These results open encouraging perspectives for using miniaturized fluorescence devices enabling red excitation coupled with red or far-red fluorescence emissions directly in the field.

  18. Thermal and Hydrologic Signatures of Soil Controls on Evaporation: A Combined Energy and Water Balance Approach with Implications for Remote Sensing of Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Guido D.

    2000-01-01

    The overall goal of this research is to examine the feasibility of applying a newly developed diagnostic model of soil water evaporation to large land areas using remotely sensed input parameters. The model estimates the rate of soil evaporation during periods when it is limited by the net transport resulting from competing effects of capillary rise and drainage. The critical soil hydraulic properties are implicitly estimated via the intensity and duration of the first stage (energy limited) evaporation, removing a major obstacle in the remote estimation of evaporation over large areas. This duration, or 'time to drying' (t(sub d)) is revealed through three signatures detectable in time series of remote sensing variables. The first is a break in soil albedo that occurs as a small vapor transmission zone develops near the surface. The second is a break in either surface to air temperature differences or in the diurnal surface temperature range, both of which indicate increased sensible heat flux (and/or storage) required to balance the decrease in latent heat flux. The third is a break in the temporal pattern of near surface soil moisture. Soil moisture tends to decrease rapidly during stage I drying (as water is removed from storage), and then become more or less constant during soil limited, or 'stage II' drying (as water is merely transmitted from deeper soil storage). The research tasks address: (1) improvements in model structure, including extensions to transpiration and aggregation over spatially variable soil and topographic landscape attributes; and (2) applications of the model using remotely sensed input parameters.

  19. Soil conditions under a Fagus sylvatica CONECOFOR stand in Central Italy: an integrated assessment through combined solid phase and solution studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido SANESI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available As soil solution represents the major phase of soil chemical reactions, its study is a powerful tool for ecological investigations. Soil solution chemical composition gives a realistic idea about the soil chemical components immediately available in the environment, mainly in relation to the soil ecosystem reaction to the disturbance due to acidifying loads. Within the CONECOFOR Program, the monitoring of forest soil conditions was performed in a level II plot (ABR I, under a Fagus sylvatica (European beech stand, through the study of throughfall and soil solutions collected from depths ranging between the base of the litter layers and 90 cm. To be able to investigate solution contents of nutrients, acidifying agents and DOC throughout the profile, both zero tension and tension lysimeters were used. The first ones were inserted below the organic horizons, while tension lysimeters were placed within the mineral horizons at 15, 25, 55 and 90 cm depth. Sampled solutions were analyzed for Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4, Cl, F, NO3, SO4, and DOC. The results evidence a clear seasonal pattern, mainly for macronutrients and inorganic N components. Acidic pulses were mostly evident below the organic horizons, in relation to strong nitric N releases from litter; these last were not always immediately neutralized by basic cations. Acid solutions leaving the organic horizons were invariably neutralized in the surface mineral horizons, within 15 cm depth. Temporal patterns of sulphate retention and release suggest that the soil has low retention capability for this anion. Such behaviour can be explained by the composition of the solid phase, where potential anion adsorbants appear strongly linked with organic matter in long residence time complexes. Sulphate and nitrate loading of this soil appear, anyway, to be mostly non-anthropogenic, but rather linked to natural mineralization pulses and, for sulphate, to aeolian solid transport from the south.

  20. Modeling of flow and mass transport processes in unsaturated soils in combination with technical facilities; Modellierung von Stroemungs- und Stofftransportprozessen bei Kombination der ungesaettigten Bodenzone mit technischen Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Issa

    2014-07-01

    The modelling of complex systems such as the underground is a means to describe the processes occurring in the reality. The conducting of experiments on a model to obtain qualitative evidence about a real system is referred to as a simulation. Thereby, various models (e.g. physical and mathematical models) can be used. The unsaturated zone (vadose zone) is the region between the land surface and the water table, in which the water content is less than full saturation, and the pressure is lower than the atmospheric pressure. The unsaturated zone is very significant for agriculture, geobiology, aerobic degradation processes and groundwater recharge. The processes of water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone can be described by means of numerical simulation programs. The aim of the present work is a comprehensive validation of the simulation program PCSiWaPro {sup registered} (developed at the TU-Dresden, Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment) for different applications. Another aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the current version of PCSiWaPro {sup registered} for different cases of a combination between the unsaturated zone and technical facilities. Four application cases with different objectives were investigated within the present work, which are: the simulation of decentralized wastewater infiltration with corresponding column and field experiments, the computation of groundwater recharge by means of lysimeters, the water balance of earth dams and the modelling of landfill covering systems. The application cases differ from each other by the objective of the simulation, the geometry, the size, the specified initial and boundary conditions, the simulation time, the applied materials, the coordinate system, the input and output data. The simulation results clearly showed that PCSiWaPro {sup registered} is applicable for all investigated cases under consideration of different flow and solute transport

  1. Combining Old and New Stable Isotope Techniques to Evaluate the Impact of Conservation Tillage on Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics and Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Clercq, T.; Xu, H.; Mercklx, R.; Heiling, M.; Dercon, G.; Resch, C.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a major carbon pool. It is a crucial factor for soil quality including several soil physical properties and a major nutrient source for crops. It also plays a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Soils can act as a carbon sink or source depending on land use and agricultural management practices. Some practices such as conservation tillage or no-tillage could increase SOM stocks, particularly in the topsoil, but in the long term it remains to be seen if and how this SOM is stabilized (De Clercq et al., 2015; Govaerts et al., 2009). In order to evaluate the sustainability and efficiency of soil carbon sequestration measures and the impact of different management and environmental factors, information on SOM stability and mean residence time (MRT) is required. However, this information on SOM stability and MRT is expensive to determine via radiocarbon dating, precluding a wide spread use of stability measurements in soil science. But alternative methods based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, can provide this information at a fraction of the cost

  2. Combined effects of climate, restoration measures and slope position in change in soil chemical properties and nutrient loss across lands affected by the Wenchuan Earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongming; Deng, Haojun; Du, Kun; Rafay, Loretta; Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Li, Jian; Chen, Can; Wu, Chengzhen; Lin, Han; Yu, Wei; Fan, Hailan; Ge, Yonggang

    2017-10-15

    The MS 8.0Wenchuan Earthquake in 2008 caused huge damage to land cover in the northwest of China's Sichuan province. In order to determine the nutrient loss and short term characteristics of change in soil chemical properties, we established an experiment with three treatments ('undestroyed', 'destroyed and treated', and 'destroyed and untreated'), two climate types (semi-arid hot climate and subtropical monsoon climate), and three slope positions (upslope, mid-slope, and bottom-slope) in 2011. Ten soil properties-including pH, organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium-were measured in surface soil samples in December 2014. Analyses were performed to compare the characteristics of 3-year change in soil chemical properties in two climate zones. This study revealed that soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, Ca 2+ content, alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium were significantly higher in subtropical monsoon climate zones than in semi-arid hot climate zones. However, subtropical monsoon climate zones had a higher decrease in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, and alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen in 'destroyed and untreated' sites than in semi-arid hot climate zones. Most soil chemical properties exhibited significant interactions, indicating that they may degrade or develop concomitantly. 'Destroyed and treated' sites in both climate types had lower C:P and N:P ratios than 'destroyed and untreated' sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the first, second, and third principal components explained 76.53% of the variation and might be interpreted as structural integrity, nutrient supply availability, and efficiency of soil; the difference of soil parent material; as well as weathering and leaching effects. Our study indicated that the characteristics of short term

  3. Climate protection, natural resources management and soil improvement by combined Energetic and Material Utilization of lignocellulosic agricultural WAstes and residues (CEMUWA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuech, Andrea; Nelles, Michael; Tscherpel, Burckhard; El Behery, Ahmed; Menanz, Rania; Bahl, Hubert; Scheel, Michael; Nipkow, Mareen

    2015-01-01

    The project Climate protection, natural resources management and soil improvement by combined Energetic and Material Utilization of lignocellulosic agricultural WAstes and residues (CEMUWA) was implemented with long-term partners from Egypt and Germany leaded by the Department Waste Management and Material Flow from September 2011 until October 2013. Aim of the project was the development of technologies for the utilization of agricultural wastes and residues at the example of rice straw, with the focus on the energetic and material use. In the long term a contribution to climate protection and natural resource management could be reached. The focus was on investigations in the field of biogas, ethanol and butanol production including pretreatment as well as the material use in horticulture. The results show that the biogas and ethanol production with adapted pretreatments of rice straws is possible. The technical adaptation of a biogas plant (eo-digestion) would be associated with about 20% higher investment costs and higher operating costs with an approximately 15% higher energy demand. In Germany, however, this may still economically by the substitution of expensive or difficult available energy crops (reduction of substrate costs by 30 to 35% for a 600 kWel-BGP using maize silage). The investigated solutions for material use in Egypt showed good results, which in some cases exceeded the expectations. By the use of rice straw imported peat substrates could be substitute or irrigation water saved, what is ecologically and economically useful. The production of ethanol from rice straw was implemented on laboratory scale and preconditions for investigations in semi-industrial and partly pilot scale were created. The bilateral project'' was funded in the framework of the German-Egypt-Research-Fond (GERF) by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the Egyptian Science and Technology Development Fund in Egypt (STDF). The total budget

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Drug Interaction Study of Two Lead Combinations, Oxantel Pamoate plus Albendazole and Albendazole plus Mebendazole, for the Treatment of Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Noemi; Vargas, Mireille; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    The current treatments against Trichuris trichiura, albendazole and mebendazole, are only poorly efficacious. Therefore, combination chemotherapy was recommended for treating soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Albendazole-mebendazole and albendazole-oxantel pamoate have shown promising results in clinical trials. However, in vitro and in vivo drug interaction studies should be performed before their simultaneous treatment can be recommended. Inhibition of human recombinant cytochromes P450 (CYPs) CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 was tested by exposure to albendazole, albendazole sulfoxide, mebendazole, and oxantel pamoate, as well as albendazole-mebendazole, albendazole sulfoxide-mebendazole, albendazole-oxantel pamoate, and albendazole sulfoxide-oxantel pamoate. A high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV/visible spectroscopy method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of albendazole sulfoxide, albendazole sulfone, mebendazole, and oxantel pamoate in plasma. Albendazole, mebendazole, oxantel pamoate, albendazole-mebendazole, and albendazole-oxantel pamoate were orally applied to rats (100 mg/kg) and pharmacokinetic parameters calculated. CYP1A2 showed a 2.6-fold increased inhibition by albendazole-oxantel pamoate (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 3.1 μM) and a 3.9-fold increased inhibition by albendazole sulfoxide-mebendazole (IC50 = 3.8 μM) compared to the single drugs. In rats, mebendazole's area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) were augmented 3.5- and 2.8-fold, respectively (P = 0.02 for both) when coadministered with albendazole compared to mebendazole alone. Albendazole sulfone was slightly affected by albendazole-mebendazole, displaying a 1.3-fold-elevated AUC compared to albendazole alone. Oxantel pamoate could not be quantified, translating to a bioavailability below 0.025% in rats. Elevated plasma levels of albendazole sulfoxide, albendazole sulfone, and mebendazole

  5. Comparison of in situ DGT measurement with ex situ methods for predicting cadmium bioavailability in soils with combined pollution to biotas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peifang; Liu, Cui; Yao, Yu; Wang, Chao; Wang, Teng; Yuan, Ye; Hou, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To assess the capabilities of the different techniques in predicting Cadmium (Cd) bioavailability in Cd-contaminated soils with the addition of Zn, one in situ technique (diffusive gradients in thin films; DGT) was compared with soil solution concentration and four widely used single-step extraction methods (acetic acid, EDTA, sodium acetate and CaCl 2 ). Wheat and maize were selected as tested species. The results demonstrated that single Cd-polluted soils inhibited the growth of wheat and maize significantly compared with control plants; the shoot and root biomasses of the plants both dropped significantly (P 0.9) between Cd concentrations in two plants and Cd bioavailability indicated by each method in soils. Consequently, the results indicated that the DGT technique could be regarded as a good predictor of Cd bioavailability to plants, comparable to soil solution concentration and the four single-step extraction methods. Because the DGT technique can offer in situ data, it is expected to be widely used in more areas.

  6. Combining an experimental study and ANFIS modeling to predict landfill leachate transport in underlying soil-a case study in north of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi Kebria, D; Ghavami, M; Javadi, S; Goharimanesh, M

    2017-12-16

    In the contemporary world, urbanization and progressive industrial activities increase the rate of waste material generated in many developed countries. Municipal solid waste landfills (MSWs) are designed to dispose the waste from urban areas. However, discharged landfill leachate, the soluble water mixture that filters through solid waste landfills, can potentially migrate into the soil and affect living organisms by making harmful biological changes in the ecosystem. Due to well-documented landfill problems involving contamination, it is necessary to investigate the long-term influence of discharged leachate on the consistency of the soil beds beneath MSW landfills. To do so, the current study collected vertical deep core samples from different locations in the same unlined landfill. The impacts of effluent leachate on physical and chemical properties of the soil and its propagation depth were studied, and the leachate-transport pattern between successive boreholes was predicted by a developed mathematical model using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The decomposition of organic leachate admixtures in the landfill yield is to produce organic acids as well as carbon dioxide, which diminishes the pH level of the landfill soil. The chemical analysis of discharged leachate in the soil samples showed that the concentrations of heavy metals are much lower than those of chloride, COD, BOD 5 , and bicarbonate. Using linear regression and mean square errors between the measured and predicted data, the accuracy of the proposed ANFIS model has been validated. Results show a high correlation between observed and predicated data.

  7. Preparation of calibration materials for microanalysis of Ti minerals by direct fusion of synthetic and natural materials: experience with LA-ICP-MS analysis of some important minor and trace elements in ilmenite and rutile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegård, M; Mansfeld, J; Dundas, S H

    2001-08-01

    Calibration materials for microanalysis of Ti minerals have been prepared by direct fusion of synthetic and natural materials by resistance heating in high-purity graphite electrodes. Synthetic materials were FeTiO3 and TiO2 reagents doped with minor and trace elements; CRMs for ilmenite, rutile, and a Ti-rich magnetite were used as natural materials. Problems occurred during fusion of Fe2O3-rich materials, because at atmospheric pressure Fe2O3 decomposes into Fe3O4 and O2 at 1462 degrees C. An alternative fusion technique under pressure was tested, but the resulting materials were characterized by extensive segregation and development of separate phases. Fe2O3-rich materials were therefore fused below this temperature, resulting in a form of sintering, without conversion of the materials into amorphous glasses. The fused materials were studied by optical microscopy and EPMA, and tested as calibration materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, equipped with laser ablation for sample introduction (LA-ICP-MS). It was demonstrated that calibration curves based on materials of rutile composition, within normal analytical uncertainty, generally coincide with calibration curves based on materials of ilmenite composition. It is, therefore, concluded that LA-ICP-MS analysis of Ti minerals can with advantage be based exclusively on calibration materials prepared for rutile, thereby avoiding the special fusion problems related to oxide mixtures of ilmenite composition. It is documented that sintered materials were in good overall agreement with homogeneous glass materials, an observation that indicates that in other situations also sintered mineral concentrates might be a useful alternative for instrument calibration, e.g. as alternative to pressed powders.

  8. Determination of Zinc, Cadmium and Lead Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils at the Single-Cell Level by a Combination of Whole-Cell Biosensors and Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Hurdebise

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc, lead and cadmium are metallic trace elements (MTEs that are widespread in the environment and tend to accumulate in soils because of their low mobility and non-degradability. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the applicability of biosensors as tools able to provide data about the bioavailability of such MTEs in contaminated soils. Here, we tested the genetically-engineered strain Escherichia coli pPZntAgfp as a biosensor applicable to the detection of zinc, lead and cadmium by the biosynthesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP accumulating inside the cells. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the fluorescence induced by the MTEs. A curvilinear response to zinc between 0 and 25 mg/L and another curvilinear response to cadmium between 0 and 1.5 mg/L were highlighted in liquid media, while lead did not produce exploitable results. The response relating to a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 was further investigated. In these conditions, E. coli pPZntAgfp responded to cadmium only. Several contaminated soils with a Zn2+/Cd2+ ratio of 10 were analyzed with the biosensor, and the metallic concentrations were also measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that E. coli pPZntAgfp could be used as a monitoring tool for contaminated soils being processed.

  9. iSOIL: Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike; Sauer, Uta

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution soil property maps are one major prerequisite for the specific protection of soil functions and restoration of degraded soils as well as sustainable land use, water and environmental management. To generate such maps the combination of digital soil mapping approaches and remote as well as proximal soil sensing techniques is most promising. However, a feasible and reliable combination of these technologies for the investigation of large areas (e.g. catchments and landscapes) and the assessment of soil degradation threats is missing. Furthermore, there is insufficient dissemination of knowledge on digital soil mapping and proximal soil sensing in the scientific community, to relevant authorities as well as prospective users. As one consequence there is inadequate standardization of techniques. At the poster we present the EU collaborative project iSOIL within the 7th framework program of the European Commission. iSOIL focuses on improving fast and reliable mapping methods of soil properties, soil functions and soil degradation risks. This requires the improvement and integration of advanced soil sampling approaches, geophysical and spectroscopic measuring techniques, as well as pedometric and pedophysical approaches. The focus of the iSOIL project is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high resolution soil property maps. At the same time the developments will reduce costs compared to traditional soil mapping. ISOIL tackles the challenges by the integration of three major components: (i)high resolution, non-destructive geophysical (e.g. Electromagnetic Induction EMI; Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR; magnetics, seismics) and spectroscopic (e.g., Near Surface Infrared, NIR) methods, (ii)Concepts of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) and pedometrics as well as (iii)optimized soil sampling with respect to profound soil scientific and (geo)statistical strategies. A special focus of iSOIL lies on the

  10. Growth and cesium uptake responses of Phytolacca americana Linn. and Amaranthus cruentus L. grown on cesium contaminated soil to elevated CO{sub 2} or inoculation with a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54, or in combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shirong, E-mail: tangshir@hotmail.com [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Key Laboratory of Production Environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Liao, Shangqiang; Guo, Junkang; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Ruigang [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Key Laboratory of Production Environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Zhou, Xiaomin [Plant Science Department, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9 (Canada)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly promoted growth of P. americana, and A. cruentus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total tissue Cs in plants was significantly increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two plants had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation can be explored for CO{sub 2}- and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology. - Abstract: Growth and cesium uptake responses of plants to elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, can be explored for clean-up of contaminated soils, and this induced phytoextraction may be better than the natural process. The present study used open-top chambers to investigate combined effects of Burkholderia sp. D54 inoculation and elevated CO{sub 2} (860 {mu}L L{sup -1}) on growth and Cs uptake by Phytolacca americana and Amaranthus cruentus grown on soil spiked with various levels of Cs (0-1000 mg kg{sup -1}). Elevated CO{sub 2} and bacterial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomass production with increased magnitude, ranging from 22% to 139% for P. americana, and 14% to 254% for A. cruentus. Total tissue Cs in both plants was significantly greater for bacterial inoculation treatment singly, and combined treatments of bacterial inoculation and elevated CO{sub 2} than for the control treatment in most cases. Regardless of CO{sub 2} concentrations and bacterial inoculation, A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana, but they had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation with

  11. Development and assessment of transparent soil and particle image velocimetry in dynamic soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    This research combines Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and transparent soil to investigate the dynamic rigid block and soil interaction. In order to get a low viscosity pore fluid for the transparent soil, 12 different types of chemical solvents wer...

  12. Soil heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherameti, Irena [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Pflanzenphysiologie; Varma, Ajit (eds.) [Amity Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India). Amity Inst. of Microbial Technology; Amity Science, Technology and Innovation Foundation, Noida, UP (India)

    2010-07-01

    Human activities have dramatically changed the composition and organisation of soils. Industrial and urban wastes, agricultural application and also mining activities resulted in an increased concentration of heavy metals in soils. How plants and soil microorganisms cope with this situation and the sophisticated techniques developed for survival in contaminated soils is discussed in this volume. The topics presented include: the general role of heavy metals in biological soil systems; the relation of inorganic and organic pollutions; heavy metal, salt tolerance and combined effects with salinity; effects on abuscular mycorrhizal and on saprophytic soil fungi; heavy metal resistance by streptomycetes; trace element determination of environmental samples; the use of microbiological communities as indicators; phytostabilization of lead polluted sites by native plants; effects of soil earthworms on removal of heavy metals and the remediation of heavy metal contaminated tropical land. (orig.)

  13. Field Application of Modified In Situ Soil Flushing in Combination with Air Sparging at a Military Site Polluted by Diesel and Gasoline in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan; Lee, Yoonjin; Kim, Jaeyoung; Kim, Choltae

    2014-01-01

    In this study the full-scale operation of soil flushing with air sparging to improve the removal efficiency of petroleum at depths of less than 7 m at a military site in Korea was evaluated. The target area was polluted by multiple gasoline and diesel fuel sources. The soil was composed of heterogeneous layers of granules, sand, silt and clay. The operation factors were systemically assessed using a column test and a pilot study before running the full-scale process at the site. The discharged TPH and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) concentrations in the water were highest at 20 min and at a rate of 350 L/min, which was selected as the volume of air for the full-scale operation in the pilot air sparging test. The surfactant-aid condition was 1.4 times more efficient than the non-surfactant condition in the serial operations of modified soil flushing followed by air sparging. The hydraulic conductivity (3.13 × 10−3 cm/s) increased 4.7 times after the serial operation of both processes relative to the existing condition (6.61 × 10−4 cm/s). The removal efficiencies of TPH were 52.8%, 57.4%, and 61.8% for the soil layers at 6 to 7, 7 to 8 and 8 to 9 m, respectively. Therefore, the TPH removal was improved at depth of less than 7 m by using this modified remediation system. The removal efficiencies for the areas with TPH and BTEX concentrations of more than 500 and 80 mg/kg, were 55.5% and 92.9%, respectively, at a pore volume of 2.9. The total TPH and BTEX mass removed during the full-scale operation was 5109 and 752 kg, respectively. PMID:25166919

  14. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Powder Diffraction for Cu (II speciation in soil and mineral phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Minkina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of Cu (II ions with the matrix of soil and mineral phases of layered silicates was assessed by the Miller method of selective sequential fractionation and a set of synchrotron X-ray methods, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES. It was shown that the input of Cu into Calcic Chernozem in the form of monoxide (CuO and salt (Cu(NO32 affected the transformation of Cu compounds and their affinity for metal-bearing phases. It was found that the contamination of soil with a soluble Cu(II salt increased the bioavailability of the metal and the role of organic matter and Fe oxides in the fixation and retention of Cu. During the incubation of soil with Cu monoxide, the content of the metal in the residual fractions increased, which was related to the possible entry of Cu in the form of isomorphic impurities into silicates, as well as to the incomplete dissolution of exogenic compounds at the high level of their input into the soil. A mechanism for the structural transformation of minerals was revealed, which showed that ion exchange processes result in the sorption of Cu (II ions from the saturated solution by active sites on the internal surface of the lattice of dioctahedral aluminosilicates. Surface hydroxyls at the octahedral aluminum atom play the main role. X-ray diagnostics revealed that excess Cu(II ions are removed from the system due to the formation and precipitation of coarsely crystalline Cu(NO3(OH3.

  15. Respiration intensiveness and inclusion of 32P in the composition of phosphorus-organic combinations in radiomutants of cotton plants and their initial forms under salinization of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirov, N.N.; Tashmatov, N.T.; Vakhabov, A.; Nabiev, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Salinization of soil affects respiration intensity, 32 P introduction into plants and its inclusion in the content of phosphoric organic compounds as well as their content in tissues of cotton plants. Respiration intensity increases: respiration intensity of weakly-stable plants increases to a greater degree. General character of changes caused by the salinization effect of different cotton sorts, is analogous, differences are only in the destruction degree [ru

  16. Combined effects of soil-applied and foliar-applied nitrogen on the nitrogen composition and distribution in water stressed "Vitis vinifera L." cv Sauvignon blanc grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Jreij

    2009-12-01

    Significance and impact of study: This work helps to provide insight into the effect of N soil fertilization along with foliar fertilization on waterstressed vines. This may be useful in fertilization programs in the Mediterranean area and may help to choose the type and the rate of the N fertilization in case of severe vine water deficit. Also, we provide information of utmost importance on the distribution of summer foliarapplied N in grape tissues.

  17. Digging up your dirt. High school students combine small-scale respiration and soil carbon measurements with satellite imagery in hands-on inquiry activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, K.; Throop, H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the greatest impacts on the global carbon cycle is changes in land use. Making this concept relevant and inquiry-based for high school students is challenging. Many are familiar with reconstructing paleo-climate from ice core data, but few have a connection to current climate research. Many students ask questions like 'What will our area be like in 20 years?' or 'How much does planting trees help?' while few have the scientific language to engage in a discussion to answer these questions. Our work connects students to climate change research in several ways: first, teacher Keska Kemper engaged in field research with Dr. Heather Throop creating a 'teacher in the field' perspective for students in the classroom. Dr. Throop met with Keska Kemper's students several times to develop an inquiry-based field study. Students predicted and then measured rates of respiration between different soil types in an urban park close to their school. Students then could compare their results from Portland, Oregon to Throop's work across a rain gradient in Australia. Discussions about percent tree cover and soil carbon helped students see connections between land use changes and changes in carbon cycling. Last, students examined satellite imagery to determine percent tree cover and numberss of trees to compare to soil carbon in the same region. Students were able to examine imagery over the last 30 years to visualize land use changes in the greater Portland area.

  18. Combining a finite mixture distribution model with indicator kriging to delineate and map the spatial patterns of soil heavy metal pollution in Chunghua County, central Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yupin; Cheng Baiyou; Shyu, G.-S.; Chang, T.-K.

    2010-01-01

    This study identifies the natural background, anthropogenic background and distribution of contamination caused by heavy metal pollutants in soil in Chunghua County of central Taiwan by using a finite mixture distribution model (FMDM). The probabilities of contaminated area distribution are mapped using single-variable indicator kriging and multiple-variable indicator kriging (MVIK) with the FMDM cut-off values and regulation thresholds for heavy metals. FMDM results indicate that Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn can be individually fitted by a mixture model representing the background and contamination distributions of the four metals in soil. The FMDM cut-off values for contamination caused by the metals are close to the regulation thresholds, except for the cut-off value of Zn. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve validates that indicator kriging and MVIK with FMDM cut-off values can reliably delineate heavy metals contamination, particularly for areas lacking background information and high heavy metal concentrations in soil. - Effectively determine pollution threshold and map contaminated areas.

  19. Ligandless surfactant mediated solid phase extraction combined with Fe₃O₄ nano-particle for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium and lead in water and soil samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: multivariate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, N; Soylak, M

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, a microextraction technique combining Fe3O4 nano-particle with surfactant mediated solid phase extraction ((SM-SPE)) was successfully developed for the preconcentration/separation of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. The analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effective variables such as the amount of adsorbent (NPs), the pH, concentration of non-ionic (TX-114) and centrifugation time (min) were investigated by Plackett-Burman (PBD) design. The important variables were further optimized by central composite design (CCD). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (LODs) of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 0.15 and 0.74 µg/L, respectively. The validation of the proposed procedure was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials of TMDA 53.3 fortified water and GBW07425 soil. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Michael C. Amacher

    2009-01-01

    Productive soils are the foundation of sustainable forests throughout the United States. Forest soils are generally subjected to fewer disturbances than agricultural soils, particularly those that are tilled, so forest soils tend to have better preserved A-horizons than agricultural soils. Another major contrast between forest and agricultural soils is the addition of...

  1. Soil and Soil Water Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Easton, Zachary M.; Bock, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Discusses the relationships between soil, water and plants. Discusses different types of soil, and how these soils hold water. Provides information about differences in soil drainage. Discusses the concept of water balance.

  2. Soil physical properties affecting soil erosion in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo Lujan, D.

    2004-01-01

    The total vegetated land area of the earth is about 11,500 hectare. Of this, about 12% is in South America. Of this, about 14% is degraded area. Water erosion, chemical degradation, wind erosion, and physical degradation have been reported as main types of degradation. In South America water erosion is a major process for soil degradation. Nevertheless, water erosion can be a consequence of degradation of the soil structure, especially the functional attributes of soil pores to transmit and retain water, and to facilitate root growth. Climate, soil and topographic characteristics determine runoff and erosion potential from agricultural lands. The main factors causing soil erosion can be divided into three groups: Energy factors: rainfall erosivity, runoff volume, wind strength, relief, slope angle, slope length; Protection factors: population density, plant cover, amenity value (pressure for use) and land management; and resistance factors: soil erodibility, infiltration capacity and soil management. The degree of soil erosion in a particular climatic zone, with particular soils, land use and socioeconomic conditions, will always result from a combination of the above mentioned factors. It is not easy to isolate a single factor. However, the soil physical properties that determine the soil erosion process, because the deterioration of soil physical properties is manifested through interrelated problems of surface sealing, crusting, soil compaction, poor drainage, impeded root growth, excessive runoff and accelerated erosion. When an unprotected soil surface is exposed to the direct impact of raindrops it can produce different responses: Production of smaller aggregates, dispersed particles, particles in suspension and translocation and deposition of particles. When this has occurred, the material is reorganized at the location into a surface seal. Aggregate breakdown under rainfall depends on soil strength and a certain threshold kinetic energy is needed to start

  3. Estimation of surface runoff for calculating recharge in the karstic massif of Ports of Beseit (Tarragona, Spain) combining water balance in the soil and analysis of flow hydrographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa Martinez, S.; Custodio, E.

    2016-07-01

    For the right estimation of aquifer recharge by precipitation surface taking into account runoff is particularly relevant. Non considering it in the estimation of the groundwater resources can overestimate them. In the Baix Ebre aquifer system, in southern Catalonia, the surface and vadose zone runoff produced in the karstified carbonate formations in the Ports de Beseit massif has to be evaluated in order to achieve a better estimation of the resources transferred from this massif to the Plana de La Galera plain. Starting from the conceptual hydrogeological model, the average annual runoff is estimated. It includes the discharge from temporal perched aquifers in the Ports de Beseit massif, in the Matarraña river basin, and in the SE watershed to the Plana de La Galera plain. This is performed by analyzing the river and tributaries hydrographs, the filling and emptying hydrographs of the Ulldecona reservoir, and the soil water balance using the Visual Balan code applied to obtain the runoff in the Ulldecona reservoir watershed. The runoff has been estimated about 105±20 mm·yr−1, which represents 20–30% of average annual recharge in the Ports, estimated with soil water balance and atmospheric chloride deposition balance, about 350–500 mm·yr−1, which is mostly transferred laterally to the Plana de La Galera plain. (Author)

  4. Estimation of surface runoff for calculating recharge in the karstic massif of Ports of Beseit (Tarragona, Spain) combining water balance in the soil and analysis of flow hydrographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa Martinez, S.; Custodio, E.

    2016-01-01

    For the right estimation of aquifer recharge by precipitation surface taking into account runoff is particularly relevant. Non considering it in the estimation of the groundwater resources can overestimate them. In the Baix Ebre aquifer system, in southern Catalonia, the surface and vadose zone runoff produced in the karstified carbonate formations in the Ports de Beseit massif has to be evaluated in order to achieve a better estimation of the resources transferred from this massif to the Plana de La Galera plain. Starting from the conceptual hydrogeological model, the average annual runoff is estimated. It includes the discharge from temporal perched aquifers in the Ports de Beseit massif, in the Matarraña river basin, and in the SE watershed to the Plana de La Galera plain. This is performed by analyzing the river and tributaries hydrographs, the filling and emptying hydrographs of the Ulldecona reservoir, and the soil water balance using the Visual Balan code applied to obtain the runoff in the Ulldecona reservoir watershed. The runoff has been estimated about 105±20 mm·yr−1, which represents 20–30% of average annual recharge in the Ports, estimated with soil water balance and atmospheric chloride deposition balance, about 350–500 mm·yr−1, which is mostly transferred laterally to the Plana de La Galera plain. (Author)

  5. Effects of Combined Application of Nitrogen and Potassiumon on Yield and Nutrient Accumulation of Wheat in Huaibei Lime Concretion Black Soil Area, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Zhi-meng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To provide theoretical and technical basis for the scientific application of nitrogen (N and potassium (K fertilizer in wheat cropping in Huaibei lime concretion black soil area, a field experiment was performed to study the effects of different N and K treatments (N:180, 240, 300, 360 kg·hm-2;K:90, 135, 180 kg·hm-2 on wheat yields, absorption of N and K, and fertilizer benefits. The results showed that: (1The wheat yield under application of N240K180 reached 7 686 kg·hm-2, which was significantly increased by 7.24% comparing with that under N180K90, and there was no significant differences between the yields under N240K180 and N360K180; (2Compared with the contents of N and K in wheat under N180K90, those under N240K180 were significantly increased by 14.67% and 29.53%, respectively; (3There was a positive interaction between the application of N and K fertilizer, and the interaction was significantly correlated with wheat yield at a contribution rate of 14.06%, which consequently increased the partial productivities of N and K fertilizer. Considering wheat yield and fertilizer benefit, the optimum application amounts of N and K2O fertilizer were 240 kg·hm-2和180 kg·hm-2 in Huaibei lime concretion black soil area.

  6. Environmental Fate of the Herbicide Fluazifop-P-butyl and Its Degradation Products in Two Loamy Agricultural Soils: A Combined Laboratory and Field Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Anette E.; Olsen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    The herbicide fluazifop-P-butyl (FPB) is used against grasses in agricultural crops such as potato, oilseed rape and sugar beet. Limited information is available in Scientific literature on its environmental fate, therefore extensive monitoring at two agricultural test fields was combined...

  7. Steam and electroheating remediation of tight soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balshaw-Biddle, K.; Oubre, C.L.; Ward, C.H. [eds.; Dablow, J.F. III; Pearce, J.A.; Johnson, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    In the past few decades the need for soil remediation has become urgent, even more necessary--innovative, cost effective methods. Steam and Electroheating Remediation of Tight Soils presents the results of a field study testing the cleanup of semi-volatile fuels from tight soils using combination of hydraulic fracturing and soil heating technologies.

  8. Soil algae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Also, the importance of algae in soil formation and soil fertility improvement cannot be over ... The presence of nitrogen fixing microalgae (Nostoc azollae) in the top soil of both vegetable ..... dung, fish food and dirty water from fish ponds on.

  9. NOAA Soil Moisture Products System (SMOPS) Daily Blended Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Soil Moisture Operational Products System (SMOPS) combines soil moisture retrievals from multiple satellite sensors to provide a global soil moisture map with...

  10. Determination of chemical availability of cadmium and zinc in soils using inert soil moisture samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, B P; Chaudri, A M; McGrath, S P; Giller, K E

    1998-01-01

    A rapid method for extracting soil solutions using porous plastic soil-moisture samplers was combined with a cation resin equilibration based speciation technique to look at the chemical availability of metals in soil. Industrially polluted, metal sulphate amended and sewage sludge treated soils were used in our study. Cadmium sulphate amended and industrially contaminated soils all had > 65% of the total soil solution Cd present as free Cd2+. However, increasing total soil Cd concentrations by adding CdSO4 resulted in smaller total soil solution Cd. Consequently, the free Cd2+ concentrations in soil solutions extracted from these soils were smaller than in the same soil contaminated by sewage sludge addition. Amendment with ZnSO4 gave much greater concentrations of free Zn2+ in soil solutions compared with the same soil after long-term Zn contamination via sewage sludge additions. Our results demonstrate the difficulty in comparing total soil solution and free metal ion concentrations for soils from different areas with different physiochemical properties and sources of contamination. However, when comparing the same Woburn soil, Cd was much less available as Cd2+ in soil solution from the CdSO4 amended soils compared with soil contaminated by about 36 years of sewage sludge additions. In contrast, much more Zn was available in soil solution as free Zn2+ in the ZnSO4 amended soils compared with the sewage sludge treated soils.

  11. Soil functional types: surveying the biophysical dimensions of soil security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Barré, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Soil is a natural capital that can deliver key ecosystem services (ES) to humans through the realization of a series of soil processes controlling ecosystem functioning. Soil is also a diverse and endangered natural resource. A huge pedodiversity has been described at all scales, which is strongly altered by global change. The multidimensional concept soil security, encompassing biophysical, economic, social, policy and legal frameworks of soils has recently been proposed, recognizing the role of soils in global environmental sustainability challenges. The biophysical dimensions of soil security focus on the functionality of a given soil that can be viewed as the combination of its capability and its condition [1]. Indeed, all soils are not equal in term of functionality. They show different processes, provide different ES to humans and respond specifically to global change. Knowledge of soil functionality in space and time is thus a crucial step towards the achievement soil security. All soil classification systems incorporate some functional information, but soil taxonomy alone cannot fully describe the functioning, limitations, resistance and resilience of soils. Droogers and Bouma [2] introduced functional variants (phenoforms) for each soil type (genoform) so as to fit more closely to soil functionality. However, different genoforms can have the same functionality. As stated by McBratney and colleagues [1], there is a great need of an agreed methodology for defining the reference state of soil functionality. Here, we propose soil functional types (SFT) as a relevant classification system for the biophysical dimensions of soil security. Following the definition of plant functional types widely used in ecology, we define a soil functional type as "a set of soil taxons or phenoforms sharing similar processes (e.g. soil respiration), similar effects on ecosystem functioning (e.g. primary productivity) and similar responses to global change (land-use, management or

  12. The acceptability and safety of praziquantel alone and in combination with mebendazole in the treatment of Schistosoma mansoni and soil-transmitted helminthiasis in children aged 1-4 years in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwanje, Harriet; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Olsen, Annette

    2011-10-01

    There is limited information on the acceptability and safety of praziquantel for treatment of schistosomiasis in children below the age of four years. In addition, although mebendazole has been extensively used together with praziquantel against infections with schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) in school-aged children, no specific acceptability or safety studies have been published on this drug combination in younger children. A randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the safety of praziquantel alone and in combination with mebendazole in the treatment of Schistosoma mansoni and STH in children aged 1 to 4 years. A total of 596 children from Bwondha fishing community in Mayuge district and Wang-Kado fishing community in Nebbi district were investigated using duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears of two stool samples and 130 (21·8%) were found infected with S. mansoni. Of these, 19·2% (25) had heavy intensity of infections. Of the infected children, 82 were included and randomised into praziquantel (40 mg/kg) + mebendazole (500 mg) or praziquantel (40 mg/kg) alone. Many symptoms were reported before treatment while very few were reported after treatment and all on treatment day. No serious adverse events were reported or observed after treatment. Praziquantel with or without mebendazole was well tolerated in small children in the study area.

  13. Soil variability and effectiveness of soil and water conservation in the Sahel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hien, F.G.; Rietkerk, M.; Stroosnijder, L.

    1997-01-01

    Sahelian sylvopastoral lands often degrade into bare and crusted areas where regeneration of soil and vegetation is impossible in the short term unless soil and water conservation measures are implemented. Five combinations of tillage with and without mulch on three crust type/soil type combinations

  14. Combination of {sup 13}C/{sup 113}Cd NMR, potentiometry, and voltammetry in characterizing the interactions between Cd and two models of the main components of soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoble, V. [IFRE PMSE 112, CEREGE (UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne), Aix-en-Provence (France); Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire PROTEE, La Garde Cedex (France); Garnier, C. [Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire PROTEE, La Garde Cedex (France); Universite Bordeaux I, ISM-LPTC (UMR CNRS 5255), Talence (France); Masion, A.; Garnier, J.M. [IFRE PMSE 112, CEREGE (UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne), Aix-en-Provence (France); Ziarelli, F. [CNRS, Federation des Sciences Chimiques de Marseille, Spectropole, Marseille cedex 20 (France)

    2008-01-15

    .7-4.0). Therefore the combination of spectroscopic analyses, voltammetry, and fitting allowed the precise characterization of the binding sites of the studied exopolysaccharides, mimicking the main SOM components. Furthermore, the binding parameters obtained by fitting can be used in biogeochemical models to better define the role of key SOM compounds like exudates of roots and of soil bacteria on trace metal transport or assimilation. (orig.)

  15. Soil pollution and soil protection

    OpenAIRE

    Haan, de, F.A.M.; Visser-Reijneveld, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    This book was compiled from lecture handouts prepared for the international postgraduate course on soil quality, entitled 'Soil Pollution and Soil Protection' given jointly by the universities of Wageningen (The Netherlands), Gent and Leuven (Belgium), under the auspices of the international Training Centre (PHLO) of Wageningen Agricultural University.Of the three environmental compartments air, water and soil, it is soil that varies most in composition under natural conditions. The effects o...

  16. Effects of soil surface management practices on soil and tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects on soil, leaf and fruit element concentrations of organic (compost, straw mulch and hand weeding) and integrated (inorganic fertilisers and herbicide usage; IP) soil surface management practices in the tree rows, in combination with weed covers, cover crops and straw mulch in the work rows, were investigated in a ...

  17. Solarization soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Ghraibe, W.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energy could be used in pest control, in soil sterilization technology. The technique consists of covering humid soils by plastic films steadily fixed to the soil. Timing must be in summer during 4-8 weeks, where soil temperature increases to degrees high enough to control pests or to produce biological and chemical changes. The technique could be applied on many pests soil, mainly fungi, bacteria, nematods, weeds and pest insects. The technique could be used in greenhouses as well as in plastic film covers or in orchards where plastic films present double benefits: soil sterilization and production of black mulch. Mechanism of soil solarization is explained. Results show that soil solarization can be used in pest control after fruit crops cultivation and could be a method for an integrated pest control. 9 refs

  18. Soils - Volusia County Soils (Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Soils: 1:24000 SSURGO Map. Polygon boundaries of Soils in Volusia County, downloaded from SJRWMD and created by NRCS and SJRWMD. This data set is a digital version...

  19. Soil microbiology and soil health assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil scientists have long recognized the importance of soil biology in ecological health. In particular, soil microbes are crucial for many soil functions including decomposition, nutrient cycling, synthesis of plant growth regulators, and degradation of synthetic chemicals. Currently, soil biologis...

  20. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  1. Evidences of the stability of magnetite in soil from Northeastern Argentina by Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causevic, H.; Morras, H.; Mijovilovich, A.; Saragovi, C.

    2004-01-01

    In red soils from southern Brazil magnetite was reported to be pedogenically unstable, weathering to maghemite. However, in similar soils from northeastern Argentina magnetite was found in all size fractions. This finding motivates the mineralogical study of an Ultisol at different depths in order to understand the influence of anthropic and natural factors in the weathering of the magnetic minerals of these subtropical soils. The sand fraction of the B t22 horizon (105-155 cm depth) of a clayey red Ultisol from the subtropical forest of Misiones, Argentina, was studied by X-ray diffraction, saturation magnetization σ s , optical microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Saturation magnetization for the whole sand fraction (wsf), the non-magnetic sand fraction (nmsf) and the magnetic sand fraction (msf) are 10.79, 1.50 and 16.92 JT -1 kg -1 , respectively. Mainly quartz, ilmenite, Al-substituted hematite, goethite, maghemite and magnetite are found. Magnetite-maghemite contents are high, and magnetite is predominant in the msf. Results are compared with those from the upper B 1 horizon (10-35 cm depth) of the same soil in which a lower σ s(wsf) value, and higher values of σ s(msf) and of (σ s(msf) -σ s(wsf) ) were measured. These results confirm the stability of magnetite in this soil contrasting with other results on soils from neighbouring areas

  2. Soil pollution and soil protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de F.A.M.; Visser-Reijneveld, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    This book was compiled from lecture handouts prepared for the international postgraduate course on soil quality, entitled 'Soil Pollution and Soil Protection' given jointly by the universities of Wageningen (The Netherlands), Gent and Leuven (Belgium), under the auspices of the international

  3. Clay-illuvial soils in the Polish and international soil classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabała Cezary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil with a clay-illuvial subsurface horizon are the most widespread soil type in Poland and significantly differ in morphology and properties developed under variable environmental conditions. Despite the long history of investigations, the rules of classification and cartography of clay-illuvial soils have been permanently discussed and modified. The distinction of clay-illuvial soils into three soil types, introduced to the Polish soil classification in 2011, has been criticized as excessively extended, non-coherent with the other parts and rules of the classification, hard to introduce in soil cartography and poorly correlated with the international soil classifications. One type of clay-illuvial soils (“gleby płowe” was justified and recommended to reintroduce in soil classification in Poland, as well as 10 soil subtypes listed in a hierarchical order. The subtypes may be combined if the soil has diagnostic features of more than one soil subtypes. Clear rules of soil name generalization (reduction of subtype number for one soil were suggested for soil cartography on various scales. One of the most important among the distinguished soil sub-types are the “eroded” or “truncated” clay-illuvial soils.

  4. Soil-ecological risks for soil degradation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid; Kust, German; Andreeva, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation includes the processes of soil properties and quality worsening, primarily from the point of view of their productivity and decrease of ecosystem services quality. Complete soil cover destruction and/or functioning termination of soil forms of organic life are considered as extreme stages of soil degradation, and for the fragile ecosystems they are normally considered in the network of their desertification, land degradation and droughts /DLDD/ concept. Block-model of ecotoxic effects, generating soil and ecosystem degradation, has been developed as a result of the long-term field and laboratory research of sod-podzol soils, contaminated with waste, containing heavy metals. The model highlights soil degradation mechanisms, caused by direct and indirect impact of ecotoxicants on "phytocenosis- soil" system and their combination, frequently causing synergistic effect. The sequence of occurring changes here can be formalized as a theory of change (succession of interrelated events). Several stages are distinguished here - from heavy metals leaching (releasing) in waste and their migration downward the soil profile to phytoproductivity decrease and certain phytocenosis composition changes. Phytoproductivity decrease leads to the reduction of cellulose content introduced into the soil. The described feedback mechanism acts as a factor of sod-podzolic soil self-purification and stability. It has been shown, that using phytomass productivity index, integrally reflecting the worsening of soil properties complex, it is possible to solve the problems dealing with the dose-reflecting reactions creation and determination of critical levels of load for phytocenosis and corresponding soil-ecological risks. Soil-ecological risk in "phytocenosis- soil" system means probable negative changes and the loss of some ecosystem functions during the transformation process of dead organic substance energy for the new biomass composition. Soil-ecological risks estimation is

  5. Pedotransfer functions estimating soil hydraulic properties using different soil parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions (PTF) are useful in many studies such as hydrochemical modelling and soil mapping. The objective of this study was to calibrate and test parametric PTFs that predict soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity...... parameters. The PTFs are based on neural networks and the Bootstrap method using different sets of predictors and predict the van Genuchten/Mualem parameters. A Danish soil data set (152 horizons) dominated by sandy and sandy loamy soils was used in the development of PTFs to predict the Mualem hydraulic...... conductivity parameters. A larger data set (1618 horizons) with a broader textural range was used in the development of PTFs to predict the van Genuchten parameters. The PTFs using either three or seven textural classes combined with soil organic mater and bulk density gave the most reliable predictions...

  6. Silvicultural practices and soil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranger, Jacques; Nys, Claude; Legout, Arnaud; Dambrine, Etienne; Augusto, Laurent; Berthelot, Alain; Bouchon, Jean; Ottorini, Jean-Marc; Cacot, Emmanuel; Gavaland, Andre; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Saint-Andre, Laurent; Nicolas, Manuel; Ponette, Quentin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the risks deriving from current forestry practices on the sustainability of soil function and ecosystems. The relationship between the production function and the soil conservation function translates as a certain conflict between these two options. Stresses on the chemical fertility of the soil were analysed from the least intensive to the most intensive treatments, i.e. from forest reserves to very short rotation, treated lignocellulosic crops. Under the extensive systems, high grade biological recycling is sustainable if logging is confined to trunks alone. Dressings can correct the slow but inevitable acidification of soils. When treatments are intensive, the natural fertility of forest soils cannot sustain production; only soils with suitable physical qualities combined with application of appropriate inputs enable sustained high levels of output to be achieved, in particular under the short rotation systems. (authors)

  7. Physical root-soil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legué, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-12-01

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to aerial organs, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex.

  8. Dynamical soil-structure interactions: influence of soil behaviour nonlinearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomzadeh, Ali

    2011-01-01

    the soil and the response of the soil-structure system. Through these parametric studies we show that depending on the soil properties, frequency content of the soil response could change significantly due to the soil nonlinearity. The peaks of the transfer function between free field and outcropping responses shift to lower frequencies and amplification happens at this frequency range. Amplification reduction for the high frequencies and even de-amplification may happen for high level input motions. These changes influence the structural response. We show that depending on the combination of the fundamental frequency of the structure and the the natural frequency of the soil, the effect of soil-structure interaction could be significant or negligible. However, the effect of structure weight and rocking of the superstructure could change the results. Finally, the basin of Nice is used as an example of wave propagation on a heterogeneous nonlinear media and dynamic soil-structure interaction. The basin response is strongly dependent on the combination of soil nonlinearity, topographic effects and impedance contrast between soil layers. For the selected structures and soil profiles of this work, the performed numerical simulations show that the shift of the fundamental frequency is not a good index to discriminate linear from nonlinear soil behavior. (author)

  9. Quicklime-induced changes of soil properties: Implications for enhanced remediation of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated soils via mechanical soil aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Dong, Binbin; He, Xiaosong; Shi, Yi; Xu, Mingyue; He, Xuwen; Du, Xiaoming; Li, Fasheng

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is used for soil remediation at sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds. However, the effectiveness of the method is limited by low soil temperature, high soil moisture, and high soil viscosity. Combined with mechanical soil aeration, quicklime has a practical application value related to reinforcement remediation and to its action in the remediation of soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds. In this study, the target pollutant was trichloroethylene, which is a volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutant commonly found in contaminated soils. A restoration experiment was carried out, using a set of mechanical soil-aeration simulation tests, by adding quicklime (mass ratios of 3, 10, and 20%) to the contaminated soil. The results clearly indicate that quicklime changed the physical properties of the soil, which affected the environmental behaviour of trichloroethylene in the soil. The addition of CaO increased soil temperature and reduced soil moisture to improve the mass transfer of trichloroethylene. In addition, it improved the macroporous cumulative pore volume and average pore size, which increased soil permeability. As soil pH increased, the clay mineral content in the soils decreased, the cation exchange capacity and the redox potential decreased, and the removal of trichloroethylene from the soil was enhanced to a certain extent. After the addition of quicklime, the functional group COO of soil organic matter could interact with calcium ions, which increased soil polarity and promoted the removal of trichloroethylene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Soil friability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2011-01-01

    This review gathers and synthesizes literature on soil friability produced during the last three decades. Soil friability is of vital importance for crop production and the impact of crop production on the environment. A friable soil is characterized by an ease of fragmentation of undesirably large...... aggregates/clods and a difficulty in fragmentation of minor aggregates into undesirable small elements. Soil friability has been assessed using qualitative field methods as well as quantitative field and laboratory methods at different scales of observation. The qualitative field methods are broadly used...... by scientists, advisors and farmers, whereas the quantitative laboratory methods demand specialized skills and more or less sophisticated equipment. Most methods address only one aspect of soil friability, i.e. either the strength of unconfined soil or the fragment size distribution after applying a stress. All...

  11. Sustainable Soil Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Evgrafova, Alevtina; Kirkegaard Nielsen, Søren

    Linket til højre henviser til rapporten i trykt format til download. This report provides an overview on new technologies for integrate sustainable and resilient management practices in arable ecosystems for advanced farmers, consultants, NGOs and policy makers. By following sustainable soil...... and soil quality in short- and long-terms. This report also illustrates the importance to combine a system approach for plant production by assessing field readiness, managing in-field traffic management, implementing the sitespecific controlled as well as sensor-controlled seedbed preparation, seeding...

  12. Soil Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Verruijt, A.

    2010-01-01

    This book is the text for the introductory course of Soil Mechanics in the Department of Civil Engineering of the Delft University of Technology, as I have given from 1980 until my retirement in 2002. It contains an introduction into the major principles and methods of soil mechanics, such as the analysis of stresses, deformations, and stability. The most important methods of determining soil parameters, in the laboratory and in situ, are also described. Some basic principles of applied mecha...

  13. Discovering the essence of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, D.

    2012-04-01

    Science, and what it can learn, is constrained by its paradigms and premises. Similarly, teaching and what topics can be addressed are constrained by the paradigms and premises of the subject matter. Modern soil science is founded on the five-factor model of Dokuchaev and Jenny. Combined with Retallack's universal definition of soil as geologic detritus affected by weathering and/or biology, modern soil science emphasizes a descriptive rather than an interpretive approach. Modern soil science however, emerged from the study of plants and the need to improve crop yields in the face of chronic and wide spread famine in Europe. In order to teach that dirt is fascinating we must first see soils in their own right, understand their behavior and expand soil science towards an interpretive approach rather than limited as a descriptive one. Following the advice of James Hutton given over two centuries ago, I look at soils from a physiological perspective. Digestive processes are mechanical and chemical weathering, the resulting constituents reformed into new soil constituents (e.g. clay and humus), translocated to different regions of the soil body to serve other physiological processes (e.g. lamellae, argillic and stone-line horizons), or eliminated as wastes (e.g. leachates and evolved gasses). Respiration is described by the ongoing and diurnal exchange of gasses between the soil and its environment. Circulatory processes are evident in soil pore space, drainage capacity and capillary capability. Reproduction of soil is evident at two different scales: the growth of clay crystals (with their capacity for mutation) and repair of disturbed areas such as result from the various pedo-perturbations. The interactions between biotic and abiotic soil components provide examples of both neurological and endocrine systems in soil physiology. Through this change in perspective, both biotic and abiotic soil processes become evident, providing insight into the possible behavior of

  14. Soil-plant transfer models for metals to improve soil screening value guidelines valid for São Paulo, Brazil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Santos-Araujo, Sabrina N; Swartjes, Frank A; Versluijs, Kees W; Moreno, Fabio Netto; Alleoni, Luís R F

    2017-01-01

    In Brazil, there is a lack of combined soil-plant data attempting to explain the influence of specific climate, soil conditions, and crop management on heavy metal uptake and accumulation by plants. As a consequence, soil-plant relationships to be used in risk assessments or for derivation of soil

  15. Forecast Combinations

    OpenAIRE

    Timmermann, Allan G

    2005-01-01

    Forecast combinations have frequently been found in empirical studies to produce better forecasts on average than methods based on the ex-ante best individual forecasting model. Moreover, simple combinations that ignore correlations between forecast errors often dominate more refined combination schemes aimed at estimating the theoretically optimal combination weights. In this paper we analyse theoretically the factors that determine the advantages from combining forecasts (for example, the d...

  16. Monitor Soil Degradation or Triage for Soil Security? An Australian Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Australian National Soil Research, Development and Extension Strategy identifies soil security as a foundation for the current and future productivity and profitability of Australian agriculture. Current agricultural production is attenuated by soil degradation. Future production is highly dependent on the condition of Australian soils. Soil degradation in Australia is dominated in its areal extent by soil erosion. We reiterate the use of soil erosion as a reliable indicator of soil condition/quality and a practical measure of soil degradation. We describe three key phases of soil degradation since European settlement, and show a clear link between inappropriate agricultural practices and the resultant soil degradation. We demonstrate that modern agricultural practices have had a marked effect on reducing erosion. Current advances in agricultural soil management could lead to further stabilization and slowing of soil degradation in addition to improving productivity. However, policy complacency towards soil degradation, combined with future climate projections of increased rainfall intensity but decreased volumes, warmer temperatures and increased time in drought may once again accelerate soil degradation and susceptibility to erosion and thus limit the ability of agriculture to advance without further improving soil management practices. Monitoring soil degradation may indicate land degradation, but we contend that monitoring will not lead to soil security. We propose the adoption of a triaging approach to soil degradation using the soil security framework, to prioritise treatment plans that engage science and agriculture to develop practices that simultaneously increase productivity and improve soil condition. This will provide a public policy platform for efficient allocation of public and private resources to secure Australia’s soil resource.

  17. the use of integrated soil fertility approach in the improvement of soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sammy

    Innovational practices in the management of organic matters in semi-arid soil, ... Compared to other areas, a large proportion of soil in semi-arid areas has low .... combine old and new methods of nutrient management into ecologically sound and ... Furthermore, organic matter is the energy source for soil fauna and micro ...

  18. Identification of optimal soil hydraulic functions and parameters for predicting soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the accuracy of several commonly used soil hydraulic functions and associated parameters for predicting observed soil moisture data. We used six combined methods formed by three commonly used soil hydraulic functions – i.e., Brooks and Corey (1964) (BC), Campbell (19...

  19. Soil health: a comparison between organically and conventionally managed arable soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Blok, W.J.; Korthals, G.W.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Ariena, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study of 13 organic and 13 neighboring conventional arable farming systems was conducted in the Netherlands to determine the effect of management practices on chemical and biological soil properties and soil health. Soils were analyzed using a polyphasic approach combining traditional

  20. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  1. Soil washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, R.S.; Diel, B.N.; Halpern, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Disposal of soils or sludges contaminated with organic and inorganic compounds is a major problem for environmental remedial activities, hazardous waste generators, and the disposal industry. This paper reports that many of these wastes can be effectively treated utilizing soil washing technology. CWM has been developing soil washing technology over the past few years, with extensive work being conducted on the bench scale. These studies have demonstrated consistently high removal efficiencies (95-99%) for a wide variety of PCB and petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste. Recently, a comprehensive study examining the removal of both organic and inorganic contraminants from two different types of surrogate soil matrices was completed. In addition to establishing the range of contaminants that can be removed from soil, a method for surfactant/water separation was evaluated. For example, using a thermal phase separation method, approximately 90% of the surfactant could be recovered from the water

  2. Soil Forming Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    It! What is Soil? Chip Off the Old Block Soil Forming Factors Matters of Life and Death Underneath It All Wise Choices A World of Soils Soil Forming Factors 2 A Top to Bottom Guide 3 Making a Soil Monolith 4 Soil Orders 5 State Soil Monoliths 6 Where in the Soil World Are You? >> A Top to

  3. What is Soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    It! What is Soil? Chip Off the Old Block Soil Forming Factors Matters of Life and Death Underneath It All Wise Choices A World of Soils Soil? 2 The Skin of the Earth 3 Soil Ingredients 4 Soil Recipes 5 CLORPT for Short >> What Is Soil? Soils Make Life Plants grow in and from

  4. Climate protection, natural resources management and soil improvement by combined Energetic and Material Utilization of lignocellulosic agricultural WAstes and residues (CEMUWA); Klimaschutz, Naturressourcenschutz und Bodenverbesserung durch kombinierte energetische und stoffliche Verwertung lignozelluloser landwirtschaftlicher Abfaelle und Reststoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuech, Andrea; Nelles, Michael; Tscherpel, Burckhard; El Behery, Ahmed; Menanz, Rania; Bahl, Hubert; Scheel, Michael; Nipkow, Mareen

    2015-07-01

    The project Climate protection, natural resources management and soil improvement by combined Energetic and Material Utilization of lignocellulosic agricultural WAstes and residues (CEMUWA) was implemented with long-term partners from Egypt and Germany leaded by the Department Waste Management and Material Flow from September 2011 until October 2013. Aim of the project was the development of technologies for the utilization of agricultural wastes and residues at the example of rice straw, with the focus on the energetic and material use. In the long term a contribution to climate protection and natural resource management could be reached. The focus was on investigations in the field of biogas, ethanol and butanol production including pretreatment as well as the material use in horticulture. The results show that the biogas and ethanol production with adapted pretreatments of rice straws is possible. The technical adaptation of a biogas plant (eo-digestion) would be associated with about 20% higher investment costs and higher operating costs with an approximately 15% higher energy demand. In Germany, however, this may still economically by the substitution of expensive or difficult available energy crops (reduction of substrate costs by 30 to 35% for a 600 kWel-BGP using maize silage). The investigated solutions for material use in Egypt showed good results, which in some cases exceeded the expectations. By the use of rice straw imported peat substrates could be substitute or irrigation water saved, what is ecologically and economically useful. The production of ethanol from rice straw was implemented on laboratory scale and preconditions for investigations in semi-industrial and partly pilot scale were created. The bilateral project'' was funded in the framework of the German-Egypt-Research-Fond (GERF) by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the Egyptian Science and Technology Development Fund in Egypt (STDF). The total budget

  5. Soil Quality Indicator: a new concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barão, Lúcia; Basch, Gottlieb

    2017-04-01

    combined to return a single evaluation of the soil status, using different techniques that are dependent on the final use of the soil quality indicator. Some of the advantages of this new concept include the evaluation of soil quality based on its vulnerability to threats, together with the evaluation of soil properties in a given context while also suggesting soil management practices that are directly capable to mitigate soil vulnerability towards specific threats. Keywords: Soil Quality, Agriculture, Sustainability, Soil threats

  6. A method to detect soil carbon degradation during soil erosion

    OpenAIRE

    F. Conen; M. Schaub; C. Alewell

    2009-01-01

    Soil erosion has been discussed intensively but controversial both as a significant source or a significant sink of atmospheric carbon possibly explaining the gap in the global carbon budget. One of the major points of discussion has been whether or not carbon is degraded and mineralized to CO2 during detachment, transport and deposition of soil material. By combining the caesium-137 (137Cs) approach (quantification of erosion rates) with stable c...

  7. Soil physical land degradation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    According to the European Soil Framework Directive (2006) soil compaction is besides water and wind erosion one of the main physical reasons and threats of soil degradation. It is estimated, that 32% of the subsoils in Europe are highly degraded and 18% moderately vulnerable to compaction. The problem is not limited to crop land or forest areas (especially because of non-site adjusted harvesting machines) but is also prevalent in rangelands and grassland, and even in so called natural non-disturbed systems. The main reasons for an intense increase in compacted agricultural or forested regions are the still increasing masses of the machines as well the increased frequency of wheeling under non favorable site conditions. Shear and vibration induced soil deformation enhances the deterioration of soil properties especially if the soil water content is very high and the internal soil strength very low. The same is true for animal trampling in combination with overgrazing of moist to wet pastures which subsequently causes a denser (i.e. reduced proportion of coarse pores with smaller continuity) but still structured soil horizons and will finally end in a compacted platy structure. In combination with high water content and shearing due to trampling therefore results in a complete muddy homogeneous soil with no structure at all. (Krümmelbein et al. 2013) Site managements of arable, forestry or horticulture soils requires a sufficiently rigid pore system which guarantees water, gas and heat exchange, nutrient transport and adsorption as well as an optimal rootability in order to avoid subsoil compaction. Such pore system also guarantees a sufficient microbial activity and composition in order to also decompose the plant etc. debris. It is therefore essential that well structured horizons dominate in soils with at best subangular blocky structure or in the top A- horizons a crumbly structure due to biological activity. In contrast defines the formation of a platy

  8. Soil analysis. Modern instrumental technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    This book covers traditional methods of analysis and specialist monographs on individual instrumental techniques, which are usually not written with soil or plant analysis specifically in mind. The principles of the techniques are combined with discussions of sample preparation and matrix problems, and critical reviews of applications in soil science and related disciplines. Individual chapters are processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  9. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

    1999-07-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  10. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.T.

    1999-01-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  11. Infrared spectra of lunar soils. [using a Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Measured data obtained by Michelson interferometer spectrometer were stored in a computer file and smoothed by being passed forward and backward through a digital four-pole low pass filter. Infrared spectra of the 10 lunar samples are presented in the format of brightness temperature versus frequency. The mol % of feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, ilmenite and ferromagnetic silicate in each sample is presented in tables. The reflectance spectra of ilmenite and enstatite are shown in graphs.

  12. Agriculture: Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Productive soils, a favorable climate, and clean and abundant water resources are essential for growing crops, raising livestock, and for ecosystems to continue to provide the critical provisioning services that humans need.

  13. Effect of soil solarization on soil-borne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobh, Hana

    1995-01-01

    Author.Soil solarization was conducted at three locations on the Lebanese coast. Maximum soil temperatures recorded were 53 and 48 celsius degrees at Jiyeh, 48.9, 46 and 43 celsius degrees at Naameh and 48, 45 and 43.5 celsius degrees at Khaldeh at 5, 15 and 25cm soil depths respectively. Mean soil temperatures recorded at 3pm were at Jiyeh 51.6, 47 and 46 celsius degrees compared to Naameh 47, 45 and 41 celsius degrees and Khaldeh 44, 42 and 41 celsius degrees at 5, 15 and 25 cm respectively. The mean temperature in solarized soils were 7.3 to 15 celsius degrees higher than those of the nonsolarized soils indicating a sustained increase of soil temperature in the solarized soils. The effect of soil solarization on artificially introduced fungal pathogens in the soil at Khaldeh, resulted in complete destruction of sclerotia of Sclerotinia spp. at three depths studied. However, with respect to the two other pathogens tested, solarization resulted in reduction of the viability of microsclerotia of Verticillium spp. by 99-79% and of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis inoculum by 88-54% at 5 and 15 cm respectively, but only by 45% and 14% reduction at 25 cm. This level of control is significant when it is compared to the percentage of control where the level of reduction of inoculum viability did not exceed 10% at any soil depth. As there were contradicting reports in the literature on nematodes, two field trials in greenhouses were conducted to study the possibility of integrating 2 methods for management on nematodes. Soil solarization alone or in combination with biological control of nematodes using Arthrobotrys spp. and Dactyl ella brocophaga to control the root-knot nematodes on two crops, tomato at Naameh and cucumber at Jiyeh were compared to Methyl Bromide treatment. It was evident that, even on a very susceptible crop like cucumber, the integration of biological control and soil solarization gave a good level of control similar to methyl bromide. Neither root

  14. Isotope Tracer-Aided Studies of Agrochemical-Biota Interactions in Soil and Water. Short Communications and Report of the Second Combined Meeting of Participants in Two Co-ordinated Research Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The importance of soil and water quality to agriculture and fisheries is self-evident. Soil and water ecosystems have a certain capacity to accept and degrade agrochemical residues. It is generally the microflora which determines this capacity. The residues can affect critical microbial processes such as heterotrophic activity, algal primary production, nitrification, and nitrogen fixation. Many methods have been developed to measure the fate and effects of these chemicals in the systems. Isotopic labelling is an essential tool in this measuring. Tracers are used not only to estimate the fate and conversion of the chemicals but also to measure by labelled substrate techniques their impact on the biota. The present document illustrates these different aspects. Pew measuring techniques have, however, found general acceptance. The great variety in methods hampers obtaining comparable data. The report stresses the need to seek more uniformity in methodology for estimating agrochemical residue - biota interactions in soil and aquatic ecosystems.This is a progress report containing short communications or abstracts of the papers presented at the second meeting of the Joint FAO/IAEA Coordinated research programmes on agrochemical residue - biota interactions in soil and aquatic ecosystems which was held 23-27 October 1978 in Burnaby, B.C., Canada. The importance of soil and water quality to agriculture and fisheries is self-evident. Soil and water ecosystems have a certain capacity to accept and degrade agrochemical residues. It is generally the microflora which determines this capacity. The residues can affect critical microbial processes such as heterotrophic activity, algal primary production, nitrification, and nitrogen fixation. Many methods have been developed to measure the fate and effects of these chemicals in the systems. Isotopic labelling is an essential tool in this measuring. Tracers are used not only to estimate the fate and conversion of the chemicals but

  15. Exploring the potential offered by legacy soil databases for ecosystem services mapping of Central African soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoodt, Ann; Baert, Geert; Van Ranst, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Central African soil resources are characterised by a large variability, ranging from stony, shallow or sandy soils with poor life-sustaining capabilities to highly weathered soils that recycle and support large amounts of biomass. Socio-economic drivers within this largely rural region foster inappropriate land use and management, threaten soil quality and finally culminate into a declining soil productivity and increasing food insecurity. For the development of sustainable land use strategies targeting development planning and natural hazard mitigation, decision makers often rely on legacy soil maps and soil profile databases. Recent development cooperation financed projects led to the design of soil information systems for Rwanda, D.R. Congo, and (ongoing) Burundi. A major challenge is to exploit these existing soil databases and convert them into soil inference systems through an optimal combination of digital soil mapping techniques, land evaluation tools, and biogeochemical models. This presentation aims at (1) highlighting some key characteristics of typical Central African soils, (2) assessing the positional, geographic and semantic quality of the soil information systems, and (3) revealing its potential impacts on the use of these datasets for thematic mapping of soil ecosystem services (e.g. organic carbon storage, pH buffering capacity). Soil map quality is assessed considering positional and semantic quality, as well as geographic completeness. Descriptive statistics, decision tree classification and linear regression techniques are used to mine the soil profile databases. Geo-matching as well as class-matching approaches are considered when developing thematic maps. Variability in inherent as well as dynamic soil properties within the soil taxonomic units is highlighted. It is hypothesized that within-unit variation in soil properties highly affects the use and interpretation of thematic maps for ecosystem services mapping. Results will mainly be based

  16. REE Distribution in Cultivated and No Cultivated Soils in Two Viticultural Areas of Central Chile: Mineralogical, Pedological and Anthropic Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, P.; Townley, B.; Aburto, F.

    2017-12-01

    Within the scope of a Corfo-Innova Project (I+D Wines of Chile-University of Chile) we have recognized remarkable REE patterns in soils of two vineyards located in traditional vinicultural areas: Casablanca and Santa Cruz. Both vineyards have granitic parent rock, with similar petrographic features and REE patterns. We studied REE distribution on twelve cultivated soil profiles at each vineyard, where a full mineralogical, geochemical and pedogenic sampling and characterization was performed. To establish the effect of management no cultivated soil profiles were included from each vineyard location. REE in soil samples were measured by ICP-MS using two digestion methods: lithium metaborate/tetraborate fusion to obtain REE contents in total soil and MMI® partial extraction technique for REE contents on bioavailable phases.Soils display similar signatures of REEs respect to the rock source at both vineyards, but showing relative enrichments in soils of Casablanca and depletion in soils of Santa Cruz. Bioavailable phase data indicates a relative depletion of LREEs compared to HREEs and different anomalies for Ce (positive vs negative) in different areas of the same vineyard. Similar patterns of soils and parent rock suggest that REEs are adequate tracers of lithological source. Enrichments and/or depletions of REE patterns in soils respect to the rock source and Ce anomalies, evidence differential pedogenetic processes occurring at each sampled site. Results of bioavailable phase are coherent with the immobilization and fractionation of LREEs by stable minerals within soils as clays and Fe oxides. Mineralogical results in soil thin sections of Casablanca evidence the occurrence of Ti phases as sphene, ilmenite and rutile, which probably control the relative REE enrichment, since these minerals are considered more stable under pedogenic conditions.Finally, cultivated soils show a depleted but analogous pattern of REE regarding to no cultivated soil, indicating the

  17. [Zoological diagnostics of soils: imperatives, purposes, and place within soil zoology and pedology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordokovich, V G

    2013-01-01

    Zoological diagnostics of soils was conceived by M.S. Ghilarov as a part of soil zoology and intended to be closely related to pedology. He considered zoo-agents as an ecological factor, one among many others, of soil formation. Contemporary soil diagnostics pursues mostly utilitarian goals and is based on conservative properties of the stable part of soil substrate. However, it is admitted that these properties are generated by specific combinations of biological, chemical, and physical phenomena that are called "elementary soil processes" (ESP) and occur nowhere but in soils. Certain ESPs are associated with distinctive combinations of biota, including invertebrates. Pedobionts act as producers of detritus and contribute to humus formation, which is necessary for any ESP starting, thus being its active party. That is why animals, being the most complex and active part of the ESP system, may be treated not only as its indicators but also as its navigators. Monitoring and studying of ESPs in soil is complicated because of inevitable disturbance of soil profile natural composition. Zoo-agents, at the same time, can be registered without habitats changing. Taking into account ecological potency of soil invertebrates that participate in an ESP, spectra of their eco-groups, life forms, and results of their activity, it is possible to diagnose a soil state at different stages of certain ESPs development, with their different combinations, and in different regions or parts of natural environmental gradients.

  18. Assessing the nutritional potential of sodium in combination with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of sodium (Na) in combination with potassium (K) in the growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) was studied in soil culture. Sodium was applied at 0, 5, 10, 20 mg / kg soil as NaCl and K at 0, 20, 40, 80 mg / kg soil as KCl. Records of components of growth and mineral nutrient uptake and ...

  19. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  20. Improved Biosensors for Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Cheng, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Microbes drive processes in the Earth system far exceeding their physical scale, affecting crop yields, water quality, the mobilization of toxic materials, and fundamental aspects of soil biogeochemistry. The tools of synthetic biology have the potential to significantly improve our understanding of microbial Earth system processes: for example, synthetic microbes can be be programmed to report on environmental conditions that stimulate greenhouse gas production, metal oxidation, biofilm formation, pollutant degradation, and microbe-plant symbioses. However, these tools are only rarely deployed in the lab. This research gap arises because synthetically programmed microbes typically report on their environment by producing molecules that are detected optically (e.g., fluorescent proteins). Fluorescent reporters are ideal for petri-dish applications and have fundamentally changed how we study human health, but their usefulness is quite limited in soils where detecting fluorescence is challenging. Here we describe the construction of gas-reporting biosensors, which release nonpolar gases that can be detected in the headspace of incubation experiments. These constructs can be used to probe microbial processes within soils in real-time noninvasive lab experiments. These biosensors can be combined with traditional omics-based approaches to reveal processes controlling soil microbial behavior and lead to improved environmental management decisions.

  1. The Effect of Gasification Biochar on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Soil Quality and Crop Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika

    and pot and field experiments was used to study the effect of straw and wood biochar on carbon sequestration, soil quality and crop growth. Overall, the biochar amendment improved soil chemical and physical properties and plant growth and showed a potential for soil carbon sequestration without having any......New synergies between agriculture and the energy sector making use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production and recycling recalcitrant residuals to soil may offer climate change mitigation potential through the substitution of fossil fuels and soil carbon sequestration. However, concerns...... have been raised about the potential negative impacts of incorporating bioenergy residuals (biochar) in soil and increasing the removal of crop residues such as straw, possibly reducing important soil functions and services for maintaining soil quality. Therefore, a combination of incubation studies...

  2. Effet de la combinaison de la chaux et de la pouzzolane naturelle sur le compactage et la résistance des sols mous argileux Effect of the combination of lime and natural pozzolana on the compaction and strength of soft clayey soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenai S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La stabilisation des sols mous a été pratiquée longtemps en mélangeant des ajouts, tels que le ciment, la chaux et les cendres volantes au sol pour augmenter sa résistance. Cependant, il y a un manque d’investigations sur l’utilisation de la pouzzolane naturelle seule ou combinée avec la chaux pour les applications d’amélioration des sols. Un programme expérimental a été entrepris pour étudier l’effet de la chaux, la pouzzolane naturelle ou leur combinaison sur les caractéristiques géotechniques des sols mous. La chaux ou la pouzzolane naturelle ont été ajoutées aux sols par des teneurs de 0-10% et 0-20% respectivement. Les échantillons préparés ont été soumis aux essais de compactage et de résistance à la compression non confinée. Les échantillons ont subis des périodes de cure de 1, 7, 28 et 90 jours après quoi ils ont été soumis aux essais de la résistance à la compression non confinée. Basé sur les résultats favorables obtenus, ilpeut être conclu que les sols mous argileux peuvent être stabilisés avec succès par l’action combinée de la chaux et de la pouzzolane naturelle. Puisque la pouzzolane naturelle est beaucoup moins chère que la chaux, l’addition de la pouzzolane naturelle dans le mélange chaux-sol peut en particulier devenir attirante et avoir comme conséquence une réduction des coûts de la construction. Soft soil stabilization has been practiced for quite some time by mixing additives, such as cement, lime and fly ash to the soil to increase its strength. However, there is a lack of investigations on the use of natural pozzolana alone or combined with lime for ground improvement applications. An experimental program was undertaken to study the effect of using lime, natural pozzolana or a combination of both on the geotechnical characteristics of soft soils. Lime or natural pozzolana was added to soft soils at ranges of 0-10% and 0-20%, respectively. In addition, combinations of

  3. Use Zircon-Ilmenite Concentrate in Steelmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, S. N.; Volkova, T. N.

    2016-08-01

    Market requirements cause a constant search for new materials and technologies, for their immediate use in increasing requirements for material and energy efficiency, as well as to the quality of steel. In practice, steel production in the tended recently of more stringent requirements for the chemical composition of the steel and its contamination by nonmetallic inclusions, gas and non-ferrous metals. The main ways of increasing of strength and performance characteristics fabricated metal products related to the profound and effective influence on the crystallizing metal structure by furnace processing of the melt with refining and modifying additives. It can be argued that the furnace processing of steel and iron chemically active metals (alkali-earth metals, rare-earth metals, and others.) is an integral part of modern production of high quality products and competitive technologies. Important condition for development of methods secondary metallurgy of steel is the use of relatively inexpensive materials in a variety of complex alloys and blends, allowing targeted control of physical and chemical state of the molten metal and, therefore, receive steel with improved performance. In this connection the development of modifying natural materials metallurgy technologies presented complex ores containing titanium and zirconium, is a very urgent task.

  4. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  5. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) - Magnesic Soils

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Magnesic soils is a subset of the SSURGO dataset containing soil family selected based on the magnesic content and serpentinite parent material. The following soil...

  6. combination Dictionary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    of the idiomatic expression as a whole" (Crystal 2003: 225-226). Idiomatic .... nations and idioms.11 Nonetheless, free combinations of words have not been .... those who thronged Emmett place last night wanted to see the film, and they.

  7. Winning Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Criscuolo, Paola; Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke

    2018-01-01

    examine the effectiveness of different combinations of knowledge sources for achieving innovative performance. We suggest that combinations involving integrative search strategies – combining internal and external knowledge – are the most likely to generate product and process innovation. In this context......, we present the idea that cognitively distant knowledge sources are helpful for innovation only when used in conjunction with knowledge sources that are closer to the focal firm. We also find important differences between product and process innovation, with the former associated with broader searches......Searching for the most rewarding sources of innovative ideas remains a key challenge in management of technological innovation. Yet, little is known about which combinations of internal and external knowledge sources are triggers for innovation. Extending theories about searching for innovation, we...

  8. Electrodialytic decontamination of heavy metal polluted soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik K.; Karlsmose, Bodil

    1996-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation of heavy metal polluted soil is a newly developed method, which combines the electrokinetic mevement of ions in soil with the principle of electrodialytis. The method has been proven to work in laboratory scale and at present two types of pilot plant tests are made....

  9. Soil and worm: on eating as relating