WorldWideScience

Sample records for smart materials technologies

  1. Smart technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The success of smart technology in the pursuit of the Gulf War has accentuated the awareness of how the Safeguards and Security disciplines are changing in response to new weaponry. Throughout the Department of Energy Integrated Complex (IC) Safeguards and Security efforts such as: Protection Programs Operations; Materials, Controls and Accountability; Information Security; Computer Security; Operational Security; Personnel Security, Safeguards and/or Security (S and S) surveys, and Inspections and Evaluations are undergoing a reassessment and refocusing. Some of this is in response to such things as the DOE initiated Freeze Report and the Drell Report. An important aspect is also technological, adjusting the way business is done in light of the weapons, tools and processes/procedures becoming available. This paper addresses the S and S issues with the promise of using smart technology to develop new approaches and equipment across the IC

  2. Smart hydrogel functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Liang-Yin; Ju, Xiao-Jie

    2014-01-01

    This book systematically introduces smart hydrogel functional materials with the configurations ranging from hydrogels to microgels. It serves as an excellent reference for designing and fabricating artificial smart hydrogel functional materials.

  3. Exploitation of Smart Materials and Sensors as Disruptive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    could form part of an automated flight control system that might minimise buffeting or incipient stall. It might be used on manned aircraft to...healing agents into a material system on its original performance must be accounted for. Self-healing by micro-encapsulation has been used to...Massachusetts, USA(2006). 135 Afshar V, S., Warren -Smith, S. C., & Monro, T. M., "Enhancement of Fluorescence-based Sensing Using Microstructured

  4. Smart space technology innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Mu-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Recently, ad hoc and wireless communication technologies have made available the device, service and information rich environment for users. Smart Space and ubiquitous computing extend the ""Living Lab"" vision of everyday objects and provide context-awareness services to users in smart living environments. This ebook investigates smart space technology and its innovations around the Living Labs. The final goal is to build context-awareness smart space and location-based service applications that integrate information from independent systems which autonomously and securely support human activ

  5. Guest Editorial - Smart materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barber, Z. H.; Clyne, T. W.; Šittner, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 30, 13a (2014), s. 1515-1516 ISSN 0267-0836 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : smart materials * shape memory effect (SME) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.995, year: 2014

  6. Smart material screening machines using smart materials and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaei, Daryoush; Corradi, Gary; Waigand, Al

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this product is to address the specific need for improvements in the efficiency and effectiveness in physical separation technologies in the screening areas. Currently, the mining industry uses approximately 33 billion kW-hr per year, costing 1.65 billion dollars at 0.05 cents per kW-hr, of electrical energy for physical separations. Even though screening and size separations are not the single most energy intensive process in the mining industry, they are often the major bottleneck in the whole process. Improvements to this area offer tremendous potential in both energy savings and production improvements. Additionally, the vibrating screens used in the mining processing plants are the most costly areas from maintenance and worker health and safety point of views. The goal of this product is to reduce energy use in the screening and total processing areas. This goal is accomplished by developing an innovative screening machine based on smart materials and smart actuators, namely smart screen that uses advanced sensory system to continuously monitor the screening process and make appropriate adjustments to improve production. The theory behind the development of Smart Screen technology is based on two key technologies, namely smart actuators and smart Energy Flow ControlT (EFCT) strategies, developed initially for military applications. Smart Screen technology controls the flow of vibration energy and confines it to the screen rather than shaking much of the mass that makes up the conventional vibratory screening machine. Consequently, Smart Screens eliminates and downsizes many of the structural components associated with conventional vibratory screening machines. As a result, the surface area of the screen increases for a given envelope. This increase in usable screening surface area extends the life of the screens, reduces required maintenance by reducing the frequency of screen change-outs and improves throughput or productivity.

  7. Smart Fabrics Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Cory; Potter, Elliott; Potter, Elliott; McCabe, Mary; Baggerman, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Advances in Smart Fabrics technology are enabling an exciting array of new applications for NASA exploration missions, the biomedical community, and consumer electronics. This report summarizes the findings of a brief investigation into the state of the art and potential applications of smart fabrics to address challenges in human spaceflight.

  8. Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The development of Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids -- which the IEA defines as an electricity network that uses digital and other advanced technologies to monitor and manage the transport of electricity from all generation sources to meet the varying electricity demands of end users -- is essential if the global community is to achieve shared goals for energy security, economic development and climate change mitigation. Unfortunately, existing misunderstandings of exactly what smart grids are and the physical and institutional complexity of electricity systems make it difficult to implement smart grids on the scale that is needed. This roadmap sets out specific steps needed over the coming years to achieve milestones that will allow smart grids to deliver a clean energy future.

  9. The Science of Smart Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boohan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few decades, smart materials have become increasingly important in the design of products. Essentially, a smart material is one that has been designed to respond to a stimulus, such as a change in temperature or magnetic field, in a particular and useful way. This article looks at a range of smart materials that are relatively…

  10. Switchable Materials for Smart Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-06-07

    This article reviews the basic principles of and recent developments in electrochromic, photochromic, and thermochromic materials for applications in smart windows. Compared with current static windows, smart windows can dynamically modulate the transmittance of solar irradiation based on weather conditions and personal preferences, thus simultaneously improving building energy efficiency and indoor human comfort. Although some smart windows are commercially available, their widespread implementation has not yet been realized. Recent advances in nanostructured materials provide new opportunities for next-generation smart window technology owing to their unique structure-property relations. Nanomaterials can provide enhanced coloration efficiency, faster switching kinetics, and longer lifetime. In addition, their compatibility with solution processing enables low-cost and high-throughput fabrication. This review also discusses the importance of dual-band modulation of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, as nearly 50% of solar energy lies in the NIR region. Some latest results show that solution-processable nanostructured systems can selectively modulate the NIR light without affecting the visible transmittance, thus reducing energy consumption by air conditioning, heating, and artificial lighting.

  11. Responsive hydrogels--structurally and dimensionally optimized smart frameworks for applications in catalysis, micro-system technology and material science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Artjom; Birnbaum, Wolfgang; Kuckling, Dirk

    2013-09-07

    Although the technological and scientific importance of functional polymers has been well established over the last few decades, the most recent focus that has attracted much attention has been on stimuli-responsive polymers. This group of materials is of particular interest due to its ability to respond to internal and/or external chemico-physical stimuli, which is often manifested as large macroscopic responses. Aside from scientific challenges of designing stimuli-responsive polymers, the main technological interest lies in their numerous applications ranging from catalysis through microsystem technology and chemomechanical actuators to sensors that have been extensively explored. Since the phase transition phenomenon of hydrogels is theoretically well understood advanced materials based on the predictions can be prepared. Since the volume phase transition of hydrogels is a diffusion-limited process the size of the synthesized hydrogels is an important factor. Consistent downscaling of the gel size will result in fast smart gels with sufficient response times. In order to apply smart gels in microsystems and sensors, new preparation techniques for hydrogels have to be developed. For the up-coming nanotechnology, nano-sized gels as actuating materials would be of great interest.

  12. Smart Cities - Smart Homes and Smart Home Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Faanes, Erlend Kydland

    2014-01-01

    This master’s thesis consists of two articles where the first article is theoretical and the second is the empirical study. Article I The purpose with this paper is to explore and illuminate how smart home and smart home technology can contribute to enhance health and Quality of Life in elderly citizens and allow them to live longer in their home. The paper provides a brief introduction to health promotion and highlights the thesis theoretical framework and foundation of Aaron Antonov...

  13. Communication technologies in smart grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of communication technologies in Smart Grid lies in integration of large number of devices into one telecommunication system. This paper provides an overview of the technologies currently in use in electric power grid, that are not necessarily in compliance with the Smart Grid concept. Considering that the Smart Grid is open to the flow of information in all directions, it is necessary to provide reliability, protection and security of information.

  14. Smart Structures and Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    function. It is reasonable to expect that all engineering design should be smart, and not dumb. But one can still make a distinction .... among the sensors, the actuators and the decision-making centre(s). ..... basic emotions like fear or pleasure.

  15. Encyclopedia of Smart Materials, 2 Volume Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mel

    2002-03-01

    Smart materials--materials and structures that can impart information about their environment to an observer or monitoring device--are revolutionizing fields as diverse as engineering, optics, and medical technology. Advances in smart materials are impacting disciplines across the scientific and technological landscape. Now, practictioners and researchers have an authoritative source to go to for answers about this emerging new area. Encyclopedia of Smart Materials provides A-to-Z coverage of the entire field of intelligent materials. Discussions of theory, fabrication, processing, applications, and uses of these unique materials are presented here in a collection of concise entries from the world's foremost experts in the field--including scientists, educators and engineers. This encyclopedia is as broad in scope as the technology itself, addressing daily, commercial applications as well as sophisticated units designed to operate in space, underwater, underground, and within the human body. Extensively cross-referenced and generously supplemented with bibliographies and indexes, this book's treatment also broaches the specialized properties and coatings that are required for the use of materials in extreme conditions. Illustrated with photographs, tables, line drawings, and equations, Encyclopedia of Smart Materials is the premier reference for material scientists, chemists, chemical engineers, process engineers, consultants, patent attorneys and students in these areas. An essential resource on the shelves of laboratories, government facilities, and academic libraries. Editor-in-Chief, Mel Schwartz has over forty years of experience with metals, ceramics, and composites, with special expertise in brazing. The holder of five patents, he has authored thirteen books and more than one hundred technical papers and articles. Reach the information you need rapidly and easily with the ONLINE edition of the Encyclopedia of Smart Materials. The online edition delivers all

  16. Perspective and potential of smart optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Duzik, Adam J.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun-Chan; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2017-09-01

    The increasing requirements of hyperspectral imaging optics, electro/photo-chromic materials, negative refractive index metamaterial optics, and miniaturized optical components from micro-scale to quantum-scale optics have all contributed to new features and advancements in optics technology. Development of multifunctional capable optics has pushed the boundaries of optics into new fields that require new disciplines and materials to maximize the potential benefits. The purpose of this study is to understand and show the fundamental materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics (referred to as smart optics) that are essential for future industrial, scientific, military, and space applications, such as membrane optics, filters, windows for sensors and probes, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras, light valves, light switches, and flat-panel displays. The proposed smart optics are based on the Stark and Zeeman effects in materials tailored with quantum dot arrays and thin films made from readily polarizable materials via ferroelectricity or ferromagnetism. Bound excitonic states of organic crystals are also capable of optical adaptability, tunability, and reconfigurability. To show the benefits of smart optics, this paper reviews spectral characteristics of smart optical materials and device technology. Experiments testing the quantum-confined Stark effect, arising from rare earth element doping effects in semiconductors, and applied electric field effects on spectral and refractive index are discussed. Other bulk and dopant materials were also discovered to have the same aspect of shifts in spectrum and refractive index. Other efforts focus on materials for creating field-controlled spectrally smart active optics on a selected spectral range. Surface plasmon polariton transmission of light through apertures is also discussed, along with potential applications. New breakthroughs in micro scale multiple zone plate optics as a micro

  17. Benefits and risks of smart home technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Charlie; Hargreaves, Tom; Hauxwell-Baldwin, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Smart homes are a priority area of strategic energy planning and national policy. The market adoption of smart home technologies (SHTs) relies on prospective users perceiving clear benefits with acceptable levels of risk. This paper characterises the perceived benefits and risks of SHTs from multiple perspectives. A representative national survey of UK homeowners (n=1025) finds prospective users have positive perceptions of the multiple functionality of SHTs including energy management. Ceding autonomy and independence in the home for increased technological control are the main perceived risks. An additional survey of actual SHT users (n=42) participating in a smart home field trial identifies the key role of early adopters in lowering perceived SHT risks for the mass market. Content analysis of SHT marketing material (n=62) finds the SHT industry are insufficiently emphasising measures to build consumer confidence on data security and privacy. Policymakers can play an important role in mitigating perceived risks, and supporting the energy-management potential of a smart-home future. Policy measures to support SHT market development include design and operating standards, guidelines on data and privacy, quality control, and in situ research programmes. Policy experiences with domestic energy efficiency technologies and with national smart meter roll-outs offer useful precedents. - Highlights: • Representative national survey of prospective smart home users. • Comparative analysis of three datasets to analyse perceived benefits and risks of smart home technologies. • Distinctive characteristics identified of early adopters who seed market growth. • Comparison of user perceptions with industry marketing. • Detailed policy recommendations to support energy benefits of smart home technologies.

  18. Aging well with smart technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Penny; Nikpour, Linda; Nowlin, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    As baby-boomers age, the need for long-term nursing care services increases. In the future, there will simply not be enough long-term care facilities to accommodate all of these patients. In addition, many people prefer to grow old at home, a concept known as aging-in-place. Smart home technology facilities aging-in-place by assisting patients with emergency assistance, fall prevention/detection, reminder systems, medication administration and assistance for those with hearing, visual or cognitive impairments. Benefits include making aging-in-place a reality, continuous monitoring, and improved psychosocial effects. Concerns of this technology include cost, availability of technology, retrofitting complications, and potential inappropriate use of the technology. Overall, the concept of smart homes is gaining in popularity and will expand the role of the nurse in the future. It is important for all nurses to understand how their practices will be transformed as smart homes become a reality for the aging population.

  19. Green Technology for Smart Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, M.

    2017-08-01

    In view of the enormous social and environmental changes at the global level, more and more cities worldwide have directed their development strategies towards smart policies aimed at sustainable mobility, energy upgrading of the building stock, increase of energy production from renewable sources, improvement of waste management and implementation of ICT infrastructures. The goal is to turn into Smart Cities, able to improve the quality of life of their inhabitants by offering a lasting opportunity for cultural, economic and social growth within a healthy, safe, stimulating and dynamic environment. After an overview of the role of cities in climate changes and environmental pollution worldwide, the article provides an up to date definition of Smart City and of its main expected features, focussing on technology innovation, smart governance and main financing and support programs. An analysis of the most interesting initiatives at the international level pursued by cities investigating the three main areas of Green Buildings, Smart grid-Smart lighting, and Smart mobility is given, with the objective to offer a broad reference for the identification of development sustainable plans and programs at the urban level within the current legislative framework.

  20. Sensor technology for smart homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A; Pasquina, Paul F; Fici-Pasquina, Lavinia

    2011-06-01

    A smart home is a residence equipped with technology that observes the residents and provides proactive services. Most recently, it has been introduced as a potential solution to support independent living of people with disabilities and older adults, as well as to relieve the workload from family caregivers and health providers. One of the key supporting features of a smart home is its ability to monitor the activities of daily living and safety of residents, and in detecting changes in their daily routines. With the availability of inexpensive low-power sensors, radios, and embedded processors, current smart homes are typically equipped with a large amount of networked sensors which collaboratively process and make deductions from the acquired data on the state of the home as well as the activities and behaviors of its residents. This article reviews sensor technology used in smart homes with a focus on direct environment sensing and infrastructure mediated sensing. The article also points out the strengths and limitations of different sensor technologies, as well as discusses challenges and opportunities from clinical, technical, and ethical perspectives. It is recommended that sensor technologies for smart homes address actual needs of all stake holders including end users, their family members and caregivers, and their doctors and therapists. More evidence on the appropriateness, usefulness, and cost benefits analysis of sensor technologies for smart homes is necessary before these sensors should be widely deployed into real-world residential settings and successfully integrated into everyday life and health care services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Micro Grid: A Smart Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Naveenkumar, M; Ratnakar, N

    2012-01-01

    Distributed Generation (DG) is an approach that employs small-scale technologies to produce electricity close to the end users of power. Todays DG technologies often consist of renewable generators, and offer a number of potential benefits. This paper presents a design of micro grid as part of Smart grid technologies with renewable energy resources like solar, wind and Diesel generator. The design of the microgrid with integration of Renewable energy sources are done in PSCAD/EMTDC.This paper...

  2. Evaluation of Smart Gun Technologies preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Smart Gun Technology Project has a goal to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing {open_quote}smart{close_quote} technologies. Smart technologies are those that can in some manner identify an officer. This report will identify, describe, and grade various technologies as compared to the requirements that were obtained from officers. This report does not make a final recommendation for a smart gun technology, nor does it give the complete design of a smart gun system.

  3. Material Science Smart Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A. I. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Sabirianov, R. F. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of electrostatic interactions to the free energy of binding between model protein and a ceramic implant surface in the aqueous solvent, considered in the framework of the nonlocal electrostatic model, is calculated as a function of the implant low-frequency dielectric constant. We show that the existence of a dynamically ordered (low-dielectric) interfacial solvent layer at the protein-solvent and ceramic-solvent interface markedly increases charging energy of the protein and ceramic implant, and consequently makes the electrostatic contribution to the protein-ceramic binding energy more favorable (attractive). Our analysis shows that the corresponding electrostatic energy between protein and oxide ceramics depends nonmonotonically on the dielectric constant of ceramic, εC. Obtained results indicate that protein can attract electrostatically to the surface if ceramic material has a moderate εC below or about 35 (in particularly ZrO2 or Ta2O5). This is in contrast to classical (local) consideration of the solvent, which demonstrates an unfavorable electrostatic interaction of protein with typical metal oxide ceramic materialsC>10). Thus, a solid implant coated by combining oxide ceramic with a reduced dielectric constant can be beneficial to strengthen the electrostatic binding of the protein-implant complex.

  4. New Materials = New Expressive Powers: Smart Material Interfaces and Arts, experience via smart materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    It is not easy for a growing artist to find his poetry. Smart materials could be an answer for those who are looking for new forms of art. Smart Material Interfaces (SMI) define a new interaction paradigm based on dynamic modications of the innovative materials' properties. SMI can be applied in

  5. Types of architectural structures and the use of smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavşan, Cengiz; Sipahi, Serkan

    2017-07-01

    The developments in technology following the industrial revolution had their share of impact on both construction techniques, and material technologies. The change in the materials used by the construction industry brought along numerous innovations, which, in turn, took on an autonomous trend of development given the rise of nano-tech materials. Today, nano-tech materials are used extensively in numerous construction categories. Nano-tech materials, in general, are characterized by their reactionary nature, with the intent of repeating the reactions again and again under certain conditions. That is why nano-tech materials are often called smart materials. In construction industry, smart materials are categorized under 4 major perspectives: Shape-shifting smart materials, power generating smart materials, self-maintenance smart materials, and smart materials providing a high level of insulation. In architecture, various categories of construction often tend to exhibit their own approaches to design, materials, and construction techniques. This is a direct consequence of the need for different solutions for different functions. In this context, the use of technological materials should lead to the use of a set of smart materials for a given category of structures, while another category utilizes yet another set. In the present study, the smart materials used in specific categories of structures were reviewed with reference to nano-tech practices implemented in Europe, with a view to try and reveal the changes in the use of smart materials with reference to categories of structures. The study entails a discussion to test the hypothesis that nano-tech materials vary with reference to structure categories, on the basis of 18 examples from various structure categories, built by the construction firms with the highest level of potential in terms of doing business in Europe. The study comprises 3 major sections: The first section reiterates what the literature has to say

  6. Development of a Biocompatible Layer-by-Layer Film System Using Aptamer Technology for Smart Material Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Foster

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single-stranded nucleic acids that fold into well-defined three dimensional (3D structures that allow for binding to a target molecule with affinities and specificities that can rival or in some cases exceed those of antibodies. The compatibility of aptamers with nanostructures such as thin films, in combination with their affinity, selectivity, and conformational changes upon target interaction, could set the foundation for the development of novel smart materials. In this study, the development of a biocompatible aptamer-polyelectrolyte film system was investigated using a layer-by-layer approach. Using fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrated the ability of the sulforhodamine B aptamer to bind its cognate target while sequestered in a chitosan-hyaluronan film matrix. Studies using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry also suggest that deposition conditions such as rinsing time and volume play a strong role in the internal film interactions and growth mechanisms of chitosan-hyaluronan films. The continued study and development of aptamer-functionalized thin films provides endless new opportunities for novel smart materials and has the potential to revolutionize the field of controlled release.

  7. Smart Grid Technologies: Trends and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buran Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explores the role of Smart Grid technologies, giving sustainable, reliable and safe energy. These technologies will provide an economic benefit to the government, the investors and the consumers. The paper overviews global trends and perspectives of using Smart Grid technologies in Russia and in other countries. The Smart Grid concept is especially important for Russia, because there are many power supply problems in the energy sector. This study is expected to be important for researchers and engineers studying Smart Grid technologies.

  8. A Smart Material Interfaces Learning Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a learning experience held with a class of primary school children who were introduced to a novel class of resources, named smart materials, and the interfaces built with them (Smart Material Interfaces). The pupils were guided along a multidisciplinary educational path in which

  9. Phase transformations im smart materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnham, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    One of the qualities that distinguishes living systems from inanimate matter is the ability to adapt to changes in the environment. Smart materials have the ability to perform both sensing and actuating functions and are, therefore, capable of imitating this rudimentary aspect of life. Four of the most widely used smart materials are piezoelectric Pb(Zr, Ti)O 3 , electrostrictive Pb(Mg, Nb)O 3 , magnetostrictive (Tb, Dy)Fe 2 and the shape-memory alloy NiTi. All four are ferroic with active domain walls and two phase transformations, which help to tune the properties of these actuator materials. Pb(Zr, Ti)O 3 is a ferroelectric ceramic which is cubic at high temperature and becomes ferroelectric on cooling through the Curie temperature. At room temperature, it is poised on a rhombohedral-tetragonal phase boundary which enhances the piezoelectric coefficients. Terfenol, (Tb, Dy)Fe 2 , is also cubic at high temperature and then becomes magnetic on cooling through its Curie temperature. At room temperature, it too is poised on a rhombohedral-tetragonal transition which enhances its magnetostriction coefficients. Pb(Mg, Nb)O 3 and nitinol (NiTi) are also cubic at high temperatures and on annealing transform to a partially ordered state. On further cooling, Pb(Mg, Nb)O 3 passes through a diffuse phase transformation at room temperature where it exhibits very large dielectric and electrostrictive coefficients. Just below room temperature, it transforms to a ferroelectric rhombohedral phase. The partially ordered shape-memory alloy NiTi undergoes an austenitic (cubic) to martensitic (mono-clinic) phase change just above room temperature. It is easily deformed in the martensitic state but recovers its original shape when reheated to austenite

  10. EU-policy and smart materials; EU-beleid en smart materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieters, D.; Van der Beek, M.

    2012-09-15

    Netherlands will focus on large-scale production of smart materials. Several examples from Dutch universities show that the Netherlands is very active in this sector. Nanotechnology and the development of advanced materials are considered as 'key technologies'. To realize these applications EU funding will be made available both for research projects and to support market introduction [Dutch] Nederland zet in de toekomst in op grootschalige productie van smart materials. Verschillende voorbeelden van Nederlandse universiteiten laten zien dat Nederland tot op heden zeer actief is in deze veelzijdige sector. Nanotechnologie en de ontwikkeling van geavanceerde materialen worden in dit licht beschouwd als zogenoemde 'sleuteltechnologieen'. Om deze toepassingen te realiseren komt zowel EU-geld beschikbaar voor onderzoeksprojecten als ter ondersteuning van marktintroductie.

  11. Smart Gun Technology project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

  12. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  13. Smart meter incorporating UWB technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, T.A.; Khan, A.B.; Babar, M.; Taj, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Smart Meter is a key element in the evolving concept of Smart Grid, which plays an important role in interaction between the consumer and the supplier. In general, the smart meter is an intelligent digital energy meter that measures the consumption of electrical energy and provides other additional

  14. Ultrathin Shape Change Smart Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weinan; Kwok, Kam Sang; Gracias, David H

    2018-02-20

    With the discovery of graphene, significant research has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of ultrathin materials. Graphene has also brought into focus other ultrathin materials composed of organics, polymers, inorganics, and their hybrids. Together, these ultrathin materials have unique properties of broad significance. For example, ultrathin materials have a large surface area and high flexibility which can enhance conformal contact in wearables and sensors leading to improved sensitivity. When porous, the short transverse diffusion length in these materials allows rapid mass transport. Alternatively, when impermeable, these materials behave as an ultrathin barrier. Such controlled permeability is critical in the design of encapsulation and drug delivery systems. Finally, ultrathin materials often feature defect-free and single-crystal-like two-dimensional atomic structures resulting in superior mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. A unique property of ultrathin materials is their low bending rigidity, which suggests that they could easily be bent, curved, or folded into 3D shapes. In this Account, we review the emerging field of 2D to 3D shape transformations of ultrathin materials. We broadly define ultrathin to include materials with a thickness below 100 nm and composed of a range of organic, inorganic, and hybrid compositions. This topic is important for both fundamental and applied reasons. Fundamentally, bending and curving of ultrathin films can cause atomistic and molecular strain which can alter their physical and chemical properties and lead to new 3D forms of matter which behave very differently from their planar precursors. Shape change can also lead to new 3D architectures with significantly smaller form factors. For example, 3D ultrathin materials would occupy a smaller space in on-chip devices or could permeate through tortuous media which is important for miniaturized robots and smart dust applications. Our

  15. SmartPark Technology Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of FMCSAs SmartPark initiative is to determine the feasibility of a technology for providing truck parking space availability in real time to truckers on the road. SmartPark consists of two phases. Phase I was a field operational test ...

  16. Smart Card Security; Technology and Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Taherdoost; Shamsul Sahibuddin; Neda Jalaliyoon

    2011-01-01

    Newly, smart card technology are being used in a number of ways around the world, on the otherhand, security has become significant in information technology, especially in those applicationinvolving data sharing and transactions through the internet. Furthermore, researches ininformation technology acceptance have identified the security as one of the factor that caninfluence on smart card adoption. This research is chiefly to study the security principals of smartcard and assess the securit...

  17. Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Soh, Chee-Kiong; Bhalla, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    "Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics" presents the latest developments in structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomechanics using smart materials. The book mainly focuses on piezoelectric, fibre optic and ionic polymer metal composite materials. It introduces concepts from the very basics and leads to advanced modelling (analytical/ numerical), practical aspects (including software/ hardware issues) and case studies spanning civil, mechanical and aerospace structures, including bridges, rocks and underground structures. This book is intended for practicing engineers, researchers from academic and R&D institutions and postgraduate students in the fields of smart materials and structures, structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomedical engineering. Professor Chee-Kiong Soh and Associate Professor Yaowen Yang both work at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Dr. Suresh Bhalla is an A...

  18. Creating smart contracts using blockchain technology

    OpenAIRE

    Baronas, Erikas

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents Blockchain, crypto-currencie’s core technology analysis and smart cont- racts potentialities research. Bringing up two frameworks - Ethereum and Bitcoin - helps to un- derstand the principles of how decentralized system work and what solutions ensure data integrity and immutability in both technologies. The main goal of this work - prove, that smart contracts can be used in real world system model. Paper egzamines prototypes, which increase exponentially by their complexit...

  19. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  20. Corrosion Characteristics of the SMART Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Y. H.; Choi, B. K.; Soh, J. R.; Lee, D. J.; Choi, B. S

    2000-05-01

    This report summarized the corrosion characteristics of the candidate steam generator tubes (PT-7M, ASTM Gr.2, Inconel-600), which are considering as the core materials in SMART. Also, this evaluated the waterchemstry conditions of commercial power plant including the PWR, BWR, WWER, PHWR, RBMK plants in comparison with that of SMART. And this report described that the microstructures of as-received PT-7M, ASTM Gr.2, and Inconel-600 as the candidate materials of fuel cladding and steam generator tubes and characterized the corrosion properties of the materials, which were tested systematically in the conditions of standard, ammonia solution and ammonia nodular to evaluate the corrosion resistance.

  1. Corrosion Characteristics of the SMART Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Y. H.; Choi, B. K.; Soh, J. R.; Lee, D. J.; Choi, B. S.

    2000-05-01

    This report summarized the corrosion characteristics of the candidate steam generator tubes (PT-7M, ASTM Gr.2, Inconel-600), which are considering as the core materials in SMART. Also, this evaluated the waterchemstry conditions of commercial power plant including the PWR, BWR, WWER, PHWR, RBMK plants in comparison with that of SMART. And this report described that the microstructures of as-received PT-7M, ASTM Gr.2, and Inconel-600 as the candidate materials of fuel cladding and steam generator tubes and characterized the corrosion properties of the materials, which were tested systematically in the conditions of standard, ammonia solution and ammonia nodular to evaluate the corrosion resistance

  2. Smart Grid Technologies in Europe: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ardito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The old electricity network infrastructure has proven to be inadequate, with respect to modern challenges such as alternative energy sources, electricity demand and energy saving policies. Moreover, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT seem to have reached an adequate level of reliability and flexibility in order to support a new concept of electricity network — the smart grid. In this work, we will analyse the state-of-the-art of smart grids, in their technical, management, security, and optimization aspects. We will also provide a brief overview of the regulatory aspects involved in the development of a smart grid, mainly from the viewpoint of the European Union.

  3. Smart grids infrastructure, technology, and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Borlase, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    What exactly is smart grid? Why is it receiving so much attention? What are utilities, vendors, and regulators doing about it? Answering these questions and more, Smart Grids: Infrastructure, Technology, and Solutions gives readers a clearer understanding of the drivers and infrastructure of one of the most talked-about topics in the electric utility market-smart grid. This book brings together the knowledge and views of a vast array of experts and leaders in their respective fields.Key Features Describes the impetus for change in the electric utility industry Discusses the business drivers, b

  4. Smart material-based radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, Scott

    2014-10-01

    From sensors to power harvesters, the unique properties of smart materials have been exploited in numerous ways to enable new applications and reduce the size of many useful devices. Smart materials are defined as materials whose properties can be changed in a controlled and often reversible fashion by use of external stimuli, such as electric and magnetic fields, temperature, or humidity. Smart materials have been used to make acceleration sensors that are ubiquitous in mobile phones, to make highly accurate frequency standards, to make unprecedentedly small actuators and motors, to seal and reduce friction of rotating shafts, and to generate power by conversion of either kinetic or thermal energy to electrical energy. The number of useful devices enabled by smart materials is large and continues to grow. Smart materials can also be used to generate plasmas and accelerate particles at small scales. The materials discussed in this talk are from non-centrosymmetric crystalline classes including piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and ferroelectric materials, which produce large electric fields in response to external stimuli such as applied electric fields or thermal energy. First, the use of ferroelectric, pyroelectric and piezoelectric materials for plasma generation and particle acceleration will be reviewed. The talk will then focus on the use of piezoelectric materials at the University of Missouri to construct plasma sources and electrostatic accelerators for applications including space propulsion, x-ray imaging, and neutron production. The basic concepts of piezoelectric transformers, which are analogous to conventional magnetic transformers, will be discussed, along with results from experiments over the last decade to produce micro-thrusters for space propulsion and particle accelerators for x-ray and neutron production. Support from ONR, AFOSR, and LANL.

  5. Benefits and risks of smart home technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Charlie; Hargreaves, Tom; Hauxwell-Baldwin, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Smart homes are a priority area of strategic energy planning and national policy. The market adoption of smart home technologies (SHTs) relies on prospective users perceiving clear benefits with acceptable levels of risk. This paper characterises the perceived benefits and risks of SHTs from multiple perspectives. A representative national survey of UK homeowners (n=1025) finds prospective users have positive perceptions of the multiple functionality of SHTs including energy management. Cedin...

  6. Researches of smart materials in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Y.; Tani, J.

    2000-01-01

    The choice of sensor and actuator material as well as optimum design to combine the actuator element with the host structure become very essential to develop a smart materials and structures. In the present paper, first, the present state and issues of the main solid actuators are described from the viewpoint of material science and engineering. Next, the developments of smart materials and systems using shape memory materials in Japan are introduced. Shape memory TiNi fiber reinforced/Al or polymer matrix composites have been fabricated to confirm the enhancements of fracture toughness (K-value) by utilizing the compression stresses caused by shape memory shrinkage of embedded TiNi fibers. Sudden failure prevention system for structures are also proposed by combining non-destructive acoustic emission detecting system with suppression of crack-tip stress intensity by shape memory shrinkage effect. Lastly, the research project scheme and several targets on smart actuator development are introduced, which are imposed on the Tohoku University team in the Japanese National Project (1998∝2002 A.D.) on smart materials and structure system by NEDO/MITI. (orig.)

  7. A Review of Systems and Technologies for Smart Homes and Smart Grids

    OpenAIRE

    Lobaccaro, Gabriele; Carlucci, Salvatore; Löfström, Erica

    2016-01-01

    In the actual era of smart homes and smart grids, advanced technological systems that allow the automation of domestic tasks are developing rapidly. There are numerous technologies and applications that can be installed in smart homes today. They enable communication between home appliances and users, and enhance home appliances’ automation, monitoring and remote control capabilities. This review article, by introducing the concept of the smart home and the advent of the smart grid, investiga...

  8. Smart Technology Applications in Business Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Tomayess; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Issa, Theodora; Isaías, Pedro; Issa, Touma B.

    2017-01-01

    Technology continues to make great strides in society by providing opportunities for advancement, inclusion, and global competency. As new systems and tools arise, novel applications are created as well. Smart Technology Applications in Business Environments is an essential reference source for the

  9. Integration of Smart Grid Technologies in Households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Freja; Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This article considers the interplay between new smart grid technologies and households everyday practices. The research focuses on how Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Dynamic Pricing influence on Danish households’ everyday life and how these technologies constitutes and change routines and practice...... to a more complex and multiple consideration of the interplay between households’ social practices and new smart grid technologies - and thereby helps to fill out the lack of research on the integration of peak-shaving technologies in the end-user design.......This article considers the interplay between new smart grid technologies and households everyday practices. The research focuses on how Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Dynamic Pricing influence on Danish households’ everyday life and how these technologies constitutes and change routines and practices......, is analysed from the analytical concept offered by the Social Practice Theory. Overall, the case-study demonstrates that the smart grid technologies influence the ‘way of driving’ and changed the temporal patterns of consumption in the families during the test-period. The inquiry attempts to contribute...

  10. Internet of things technologies in smart cities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available at exploiting the most advanced technologies to support value-added services for the administration of the city and its citizens (Zanella, 2014). Smart cities worldwide live under a ‘data deluge” in which big data generated by people and sensors are processed... single ticket in the form of a smart card which can be loaded with money and is swiped at any point of entry into a transport system using Near Field Communication (NFC) technology to transmit information from the card to the reading machine and back...

  11. Application of new technology to SMART instrumentation and control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Heui Youn; Lee, C. K.; Kim, D. H.; Suh, Y. S.; Hur, S.; Seong, S. H.; Jang, G. S.; Koo, I. S.; Chang, M. H

    1998-03-01

    It is very important to examine the conformance with licensing requirements and standards when new digital technology and equipment apply to nuclear plants. Key requirements of licensing on digitalisation using new technologies are software and hardware V and V, reliability of communication network, and diversity and defence-in-depth concept against common mode failures of hardware and software. And it should be also evaluated whether the selection and application of new technology comply with the design concept and requirements of SMART MMIS or not. In this report, we reviewed digitalisation materials such as EPRI`s ALWR utility requirements document, I and C upgrade plan, guideline on licensing digital upgrades, and IAEA`s issues and approaches to plant modernization to explore application method on new I and C technologies, and evaluated the state of applicable new technologies for SMART MMIS which are selected from the technologies, methods, and manuals of the industrial area. (author). 36 refs., 15 tabs.

  12. Application of new technology to SMART instrumentation and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heui Youn; Lee, C. K.; Kim, D. H.; Suh, Y. S.; Hur, S.; Seong, S. H.; Jang, G. S.; Koo, I. S.; Chang, M. H.

    1998-03-01

    It is very important to examine the conformance with licensing requirements and standards when new digital technology and equipment apply to nuclear plants. Key requirements of licensing on digitalisation using new technologies are software and hardware V and V, reliability of communication network, and diversity and defence-in-depth concept against common mode failures of hardware and software. And it should be also evaluated whether the selection and application of new technology comply with the design concept and requirements of SMART MMIS or not. In this report, we reviewed digitalisation materials such as EPRI's ALWR utility requirements document, I and C upgrade plan, guideline on licensing digital upgrades, and IAEA's issues and approaches to plant modernization to explore application method on new I and C technologies, and evaluated the state of applicable new technologies for SMART MMIS which are selected from the technologies, methods, and manuals of the industrial area. (author). 36 refs., 15 tabs

  13. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion XI: Chromogenics for smart windows; Proceedings of the Meeting, Toulouse, France, May 19, 21, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugot-le Goff, A.; Granqvist, C.G.; Lampert, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses electrochromic tungsten oxide and nickel oxide films, electrochromic smart window devices, and thermochromic and variable light-scattering materials. Attention is given to the structural and physical properties of WO3 films prepared by CVD, the degradation of electrochromic amorphous WO3 films after coloration, the electrochromic mechanism of RF diode-sputtered nickel oxide films, and the optical and electrochemical properties of CeO2 and CeO2-TiO2 coatings. Also discussed are new solid electrolytes for electrochromic smart windows, electrochromic glazing, a smart window using a proton-conducting polymer as an electrolyte, and the electrochromism of colloidal WO3 and IrO2

  14. Study of Smart Campus Development Using Internet of Things Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widya Sari, Marti; Wahyu Ciptadi, Prahenusa; Hafid Hardyanto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of smart campus using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through smart campus, it is possible that a campus is connected via online by the outside entity, so that the teaching approach based on technology can be conducted in real time. This research was conducted in smart education, smart parking and smart room. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the related theme for the sake of system design of smart campus. The result of this research is the design of smart campus system that includes smart education development, smart parking and smart room with the sake of Universitas PGRI Yogyakarta as the case study.

  15. Membrane-based biomolecular smart materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarles, Stephen A; Leo, Donald J

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-based biomolecular materials are a new class of smart material that feature networks of artificial lipid bilayers contained within durable synthetic substrates. Bilayers contained within this modular material platform provide an environment that can be tailored to host an enormous diversity of functional biomolecules, where the functionality of the global material system depends on the type(s) and organization(s) of the biomolecules that are chosen. In this paper, we review a series of biomolecular material platforms developed recently within the Leo Group at Virginia Tech and we discuss several novel coupling mechanisms provided by these hybrid material systems. The platforms developed demonstrate that the functions of biomolecules and the properties of synthetic materials can be combined to operate in concert, and the examples provided demonstrate how the formation and properties of a lipid bilayer can respond to a variety of stimuli including mechanical forces and electric fields

  16. Smart Metering. Technological, economic and legal aspects. 2. ed.; Smart Metering. Technologische, wirtschaftliche und juristische Aspekte des Smart Metering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler-Schute, Christiana (ed.)

    2010-07-01

    Smart metering comprises more than just meter technology, and the use of information and communication technologies is indispensable. Processes, roles and business models must be reconsidered as further challenges arise in the context of smart metering. For one, there is the operator of the metering points. Secondly, there is the end user who is in the role of an active market partner. Further, there is smart metering as a basic technology, e.g. for smart grids and smart homes. In spite of the need for action, many utilities are reluctant to introduce smart metering. Reasons for this are the cost, a lack of defined standards, and an unclear legal situation. On the other hand, smart metering offers potential for grids and distribution that should be made use of. The authors discuss all aspects of the subject. The point out the chances and limitations of smart metering and present their own experience. [German] Smart Metering geht weit ueber die Zaehlertechnologie hinaus und der Einsatz von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien ist unabdingbar. Damit einhergehend muessen Prozesse, Rollen und auch Geschaeftsmodelle neu durchdacht werden. Denn weitere Herausforderungen stehen im direkten Zusammenhang mit Smart Metering. Das ist zum einen die Rolle des Messstellenbetreibers / Messdienstleisters. Das ist zum anderen der Endnutzer, dem die Rolle des aktiven Marktpartners zugedacht wird. Das ist des Weiteren das Smart Metering als Basistechnologie beispielsweise fuer Smart Grid und Smart Home. Trotz des Handlungsdrucks stehen viele Unternehmen der Energiewirtschaft dem Smart Metering zurueckhaltend gegenueber. Drei gewichtige Gruende werden ins Feld gefuehrt: die Kostenfrage, nicht definierte Standards und die in vielen Bereichen ungeklaerte Gesetzeslage. Demgegenueber bietet das Smart Metering Potenziale fuer Netz und Vertrieb, die es zu nutzen gilt. Die Autoren setzen sich in ihren Beitraegen mit diesen Themen auseinander, zeigen Chancen, aber auch Grenzen des

  17. Deploying 5G-technologies in smart city and smart home wireless sensor networks with interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2015-01-01

    communication in an Internet of Things (5G) contexts. In this paper we discuss some of the key challenges that exist in the smart city and smart home networks in the light of possible 5G-solutions. Focus is on deploying cognitive radio technologies (5G) which enables the smart city networks to support......Deploying 5G technologies in a combination of smart homes and smart city opens for a new ecosystem with big potentials. The potentials lie in the creation of an advanced ICT infrastructure with support for connected and entangled services possibilities including technologies for efficient...... interconnected infrastructure elements, to handle big-data from the smart homes, and to be compatible with existing infrastructures. The considered cognitive radio technology is based on pre-coded OFDM which offers the needed flexibility to deal with the key challenges found in the smart home networks. Thus...

  18. Potential Applications of Smart Multifunctional Wearable Materials to Gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David G; Najafi, Bijan; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Smart multifunctional materials can play a constructive role in addressing some very important aging-related issues. Aging affects the ability of older adults to continue to live safely and economically in their own residences for as long as possible. Thus, there will be a greater need for preventive, acute, rehabilitative, and long-term health care services for older adults as well as a need for tools to enable them to function independently during daily activities. The objective of this paper is, thus, to present a comprehensive review of some potential smart materials and their areas of applications to gerontology. Thus, brief descriptions of various currently available multifunctional smart materials and their possible applications to aging-related problems are presented. It is concluded that some of the most important applications to geriatrics may be in various sensing scenarios to collect health-related feedback or information and provide personalized care. Further described are the applications of wearable technologies to aging-related needs, including devices for home rehabilitation, remote monitoring, social well-being, frailty monitoring, monitoring of diabetes and wound healing and fall detection or prediction. It is also concluded that wearable technologies, when combined with an appropriate application and with appropriate feedback, may help improve activities and functions of older patients with chronic diseases. Finally, it is noted that methods developed to measure what one collectively manages in this population may provide a foundation to establish new definitions of quality of life. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Smart gun technology requirements preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.R.; Brandt, D.J.; Tweet, K.D.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing surety technologies. This project is funded by the National Institute of Justice. This document reports the projects first objective: to find and document the requirements for a user-recognizing-and-authorizing firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. This report details the problem of firearm takeaways in law enforcement, the methodology used to develop the law enforcement officers` requirements, and the requirements themselves.

  1. Development of Information Technology for Smart Defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Kyoil; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Sangjoon; Park, Jonghyun; Han, Sangcheol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been demand for the convergence of IT (Information and communication Technologies, ICT) with defense, as has already been achieved in civilian fields such as healthcare and construction. It is expected that completely new and common requirements would emerge from the civilian and military domains and that the shape of war field would change rapidly. Many military scientists forecast that future wars would be network-centric and be based on C4I(Command, Control, Communication and Computer, Intelligence), ISR(Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance), and PGM(Precision Guided Munitions). For realizing the smart defense concept, IT should act as a baseline technology even for simulating a real combat field using virtual reality. In this paper, we propose the concept of IT-based smart defense with a focus on accurate detection in real and cyber wars, effective data communication, automated and unmanned operation, and modeling and simulation

  2. Development of Information Technology for Smart Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyoil; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Sangjoon; Park, Jonghyun [ETRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sangcheol [KEIT, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Recently, there has been demand for the convergence of IT (Information and communication Technologies, ICT) with defense, as has already been achieved in civilian fields such as healthcare and construction. It is expected that completely new and common requirements would emerge from the civilian and military domains and that the shape of war field would change rapidly. Many military scientists forecast that future wars would be network-centric and be based on C4I(Command, Control, Communication and Computer, Intelligence), ISR(Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance), and PGM(Precision Guided Munitions). For realizing the smart defense concept, IT should act as a baseline technology even for simulating a real combat field using virtual reality. In this paper, we propose the concept of IT-based smart defense with a focus on accurate detection in real and cyber wars, effective data communication, automated and unmanned operation, and modeling and simulation.

  3. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Min; Gao, Zhongxue; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-06-30

    Fresh foods are perishable, seasonal and regional in nature and their storage, transportation, and preservation of freshness are quite challenging. Smart storage technologies can online detection and monitor the changes of quality parameters and storage environment of fresh foods during storage, so that operators can make timely adjustments to reduce the loss. This article reviews the smart storage technologies from two aspects: online detection technologies and smartly monitoring technologies for fresh foods. Online detection technologies include electronic nose, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), hyperspectral imaging and computer vision. Smartly monitoring technologies mainly include some intelligent indicators for monitoring the change of storage environment. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods need to be highly efficient and nondestructive and need to be competitively priced. In this work, we have critically reviewed the principles, applications, and development trends of smart storage technologies.

  4. A Review of Systems and Technologies for Smart Homes and Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Lobaccaro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the actual era of smart homes and smart grids, advanced technological systems that allow the automation of domestic tasks are developing rapidly. There are numerous technologies and applications that can be installed in smart homes today. They enable communication between home appliances and users, and enhance home appliances’ automation, monitoring and remote control capabilities. This review article, by introducing the concept of the smart home and the advent of the smart grid, investigates technologies for smart homes. The technical descriptions of the systems are presented and point out advantages and disadvantages of each technology and product today available on the market. Barriers, challenges, benefits and future trends regarding the technologies and the role of users have also been discussed.

  5. Microbial Biofilm as a Smart Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Christian; Welch, Martin; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilm colonies will in many cases form a smart material capable of responding to external threats dependent on their size and internal state. The microbial community accordingly switches between passive, protective, or attack modes of action. In order to decide which strategy to employ......, it is essential for the biofilm community to be able to sense its own size. The sensor designed to perform this task is termed a quorum sensor, since it only permits collective behaviour once a sufficiently large assembly of microbes have been established. The generic quorum sensor construct involves two genes...

  6. 7th ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Smart Structures and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This work was compiled with expanded and reviewed contributions from the 7th ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Smart Structures and Materials, that was held from 3 to 6 June 2015 at Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal. The Conference provided a comprehensive forum for discussing the current state of the art in the field as well as generating inspiration for future ideas specifically on a multidisciplinary level. The scope of the Conference included topics related to the following areas: Fundamentals of smart materials and structures; Modeling/formulation and characterization of smart actuators, sensors and smart material systems; Trends and developments in diverse areas such as material science including composite materials, intelligent hydrogels, interfacial phenomena, phase boundaries and boundary layers of phase boundaries, control, micro- and nano-systems, electronics, etc. to be considered for smart systems; Comparative evaluation of different smart actuators and sensors; Analysis of structural concepts and des...

  7. A smart predictor for material property testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wilson; Kanneg, Derek

    2008-01-01

    A reliable predictor is very useful for real-world industrial applications to forecast the future behavior of dynamic systems. A smart predictor, based on a novel recurrent neural fuzzy (RNF) scheme, is developed in this paper for multi-step-ahead prediction of material properties. A systematic investigation based on two benchmark data sets is conducted in terms of performance and efficiency. Analysis results reveal that, of the data-driven forecasting schemes, predictors based on step input patterns outperform those based on sequential input patterns; the RNF predictor outperforms those based on recurrent neural networks and ANFIS schemes in multi-step-ahead prediction of nonlinear time series. An adaptive Levenberg–Marquardt training technique is adopted to improve the robustness and convergence of the RNF predictor. Furthermore, the proposed smart predictor is implemented for material property testing. Investigation results show that the developed RNF predictor is a reliable forecasting tool for material property testing; it can capture and track the system's dynamic characteristics quickly and accurately. It is also a robust predictor to accommodate different system conditions

  8. The smart - development and technology; Der smart - Entwicklung und Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goppelt, G.

    1999-06-01

    The smart is the first representative of a radically new vehicle concept, with minimum space requirements and trend-setting in terms of ecology, safety, and individualism. The new design is not rooted in any tradition. The contribution describes the development process and constructional features of the smart. [Deutsch] Der smart ist der erste Vertreter eines voellig neuen Fahrzeugkonzepts. Bei kleinstem Raumbedarf soll er neue Massstaebe bei Oekologie, Sicherheit und Individualitaet setzen. Entstanden ist eine konsequente Neukonstruktion, die sich von bisherigen Traditionen loest. In diesem Beitrag sind der Entwicklungsprozess sowie die Konstruktionsmerkmale des smart beschrieben. (orig.)

  9. Smart Grid Technology and Consumer Call Center Readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Schamber, Kelsey L.

    2010-01-01

    The following reasearch project deals with utility call center readiness to address customer concerns and questions about the Smart Grid and smart meter technology. Since consumer engagement is important for the benefits of the Smart Grid to be realized, the readiness and ability of utilities to answer consumer questions is an important issue. Assessing the readiness of utility call centers to address pertinant customer concerns was accomplished by calling utility call centers with Smart Grid...

  10. EDITORIAL Smart materials, multifunctional composites, and morphing structures: selected papers from the 20th International Conference on Adaptive Structures and Technologies (ICAST 2009) Smart materials, multifunctional composites, and morphing structures: selected papers from the 20th International Conference on Adaptive Structures and Technologies (ICAST 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2010-12-01

    The 20th International Conference on Adaptive Structures and Technologies (ICAST) was held on 20-22 October 2009 in Hong Kong. This special section of Smart Materials and Structures is derived from the research papers presented at the conference. Of the 106 papers presented at the conference, 11 papers were reviewed and accepted for this special section, following the regular review procedures of the journal. This special section is focused on smart materials, multifunctional composites, and applications on morphing structures. Smart materials. Smart materials are the foundation of adaptive structures and intelligent systems. The development of new materials will lead to significant improvement in various applications. Three articles are focused on the fabrication of new materials and investigation of their behaviors: Barium strontium zirconate titanate ((Ba1-xSrx)(ZrxTi1-x)O3; BSZT, x = 0.25 and 0.75) ceramics with a highly crystalline structure were fabricated using the combustion technique. The microstructure of BSZT powders exhibited an almost-spherical morphology and had a porous agglomerated form. Polyaniline (PANI)/clay nanoparticles with unique core-shell structure were synthesized via Pickering emulsion polymerization. By dispersing PANI/clay nanoparticles in silicone oil, the ER fluid was made. Magnetic field effects were investigated on the deposition rate and surface morphology of chromium nitride coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering for superior hardness, excellent wear and oxidation resistance. The surface morphology of chromium nitride films was also examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Multifunctional composites. Composites are made from two or more constituent materials so they can combine the best properties of different materials. Five papers deal with fabrication, testing, and modeling of various multifunctional composites: A new active structural fiber (ASF) was fabricated by coating a single carbon fiber with a concentric

  11. Research on the application of wisdom technology in smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juntao; Ma, Shuai; Gu, Weihua; Chen, Weiyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper first analyzes the concept of smart technology, the relationship between wisdom technology and smart city, and discusses the practical application of IOT(Internet of things) in smart city to explore a better way to realize smart city; then Introduces the basic concepts of cloud computing and smart city, and explains the relationship between the two; Discusses five advantages of cloud computing that applies to smart city construction: a unified and highly efficient, large-scale infrastructure software and hardware management, service scheduling and resource management, security control and management, energy conservation and management platform layer, and to promote modern practical significance of the development of services, promoting regional social and economic development faster. Finally, a brief description of the wisdom technology and smart city management is presented.

  12. Technology for Democracy in Smart City Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo De Pascali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent history the relationship between technology and urban planning has been variously taken into account (and possibly also undervalued, but lately it has come into focus with the maturation ofthe concept of the Smart City. Building on an analysis of documents dealing with the issue andcurrent experiences, this paper tries to determine which opportunity factors the new technologies are offering for the improvement of urban planning. In particular it considers how these technologies arebeing integrated into the processes of participatory planning thus supporting the development of direct democracy. The resulting complex framework suggests four main fields of application where the new technologies can contribute to addressing contents and governance of the plan for an urban organisation that enhances virtuous behaviours and steers the town’s residents towardsadopting them.

  13. Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Lindsey, K.; McBride, James; Clark, G. L.

    2013-06-30

    Reluctance to adopt new technology into a utility application is understandable, given the critical nature of the infrastructure and the less-than-ideal experiences of some power companies. The authors of this paper have considered adapting the NASA approach of classifying technology readiness, but find it not quite appropriate because NASA was both the developer and the eventual user of the new technology it was evaluating, whereas a utility is ordinarily in the mode of a customer, acquiring a new product from a manufacturer. Instead of a generic scale of technology readiness, a scale of readiness is proposed specifically for the smart grid, based on the many standards that exist for the relevant technologies. In this paper we present an overall structure for organization those standards. The acceptance of new technology is organized into five SGL (Smart Grid Level) steps, numbered five through 9 to correspond approximately to the last five numbers of the NASA TRL scale. SGL 5 is a certification that the hardware and software of the technology is safe for the system into which is intended to be placed. SGL 6 is documentation that the system is safe for itself, and will have adequate reliability. It is thus clear that the steps differ from NASA’s TRL in that technology development is not required, the transition is more one of documenting already existing system readiness. Since SGL 6 describes a system that is safe for the power system and for itself, it should not be restricted from being in a pilot-scale study, and achieving SGL 7. A larger-scale demonstration in a realistic environment will demonstrate interoperability and achieve SGL 8. Only when systems are installed and operating, and when disposal plans are in place will the designation of fully operable at SGL 9 be granted.

  14. Networked Rectenna Array for Smart Material Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Song, Kyo D.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart material actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. Networked rectenna patch array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is adopted for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. The PAD circuit is imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array. The thin-film microcircuit embodiment of PAD circuit adds insignificant amount of rigidity to membrane flexibility. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a few nodal elements were made for laboratory testing. The networked actuators were tested to correlate the network coupling effect, power allocation and distribution, and response time. The features of preliminary design are 16-channel computer control of actuators by a PCI board and the compensator for a power failure or leakage of one or more rectennas.

  15. Smart fabric sensors and e-textile technologies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, Lina M; Flatau, Alison B

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a review of recent developments in the rapidly changing and advancing field of smart fabric sensor and electronic textile technologies. It summarizes the basic principles and approaches employed when building fabric sensors as well as the most commonly used materials and techniques used in electronic textiles. This paper shows that sensing functionality can be created by intrinsic and extrinsic modifications to textile substrates depending on the level of integration into the fabric platform. The current work demonstrates that fabric sensors can be tailored to measure force, pressure, chemicals, humidity and temperature variations. Materials, connectors, fabric circuits, interconnects, encapsulation and fabrication methods associated with fabric technologies prove to be customizable and versatile but less robust than their conventional electronics counterparts. The findings of this survey suggest that a complete smart fabric system is possible through the integration of the different types of textile based functional elements. This work intends to be a starting point for standardization of smart fabric sensing techniques and e-textile fabrication methods. (topical review)

  16. Small Rocket/Spacecraft Technology (SMART) Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime; Flatley, Thomas P.; Bull, James B.; Buckley, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Department of Defense Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) Office are exercising a multi-year collaborative agreement focused on a redefinition of the way space missions are designed and implemented. A much faster, leaner and effective approach to space flight requires the concerted effort of a multi-agency team tasked with developing the building blocks, both programmatically and technologically, to ultimately achieve flights within 7-days from mission call-up. For NASA, rapid mission implementations represent an opportunity to find creative ways for reducing mission life-cycle times with the resulting savings in cost. This in tum enables a class of missions catering to a broader audience of science participants, from universities to private and national laboratory researchers. To that end, the SMART (Small Rocket/Spacecraft Technology) micro-spacecraft prototype demonstrates an advanced avionics system with integrated GPS capability, high-speed plug-and-playable interfaces, legacy interfaces, inertial navigation, a modular reconfigurable structure, tunable thermal technology, and a number of instruments for environmental and optical sensing. Although SMART was first launched inside a sounding rocket, it is designed as a free-flyer.

  17. An overview of smart card technology and markets

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Furletti

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Payment Cards Center's series of discussion papers, this paper provides an overview of smart card technology and its potential for significantly increasing payment card functionality. In addition to reviewing the current market for smart cards in the U.S., this paper examines the costs and barriers associated with their wide spread adoption. European and US smart card acceptance is compared. In addition, this paper provides background on the technological and infrastructure dev...

  18. Telecommunication Technologies for Smart Grid Projects with Focus on Smart Metering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoleta Andreadou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a study of the smart grid projects realised in Europe and presents their technological solutions with a focus on smart metering Low Voltage (LV applications. Special attention is given to the telecommunications technologies used. For this purpose, we present the telecommunication technologies chosen by several European utilities for the accomplishment of their smart meter national roll-outs. Further on, a study is performed based on the European Smart Grid Projects, highlighting their technological options. The range of the projects analysed covers the ones including smart metering implementation as well as those in which smart metering applications play a significant role in the overall project success. The survey reveals that various topics are directly or indirectly linked to smart metering applications, like smart home/building, energy management, grid monitoring and integration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES. Therefore, the technological options that lie behind such projects are pointed out. For reasons of completeness, we also present the main characteristics of the telecommunication technologies that are found to be used in practice for the LV grid.

  19. Smart Home Technology for the Elderly: Perceptions of Multidisciplinary Stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Don Bouwhuis; B.A.M. Ben Schouten; Charles Willems; Anne-mie Sponselee

    2008-01-01

    The 'implementation' and use of smart home technology to lengthen independent living of non-instutionalized elderly have not always been flawless. The purpose of this study is to show that problems with smart home technology can be partially ascribed to differences in perception of the stakeholders

  20. Smart home technology for the elderly : perceptions of multidisciplinary stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sponselee, A.A.G.; Schouten, B.A.M.; Bouwhuis, D.G.; Willems, C.; Mühlhauser, M.; Ferscha, A.; Aitenbichler, E.

    2008-01-01

    The "implementation" and use of smart home technology to lengthen independent living of non-instutionalized elderly have not always been flawless. The purpose of this study is to show that problems with smart home technology can be partially ascribed to differences in perception of the stakeholders

  1. Improving reservoir performance using new 'smart' well technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roggensack, W.D.; Matthews, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    The technologies that were available in the past to improve reservoir performance include 3-D seismic, coiled tubing, horizontal wells, and PCP's. Future enabling technologies will also include multi-lateral wells, 'smart' wells, underbalanced drilling, and downhole fluids processing. A description of 'smart' well technology was given, defined as well completions which facilitate downhole monitoring and control of production to achieve maximum reserves recovery. The current development for 'smart' wells is focused on offshore and subsea wells for marginal field development and work-over mitigation, with the emphasis in system design for production control of horizontal and multi-lateral wells. Basic 'smart' well configuration, instrumentation and monitoring systems, applications of 'smart' well technology in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, and future developments and applications for the technology in general, were also discussed. 30 figs

  2. Disseminating and Promoting Smart Farming Technologies –The SmartAKIS Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinker, D.; Kernecker, M.; Knierim, A.; Wurbs, A.; Wolters, Sandra; Evert, van F.K.; Bellostas, N.; Aït-Amar, S.; Balafoutis, T.; Fountas, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarises the early stages of the Smart AKIS project which aims to collect and disseminate Smart Farming Technologies (SFT) in line with farmers' needs. The methodology of collecting information and opinions from over 270 farmers from seven countries about SFTs is given. The methodology

  3. Impact of Smart Grid Technologies on Peak Load to 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The IEA's Smart Grids Technology Roadmap identified five global trends that could be effectively addressed by deploying smart grids. These are: increasing peak load (the maximum power that the grid delivers during peak hours), rising electricity consumption, electrification of transport, deployment of variable generation technologies (e.g. wind and solar PV) and ageing infrastructure. Along with this roadmap, a new working paper -- Impact of Smart Grid Technologies on Peak Load to 2050 -- develops a methodology to estimate the evolution of peak load until 2050. It also analyses the impact of smart grid technologies in reducing peak load for four key regions; OECD North America, OECD Europe, OECD Pacific and China. This working paper is a first IEA effort in an evolving modelling process of smart grids that is considering demand response in residential and commercial sectors as well as the integration of electric vehicles.

  4. Ti-Ni-based shape memory alloys as smart materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, K.; Xu, Y.; Ren, X.

    2003-01-01

    Smart materials consist of three principal materials, ferroelectrics, shape memory alloys (SMA) and electro-active polymers (EAP). Among these SMAs, especially Ti-Ni-based alloys are important, since only they can provide large recoverable strains and high recovery stress. In the present paper the unique characteristics of Ti-Ni-based shape memory alloys are reviewed on an up-to-date basis with the aim of their applications to smart materials and structures. (orig.)

  5. Smart grid standards specifications, requirements, and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takuro; Duan, Bin; Macuha, Martin; Zhou, Zhenyu; Wu, Jun; Tariq, Muhammad; Asfaw, Solomon A

    2015-01-01

    With numerous existing Smart Grid standards, it is clear that governments and industrial organizations world-wide have understood and acknowledged the critical role they play. This timely book is a useful guide for Smart Grid professionals in easily classifying fundamental Smart Grid standards, and to quickly find the building blocks they need to analyse and implement a Smart Grid system. The standards are organized in a systematic manner that aids identification, according to grid requirements. It also covers broader Smart Grid areas including, but not limited to, the following: A fully c

  6. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A., E-mail: osadik@binghamton.ed [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States)

    2010-05-30

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  7. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A.; Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin

    2010-01-01

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  8. Emerging areas of Nano and Smart Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Partha Ghosal

    2016-01-01

    ‘There’s plenty of room at the bottom’ – In 1959, one of the most brilliant physicists the world has ever seen, Richard P. Feynmann, gave us a beautiful introduction to nano-science. Today, after almost seven decades, nano-materials and related technologies are not just a simple extension of regular research and miniaturisation of materials, but have become the prime driver of advancement in science and technology all over the world. Over the past few decades, new societal requirement haveeme...

  9. Microbial Biofilm as a Smart Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Garde

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilm colonies will in many cases form a smart material capable of responding to external threats dependent on their size and internal state. The microbial community accordingly switches between passive, protective, or attack modes of action. In order to decide which strategy to employ, it is essential for the biofilm community to be able to sense its own size. The sensor designed to perform this task is termed a quorum sensor, since it only permits collective behaviour once a sufficiently large assembly of microbes have been established. The generic quorum sensor construct involves two genes, one coding for the production of a diffusible signal molecule and one coding for a regulator protein dedicated to sensing the signal molecules. A positive feedback in the signal molecule production sets a well-defined condition for switching into the collective mode. The activation of the regulator involves a slow dimerization, which allows low-pass filtering of the activation of the collective mode. Here, we review and combine the model components that form the basic quorum sensor in a number of Gram-negative bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  10. Using Smart City Technology to Make Healthcare Smarter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Duncan, Glen; Sprint, Gina; Fritz, Roschelle

    2018-04-01

    Smart cities use information and communication technologies (ICT) to scale services include utilities and transportation to a growing population. In this article we discuss how smart city ICT can also improve healthcare effectiveness and lower healthcare cost for smart city residents. We survey current literature and introduce original research to offer an overview of how smart city infrastructure supports strategic healthcare using both mobile and ambient sensors combined with machine learning. Finally, we consider challenges that will be faced as healthcare providers make use of these opportunities.

  11. SmartPark Technology Demonstration Project, Phase II: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of FMCSA's SmartPark project was to determine the feasibility of a technology for providing truck parking space availability information in real time to truckers on the road. SmartPark consisted of two phases. Phase I was a field operatio...

  12. Welcome to the 2014 volume of Smart Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Smart materials and structures are comprised of structural matter that responds to a stimulus. These materials can be controlled or have properties that can be altered in a prescribed manner. Smart materials generate non-traditional forms of transduction. We are all familiar with common forms of transduction, electromechanical motors. Lorenz's forces utilize permanent and variable magnets, controlled by current, to generate magnetically generated forces that oppose each other. Utilizing this simple principal we have advanced the industrial revolution of the 19th Century by the creation of the servo-mechanism. Controlled velocity and position generation systems that have automated manufacturing, our machines and the very environs in which we dwell. Smart materials often rely on a variety of new and different methods of transduction. Piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, electrostrictive, and phase-change materials, such as shape memory alloys, are among the most common smart materials. Other approaches such as polymer actuators that rely on complex three-dimensional chemical-based composites are also emerging. The trinity of engineering research is analysis, simulation and experimentation. To perform analyses we must understand the physical phenomena at hand in order to develop a mathematical model for the problem. These models form the basis of simulation and complex computational modeling of a system. It is from these models that we begin to expand our understanding about what is possible, ultimately developing simulation-based tools that verify new designs and insights. Experimentation offers the opportunity to verify our analyses and simulations in addition to providing the 'proof of the pudding' so to speak. But it is our ability to simulate that guides us and our expectations, predicting the behavior of what we may see in the lab or in a prototype. Experimentation ultimately provides the feedback to our modeling

  13. Internet of Things Technology and its Applications in Smart Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Hua; Zhang Junguo; Lin Fantao

    2013-01-01

    Smart grid is the latest trend of development and reform in today’s world, and it is also a major technological innovation and development trend in the 21st century. Internet of Things technology is a new information processing and acquisition method, and it has been widely used in intelligent transportation, environmental monitoring and other fields. Internet of Things is an important technical mean to promote the development of smart grid. Using Internet of Things technology can effectively...

  14. SMART - Structure mechanical analysis in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyris, J.H.; Faust, G.; Szimmat, J.; Warnke, E.P.; Willam, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The programme system SMART was developed in the years 1970-75 to calculate prestressed-concrete reactor pressure vessels with finite elements. The present report outlines the course and present state of research and development work. Following the specification of SMART, a brief presentation of the analytical possibilities and of the expansions for investigating creep, ultimate load behaviour and thermodiffusion is given. In conclusion, the fields of application of SMART are illustrated by means of examples. (orig./LH) [de

  15. Utilities’ Technology Management of Smart Grid Innovation and Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben

    2012-01-01

    To create sustainability in society’s energy system, power producers and consumers need smart grid technology to balance among producing and consuming units. Smart grid makes up a host of specifications, unproven products and concepts as well as a strong and dedicated innovation process for utility...... companies. Few proven concepts exist, and with the prolongation, smart grid represents an excellent case of technology management. The current study uses a series of loosely related technological studies of smart grid technologies in SME electricity companies to highlight and characterise critical issues....... Major findings are that the companies have limited capabilities in management of technology despite both strong push and pull, and they suffer from vaguely expressed objectives....

  16. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaokun

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have been investigated with important new applications: (1) healable polymer composites for structural application and healable composite conductor for electronic device application; (2) conducting polymer polypyrrole actuator for implantable medical device application; and (3) ferroelectric polymer and ceramic nanoparticles composites for electrocaloric effect based solid state refrigeration application. These application entail highly challenging materials innovation, and my work has led to significant progress in all three areas. For the healable polymer composites, well known intrinsically healable polymer 2MEP4F (a Diels-Alder crosslinked polymer formed from a monomer with four furan groups and another monomer with two maleimide groups) was first chosen as the matrix reinforced with fiber. Glass fibers were successfully functionalized with maleimide functional groups on their surface. Composites from functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F healable polymer were made to compare with composites made from commercial carbon fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. Dramatically improved short beam shear strength was obtained from composite of functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. The high cost of 2MEP4F polymer can potentially limit the large-scale application of the developed healable composite, we further developed a new healable polymer with much lower cost. This new polymer was formed through the Diels-Alder crosslinking of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) and 1,1'-(Methylenedi-4

  17. SMART - structure mechanical analysis in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyris, J.H.; Faust, G.; Szimmat, J.; Warnke, E.P.; Willam, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The present report outlines the course and present state of research and development work. The specification of SMART is followed by a brief presentation of the analytical possibilities and the expansions for investigations on creep, critical load behaviour and thermodiffusion. Finally, the application regions of SMART are explained by means of examples. (orig./LH) [de

  18. What SMART Technology implies for the industry of the future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Annamalai, Leeandran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This presentation discusses how SMART technology can influence the industry of the future. Topics touched on are software enabled machines able to respond relevantly to real world events, the industrial Internet of Things, and machines measurements...

  19. Human monitoring, smart health and assisted living techniques and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Sauro; Freddi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the three main scientific and technological areas critical for improving people's quality of life - namely human monitoring, smart health and assisted living - from both the research and development points of view.

  20. Health-Enabled Smart Sensor Fusion Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It has been proven that the combination of smart sensors with embedded metadata and wireless technologies present real opportunities for significant improvements in...

  1. Context Aware Systems, Methods and Trends in Smart Home Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Rosslin John; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    Context aware applications respond and adapt to changes in the computing environment. It is the concept of leveraging information about the end user to improve the quality of the interaction. New technologies in context-enriched services will use location, presence, social attributes, and other environmental information to anticipate an end user's immediate needs, offering more-sophisticated, situation-aware and usable functions. Smart homes connect all the devices and appliances in your home so they can communicate with each other and with you. Context-awareness can be applied to Smart Home technology. In this paper, we discuss the context-aware tools for development of Smart Home Systems.

  2. Smart Grid Communication Technologies in the Brazilian Electrical Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Kühne, Philipp; Hauer, Ines; Styczynski, Zbigniew A.; Fernandes, Rubipiara; Vale, Zita

    2013-01-01

    Intelligent electrical grids can be considered as the next generation of electrical energy transportation. The enormous potential leads to worldwide focus of research on the technology of smart grids. This paper aims to present a review of the Brazilian electricity sector in context with the integration of communication technologies for smart grids. The work gives an overview of the generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy in the Brazil and a brief summary ...

  3. Aerospace materials and material technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wanhill, R

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of chapters on materials (both established and evolving) and material technologies that are important for aerospace systems. It considers aerospace materials in three Parts. Part I covers Metallic Materials (Mg, Al, Al-Li, Ti, aero steels, Ni, intermetallics, bronzes and Nb alloys); Part II deals with Composites (GLARE, PMCs, CMCs and Carbon based CMCs); and Part III considers Special Materials. This compilation has ensured that no important aerospace material system is ignored. Emphasis is laid in each chapter on the underlying scientific principles as well as basic and fundamental mechanisms leading to processing, characterization, property evaluation and applications. A considerable amount of materials data is compiled and presented in appendices at the end of the book. This book will be useful to students, researchers and professionals working in the domain of aerospace materials.

  4. Privacy, technology, and norms: the case of Smart Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Christine; Darras, Brice; Bean, Elyse; Srivastava, Anurag; Frickel, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Norms shift and emerge in response to technological innovation. One such innovation is Smart Meters - components of Smart Grid energy systems capable of minute-to-minute transmission of consumer electricity use information. We integrate theory from sociological research on social norms and privacy to examine how privacy threats affect the demand for and expectations of norms that emerge in response to new technologies, using Smart Meters as a test case. Results from three vignette experiments suggest that increased threats to privacy created by Smart Meters are likely to provoke strong demand for and expectations of norms opposing the technology and that the strength of these normative rules is at least partly conditional on the context. Privacy concerns vary little with actors' demographic characteristics. These findings contribute to theoretical understanding of norm emergence and have practical implications for implementing privacy protections that effectively address concerns of electricity users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Applying Smart Grid Technology For Reducing Electric Energy Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Roy

    2010-09-15

    In recent years the term 'Smart Grid' has become a widely used buzz word with respect to the operation of Electric Power Systems. One analysis has suggested that a Smart Grid could potentially reduce annual energy consumption in the USA by 56 to 203 billion kWh in 2030, corresponding to a 1.2 to 4.3% reduction in projected retail electricity sales in 2030. This paper discusses some of the smart grid technologies pertaining to the operation of electric power distribution networks.

  6. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  7. Smart Technology Brings Power to the People

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Gephart, Julie M.

    2006-12-01

    Imagine you’re at home one Saturday morning on the computer, as your son takes a shower, your daughter is watching TV, and a load of laundry is in your washer and dryer. Meanwhile, the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee fills the house. You hear a momentary beep from the dryer that tells you that if you were to look, a high-energy price indicator would be displayed on the front panels of some of your favorite appliances. This tells you that you could save money right now by using less energy. (You’ve agreed to this arrangement to help your utility avoid a substation upgrade. In return, you get a lower rate most of the time.) So you turn off some of the unneeded lights in your home and opt to wait until evening to run the dishwasher. Meanwhile, some of your largest appliances have automatically responded to this signal and have already reduced your home’s energy consumption, saving you money. On January 11, 2006, demonstration projects were launched in 200 homes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory in Richland, Washington, is managing the yearlong study called the Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration, a project funded primarily by DOE. Through the GridWise™ Demonstration projects, researchers are gaining insight into energy consumers’ behavior while testing new technologies designed to bring the electric transmission system into the information age. Northwest utilities, appliance manufacturers and technology companies are also supporting this effort to demonstrate the devices and assess the resulting consumer response. A combination of devices, software and advanced analytical tools will give homeowners more information about their energy use and cost, and we want to know if this will modify their behavior. Approximately 100

  8. ENABLING SMART MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECISION-MAKING SUPPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helu, Moneer; Libes, Don; Lubell, Joshua; Lyons, Kevin; Morris, KC

    2017-01-01

    Smart manufacturing combines advanced manufacturing capabilities and digital technologies throughout the product lifecycle. These technologies can provide decision-making support to manufacturers through improved monitoring, analysis, modeling, and simulation that generate more and better intelligence about manufacturing systems. However, challenges and barriers have impeded the adoption of smart manufacturing technologies. To begin to address this need, this paper defines requirements for data-driven decision making in manufacturing based on a generalized description of decision making. Using these requirements, we then focus on identifying key barriers that prevent the development and use of data-driven decision making in industry as well as examples of technologies and standards that have the potential to overcome these barriers. The goal of this research is to promote a common understanding among the manufacturing community that can enable standardization efforts and innovation needed to continue adoption and use of smart manufacturing technologies. PMID:28649678

  9. Smart material interfaces: a new form of physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, E.H.; Vyas, Dhaval; Poelman, Wim; Höök, K,; Nijholt, Antinus; De Bruijn, Arnoud

    2012-01-01

    Smart Material Interface (SMI) is the latest generation of user interface that makes use of engineered materials and leverages their special properties. SMIs are capable of changing their physical properties such as shape, size and color, and can be controlled under certain (external) conditions. We

  10. A business case for Smart Grid technologies: A systemic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Fulli, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    The digitalization of the electricity grid opens the way to bundle value added services to the electricity commodity, and possibly shift business value to electricity services in line with the notions of efficiency, conservation and sustainability. In this context, market forces should be mobilized within the boundaries of energy policy goals to contribute to the massive investments that are required to fulfill the Smart Grid vision. In this paper, we present a systemic perspective aimed at establishing technical and economic synergies that may improve the business cases of individual different Smart Grid technologies and contribute to reverse the consumption-driven paradigm of the electricity sector. Our analysis is supported by evidence from applications in the electric vehicle and smart meter ecosystems. Throughout the paper, an EU (European Union) perspective is primarily considered. - Highlights: ► We show how the analysis of systemic effects can play a fundamental role in offering a business case to Smart Grid technology and in providing some guidance to new policy interventions and initiatives. ► We base our discussion on two case studies: the set-up of business platforms for (1) Electric Vehicles and E-mobility services and (2) Smart Meters and Smart Home Services. ► We highlight how new business arrangements might leverage technological/business synergies, foster investments and shift business value to electricity services. ► We discuss possible downsides and challenges such as privacy concerns, dominant positions in new business platforms, and consumers' resistance.

  11. Analysis of instrumentation technology for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Seop; Koo, I. S.; Park, H. Y.; Lee, C. K.; Kim, D. H.; Suh, Y. S.; Seong, S. H.; Jang, G. S.

    1998-03-01

    It is necessary that development requirements, techniques to be developed, and development tasks and approach are established to develop the SMART instrumentation system. It is important to establish the development strategies for input for developing SMART instrumentation system. To meet above needs, the industry general and nuclear instrumentation techniques were analyzed and reviewed, respectively, based on the classification of instrumentation to analyze the industrial instrumentation techniques, and analysis results which described the inherent merits and demerits of each technique can be used for inputs to select the instruments for SMART. For the instrumentation techniques for nuclear environments, the major instrumentation techniques were reviewed, and the instrumentation system were established. The following development approaches were established based on the development requirements and the analysis results of research and development trends of industrial and nuclear instrumentation techniques. (author). 90 refs., 38 tabs., 33 figs

  12. Smart Materials for Electromagnetic and Optical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Prashanth

    dissertation demonstrates GaN as a candidate material well suited for novel microelectromechanical systems. The potential of GaN for MEMS is demonstrated via the design, analysis, fabrication, testing and characterization of an optical microswitch device actuated by piezoelectric and electrostrictive means. The piezoelectric and electrostrictive properties of GaN and its differences from common piezoelectrics are discussed before elaborating on the device configuration used to implement the microswitch device. Next, the development of two recent fabrication technologies, Photoelectrochemical etch and Bias-enabled Dark Electrochemical etch, used to realize the 3-dimensional device structure in GaN are described in detail. Finally, an ultra-low-cost, laser-based, non-contact approach to test and characterize the microswitch device is described, followed by the device testing results.

  13. Unlocking the potential of smart grid technologies with behavioral science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintov, Nicole D; Schultz, P Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Smart grid systems aim to provide a more stable and adaptable electricity infrastructure, and to maximize energy efficiency. Grid-linked technologies vary widely in form and function, but generally share common potentials: to reduce energy consumption via efficiency and/or curtailment, to shift use to off-peak times of day, and to enable distributed storage and generation options. Although end users are central players in these systems, they are sometimes not central considerations in technology or program design, and in some cases, their motivations for participating in such systems are not fully appreciated. Behavioral science can be instrumental in engaging end-users and maximizing the impact of smart grid technologies. In this paper, we present emerging technologies made possible by a smart grid infrastructure, and for each we highlight ways in which behavioral science can be applied to enhance their impact on energy savings.

  14. Shape Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) Updates to Techport Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa; Bertagne, Christopher; Hartl, Darren; Witcomb, John; Cognata, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Shape-Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) project builds off the FY16 research effort that developed a flexible composite radiator panel and demonstrated its ability to actuate from SMA's attached to it. The proposed FY17 Shape-Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) project's goal is to 1) develop a practical radiator design with shape memory alloys (SMAs) bonded to the radiator's panel, and 2) build a multi-panel radiator prototype for subsequent system level thermal vacuum tests. The morphing radiator employs SMA materials to passively change its shape to adapt its rate of heat rejection to vehicle requirements. Conceptually, the radiator panel has a naturally closed position (like a cylinder) in a cold environment. Whenever the radiator's temperature gradually rises, SMA's affixed to the face sheet will pull the face sheet open a commensurate amount - increasing the radiators view to space and causing it to reject more heat. In a vehicle, the radiator's variable heat rejection capabilities would reduce the number of additional heat rejection devices in a vehicle's thermal control system. This technology aims to help achieve the required maximum to minimum heat rejection ratio required for manned space vehicles to adopt a lighter, simpler, single loop thermal control architecture (ATCS). Single loop architectures are viewed as an attractive means to reduce mass and complexity over traditional dual-loop solutions. However, fluids generally considered safe enough to flow within crewed cabins (e.g. propylene glycol-water mixtures) have much higher freezing points and viscosities than those used in the external sides of dual loop ATCSs (e.g. Ammonia and HFE7000).

  15. Application of smart grid technologies in developing areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, E.A.M.; Asare-Bediako, B.; Kling, W.L.; Balkema, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations has set the ambitious goal of assuring universal access to modern energy by 2030. Nowadays there are a lot of technical opportunities available to achieve these goals in an efficient way using smart grid technologies. However the extent to which these technologies are being

  16. Designing components using smartMOVE electroactive polymer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marcus; Weaber, Chris; Polyakov, Ilya; Zarrabi, Al; Gise, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Designing components using SmartMOVE TM electroactive polymer technology requires an understanding of the basic operation principles and the necessary design tools for integration into actuator, sensor and energy generation applications. Artificial Muscle, Inc. is collaborating with OEMs to develop customized solutions for their applications using smartMOVE. SmartMOVE is an advanced and elegant way to obtain almost any kind of movement using dielectric elastomer electroactive polymers. Integration of this technology offers the unique capability to create highly precise and customized motion for devices and systems that require actuation. Applications of SmartMOVE include linear actuators for medical, consumer and industrial applications, such as pumps, valves, optical or haptic devices. This paper will present design guidelines for selecting a smartMOVE actuator design to match the stroke, force, power, size, speed, environmental and reliability requirements for a range of applications. Power supply and controller design and selection will also be introduced. An overview of some of the most versatile configuration options will be presented with performance comparisons. A case example will include the selection, optimization, and performance overview of a smartMOVE actuator for the cell phone camera auto-focus and proportional valve applications.

  17. Development of the core safety regulation technology for the SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam Zin; Kim, Do Sam; Lee, Kyeong Taek; Park, Young Ryoung; Lee, Gil Soo; Kim, Jong Woon; Yun, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Myung Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    As the SMART-P is different from existing general reactors, new regulation technology is required to understand and assess the SMART-P for its regulatory reviews. One of the these technologies is related to the core design analysis. Because the SMART-P used metallic fuels, this study also collects general metallic nuclear fuel data and SMART-P's metallic fuel data from the materials studied by KAERI. The core design methodologies of KWU, ABB-CE, Westinghouse, Studsvik, Scandpower, US NRC and domestic research centers were investigated. Specially, The Hellios lattice core was studied for hexagonal nuclear fuel assembly calculation. Also, the VVER-1000 benchmark problem was analyzed by the PARCS code which has been developed by U.S. NRC. In this study, a AFEN-based computing code KORDAX os developed for the regulatory review of the SMART-P. KORDAX which is a nodal code using AFEN method dose not use transverse integration and this it can give higher accuracy results. Also, Because KORDAX is useful for hexagonal core and uses a method different with the core design code of the SMART-P developed by KAERI, it is judged that KORDAX can be an independent and reliable regulation verification code. In the next year study, HELIOS will be further studied as a core lattice code, and a hexagonal kinetics code which is based on AFEN method will be developed more systematically.

  18. Special Issue: Adaptive/Smart Structures and Multifunctional Materials with Application to Morphing Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafic Ajaj

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in smart structures and multifunctional materials have facilitated many novel aerospace technologies such as morphing aircraft. A morphing aircraft, bio-inspired by natural fliers, has gained a lot of interest as a potential technology to meet the ambitious goals of the Advisory Council for Aeronautics Research in Europe (ACARE Vision 2020 and the FlightPath 2050 documents. A morphing aircraft continuously adjusts its wing geometry to enhance flight performance, control authority, and multi-mission capability.[...

  19. Wearable technology smart watches to Google Glass for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Emerging devices are placing powerful computing abilities into the wardrobes of consumers through wearable technology which combines fashion and function in new and exciting ways. The most recognizable of these emerging gadgets is Google Glass. Wearable Technology: Smart Watches to Google Glass for Libraries provides a comprehensive overview of the current wearable technology landscape, the types of devices and functionality available, the benefits and limitations of this type of technology, and how you can make use of it in yo

  20. Exploring private consumers’ willingness to adopt Smart Grid technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Madeleine Broman; Thøgersen, John

    2015-01-01

    it involves behavioural changes. There is a need to get more insight into who are willing to adopt SGT and why. This study draws on innovation adoption theory as a framework for understanding consumer adoption of this new technology. We explore whether consumers who have already adopted other types of new......The goal of radically increasing the proportion of electricity generated from renewable sources puts the current electrical grid under pressure and one of the solutions is to turn the grid into a ‘Smart Grid’. One of the key elements of the Smart Grid is that electricity consumers make some...... of their consumption available as flexible capacity to balance the grid. Consumers’ flexible capacity is only available to the grid if the consumers adopt Smart Grid technology (SGT) that establishes the link between the electric system and the consumer. This technology is new to private consumers and using...

  1. Nano-Bio Quantum Technology for Device-Specific Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2009-01-01

    The areas discussed are still under development: I. Nano structured materials for TE applications a) SiGe and Be.Te; b) Nano particles and nanoshells. II. Quantum technology for optical devices: a) Quantum apertures; b) Smart optical materials; c) Micro spectrometer. III. Bio-template oriented materials: a) Bionanobattery; b) Bio-fuel cells; c) Energetic materials.

  2. Strain characterization of embedded aerospace smart materials using shearography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anisimov, A.; Muller, B.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of smart materials for embedding in aerospace composites provides enhanced functionality for future aircraft structures. Critical flight conditions like icing of the leading edges can affect the aircraft functionality and controllability. Hence, anti-icing and de-icing capabilities

  3. SMARTS - a spectrometer for strain measurement in engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, M.A.M. [MS H805, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Dunand, D.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Cook Hall, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); Ustundag, E. [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A new spectrometer called SMARTS (Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress) has been commissioned at the Los Alamos neutron science center and entered the user program in August of 2002. Its design maximizes capability and throughput for measurements of (a) residual macrostrain in engineering components and (b) in situ loading. This paper describes some aspects of the instrument. (orig.)

  4. SMARTS - a spectrometer for strain measurement in engineering materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bourke, M A M; Ustundag, E

    2002-01-01

    A new spectrometer called SMARTS (Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress) has been commissioned at the Los Alamos neutron science center and entered the user program in August of 2002. Its design maximizes capability and throughput for measurements of (a) residual macrostrain in engineering components and (b) in situ loading. This paper describes some aspects of the instrument. (orig.)

  5. Materials and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gockel, E.; Simon, J.

    1998-01-01

    New materials and the processes for their economical fabrication and use are the factors which drive innovation in totally different fields of technology, such as energy engineering, transport, and information. But they also open up new fields of technology such as micro systems or medicine technology. Five out of a total of twelve articles are separately listed in the ENERGY database [de

  6. Analyses and Forecasting of Smart Grid Technological Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Danilin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: this paper analyzes and forecasts medium- to long-term dynamics of Smart Grid technology developments considering both patent activity and socio-economic (demand-side issues and requirements of economy and power system factors. Methods: for the analysis of Smart Grid patent data (IIP, USPTO, and WIPO patent databases used we apply syntactic semantic analysis of texts in natural languages and logistic curve-based method. We propose Exactus Patent system for intelligent full-text search and analysis of patents (results verified with Thomson Innovation and TotalPatent patent search systems. For interpretation of revealed dynamics and forecasting of future conditions we identify key long-term socio-economic factors drivers for Smart Grid development. Elements of C. Christensen (disruptive innovations and G. Dosi (technological trajectories theories were applied. Results: the study reveals a fast technological transformation within the Smart Grid domain due to the long-term socio-economic factors such as rise of renewables; energy efficiency and energy security issues; environmental constraints and shift of values; requirements for accelerated grid construction (in developing economies and grid modernization (in developed ones; ongoing economy-wide digitalization. Due to the limited economic effects of Smart Grid roll-outs (considering major requirements of economic agents and society and considering progressions of patent dynamics, authors forecasts technology stagnation (in terms of number of patents growth by the end of 2010-s as end of Gartner`s hype development stage. Conclusions and Relevance: a foreseen change in dynamics of Smart Grid technology development is interpreted as a manifestation of sinusoidal fluctuations in technology development for disruptive technologies (supported with OECD data. A longer cycle (in comparison with other disruptive technologies is interpreted as consequence of technology and industry specifics

  7. Smart photonic materials for theranostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Do Hee; Beack, Songeun; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2017-05-01

    We developed melanoidin nanoparticles for in vivo noninvasive photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, photoacoustic tomography of gastro-intestinal tracts, and photothermal ablation cancer therapy. In addition, we developed cell-integrated poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for in vivo optogenetic sensing and therapy. Real-time optical readout of encapsulated heat-shock-protein-coupled fluorescent reporter cells made it possible to measure the nanotoxicity of cadmium-based quantum dots in vivo. Using optogenetic cells producing glucagon-like peptide-1, we performed lightcontrolled diabetic therapy for glucose homeostasis. Finally, we developed a smart contact lens composed of biosensors, drug delivery systems, and power sources for the treatment of diabetes as a model disease.

  8. General Motors and the University of Michigan smart materials and structures collaborative research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Shaw, John; Johnson, Nancy L.; Browne, Alan L.; Alexander, Paul W.; Mankame, Nilesh D.

    2007-04-01

    The field of Smart Materials and Structures is evolving from high-end, one-of-a-kind products for medical, military and aerospace applications to the point of viability for mainstream affordable high volume products for automotive applications. For the automotive industry, there are significant potential benefits to be realized including reduction in vehicle mass, added functionality and design flexibility and decrease in component size and cost. To further accelerate the path from basic research and development to launched competitive products, General Motors (GM) has teamed with the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM) to establish a $2.9 Million Collaborative Research Laboratory (CRL) in Smart Materials and Structures. Researchers at both GM and UM are working closely together to create leap-frog technologies which start at conceptualization and proceed all the way through demonstration and handoff to product teams, thereby bridging the traditional technology gap between industry and academia. In addition to Smart Device Technology Innovation, other thrust areas in the CRL include Smart Material Maturity with a basic research focus on overcoming material issues that form roadblocks to commercialism and Mechamatronic System Design Methodology with an applied focus on development tools (synthesis and analysis) to aid the engineer in application of smart materials to system engineering. This CRL is a global effort with partners across the nation and world from GM's Global Research Network such as HRL Laboratories in California and GM's India Science Lab in Bangalore, India. This paper provides an overview of this new CRL and gives examples of several of the projects underway.

  9. Consumer attitudes and the benefits of smart grid technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablondi, B. [Parks Associates, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    This article discussed consumer attitudes regarding the benefits of smart grid technology. Understanding the motivations of consumers and how much they are willing to pay for smart grid technologies allows utilities to tailor their offerings to ensure market success. Surveys revealed that more than 80 percent of consumers are very interested in learning about ways to cut energy expenditures. Most consumers are only willing to pay less than the cost of the special equipment to participate in programs that guarantee cost savings, requiring innovation on the part of both utilities and their vendors to develop viable business models. Remote monitoring systems are a potential residential energy management solution that would increase consumer awareness of energy consumption, but adoption will occur slowly and only after consumer awareness is increased. The segmentation of consumers is necessary for providers to target those with both an interest in and a willingness to pay for an energy monitoring system. Most consumers want to see information on a thermostat with an enhanced display, and there is limited interest in other formats at this time. Consumers are willing to pay a premium for smart appliances, but the premium only amounts to a fraction of the actual cost, leaving no incentive for appliance manufacturers in the absence of tax or utility incentives. It was concluded that consumer attitudes toward smart grid technology are still being formed and that the consumer must be engaged to realize the full benefit of the smart grid in the residential market. 4 figs.

  10. Design and value of service oriented technologies for smart business networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alt, R.; Smits, M.T.; Beverungen, D.; Tuunanen, T.; Wijnhoven, F.

    2014-01-01

    Business networks that effectively use technologies and outperform competing networks are known as smart business networks. Theory hypothesizes that smart business networking requires a ‘Networked Business Operating System’ (NBOS), a technological architecture consisting of business logic, that

  11. Evaluation of Smart Grid Technologies Employed for System Reliability Improvement: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agalgaonkar, Yashodhan P.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2017-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD) was a smart grid technology performance evaluation project that included multiple U.S. states and cooperation from multiple electric utilities in the northwest region. One of the local objectives for the project was to achieve improved distribution system reliability. Toward this end, some PNWSGD utilities automated their distribution systems, including the application of fault detection, isolation, and restoration and advanced metering infrastructure. In light of this investment, a major challenge was to establish a correlation between implementation of these smart grid technologies and actual improvements of distribution system reliability. This paper proposes using Welch’s t-test to objectively determine and quantify whether distribution system reliability is improving over time. The proposed methodology is generic, and it can be implemented by any utility after calculation of the standard reliability indices. The effectiveness of the proposed hypothesis testing approach is demonstrated through comprehensive practical results. It is believed that wider adoption of the proposed approach can help utilities to evaluate a realistic long-term performance of smart grid technologies.

  12. Prosumers and smart grid technologies in Denmark: developing user competences in smart grid households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Hauge, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores and describes resident’s experiences from a smart grid project that involved 20 households in a rural area in Denmark and ran from 2014 to 2015. The study is based on qualitative data from the participating households, collected 6, 12 and 18 months after the start...... of the intervention. Drawing on theories of social practice and the three intertwined elements of a practice: competences, images and materials, the paper contributes with an in-depth analysis of a complex intervention, focusing on how the participants changed energy practices as a result of the installed smart grid...

  13. Unlocking the potential of smart grid technologies with behavioral science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eSintov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart grid systems aim to provide a more stable and adaptable electricity infrastructure, and to maximize energy efficiency. Grid-linked technologies vary widely in form and function, but generally share common potentials: to reduce energy consumption via efficiency and/or curtailment, to shift use to off-peak times of day, and to enable distributed storage and generation options. Although end users are key players in these systems, they tend to be overlooked. Behavioral science is therefore key to engaging end-users and maximizing the impact of smart grid technologies. In this paper, we highlight several ways in which behavioral science can be applied to better understand and engage customers in smart grid systems.

  14. Disease Diagnosis in Smart Healthcare: Innovation, Technologies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Tai Chui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To promote sustainable development, the smart city implies a global vision that merges artificial intelligence, big data, decision making, information and communication technology (ICT, and the internet-of-things (IoT. The ageing issue is an aspect that researchers, companies and government should devote efforts in developing smart healthcare innovative technology and applications. In this paper, the topic of disease diagnosis in smart healthcare is reviewed. Typical emerging optimization algorithms and machine learning algorithms are summarized. Evolutionary optimization, stochastic optimization and combinatorial optimization are covered. Owning to the fact that there are plenty of applications in healthcare, four applications in the field of diseases diagnosis (which also list in the top 10 causes of global death in 2015, namely cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, and tuberculosis, are considered. In addition, challenges in the deployment of disease diagnosis in healthcare have been discussed.

  15. Smart homes, private homes? An empirical study of technology researchers? perceptions of ethical issues in developing smart-home health technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Birchley, Giles; Huxtable, Richard; Murtagh, Madeleine; ter Meulen, Ruud; Flach, Peter; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    Background Smart-home technologies, comprising environmental sensors, wearables and video are attracting interest in home healthcare delivery. Development of such technology is usually justified on the basis of the technology?s potential to increase the autonomy of people living with long-term conditions. Studies of the ethics of smart-homes raise concerns about privacy, consent, social isolation and equity of access. Few studies have investigated the ethical perspectives of smart-home engine...

  16. Smart materials for energy storage in Li-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf E Abdel-Ghany

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced lithium-ion batteries contain smart materials having the function of insertion electrodes in the form of powders with specific and optimized electrochemical properties. Different classes can be considered: the surface modified active particles at either positive or negative electrodes, the nano-composite electrodes and the blended materials. In this paper, various systems are described, which illustrate the improvement of lithium-ion batteries in term of specific energy and power, thermal stability and life cycling.

  17. Technology comparison of wireless of control networks for smart home and smart metering applications; Technologievergleich drahtloser Steuernetzwerke fuer Smart Home und Smart Metering Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langhammer, N.; Kays, R. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Kommunikationstechnik

    2012-07-01

    Smart grid power systems require a continuous communication technology networking at all levels of the hierarchy. In addition to large industrial consumers in the higher network levels, components in low voltage networks must be integrated into the smart grid. The realization of a robust control network for smart home and smart metering applications in the residential environment requires a major challenge. Due to the easy upgradeability and the great flexibility, the utilization of wireless technologies is very attractive. In practice, however, many different standards are competing. Examples for this include IEEE 802.15.4 and Konnex-RF. A tendency towards a de-facto standard is not yet in sight. In addition, the individual performance of the various technologies is difficult to estimate due to the large variety of parameters. This complicates the selection and commitment to a particular technology. However, in order to make a decision, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on an objective comparison of the new communication technology layers of the current wireless control networks. As a comparison, the parameters of reliable indoor coverage and the expected energy consumption are used.

  18. Preparing for smart grid technologies: A behavioral decision research approach to understanding consumer expectations about smart meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurti, Tamar; Schwartz, Daniel; Davis, Alexander; Fischhoff, Baruch; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Lave, Lester; Wang, Jack

    2012-01-01

    With the enactment of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, U.S. President Obama made a public commitment to a new approach to energy production and transmission in the United States. It features installing smart meters and related technologies in residential homes, as part of transforming the current electrical grid into a “smart grid.” Realizing this transformation requires consumers to accept these new technologies and take advantage of the opportunities that they create. We use methods from behavioral decision research to understand consumer beliefs about smart meters, including in-depth mental models interviews and a follow-up survey with a sample of potential smart meter customers of a major U.S. mid-Atlantic electricity utility. In both the surveys and the interviews, most respondents reported wanting smart meters. However, these preferences were often based on erroneous beliefs regarding their purpose and function. Respondents confused smart meters with in-home displays and other enabling technologies, while expecting to realize immediate savings. They also perceived risks, including less control over their electricity usage, violations of their privacy, and increased costs. We discuss the policy implications of our results. - Highlights: ► We outline normative risks and benefits of smart meters from scientific literature. ► We examine consumer perceptions of smart meters via interviews and surveys. ► Smart meter desire stems from consumer misconceptions about purpose and function. ► Appropriate communications may prevent consumer protests against the smart grid.

  19. How Older Adults Make Decisions regarding Smart Technology: An Ethnographic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Rick D.; Mann, William; Lutz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Comparatively little research has been conducted regarding the smart technology needs of the older adult population despite the proliferation of smart technology prototypes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived smart technology needs of older adults with mobility impairments while using an ethnographic research approach to…

  20. Broadband transmission noise reduction of smart panels featuring piezoelectric shunt circuits and sound-absorbing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Lee, Joong-Kuen

    2002-09-01

    The possibility of a broadband noise reduction of piezoelectric smart panels is experimentally studied. A piezoelectric smart panel is basically a plate structure on which piezoelectric patches with electrical shunt circuits are mounted and sound-absorbing material is bonded on the surface of the structure. Sound-absorbing material can absorb the sound transmitted at the midfrequency region effectively while the use of piezoelectric shunt damping can reduce the transmission at resonance frequencies of the panel structure. To be able to reduce the sound transmission at low panel resonance frequencies, piezoelectric damping using the measured electrical impedance model is adopted. A resonant shunt circuit for piezoelectric shunt damping is composed of resistor and inductor in series, and they are determined by maximizing the dissipated energy through the circuit. The transmitted noise-reduction performance of smart panels is tested in an acoustic tunnel. The tunnel is a square cross-sectional tube and a loudspeaker is mounted at one side of the tube as a sound source. Panels are mounted in the middle of the tunnel and the transmitted sound pressure across panels is measured. When an absorbing material is bonded on a single plate, a remarkable transmitted noise reduction in the midfrequency region is observed except for the fundamental resonance frequency of the plate. By enabling the piezoelectric shunt damping, noise reduction is achieved at the resonance frequency as well. Piezoelectric smart panels incorporating passive absorbing material and piezoelectric shunt damping is a promising technology for noise reduction over a broadband of frequencies.

  1. Improving Blood Pressure Control Using Smart Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciemins, Elizabeth L; Arora, Anupama; Coombs, Nicholas C; Holloway, Barbara; Mullette, Elizabeth J; Garland, Robin; Walsh Bishop-Green, Shannon; Penso, Jerry; Coon, Patricia J

    2018-03-01

    The authors sought to determine if wireless oscillometric home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) that integrates with smartphone technology improves blood pressure (BP) control among patients with new or existing uncontrolled hypertension (HTN). A prospective observational cohort study monitored BP control before and after an educational intervention and introduction to HBPM. Patients in the intervention group were instructed to track their BP using a smartphone device three to seven times per week. Cases were matched to controls at a 1:3 allocation ratio on several clinical characteristics over the same period and received usual care. The proportion of patients with controlled BP was compared between groups at pre- and postintervention, ∼9 months later. Results and Materials: The total study population included 484 patients with mean age 60 years (range 23-102 years), 47.7% female, and 84.6% Caucasian. Mean preintervention BP was 137.8 mm Hg systolic and 81.4 mm Hg diastolic. Mean BP control rates improved for patients who received HBPM from 42% to 67% compared with matched control patients who improved from 59% to 67% (p technology has the potential to improve HTN management among patients with uncontrolled or newly diagnosed HTN. Technology needs to be easy to use and operate and would work best when integrated into local electronic health record systems. In systems without this capability, medical assistants or other personnel may be trained to facilitate the process. Nurse navigator involvement was instrumental in bridging communication between the patients and provider.

  2. A Semantics-Rich Information Technology Architecture for Smart Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Bonino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of smart homes, buildings and environments currently suffers from a low maturity of available methodologies and tools. Technologies, devices and protocols strongly bias the design process towards vertical integration, and more flexible solutions based on separation of design concerns are seldom applied. As a result, the current landscape of smart environments is mostly populated by defectively designed solutions where application requirements (e.g., end-user functionality are too often mixed and intertwined with technical requirements (e.g., managing the network of devices. A mature and effective design process must, instead, rely on a clear separation between the application layer and the underlying enabling technologies, to enable effective design reuse. The role of smart gateways is to enable this separation of concerns and to provide an abstracted view of available automation technology to higher software layers. This paper presents a blueprint for the information technology (IT architecture of smart buildings that builds on top of established software engineering practices, such as model-driven development and semantic representation, and that avoids many pitfalls inherent in legacy approaches. The paper will also present a representative use case where the approach has been applied and the corresponding modeling and software tools.

  3. Novel Smart Glove Technology as a Biomechanical Monitoring Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan O’FLYNN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Developments in Virtual Reality (VR technology and its overall market have been occurring since the 1960s when Ivan Sutherland created the world’s first tracked head-mounted display (HMD – a goggle type head gear. In society today, consumers are expecting a more immersive experience and associated tools to bridge the cyber-physical divide. This paper presents the development of a next generation smart glove microsystem to facilitate Human Computer Interaction through the integration of sensors, processors and wireless technology. The objective of the glove is to measure the range of hand joint movements, in real time and empirically in a quantitative manner. This includes accurate measurement of flexion, extension, adduction and abduction of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP, Proximal interphalangeal (PIP and Distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the fingers and thumb in degrees, together with thumb-index web space movement. This system enables full real-time monitoring of complex hand movements. Commercially available gloves are not fitted with sufficient sensors for full data capture, and require calibration for each glove wearer. Unlike these current state-of-the-art data gloves, the UU / Tyndall Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU glove uses a combination of novel stretchable substrate material and 9 degree of freedom (DOF inertial sensors in conjunction with complex data analytics to detect joint movement. Our novel IMU data glove requires minimal calibration and is therefore particularly suited to multiple application domains such as Human Computer interfacing, Virtual reality, the healthcare environment..

  4. Smart Materials Systems Through Mesoscale Patterning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aksay, Ilhan

    2001-01-01

    ...) self-assembled monolayers, and (3) 3-dimensional co-assembly. The two novel systems developed for use in sensor and actuator technologies were piezoelectric shell transducers and 1-3 piezocomposite hydrophones...

  5. SMART MATERIALS AS MODERN ENGINEERING SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ćwikła

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the type and use of intelligent materials in aviation and medicine. Their basic features and properties have been discussed. Moreover, the authors quote examples of different uses of intelligent materials, both the existing ones and those in design and development stages. Their use is claimed to be increasing the efficiency and reliability of processes and equipment as well as facilitates the development of new mechanisms.

  6. Integration of nature and technology for smart cities

    CERN Document Server

    Ahuja, Anil

    2016-01-01

    This book is a resumption of the work “Integrated M/E Design: Building Systems Engineering” published by Anil Ahuja in 1997. Together with an international group of authors from the engineering, urban planning, and architecture fields, Mr. Ahuja discussed new trends and paradigms in the smart buildings and smart city sectors and extended the topic of the previous publication from the building to the entire city. A smart, sustainable building is not just about the building itself. There are things happening in the inside of the building and on the outside. A smart building connects the inside with the outside, provides efficiencies on both sides, synchronizes the outside infrastructure with its inside systems, and integrates nature and its occupants in its design. A smart building doesn’t just provide technology solutions. It is about constant exchange between the inside and the outside of the building, the contribution of the building to the quality of the entire neighborhood and the rest of the city, h...

  7. Using smart materials to solve new challenges in the automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gath, Kerrie K.; Maranville, Clay; Tardiff, Janice

    2018-03-01

    Ford has an extensive history of developing and utilizing smart and innovative materials in its vehicles. In this paper, we present new challenges the automotive industry is facing and explore how intelligent uses of smart materials can help provide solutions. We explore which vehicle attributes may provide most advantageous for the use smart materials, and discuss how smart material have had technical challenges that limit their use. We also look at how smart materials such as gecko inspired adhesion is providing opportunities during the vehicle assembly process by improving manufacturing quality, environmental sustainability, and worker safety. An emerging area for deployment of smart materials may involve autonomous vehicles and mobility solutions, where customer expectations are migrating toward a seamless and adaptive experience leading to new expectations for an enhanced journey. Another area where smart materials are influencing change is interior and exterior design including smart textiles, photochromatic dyes, and thermochromatic materials. The key to advancing smart materials in automotive industry is to capitalize on the smaller niche applications where there will be an advantage over traditional methods. Ford has an extensive history of developing and utilizing smart and innovative materials. Magnetorheological fluids, thermoelectric materials, piezoelectric actuators, and shape memory alloys are all in production. In this paper we present new challenges the automotive industry is facing and explore how intelligent uses of smart materials can help provide solutions. We explore which vehicle attributes may provide most advantageous for the use smart materials, and discuss how smart materials have had technical challenges that limit their use. An emerging area for deployment of smart materials may involve autonomous vehicles and mobility solutions, where customer expectations may require a seamless and adaptive experience for users having various

  8. EU policy: Which technological strategies for smart, sustainable growth?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberali, Raffaele; )

    2011-01-01

    The EU's Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET Plan) was launched in November 2007 in response to issues having to do with energy and the climate. Its priority is to speed up the development and deployment of new energy technology thanks to a global approach providing coordination among member states. This plan is to position Europe as a world leader in the transition toward smart, sustainable growth

  9. Recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-09-02

    Due to the increased awareness of consumers in sensorial and nutritional quality of frozen foods, the freezing technology has to seek new and innovative technologies for better retaining the fresh like quality of foods. In this article, we review the recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods. The application of these intelligent technologies and the associated underpinning concepts have greatly improved the quality of frozen foods and the freezing efficiency. These technologies are able to automatically collect the information in-line during freezing and help control the freezing process better. Smart freezing technology includes new and intelligent technologies and concepts applied to the pretreatment of the frozen product, freezing processes, cold chain logistics as well as warehouse management. These technologies enable real-time monitoring of quality during the freezing process and help improve product quality and freezing efficiency. We also provide a brief overview of several sensing technologies used to achieve automatic control of individual steps of freezing process. These sensing technologies include computer vision, electronic nose, electronic tongue, digital simulation, confocal laser, near infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance technology and ultrasound. Understanding of the mechanism of these new technologies will be helpful for applying them to improve the quality of frozen foods.

  10. Evaluation of corrosion characteristics of SMART materials (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, J. G.

    2006-02-01

    The corrosion characteristics of materials (Low-Sn Zircaloy-4, Zr-1.0Nb, PT-7M, ASTM Gr. 2 Ti, Inconel-690 alloys) for cladding and heat-exchanger tubes of SMART were evaluated in ammonia aqueous solution contained recirculating loop of pH 9.98 at 360 .deg. C 300 .deg. C. And CEDM materials (ball bearing, ball screw, magnetic material) were evaluated in ammonia aqueous solution contained static autoclave of pH 9.98 at 120 .deg. C

  11. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  12. Smart Secure Homes: A Survey of Smart Home Technologies that Sense, Assess, and Respond to Security Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Cook, Diane J; Wang, Xiaobo; Honglei, Wang

    2017-08-01

    Smart home design has undergone a metamorphosis in recent years. The field has evolved from designing theoretical smart home frameworks and performing scripted tasks in laboratories. Instead, we now find robust smart home technologies that are commonly used by large segments of the population in a variety of settings. Recent smart home applications are focused on activity recognition, health monitoring, and automation. In this paper, we take a look at another important role for smart homes: security. We first explore the numerous ways smart homes can and do provide protection for their residents. Next, we provide a comparative analysis of the alternative tools and research that has been developed for this purpose. We investigate not only existing commercial products that have been introduced but also discuss the numerous research that has been focused on detecting and identifying potential threats. Finally, we close with open challenges and ideas for future research that will keep individuals secure and healthy while in their own homes.

  13. Smart printing technology for counterfeit deterrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Peter J.

    1996-03-01

    Smart (intelligent) printing is the creation of useful patterns beyond alphanumerics and graphics immediately obvious to the human eye. It employs smart inks, patterns, surfaces and substrates. Recent proliferation of color copiers, personal computers and scanners has facilitated a tenfold increase in counterfeiting in many countries over the past three years. Banknotes, cheques, academic certificates, art work, visitors passes, venue tickets and many other artifacts have been compromised. Paradoxically, the best counterfeits produced by some foreign governments and organized crime are rarely the main problem. The secret services of many countries use forensic science to great effect in pursuing these fairly readily identified sources of limited number. Bad counterfeits usually made on color copiers or computers, with or without color scanners, are the most difficult to combat because they are made by very large numbers of casual counterfeiters who may never commit crime again. For instance, counterfeit banknotes intercepted by the Bundesbank have been photocopies in a fluctuating range of 50 - 84% of cases in the last four reported years. Cheque and other document fraud is also inflated by these burgeoning bad copies and here we must add amateurish alterations using copiers or scanners. For instance, a better academic degree can mean a better job, an interbank transfer form can be 'raised' in value by enormous amounts. The issuer of a 'bad' counterfeit does not mind that it is usually picked up on a second transferral. They are long gone by then or, with banknotes, they can deny that they issued it. First priority in reversing the upward trend of counterfeiting must not therefore be the creation of better secret features traceable by forensic laboratories over extended periods of time. Rather we need better and more obvious optically unique features, not easily emulated, that can be spotted in the split second when several, say, banknotes are handed over in a

  14. Functional and Multifunctional Polymers: Materials for Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S.; Pratt, L. M.; Li, J.; Wuagaman, M.; Khan, I. M.

    1996-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the research in smart structures and smart materials is the development of a new generation of products/devices which will perform better than products/devices built from passive materials. There are a few examples of multilayer polymer systems which function as smart structures, e.g. a synthetic muscle which is a multilayer assembly of a poly(ethylene) layer, a gold layer, and a poly(pyrrole) layer immersed in a liquid electrolyte. Oxidation and reductions of the active pyrrole layer causes the assembly to reversibly deflect and mimic biological muscles. The drawback of such a setup is slow response times and the use of a liquid electrolyte. We have developed multifunctional polymers which will eliminate the use of a liquid electrolyte, and also because the functionalities of the polymers are within a few hundred angstroms, an improved response time to changes in the external field should be possible. Such multifunctional polymers may be classified as the futuristic 'smart materials.' These materials are composed of a number of different functionalities which work in a synergistic fashion to function as a device. The device performs on the application of an external field and such multifunctional polymers may be scientifically labeled as 'field responsive polymers.' Our group has undertaken a systematic approach to develop functional and multifunctional polymers capable of functioning as field responsive polymers. Our approach utilizes multicomponent polymer systems (block copolymers and graft copolymers), the strategy involves the preparation of block or graft copolymers where the functionalities are limited to different phases in a microphase separated system. Depending on the weight (or volume) fractions of each of the components, different microstructures are possible. And, because of the intimate contact between the functional components, an increase in the synergism between the functionalities may be observed. In this presentation, three

  15. Efficient identification of opportunities for Distributed Generation based on Smart Grid Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutule, Anna; Obushevs, Artjoms; Lvov, Aleksandr

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the main goals and achievements of the Smart Grids ERA-NET project named “Efficient identification of opportunities for Distributed Generation based on Smart Grid Technology (SmartGen)” during the second stage of project implementation. A description of Smart Grid Technology (S......) models developed within the framework of the project is given. The performed study cases where the SGT-models were implemented to analyze the impact of the electrical grid are discussed....

  16. Research and technology organisations and smart specialisation

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, David; Ciampi Stancova, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Research and Technology Organisations (RTOs) have developed in many European countries at both national and regional levels to assist in the support of local industry, often around specific industrial technologies or sectors. With a core responsibility for technological upgrading they play a key role in regional and national innovation systems. Yet there is great variety in the form and mission of such RTOs, especially in terms of the degree of regional alignment, and whilst some regions are ...

  17. Wearable smart systems: from technologies to integrated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymberis, A

    2011-01-01

    Wearable technology and integrated systems, so called Smart Wearable Systems (SWS) have demonstrated during the last 10-15 years significant advances in terms of, miniaturisation, seamless integration, data processing & communication, functionalisation and comfort. This is mainly due to the huge progress in sciences and technologies e.g. biomedical and micro & nano technologies, but also to a strong demand for new applications such as continuous personal health monitoring, healthy lifestyle support, human performance monitoring and support of professionals at risk. Development of wearable systems based of smart textile have, in addition, benefited from the eagerness of textile industry to develop new value-added apparel products like functionalized garments and smart clothing. Research and development in these areas has been strongly promoted worldwide. In Europe the major R&D activities were supported through the Information & Communication Technologies (ICT) priority of the R&D EU programs. The paper presents and discusses the main achievements towards integrated systems as well as future challenges to be met in order to reach a market with reliable and high value-added products.

  18. Automating the application of smart materials for protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Govada, Lata; EL-Sharif, Hazim F.; Reddy, Subrayal M.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2015-01-01

    The first semi-liquid, non-protein nucleating agent for automated protein crystallization trials is described. This ‘smart material’ is demonstrated to induce crystal growth and will provide a simple, cost-effective tool for scientists in academia and industry. The fabrication and validation of the first semi-liquid nonprotein nucleating agent to be administered automatically to crystallization trials is reported. This research builds upon prior demonstration of the suitability of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs; known as ‘smart materials’) for inducing protein crystal growth. Modified MIPs of altered texture suitable for high-throughput trials are demonstrated to improve crystal quality and to increase the probability of success when screening for suitable crystallization conditions. The application of these materials is simple, time-efficient and will provide a potent tool for structural biologists embarking on crystallization trials

  19. Automating the application of smart materials for protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Govada, Lata; El-Sharif, Hazim F; Reddy, Subrayal M; Chayen, Naomi E

    2015-03-01

    The fabrication and validation of the first semi-liquid nonprotein nucleating agent to be administered automatically to crystallization trials is reported. This research builds upon prior demonstration of the suitability of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs; known as `smart materials') for inducing protein crystal growth. Modified MIPs of altered texture suitable for high-throughput trials are demonstrated to improve crystal quality and to increase the probability of success when screening for suitable crystallization conditions. The application of these materials is simple, time-efficient and will provide a potent tool for structural biologists embarking on crystallization trials.

  20. Development of design technology for system - integrated modular advanced react or (SMART) /technology support of NSSS design for SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joon, Hah Yung; Kim, Kee Eun [KOPEC, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    SMART design concept is very different from that of the commercial PWRs, as the main components such as the steam generator, pressurizer, and the main coolant pumps are incorporate the related sub-part systems into the reactor vessel. In this report the design for SMART is the basic design stage and is the new design technology development task for the first trial in Korea. KOPEC NED has participated with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for the task of 'Development of Design Technology for SMART' as supporting sub-task of it. The system design (ECCS, Makeup and Purification System), mechanical design (Seismic Analysis, BLPB Analysis, Structural Analysis, Design Load Calculation, Stress Fatigue Evaluation, Fracture Mechanical and Structural Integrity Evaluation), MMIS design (Alarm and Indication System, Information Processing System, Large Display Panel, Human System Interface Guideline) have been performed as a basic design for SMART during 31 months (1999. 9.1{approx}2002.3.31). This report is the final one for the support of the main task of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 124 refs., 154 figs., 97 tabs. (Author)

  1. Development of Personalized Urination Recognition Technology Using Smart Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jong Eun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study collected and analyzed activity data sensed through smart bands worn by patients in order to resolve the clinical issues posed by using voiding charts. By developing a smart band-based algorithm for recognizing urination activity in patients, this study aimed to explore the feasibility of urination monitoring systems. Methods This study aimed to develop an algorithm that recognizes urination based on a patient’s posture and changes in posture. Motion data was obtained from a smart band on the arm. An algorithm that recognizes the 3 stages of urination (forward movement, urination, backward movement was developed based on data collected from a 3-axis accelerometer and from tilt angle data. Real-time data were acquired from the smart band, and for data corresponding to a certain duration, the absolute value of the signals was calculated and then compared with the set threshold value to determine the occurrence of vibration signals. In feature extraction, the most essential information describing each pattern was identified after analyzing the characteristics of the data. The results of the feature extraction process were sorted using a classifier to detect urination. Results An experiment was carried out to assess the performance of the recognition technology proposed in this study. The final accuracy of the algorithm was calculated based on clinical guidelines for urologists. The experiment showed a high average accuracy of 90.4%, proving the robustness of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions The proposed urination recognition technology draws on acceleration data and tilt angle data collected via a smart band; these data were then analyzed using a classifier after comparative analyses with standardized feature patterns.

  2. Application of smart transmitter technology in nuclear engineering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1993-01-01

    By making use of the microprocessor technology, instrumentation system becomes intelligent. In this study a programmable smart transmitter is designed and applied to the nuclear engineering measurements. In order to apply the smart transmitter technology to nuclear engineering measurements, the digital time delay compensation function and water level change detection function are developed and applied in this work. The time compensation function compensates effectively the time delay of the measured signal, but it is found that the characteristics of the compensation function should be considered through its application. It is also found that the water level change detection function reduces the detection time to about 7 seconds by the signal processing which has the time constant of over 250 seconds and which has the heavy noise. (Author)

  3. Progress in the Development of SRF Cavity Tuners Based on Magnetic Smart Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Joshi; A. Pappo; D. Upham; J. Preble

    2001-01-01

    Energen, Inc. has developed and demonstrated an SRF cavity tuning mechanism based on magnetic smart materials. Magnetic ''smart'' materials change their shape in a reversible and repeatable manner when exposed to a small magnetic field. A fine-tuning mechanism with a 2 kHz tuning range on a nominal resonant frequency of 1.497 GHz. was successfully demonstrated in 1999 [1]. Since then, Energen has been developing a tuning mechanism based on its linear stepper motors. These stepper motors are designed to deliver high-force precision linear motion of tens of millimeters at cryogenic temperatures. A locking mechanism built into the stepper motor enables the tuner to be locked into position when the power is turned off. This new tuning technology will eliminate the mechanical feeds through the vacuum jacket and reduce the complexity of the cryostat design and assembly. Performance and capabilities of a prototype SRF cavity tuner will be reported

  4. Feasibility study of introducing smart technologies in Barcelona Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Guiu, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the project are to define and evaluate the diferent alternatives for implementing new Smart concepts and technologies in Barcelona Airport. The structure of the project activities will follow an initial approach (not exhaustive) consisting of: Context and background, justification of the project, assessment of Barcelona Airport baseline, identification of needs, technolgy Stae-of the art, definition of potential solutions and implementation scenarios, evaluation of altern...

  5. INTELLIGENT NETWORKS, SMART GRIDS CONCEPT, CRUCIAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin RADU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article is presented the concept of smart grids, a very important technology for sustainable development. In the context of globalization of the world lives in an increasingly complex security environment, with rapid changes, some obvious, others less obvious implications in the short, medium or long term, international, national, local and up to every citizen. All countries in the globalized world economy is facing energy problems in terms of climate change have intensified in the twentieth century.

  6. Home Automation : Smart home technology and template house design

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zeya

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, home automation’s general knowledge, technology information and each component will be introduced to the reader in the first half of the whole thesis. In the second half, thesis includes the Home Automation template design and market competitiveness analysis. The author assumes that the reader is going to spend lots of money to have a smart home. In this situation, the author introduces the home automation to the reader at each component. So the reader in this thesis actu...

  7. Attitude of senior citizens towards smart home technologies:a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Hamal Mishra, Binisha

    2015-01-01

    Smart home can be of significant importance for positive ageing allowing elderly to maintain independence, functionality, well-being and higher quality of life. Aim: The aim of this thesis is to study attitude of senior citizens towards smart home technologies. Understanding senior citizen's attitude towards current smart home technol-ogies is an important aspect in optimization of the existing technologies as well as in the design of new technologies. The review will aim to find the answe...

  8. Study on smart city construction of Jiujiang based on IOT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeliang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Qin; Yan, Tao

    2017-06-01

    At present, with the technology of the Internet of things (IOT), building smart city is forming a powerful wave of city, which promotes economic and social development of city. This paper expounds the connotation of smart city, explores the social and economic significance of the construction of smart city, analyzes the present situation of smart city construction in Jiujiang, studies the basic principles development altar get and key construction projects, and puts forward relevant of Jiujiang smart city construction, and puts forward relevant proposals about smart construction in Jiujiang, Jiangxi.

  9. Smart Grid Technologies in Europe: An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardito, L.; Procaccianti, G.; Menga, G.; Morisio, M.

    2013-01-01

    The old electricity network infrastructure has proven to be inadequate, with respect to modern challenges such as alternative energy sources, electricity demand and energy saving policies. Moreover, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)seem to have reached an adequate level of reliability

  10. Smart Home Technologies: Insights into Generation-Specific Acceptance Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Sylvia; Ziefle, Martina

    In this research we examine the generation specific acceptance motives of eHealth technologies in order to assess the likelihood of success for these new technologies. 280 participants (14 - 92 years of age) volunteered to participate in a survey, in which using motives and barriers toward smart home technologies were explored. The scenario envisaged was the use of a medical stent implemented into the body, which monitors automatically the health status and which is able to remotely communicate with the doctor. Participants were asked to evaluate the pros and cons of the usage of this technology, their acceptance motives and potential utilization barriers. In order to understand the complex nature of acceptance, personal variables (age, technical expertise, health status), individual's cognitive concepts toward ageing as well as perceived usefulness were related. Outcomes show that trust, believe in the reliability of technology, privacy and security as well as intimacy facets are essential for acceptance and should be considered in order to proactively design a successful rollout of smart home technologies.

  11. Tracking Activities in Complex Settings Using Smart Environment Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Geetika; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. A primary challenge that needs to be tackled to meet this need is the ability to recognize and track functional activities that people perform in their own homes and everyday settings. In this paper we look at approaches to perform real-time recognition of Activities of Daily Living. We enhance other related research efforts to develop approaches that are effective when activities are interrupted and interleaved. To evaluate the accuracy of our recognition algorithms we assess them using real data collected from participants performing activities in our on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  12. Interferometry for the LISA technology package (LTP) aboard SMART-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, G; Braxmaier, C; Schilling, R; Ruediger, A; Robertson, D; Plate, M te; Wand, V; Arai, K; Johann, U; Danzmann, K

    2003-01-01

    The interferometer of the LISA technology package (LTP) on SMART-2 is needed to verify the performance of the gravitational sensors by monitoring the distance between two test masses with a noise level of 10 pm Hz -1/2 between 3 mHz and 30 mHz. It must continuously track the motion of the test mass distance while that distance changes by many μm with a speed of up to 20 μm s -1 , without losing track of the sign of the motion and without exerting any influence on the test masses that might lead to a motion above that level. As a result of a detailed comparison study, a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer was selected as the baseline for the SMART-2 mission. Its design and expected performance are described in this paper

  13. A Study on a Microwave-Driven Smart Material Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Kwak, M.; Cutler, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    NASA s Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) has a large deployable, fragmented optical surface (greater than or = 2 8 m in diameter) that requires autonomous correction of deployment misalignments and thermal effects. Its high and stringent resolution requirement imposes a great deal of challenge for optical correction. The threshold value for optical correction is dictated by lambda/20 (30 nm for NGST optics). Control of an adaptive optics array consisting of a large number of optical elements and smart material actuators is so complex that power distribution for activation and control of actuators must be done by other than hard-wired circuitry. The concept of microwave-driven smart actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wiring. A microwave-driven actuator was studied to realize such a concept for future applications. Piezoelectric material was used as an actuator that shows dimensional change with high electric field. The actuators were coupled with microwave rectenna and tested to correlate the coupling effect of electromagnetic wave. In experiments, a 3x3 rectenna patch array generated more than 50 volts which is a threshold voltage for 30-nm displacement of a single piezoelectric material. Overall, the test results indicate that the microwave-driven actuator concept can be adopted for NGST applications.

  14. The need to know caregiver perspectives toward using smart home technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, Jarod T; Markward, Martha

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on adults with serious mental illness, their caregivers, and smart home technology. The article provides compelling evidence for social workers to undertake research aimed at investigating caregivers' perceptions toward using smart home technology for care of adult family members or friends with a serious mental illness. Empirical support for using smart home technologies with adults with serious mental illness is provided, and recommendations for future social work research are offered.

  15. Space Missions for Automation and Robotics Technologies (SMART) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffone, D. L.; Lum, H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is currently considering the establishment of a Space Mission for Automation and Robotics Technologies (SMART) Program to define, develop, integrate, test, and operate a spaceborne national research facility for the validation of advanced automation and robotics technologies. Initially, the concept is envisioned to be implemented through a series of shuttle based flight experiments which will utilize telepresence technologies and real time operation concepts. However, eventually the facility will be capable of a more autonomous role and will be supported by either the shuttle or the space station. To ensure incorporation of leading edge technology in the facility, performance capability will periodically and systematically be upgraded by the solicitation of recommendations from a user advisory group. The facility will be managed by NASA, but will be available to all potential investigators. Experiments for each flight will be selected by a peer review group. Detailed definition and design is proposed to take place during FY 86, with the first SMART flight projected for FY 89.

  16. Smart farming technologies - description, taxonomy and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balafoutis, Athanasios T.; Beck, Bert; Tsiropoulos, Zisis

    2017-01-01

    Precision Agriculture is a cyclic optimization process where data have to be collected from the field, analysed and evaluated and finally used for decision making for site-specific management of the field. Smart farming technologies (SFT ) cover all these aspects of precision agriculture and can...... comprise the delineation of management zones, decision support systems and farm management information system s. Finally, precision application technologies embrace variable-rate application technologies, precision irrigation and weeding and machine guidance. In this chapter, the reader can find...... a technical description of the technologies included in each category accompanied by a taxonomy of all SFT in terms of farming system type, cropping system, availability, level of investment and farmers’ motives to adopt them. Finally, the economic impact that each SFT has compared to conventional...

  17. "Smart" Materials Based on Cellulose: A Review of the Preparations, Properties, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Shuwen

    2013-02-28

    Cellulose is the most abundant biomass material in nature, and possesses some promising properties, such as mechanical robustness, hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, cellulose has been widely applied in many fields. "Smart" materials based on cellulose have great advantages-especially their intelligent behaviors in reaction to environmental stimuli-and they can be applied to many circumstances, especially as biomaterials. This review aims to present the developments of "smart" materials based on cellulose in the last decade, including the preparations, properties, and applications of these materials. The preparations of "smart" materials based on cellulose by chemical modifications and physical incorporating/blending were reviewed. The responsiveness to pH, temperature, light, electricity, magnetic fields, and mechanical forces, etc. of these "smart" materials in their different forms such as copolymers, nanoparticles, gels, and membranes were also reviewed, and the applications as drug delivery systems, hydrogels, electronic active papers, sensors, shape memory materials and smart membranes, etc. were also described in this review.

  18. Effective use of smart home technology to increase well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Don Bouwhuis; B.A.M. Ben Schouten; Paul Rutten; Anne-mie Sponselee

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of smart home technology in home care situations depends on the acceptance and use of the technology by both users and end-users. In the Netherlands many projects have started to introduce smart home technology and telecare in the homes of elderly people, but only some have been

  19. The Potential of Wastewater Energy Recovery in Smart Buildings by using Internet of Things Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    2015-01-01

    exchanger technology in combination with smart building and Internet of Things technologies. By using advanced artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things technologies found in smart homes the heat recovering process is organized, controlled and planned intelligently; this provides the savings...

  20. Polymeric Smart Skin Materials: Concepts, Materials, and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-31

    Fudouzi, H. and Xia, Y., Langmuir 2003, 19, 9653-9658 (also see the highlight in Materials Today, 2003, December, p. 7). 15. Langmuir - Blodgett Silver...development of electroactive dendrimers, dendronized polymers, hyperbranched polymers, and phase- separating block copolymers. Development of such materials...Dalton, and A. K-Y. Jen, " Hyperbranched Fluorinated Aromatic Polyester from Mild One-Pot Polymerization of AB 2 Hydroxy Acid Monomer," Macromolecules

  1. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Smart Materials for Ranging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Franse, Jaap; Sirenko, Valentyna

    2006-01-01

    The problem of determining the location of an object (usually called ranging) attracts at present much attention in different areas of applications, among them in ecological and safety devices. Electromagnetic waves along with sound waves are widely used for these purposes. Different aspects of materials with specific magnetic, electric and elastic properties are considered in view of potential application in the design and manufacturing of smart materials. Progress is reported in the fabrication and understanding of in-situ formation and characterization of solid state structures with specified properties. Attention is paid to the observation and study of the mobility of magnetic structures and of the kinetics of magnetic ordering transitions. Looking from a different perspective, one of the outcomes of the ARW is the emphasis on the important role that collective phenomena (like spin waves in systems with a magnetically ordered ground state, or critical currents in superconductors) could play at the design ...

  2. Impact analysis of automotive structures with distributed smart material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelamedu, Saravanan M.; Naganathan, Ganapathy; Buckley, Stephen J.

    1999-06-01

    New class of automobiles has structural skins that are quite different from their current designs. Particularly, new families of composite skins are developed with new injection molding processes. These skins while support the concept of lighter vehicles of the future, are also susceptible to damage upon impact. It is important that their design should be based on a better understanding on the type of impact loads and the resulting strains and damage. It is possible that these skins can be integrally designed with active materials to counter damages. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of a new class of automotive skins, using piezoceramic as a smart material. The main objective is to consider the complex system with, the skin to be modeled as a layered plate structure involving a lightweight material with foam and active materials imbedded on them. To begin with a cantilever beam structure is subjected to a load through piezoceramic and the resulting strain at the active material site is predicted accounting for the material properties, piezoceramic thickness, adhesive thickness including the effect of adhesives. A finite element analysis is carried out to compare experimental work. Further work in this direction would provide an analytical tool that will provide the basis for algorithms to predict and counter impacts on the future class of automobiles.

  3. Growing grass: a smart material interactive display, design and construction history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we will present the design process and development of "Follow the Grass", our smart material interactive pervasive display, with related technical detailed explanation. We will present the design steps and prototypes with instructions for the use of smart materials (NiTiNOL) to create

  4. Cities for smart environmental and energy futures. Impacts on architecture and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassia, Stamatina T. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. of Technology in Architecture; Pardalos, Panos M. (eds.) [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Industrial and Systems Engneering

    2014-07-01

    Strategies for energy conservation in smart cities. Up-to-date presentation of on-going research. Innovative ideas for sustainable design. Cities for Smart Environmental and Energy Futures presents works written by eminent international experts from a variety of disciplines including architecture, engineering and related fields. Due to the ever-increasing focus on sustainable technologies, alternative energy sources, and global social and urban issues, interest in the energy systems for cities of the future has grown in a wealth of disciplines. Some of the special features of this book include new findings on the city of the future from the macro to the micro level. These range from urban sustainability to indoor urbanism, and from strategies for cities and global climate change to material properties. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers active in architecture, engineering, the social and computational sciences, building physics and related fields.

  5. Smart Material-Actuated Flexible Tendon-Based Snake Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiuddin Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A flexible snake robot has better navigation ability compare with the existing electrical motor-based rigid snake robot, due to its excellent bending capability during navigation inside a narrow maze. This paper discusses the modelling, simulation and experiment of a flexible snake robot. The modelling consists of the kinematic analysis and the dynamic analysis of the snake robot. A platform based on the Incompletely Restrained Positioning Mechanism (IRPM is proposed, which uses the external force provided by a compliant flexible beam in each of the actuators. The compliant central column allows the configuration to achieve three degrees of freedom (3DOFs with three tendons. The proposed flexible snake robot has been built using smart material, such as electroactive polymers (EAPs, which can be activated by applying power to it. Finally, the physical prototype of the snake robot has been built. An experiment has been performed in order to justify the proposed model.

  6. Smart responsive phosphorescent materials for data recording and security protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huibin; Liu, Shujuan; Lin, Wenpeng; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Lv, Wen; Huang, Xiao; Huo, Fengwei; Yang, Huiran; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-04-07

    Smart luminescent materials that are responsive to external stimuli have received considerable interest. Here we report ionic iridium (III) complexes simultaneously exhibiting mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. These complexes share the same phosphorescent iridium (III) cation with a N-H moiety in the N^N ligand and contain different anions, including hexafluorophosphate, tetrafluoroborate, iodide, bromide and chloride. The anionic counterions cause a variation in the emission colours of the complexes from yellow to green by forming hydrogen bonds with the N-H proton. The electronic effect of the N-H moiety is sensitive towards mechanical grinding, solvent vapour and electric field, resulting in mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. On the basis of these findings, we construct a data-recording device and demonstrate data encryption and decryption via fluorescence lifetime imaging and time-gated luminescence imaging techniques. Our results suggest that rationally designed phosphorescent complexes may be promising candidates for advanced data recording and security protection.

  7. Experimental identification of smart material coupling effects in composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesne, S; Jean-Mistral, C; Gaudiller, L

    2013-01-01

    Smart composite structures have an enormous potential for industrial applications, in terms of mass reduction, high material resistance and flexibility. The correct characterization of these complex structures is essential for active vibration control or structural health monitoring applications. The identification process generally calls for the determination of a generalized electromechanical coupling coefficient. As this process can in practice be difficult to implement, an original approach, presented in this paper, has been developed for the identification of the coupling effects of a smart material used in a composite curved beam. The accuracy of the proposed identification technique is tested by applying active modal control to the beam, using a reduced model based on this identification. The studied structure was as close to reality as possible, and made use of integrated transducers, low-cost sensors, clamped boundary conditions and substantial, complex excitation sources. PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) and MFC (macrofiber composite) transducers were integrated into the composite structure, to ensure their protection from environmental damage. The experimental identification described here was based on a curve fitting approach combined with the reduced model. It allowed a reliable, powerful modal control system to be built, controlling two modes of the structure. A linear quadratic Gaussian algorithm was used to determine the modal controller–observer gains. The selected modes were found to have an attenuation as strong as −13 dB in experiments, revealing the effectiveness of this method. In this study a generalized approach is proposed, which can be extended to most complex or composite industrial structures when they are subjected to vibration. (paper)

  8. To create added value of smart home technology in small scale senior accommodations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. H.S.M. Kort; Hans Duits; Emelieke Huisman; Gerrit Jan Lanting

    2013-01-01

    Smart home technology has been introduced as a potential solution to support ageing in place, to enhance the quality of life of residents, or to decrease the workload of professionals. The ability of smart home technology is to monitor the activity of daily living and safety of residents. The aim of

  9. Needing smart home technologies: the perspectives of older adults in continuing care retirement communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Courtney

    2008-11-01

    Conclusions Factors influencing self-perception of need for smart home technology, including the influence of primary care providers, are presented. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home technology need and the development of appropriate interventions is necessary.

  10. Bioinspiration from fish for smart material design and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauder, G V; Madden, P G A; Tangorra, J L; Anderson, E; Baker, T V

    2011-01-01

    Fish are a potentially rich source of inspiration for the design of smart materials. Fish exemplify the use of flexible materials to generate forces during locomotion, and a hallmark of fish functional design is the use of body and fin deformation to power propulsion and maneuvering. As a result of nearly 500 million years of evolutionary experimentation, fish design has a number of interesting features of note to materials engineers. In this paper we first provide a brief general overview of some key features of the mechanical design of fish, and then focus on two key properties of fish: the bilaminar mechanical design of bony fish fin rays that allows active muscular control of curvature, and the role of body flexibility in propulsion. After describing the anatomy of bony fish fin rays, we provide new data on their mechanical properties. Three-point bending tests and measurement of force inputs to and outputs from the fin rays show that these fin rays are effective displacement transducers. Fin rays in different regions of the fin differ considerably in their material properties, and in the curvature produced by displacement of one of the two fin ray halves. The mean modulus for the proximal (basal) region of the fin rays was 1.34 GPa, but this varied from 0.24 to 3.7 GPa for different fin rays. The distal fin region was less stiff, and moduli for the different fin rays measured varied from 0.11 to 0.67 GPa. These data are similar to those for human tendons (modulus around 0.5 GPa). Analysis of propulsion using flexible foils controlled using a robotic flapping device allows investigation of the effect of altering flexural stiffness on swimming speed. Flexible foils with the leading edge moved in a heave show a distinct peak in propulsive performance, while the addition of pitch input produces a broad plateau where the swimming speed is relatively unaffected by the flexural stiffness. Our understanding of the material design of fish and the control of tissue

  11. Research on data collection key technology of smart electric energy meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangqun; Huang, Rui; Shen, Liman; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Dezhi; Xiao, Xiangqi; Mouhailiu; Renheng, Xu

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, smart electric energy meters are demand at 70 million to 90 million with the strong smart grid construction every year in China. However, there are some issues in smart electric energy meters data collection such as the interference of environment, low collection efficiency and inability to work when the power is off. In order to solve these issues above, it uses the RFID communication technology to collect the numbers and electric energy information of smart electric energy meters on the basis of the existing smart electric energy meters, and the related data collection communication experiments were made. The experimental result shows that the electric information and other data batch collection of RFID smart electric energy meters are realized in power and power off. It improves the efficiency and the overall success rate is 99.2% within 2 meters. It provides a new method for smart electric energy meters data collection.

  12. Smart Power: New power integrated circuit technologies and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivalainen, Pekka; Pohjonen, Helena; Yli-Pietilae, Timo; Lenkkeri, Jaakko

    1992-05-01

    Power Integrated Circuits (PIC) is one of the most rapidly growing branches of the semiconductor technology. The PIC markets has been forecast to grow from 660 million dollars in 1990 to 1658 million dollars in 1994. It has even been forecast that at the end of the 1990's the PIC markets would correspond to the value of the whole semiconductor production in 1990. Automotive electronics will play the leading role in the development of the standard PIC's. Integrated motor drivers (36 V/4 A), smart integrated switches (60 V/30 A), solenoid drivers, integrated switch-mode power supplies and regulators are the latest standard devices of the PIC manufactures. ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) PIC solutions are needed for the same reasons as other ASIC devices: there are no proper standard devices, a company has a lot of application knowhow, which should be kept inside the company, the size of the product must be reduced, and assembly costs are wished to be reduced by decreasing the number of discrete devices. During the next few years the most probable ASIC PIC applications in Finland will be integrated solenoid and motor drivers, an integrated electronic lamp ballast circuit and various sensor interface circuits. Application of the PIC technologies to machines and actuators will strongly be increased all over the world. This means that various PIC's, either standard PIC's or full custom ASIC circuits, will appear in many products which compete with the corresponding Finnish products. Therefore the development of the PIC technologies must be followed carefully in order to immediately be able to apply the latest development in the smart power technologies and their design methods.

  13. Smart gun technologies: One method of eliminating unauthorized firearm use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Law enforcement officers work each day with individuals who can become aggressive and violent. Among the worst scenarios, which occur each year and often raise national media attention, an officer has his handgun taken away and used against him. As many as 12 officers per year are killed with their own gun. This problem can be addressed through the integration of modern sensors with control electronics to provide authorized user firearms for law enforcement and even recreational uses. A considerable benefit to law enforcement agencies, as well as society as a whole, would be gained by the application of recommended Smart Gun Technologies (SGT) as a method of limiting the use of firearms to authorized individuals. Sandia National Laboratory has been actively involved in the research and design of technologically sophisticated surety devices for weapons for the DOE and DOD. This experience is now being applied to criminal justice problems by transferring these technologies to commercial industry. In the SGT project Sandia is developing the user requirements that would limit a firearms use to its owner and/or authorized users. Various technologies that are capable of meeting the requirements are being investigated, these range from biometrics identification to radio-controlled devices. Research is presently underway to investigate which technologies represent the best solutions to the problem. Proof of concept demonstration models are being built for the most promising SGT with the intent of technology transfer. Different solutions are recommended for the possible applications: law enforcement, military, and commercial (personal protection/recreational) use.

  14. NATO CCMS Workshop on Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security (SMECS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzane, Daoud

    2008-01-01

    Rapid evolution of trade, cultural and human relations provides the qualitative and quantitative enhancement of international collaborations, linking the countries with different economical and technological level. Delocalization of High-Tech industry inevitably leads to development of the material science and engineering researches in emergent countries, requiring transfer of know-how, restructuration of basic research and educational networks. This book presents the contributions of participants of the Advanced Research Workshop “Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security” (ARW SMECS; www.smecs.ferroix.net), organized in December 2007 in Marrakech in frame of the “NATO - Science for Peace” program. The objective of this event was the attempt to overview several hot topics of material physics related with problems of modern society: transformation and storage of energy, treatment and transmission of information, environmental security issues etc., with the focus of their implementation i...

  15. Periodic reference tracking control approach for smart material actuators with complex hysteretic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyong; Hao, Lina; Song, Bo; Yang, Ruiguo; Cao, Ruimin; Cheng, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Micro/nano positioning technologies have been attractive for decades for their various applications in both industrial and scientific fields. The actuators employed in these technologies are typically smart material actuators, which possess inherent hysteresis that may cause systems behave unexpectedly. Periodic reference tracking capability is fundamental for apparatuses such as scanning probe microscope, which employs smart material actuators to generate periodic scanning motion. However, traditional controller such as PID method cannot guarantee accurate fast periodic scanning motion. To tackle this problem and to conduct practical implementation in digital devices, this paper proposes a novel control method named discrete extended unparallel Prandtl-Ishlinskii model based internal model (d-EUPI-IM) control approach. To tackle modeling uncertainties, the robust d-EUPI-IM control approach is investigated, and the associated sufficient stabilizing conditions are derived. The advantages of the proposed controller are: it is designed and represented in discrete form, thus practical for digital devices implementation; the extended unparallel Prandtl-Ishlinskii model can precisely represent forward/inverse complex hysteretic characteristics, thus can reduce modeling uncertainties and benefits controllers design; in addition, the internal model principle based control module can be utilized as a natural oscillator for tackling periodic references tracking problem. The proposed controller was verified through comparative experiments on a piezoelectric actuator platform, and convincing results have been achieved.

  16. Smart home technologies for health and social care support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Kelly, Greg; Kernohan, W George; McCreight, Bernadette; Nugent, Christopher

    2008-10-08

    The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. To explore the effectiveness of smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home, and to consider the impact on the individual's health status and on the financial resources of health care. We searched the following databases for primary studies: (a) the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Register, (b) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, issue 1, 2007), and (c) bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2007). We also searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched the electronic databases using a strategy developed by the EPOC Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series analyses (ITS). Participants included adults over the age of 18, living in their home in a community setting. Participants with a physical disability, dementia or a learning disability were included. The included interventions were social alarms, electronic assistive devices, telecare social alert platforms, environmental control systems, automated home environments and 'ubiquitous homes'. Outcome measures included any objective measure that records an impact on a participant's quality of life, healthcare professional workload, economic outcomes, costs to healthcare provider or costs to participant. We included measures of service satisfaction

  17. Modeling the Behaviour of an Advanced Material Based Smart Landing Gear System for Aerospace Vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varughese, Byji; Dayananda, G. N.; Rao, M. Subba

    2008-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a substantial rise in the use of advanced materials such as polymer composites for aerospace structural applications. In more recent years there has been a concerted effort to integrate materials, which mimic biological functions (referred to as smart materials) with polymeric composites. Prominent among smart materials are shape memory alloys, which possess both actuating and sensory functions that can be realized simultaneously. The proper characterization and modeling of advanced and smart materials holds the key to the design and development of efficient smart devices/systems. This paper focuses on the material characterization; modeling and validation of the model in relation to the development of a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) based smart landing gear (with high energy dissipation features) for a semi rigid radio controlled airship (RC-blimp). The Super Elastic (SE) SMA element is configured in such a way that it is forced into a tensile mode of high elastic deformation. The smart landing gear comprises of a landing beam, an arch and a super elastic Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) SMA element. The landing gear is primarily made of polymer carbon composites, which possess high specific stiffness and high specific strength compared to conventional materials, and are therefore ideally suited for the design and development of an efficient skid landing gear system with good energy dissipation characteristics. The development of the smart landing gear in relation to a conventional metal landing gear design is also dealt with

  18. Design of a smart textile mat to study pressure distribution on multiple foam material configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, van R.; Chen, W.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a design of a smart textile pressure mat to study the pressure distribution with multiple foam material configurations for neonatal monitoring at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A smart textile mat with 64 pressure sensors has been developed including software at the

  19. Independence and shared decision making: the role of smart home technology in empowering older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the concepts of independence and shared decision making in the context of smart home technologies for older adults. We conducted a Delphi study with three rounds involving smart home designers, and researchers as well as community dwelling older adults. While there were differences in the way different stakeholders define these concepts, the study findings provide clear implications for the design, implementation and evaluation of smart home applications.

  20. Emerging roles for telemedicine and smart technologies in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Ann L; Kim, Heejung; Williams, Kristine N; Steinhoff, Andreanna E; Strieker, Molly

    Demographic aging of the world population contributes to an increase in the number of persons diagnosed with dementia (PWD), with corresponding increases in health care expenditures. In addition, fewer family members are available to care for these individuals. Most care for PWD occurs in the home, and family members caring for PWD frequently suffer negative outcomes related to the stress and burden of observing their loved one's progressive memory and functional decline. Decreases in cognition and self-care also necessitate that the caregiver takes on new roles and responsibilities in care provision. Smart technologies are being developed to support family caregivers of PWD in a variety of ways, including provision of information and support resources online, wayfinding technology to support independent mobility of the PWD, monitoring systems to alert caregivers to changes in the PWD and their environment, navigation devices to track PWD experiencing wandering, and telemedicine and e-health services linking caregivers and PWD with health care providers. This paper will review current uses of these advancing technologies to support care of PWD. Challenges unique to widespread acceptance of technology will be addressed and future directions explored.

  1. SMART Boards Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Rebecca M.; Shaw, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    SMART Board is a technology that combines the functionality of a whiteboard, computer, and projector into a single system. The interactive nature of the SMART Board offers many practical uses for providing an introduction to or review of material, while the large work area invites collaboration through social interaction and communication. As a…

  2. The User Characteristics Effects to Smart Board Usage on Technology Acceptance Model Variables: The Sample of Bartin Highschool Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Akça

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new technology’s acceptance also gets shaped according to users’ features, expectations and perceptions. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM that developed by Davis (1989, defends that there are perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use variables to determinants of a new technology’s usage by user. These perceptions predict the user’s behavior and explain it. The smart board that has common usage in modern classrooms provides effectiveness at education and learning activities. Teachers who use smart boards can present more effectively. This situation increases the teacher’s productivity and student’s learning success and improvement the class’s education quality. Existence of the smart board in the classroom motivates all by self. Thanks to this technological device, it is easy to access internet based study materials. This study’s purpose is testing the user features explanation power effects to usage of smart board, which is a new education tool, based on TAM variables. For performing of the research, surveys have actualized with 24 teachers at Bartin High School with smart boards. Survey data have been interpreted based on correlation, factor and regression analyses in WarpPLS 5.0. Results have been concluded from analyse strongly supports research model.

  3. SLAE–CPS: Smart Lean Automation Engine Enabled by Cyber-Physical Systems Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhibiao

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Industry 4.0, the demand for the mass production of highly customized products will lead to complex products and an increasing demand for production system flexibility. Simply implementing lean production-based human-centered production or high automation to improve system flexibility is insufficient. Currently, lean automation (Jidoka) that utilizes cyber-physical systems (CPS) is considered a cost-efficient and effective approach for improving system flexibility under shrinking global economic conditions. Therefore, a smart lean automation engine enabled by CPS technologies (SLAE–CPS), which is based on an analysis of Jidoka functions and the smart capacity of CPS technologies, is proposed in this study to provide an integrated and standardized approach to design and implement a CPS-based smart Jidoka system. A set of comprehensive architecture and standardized key technologies should be presented to achieve the above-mentioned goal. Therefore, a distributed architecture that joins service-oriented architecture, agent, function block (FB), cloud, and Internet of things is proposed to support the flexible configuration, deployment, and performance of SLAE–CPS. Then, several standardized key techniques are proposed under this architecture. The first one is for converting heterogeneous physical data into uniform services for subsequent abnormality analysis and detection. The second one is a set of Jidoka scene rules, which is abstracted based on the analysis of the operator, machine, material, quality, and other factors in different time dimensions. These Jidoka rules can support executive FBs in performing different Jidoka functions. Finally, supported by the integrated and standardized approach of our proposed engine, a case study is conducted to verify the current research results. The proposed SLAE–CPS can serve as an important reference value for combining the benefits of innovative technology and proper methodology. PMID:28657577

  4. SLAE-CPS: Smart Lean Automation Engine Enabled by Cyber-Physical Systems Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhibiao

    2017-06-28

    In the context of Industry 4.0, the demand for the mass production of highly customized products will lead to complex products and an increasing demand for production system flexibility. Simply implementing lean production-based human-centered production or high automation to improve system flexibility is insufficient. Currently, lean automation (Jidoka) that utilizes cyber-physical systems (CPS) is considered a cost-efficient and effective approach for improving system flexibility under shrinking global economic conditions. Therefore, a smart lean automation engine enabled by CPS technologies (SLAE-CPS), which is based on an analysis of Jidoka functions and the smart capacity of CPS technologies, is proposed in this study to provide an integrated and standardized approach to design and implement a CPS-based smart Jidoka system. A set of comprehensive architecture and standardized key technologies should be presented to achieve the above-mentioned goal. Therefore, a distributed architecture that joins service-oriented architecture, agent, function block (FB), cloud, and Internet of things is proposed to support the flexible configuration, deployment, and performance of SLAE-CPS. Then, several standardized key techniques are proposed under this architecture. The first one is for converting heterogeneous physical data into uniform services for subsequent abnormality analysis and detection. The second one is a set of Jidoka scene rules, which is abstracted based on the analysis of the operator, machine, material, quality, and other factors in different time dimensions. These Jidoka rules can support executive FBs in performing different Jidoka functions. Finally, supported by the integrated and standardized approach of our proposed engine, a case study is conducted to verify the current research results. The proposed SLAE-CPS can serve as an important reference value for combining the benefits of innovative technology and proper methodology.

  5. Technology Analysis of Global Smart Light Emitting Diode (LED Development Using Patent Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsung Park

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Technological developments related to smart light emitting diode (LED systems have progressed rapidly in recent years. In this paper, patent documents related to smart LED technology are collected and analyzed to understand the technology development of smart LED systems. Most previous studies of the technology were dependent on the knowledge and experience of domain experts, using techniques such as Delphi surveys or technology road-mapping. These approaches may be subjective and lack robustness, because the results can vary according to the selected expert groups. We therefore propose a new technology analysis methodology based on statistical modeling to obtain objective and relatively stable results. The proposed method consists of visualization based on Bayesian networks and a linear count model to analyze patent documents related to smart LED technology. Combining these results, a global hierarchical technology structure is created that can enhance the sustainability in smart LED system technology. In order to show how this methodology could be applied to real-world problems, we carry out a case study on the technology analysis of smart LED systems.

  6. Prosthetic Smart Socket Technology to Improve Patient Interaction, Usability, Comfort, Fit and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    impact on society beyond science and technology ? Nothing to report at this time. 5. CHANGES/PROBLEMS: Changes in approach and reasons for...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0785 TITLE: Prosthetic Smart Socket Technology to Improve Patient Interaction, Usability, Comfort, Fit and Function...2016 - 29 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prosthetic Smart Socket Technology to Improve Patient Interaction, Usability, Comfort, Fit and Function 5a

  7. High-authority smart material integrated electric actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisensel, G. N.; Pierce, Thomas D.; Zunkel, Gary

    1997-05-01

    For many current applications, hydraulic power is still the preferred method of gaining mechanical advantage. However, in many of these applications, this power comes with the penalties of high weight, size, cost, and maintenance due to the system's distributed nature and redundancy requirements. A high authority smart material Integrated Electric Actuator (IEA) is a modular, self-contained linear motion device that is capable of producing dynamic output strokes similar to those of hydraulic actuators yet at significantly reduced weight and volume. It provides system simplification and miniaturization. This actuator concept has many innovative features, including a TERFENOL-D-based pump, TERFENOL-D- based active valves, control algorithms, a displacement amplification unit and integrated, unitized packaging. The IEA needs only electrical power and a control command signal as inputs to provide high authority, high response rate actuation. This approach is directly compatible with distributed control strategies. Aircraft control, automotive brakes and fuel injection, and fluid power delivery are just some examples of the IEA's pervasive applications in aerospace, defense and commercial systems.

  8. Introducing sequential managed aquifer recharge technology (SMART) - From laboratory to full-scale application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, Julia; Wing, Alexandre D; Kautz, Jessica; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-07-01

    Previous lab-scale studies demonstrated that stimulating the indigenous soil microbial community of groundwater recharge systems by manipulating the availability of biodegradable organic carbon (BDOC) and establishing sequential redox conditions in the subsurface resulted in enhanced removal of compounds with redox-dependent removal behavior such as trace organic chemicals. The aim of this study is to advance this concept from laboratory to full-scale application by introducing sequential managed aquifer recharge technology (SMART). To validate the concept of SMART, a full-scale managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facility in Colorado was studied for three years that featured the proposed sequential configuration: A short riverbank filtration passage followed by subsequent re-aeration and artificial recharge and recovery. Our findings demonstrate that sequential subsurface treatment zones characterized by carbon-rich (>3 mg/L BDOC) to carbon-depleted (≤1 mg/L BDOC) and predominant oxic redox conditions can be established at full-scale MAR facilities adopting the SMART concept. The sequential configuration resulted in substantially improved trace organic chemical removal (i.e. higher biodegradation rate coefficients) for moderately biodegradable compounds compared to conventional MAR systems with extended travel times in an anoxic aquifer. Furthermore, sorption batch experiments with clay materials dispersed in the subsurface implied that sorptive processes might also play a role in the attenuation and retardation of chlorinated flame retardants during MAR. Hence, understanding key factors controlling trace organic chemical removal performance during SMART allows for systems to be engineered for optimal efficiency, resulting in improved removal of constituents at shorter subsurface travel times and a potentially reduced physical footprint of MAR installations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Health smart cards: merging technology and medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sherry R

    2003-01-01

    Smart cards are credit card-sized plastic cards, with an embedded dime-sized Integrated Circuit microprocessor chip. Smart cards can be used for keyless entry, electronic medical records, etc. Health smart cards have been in limited use since 1982 in Europe and the United States, and several barriers including lack of infrastructure, low consumer confidence, competing standards, and cost continue to be addressed.

  10. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  11. Smart Materials in the Netherlands. From fundamental research to innovative societal applications; Smart Materials in Nederland. Van Fundamenteel Onderzoek naar Innovatieve Maatschappelijke Toepassingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callant, C.

    2012-11-15

    Research in the field of smart materials in the Netherlands is subdivided into structural materials research and functional materials research. In addition, it shows a breakdown by type of material: metals, polymers and composites. Netherlands is particularly active in a number of sub-areas carries out research on a global level, such as selfhealing materials and biomimetic materials [Dutch] Onderzoek op het gebied van slimme materialen wordt in Nederland onderverdeeld in constructief materiaalonderzoek en functioneel materiaalonderzoek. Daarnaast kent men een onderverdeling naar soort materiaal: metalen, polymeren en composieten. Nederland is op een aantal deelgebieden bijzonder actief en voert daarbij onderzoek uit op wereldniveau, zoals selfhealing materials en biomimetic materials.

  12. EDITORIAL: Adaptive and active materials: Selected papers from the ASME 2010 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 10) (Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28 September-1 October 2010) Adaptive and active materials: Selected papers from the ASME 2010 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 10) (Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28 September-1 October 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brei, Diann

    2011-09-01

    The third annual meeting of the AMSE/AIAA Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) took place in the heart of historic Philadelphia's cultural district, and included a pioneer banquet in the National Constitutional Center. The applications emphasis of the 2010 conference was reflected in keynote talks by Dr Alan Taub, vice president of General Motors global research and development, 'Smart materials in the automotive industry'; Dr Charles R Farrar, engineering institute leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory, 'Future directions for structural health monitoring of civil engineering infrastructure'; and Professor Christopher S Lynch of the University of California Los Angeles, 'Ferroelectric materials and their applications'. The SMASIS conference was divided into six technical symposia each of which included basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. The six symposia were: SYMP 1 Multifunctional Materials; SYMP 2 Active Materials, Mechanics and Behavior; SYMP 3 Modeling, Simulation and Control; SYMP 4 Enabling Technologies and Integrated System Design; SYMP 5 Structural Health Monitoring/NDE; and SYMP 6 Bio-inspired Smart Materials and Structures. In addition, the conference introduced a new student and young professional development symposium. Authors of papers in the materials areas (symposia 1, 2 and 6) were invited to write a full journal article on their presentation topic for publication in this special issue of Smart Materials and Structures. This set of papers demonstrates the exceptional quality and originality of the conference presentations. We are appreciative of their efforts in producing this collection of highly relevant articles on smart materials.

  13. Mechanics for materials and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, Robert; Murashkin, Evgenii

    2017-01-01

    This book shows impressively how complex mathematical modeling of materials can be applied to technological problems. Top-class researchers present the theoretical approaches in modern mechanics and apply them to real-world problems in solid mechanics, creep, plasticity, fracture, impact, and friction. They show how they can be applied to technological challenges in various fields like aerospace technology, biological sciences and modern engineering materials.

  14. A Review on Development Practice of Smart Grid Technology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liu; Chen, Wei; Zhuang, Bo; Shen, Hongming

    2017-05-01

    Smart grid has become an inexorable trend of energy and economy development worldwide. Since the development of smart grid was put forward in China in 2009, we have obtained abundant research results and practical experiences as well as extensive attention from international community in this field. This paper reviews the key technologies and demonstration projects on new energy connection forecasts; energy storage; smart substations; disaster prevention and reduction for power transmission lines; flexible DC transmission; distribution automation; distributed generation access and micro grid; smart power consumption; the comprehensive demonstration of power distribution and utilization; smart power dispatching and control systems; and the communication networks and information platforms of China, systematically, on the basis of 5 fields, i.e., renewable energy integration, smart power transmission and transformation, smart power distribution and consumption, smart power dispatching and control systems and information and communication platforms. Meanwhile, it also analyzes and compares with the developmental level of similar technologies abroad, providing an outlook on the future development trends of various technologies.

  15. Smart polymeric materials in forms of fiber and film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu

    1998-01-01

    Chemical grafting: graft polymerization is a powerful technology to append novel functionality to base fibers, clothes, felts, films and others, while maintaining their original properties. As shown in Figure 1, while a gardener may use a pair of shears to cut the branch, to cut the molecular branch of a polymeric material, one can utilize the radiation energy. Effective utilization of the radiation energy can proceed to a novel reaction that is impossible for other conventional methods and develop a new material bearing outstanding functions. This technology is named radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP). In this article, the present research and development of novel functional polymeric materials by radiation-induced graft polymerization is described. The felt of intertwined fibers has been widely used as a filter to remove particles from air but not toxic gaseous compounds. However, by RIGP, one can transform the felt into a high functional filter that will absorb the toxic gaseous compounds while removing particles simultaneously. As a result, the RIGP technology, which is impossible by conventional technology, has enabled the development of a novel functional material that produce highly pure air. Commercialization of this filter for applications in a semiconductor manufacturing facility and as an air purifier is under process. Moreover, this filter can also be used to produce highly purified water by removing toxic heavy metals. Commercially available polyethylene films are also been transform into conductive separators by RIGP to increase the lifetime of a battery by more than five-fold. (J.P.N)

  16. Smart homes, private homes? An empirical study of technology researchers' perceptions of ethical issues in developing smart-home health technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchley, Giles; Huxtable, Richard; Murtagh, Madeleine; Ter Meulen, Ruud; Flach, Peter; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2017-04-04

    Smart-home technologies, comprising environmental sensors, wearables and video are attracting interest in home healthcare delivery. Development of such technology is usually justified on the basis of the technology's potential to increase the autonomy of people living with long-term conditions. Studies of the ethics of smart-homes raise concerns about privacy, consent, social isolation and equity of access. Few studies have investigated the ethical perspectives of smart-home engineers themselves. By exploring the views of engineering researchers in a large smart-home project, we sought to contribute to dialogue between ethics and the engineering community. Either face-to-face or using Skype, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 20 early- and mid-career smart-home researchers from a multi-centre smart-home project, who were asked to describe their own experience and to reflect more broadly about ethical considerations that relate to smart-home design. With participants' consent, interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. Two overarching themes emerged: in 'Privacy', researchers indicated that they paid close attention to negative consequences of potential unauthorised information sharing in their current work. However, when discussing broader issues in smart-home design beyond the confines of their immediate project, researchers considered physical privacy to a lesser extent, even though physical privacy may manifest in emotive concerns about being watched or monitored. In 'Choice', researchers indicated they often saw provision of choice to end-users as a solution to ethical dilemmas. While researchers indicated that choices of end-users may need to be restricted for technological reasons, ethical standpoints that restrict choice were usually assumed and embedded in design. The tractability of informational privacy may explain the greater attention that is paid to it. However, concerns about physical privacy may

  17. The Role of Internet of Things (IoT) in Smart Cities: Technology Roadmap-oriented Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Eunil Park; Angel P. del Pobil; Sang Jib Kwon

    2018-01-01

    Since the concept of a smart city was introduced, IoT (Internet of Things) has beenconsidered the key infrastructure in a smart city. However, there are currently no detailed explanations of the technical contributions of IoT in terms of the management, development, and improvements of smart cities. Therefore, the current study describes the importance of IoT technologies on the technology roadmap (TRM) of a smart city. Moreover, the survey with about 200 experts was conducted to investigate ...

  18. ETHICS OF SMART HOUSE WELFARE TECHNOLOGY FOR OLDER ADULTS: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Veralia Gabriela; Taylor, Ingrid; Bing-Jonsson, Pia Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    The University College of Southeast Norway has an on-going project to develop a smart house welfare system to allow older adults and people with disabilities to remain in their homes for as long as they wish in safe, dignified, living conditions. This article reviews reported ethical challenges to implementing smart houses for older adults. A systematic literature review identified twenty-four articles in English, French, Spanish, and Norwegian, which were analyzed and synthesized using Hofmann's question list to investigate the reported ethical challenges. Smart houses offer a promising way to improve access to home care for older adults and people with disabilities. However, important ethical challenges arise when implementing smart houses, including cost-effectiveness, privacy, autonomy, informed consent, dignity, safety, and trust. The identified ethical challenges are important to consider when developing smart house systems. Due to the limitations of smart house technology, designers and users should be mindful that smart houses can achieve a safer and more dignified life-style but cannot solve all the challenges related to ageing, disabilities, and disease. At some point, smart houses can no longer help persons as they develop needs that smart houses cannot meet.

  19. Implementing Smart School Technology at the Secondary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Charles K.

    This paper describes the characteristics of "smart schools" and offers guidelines for developing such schools. Smart schools are defined as having three features: (1) they are computer networked via local area networks in order to share information through teleconferencing, databases, and electronic mail; (2) they are connected beyond…

  20. Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipperer, A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Aloise-Young, P. A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Suryanarayanan, S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Zimmerle, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Roche, R. [Univ. of Technology, Belfort-Montebeliard (France); Earle, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bauleo, P. [Fort Collins Utilities, CO (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and trans-forming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electricity grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

  1. Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipperer, Adam; Aloise-Young, Patricia A.; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Roche, Robin; Earle, Lieko; Christensen, Dane; Bauleo, Pablo; Zimmerle, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and transforming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electric grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

  2. Investigating the effects of smart technology on customer dynamics and customer experience

    OpenAIRE

    Foroudi, Pantea; Gupta, Suraksha; Sivarajah, Uthayasankar; Broderick, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Increased use of smart technologies by customers is leading to recognition of their influence on the shopping experiences of customers by practitioners. However, the academic literature fails to acknowledge the influence of smart technology usage, combined with behavioural intention of the customer, on the dynamics and experience of customers. This research utilises explanatory research at the preliminary stage to examine this phenomenon in a retail setting. A conceptual framework was created...

  3. [Vision on and use of physical restraints and 'smart technology' in nursing homes in Flanders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlassara, V; Lampo, E; Degryse, B; Van Audenhove, C; Spruytte, N

    2017-04-01

    The STAFF-project investigates in what way 'smart technology' can offer an alternative for physical restraints in nursing homes. A survey is realized aimed at gaining more insight into the vision on and the use of physical restraints and 'smart technology'. Two partly overlapping structured questionnaires were developed and sent to nursing home staff in Flanders (Belgium). One hundred fifty six administrators (managers or assistant-managers) and 238 caregiving staff (nurses, nursing aids, paramedical staff and other) completed the online questionnaire. In general there is a low acceptability of physical restraint use, however, a more nuanced picture of acceptability is present depending on the specific motivation for using physical restraints and on the specific means of physical restraints. About half of the administrators say they use smart technology in the nursing home. The two main reasons for not applying (yet) smart technology are 'too high price for smart technology' and 'inadequate infrastructure of the nursing home'. All respondents underscore the importance of multiple strategies to diminish the use of physical restraints in nursing homes. Physical restraint use is a complex theme and needs a nuanced analysis and management. This study shows that there is still room for improvement in diminishing the use of physical restraints and that nursing homes in Flanders are open to use smart technology.

  4. Materials and technology in sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Mike; Blair, Kim; Vasquez, Mike

    2012-08-01

    An evolution from natural to highly engineered materials has drastically changed the way in which athletes train and compete. Thanks to challenging technological problems and unconventional commercialization pathways, universities can make a direct impact on the development of sporting goods.

  5. Technologies to Combat Aedes Mosquitoes: A Model Based on Smart City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Silva, Geovanna Cristine; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Yoshikazu Shishido, Henrique; Jacklin Eler, Gabrielle

    2018-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes are responsible for the transmission of diseases such as dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunya fever, zika virus fever, some of which can cause irreversible central nervous system problems and death. This study investigates what technologies are being used for combatting and monitoring the Aedes mosquitoes and to propose joining these technologies into a single and complete solution using the Smart Cities concept. A search for newscasts on Google and mobile apps in app stores were performed to identify technological solutions for combat to Aedes mosquitoes. Also, a model for joint technology was proposed. Results identified the following technologies: 170 software, two sensors, two drones, one electronic device, ten mosquito traps/lures, seven biological tools, six biotechnologies, and eight chemical formulations. Technological resources and adoption of preventive measures by the population could be a useful method for the mosquito control. Examples include a georeferenced model for identification and examination of larvae, application of chemical/biological products, real-time mapping, sending of educational materials via email or social media for the population, and alerts to health professionals in the zones of combat/risk. In combination, these technologies may indicate a better solution to the current problem.

  6. Smart City Pilot Projects Using LoRa and IEEE802.15.4 Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasolini, Gianni; Buratti, Chiara; Feltrin, Luca; Zabini, Flavio; De Castro, Cristina; Verdone, Roberto; Andrisano, Oreste

    2018-04-06

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), through wireless communications and the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm, are the enabling keys for transforming traditional cities into smart cities, since they provide the core infrastructure behind public utilities and services. However, to be effective, IoT-based services could require different technologies and network topologies, even when addressing the same urban scenario. In this paper, we highlight this aspect and present two smart city testbeds developed in Italy. The first one concerns a smart infrastructure for public lighting and relies on a heterogeneous network using the IEEE 802.15.4 short-range communication technology, whereas the second one addresses smart-building applications and is based on the LoRa low-rate, long-range communication technology. The smart lighting scenario is discussed providing the technical details and the economic benefits of a large-scale (around 3000 light poles) flexible and modular implementation of a public lighting infrastructure, while the smart-building testbed is investigated, through measurement campaigns and simulations, assessing the coverage and the performance of the LoRa technology in a real urban scenario. Results show that a proper parameter setting is needed to cover large urban areas while maintaining the airtime sufficiently low to keep packet losses at satisfactory levels.

  7. Smart City Pilot Projects Using LoRa and IEEE802.15.4 Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Pasolini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs, through wireless communications and the Internet of Things (IoT paradigm, are the enabling keys for transforming traditional cities into smart cities, since they provide the core infrastructure behind public utilities and services. However, to be effective, IoT-based services could require different technologies and network topologies, even when addressing the same urban scenario. In this paper, we highlight this aspect and present two smart city testbeds developed in Italy. The first one concerns a smart infrastructure for public lighting and relies on a heterogeneous network using the IEEE 802.15.4 short-range communication technology, whereas the second one addresses smart-building applications and is based on the LoRa low-rate, long-range communication technology. The smart lighting scenario is discussed providing the technical details and the economic benefits of a large-scale (around 3000 light poles flexible and modular implementation of a public lighting infrastructure, while the smart-building testbed is investigated, through measurement campaigns and simulations, assessing the coverage and the performance of the LoRa technology in a real urban scenario. Results show that a proper parameter setting is needed to cover large urban areas while maintaining the airtime sufficiently low to keep packet losses at satisfactory levels.

  8. Advanced materials and technologies. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, V K; Alander, T K.R. [eds.; Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

    1996-12-31

    The contents of the proceedings consist of three chapters, of which, the first discusses common megatrends, both nationally and globally, in different fields of materials technology. The second chapter is dealing with novel production and processing of base metals and, finally, the third chapter is related with current achievements and future goals of electronic, magnetic, optical and coating materials and their processing

  9. Advanced materials and technologies. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, V.K.; Alander, T.K.R. [eds.] [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

    1995-12-31

    The contents of the proceedings consist of three chapters, of which, the first discusses common megatrends, both nationally and globally, in different fields of materials technology. The second chapter is dealing with novel production and processing of base metals and, finally, the third chapter is related with current achievements and future goals of electronic, magnetic, optical and coating materials and their processing

  10. Smart Grids influence in the competitiveness of the EITT sector (Electronics, Information Technologies and Telecommunications); Incidencia de las Smart Grids en la competitividad del sector ETIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanes del Agua, E.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a general vision about the how the smart grids development could have an influence in the competitiveness and opportunities for the industry of electronics, information technologies and telecommunications. General concepts about smart grids are summarized, as well as the changes that are foreseen in the electrical network and the most important technologies that will support the development of the smart grids. A smart grid is a transport and distribution network that has the capacity to understanding, assimilate, elaborate and use it adequately, with an intensive use of the information technologies and the telecommunications. The article is completed by projects, initiatives and activities related to the smart grids and by different conclusions. (Author)

  11. Selecting e-Purse Smart Card Technology via Fuzzy AHP and ANP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgül Demirtaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developments in the information technologies provide important advantages to consumers and companies. Nowadays, smart card technology starts to use e-purse applications. The aim of this paper is to identify the most important decision criteria to select the best card technology. In this study, at first smart card and multiple selection techniques were explained. Then the best card technology was selected for an e-purse application. The three types of card technologies were examined and the most important criteria were taken into account by the software developer while they develop card software. Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP and analytical network process (ANP techniques were used to compare smart card technologies.

  12. A theoretical model to explain the smart technology adoption behaviors of elder consumers (Elderadopt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golant, Stephen M

    2017-08-01

    A growing global population of older adults is potential consumers of a category of products referred to as smart technologies, but also known as telehealth, telecare, information and communication technologies, robotics, and gerontechnology. This paper constructs a theoretical model to explain whether older people will adopt smart technology options to cope with their discrepant individual or environmental circumstances, thereby enabling them to age in place. Its proposed constructs and relationships are drawn from multiple academic disciplines and professional specialties, and an extensive literature focused on the factors influencing the acceptance of these smart technologies. It specifically examines whether older adults will substitute these new technologies for traditional coping solutions that rely on informal and formal care assistance and low technology related products. The model argues that older people will more positively evaluate smart technology alternatives when they feel more stressed because of their unmet needs, have greater resilience (stronger perceptions of self-efficacy and greater openness to new information), and are more strongly persuaded by their sources of outside messaging (external information) and their past experiences (internal information). It proposes that older people distinguish three attributes of these coping options when they appraise them: perceived efficaciousness, perceived usability, and perceived collateral damages. The more positively older people evaluate these attributes, the more likely that they will adopt these smart technology products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. User Adaptive and Context-Aware Smart Home Using Pervasive and Semantic Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggeliki Vlachostergiou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous Computing is moving the interaction away from the human-computer paradigm and towards the creation of smart environments that users and things, from the IoT perspective, interact with. User modeling and adaptation is consistently present having the human user as a constant but pervasive interaction introduces the need for context incorporation towards context-aware smart environments. The current article discusses both aspects of the user modeling and adaptation as well as context awareness and incorporation into the smart home domain. Users are modeled as fuzzy personas and these models are semantically related. Context information is collected via sensors and corresponds to various aspects of the pervasive interaction such as temperature and humidity, but also smart city sensors and services. This context information enhances the smart home environment via the incorporation of user defined home rules. Semantic Web technologies support the knowledge representation of this ecosystem while the overall architecture has been experimentally verified using input from the SmartSantander smart city and applying it to the SandS smart home within FIRE and FIWARE frameworks.

  14. Smart Grid as advanced technology enabler of demand response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellings, C.W.; Samotyj, M. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Numerous papers and articles presented worldwide at different conferences and meetings have already covered the goals, objectives, architecture, and business plans of Smart Grid. The number of electric utilities worldwide has followed up with demonstration and deployment efforts. Our initial assumptions and expectations of Smart Grid functionality have been confirmed. We have indicated that Smart Grid will fulfill the following goals: enhance customer service, improve operational efficiency, enhance demand response and load control, transform customer energy use behavior, and support new utility business models. For the purpose of this paper, we shall focus on which of those above-mentioned Smart Grid functionalities are going to facilitate the ever-growing need for enhanced demand response and load control.

  15. Smart roadside initiative gap analysis : trucking technology literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Smart Roadside Initiative (SRI) was designed to breakdown information silos at the roadside in order to improve : motor carrier safety and mobility, as well as the operational efficiency of motor carriers and the public-sector agencies : that reg...

  16. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  17. Adaptive and active materials: selected papers from the ASME 2013 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 13) (Snowbird, UT, USA, 16-18 September 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nancy; Naguib, Hani; Turner, Travis; Anderson, Iain; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin; Daqaq, Mohammed; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu; Sarles, Andy

    2014-10-01

    The sixth annual meeting of the ASME Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) was held in the beautiful mountain encircled Snowbird Resort and Conference Center in Little Cottonwood Canyon near Salt Lake City, Utah. It is the conference's objective to provide an up-to-date overview of research trends in the entire field of smart materials systems in a friendly casual forum conducive to the exchange of ideas and latest results. As each year we strive to grow and offer new experiences, this year we included special focused topic tracks on nanoscale multiferroic materials and origami engineering. The cross-disciplinary emphasis was reflected in keynote speeches by Professor Kaushik Bhattacharya (California Institute of Technology) on 'Cyclic Deformation and the Interplay between Phase Transformation and Plasticity in Shape Memory Alloys', by Professor Alison Flatau (University of Maryland at College Park) on 'Structural Magnetostrictive Alloys: The Other Smart Material', and by Dr Leslie Momoda (Director of the Sensors and Materials Laboratories, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA) on 'Architecturing New Functional Materials: An Industrial Perspective'. SMASIS 2013 was divided into seven symposia which span basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. SYMP 1. Development and Characterization of Multifunctional Materials. SYMP 2. Mechanics and Behavior of Active Materials. SYMP 3. Modeling, Simulation and Control of Adaptive Systems. SYMP 4. Integrated System Design and Implementation. SYMP 5. Structural Health Monitoring. SYMP 6. Bioinspired Smart Materials and Systems. SYMP 7. Energy Harvesting. Authors of selected papers in the materials areas (symposia 1, 2, and 6) as well as energy harvesting (symposium 7) were invited to write a full journal article on their presentation topic for publication in this special issue of Smart

  18. Cognitive Spectrum Sharing: An Enabling Wireless Communication Technology for a Wide Use of Smart Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Fantacci

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A smart city is an environment where a pervasive, multi-service network is employed to provide citizens improved living conditions as well as better public safety and security. Advanced communication technologies are essential to achieve this goal. In particular, an efficient and reliable communication network plays a crucial role in providing continue, ubiquitous, and reliable interconnections among users, smart devices, and applications. As a consequence, wireless networking appears as the principal enabling communication technology despite the necessity to face severe challenges to satisfy the needs arising from a smart environment, such as explosive data volume, heterogeneous data traffic, and support of quality of service constraints. An interesting approach for meeting the growing data demand due to smart city applications is to adopt suitable methodologies to improve the usage of all potential spectrum resources. Towards this goal, a very promising solution is represented by the Cognitive Radio technology that enables context-aware capability in order to pursue an efficient use of the available communication resources according to the surrounding environment conditions. In this paper we provide a review of the characteristics, challenges, and solutions of a smart city communication architecture, based on the Cognitive Radio technology, by focusing on two new network paradigms—namely, Heterogeneous Network and Machines-to-Machines communications—that are of special interest to efficiently support smart city applications and services.

  19. Nuclear Safety in A Post-Fukushima ERDA: Moving Forward with smart Mobile Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J. H.; Suh, K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The so-called smart mobile technology refers to the know-how that is being applied to smart phones and smart pads such as ipa and Galaxy Tab, just to name a few. According to Gardner, 280 million smart phones were purchased in year 2010, and another 500 million will be sold in 2013. For the smart pad, the number was 7 million in 2010 and over 30 million pad shall be picked up by buyers. Smart devices are charging the individuals, corporate and societies in the world with '3a' meaning real time, infinite reach of information and communication beating the space limitation. Smart devices are tethered to the Global Positioning System (GPS), high resolution camera, touch sensor Graphic User Interface (GUI), gyro sensor for inclination information, motion sensor, voice recognition, face recognition, cloud, and so forth. These technologies bring about the remote office so that people not only work in their offices but communicate with concurrent information through the Social Networking Service (SNS), build their social relationship, and enjoy their free time with various entertainment mobile applications. These changes signify the strongest information power since the computing history began. The smart mobile technology can also bestow a boost to congested nuclear power industry due to the recent Fukushima Decah nuclear power plants (NPPs) accident. At first, the mobile office and cloud technology will endow the biggest variety to let US manage and access to the desired information anytime and anywhere. The display panel and camera built in the smart mobile device can make the augmented reality (AR) possible to nuclear power industry. For example, the smart mobile devices can be utilized to support the product assembly process in manufacturing company relevant to NPPs. Compared to previous assembly work that is coming and going to find the tools, one can accomplish the assembly process without wasting time, watching manual at the same time at the spot. Experienced

  20. Nuclear Safety in A Post-Fukushima ERDA: Moving Forward with smart Mobile Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J. H. [PHILOSOPHIA, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, K. Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The so-called smart mobile technology refers to the know-how that is being applied to smart phones and smart pads such as ipa and Galaxy Tab, just to name a few. According to Gardner, 280 million smart phones were purchased in year 2010, and another 500 million will be sold in 2013. For the smart pad, the number was 7 million in 2010 and over 30 million pad shall be picked up by buyers. Smart devices are charging the individuals, corporate and societies in the world with '3a' meaning real time, infinite reach of information and communication beating the space limitation. Smart devices are tethered to the Global Positioning System (GPS), high resolution camera, touch sensor Graphic User Interface (GUI), gyro sensor for inclination information, motion sensor, voice recognition, face recognition, cloud, and so forth. These technologies bring about the remote office so that people not only work in their offices but communicate with concurrent information through the Social Networking Service (SNS), build their social relationship, and enjoy their free time with various entertainment mobile applications. These changes signify the strongest information power since the computing history began. The smart mobile technology can also bestow a boost to congested nuclear power industry due to the recent Fukushima Decah nuclear power plants (NPPs) accident. At first, the mobile office and cloud technology will endow the biggest variety to let US manage and access to the desired information anytime and anywhere. The display panel and camera built in the smart mobile device can make the augmented reality (AR) possible to nuclear power industry. For example, the smart mobile devices can be utilized to support the product assembly process in manufacturing company relevant to NPPs. Compared to previous assembly work that is coming and going to find the tools, one can accomplish the assembly process without wasting time, watching manual at the same time at the spot

  1. Organizational and technological correlates of nurses' trust in a smart intravenous pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur; Chiou, Erin

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand technology and system characteristics that contribute to nurses' ratings of trust in a smart intravenous pump. Nurses' trust in new technologies can influence how technologies are used. Trust in technology is defined as a person's belief that a technology will not fail them. Potential outcomes of trust in technology are appropriate trust, overtrust, distrust, and mistrust. Trust in technology is also related to several use-specific outcomes, including appropriate use and inappropriate use such as overreliance, disuse or rejection, or misuse. Understanding trust in relation to outcomes can contribute to designs that facilitate appropriate trust in new technologies. A survey was completed by 391 nurses a year after the implementation of a new smart intravenous pump. The survey assessed trust in the intravenous pump and other elements of the sociotechnical system, individual characteristics, technology characteristics, and organizational characteristics. Results show that perceptions of usefulness, safety, ease of use, and usability are related to ratings of trust in smart intravenous pumps. Other work systemfactors such as perception of work environment, age, experience, quality of work, and perception of work performance are also related to ratings of trust. Nurses' trust in smart intravenous pumps is influenced by both characteristics of the technology and the sociotechnical system. Findings from this research have implications for the design of future smart intravenous pumps and health systems. Recommendations for appropriately trustworthy smart intravenous pumps are discussed. Findings also have implications for how trust in health technologies can be measured and conceptualized in complex sociotechnical systems.

  2. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  3. Get SMART: the case for a strategic materials reduction treaty, and its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numark, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    Inventories of weapons plutonium removed from nuclear warheads should be reduced as quickly as possible to prevent large-scale rearmament by the United States or Russia and to minimize the risk of theft or sabotage by a sub-national group. The U.S. and Russia should agree to a Strategic Materials Reduction Treaty (SMART) establishing an aggressive timetable for manual reduction of national security needs and schedule the final disposition of this material. An aggressive disarmament timetable will require an aggressive implementation program. This should take advantage of available resources within the U.S. and Russia as well as in third countries, including potentially both reactor and immobilization options, as long as stringent safeguards and security can be guaranteed at all participating facilities. Many existing light water reactors in the U.S. are well suited to the purpose, and several private operators of these plants have formally expressed interest to the U.S. government in providing such service. Russian fast and light water reactors appear to be less readily available to burn weapons plutonium. Russia, the United States and other G-7 countries should develop international programs to facilitate the most rapid possible reduction in weapons plutonium inventories, consistent with SMART. Such international co-operation would add credibility and transparency to the nuclear disarmament process in the spirit of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and could add momentum toward the conclusion of both a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and a Fissile Material Production Cut-off Treaty. This international program should take advantage of existing global infrastructure for the use of plutonium fuel as well as other capability (e.g., in the U.S. and Canada) that could supplement existing civilian Pu use plans, as well as vitrification or other immobilization facilities. In combination, it is reasonable to forecast a global capability to disposition at least 10 tons of weapons

  4. Smart technologies to enhance social connectedness in older people who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Kurowski, William; Miller, Kimberly J; Pearce, Alan J; Santamaria, Nick; Long, Maureen; Ventura, Cameron; Said, Catherine M

    2014-09-01

    To examine the effectiveness of smart technologies in improving or maintaining the social connectedness of older people living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of research articles published between 2000 and 2013. Article screening, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Downs and Black checklist) were conducted by two independent researchers. Eighteen publications were identified that evaluated the effect of smart technologies on dimensions of social connectedness. Fourteen studies reported positive outcomes in aspects such as social support, isolation and loneliness. There was emerging evidence that some technologies augmented the beneficial effects of more traditional aged-care services. Smart technologies, such as tailored internet programs, may help older people better manage and understand various health conditions, resulting in subsequent improvements in aspects of social connectedness. Further research is required regarding how technological innovations could be promoted, marketed and implemented to benefit older people. © 2014 ACOTA.

  5. Leaving patients to their own devices? Smart technology, safety and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita; Quick, Oliver

    2018-03-06

    This debate article explores how smart technologies may create a double-edged sword for patient safety and effective therapeutic relationships. Increasing utilization of health monitoring devices by patients will likely become an important aspect of self-care and preventive medicine. It may also help to enhance accurate symptom reports, diagnoses, and prompt referral to specialist care where appropriate. However, the development, marketing, and use of such technology raise significant ethical implications for therapeutic relationships and patient safety. Drawing on lessons learned from other direct-to-consumer health products such as genetic testing, this article explores how smart technology can also pose regulatory challenges and encourage overutilization of healthcare services. In order for smart technology to promote safer care and effective therapeutic encounters, the technology and its utilization must be safe. This article argues for unified regulatory guidelines and better education for both healthcare providers and patients regarding the benefits and risks of these devices.

  6. Smart grid, household consumers and asymmetries: Energy visualization and scripting of technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken

    This paper will focus on the asymmetries that occur when different consumer groups are presented to the same energy visualisation equipment. The studied technology is home automation/control equipment, designed to contribute to the general set up of smart grid (facilitate a flexible use......-technologies applied in the human actor's homes) and how the consumers interpret the technology (the De-scription of the object). In relation to the general goals of smart grid to change the consumption of electricity into being more flexible, it is relevant to investigate if different consumer groups accept...... of electricity and accommodate demand response). Large smart grid pilot projects suggest that energy visualisation technology will be a common part of households in the future. There exist numerous different visualisation technologies within the area of electricity and private consumers today.This study seeks...

  7. Automated assessment of cognitive health using smart home technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Prafulla N; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop intelligent systems to monitor the wellbeing of individuals in their home environments. This paper introduces a machine learning-based method to automatically predict activity quality in smart homes and automatically assess cognitive health based on activity quality. This paper describes an automated framework to extract set of features from smart home sensors data that reflects the activity performance or ability of an individual to complete an activity which can be input to machine learning algorithms. Output from learning algorithms including principal component analysis, support vector machine, and logistic regression algorithms are used to quantify activity quality for a complex set of smart home activities and predict cognitive health of participants. Smart home activity data was gathered from volunteer participants (n=263) who performed a complex set of activities in our smart home testbed. We compare our automated activity quality prediction and cognitive health prediction with direct observation scores and health assessment obtained from neuropsychologists. With all samples included, we obtained statistically significant correlation (r=0.54) between direct observation scores and predicted activity quality. Similarly, using a support vector machine classifier, we obtained reasonable classification accuracy (area under the ROC curve=0.80, g-mean=0.73) in classifying participants into two different cognitive classes, dementia and cognitive healthy. The results suggest that it is possible to automatically quantify the task quality of smart home activities and perform limited assessment of the cognitive health of individual if smart home activities are properly chosen and learning algorithms are appropriately trained.

  8. Ethical Implications to the Assessment of the Smart Grid Technology in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Makienko Marina A.; Kurkan Natalia V.; Emelyanenko Ekaterina E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper brings up the issue of staff training for professional development of the Smart Grid technology and for use of its elements by customers in households. It was revealed that the considerable part of the respondents was not familiar with the definition of Smart Grid. That required the development of communication skills by energy engineering students and their social activity as well. The reasons mentioned make actual the following elements of engineering education: social responsibi...

  9. Smart homes and home health monitoring technologies for older adults: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Stroulia, Eleni; Nikolaidis, Ioanis; Miguel-Cruz, Antonio; Rios Rincon, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    Around the world, populations are aging and there is a growing concern about ways that older adults can maintain their health and well-being while living in their homes. The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic literature review to determine: (1) the levels of technology readiness among older adults and, (2) evidence for smart homes and home-based health-monitoring technologies that support aging in place for older adults who have complex needs. We identified and analyzed 48 of 1863 relevant papers. Our analyses found that: (1) technology-readiness level for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is low; (2) the highest level of evidence is 1b (i.e., one randomized controlled trial with a PEDro score ≥6); smart homes and home health monitoring technologies are used to monitor activities of daily living, cognitive decline and mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs; (3) there is no evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address disability prediction and health-related quality of life, or fall prevention; and (4) there is conflicting evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The level of technology readiness for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is still low. The highest level of evidence found was in a study that supported home health technologies for use in monitoring activities of daily living, cognitive decline, mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A technology roadmap of smart biosensors from conventional glucose monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Pravin; Sahu, Pratiksha; Gaud, Ram

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this review article is to focus on technology roadmap of smart biosensors from a conventional glucose monitoring system. The estimation of glucose with commercially available devices involves analysis of blood samples that are obtained by pricking finger or extracting blood from the forearm. Since pain and discomfort are associated with invasive methods, the non-invasive measurement techniques have been investigated. The non-invasive methods show advantages like non-exposure to sharp objects such as needles and syringes, due to which there is an increase in testing frequency, improved control of glucose concentration and absence of pain and biohazard materials. This review study is aimed to describe recent invasive techniques and major noninvasive techniques, viz. biosensors, optical techniques and sensor-embedded contact lenses for glucose estimation.

  11. Application of shape changing smart materials in household appliances : A fragmented and inconsistent uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Kassim, A.; Horvath, I.; Gerritsen, B.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Shape changing smart materials (SCSM) have a wide range of applications, supporting product functions through material features. Surprisingly, their application in consumer durables such as household appliances is not as expected. This phenomenon could be related to a possible SCSM knowledge gap

  12. A Review of Smart Materials in Tactile Actuators for Information Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As the largest organ in the human body, the skin provides the important sensory channel for humans to receive external stimulations based on touch. By the information perceived through touch, people can feel and guess the properties of objects, like weight, temperature, textures, and motion, etc. In fact, those properties are nerve stimuli to our brain received by different kinds of receptors in the skin. Mechanical, electrical, and thermal stimuli can stimulate these receptors and cause different information to be conveyed through the nerves. Technologies for actuators to provide mechanical, electrical or thermal stimuli have been developed. These include static or vibrational actuation, electrostatic stimulation, focused ultrasound, and more. Smart materials, such as piezoelectric materials, carbon nanotubes, and shape memory alloys, play important roles in providing actuation for tactile sensation. This paper aims to review the background biological knowledge of human tactile sensing, to give an understanding of how we sense and interact with the world through the sense of touch, as well as the conventional and state-of-the-art technologies of tactile actuators for tactile feedback delivery.

  13. Smart Cities Will Need Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru WOINAROSCHY

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A smart city is a sustainable and efficient urban centre that provides a high quality of life to its inhabitants through optimal management of its resources. Chemical industry has a key role to play in the sustainable evolution of the smart cities. Additionally, chemistry is at the heart of all modern industries, including electronics, information technology, biotechnology and nano-technology. Chemistry can make the smart cities project more sustainable, more energy efficient and more cost effective. There are six broad critical elements of any smart city: water management systems; infrastructure; transportation; energy; waste management and raw materials consumption. In all these elements chemistry and chemical engineering are deeply involved.

  14. Smart-Home Architecture Based on Bluetooth mesh Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qing; Liu, Jianghua

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes the smart home network system based on Nordic nrf52832 device. Nrf52832 is new generation RF SOC device focus on sensor monitor and low power Bluetooth connection applications. In this smart home system, we set up a self-organizing network system which consists of one control node and a lot of monitor nodes. The control node manages the whole network works; the monitor nodes collect the sensor information such as light intensity, temperature, humidity, PM2.5, etc. Then update to the control node by Bluetooth mesh network. The design results show that the Bluetooth mesh wireless network system is flexible and construction cost is low, which is suitable for the communication characteristics of a smart home network. We believe it will be wildly used in the future.

  15. Novel Tactile Sensor Technology and Smart Tactile Sensing Systems: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liang; Ge, Chang; Wang, Z Jane; Cretu, Edmond; Li, Xiaoou

    2017-11-17

    During the last decades, smart tactile sensing systems based on different sensing techniques have been developed due to their high potential in industry and biomedical engineering. However, smart tactile sensing technologies and systems are still in their infancy, as many technological and system issues remain unresolved and require strong interdisciplinary efforts to address them. This paper provides an overview of smart tactile sensing systems, with a focus on signal processing technologies used to interpret the measured information from tactile sensors and/or sensors for other sensory modalities. The tactile sensing transduction and principles, fabrication and structures are also discussed with their merits and demerits. Finally, the challenges that tactile sensing technology needs to overcome are highlighted.

  16. The Impact of Culture On Smart Community Technology: The Case of 13 Wikipedia Instances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinayida Petrushyna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Smart communities provide technologies for monitoring social behaviors inside communities. The technologies that support knowledge building should consider the cultural background of community members. The studies of the influence of the culture on knowledge building is limited. Just a few works consider digital traces of individuals that they explain using cultural values and beliefs. In this work, we analyze 13 Wikipedia instances where users with different cultural background build knowledge in different ways. We compare edits of users. Using social network analysis we build and analyze co- authorship networks and watch the networks evolution. We explain the differences we have found using Hofstede dimensions and Schwartz cultural values and discuss implications for the design of smart community technologies. Our findings provide insights in requirements for technologies used for smart communities in different cultures.

  17. The Impact of Communication Technologies on Social Structure--Take the Example of Smart City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nie Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Human society has entered the era of digit and internet, and the communication technology is one of the important factors which result in changes of social structure. Smart City is an active attempt to future urban development, to use the communication technology as an constitutive element of smart city from the economic base to the superstructure, production relation to exchange relation. Digitization and networking are committed to reflect the state of human's comprehensive development, which is an important stage of emancipation of humanity itself. Communication technology can bring people's initiative into full play and learning in development and establish the harmonious relationships during the interaction. This article is based on the example of smart city, which analyzed the impact of communication technologies on social structure from different aspects.

  18. Novel Tactile Sensor Technology and Smart Tactile Sensing Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, smart tactile sensing systems based on different sensing techniques have been developed due to their high potential in industry and biomedical engineering. However, smart tactile sensing technologies and systems are still in their infancy, as many technological and system issues remain unresolved and require strong interdisciplinary efforts to address them. This paper provides an overview of smart tactile sensing systems, with a focus on signal processing technologies used to interpret the measured information from tactile sensors and/or sensors for other sensory modalities. The tactile sensing transduction and principles, fabrication and structures are also discussed with their merits and demerits. Finally, the challenges that tactile sensing technology needs to overcome are highlighted.

  19. Design of a 4D Printing System Using Thermal Sensitive Smart Materials and Photoactivated Shape Changing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Steven Kyle

    4D printing is an emerging additive manufacturing technology that combines 3D printing with smart materials. Current 3D printing technology can print objects with a multitude of materials; however, these objects are usually static, geometrically permanent, and not suitable for multi-functional use. The 4D printed objects can change their shape over time when exposed to different external stimuli such as heat, pressure, magnetic fields, or moisture. In this research, heat and light reactive smart materials are explored as a 4D printing materials. Synthetization of a material that actuates when exposed to stimulus can be a very difficult process, and merging that same material with the ability to be 3D printed can be further difficult. A common 3D printing thermoplastic, poly(lactic) acid (PLA), is used as a shape memory material that is 3D printed using a fused deposition machine (FDM) and combined with nylon fabric for the exploration of smart textiles. The research shows that post printed PLA possesses shape memory properties depending on the thickness of the 3D printed material and the activation temperature. PLA can be thermomechanically trained into temporary shapes and return to its original shape when exposed to high temperatures. PLA can be 3D printed onto nylon fabrics for the creation of the smart textiles. Additionally, a photoisomerable shape changing material is explored because light activation is wireless, controllable, focusable, abundant, causes rapid shape change of the smart material, and induces reversible shape change in the material. This study supports the fundamental research to generate knowledge needed for synthesis of a novel azobenzene shape changing polymer (SCP) and integrating this smart material into objects printed with a 4D printing process using syringe printing. Multiple versions of azobenzene SCP are synthesized that actuate when exposed to 365 nm and 455 nm light. Two SCPs, MeOABHx and DR1Hx, are selected for the 4D printing

  20. Enabling Smart Grid Cosimulation Studies: Rapid Design and Development of the Technologies and Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Timothy M.; Kadavil, Rahul; Palmintier, Bryan; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Maciejewski, Anthony A.; Siegel, Howard Jay; Chong, Edwin K. P.; Hale, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    The 21st century electric power grid is transforming with an unprecedented increase in demand and increase in new technologies. In the United States Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Title XIII sets the tenets for modernizing the electricity grid through what is known as the 'Smart Grid Initiative.' This initiative calls for increased design, deployment, and integration of distributed energy resources, smart technologies and appliances, and advanced storage devices. The deployment of these new technologies requires rethinking and re-engineering the traditional boundaries between different electric power system domains.

  1. Smart grids fundamentals and technologies in electricity networks

    CERN Document Server

    Buchholz, Bernd M

    2014-01-01

    Efficient transmission and distribution of electricity is a fundamental requirement for sustainable development and prosperity. The world is facing great challenges regarding the reliable grid integration of renewable energy sources in the 21st century. The electric power systems of the future require fundamental innovations and enhancements to meet these challenges. The European Union's "Smart Grid" vision provides a first overview of the appropriate deep-paradigm changes in the transmission, distribution and supply of electricity.The book brings together common themes beginning with Smart Gr

  2. Ethical Considerations Regarding the Use of Smart Home Technologies for Older Adults: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jane; Demiris, George; Thompson, Hilaire J

    2016-01-01

    With the wide adoption and use of smart home applications, there is a need for examining ethical issues regarding smart home use at the intersection of aging, technology, and home environment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of ethical considerations and the evidence on these ethical issues based on an integrative literature review with regard to the utilization of smart home technologies by older adults and their family members. REVIEW DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted an integrative literature review of the scientific literature from indexed databases (e. g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO). The framework guiding this review is derived from previous work on ethical considerations related to telehealth use for older adults and smart homes for palliative care. Key ethical issues of the framework include privacy, informed consent, autonomy, obtrusiveness, equal access, reduction in human touch, and usability. Six hundred and thirty-five candidate articles were identified between the years 1990 and 2014. Sixteen articles were included in the review. Privacy and obtrusiveness issues appear to be the most important factors that can affect smart home technology adoption. In addition, this article recommends that stigmatization and reliability and maintenance of the system are additional factors to consider. When smart home technology is used appropriately, it has the potential to improve quality of life and maintain safety among older adults, ultimately supporting the desire of older adults for aging in place. The ability to respond to potential ethical concerns will be critical to the future development and application of smart home technologies that aim to enhance safety and independence.

  3. Third-Generation Display Technology: Nominally Transparent Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Willow

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Display technology is reshaping the consumer, business, government, and even not-for-profit markets in the midst of the digital convergence, coupled with recent smart phones led by Apple, Inc. First-Generation (1G display technology was dominated by the Cathode Ray Tubes, followed by Liquid Crystal Display and Plasma in 2G. A radically innovative shift as a disruptive technology is expected to follow in 3G to utilize virtually any transparent material, which wirelessly connects to portable access points. This paper studies the feasibility of the 3G Display Technology (DT with Technology S-Curves, and presents possible business models and technology strategies which may be generated from it. Additional subsets of business models may be derived for a wide range of industry applications.

  4. Risk Identification in a Smart Monitoring System Used to Preserve Artefacts Based on Textile Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, V. D.; Scripcariu, L.; Mătăsaru, P. D.; Diaconescu, M. R.; Ignat, C. A.

    2018-06-01

    Exhibited textile-materials-based artefacts can be affected by the environmental conditions. A smart monitoring system that commands an adaptive automatic environment control system is proposed for indoor exhibition spaces containing various textile artefacts. All exhibited objects are monitored by many multi-sensor nodes containing temperature, relative humidity and light sensors. Data collected periodically from the entire sensor network is stored in a database and statistically processed in order to identify and classify the environment risk. Risk consequences are analyzed depending on the risk class and the smart system commands different control measures in order to stabilize the indoor environment conditions to the recommended values and prevent material degradation.

  5. Business models for maximising the diffusion of technological innovations for climate-smart agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Thomas B.; Blok, Vincent; Poldner, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Technological innovations will play a prominent role in the transition to climate-smart agriculture (CSA). However, CSA technological innovation diffusion is subject to socio-economic barriers. The success of innovations is partly dependent on the business models that are used to diffuse them.

  6. The assessment of technological and safety aspects of small power reactor SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, A.R.; Ekariansyah, Andi S.; Sony, D.T.; Suharno; Hastowo, Hudi

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the technology and safety of small nuclear power plant SMART. The reactor SMART produces 300 MWth of power is cooled and moderated with light water and integral PWR type developed by KAERI. At present, the development activities had reached the end of basic design stage. The concept design of reactor SMART is based on safety enhancement, economic competitiveness and high performance. The fuel is uranium oxide with approximately 5% w/o enrichment. The safety characteristics of the core are shown with low power density around 62.6 W/cc, high negative reactivity coefficient, and high shutdown and thermal margin. Besides the inherent safety characteristics, SMART is equipped with engineered safety features and severe accident management system which are in compliance with the IAEA recommendations. The application of SMART for dual-purpose produces 90 Mwe and 40,000 to fresh water a day. Based on the technology and core characteristics of the reactor SMART, it is very interesting to be deeply assessed

  7. The Development of «Smart» Technologies as a Factor in the Competitiveness of City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkolnyi Oleksandr O.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of research prove that use of «smart» technologies is one of the ways to solve the problems of city. The involvement of projects, which are aimed at the smart city development, contributes to achieving the effective management of economic resources, innovation development, and improvement of the well-being of population. The dynamic nature of «smart» cities that has been evaluated using the indicators of economic development, human capital, technological support, environmental protection, international recognition, social cohesion, transport service, regulatory mechanisms, urban planning and public administration is a prerequisite for developing the global competitive advantages. The functional spheres of the smart city project have been analyzed with emphasis on energy, transport, water supply, housing and the local government system. The example of the Metropolregion Hamburg illustrates the possibilities of strengthening competitive advantages through the «smart» logistics solutions. The need to harness the best global experience in the development of smart cities in order to enhance the global competitiveness of the domestic economy has been identified.

  8. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

  9. Enabling Technologies for Smart Grid Integration and Interoperability of Electric Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenas, Sergejus

    Conventional, centralized power plants are being replaced by intermittent, distributed renewable energy sources, thus raising the concern about the stability of the power grid in its current state. All the while, electrification of all forms of transportation is increasing the load...... for successful EV integration into the smart grid, as a smart, mobile distributed energy resource. The work is split into three key topics: enabling technologies, grid service applications and interoperability issues. The current state of e-mobility technologies is surveyed. Technologies and protocols...... EVs to not only mitigate their own effects on the grid, but also provide value to grid operators, locally as well as system wide. Finally, it is shown that active integration of EVs into the smart grid, is not only achievable, but is well on its way to becoming a reality....

  10. On Study of Application of Big Data and Cloud Computing Technology in Smart Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zijiao

    2017-12-01

    We live in an era of network and information, which means we produce and face a lot of data every day, however it is not easy for database in the traditional meaning to better store, process and analyze the mass data, therefore the big data was born at the right moment. Meanwhile, the development and operation of big data rest with cloud computing which provides sufficient space and resources available to process and analyze data of big data technology. Nowadays, the proposal of smart campus construction aims at improving the process of building information in colleges and universities, therefore it is necessary to consider combining big data technology and cloud computing technology into construction of smart campus to make campus database system and campus management system mutually combined rather than isolated, and to serve smart campus construction through integrating, storing, processing and analyzing mass data.

  11. The Role of Internet of Things (IoT in Smart Cities: Technology Roadmap-oriented Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunil Park

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of a smart city was introduced, IoT (Internet of Things has beenconsidered the key infrastructure in a smart city. However, there are currently no detailed explanations of the technical contributions of IoT in terms of the management, development, and improvements of smart cities. Therefore, the current study describes the importance of IoT technologies on the technology roadmap (TRM of a smart city. Moreover, the survey with about 200 experts was conducted to investigate both the importance and essentiality of detail components of IoT technologies for a smart city. Based on the survey results, the focal points and essential elements for the successful developments of a smart city are presented.

  12. Renewable energy resources and management appliances-use of smart technologies in the energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kultan, J.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution is aimed at analyzing the impact of renewable energy resources to power system steady modes and the possibility of using smart technology to reduce the impact of inequalities and the variance of the energies and the quality of energy supplied. The use of smart technologies in the form of active dynamic appliances in response to network conditions to reduce effects of stochastic renewable resources dynamic impacts / wind blasts, quickly changing sunlight emissions on solar panels, increasing the amount of water in flow-based water power plants /or a change in network status. Active response appliances, depending on network conditions, improves parameters of economic power generation, transmission, distribution and consumption. (Authors)

  13. Perception of Smart Home Technologies to\\ud Assist Elderly People

    OpenAIRE

    CHERNBUMROONG, Saisakul; ATKINS, Anthony; YU, Hongnian

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, the number of elderly\\ud population has increased significantly which affects\\ud human in many aspects, especially in healthcare. Many\\ud studies have shown increases in expenditures on longterm\\ud care. New models of care are needed including\\ud supported self-care and home-based services. Advance\\ud in sensor and network technologies have made these\\ud possible. A smart home which is a residence equipped\\ud with smart technologies providing services that enhance\\ud human...

  14. Privacy and senior willingness to adopt smart home information technology in residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, K L

    2008-01-01

    With large predicted increases of the older adult (65 years and older) population, researchers have been exploring the use of smart home information technologies (IT) in residential care (RC) facilities to enhance resident quality of life and safety. Older adults' perceptions of privacy can inhibit their acceptance and subsequent adoption of smart home IT. This qualitative study, guided by principles of grounded theory research, investigated the relationship between privacy, living environment and willingness of older adults living in residential care facilities to adopt smart home IT through focus groups and individual interviews. The findings from this study indicate that privacy can be a barrier for older adults' adoption of smart home IT; however their own perception of their need for the technology may override their privacy concerns. Privacy concerns, as a barrier to technology adoption, can be influenced by both individual-level and community-level factors. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home IT need is necessary.

  15. Advanced power plant materials, design and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roddy, D. (ed.) [Newcastle University (United Kingdom). Sir Joseph Swan Institute

    2010-07-01

    The book is a comprehensive reference on the state of the art of gas-fired and coal-fired power plants, their major components and performance improvement options. Selected chapters are: Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant design and technology by Y. Zhu, and H. C. Frey; Improving thermal cycle efficiency in advanced power plants: water and steam chemistry and materials performance by B. Dooley; Advanced carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas separation membrane development for power plants by A. Basile, F. Gallucci, and P. Morrone; Advanced flue gas cleaning systems for sulphur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and mercury emissions control in power plants by S. Miller and B.G. Miller; Advanced flue gas dedusting systems and filters for ash and particulate emissions control in power plants by B.G. Miller; Advanced sensors for combustion monitoring in power plants: towards smart high-density sensor networks by M. Yu and A.K. Gupta; Advanced monitoring and process control technology for coal-fired power plants by Y. Yan; Low-rank coal properties, upgrading and utilisation for improving the fuel flexibility of advanced power plants by T. Dlouhy; Development and integration of underground coal gasification (UCG) for improving the environmental impact of advanced power plants by M. Green; Development and application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage for improving the environmental impact of advanced power plants by B. McPherson; and Advanced technologies for syngas and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production from fossil-fuel feedstocks in power plants by P. Chiesa.

  16. Students’ Perceived Effectiveness of Educational Technologies and Motivation in Smart Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard Van De Bogart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The smart classroom incorporates many different types of IT hardware including tablet computers, interactive white boards, work stations and many other integrated uses of these IT technologies which are used for instructional purposes. Conducted with 40 students majoring in Communicative Arts who participated in a technology-supported learning environment, this study investigated the perceived effectiveness of technologies, learner motivation, participation and learning outcome in the smart classroom. Research findings show that the students’ perceived effectiveness of educational technologies was at a high level while their learning motivation was at a moderate level. In addition, a positive relationship was found between students’ learning outcome and participation, but motivation and perceived effectiveness of technologies in the smart classroom were not related to their learning outcome. Responses from open-ended questions can be used to support the acceptance of the new learning environment since the use of various media equipment by first time users allows for the exploration and the presentation of ideas not achieved in a traditional classroom setting. It can be concluded that learning in a technology-supported environment like the smart classroom can foster a more inquisitive approach.

  17. Attitudes in Korea toward Introducing Smart Policing Technologies: Differences between the General Public and Police Officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungBin Moon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes different attitudes toward introduction of smart policing technologies in cybercrime policing among the Korean public and police. Policing is essential for a sustainable community. Technological advances in policing have both positive and negative aspects, making it essential to investigate perceptions of both public and police when introducing smart policing technologies. A discrete choice experiment was undertaken to survey preferences of the public and police toward introduction of such technologies and conduct simulation analysis to compare changes in the acceptance of various scenarios. The study divides cybercrime policing into prevention and investigation. The sample included 500 members of the public and 161 police officers. The results show that the public thinks an increase in yearly taxes and invasion of privacy are the most important factors. Conversely, the police think factors enhancing the efficiency of policing are most important. Moreover, when smart policing technologies are introduced, the public and police perceive more utility in the prevention and investigation of cybercrime, respectively. Few studies in this field separate the prevention and investigation of crimes, or compare perceptions of the public and police toward the introduction of smart policing technologies. This study’s quantitative analysis provides insights lacking in previous literature.

  18. Modernization of Special Monitoring of Applied Response Technologies (SMART) Technology and Methods - 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    3  3  HISTORY OF SMART USE...A-19  Figure A-16. Example of an EPA Air Particulate Matter Report from Venice , LA for 28 April 2010...developing an improved data collection program to satisfy the requirements of the SMART Protocol. 3 HISTORY OF SMART USE The project team evaluated the

  19. Material Agency In User-Centred Design Practices: High School Students Improvising (with) Smart Sensor Prototypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauer, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates (digital) materiality through an analysis of the "sociomaterial configuration" (Orlikowski 2009) of the participatory design project SensorLab (2010). In SensorLab, users were enrolled as designers: a group of high school students developed and tested smart pollution-sensing

  20. Material Agency In User-Centred Design Practices: High School Students Improvising (with) Smart Sensor Prototypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauer, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates (digital) materiality through an analysis of the “sociomaterial configuration” (Orlikowski 2009) of the participatory design project SensorLab (2010). In SensorLab, users were enrolled as designers: a group of high school students developed and tested smart pollution-sensing

  1. Corrosion behaviors of SMART materials in the ammonia atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, J. H.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. S.; Kim, J. P.; Jung, Y. H.; Lee, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of the zirconium-based alloy(Low-Sn Zircaloy-4) and titanium-based alloys(PT-7M and ASTM Gr.2), which would be used for fuel cladding tube and steam generator tube in the SMART, were investigated at 360 deg C, 400 deg C, 500 deg C, and 520 deg C in the ammonia atmosphere. In all test conditions, the resistance to uniform and nodular corrosion of zirconium-based alloy was inferior to that of titanium-based alloys. In the case of 360 deg C test, the corrosion rate of zirconium-based alloy decreased slightly with increasing the ammonia concentration, while that of titanium-based alloys increased. The test results above 400 deg C showed that the corrosion resistance of PT-7M alloys was superior to that of ASTM Gr.2 alloy and was not influenced from the variation of ammonia concentration

  2. Urban Analysis and Smart Communities: An Approach to the Use of Technology in Everyday Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurisaddai De la Cruz Severiche Maury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentration of population in urban centers is a global problem for which different strategies in order to organize different processes in cities and improve the quality of life are required. The creation of smart communities is shown as a sustainable solution since they deal with various key aspects, such as traffic management and mobility, through the use of information technologies (ITs. This work presents a review of recent studies using information technologies for urban analysis and mobility in cities. A descriptive analysis of automated methods for collecting and analyzing citizens’ mobility patterns is performed; it is centered in smart card use, geolocation and geotagging. It is concluded that a robust communication infrastructure, supported by an efficient computational platform allowing big data management and ubiquitous computing, is a crucial aspect for urban management in a smart community

  3. Flexible technologies and smart clothing for citizen medicine, home healthcare, and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axisa, Fabrice; Schmitt, Pierre Michael; Gehin, Claudine; Delhomme, Georges; McAdams, Eric; Dittmar, André

    2005-09-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of healthcare in medicine, both at home and in hospital, is becoming more and more important for patients and society at large. As many technologies (micro technologies, telecommunication, low-power design, new textiles, and flexible sensors) are now available, new user-friendly devices can be developed to enhance the comfort and security of the patient. As clothes and textiles are in direct contact with about 90% of the skin surface, smart sensors and smart clothes with noninvasive sensors are an attractive solution for home-based and ambulatory health monitoring. Moreover, wearable devices or smart homes with exosensors are also potential solutions. All these systems can provide a safe and comfortable environment for home healthcare, illness prevention, and citizen medicine.

  4. Research on the framework and key technologies of panoramic visualization for smart distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian; Sheng, Wanxing; Lin, Tao; Lv, Guangxian

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays, the smart distribution network has made tremendous progress, and the business visualization becomes even more significant and indispensable. Based on the summarization of traditional visualization technologies and demands of smart distribution network, a panoramic visualization application is proposed in this paper. The overall architecture, integrated architecture and service architecture of panoramic visualization application is firstly presented. Then, the architecture design and main functions of panoramic visualization system are elaborated in depth. In addition, the key technologies related to the application is discussed briefly. At last, two typical visualization scenarios in smart distribution network, which are risk warning and fault self-healing, proves that the panoramic visualization application is valuable for the operation and maintenance of the distribution network.

  5. Fusion of smart, multimedia and computer gaming technologies research, systems and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Favorskaya, Margarita; Jain, Lakhmi; Howlett, Robert

    2015-01-01

      This monograph book is focused on the recent advances in smart, multimedia and computer gaming technologies. The Contributions include:   ·         Smart Gamification and Smart Serious Games. ·         Fusion of secure IPsec-based Virtual Private Network, mobile computing and rich multimedia technology. ·         Teaching and Promoting Smart Internet of Things Solutions Using the Serious-game Approach. ·         Evaluation of Student Knowledge using an e-Learning Framework. ·         The iTEC Eduteka. ·         3D Virtual Worlds as a Fusion of Immersing, Visualizing, Recording, and Replaying Technologies. ·         Fusion of multimedia and mobile technology in audioguides for Museums and Exhibitions: from Bluetooth Push to Web Pull. The book is directed to researchers, students and software developers working in the areas of education and information technologies.  

  6. The research and implementation of nuclear science and technology literature processing system based on smart client technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shufeng

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear literature processing, namely cataloging, subject indexing and abstracting, is one of the highly specialized work, the quality and speed of literature processing have an important impact on the building of information resources in nuclear field. Firstly, the system's overall functionality was determined through the analysis of system requirements and the difficulties we meet with were pointed out. Secondly, the function of collaborative collecting and processing of nuclear literature is realized using smart client technology, achieve the purpose of providing a network platform to the literature processing specialists located in different places, therefore the out source of nuclear literature collecting and processing can be done. The article comprises three aspects: needs analysis and overall functional design, smart client technical presentations, Net platform based on smart client technology, nuclear literature processing system implementation. (author)

  7. Needing smart home technologies: the perspectives of older adults in continuing care retirement communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    At present, the vast majority of older adults reside in the community. Though many older adults live in their own homes, increasing numbers are choosing continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs), which range from independent apartments to assisted living and skilled-nursing facilities. With predictions of a large increase in the segment of the population aged 65 and older, a subsequent increase in demand on CCRCs can be anticipated. With these expectations, researchers have begun exploring the use of smart home information-based technologies in these care facilities to enhance resident quality of life and safety, but little evaluation research exists on older adults' acceptance and use of these technologies. This study investigated the factors that influence the willingness of older adults living in independent and assisted living CCRCs to adopt smart home technology. Participants (n = 14) were recruited from community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 or older, living in one of two mid-western US CCRC facilities (independent living and assisted living type facilities). This study used a qualitative, descriptive approach, guided by principles of grounded theory research. Data saturation (or when no new themes or issues emerged from group sessions) occurred after four focus groups (n = 11 unique respondents) and was confirmed through additional individual interviews (n = 3). The findings from this study indicate that although privacy can be a barrier for older adults' adoption of smart home technology their own perception of their need for the technology can override their privacy concerns. Factors influencing self-perception of need for smart home technology, including the influence of primary care providers, are presented. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home technology need and the development of appropriate interventions is necessary.

  8. Experimental and Modeling Study of Liquid-Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining of Smart Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Parmar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Smart ceramic materials are next generation materials with the inherent intelligence to adapt to change in the external environment. These materials are destined to play an essential role in several critical engineering applications. Machining these materials using traditional machining processes is a challenge. The laser beam micromachining (LBMM process has the potential to machine such smart materials. However, laser machining when performed in air induces high thermal stress on the surface, often leading to crack formation, recast and re-deposition of ablated material, and large heat-affected zones (HAZ. Performing laser beam machining in the presence of a liquid medium could potentially resolve these issues. This research investigates the possibility of using a Liquid Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining (LA-LBMM process for micromachining smart ceramic materials. Experimental studies are performed to compare the machining quality of laser beam machining process in air and in a liquid medium. The study reveals that the presence of liquid medium helps in controlling the heat-affected zone and the taper angle of the cavity drilled, thereby enhancing the machining quality. Analytical modeling is developed for the prediction of HAZ and cavity diameter both in air and underwater conditions, and the model is capable of predicting the experimental results to within 10% error.

  9. Technologies for an aging society: a systematic review of "smart home" applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, G; Hensel, B K

    2008-01-01

    A "smart home" is a residence wired with technology features that monitor the well-being and activities of their residents to improve overall quality of life, increase independence and prevent emergencies. This type of informatics applications targeting older adults, people with disabilities or the general population is increasingly becoming the focus of research worldwide. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of health related smart home projects and discuss human factors and other challenges. To cover not only the medical but also the social sciences and electronics literature, we conducted extensive searches across disciplines (e.g., Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Electronics and Communications Abstracts, Web of Science etc.). In order to be inclusive of all new initiatives and efforts in this area given the innovativeness of the concept, we manually searched for relevant references in the retrieved articles as well as published books on smart homes and gerontechnology. A total of 114 publications (including papers, abstracts and web pages) were identified and reviewed to identify the overarching projects. Twenty one smart home projects were identified (71% of the projects include technologies for functional monitoring, 67% for safety monitoring, 47% for physiological monitoring, 43% for cognitive support or sensory aids, 19% for monitoring security and 19% to increase social interaction). Evidence for their impact on clinical outcomes is lacking. The field of smart homes is a growing informatics domain. Several challenges including not only technical but also ethical ones need to be addressed.

  10. Can smart home technology deliver on the promise of independent living? : a critical reflection based on the perspectives of older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eveline J.M. Wouters; Sil Aarts; Sebastiaan T. M. Peek

    2009-01-01

    Expectations are high with regards to smart home technology. In particular, smart home technology is expected to support or enable independent living by older adults. This raises the question: can smart home technology contribute to independent living, according to older adults themselves? This

  11. A City Parking Integration System Combined with Cloud Computing Technologies and Smart Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Her-Tyan; Chen, Bing-Chang; Wang, Bo-Xun

    2016-01-01

    The current study applied cloud computing technology and smart mobile devices combined with a streaming server for parking lots to plan a city parking integration system. It is also equipped with a parking search system, parking navigation system, parking reservation service, and car retrieval service. With this system, users can quickly find…

  12. Market adoption barriers of multi-stakeholder technology: smart homes for the aging population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrenhard, Michel Léon; Kijl, Björn; Nieuwenhuis, Lambertus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, the Smart Home has promised to offer a better quality of life by connecting in-house devices and monitoring their usage. Such platform-based configurational technology has demonstrated the potential to improve comfort, healthcare, safety and security, and energy conservation

  13. Determining the feasibility of objective adherence measurement with blister packaging smart technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onzenoort, H.A. van; Neef, C.; Verberk, W.W.; van Iperen, H.P.; Leeuw, P.W. de; van der Kuy, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The results of a feasibility study of blister-pack smart technology for monitoring medication adherence are reported. METHODS: Research in the area of objective therapy compliance measurement has led to the development of microprocessor-driven systems that record the time a unit dose is

  14. Greening the Grid - Advancing Solar, Wind, and Smart Grid Technologies (Spanish Version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    This is the Spanish version of 'Greening the Grid - Advancing Solar, Wind, and Smart Grid Technologies'. Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid.

  15. The Impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on the Management Practices of Malaysian Smart Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Muhammad Z. M.; Atan, Hanafi; Idrus, Rozhan M.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on the management practices in the Malaysian Smart Schools was investigated. The analysis revealed that the impact has resulted in changes that include the enrichment of the ICT culture among students and teachers, more efficient student and teacher administration, better accessibility…

  16. Using smart card technology to prevent sales of alcohol to underage persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This report documents the results of a demonstration and evaluation project to examine the effectiveness of smart card technology (i.e., magnetic stripe on the driver's license and a card reader system) as a means of providing alcohol retailers with ...

  17. Design and Implementation of a Smart Home System Using Multisensor Data Fusion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Po-Huan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Lin, Shyan-Lung; Yang, Shih-Chin; Su, Heng-Yi; Chang, Chih-Chien; Cheng, Yuan-Sheng; Kuo, Yu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a multisensor data fusion technology-based smart home system by integrating wearable intelligent technology, artificial intelligence, and sensor fusion technology. We have developed the following three systems to create an intelligent smart home environment: (1) a wearable motion sensing device to be placed on residents’ wrists and its corresponding 3D gesture recognition algorithm to implement a convenient automated household appliance control system; (2) a wearable motion sensing device mounted on a resident’s feet and its indoor positioning algorithm to realize an effective indoor pedestrian navigation system for smart energy management; (3) a multisensor circuit module and an intelligent fire detection and alarm algorithm to realize a home safety and fire detection system. In addition, an intelligent monitoring interface is developed to provide in real-time information about the smart home system, such as environmental temperatures, CO concentrations, communicative environmental alarms, household appliance status, human motion signals, and the results of gesture recognition and indoor positioning. Furthermore, an experimental testbed for validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the smart home system was built and verified experimentally. The results showed that the 3D gesture recognition algorithm could achieve recognition rates for automated household appliance control of 92.0%, 94.8%, 95.3%, and 87.7% by the 2-fold cross-validation, 5-fold cross-validation, 10-fold cross-validation, and leave-one-subject-out cross-validation strategies. For indoor positioning and smart energy management, the distance accuracy and positioning accuracy were around 0.22% and 3.36% of the total traveled distance in the indoor environment. For home safety and fire detection, the classification rate achieved 98.81% accuracy for determining the conditions of the indoor living environment. PMID:28714884

  18. Design and Implementation of a Smart Home System Using Multisensor Data Fusion Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Liang; Chou, Po-Huan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Lin, Shyan-Lung; Yang, Shih-Chin; Su, Heng-Yi; Chang, Chih-Chien; Cheng, Yuan-Sheng; Kuo, Yu-Chen

    2017-07-15

    This paper aims to develop a multisensor data fusion technology-based smart home system by integrating wearable intelligent technology, artificial intelligence, and sensor fusion technology. We have developed the following three systems to create an intelligent smart home environment: (1) a wearable motion sensing device to be placed on residents' wrists and its corresponding 3D gesture recognition algorithm to implement a convenient automated household appliance control system; (2) a wearable motion sensing device mounted on a resident's feet and its indoor positioning algorithm to realize an effective indoor pedestrian navigation system for smart energy management; (3) a multisensor circuit module and an intelligent fire detection and alarm algorithm to realize a home safety and fire detection system. In addition, an intelligent monitoring interface is developed to provide in real-time information about the smart home system, such as environmental temperatures, CO concentrations, communicative environmental alarms, household appliance status, human motion signals, and the results of gesture recognition and indoor positioning. Furthermore, an experimental testbed for validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the smart home system was built and verified experimentally. The results showed that the 3D gesture recognition algorithm could achieve recognition rates for automated household appliance control of 92.0%, 94.8%, 95.3%, and 87.7% by the 2-fold cross-validation, 5-fold cross-validation, 10-fold cross-validation, and leave-one-subject-out cross-validation strategies. For indoor positioning and smart energy management, the distance accuracy and positioning accuracy were around 0.22% and 3.36% of the total traveled distance in the indoor environment. For home safety and fire detection, the classification rate achieved 98.81% accuracy for determining the conditions of the indoor living environment.

  19. Biosurfactants' Production from Renewable Natural Resources: Example of Innovativeand Smart Technology in Circular Bioeconomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Surekha K.; Płaza, Grażyna A.; Banpurkar, Arun G.

    2017-03-01

    A strong developed bio-based industrial sector will significantly reduce dependency on fossil resources, help the countries meet climate change targets, and lead to greener and more environmental friendly growth. The key is to develop new technologies to sustainably transform renewable natural resources into bio-based products and biofuels. Biomass is a valuable resource and many parameters need to be taken in to account when assessing its use and the products made from its. The bioeconomy encompass the production of renewable biological resources and their conversion into food, feed and bio-based products (chemicals, materials and fuels) via innovative and efficient technologies provided by industrial biotechnology. The paper presents the smart and efficient way to use the agro-industrial, dairy and food processing wastes for biosurfactant's production. Clarification processes are mandatory to use the raw substrates for microbial growth as well as biosurfactant production for commercial purposes. At the same time it is very essential to retain the nutritional values of those cheap substrates. Broad industrial perspectives can be achieved when quality as well as the quantity of the biosurfactant is considered in great depth. Since substrates resulting from food processing, dairy, animal fat industries are not explored in great details; and hence are potential areas which can be explored thoroughly.

  20. Using applied behavior analysis and smart technology for meeting the health needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Linda K; Storey, Keith; Maldonado, Ana; Post, Michal; Montgomery, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities often have special healthcare concerns such as diabetes, kidney disease, severe allergies, progressive illnesses, respiratory weaknesses, and obesity. Smart technology can be an asset for individuals with intellectual disabilities for better managing their healthcare needs. A critical review of the literature related to applied behavior analysis, smart technology, and health needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities was conducted. This discussion paper describes factors that contribute to the successful use of smart technology for the health issues of individuals with intellectual disabilities. We see key components in developing appropriate access and use of smart technology for the health of people with intellectual disabilities being: (a) systematic instructional methods for consistent and accurate use of the technology, (b) modifying the current technology for people with intellectual disabilities, (c) guidelines for implementation, and (d) resources for getting the technology.

  1. Remote Sensing Technologies and Geospatial Modelling Hierarchy for Smart City Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M.; Fedorovsky, O.; Stankevich, S.; Filipovich, V.; Khyzhniak, A.; Piestova, I.; Lubskyi, M.; Svideniuk, M.

    2017-12-01

    The approach to implementing the remote sensing technologies and geospatial modelling for smart city support is presented. The hierarchical structure and basic components of the smart city information support subsystem are considered. Some of the already available useful practical developments are described. These include city land use planning, urban vegetation analysis, thermal condition forecasting, geohazard detection, flooding risk assessment. Remote sensing data fusion approach for comprehensive geospatial analysis is discussed. Long-term city development forecasting by Forrester - Graham system dynamics model is provided over Kiev urban area.

  2. A Generic Danish Distribution Grid Model for Smart Grid Technology Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Seung-Tae; Wu, Qiuwei; Østergaard, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a generic Danish distribution grid model for smart grid technology testing based on the Bornholm power system. The frequency dependent network equivalent (FDNE) method has been used in order to accurately preserve the desired properties and characteristics...... as a generic Smart Grid benchmark model for testing purposes....... by comparing the transient response of the original Bornholm power system model and the developed generic model under significant fault conditions. The results clearly show that the equivalent generic distribution grid model retains the dynamic characteristics of the original system, and can be used...

  3. 75 FR 62515 - Notice of Availability of Report on the Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ...Through this notice, the Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of its report entitled, ``Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies.'' In this report, DOE sets forth recommendations and observations on current and potential communications requirements of the Smart Grid, as well as the types of networks and communications services that may be used. DOE also provides a comprehensive summary of the comments received in response to a Request for Information and during a public meeting conducted during the preparation of the report. This report responds to recommendations for DOE set forth in the National Broadband Plan authored by the Federal Communications Commission at the direction of Congress.

  4. Ethical Implications to the Assessment of the Smart Grid Technology in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makienko Marina A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings up the issue of staff training for professional development of the Smart Grid technology and for use of its elements by customers in households. It was revealed that the considerable part of the respondents was not familiar with the definition of Smart Grid. That required the development of communication skills by energy engineering students and their social activity as well. The reasons mentioned make actual the following elements of engineering education: social responsibility, stress resistance, ability to forecast the future.

  5. Determining the feasibility of objective adherence measurement with blister packaging smart technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Onzenoort, Hein A; Neef, Cees; Verberk, Willem W; van Iperen, H Peter; de Leeuw, Peter W; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M

    2012-05-15

    The results of a feasibility study of blister-pack smart technology for monitoring medication adherence are reported. Research in the area of objective therapy compliance measurement has led to the development of microprocessor-driven systems that record the time a unit dose is removed from blister packaging. One device under development is the Smart Blister-a label imprinted with event-detection circuitry that can be affixed to standard commercial blister cards. In the first trial of the device in actual clinical practice, 115 community-dwelling Dutch patients receiving valsartan maintenance therapy (160 mg once daily) were given 14-day blister packages equipped with the Smart Blister. On the return of empty blister cards to the 20 participating community pharmacies, the stored information was scanned and downloaded for data analysis and patient counseling purposes. A total of 245 Smart Blister-equipped packages were used by valsartan recipients during the eight-month study. The device was largely effective in recording patient and blister-card identification data and other desired information. However, in 17% of cases, the Smart Blister system registered multiple tablet-removal events at the same time, presumably indicating unintentional breakage of nearby conductive circuits and the need for design refinements. The Smart Blister-equipped medication cards were generally well received by patients and pharmacies. An evaluation of the functionality and robustness of the Smart Blister in a real-world clinical practice situation yielded some promising results, but the findings also indicated a need for design refinements and additional performance testing of the device.

  6. Does smart home technology prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Eva; Cotea, Cristina; Pullman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Falls in older Australians are an increasingly costly public health issue, driving the development of novel modes of intervention, especially those that rely on computer-driven technologies. The aim of this paper was to gain an understanding of the state of the art of research on smart homes and computer-based monitoring technologies to prevent and detect falls in the community-dwelling elderly. Cochrane, Medline, Embase and Google databases were searched for articles on fall prevention in the elderly using pre-specified search terms. Additional papers were searched for in the reference lists of relevant reviews and by the process of 'snowballing'. Only studies that investigated outcomes related to falling such as fall prevention and detection, change in participants' fear of falling and attitudes towards monitoring technology were included. Nine papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The following outcomes were observed: (1) older adults' attitudes towards fall detectors and smart home technology are generally positive; (2) privacy concerns and intrusiveness of technology were perceived as less important to participants than their perception of health needs and (3) unfriendly and age-inappropriate design of the interface may be one of the deciding factors in not using the technology. So far, there is little evidence that using smart home technology may assist in fall prevention or detection, but there are some indications that it may increase older adults' confidence and sense of security, thus possibly enabling aging in place.

  7. Information and Communication Technology and Electric Vehicles — Paving the Way towards a Smart Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Kenichi

    A smart community can be considered an essential component to realize a sustainable, low-carbon, and disaster-tolerant society, thereby providing a base for community inhabitants to lead a simple, healthy, and energy-saving way of life as well as ensuring safety, security, and a high quality-of-life in the community. In particular, a smart community can be essential for senior citizens in an aging society. Smart community enablers such as information and communication technology (ICT) and electric vehicles (EVs) can perform essential roles to realize a smart community. With regard to ICT, the necessity of a dedicated wireless sensor backbone has been identified. With regard to EV, a small-sized EV with one or two seats (Mini-EV) has been identified as an emerging player to support personal daily mobility in an aged society. The Mini-EV may be powered by a solar battery, thereby mitigating vehicular maintenance burden for the elderly. It is essential to realize a dependable ICT network and communication service for a smart community. In the study, we present the concept of trans-locatable design to achieve this goal. The two possible roles of EVs in contributing to a dependable ICT network are highlighted; these include EV charging of the batteries of the base stations in the network, and the creation of a Mini-EV based ad-hoc network that can enable applications such as safe driving assistance and secure neighborhoods.

  8. From the manual meter reading to Smart Metering. Step by step migration concepts for smart technologies; Von der Handablesung zum Smart Metering. Migrationskonzepte zum schrittweisen Ausbau von smarten Technologien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imholz, Urs [GWF MessSysteme AG, Luzern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Many Utility companies are planning the modification of their grid for the future demand of decentralized power production of renewable energy. This report is giving attention to the question how to invest already today step by step in smart technologies, based on the existing infrastructure. Multi Utility companies are also asking the question, how to deal with the integration of gas, water and heat into an automated meter reading system. A number of Swiss Utility companies are testing the process of Smart Metering and Smart Grid in pilot projects and field tests. In those tests, the Utility companies will not also cover the technical feasibility but also to check the financial aspects with a business assessment for smart technologies. The Industry is creating together with the Utility companies a sustainable development for the energy landscape of tomorrow. We all know, in the sense of energy distribution, the year 2050 will be the day after tomorrow. (orig.)

  9. Social Networking and Smart Technology: Viable Environmental Communication Tools…?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montain, J.; Byrne, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    To what extent do popular social networking channels represent a viable means for disseminating information regarding environmental change to the general public? Are new forms of communication such as YouTube™, Facebook™, MySpace™ and Twitter™ and smart devices such as iPhone™ and BlackBerry™ useful and effective in terms motivating people into social action and behavioural modification; or do they simply pay ‘lip service’ to these pressing environmental issues? This project will explore the background connections between social networking and environmental communication and education; and outline why such tools might be an appropriate way to connect to a broad audience in an efficient and unconventional manner. Further, research will survey the current prevalence of reliable environmental change information on social networking Internet-based media; and finally, suggestions for improved strategies and new directions will be provided.

  10. Micromechanics of Smart Materials for Large Deployable Mirrors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maji, Arup K

    2004-01-01

    Elastic memory composites, or EMC, can be folded by applying a load that forcibly folds the material into the desired, packaged shape while at an elevated temperature above the polymer's glass transition temperature...

  11. The Smart Home for the Elderly: Perceptions, Technologies and Psychological Accessibilities : The Requirements Analysis for the Elderly in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Visutsak , Porawat; DAOUDI , Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Various studies of assistive technology, embedded into the house for helping elderly persons have been introduced. There are many terms used to call this assistive technology, such as smart home, intelligent home, and home networking. The current technologies for smart home system can be divided into two basic categories: passive-intervention devices and active-intervention devices. Passive-intervention devices monitor an elderly person's condition and safety without i...

  12. Smart materials-based actuators at the micronano-scale characterization, control, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Smart Materials-Based Actuators at the Micro/Nano-Scale: Characterization, Control, and Applications gives a state of the art of emerging techniques to the characterization and control of actuators based on smart materials working at the micro/nano scale. The book aims to characterize some commonly used structures based on piezoelectric and electroactive polymeric actuators and also focuses on various and emerging techniques employed to control them. This book also includes two of the most emerging topics and applications: nanorobotics and cells micro/nano-manipulation. This book: Provides both theoretical and experimental results Contains complete information from characterization, modeling, identification, control to final applications for researchers and engineers that would like to model, characterize, control and apply their own micro/nano-systems Discusses applications such as microrobotics and their control, design and fabrication of microsystems, microassembly and its automation, nanorobotics and thei...

  13. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  14. Development of magnetorheological elastomers based on Deproteinised natural rubber as smart damping materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nik Intan Nik; Kamaruddin, Shamsul

    2017-12-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are composite materials consist of micron-sized magnetizable particles carbonyl iron particles [CIPs]) embedded in a soft elastomer matrix. MRE technology offers variable stiffness and damping properties under the influence of a magnetic field. Herein, the feasibility of incorporating a new generation specialty rubber, Pureprena as a matrix for MREs was investigated. Pureprena or Deproteinised Natural Rubber (DPNR) is a specialty natural rubber that has good dynamic properties, particularly with respect to damping parameters. DPNR was compounded with 60 wt% of CIPs to fabricate MREs. The performance of the DPNR-based MRE was measured in terms of tensile strength, dynamic properties, and magnetorheological (MR) effect and compared with polyisoprene (IR)-based MRE with the same amount of CIPs. Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) showed that the loss factor in the glass transition region of the DPNR-based MRE was higher than that of the IR-based MRE, indicating better damping properties. Further investigation was undertaken using a servo-hydraulic testing machine to characterise the effect of strain amplitude and frequency on the dynamic properties (e.g. damping coefficient) of MREs at zero magnetic fields. The results demonstrate that DPNR-based MREs possess a comparable damping coefficient to that of IR-based MREs. In addition, MR effect, which relates to the ratio between elastic modulus with applied magnetic field (on-state) to the same modulus without applied fields (off-state), was measured using a parallel plate rheometer. As a result, DPNR-based MREs have improved MR effect than that of IR-based MREs. Moreover, variable stiffness is obtained when the magnetic field was increased to 0.8T. Loss factor or tan δ of MREs was found to vary against different magnetic fields. Finally, MREs with varied stiffness and damping were found to have potential as active control devices for smart damping materials.

  15. Economic and Social Importance of Modern SMART Technologies of Budgeting at the Local Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotina Hanna M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to study the main SMART technologies of budgeting in terms of their economic and social aspects, consider the risks and prospects of their implementation at the local level in Ukraine. The article is dedicated to description of modern SMART technologies of budgeting. The essence of the concept of infrastructure gap is defined, the necessity of its overcoming through increasing capital expenditures is substantiated. The main methods of financing capital investments are disclosed, the advantages and disadvantages of public-private partnership are determined. The technology of participative budget, its history, features of its introduction and functioning in Poland, Germany and Ukraine are described. The necessity of implementing the Public Finance Management Strategy for 2017-2021 in Ukraine is justified, and risks related to it are investigated.

  16. Temperature- and light-responsive smart polymer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Florian D; Theato, Patrick

    2013-09-07

    Stimuli-responsive polymers have been attracting great interest within the scientific community for several decades. The unique feature to respond to small changes in the environmental conditions has made this class of materials very promising for several applications in the field of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanomedicine. So far, several different chemical, physical or biochemical stimuli have been investigated within natural or synthetic polymers. Very interesting and appealing seems to be the combination of several stimuli to tune the properties of these materials in manifold ways. Within this present review, we want to highlight the recent progress in the field of synthetic stimuli-responsive polymers combining temperature and light responsiveness.

  17. Sensors 4.0 – smart sensors and measurement technology enable Industry 4.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schütze

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Industrie 4.0 or the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT are two terms for the current (revolution seen in industrial automation and control. Everything is getting smarter and data generated at all levels of the production process are used to improve product quality, flexibility, and productivity. This would not be possible without smart sensors, which generate the data and allow further functionality from self-monitoring and self-configuration to condition monitoring of complex processes. In analogy to Industry 4.0, the development of sensors has undergone distinctive stages culminating in today's smart sensors or Sensor 4.0. This paper briefly reviews the development of sensor technology over the last 2 centuries, highlights some of the potential that can be achieved with smart sensors and data evaluation, and discusses success requirements for future developments. In addition to magnetic sensor technologies which allow self-test and self-calibration and can contribute to many applications due to their wide spectrum of measured quantities, the paper discusses condition monitoring as a primary paradigm for introducing smart sensors and data analysis in manufacturing processes based on two projects performed in our group.

  18. Environmental cognitive remediation in schizophrenia: ethical implications of "smart home" technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stip, Emmanuel; Rialle, Vincent

    2005-04-01

    In light of the advent of new technologies, we proposed to reexamine certain challenges posed by cognitive remediation and social reintegration (that is, deinstitutionalization) of patients with severe and persistent mental disorders. We reviewed literature on cognition, remediation, smart homes, as well as on objects and utilities, using medical and computer science electronic library and Internet searches. These technologies provide solutions for disabled persons with respect to care delivery, workload reduction, and socialization. Examples include home support, video conferencing, remote monitoring of medical parameters through sensors, teledetection of critical situations (for example, a fall or malaise), measures of daily living activities, and help with tasks of daily living. One of the key concepts unifying all these technologies is the health-smart home. We present the notion of the health-smart home in general and then examine it more specifically in relation to schizophrenia. Management of people with schizophrenia with cognitive deficits who are being rehabilitated in the community can be improved with the use of technology; however, such technology has ethical ramifications.

  19. Big-deep-smart data in imaging for guiding materials design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Archibald, Richard K.

    2015-10-01

    Harnessing big data, deep data, and smart data from state-of-the-art imaging might accelerate the design and realization of advanced functional materials. Here we discuss new opportunities in materials design enabled by the availability of big data in imaging and data analytics approaches, including their limitations, in material systems of practical interest. We specifically focus on how these tools might help realize new discoveries in a timely manner. Such methodologies are particularly appropriate to explore in light of continued improvements in atomistic imaging, modelling and data analytics methods.

  20. Smart Materials and Active Noise and Vibration Control in Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.; van Overbeek, M.; Gissinger, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies, and discusses two approaches for active structural acoustic control: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. Integrated actuators in structure material are

  1. Materials Advance Chemical Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In the future, the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate hopes to use better-performing and lower-cost propulsion systems to send rovers, probes, and observers to places like Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. For such purposes, a new propulsion technology called the Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) was developed under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, located at Glenn Research Center. As an advanced chemical propulsion system, AMBR uses nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer and hydrazine fuel to propel a spacecraft. Based on current research and development efforts, the technology shows great promise for increasing engine operation and engine lifespan, as well as lowering manufacturing costs. In developing AMBR, ISPT has several goals: to decrease the time it takes for a spacecraft to travel to its destination, reduce the cost of making the propulsion system, and lessen the weight of the propulsion system. If goals like these are met, it could result in greater capabilities for in-space science investigations. For example, if the amount (and weight) of propellant required on a spacecraft is reduced, more scientific instruments (and weight) could be added to the spacecraft. To achieve AMBR s maximum potential performance, the engine needed to be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures and pressure. To this end, ISPT required engine chambers made of iridium-coated rhenium (strong, high-temperature metallic elements) that allowed operation at temperatures close to 4,000 F. In addition, ISPT needed an advanced manufacturing technique for better coating methods to increase the strength of the engine chamber without increasing the costs of fabricating the chamber.

  2. Nonlinear dynamic modeling for smart material electro-hydraulic actuator development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John P.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2013-03-01

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators use hydraulic rectification by one-way check valves to amplify the motion of smart materials, such as magnetostrictives and piezoelectrics, in order to create compact, lightweight actuators. A piston pump driven by a smart material is combined with a hydraulic cylinder to form a self-contained, power-by-wire actuator that can be used in place of a conventional hydraulic system without the need for hydraulic lines and a centralized pump. The performance of an experimental actuator driven by a 12.7 mm diameter, 114 mm length Terfenol-D rod is evaluated over a range of applied input frequencies, loads, and currents. The peak performance achieved is 37 W, moving a 220 N load at a rate of 17 cm/s and producing a blocked pressure of 12.5 MPa. Additional tests are conducted to quantify the dynamic behavior of the one-way reed valves using a scanning laser vibrometer to identify the frequency response of the reeds and the effect of the valve seat and fluid mass loading. A lumped-parameter model is developed for the system that includes valve inertia and fluid response nonlinearities, and the model results are compared with the experimental data.

  3. SMART-1 technology, scientific results and heritage for future space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B. H.; Racca, G.; Marini, A.; Koschny, D.; Frew, D.; Grieger, B.; Camino-Ramos, O.; Josset, J. L.; Grande, M.; Smart-1 Science; Technology Working Team

    2018-02-01

    ESA's SMART-1 mission to the Moon achieved record firsts such as: 1) first Small Mission for Advanced Research and Technology; with spacecraft built and integrated in 2.5 years and launched 3.5 years after mission approval; 2) first mission leaving the Earth orbit using solar power alone; 3) most fuel effective mission (60 L of Xenon) and longest travel (13 months) to the Moon!; 4) first ESA mission reaching the Moon and first European views of lunar poles; 5) first European demonstration of a wide range of new technologies: Li-Ion modular battery, deep-space communications in X- and Ka-bands, and autonomous positioning for navigation; 6) first lunar demonstration of an infrared spectrometer and of a Swept Charge Detector Lunar X-ray fluorescence spectrometer; 7) first ESA mission with opportunity for lunar science, elemental geochemistry, surface mineralogy mapping, surface geology and precursor studies for exploration; 8) first controlled impact landing on the Moon with real time observations campaign; 9) first mission supporting goals of the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) in technical and scientific exchange, international collaboration, public and youth engagement; 10) first mission preparing the ground for ESA collaboration in Chandrayaan-1, Chang' E1 and future international lunar exploration. We review SMART-1 highlights and new results that are relevant to the preparation for future lunar exploration. The technology and methods had impact on space research and applications. Recent SMART-1 results are relevant to topics on: 1) the study of properties of the lunar dust, 2) impact craters and ejecta, 3) the study of illumination, 4) radio observations and science from the Moon, 5) support to future missions, 6) identifying and characterising sites for exploration and exploitation. On these respective topics, we discuss recent SMART-1 results and challenges. We also discuss the use of SMART-1 publications library. The SMART-1 archive

  4. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  5. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  6. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  7. Smart City Energy Interconnection Technology Framework Preliminary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guotai; Zhao, Baoguo; Zhao, Xin; Li, Hao; Huo, Xianxu; Li, Wen; Xia, Yu

    2018-01-01

    to improve urban energy efficiency, improve the absorptive ratio of new energy resources and renewable energy sources, and reduce environmental pollution and other energy supply and consumption technology framework matched with future energy restriction conditions and applied technology level are required to be studied. Relative to traditional energy supply system, advanced information technology-based “Energy Internet” technical framework may give play to energy integrated application and load side interactive technology advantages, as a whole optimize energy supply and consumption and improve the overall utilization efficiency of energy.

  8. Materials, critical materials and clean-energy technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggert R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern engineered materials, components and systems depend on raw materials whose properties provide essential functionality to these technologies. Some of these raw materials are subject to supply-chain risks, and such materials are known as critical materials. This paper reviews corporate, national and world perspectives on material criticality. It then narrows its focus to studies that assess “what is critical” to clean-energy technologies. The focus on supply-chain risks is not meant to be alarmist but rather to encourage attention to monitoring these risks and pursuing technological innovation to mitigate the risks.

  9. Materials, critical materials and clean-energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, R.

    2017-07-01

    Modern engineered materials, components and systems depend on raw materials whose properties provide essential functionality to these technologies. Some of these raw materials are subject to supply-chain risks, and such materials are known as critical materials. This paper reviews corporate, national and world perspectives on material criticality. It then narrows its focus to studies that assess "what is critical" to clean-energy technologies. The focus on supply-chain risks is not meant to be alarmist but rather to encourage attention to monitoring these risks and pursuing technological innovation to mitigate the risks.

  10. Assembly and testing of microparticle and microcapsule smart tattoo materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Microscale biochemical sensors are attractive for in vitro diagnostics and disease management, as well as medical and biological research applications. Fluorescent sensors, coupling specific glucose-binding proteins with fluorescent readout methods, have been developed for this purpose. Our work has focused on the development of assembly and packaging systems for producing micro- and nanoscale sensing components that can be used as implants, intracellular reporters, or as elements in larger systems. Both hybrid organic/inorganic particles and hollow microshells have been developed to physically couple the sensing materials together in biocompatible, semipermeable packages. Fabrication details and sensor characterization are used to demonstrate the potential of these sensor concepts.

  11. Current Capabilities at SNL for the Integration of Small Modular Reactors onto Smart Microgrids Using Sandia's Smart Microgrid Technology High Performance Computing and Advanced Manufacturing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Smart grids are a crucial component for enabling the nation’s future energy needs, as part of a modernization effort led by the Department of Energy. Smart grids and smart microgrids are being considered in niche applications, and as part of a comprehensive energy strategy to help manage the nation’s growing energy demands, for critical infrastructures, military installations, small rural communities, and large populations with limited water supplies. As part of a far-reaching strategic initiative, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) presents herein a unique, three-pronged approach to integrate small modular reactors (SMRs) into microgrids, with the goal of providing economically-competitive, reliable, and secure energy to meet the nation’s needs. SNL’s triad methodology involves an innovative blend of smart microgrid technology, high performance computing (HPC), and advanced manufacturing (AM). In this report, Sandia’s current capabilities in those areas are summarized, as well as paths forward that will enable DOE to achieve its energy goals. In the area of smart grid/microgrid technology, Sandia’s current computational capabilities can model the entire grid, including temporal aspects and cyber security issues. Our tools include system development, integration, testing and evaluation, monitoring, and sustainment.

  12. [INVITED] Computational intelligence for smart laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    Computational intelligence (CI) involves using a computer algorithm to capture hidden knowledge from data and to use them for training ;intelligent machine; to make complex decisions without human intervention. As simulation is becoming more prevalent from design and planning to manufacturing and operations, laser material processing can also benefit from computer generating knowledge through soft computing. This work is a review of the state-of-the-art on the methodology and applications of CI in laser materials processing (LMP), which is nowadays receiving increasing interest from world class manufacturers and 4.0 industry. The focus is on the methods that have been proven effective and robust in solving several problems in welding, cutting, drilling, surface treating and additive manufacturing using the laser beam. After a basic description of the most common computational intelligences employed in manufacturing, four sections, namely, laser joining, machining, surface, and additive covered the most recent applications in the already extensive literature regarding the CI in LMP. Eventually, emerging trends and future challenges were identified and discussed.

  13. Smart home technology for safety and functional independence: the UK experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewsbury, Guy; Linskell, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes that people with neurological conditions can be successfully supported by smart homes only when their needs and aspirations of the technological interventions are fully understood and integrated in the design. A neurological condition can and does provide a clue to the finished technological design but this alone fails to personalise the system and stands to be rejected by the person who requires the technology. This paper explores the underlying issues of the complexity of this design process when designing for people with neurological conditions, and advances a matrix to facilitate the assessment process to maintain a person-centred design of any system.

  14. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  15. Connecting drug delivery reality to smart materials design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, David W

    2013-09-15

    Inflated claims to both design and mechanistic novelty in drug delivery and imaging systems, including most nanotechnologies, are not supported by the generally poor translation of these systems to clinical efficacy. The "form begets function" design paradigm is seductive but perhaps over-simplistic in translation to pharmaceutical efficacy. Most innovations show few clinically important distinctions in their therapeutic benefits in relevant preclinical disease and delivery models, despite frequent claims to the contrary. Long-standing challenges in drug delivery issues must enlist more realistic, back-to-basics approaches to address fundamental materials properties in complex biological systems, preclinical test beds, and analytical methods to more reliably determine fundamental pharmaceutical figures of merit, including drug carrier purity and batch-batch variability, agent biodistribution, therapeutic index (safety), and efficacy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluorinated Polymers as Smart Materials for Advanced Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa F. Cardoso

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorinated polymers constitute a unique class of materials that exhibit a combination of suitable properties for a wide range of applications, which mainly arise from their outstanding chemical resistance, thermal stability, low friction coefficients and electrical properties. Furthermore, those presenting stimuli-responsive properties have found widespread industrial and commercial applications, based on their ability to change in a controlled fashion one or more of their physicochemical properties, in response to single or multiple external stimuli such as light, temperature, electrical and magnetic fields, pH and/or biological signals. In particular, some fluorinated polymers have been intensively investigated and applied due to their piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric properties in biomedical applications including controlled drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, microfluidic and artificial muscle actuators, among others. This review summarizes the main characteristics, microstructures and biomedical applications of electroactive fluorinated polymers.

  17. Smart Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Engineering Structures

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sun; W. J. Staszewski; R. N. Swamy

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) aims to develop automated systems for the continuous monitoring, inspection, and damage detection of structures with minimum labour involvement. The first step to set up a SHM system is to incorporate a level of structural sensing capability that is reliable and possesses long term stability. Smart sensing technologies including the applications of fibre optic sensors, piezoelectric sensors, magnetostrictive sensors and self-diagnosing fibre reinforced compo...

  18. Smart Geographic object: Toward a new understanding of GIS Technology in Ubiquitous Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Zakaria, Sakyoud; Rey, Gaëtan; Mohamed, Eladnani; Lavirotte, Stéphane; Abdelaziz, El Fazziki; Tigli, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    International audience; One of the fundamental aspects of ubiquitous computing is the instrumentation of the real world by smart devices. This instrumentation constitutes an opportunity to rethink the interactions between human beings and their environment on the one hand, and between the components of this environment on the other. In this paper we discuss what this understanding of ubiquitous computing can bring to geographic science and particularly to GIS technology. Our main idea is the ...

  19. Planning low-carbon electricity systems under uncertainty considering operational flexibility and smart grid technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Rodrigo; Street, Alexandre; Arroyo, José M; Mancarella, Pierluigi

    2017-08-13

    Electricity grid operators and planners need to deal with both the rapidly increasing integration of renewables and an unprecedented level of uncertainty that originates from unknown generation outputs, changing commercial and regulatory frameworks aimed to foster low-carbon technologies, the evolving availability of market information on feasibility and costs of various technologies, etc. In this context, there is a significant risk of locking-in to inefficient investment planning solutions determined by current deterministic engineering practices that neither capture uncertainty nor represent the actual operation of the planned infrastructure under high penetration of renewables. We therefore present an alternative optimization framework to plan electricity grids that deals with uncertain scenarios and represents increased operational details. The presented framework is able to model the effects of an array of flexible, smart grid technologies that can efficiently displace the need for conventional solutions. We then argue, and demonstrate via the proposed framework and an illustrative example, that proper modelling of uncertainty and operational constraints in planning is key to valuing operationally flexible solutions leading to optimal investment in a smart grid context. Finally, we review the most used practices in power system planning under uncertainty, highlight the challenges of incorporating operational aspects and advocate the need for new and computationally effective optimization tools to properly value the benefits of flexible, smart grid solutions in planning. Such tools are essential to accelerate the development of a low-carbon energy system and investment in the most appropriate portfolio of renewable energy sources and complementary enabling smart technologies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy management: flexibility, risk and optimization'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Smart Energy Cryo-refrigerator Technology for the next generation Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagna, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    We describe a “smart energy” cryocooler technology architecture for the next generation Very Large Array that makes use of multiple variable frequency cold heads driven from a single variable speed air cooled compressor. Preliminary experiments indicate that the compressor variable flow control, advanced diagnostics, and the cryo-refrigerator low vibration, provide a unique energy efficient capability for the very large number of antennas that will be employed in this array.

  1. Solar cell materials developing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Conibeer, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a comparison of solar cell materials, including both new materials based on organics, nanostructures and novel inorganics and developments in more traditional photovoltaic materials. It surveys the materials and materials trends in the field including third generation solar cells (multiple energy level cells, thermal approaches and the modification of the solar spectrum) with an eye firmly on low costs, energy efficiency and the use of abundant non-toxic materials.

  2. Applications of ATILA FEM software to smart materials case studies in designing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    ATILA Finite Element Method (FEM) software facilitates the modelling and analysis of applications using piezoelectric, magnetostrictor and shape memory materials. It allows entire designs to be constructed, refined and optimized before production begins. Through a range of instructive case studies, Applications of ATILA FEM software to smart materials provides an indispensable guide to the use of this software in the design of effective products.Part one provides an introduction to ATILA FEM software, beginning with an overview of the software code. New capabilities and loss integratio

  3. Senior residents' perceived need of and preferences for "smart home" sensor technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Hensel, Brian K; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    The goal of meeting the desire of older adults to remain independent in their home setting while controlling healthcare costs has led to the conceptualization of "smart homes." A smart home is a residence equipped with technology that enhances safety of residents and monitors their health conditions. The study aim is to assess older adults' perceptions of specific smart home technologies (i.e., a bed sensor, gait monitor, stove sensor, motion sensor, and video sensor). The study setting is TigerPlace, a retirement community designed according to the Aging in Place model. Focus group sessions with fourteen residents were conducted to assess perceived advantages and concerns associated with specific applications, and preferences for recipients of sensor-generated information pertaining to residents' activity levels, sleep patterns and potential emergencies. Sessions were audio-taped; tapes were transcribed, and a content analysis was performed. A total of fourteen older adults over the age of 65 participated in three focus group sessions Most applications were perceived as useful, and participants would agree to their installation in their own home. Preference for specific sensors related to sensors' appearance and residents' own level of frailty and perceived need. Specific concerns about privacy were raised. The findings indicate an overall positive attitude toward sensor technologies for nonobtrusive monitoring. Researchers and practitioners are called upon to address ethical and technical challenges in this emerging domain.

  4. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  5. Does smart home technology prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pietrzak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls in older Australians are an increasingly costly public health issue, driving the development of novel modes of intervention, especially those that rely on computer-driven technologies. Objective: The aim of this paper was to gain an understanding of the state of the art of research on smart homes and computer-based monitoring technologies to prevent and detect falls in the community-dwelling elderly. Method: Cochrane, Medline, Embase and Google databases were searched for articles on fall prevention in the elderly using pre-specified search terms. Additional papers were searched for in the reference lists of relevant reviews and by the process of ‘snowballing’. Only studies that investigated outcomes related to falling such as fall prevention and detection, change in participants’ fear of falling and attitudes towards monitoring technology were included. Results: Nine papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The following outcomes were observed: (1 older adults’ attitudes towards fall detectors and smart home technology are generally positive; (2 privacy concerns and intrusiveness of technology were perceived as less important to participants than their perception of health needs and (3 unfriendly and age-inappropriate design of the interface may be one of the deciding factors in not using the technology. Conclusion: So far, there is little evidence that using smart home technology may assist in fall prevention or detection, but there are some indications that it may increase older adults’ confidence and sense of security, thus possibly enabling aging in place.

  6. Nucleic acids and smart materials: advanced building blocks for logic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-03

    Logic gates can convert input signals into a defined output signal, which is the fundamental basis of computing. Inspired by molecular switching from one state to another under an external stimulus, molecular logic gates are explored extensively and recognized as an alternative to traditional silicon-based computing. Among various building blocks of molecular logic gates, nucleic acid attracts special attention owing to its specific recognition abilities and structural features. Functional materials with unique physical and chemical properties offer significant advantages and are used in many fields. The integration of nucleic acids and functional materials is expected to bring about several new phenomena. In this Progress Report, recent progress in the construction of logic gates by combining the properties of a range of smart materials with nucleic acids is introduced. According to the structural characteristics and composition, functional materials are categorized into three classes: polymers, noble-metal nanomaterials, and inorganic nanomaterials. Furthermore, the unsolved problems and future challenges in the construction of logic gates are discussed. It is hoped that broader interests in introducing new smart materials into the field are inspired and tangible applications for these constructs are found. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Study protocol: mobile improvement of self-management ability through rural technology (mI SMART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow, Jennifer A; Theeke, Laurie A; Long, Dustin M; Whetsel, Tara; Theeke, Elliott; Mallow, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    There are 62 million Americans currently residing in rural areas who are more likely to have multiple chronic conditions and be economically disadvantaged, and in poor health, receive less recommended preventive services and attend fewer visits to health care providers. Recent advances in mobile healthcare (mHealth) offer a promising new approach to solving health disparities and improving chronic illness care. It is now possible and affordable to transmit health information, including values from glucometers, automated blood pressure monitors, and scales, through Bluetooth-enabled devices. Additionally, audio and video communications technologies can allow healthcare providers to conduct many parts of a physical exam remotely from varied settings. These technologies could remove geographical distance as a barrier to care and diminish the access to care issues faced by patients who live rurally. However, currently there is lack of studies that provide evidence of feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of mHealth initiatives on improved outcomes of care, a needed step to make the translation to implementation studies in healthcare systems. The purpose of this paper is to present the protocol for the first study of mI SMART (mobile Improvement of Self-Management Ability through Rural Technology), a new integrated mHealth intervention. Our objective is to provide evidence of feasibility and acceptability for the use of mI SMART in an underserved population and establish evidence for the refinement of mI SMART. The proposed study will take place at Milan Puskar Health Right, a free primary care clinic in the state of West Virginia. The clinic provides health care at no cost to uninsured, low income; adults aged 18-64 living in West Virginia. We will enroll 30 participants into this feasibility study with plans of implementing a longitudinal randomized, comparative effectiveness design in the future. Data collection will include tracking of barriers and

  8. Survey report on smart-tribo-mechanics; Smart tribo mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Survey results of smart-tribo-mechanics are described. For the smart-tribo-mechanics differing from the conventional tribology, an intelligent system is constructed by making full use of various science and technology ranging from basic to application, to solve problems. Self-diagnosis and self-remediation, active control, passive control, and smart-biotribo-mechanics are typical methods. Electronics, telecommunication, healthcare, and new biotechnology are new and advanced application areas. In these areas, tribology to control and act to the material surface in the atomic and molecular scale should be the key technology. In addition, the smart-tribo-mechanics is expected to be used for sustaining basic industry, such as material, transportation, and life industries. 101 refs., 67 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Geothermal Technology: A Smart Way to Lower Energy Bills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahan, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Heating costs for both natural gas and oil have risen dramatically in recent years--and will likely continue to do so. Consequently, it is important that students learn not only about traditional heating technology, but also about the alternative methods that will surely grow in use in the coming years. One such method is geothermal. In this…

  10. Shape Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) for Variable Heat Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology leverages the temperature dependent phase change of shape memory alloys (SMAs) to drive the shape of a flexible radiator panel. The opening/closing of the radiator panel, as a function of temperature, passively adapts the radiator's rate of heat rejection in response to a vehicle's needs.

  11. Mobilizing Older Adults: Harnessing the Potential of Smart Home Technologies. Contribution of the IMIA Working Group on Smart Homes and Ambient Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, G; Thompson, H J

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the potential of smart home applications to not only assess mobility determinants for older adults in the home environment but also provide the opportunity for tailored interventions. We present a theoretical framework for assessing mobility parameters and utilizing this information to enable behavior change based on the Health Belief Model. We discuss examples that showcase the potential of smart home systems to not only measure but also improve mobility for community dwelling older adults. Mobility is a complex construct that cannot be addressed with a single monitoring approach or a single intervention. Instead, tailored interventions that address specific needs and behaviors of individuals and take into consideration preferences of older adults and potentially their social network are needed to effectively enforce positive behavior change. Smart home systems have the ability to capture details of one's daily living that could otherwise not be easily obtained; however, such data repositories alone are not sufficient to improve clinical outcomes if appropriate mechanisms for data mining and analysis, as well as tailored response systems are not in place. Unleashing the potential of smart home applications to measure and improve mobility has the potential of transforming elder care and providing potentially cost-effective tools to support independence for older adults. A technologically driven smart home application can maximize its clinical relevance by pursuing interactive features that can lead to behavior change.

  12. Older adult perceptions of smart home technologies: implications for research, policy & market innovations in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, J; D'Ambrosio, L A; Reimer, B; Pratt, M R

    2007-01-01

    Advances in information communications technology and related computational power are providing a wide array of systems and related services that form the basis of smart home technologies to support the health, safety and independence of older adults. While these technologies offer significant benefits to older people and their families, they are also transforming older adults into lead adopters of a new 24/7 lifestyle of being monitored, managed, and, at times, motivated, to maintain their health and wellness. To better understand older adult perceptions of smart home technologies and to inform future research a workshop and focus group was conducted with 30 leaders in aging advocacy and aging services from 10 northeastern states. Participants expressed support of technological advance along with a variety of concerns that included usability, reliability, trust, privacy, stigma, accessibility and affordability. Participants also observed that there is a virtual absence of a comprehensive market and policy environment to support either the consumer or the diffusion of these technologies. Implications for research, policy and market innovation are discussed.

  13. An analysis of communications and networking technologies for the smart grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, Joaquin [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    The Smart Grid concept has been foreseen as the integration of the electrical generation, transmission and distribution network and the data communications network. Although, traditional communications interfaces, protocols and standards has been used in the electrical grid in an isolated manner, modern communications network is considered as the fundamental enabling technology within the future Smart Grid. Modern communications technologies, protocol architectures and standards can help to build a common communications network infrastructure for data transport between customer premises, power substations, and power distribution systems, utility control centers and utility data centers. The Smart Grid will support traditional applications such as SCADA, distribution automation (DA), energy management systems (EMS), demand site management (DSM) and automatic meter reading (AMR), etc., as well as new applications like advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), substation automation (SA), microgrids, distributed generation, grid monitoring and control, data storage and analysis, among others. To make this possible, the Smart Grid requires a two-way wide area communications network between different dispersed areas, from generation, to distribution to consumer premises. In fact, it will consist of many different types of communications networks such as wide area networks, local area network, home area networks, etc. This requires a new architectural approach to implement a common communications infrastructure that provides the reliability, scalability, security and interoperability to support multiple applications. In addition, open standards addressing interoperability, are key for the development and deployment of the Smart Grid as a true integrated network. A communications backbone is necessary to provide interoperability. To achieve the level of networking, interoperability and security that meets the technical requirements of the Smart Grid, its data communications

  14. Smart Materials Meet Multifunctional Biomedical Devices: Current and Prospective Implications for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Graziana Genchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing advances in the fabrication and in monitoring approaches of nanotechnology devices, novel materials are being synthesized and tested for the interaction with biological environments. Among them, smart materials in particular provide versatile and dynamically tunable platforms for the investigation and manipulation of several biological activities with very low invasiveness in hardly accessible anatomical districts. In the following, we will briefly recall recent examples of nanotechnology-based materials that can be remotely activated and controlled through different sources of energy, such as electromagnetic fields or ultrasounds, for their relevance to both basic science investigations and translational nanomedicine. Moreover, we will introduce some examples of hybrid materials showing mutually beneficial components for the development of multifunctional devices, able to simultaneously perform duties like imaging, tissue targeting, drug delivery, and redox state control. Finally, we will highlight challenging perspectives for the development of theranostic agents (merging diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities, underlining open questions for these smart nanotechnology-based devices to be made readily available to the patients in need.

  15. PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Judy; Schneider, Susan; Horvath, Monica; Hammond, Julia; Jackson, Jason; Ginsberg, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Medication errors account for 20% of medical errors in the United States with the largest risk at prescribing and administration. Analgesics or opioids are frequently used medications that can be associated with patient harm when prescribed or administered improperly. In an effort to decrease medication errors, Duke University Hospital implemented clinical decision support via computer provider order entry (CPOE) and "smart pump" technology, 2/2008, with the goal to decrease patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) adverse events. This project evaluated PCA safety events, reviewing voluntary report system and adverse drug events via surveillance (ADE-S), on intermediate and step-down units preimplementation and postimplementation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pumps for the prescribing and administration of opioids therapy in the adult patient requiring analgesia for acute pain. Voluntary report system and ADE-S PCA events decreased based upon 1000 PCA days; ADE-S PCA events per 1000 PCA days decreased 22%, from 5.3 (pre) to 4.2 (post) (P = 0.09). Voluntary report system events decreased 72%, from 2.4/1000 PCA days (pre) to 0.66/1000 PCA days (post) and was statistically significant (P PCA events between time periods in both the ADE-S and voluntary report system data, thus supporting the recommendation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pump technology.

  16. Fundamental Theories and Key Technologies for Smart and Optimal Manufacturing in the Process Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the significant requirements for transforming and promoting the process industry, we present the major limitations of current petrochemical enterprises, including limitations in decision-making, production operation, efficiency and security, information integration, and so forth. To promote a vision of the process industry with efficient, green, and smart production, modern information technology should be utilized throughout the entire optimization process for production, management, and marketing. To focus on smart equipment in manufacturing processes, as well as on the adaptive intelligent optimization of the manufacturing process, operating mode, and supply chain management, we put forward several key scientific problems in engineering in a demand-driven and application-oriented manner, namely: ① intelligent sensing and integration of all process information, including production and management information; ② collaborative decision-making in the supply chain, industry chain, and value chain, driven by knowledge; ③ cooperative control and optimization of plant-wide production processes via human-cyber-physical interaction; and ④ life-cycle assessments for safety and environmental footprint monitoring, in addition to tracing analysis and risk control. In order to solve these limitations and core scientific problems, we further present fundamental theories and key technologies for smart and optimal manufacturing in the process industry. Although this paper discusses the process industry in China, the conclusions in this paper can be extended to the process industry around the world.

  17. Smart Money

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Hedman, Jonas; Albinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    transaction costs by providing seamless real-time payments. In addition, digital legal tender that is based on blockchain technology can provide a foundation for customizable “smart money” which can be used to manage the appropriation of money and its use. In essence, the smart money is a customizable value...

  18. Physics and technology of nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ursu, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Physics and Technology of Nuclear Materials presents basic information regarding the structure, properties, processing methods, and response to irradiation of the key materials that fission and fusion nuclear reactors have to rely upon. Organized into 12 chapters, this book begins with selectively several fundamentals of nuclear physics. Subsequent chapters focus on the nuclear materials science; nuclear fuel; structural materials; moderator materials employed to """"slow down"""" fission neutrons; and neutron highly absorbent materials that serve in reactor's power control. Other chapters exp

  19. Using Smart Grids to Enhance Use of Energy-Efficiency and Renewable-Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Paget, Maria L.; Secrest, Thomas J.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Orrell, Alice C.; Bloyd, Cary N.

    2011-05-10

    This report addresses the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) organization’s desire to minimize the learning time required to understand the implications of smart-grid concepts so APEC members can advance their thinking in a timely manner and advance strategies regarding smart approaches that can help meet their environmental-sustainability and energy-efficiency policy goals. As significant investments are needed to grow and maintain the electricity infrastructure, consideration needs to be given to how information and communications technologies can be applied to electricity infrastructure decisions that not only meet traditional needs for basic service and reliability, but also provide the flexibility for a changing the mix of generation sources with sensitivity to environmental and societal impacts.

  20. Application of smart transmitter technology in nuclear engineering measurements with level detection algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1994-01-01

    In this study a programmable smart transmitter is designed and applied to the nuclear engineering measurements. In order to apply the smart transmitter technology to nuclear engineering measurements, the water level detection function is developed and applied in this work. In the real time system, the application of level detection algorithm can make the operator of the nuclear power plant sense the water level more rapidly. Furthermore this work can simplify the data communication between the level-sensing thermocouples and the main signal processor because the level signal is determined at field. The water level detection function reduces the detection time to about 8.3 seconds by processing the signal which has the time constant 250 seconds and the heavy noise signal

  1. Smart Materials in Architecture: Useful Tools with Practical Applications or Fascinating Inventions for Experimental Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarzewska, Bogusława

    2017-10-01

    For at least several decades smart or so-called intelligent materials, being the result of great advancements in material engineering, appear in architecture in different applications. Most of them are called “smart” because of their inherent properties: a real-time response to environmental stimuli. There are also those considered to be “smart” due to smart design: their original structure or the composition of their materials are in nanoscale, providing them with unique properties. Colour changes, physical states, temperature or shape-always repeatable and reversible - make these materials attractive to architects, both from a visual and a practical point of view. Their spectacular applications often inspire architects, scientists and artists to create, for instance, city displays revealing various shapes and figures according to daily weather conditions; thermochromics urban seats that reflect peoples’ presence; wallpaper with organic patterns that glow in darkness, and many others. On the other hand, more practical projects are being developed, such as “switchable” partition glass walls (that is, we can turn them on and they change their transparency while switching on or off: electrochromic glass is a good example). Other concepts include self-cleaning building envelopes; self-repairing concrete; phase-changing materials diminishing cooling loads in the buildings; energy-generating highways; materials that harden at the moment of impact thus withstanding exceptionally great forces; shape memory alloys playing the role of actuators-opening and - closing façade louvers or thin polymer films mimicking the function of living skin, adopted as a building envelope. All those projects result from the fascination of designers with the possibility to create materials and, in effect, a complex environment that is active, “flexible”, and adapts to changing conditions and users’ needs and is compatible with real, natural environments. Smart materials

  2. Smart Sensing Technology for Agriculture and Environmental Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book focuses on the different aspects of sensing technology, i.e. high reliability, adaptability, recalibration, information processing, data fusion, validation and integration of novel and high performance sensors specifically aims to monitor agricultural and environmental parameters.   This book is dedicated to Sensing systems for Agricultural and Environmental Monitoring  offers to variety of users, namely, Master and PhD degree students, researchers, practitioners, especially Agriculture and Environmental engineers. The book will provide an opportunity of a dedicated and a deep approach in order to improve their knowledge in this specific field.

  3. Climate-smart technologies. Integrating renewable energy and energy efficiency in mitigation and adaptation responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Filho, Walter; Mannke, Franziska; Schulte, Veronika [Hamburg Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany). Faculty of Life Sciences; Mohee, Romeela; Surroop, Dinesh (eds.) [Mauritius Univ., Reduit (Mauritius). Chemical and Environmental Engineering Dept.

    2013-11-01

    Explores the links between climate change and technologies. Relates to the links between renewable energy and climate change. Documents and promotes a collection of experiences from island nations. Has a strong international focus and value to developing countries. The book addresses the perceived need for a publication with looks at both, climate smart technologies and the integration of renewable energy and energy efficiency in mitigation and adaptation responses. Based on a set of papers submitted as part of the fifth on-line climate conference (CLIMATE 2012) and a major conference on renewable energy on island States held in Mauritius in 2012, the book provides a wealth of information on climate change strategies and the role of smart technologies. The book has been produced in the context of the project ''Small Developing Island Renewable Energy Knowledge and Technology Transfer Network'' (DIREKT), funded by the ACP Science and Technology Programme, an EU programme for cooperation between the European Union and the ACP region.

  4. Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys as smart materials for micro-positioning devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hubert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of microrobotics, actuators based on smart materials are predominant because of very good precision, integration capabilities and high compactness. This paper presents the main characteristics of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys as new candidates for the design of micromechatronic devices. The thermo-magneto-mechanical energy conversion process is first presented followed by the adequate modeling procedure required to design actuators. Finally, some actuators prototypes realized at the Femto-ST institute are presented, including a push-pull bidirectional actuator. Some results on the control and performances of these devices conclude the paper.

  5. Development of non-conventional instrument transformers (NCIT) using smart materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolić, Bojan; Khan, Sanowar; Gabdullin, Nikita

    2016-01-01

    In this paper is presented a novel approach for current measurement using smart materials, magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys. Their shape change can be controlled by the application of magnetic field or mechanical stress. This gives the possibility to measure currents by correlating the magnetic field produced by the current, shape change in an MSM- based sensor and the voltage output of a Linear Variable Differential Transducer (LVDT) actuated by this shape change. In the first part of the paper is presented a review of existing current measurement sensors by comparing their properties and highlighting their advantages and disadvantages. (paper)

  6. Get Smart About Energy: Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (OBT) EnergySmart Schools Program Folder (Revision)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-02-01

    While improving their energy use in buildings and bus fleets, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. Smart districts also realize benefits in student performance.

  7. Get Smart About Energy: Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (OBT) EnergySmart Schools Program Brochure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-10-11

    While improving their energy use in buildings and bus fleets, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. Smart districts also realize benefits in student performance.

  8. Get Smart About Energy: Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (OBT) EnergySmart Schools Program Brochure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-01-01

    While improving their energy use in buildings and bus fleets, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. Smart districts also realize benefits in student performance

  9. Hangover free! The social and material trajectories of PartySmart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pordié, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents three embedded episodes in the life of a polyherbal drug indicated as a preventative measure for hangovers. Invented and marketed in 2005 by a leading ayurvedic pharmaceutical company in India, PartySmart is a reformulated compound based on ayurvedic, biomedical and phytochemical sources. This creative process has involved multiple translations, resulting in hybrid pharmacological models, including, for instance, ayurvedic post-digestive tastes and biomedical effects on enzymatic activities. These modes of therapeutic action are conceptualizations of an active drug-- i.e., a digested and metabolized drug. A problem arises, however, in the fact that the ingestion of this drug is linked to alcohol consumption in a country where it is widely considered in negative terms. For this reason, PartySmart was seen as an ambivalent presence in the firm's catalogue and thus a series of interventions aiming to uphold the image of this drug transformed both its social inscription and its materiality. This transformation also took a different, global trajectory as the drug gradually developed as a transnational pharmaceutical commodity and became a new object in new latitudes. By focusing on the social and material dimensions of this drug in these contexts, this paper calls upon science studies to expand the scope of pharmaceutical anthropology. It brings together various layers of analysis to offer new perspectives on contemporary herbal formulations as they traverse material cultures, medical epistemologies, sociopolitical borders, legal environments and social practices.

  10. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  11. Indoor visible light communication with smart lighting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Barman, Abhirup; Halder, Alak

    2017-02-01

    An indoor visible-light communication performance is investigated utilizing energy efficient white light by 2D LED arrays. Enabled by recent advances in LED technology, IEEE 802.15.7 standardizes high-data-rate visible light communication and advocates for colour shift keying (CSK) modulation to overcome flicker and to support dimming. Voronoi segmentation is employed for decoding N-CSK constellation which has superior performance compared to other existing decoding methods. The two chief performance degrading effects of inter-symbol interference and LED nonlinearity is jointly mitigated using LMS post equalization at the receiver which improves the symbol error rate performance and increases field of view of the receiver. It is found that LMS post equalization symbol at 250MHz offers 7dB SNR improvement at SER10-6

  12. Trends in a aerospace technology advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogren, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss recent trends in aerospace technology and to discuss as they relate to recent trends in the materials technologies. We shall do this within the framework of a large new activity that is, in fact, underway at the present, namely, MISSION TO THE PLANET EARTH. Mission requirements will be described in a hierarchical order. It will be shown that materials technology, in one form or another, is an identified critical technology for every single aspect of the mission. Other critical aspects exist, primarily in the areas of data processing and data management. International cooperation in aerospace-materials activities will be described. (author)

  13. Recent progress in the growth and applications of graphene as a smart material: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim eAissa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovative breakthroughs in fundamental research and industrial applications of graphene material have made its mass and low-cost production a necessary step toward its real world applications. This one-atom thick crystal of carbon, gathers a set of unique physico-chemical properties, ranging from its extreme mechanical behavior to its exceptional electrical and thermal conductivities, which are making graphene as a serious alternative to replace many conventional materials for various applications. In this review paper, we highlight the most important experimental results on the synthesis of graphene material, its emerging properties with reference to its smart applications. We discuss the possibility to successfully integrating graphene directly into device, enabling thereby the realization of a wide range of applications, including actuation, photovoltaic, thermoelectricity, shape memory, self-healing, electrorheology and space missions. The future outlook of graphene is also considered and discussed.

  14. An integrated approach to Smart House technology for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B

    1996-04-01

    It is now commonly accepted that 'Smart House' technology can play a significant part in helping both elderly and disabled people enjoy a greater degree of independence in the near future. In order to realize this aspiration, it is necessary to examine a number of factors: the development of the appropriate Home Bus technologies and supported devices; the development of the appropriate user interfaces that will allow people with a range of special needs use the system; the incorporation of the requirements of the 'Smart House' controller with the other technological needs of the user; and the development of mainstream technologies that will affect the cost and availability of devices to the user. This paper will examine the above points and suggest appropriate actions and trends. It will draw upon the work of a four-member consortium currently finalizing a technical development project under the EC TIDE program, the experience of research and commercial organizations engaged in development work in associated areas and the experiences of the Dublin-based, Central Remedial Clinic and in particular, its Client Technical Services Unit. The CTSU have been actively engaged in the development of systems for clients and direct clinical assessments for the last 12 years.

  15. Privacy versus autonomy: a tradeoff model for smart home monitoring technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Daphne; Knoefel, Frank; Goubran, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are proposed as a new location for the delivery of healthcare services. They provide healthcare monitoring and communication services, by using integrated sensor network technologies. We validate a hypothesis regarding older adults' adoption of home monitoring technologies by conducting a literature review of articles studying older adults' attitudes and perceptions of sensor technologies. Using current literature to support the hypothesis, this paper applies the tradeoff model to decisions about sensor acceptance. Older adults are willing to trade privacy (by accepting a monitoring technology), for autonomy. As the information captured by the sensor becomes more intrusive and the infringement on privacy increases, sensors are accepted if the loss in privacy is traded for autonomy. Even video cameras, the most intrusive sensor type were accepted in exchange for the height of autonomy which is to remain in the home.

  16. Social Innovation in Smart Tourism Ecosystems: How Technology and Institutions Shape Sustainable Value Co-Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Polese

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the service era, markets are reconceptualized as systems of actors interconnected through networked relationships based on resources exchange and producing value co-creation. Two of the main contemporary service research theories, Service-dominant logic and Service science, propose different organizational layouts for producing and harmonizing value co-creation: Service ecosystems and smart service systems. However, these two models show some limitations. So, this work aims at drawing an integrated model, the so called Smart service ecosystem that can be applied to hypercompetitive and experience-based sectors. The model was tested in the tourism sector by using a case study methodology. Ten interviews were administered to key informants to analyze their perception about the main dimensions of the smart service ecosystems. By adopting a holistic view, the results obtained can allow the elaboration of a framework which pinpoints: (1 the main stakeholder groups (actors; (2 the kind of resources exchanged (resource integration; (3 the tools employed (technology; (4 the institution exchange among users (institutions. Applying the model obtained to the tourism sector this work explores the main element-steps for managing and optimizing value co-creation and sustainability in the long run and thus for transitioning from innovation to social innovation.

  17. Multi-Residential Activity Labelling in Smart Homes with Wearable Tags Using BLE Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Ghassem; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Zhang, Qing; Karunanithi, Mohanraj

    2018-03-19

    Smart home platforms show promising outcomes to provide a better quality of life for residents in their homes. One of the main challenges that exists with these platforms in multi-residential houses is activity labeling. As most of the activity sensors do not provide any information regarding the identity of the person who triggers them, it is difficult to label the sensor events in multi-residential smart homes. To deal with this challenge, individual localization in different areas can be a promising solution. The localization information can be used to automatically label the activity sensor data to individuals. Bluetooth low energy (BLE) is a promising technology for this application due to how easy it is to implement and its low energy footprint. In this approach, individuals wear a tag that broadcasts its unique identity (ID) in certain time intervals, while fixed scanners listen to the broadcasting packet to localize the tag and the individual. However, the localization accuracy of this method depends greatly on different settings of broadcasting signal strength, and the time interval of BLE tags. To achieve the best localization accuracy, this paper studies the impacts of different advertising time intervals and power levels, and proposes an efficient and applicable algorithm to select optimal value settings of BLE sensors. Moreover, it proposes an automatic activity labeling method, through integrating BLE localization information and ambient sensor data. The applicability and effectiveness of the proposed structure is also demonstrated in a real multi-resident smart home scenario.

  18. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R ampersand D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  19. Feasibility of the iPad as a hub for smart house technology in the elderly; effects of cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvseike H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hilde Alvseike,1 Kolbjørn Brønnick2,31The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, 2Regional Centre for Clinical Research in Psychosis, Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway; 3The Reading Centre, University of Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: Smart house technology using tablet computers may help older people to master activities of daily living by making it easier to perform daily tasks like controlling lights and indoor temperature throughout the house with a few keystrokes. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of age, cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience on the ability of older people to perceive and use iPad tablet computers for this purpose. Twenty-eight participants were interviewed using a structured interview guide and questionnaires, and a practical test of how to use the iPad was performed. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE was used to assess cognition. Cognitive deficits and low self-efficacy significantly reduced the ability of the subjects to use the smart house technology and to perceive the smart house technology service as provided. Age was unrelated to the outcome variables. Finally, technology experience had an effect on technology perception. If further research supports these findings, it should influence smart-house implementation in an elderly population, raising awareness of usability problems in older people with low self-efficacy and cognitive problems.Keywords: smart house technology, iPad, cognition, self-efficacy, technology experience, elderly

  20. Facile Fabrication of Electrically Conductive Low-Density Polyethylene/Carbon Fiber Tubes for Novel Smart Materials via Multiaxial Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijun; Nie, Min; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-10

    Electromechanical sensors are indispensable components in functional devices and robotics application. However, the fabrication of the sensors still maintains a challenging issue that high percolation threshold and easy failure of conductive network are derived from uniaxial orientation of conductive fillers in practical melt processing. Herein, we reported a facile fabrication method to prepare a multiaxial low-density polyethylene (LDPE)/carbon fibers (CFs) tube with bidirectional controllable electrical conductivity and sensitive strain-responsive performance via rotation extrusion technology. The multidimensional helical flow is confirmed in the reverse rotation extrusion, and the CFs readily respond to the flow field leading to a multiaxial orientation in the LDPE matrix. In contrast to uniaxial LDPE/CF composites, which perform a "head to head" conjunction, multiaxial-orientated CF networks exhibit a unique multilayer structure in which the CFs with distinct orientation direction intersect in the interface, endowing the LDPE/CF composites with a low percolation threshold (15 wt %) to those of the uniaxial ones (∼35 wt %). The angles between two axes play a vital role in determining the density of the conductive networks in the interface, which is predominant in tuning the bending-responsive behaviors with a gauge factor range from 12.5 to 56.3 and the corresponding linear respond region from ∼15 to ∼1%. Such a superior performance of conductive LDPE/CF tube confirms that the design of multiaxial orientation paves a novel way to facile fabrication of advanced cost-effective CF-based smart materials, shedding light on promising applications such as smart materials and intelligent engineering monitoring.

  1. Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project Technology Performance Report Volume 1: Technology Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Ron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), a $179 million project that was co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in late 2009, was one of the largest and most comprehensive demonstrations of electricity grid modernization ever completed. The project was one of 16 regional smart grid demonstrations funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. It was the only demonstration that included multiple states and cooperation from multiple electric utilities, including rural electric co-ops, investor-owned, municipal, and other public utilities. No fewer than 55 unique instantiations of distinct smart grid systems were demonstrated at the projects’ sites. The local objectives for these systems included improved reliability, energy conservation, improved efficiency, and demand responsiveness. The demonstration developed and deployed an innovative transactive system, unique in the world, that coordinated many of the project’s distributed energy resources and demand-responsive components. With the transactive system, additional regional objectives were also addressed, including the mitigation of renewable energy intermittency and the flattening of system load. Using the transactive system, the project coordinated a regional response across the 11 utilities. This region-wide connection from the transmission system down to individual premises equipment was one of the major successes of the project. The project showed that this can be done and assets at the end points can respond dynamically on a wide scale. In principle, a transactive system of this type might eventually help coordinate electricity supply, transmission, distribution, and end uses by distributing mostly automated control responsibilities among the many distributed smart grid domain members and their smart devices.

  2. Materials performance in advanced fossil technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.

    1991-01-01

    A number of advanced technologies are being developed to convert coal into clean fuels for use as a feedstock in chemical plants and for power generation. From the standpoint of component materials, the environments created by coal conversion and combustion in these technologies and their interactions with materials are of interest. This article identifies several modes of materials degradation and possible mechanisms for metal wastage. Available data on the performance of materials in several of the environments are highlighted, and examples of promising research activities to improve the corrosion resistance of materials are presented

  3. Applications of nano and smart materials in renewable energy production and storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents development of renewable energy production and storage devices employing nanomaterials and smart materials. The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanosheets (GNS) to improve the performance and durability of wind turbine and wave rotor blades will be explained. While GNS are primary used for the performance enhancement of the resin system called Nanoresin, CNT Nanoforests and Nanofilms are used to improve the performance of fiber systems in high-performance Nanocomposites. In addition, the use of CNTs and piezo-nanofibers will be explained as the health monitoring and smart systems within the composites. A self-healing mechanism will also be explained within the composites using these materials. Next the use of CNTs as gas diffusion layers and CNTs combined with in-situ generated platinum nanoparticles as catalyst layers will be explained to improve the performance, efficiency, and durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells while reducing their costs, weight, and size. In addition, the use of CNTs and GNSs to improve the efficiency and performance of polymer solar cells will be explained. Finally, the use of CNTs and GNSs to enhance the performance, efficiency, and durability of batteries and supercapacitors while reducing their costs, weight, and size will be discussed.

  4. Mechanical Tests Plan after Neutron Irradiation for SMART SG Tube Materials in a Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Bok; Baik, Seung Jai; Kim, Do Sik; Yoo, Byung Ok; Jung, Yang Hong; Song, Woong Sub; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Jin Seok; Lee, Yong Sun; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2010-01-01

    An advanced integral PWR, SMART (System- Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is being developed in KAERI. It has compact size and a relatively small power rating compared to a conventional reactor. The main components such as the steam generators, main circulation pumps are located in the reactor vessel. Therefore they are damaged from neutron irradiations generated from nuclear fuel fissions during operation. The SMART SG tubes which are 17 mm in a diameter and 2.5 mm in a thickness will be made of Alloy 690. To ensure the operation safety the post irradiation examinations is necessary to evaluate the deterioration levels of various original properties. Specially the amount of mechanical properties change should be reflected and revised to design data. For that tensile, fracture, hardness test are planned and under preparations. In this paper the detailed plans are reviewed. Three kinds of materials having different heat treatment procedures are prepared to fabricate specimens. The capsules installed the specimens are going to be irradiated in HANARO. Finally the tests for them will be performed in IMEF, Irradiated Materials Examination Facility at KAERI

  5. Review of FACTS technologies and applications for power quality in smart grids with renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandoman, Foad H.; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Sharaf, Adel M.

    2018-01-01

    In the last two decades, emerging use of renewable and distributed energy sources in electricity grid has created new challenges for the utility regarding the power quality, voltage stabilization and efficient energy utilization. Power electronic converters are extensively utilized to interface...... the power quality. Also, distributed FACTSs play an important role in improving the power factor, energy utilization, enhancing the power quality, and ensuring efficient energy utilization and energy management in smart grids with renewable energy sources. This paper presents a literature survey of FACTS...... technology tools and applications for power quality and efficient renewable energy system utilization....

  6. Building heating technology in Smart Home using PI System management tools

    OpenAIRE

    Vanus, Jan; Vojcinak, Petr; Martinek, Radek; Kelnar, Michal; Machacek, Zdenek; Bilik, Petr; Koziorek, Jiri; Zidek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    For comfortable remote monitoring of some operational and technical functions inside own Smart Home building, it is possible to use a lot of useful programmes and tools. However, not each programme or tool is suited to this purpose, or it does not offer required functionality. The aim of this paper is to describe using an appropriate software tool of PI System for a real-time monitoring of acquired data from real technology parts located at a training centre of the Moravian-Silesian Wood Clus...

  7. Smart Home Communication Technologies and Applications: Wireless Protocol Assessment for Home Area Network Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago D. P. Mendes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses Home Area Networks (HAN communication technologies for smart home and domestic application integration. The work is initiated by identifying the application areas that can benefit from this integration. A broad and inclusive home communication interface is analysed utilizing as a key piece a Gateway based on machine-to-machine (M2M communications that interacts with the surrounding environment. Then, the main wireless networks are thoroughly assessed, and later, their suitability to the requirements of HAN considering the application area is analysed. Finally, a qualitative analysis is portrayed.

  8. Textile materials for lightweight constructions technologies, methods, materials, properties

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    In this book, experts on textile technologies convey both general and specific informa­tion on various aspects of textile engineering, ready-made technologies, and textile chemistry. They describe the entire process chain from fiber materials to various yarn constructions, 2D and 3D textile constructions, preforms, and interface layer design. In addition, the authors introduce testing methods, shaping and simulation techniques for the characterization of and structural mechanics calculations on anisotropic, pliable high-performance textiles, including specific examples from the fields of fiber plastic composites, textile concrete, and textile membranes. Readers will also be familiarized with the potential offered by increasingly popular textile structures, for instance in the fields of composite technology, construction technology, security technology, and membrane technology. Textile materials and semi-finished products have widely varied potential characteristics, and are commonly used as essential element...

  9. Smart tungsten alloys as a material for the first wall of a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Du, H.; Mayer, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Calvo, A.; Ordas, N.

    2017-06-01

    Tungsten is currently deemed as a promising plasma-facing material (PFM) for the future power plant DEMO. In the case of an accident, air can get into contact with PFMs during the air ingress. The temperature of PFMs can rise up to 1200 °C due to nuclear decay heat in the case of damaged coolant supply. Heated neutron-activated tungsten forms a volatile radioactive oxide which can be mobilized into the atmosphere. New self-passivating ‘smart’ alloys can adjust their properties to the environment. During plasma operation the preferential sputtering of lighter alloying elements will leave an almost pure tungsten surface facing the plasma. During an accident the alloying elements in the bulk are forming oxides thus protecting tungsten from mobilization. Good plasma performance and the suppression of oxidation are required for smart alloys. Bulk tungsten (W)-chroimum (Cr)-titanium (Ti) alloys were exposed together with pure tungsten (W) samples to the steady-state deuterium plasma under identical conditions in the linear plasma device PSI 2. The temperature of the samples was ~576 °C-715 °C, the energy of impinging ions was 210 eV matching well the conditions expected at the first wall of DEMO. Weight loss measurements demonstrated similar mass decrease of smart alloys and pure tungsten samples. The oxidation of exposed samples has proven no effect of plasma exposure on the oxidation resistance. The W-Cr-Ti alloy demonstrated advantageous 3-fold lower mass gain due to oxidation than that of pure tungsten. New yttrium (Y)-containing thin film systems are demonstrating superior performance in comparison to that of W-Cr-Ti systems and of pure W. The oxidation rate constant of W-Cr-Y thin film is 105 times less than that of pure tungsten. However, the detected reactivity of the bulk smart alloy in humid atmosphere is calling for a further improvement.

  10. EDITORIAL: Adaptive and active materials: Selected papers from the ASME 2011 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 11) (Scottsdale, AZ, USA, 18-21 September 2011) Adaptive and active materials: Selected papers from the ASME 2011 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 11) (Scottsdale, AZ, USA, 18-21 September 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brei, Diann

    2012-09-01

    ultimate goal was to provide a friendly, casual southwestern forum for the exchange of the 'hottest' ideas and latest results. Our sincere appreciation goes to all the presenters for choosing to share their very best work at this conference. SMASIS is divided into seven symposia which span basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations: SYMP 1 Multifunctional Materials; SYMP 2 Active Materials, Mechanics and Behavior; SYMP 3 Modeling, Simulation and Control; SYMP 4 Enabling Technologies and Integrated System Design; SYMP 5 Structural Health Monitoring/NDE; SYMP 6 Bio-inspired Smart Materials and Structures; and SYMP 7 Guest Symposium on Sustainability. In addition, the conference introduced a new student and young professional development symposium. Authors of papers in the materials area (symposia 1, 2 and 6) were invited to write a full journal article on their presentation topic for publication in this Special Issue of Smart Materials and Structures. This collection of papers demonstrates the exceptional quality and originality of the conference presentations. We appreciate their efforts in producing this collection of highly relevant articles on smart materials.

  11. A switch by design : User-centred design of smart energy technologies to change habits of using energy at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobus, C.B.A.

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis demonstrates that households are able and willing to permanently change their habits of using energy, if they are supported by well-designed, user-friendly technology. Previous studies have assessed the impact of smart energy technologies and new tariff structures to make

  12. State of the art of control schemes for smart systems featuring magneto-rheological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Do, Phu Xuan; Li, Weihua; Yu, Miao; Fu, Jie; Du, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    This review presents various control strategies for application systems utilizing smart magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) and magneto-rheological elastomers (MRE). It is well known that both MRF and MRE are actively studied and applied to many practical systems such as vehicle dampers. The mandatory requirements for successful applications of MRF and MRE include several factors: advanced material properties, optimal mechanisms, suitable modeling, and appropriate control schemes. Among these requirements, the use of an appropriate control scheme is a crucial factor since it is the final action stage of the application systems to achieve the desired output responses. There are numerous different control strategies which have been applied to many different application systems of MRF and MRE, summarized in this review. In the literature review, advantages and disadvantages of each control scheme are discussed so that potential researchers can develop more effective strategies to achieve higher control performance of many application systems utilizing magneto-rheological materials. (topical review)

  13. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home

  14. Adaptive and active materials: selected papers from the ASME 2012 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 12) (Stone Mountain, GA, USA, 19-21 September 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelecke, Stefan; Erturk, Alper; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Naguib, Hani; Huber, John; Turner, Travis; Anderson, Iain; Philen, Michael; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu

    2013-09-01

    The fifth annual meeting of the ASME/AIAA Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) was held in beautiful Stone Mountain near Atlanta, GA. It is the conference's objective to provide an up-to-date overview of research trends in the entire field of smart materials systems. This was reflected in keynote speeches by Professor Eduard Arzt (Institute of New Materials and Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany) on 'Micro-patterned artificial 'Gecko' surfaces: a path to switchable adhesive function', by Professor Ray H Baughman (The Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas) on 'The diverse and growing family of carbon nanotube and related artificial muscles', and by Professor Richard James (University of Minnesota) on 'The direct conversion of heat to electricity using multiferroic materials with phase transformations'. SMASIS 2012 was divided into eight symposia which span basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. • SYMP 1. Development and characterization of multifunctional materials. • SYMP 2. Mechanics and behavior of active materials. • SYMP 3. Modeling, simulation and control of adaptive systems. • SYMP 4. Integrated system design and implementation. • SYMP 5. Structural health monitoring/NDE. • SYMP 6. Bio-inspired materials and systems. • SYMP 7. Energy harvesting. • SYMP 8. Structural and materials logic. This year we were particularly excited to introduce a new symposium on energy harvesting, which has quickly matured from a special track in previous years to an independent symposium for the first time. The subject cuts across fields by studying different materials, ranging from piezoelectrics to electroactive polymers, as well as by emphasizing different energy sources from wind to waves and ambient vibrations. Modeling, experimental studies, and technology applications all

  15. Cathode material for lithium ion accumulators prepared by screen printing for Smart Textile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrový, T.; Kazda, T.; Syrová, L.; Vondrák, J.; Kubáč, L.; Sedlaříková, M.

    2016-03-01

    The presented study is focused on the development of LiFePO4 based cathode for thin and flexible screen printed secondary lithium based accumulators. An ink formulation was developed for the screen printing technique, which enabled mass production of accumulator's cathode for Smart Label and Smart Textile applications. The screen printed cathode was compared with an electrode prepared by the bar coating technique using an ink formulation based on the standard approach of ink composition. Obtained LiFePO4 cathode layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements at different loads. The discharge capacity, capacity retention and stability at a high C rate of the LiFePO4 cathode were improved when Super P and PVDF were replaced by conductive polymers PEDOT:PSS. The achieved capacity during cycling at various C rates was approximately the same at the beginning and at the end, and it was about 151 mAh/g for cycling under 1C. The obtained results of this novelty electrode layer exceed the parameters of several electrode layers based on LiFePO4 published in literature in terms of capacity, cycling stability and overcomes them in terms of simplicity/industrial process ability of cathode layer fabrication and electrode material preparation.

  16. Safety awareness educational topics for the construction of power transmission systems with smart grid technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Hubbard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Power transmission facilities in the U.S. are undergoing a transformation due to the increased use of distributed generation sources such as wind and solar power.  The current power grid system is also antiquated and in need of substantial retrofits to make it more efficient and reliable.  The new energy transmission system being designed and built to optimize power delivery is known as “Smart Grid”.  The increased activity in the construction of power transmission facilities and installation of new technologies into the current power system raises potential safety concerns.  Existing construction management curriculum may include general information about safety training, but does not typically include information about this specialized sector.  The objective of this study was to work with industry to identify key safety topics appropriate for inclusion in an introductory industrial construction course.  Results of interviews with industry identified numerous hazards that are not typically covered in typical construction curricula.  A joint undergraduate and graduate course in industrial construction was created to address these and additional concepts. A survey of the students was performed to determine the effectiveness of the course and also to determine their thoughts about the smart grid technologies and safety training. Information on electrical system hazards is presented along with results of the student surveys.

  17. Smart facility location planning for Smart Cities: using GIS technology and facility provision standards for pro-active planning of social facilities to support smart growth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Chéri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available step toward “smart” planning processes to support smart cities of the future. A case study application in Cape Town is used to illustrate the application of the methodology of spatially matching supply and demand for facilities using GIS tools...

  18. Technology transfer and international development: Materials and manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Policy oriented studies on technological development in several relatively advanced developing countries were conducted. Priority sectors defined in terms of technological sophistication, capital intensity, value added, and export potential were studied in Brazil, Venezuela, Israel, and Korea. The development of technological policy alternatives for the sponsoring country is assessed. Much emphasis is placed on understanding the dynamics of the sectors through structured interviews with a large sample of firms in the leading manufacturing and materials processing sectors.

  19. Emerging Materials Technologies That Matter to Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    A brief overview of emerging materials technologies. Exploring the weight reduction benefit of replacing Carbon Fiber with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) in Polymer Composites. Review of the benign purification method developed for CNT sheets. The future of manufacturing will include the integration of computational material design and big data analytics, along with Nanomaterials as building blocks.

  20. Frontiers in Materials Science and Technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Tailored materials and innovative designs of products are the key drivers in many modern ... affordable multistage processing and manufacturing technologies. ..... large-scale production of micro components of a wide range of materials are described in ... rapid prototyping with accurate and flexible ceramic manufacture by ...

  1. Development concepts of a Smart Cyber Operating Theater (SCOT) using ORiN technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Jun; Masamune, Ken; Iseki, Hiroshi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-23

    Currently, networking has not progressed in the treatment room. Almost every medical device in the treatment room operates as a stand-alone device. In this project, we aim to develop a networked operating room called "Smart Cyber Operating Theater (SCOT)". Medical devices are connected using Open Resource interface for the Network (ORiN) technology. In this paper, we describe the concept of the SCOT project. SCOT is integrated using the communication interface ORiN, which was originally developed for industry. One feature of ORiN is that the system can be constructed flexibly. ORiN creates abstracts of the same type of devices and increases the robustness of the system for device exchange. By using ORiN technology, we are developing new applications, such as decision-making navigation or a precision guided treatment system.

  2. New technologies for monitoring nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes new technologies for monitoring the continued presence of nuclear materials that are being evaluated in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to reduce the effort, cost, and employee exposures associated with conducting nuclear material inventories. These technologies also show promise for the international safeguarding of process systems and nuclear materials in storage, including spent fuels. The identified systems are based on innovative technologies that were not developed for safeguards applications. These advanced technologies include passive and active sensor systems based on optical materials, inexpensive solid-state radiation detectors, dimensional surface characterization, and digital color imagery. The passive sensor systems use specialized scintillator materials coupled to optical-fiber technologies that not only are capable of measuring radioactive emissions but also are capable of measuring or monitoring pressure, weight, temperature, and source location. Small, durable solid-state gamma-ray detection devices, whose components are estimated to cost less than $25 per unit, can be implemented in a variety of configurations and can be adapted to enhance existing monitoring systems. Variations in detector design have produced significantly different system capabilities. Dimensional surface characterization and digital color imaging are applications of developed technologies that are capable of motion detection, item surveillance, and unique identification of items

  3. Hydrogen storage technology materials and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klebanoff, Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Zero-carbon, hydrogen-based power technology offers the most promising long-term solution for a secure and sustainable energy infrastructure. With contributions from the world's leading technical experts in the field, Hydrogen Storage Technology: Materials and Applications presents a broad yet unified account of the various materials science, physics, and engineering aspects involved in storing hydrogen gas so that it can be used to provide power. The book helps you understand advanced hydrogen storage materials and how to build systems around them. Accessible to nonscientists, the first chapt

  4. Through the Looking Glass: Real-Time Video Using 'Smart' Technology Provides Enhanced Intraoperative Logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Andrew C W; Mallidi, Hari R; Baldwin, John C; Sandoval, Elena; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H; Singh, Steve K

    2016-01-01

    In the setting of increasingly complex medical therapies and limited physician resources, the recent emergence of 'smart' technology offers tremendous potential for improved logistics, efficiency, and communication between medical team members. In an effort to harness these capabilities, we sought to evaluate the utility of this technology in surgical practice through the employment of a wearable camera device during cardiothoracic organ recovery. A single procurement surgeon was trained for use of an Explorer Edition Google Glass (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA) during the recovery process. Live video feed of each procedure was securely broadcast to allow for members of the home transplant team to remotely participate in organ assessment. Primary outcomes involved demonstration of technological feasibility and validation of quality assurance through group assessment. The device was employed for the recovery of four organs: a right single lung, a left single lung, and two bilateral lung harvests. Live video of the visualization process was remotely accessed by the home transplant team, and supplemented final verification of organ quality. In each case, the organs were accepted for transplant without disruption of standard procurement protocols. Media files generated during the procedures were stored in a secure drive for future documentation, evaluation, and education purposes without preservation of patient identifiers. Live video streaming can improve quality assurance measures by allowing off-site members of the transplant team to participate in the final assessment of donor organ quality. While further studies are needed, this project suggests that the application of mobile 'smart' technology offers not just immediate value, but the potential to transform our approach to the practice of medicine.

  5. Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Hung, I. H.; Kim, K. K. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The project 'Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development' aims to be normal operation for the experiments at DUPIC fuel development facility (DFDF) and safe operation of the facility through the technology developments such as remote operation, maintenance and pair of the facility, treatment of various high level process wastes and trapping of volatile process gases. DUPIC Fuel Development Facility (DFDF) can accommodate highly active nuclear materials, and now it is for fabrication of the oxide fuel by dry process characterizing the proliferation resistance. During the second stage from march 2005 to February 2007, we carried out technology development of the remote maintenance and the DFDF's safe operation, development of treatment technology for process off-gas, and development of treatment technology for PWR cladding hull and the results was described in this report.

  6. Development of core design/analysis technology for integral reactor; verification of SMART nuclear design by Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyo; Hong, In Seob; Han, Beom Seok; Jeong, Jong Seong [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this project is to verify neutronics characteristics of the SMART core design as to compare computational results of the MCNAP code with those of the MASTER code. To achieve this goal, we will analyze neutronics characteristics of the SMART core using the MCNAP code and compare these results with results of the MASTER code. We improved parallel computing module and developed error analysis module of the MCNAP code. We analyzed mechanism of the error propagation through depletion computation and developed a calculation module for quantifying these errors. We performed depletion analysis for fuel pins and assemblies of the SMART core. We modeled a 3-D structure of the SMART core and considered a variation of material compositions by control rods operation and performed depletion analysis for the SMART core. We computed control-rod worths of assemblies and a reactor core for operation of individual control-rod groups. We computed core reactivity coefficients-MTC, FTC and compared these results with computational results of the MASTER code. To verify error analysis module of the MCNAP code, we analyzed error propagation through depletion of the SMART B-type assembly. 18 refs., 102 figs., 36 tabs. (Author)

  7. Understanding Modern Banking Ledgers through Blockchain Technologies: Future of Transaction Processing and Smart Contracts on the Internet of Money

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Gareth William; Panayi, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we provide an overview of the concept of blockchain technology and its potential to disrupt the world of banking through facilitating global money remittance, smart contracts, automated banking ledgers and digital assets. In this regard, we first provide a brief overview of the core aspects of this technology, as well as the second-generation contract-based developments. From there we discuss key issues that must be considered in developing such ledger based technologies in a ...

  8. Materials of 13. conference: ATM'92 - Advanced materials and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    13th conference on metal science, modern materials and technologies (ATM'92) has been held in Popowo near Warsaw, Poland in September 1992. The conference has been divided into 9 sections. There are: Plenary section (7 lectures); Functional materials (12 lectures); Methods of material microstructure shaping (5 lectures and 14 posters); Surface engineering (5 lectures and 27 posters); Composites (5 lectures and 9 posters); Iron alloys A (7 lectures and 8 posters); Iron alloys B (7 lectures and 18 posters); Non-ferrous metal alloys (7 lectures and 11 posters) and Methods for materials research (5 lectures and 23 posters). The new materials preparation, their properties and structure as well as a methods for obtaining a desirable properties of material or their surface have been broadly referred and discussed

  9. SMART GROUND Project: SMART data collection and inteGRation platform to enhance availability and accessibility of data and infOrmation in the EU territory on SecoNDary Raw Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Piergiorgio; Antonella Dino, Giovanna; de la Feld, Marco; Pizza, Antonietta; Coulon, Frederic; Wagland, Stuart; Gomes, Diogo

    2016-04-01

    , by i) providing training on the assessment of landfill sites material recovery to targeting end-users, ii) establishing a dedicated network of academic, industrial, regulators and other stakeholders committed to cost-effective research, technology transfer and training. The present contribution will provide an overview of the SMART GROUND project and highlights the results obtained during the first six months of project activity.

  10. Preparing technicians for engineering materials technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, James A.; Metzloff, Carlton H.

    1990-01-01

    A long held principle is that for every engineer and scientist there is a need for ten technicians to maximize the efficiency of the technology team for meeting needs of industry and government. Developing an adequate supply of technicians to meet the requirements of the materials related industry will be a challenge and difficult to accomplish. A variety of agencies feel the need and wish to support development of engineering materials technology programs. In a joint effort among Battelle Laboratories, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Northwest College and University Association for Science (NORCUS), the development of an engineering materials technology program for vocational programs and community colleges for the Pacific Northwest Region was recently completed. This effort has implications for a national model. The model Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Materials Technology shown provides a general structure. It purposely has course titles which need delimiting while also including a core of courses necessary to develop cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills with the underlining principles of math, science and technology so students have job entry skills, and so that students can learn about and adapt to evolving technology.

  11. The adoption of new smart-grid technologies incentives, outcomes, and opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Christopher; Narayanan, Anu

    2015-01-01

    RAND Corporation researchers review the current technical, regulatory, and economic context of the electricity market and theoretical benefits of developing a smart grid; discuss some entrepreneurial opportunities associated with smart-grid data; examine empirical evidence related to smart-grid adoption and implementation; and offer policy suggestions for overcoming identified barriers.

  12. Acceptance of Privacy-Sensitive Technologies : Smart Metering Case in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alabdulkarim, L.O.; Lukszo, Z.; Fens, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years there have been several initiatives around the world that aim to roll out smart metering systems, especially within North America and member states of the European Union. Smart metering systems, giving essential conditions for smart grids in the energy sector, can offer services

  13. Renewable energy sources, the internet of things and the third industrial revolution: Smart grid and contemporary information and communication technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsios, Aristidis; Bousakas, Konstantinos; Salame, Takla; Bogno, Bachirou; Papageorgas, Panagiotis; Vokas, Georgios A.; Mauffay, Fabrice; Petit, Pierre; Aillerie, Michel; Charles, Jean-Pierre

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the energy efficiency of a contemporary Smart Grid that is based on Distributed Renewable Energy Sources (DRES) is examined under the scope of the communication systems utilized between the energy loads and the energy sources. What is evident is that the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies that are based on the existing Web infrastructure can be heavily introduced in this direction especially when combined with long range low bandwidth networking technologies, power line communication technologies and optimization methodologies for renewable energy generation. The renewable energy generation optimization will be based on devices embedded in the PV panels and the wind power generators, which will rely on bidirectional communications with local gateways and remote control stations for achieving energy efficiency. Smart meters and DRES combined with IoT communications will be the enabling technologies for the ultimate fusion of Internet technology and renewable energy generation realizing the Energy Internet.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of SMART Board Technology and Flash Card Instruction on Sight Word Recognition and Observational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Gast, David L.; Thompson, Kimberly L.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of SMART Board, interactive whiteboard technology and traditional flash cards in teaching reading in a small-group instructional arrangement. Three students with moderate intellectual disabilities were taught to read grocery store aisle marker words under each condition. Observational learning (students…

  15. Smart charging of electric vehicles with photovoltaic power and vehicle-to-grid technology in a microgrid; a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, M.J.; van Sark, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    We present a model developed to study the increase of self-consumption of photovoltaic (PV) power by smart charging of electric vehicles (EVs) and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology. Whereas previous studies mostly use large EV fleets in their models, our focus is on a smaller scale. We apply the

  16. Passive RF component technology materials, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on novel materials and techniques, this pioneering volume provides you with a solid understanding of the design and fabrication of smart RF passive components. You find comprehensive details on LCP, metal materials, ferrite materials, nano materials, high aspect ratio enabled materials, green materials for RFID, and silicon micromachining techniques. Moreover, this practical book offers expert guidance on how to apply these materials and techniques to design a wide range of cutting-edge RF passive components, from MEMS switch based tunable passives and 3D passives, to metamaterial-bas

  17. Towards a conceptual framework of OSH risk management in smart working environments based on smart PPE, ambient intelligence and the Internet of Things technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórski, Daniel; Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Dąbrowska, Anna; Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Okrasa, Małgorzata

    2017-03-01

    Recent developments in domains of ambient intelligence (AmI), Internet of Things, cyber-physical systems (CPS), ubiquitous/pervasive computing, etc., have led to numerous attempts to apply ICT solutions in the occupational safety and health (OSH) area. A literature review reveals a wide range of examples of smart materials, smart personal protective equipment and other AmI applications that have been developed to improve workers' safety and health. Because the use of these solutions modifies work methods, increases complexity of production processes and introduces high dynamism into thus created smart working environments (SWE), a new conceptual framework for dynamic OSH management in SWE is called for. A proposed framework is based on a new paradigm of OSH risk management consisting of real-time risk assessment and the capacity to monitor the risk level of each worker individually. A rationale for context-based reasoning in SWE and a respective model of the SWE-dedicated CPS are also proposed.

  18. Feasibility of the iPad as a hub for smart house technology in the elderly; effects of cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvseike, Hilde; Brønnick, Kolbjørn

    2012-01-01

    Smart house technology using tablet computers may help older people to master activities of daily living by making it easier to perform daily tasks like controlling lights and indoor temperature throughout the house with a few keystrokes. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of age, cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience on the ability of older people to perceive and use iPad tablet computers for this purpose. Twenty-eight participants were interviewed using a structured interview guide and questionnaires, and a practical test of how to use the iPad was performed. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess cognition. Cognitive deficits and low self-efficacy significantly reduced the ability of the subjects to use the smart house technology and to perceive the smart house technology service as provided. Age was unrelated to the outcome variables. Finally, technology experience had an effect on technology perception. If further research supports these findings, it should influence smart-house implementation in an elderly population, raising awareness of usability problems in older people with low self-efficacy and cognitive problems.

  19. Materials Science and Technology Teachers Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieda, Karen J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Bliss, Mary; Pitman, Stan G.; Eschbach, Eugene A.

    2008-09-04

    The Materials Science and Technology (MST) Handbook was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in Richland, Washington, under support from the U.S. Department of Energy. Many individuals have been involved in writing and reviewing materials for this project since it began at Richland High School in 1986, including contributions from educators at the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory, Central Washington University, the University of Washington, teachers from Northwest Schools, and science and education personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Support for its development was also provided by the U.S. Department of Education. This introductory course combines the academic disciplines of chemistry, physics, and engineering to create a materials science and technology curriculum. The course covers the fundamentals of ceramics, glass, metals, polymers and composites. Designed to appeal to a broad range of students, the course combines hands-on activities, demonstrations and long term student project descriptions. The basic philosophy of the course is for students to observe, experiment, record, question, seek additional information, and, through creative and insightful thinking, solve problems related to materials science and technology. The MST Teacher Handbook contains a course description, philosophy, student learning objectives, and instructional approach and processes. Science and technology teachers can collaborate to build the course from their own interests, strengths, and experience while incorporating existing school and community resources. The course is intended to meet local educational requirements for technology, vocational and science education.

  20. Bilateral collaboration in built heritage material research and resource maintenance supportive to smart and sustainable cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quist, W.J.; Clarke, N.J.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Conradie, D.C.U.; du Plessis, C.; van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2017-01-01

    Built heritage contains value on many scales. On the most basic level it represents the investment of building materials following a constructional logic. As the use of once-predominant materials goes out of fashion due to changing technological regimes and architectural styles, knowledge about them

  1. Application of smart technology in monitoring and control of home appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abdulrazaq

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The inherent dependency of home appliances on human for monitoring and control has been found to be mainly responsible for power wastage, and increase in the rate of wear and tear, which invariably implies additional spending on the part of owners. The smart technology provides a way out. This paper presents an automated system which is based on arduino and android device for monitoring and controlling appliances to prevent the wastage of power. The system design is based on the Microcontroller MIKRO-C software, active sensors and wireless internet services which is used in different monitoring and control processes of fan, air-conditioner, light and heater. The system when tested performs efficiently in monitoring and controlling through switching the appliances in the room based on human presence and environmental changes due to light intensity and temperature variation.

  2. Building heating technology in Smart Home using PI System management tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vanus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For comfortable remote monitoring of some operational and technical functions inside own Smart Home building, it is possible to use a lot of useful programmes and tools. However, not each programme or tool is suited to this purpose, or it does not offer required functionality. The aim of this paper is to describe using an appropriate software tool of PI System for a real-time monitoring of acquired data from real technology parts located at a training centre of the Moravian-Silesian Wood Cluster. Then a superior system including applications of PI Coresight and PI ProcessBook is used for analysis and processing of these acquired data (e.g. by using the Dynamic Time Warping method for specific technological quantities. Each application has own advantages and disadvantages, which are evaluated in conjunction with possibilities of manipulating the data. In an experimental part, there are also applied a technological communication standard of BACnet to controlling heating, cooling and forced ventilation, and a software tool of DESIGO Insight for visualising the data in forms of tables, multi-layer graphs, and screens for a certain technology.

  3. Materials technology applied to nuclear accelerator targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthell, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The continuing requests for both shaped and flat, very low areal density metal foils have led to the development of metallurgical quality, high strength products. Intent of this paper is to show methods of forming structures on various substrates using periodic vapor interruptions, alternating anodes, and mechanical peening to alter otherwise unacceptable grain morphology which both lowers tensile strength and causes high stresses in thin films. The three technologies, physical vapor deposition, electrochemistry, and chemical vapor deposition and their thin film products can benefit from the use of laminate technology and control of grain structure morphology through the use of materials research and technology

  4. Rapid Prototyping: Technologies, Materials and Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of product development, the term rapid prototyping (RP is widely used to describe technologies which create physical prototypes directly from digital data. Recently, this technology has become one of the fastest-growing methods of manufacturing parts. The paper provides brief notes on the creation of composites using RP methods, such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering or melting, laminated object modelling, fused deposition modelling or three-dimensional printing. The emphasis of this work is on the methodology of composite fabrication and the variety of materials used in these technologies.

  5. Scientific development of smart farming technologies and their application in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieisson Pivoto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart farming (SF involves the incorporation of information and communication technologies into machinery, equipment, and sensors for use in agricultural production systems. New technologies such as the internet of things and cloud computing are expected to advance this development, introducing more robots and artificial intelligence into farming. Therefore, the aims of this paper are twofold: (i to characterize the scientific knowledge about SF that is available in the worldwide scientific literature based on the main factors of development by country and over time and (ii to describe current SF prospects in Brazil from the perspective of experts in this field. The research involved conducting semi-structured interviews with market and researcher experts in Brazil and using a bibliometric survey by means of data mining software. Integration between the different available systems on the market was identified as one of the main limiting factors to SF evolution. Another limiting factor is the education, ability, and skills of farmers to understand and handle SF tools. These limitations revealed a market opportunity for enterprises to explore and help solve these problems, and science can contribute to this process. China, the United States, South Korea, Germany, and Japan contribute the largest number of scientific studies to the field. Countries that invest more in R&D generate the most publications; this could indicate which countries will be leaders in smart farming. The use of both research methods in a complementary manner allowed to understand how science frame the SF and the mains barriers to adopt it in Brazil.

  6. Why Promote Improved Fallows as a Climate-Smart Agroforestry Technology in Sub-Saharan Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Partey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the literature, a lot is discussed about how agroforestry can achieve the mitigation, adaptation and productivity goals of climate-smart agriculture (CSA. However, this may be relatively too broad to assess the trade-offs and synergies of how specific agroforestry technologies or practices achieve the three pillars of CSA. Here, we provide an overview of how improved fallows (an agroforestry technology consisting of planting mainly legume tree/shrub species in rotation with cultivated crops may achieve the goals of climate-smart agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Our review showed that improved fallow systems have real potential to contribute to food security and climate change mitigation and adaptation in SSA. Under proper management, improved fallows can increase maize yields to about 6 t ha−1, which is comparable to conventional maize yields under fertilization. This is attributed to improved soil fertility and nutrient use efficiency. Although data was generally limited, the growing literature showed that improved fallows increased soil carbon sequestration and reduced greenhouse emissions. Further, as a multiple output land use system, improved fallows may increase fodder availability during dry periods and provide substantial biomass for charcoal production. These livelihood options may become important financial safety nets during off seasons or in the event of crop failures. This notwithstanding, the adoption of improved fallows is mainly in Southern and Eastern Africa, where over 20,000 farmers are now using Sesbania sesban, Tephrosia vogelii, and Cajanus cajan in two-year fallows followed by maize rotations. Land tenure issues, lack of social capital, and improved germplasm and accessions of fallow species have been cited as constraints to scaling up. However, development of seed orchards, nursery development, and the willingness of policy makers to create a policy environment that addresses market failures and alleviates

  7. Exploring Transition of Large Technological Systems through Relational Data - A Study of The Danish Smart Grid Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurowetzki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    in the transformation process. While they can contribute with resources, capabilities, and their connections to the development of the new grid infrastructure, they may also impede innovation given their ownership of and assumed interest in the established system. These insights should be considered in policy...... transformation of the energy grid infrastructure. The focus is set on how the interplay between established and new technologies and actors determines the direction and outcomes of innovation in large technological systems (such as the Danish smart grid). Results of several chapters indicate that in the Danish......Combining elements form the Science, Technology and Society (STS) tradition with the Technological Innovation System (TIS) framework and utilising unstructured and relational data as well as novel analysis tools, this thesis explores the development of the Danish smart grid and the associated...

  8. Smart Materials for Advanced Applications: Self-Decontaminating Polymers, Photofunctional Composites, and Electroconductive Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Brian Kevin

    2011-12-01

    Materials capable of providing multifunctional properties controllable by some external stimulus (pH, light, temperature, etc) are highly desirable and obtainable given recent advancements in material science. Development of these so called "Smart" materials spanned across many disciplines of science with applications in industrial areas such as medical, military, security, and environmental. Furthermore, next-generation materials require the ability to not only sense/respond to changes in their external/internal environment, but process information in regards to these changes and adapt accordingly in a dynamic fashion, autonomously, so called "Intelligent" materials. Findings reported in this manuscript detail the synthesis, characterization, and application of smart materials in the following three areas: (1) self-cleaning polymers (2) photoresponsive composites and (3) electroconductive fibers. Self-Cleaning Polymers: Self-decontaminating polymers are unique materials capable of degrading toxic organic chemicals (TOCs). Barriers composed of or coated with our photochemical reactive polymer matrix could be applied to multiple surfaces for defense against TOCs; for example, military garments for protection against chemical warfare agents. This study investigates conditions necessary for formation of peroxides via O2 reduction induced by long-lived, strongly reducing benzophenyl ketyl (BPK) polymer radicals. Photolysis of aqueous solutions composed of sulphonated poly(ether etherketone), SPEEK, and poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA lead to the formation of the BPK radicals. Experiments investigate the formation and decomposition of peroxides in aqueous solutions of SPEEK/PVA under photolysis. Photofunctional Composites: Photoresponsive nanoporous (PN) films and powders were studied and evaluated as possible additives to sensitize the initiation of CH3NO2 via a mechanism involving coalescence of reaction sites. Such materials consist of a 3-D mesoporous silica framework

  9. Smart photonic coating for civil engineering field: for a future inspection technology on concrete bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudouzi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Todoroki, Shin-ichi; Hyakutake, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Nishizaki, Itaru; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Ohya, Takao

    2017-04-01

    Here we will propose the conceptual new idea of the inspection of concrete bridge using smart materials and mobile IoT system. We apply opal photonic crystal film to detect cracks on concrete infrastructures. High quality opal photonic crystal films were coated on black color PET sheet over 1000 cm2 area. The opal film sheet was cut and adhered to concrete or mortar test pieces by epoxy resin. In the tensile test, the structural color of the opal sheet was changed when the crack was formed. As a demonstration, we have installated the opal film sheet on the wall of the concrete bridge. Our final purpose is the color change will be recorded by portable CCD devices, and send to expert via IoT network.

  10. Mesoporous materials for clean energy technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Noemi; Silvestre-Albero, Ana M; Serrano, Elena; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; García-Martínez, Javier

    2014-11-21

    Alternative energy technologies are greatly hindered by significant limitations in materials science. From low activity to poor stability, and from mineral scarcity to high cost, the current materials are not able to cope with the significant challenges of clean energy technologies. However, recent advances in the preparation of nanomaterials, porous solids, and nanostructured solids are providing hope in the race for a better, cleaner energy production. The present contribution critically reviews the development and role of mesoporosity in a wide range of technologies, as this provides for critical improvements in accessibility, the dispersion of the active phase and a higher surface area. Relevant examples of the development of mesoporosity by a wide range of techniques are provided, including the preparation of hierarchical structures with pore systems in different scale ranges. Mesoporosity plays a significant role in catalysis, especially in the most challenging processes where bulky molecules, like those obtained from biomass or highly unreactive species, such as CO2 should be transformed into most valuable products. Furthermore, mesoporous materials also play a significant role as electrodes in fuel and solar cells and in thermoelectric devices, technologies which are benefiting from improved accessibility and a better dispersion of materials with controlled porosity.

  11. Report on the Audit of Materials Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-25

    We are providing this report on the Audit of Materials Technology for your information and use. No comments were required or received on the draft...report. The audit was made from July through September 1989. The objectives of the audit were to evaluate the missions and functions assigned to DOD

  12. Art for the Smart: Paper and oral presentation assignments for an Earth Materials course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    A letter from the fictional Art for the Smart company addresses students in the Earth Materials course: "You might be wondering why an artist needs a geology consultant. I am creating a sculpture garden filled with mythical beings. I would like each student to recommend two unique minerals for one of these sculptures..." For this project students randomly select a mythical being, two mineral groups, and a mineral characteristic. For example, a student might be assigned the goddess Freya, a sulfate, a vanadate, and twinning. Students then choose a specific mineral from each group, describe their physical and chemical characteristics, and recommend how the minerals could be incorporated into the sculpture. Reports are presented in short oral presentations and two-page business letters with accompanying bibliography and illustrations. The letter format provides a concise way to communicate results to the Art for the Smart "client" while preparing students for their job-hunting days ahead. The oral presentations are structured as features for a news program. Talks are limited to three to five minutes and four slides: title page, mineral #1, mineral #2, and mythical being. The strict limits help students concentrate on scientific content and smooth delivery rather than flashy visual aids. The student audience and the professor evaluate each in-class presentation. This has become a popular assignment because it engages student imaginations to relate minerals to mythical beings and creatively design a sculpture. Each project is unique and therefore more interesting for both students and faculty to evaluate. The projects are nearly impossible to plagiarize from previous years or from internet sources. Earth Materials is a sophomore level course for Geoscience and Marine Science majors at Eckerd College. The Art for the Smart project leads into an assignment for the second half of the semester featuring building stones. A new "client" sends a letter to the class explaining

  13. Radiation technology of improved quality materials production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajkin, Yu.A.; Nadirov, N.K.; Zajkina, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    The technology of materials production from metals and alloys with high operational properties is developed. The technology is based on use of radiation methods in powder metallurgy. Use of radiation processing allows to improve technological conditions of sintering. It is established, that in certain regimes the sintering temperature is decreasing from 1200 deg C up to 950 deg C in the result of radiation processing of stainless steel powders . According to the processing regimes it is possible load reduction by powder pressing on 15-20 % and sintering time in to 1,5 - 2 times . The radiation methods give possibility to produce high qualitative goods from cheap powder materials without use energy-intensive processes and prolonged processing of finished products

  14. Science-Economy-Technology Concordance Matrix for Development and Implementation of Regional Smart Specializations in the Silesian Voivodeship, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliński, Adam; Bondaruk, Jan; Pichlak, Magdalena; Trząski, Leszek; Uszok, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The regional smart specializations include the innovative activities within a common science-economy-technology sector, which open the opportunities to gain a competitive advantage. The original procedure of science-economy-technology concordance matrix development on an example of smart specializations of the Silesian Voivodeship was presented in the paper. The procedure developed includes recognition of the research and economic components of the regional smart specialization and the connection between the economic components of the regional specialization and the technological innovation through the international patent classification. It also comprises recognition of key enabling technologies (KETs) and high technologies (of high R&D intensity) other than KET in the economic and technological dimensions of innovation as well as the high R&D intensity services in the economic dimension of innovation. The in-depth expert analyses with the application of the Delphi method were also taken into account. The methodological approach developed and the visualization method applied are both of cognitive and practical importance since they contribute significantly to the creation of efficient development policies, to the enhancement and facilitation of cross-sectoral cooperation, and to the focusing on the fields of key importance in terms of the competitive advantage of a region.

  15. Science-Economy-Technology Concordance Matrix for Development and Implementation of Regional Smart Specializations in the Silesian Voivodeship, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Smoliński

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The regional smart specializations include the innovative activities within a common science-economy-technology sector, which open the opportunities to gain a competitive advantage. The original procedure of science-economy-technology concordance matrix development on an example of smart specializations of the Silesian Voivodeship was presented in the paper. The procedure developed includes recognition of the research and economic components of the regional smart specialization and the connection between the economic components of the regional specialization and the technological innovation through the international patent classification. It also comprises recognition of key enabling technologies (KETs and high technologies (of high R&D intensity other than KET in the economic and technological dimensions of innovation as well as the high R&D intensity services in the economic dimension of innovation. The in-depth expert analyses with the application of the Delphi method were also taken into account. The methodological approach developed and the visualization method applied are both of cognitive and practical importance since they contribute significantly to the creation of efficient development policies, to the enhancement and facilitation of cross-sectoral cooperation, and to the focusing on the fields of key importance in terms of the competitive advantage of a region.

  16. BWR mechanics and materials technology update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical results obtained from a variety of important programs underway at General Electric's Nuclear Engineering Division. The principal objective of these programs is to qualify and improve BWR product related technologies that fall broadly under the disciplines of Applied Mechanics and Materials Engineering. The paper identifies and deals with current technical issues that are of general importance to the LWR industry albeit the specific focus is directed to the development and qualification of analytical predictive methods and criteria, and improved materials for use in the design of the BWR. In this paper, specific results and accomplishments are summarized to provide a braod perspective of technology advances. Results are presented in sections which discuss: dynamic analysis and modeling; fatigue and fracture evaluation; materials engineering advances; and flow induced vibration. (orig.)

  17. Leveraging gigawatt potentials by smart heat-pump technologies using ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserscheid, Peter; Seiler, Matthias

    2011-04-18

    One of the greatest challenges to science in the 21 st century is the development of efficient energy production, storage, and transformation systems with minimal ecological footprints. Due to the lack of efficient heat-transformation technologies, industries around the world currently waste energy in the gigawatt range at low temperatures (40-80 °C). These energy potentials can be unlocked or used more efficiently through a new generation of smart heat pumps operating with novel ionic liquid (IL)-based working pairs. The new technology is expected to allow revolutionary technical progress in heat-transformation devices, for example, significantly higher potential efficiencies, lower specific investments, and broader possibilities to incorporate waste energy from renewable sources. Furthermore, due to drastically reduced corrosion rates and excellent thermal stabilities of the new, IL-based working pairs, the high driving temperatures necessary for multi-effect cycles such as double- or triple-effect absorption chillers, can also be realized. The details of this novel and innovative heat-transformation technology are described. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Li-Fi for a Digital Urban Infrastructure: A Novel Technology for the Smart City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Iannucci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of “building a smart city” implies that the way a urban area provides its traditional functions be properly re-designed, in order to meet the often conflicting requirements of furthering the economical development and of improving the quality of the life. ICT can make available methodologies and tools able to support such process, as far as the new solutions are carried out within a global vision of the task to be carried out i.e. within a system approach. In such context, even traditional infrastructures as the streetlamp system of a city can reveal interesting opportunities, when coupled with updated technologies. Here, the potential benefits of moving to the LED technologies are presented. The relevance of Li-Fi technology is pinpointed. in relation to the ability of efficiently install wireless links for data transfer without increasing (or also reducing the microwave background in a urban area.  Also the data collection can be improved leveraging upon the already installed streetlamps: the ever increasing amount of sensors (required for many functions, from street security to environment protection can be deployed without further waste of urban 3D space.

  19. Smart City project

    KAUST Repository

    Al Harbi, Ayman

    2018-01-24

    A \\'smart city\\' is an urban region that is highly advanced in terms of overall infrastructure, sustainable real estate, communications and market viability. It is a city where information technology is the principal infrastructure and the basis for providing essential services to residents. Yanbu Industrial City- Smart City Project - First large scale smart city in The kingdom.

  20. Warm/cool-tone switchable thermochromic material for smart windows by orthogonally integrating properties of pillar[6]arene and ferrocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sai; Xu, Zuqiang; Wang, Tingting; Xiao, Tangxin; Hu, Xiao-Yu; Shen, Ying-Zhong; Wang, Leyong

    2018-04-30

    Functional materials play a vital role in the fabrication of smart windows, which can provide a more comfortable indoor environment for humans to enjoy a better lifestyle. Traditional materials for smart windows tend to possess only a single functionality with the purpose of regulating the input of solar energy. However, different color tones also have great influences on human emotions. Herein, a strategy for orthogonal integration of different properties is proposed, namely the thermo-responsiveness of ethylene glycol-modified pillar[6]arene (EGP6) and the redox-induced reversible color switching of ferrocene/ferrocenium groups are orthogonally integrated into one system. This gives rise to a material with cooperative and non-interfering dual functions, featuring both thermochromism and warm/cool tone-switchability. Consequently, the obtained bifunctional material for fabricating smart windows can not only regulate the input of solar energy but also can provide a more comfortable color tone to improve the feelings and emotions of people in indoor environments.

  1. Functional Materials for Microsystems: Smart Self-Assembled Photochromic Films: Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURNS, ALAN R.; SASAKI, DARRYL Y.; CARPICK, R.W.; SHELNUTT, JOHN A.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY

    2001-01-01

    This project set out to scientifically-tailor ''smart'' interfacial films and 3-D composite nanostructures to exhibit photochromic responses to specific, highly-localized chemical and/or mechanical stimuli, and to integrate them into optical microsystems. The project involved the design of functionalized chromophoric self-assembled materials that possessed intense and environmentally-sensitive optical properties (absorbance, fluorescence) enabling their use as detectors of specific stimuli and transducers when interfaced with optical probes. The conjugated polymer polydiacetylene (PDA) proved to be the most promising material in many respects, although it had some drawbacks concerning reversibility. Throughout his work we used multi-task scanning probes (AFM, NSOM), offering simultaneous optical and interfacial force capabilities, to actuate and characterize the PDA with localized and specific interactions for detailed characterization of physical mechanisms and parameters. In addition to forming high quality mono-, bi-, and tri-layers of PDA via Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, we were successful in using the diacetylene monomer precursor as a surfactant that directed the self-assembly of an ordered, mesostructured inorganic host matrix. Remarkably, the diacetylene was polymerized in the matrix, thus providing a PDA-silica composite. The inorganic matrix serves as a perm-selective barrier to chemical and biological agents and provides structural support for improved material durability in microsystems. Our original goal was to use the composite films as a direct interface with microscale devices as optical elements (e.g., intracavity mirrors, diffraction gratings), taking advantage of the very high sensitivity of device performance to real-time dielectric changes in the films. However, our optical physics colleagues (M. Crawford and S. Kemme) were unsuccessful in these efforts, mainly due to the poor optical quality of the composite films

  2. Smart Home : A Social, Technological and Virtual Learning and Development Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Heimovaara-Kotonen, Essi (ed.)

    2014-01-01

    All people have the right to good housing regardless of their age or functional capacity. The objective of the Smart Home environment is to present solutions that enable accessible and safe housing and promote meaningful assistance and life at home. The goal of building the Smart Home environment was to find a useroriented, comprehensive solution for the client, which maintains the client’s own control over his or her home environment. The Smart Home was also built to serve the developme...

  3. Ergonomic audit of a specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing and control technologies, the Sonicare Flexcare, and the Oral-B Smart Series 5000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gail; Burns, Laurie; Bone, Brian; Mintel, Thomas; Jimenez, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The presence of ergonomic features can impact the marketplace success of a new product. Metaphase Design Group, Inc., in partnership with the Colgate-Palmolive Company, conducted an ergonomic audit on three electric toothbrushes: a specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing and control technologies, the Sonicare FlexCare, and the Oral-B Smart Series 5000. The ergonomic audit was conducted by Metaphase Design Groups's ergonomic and usability experts. Two experts used the toothbrushes over a one-week period and assessed the performance of each brush against a set of ergonomic principles. The three toothbrushes have some solid ergonomic features. They each have adequate grip zones, provide grip security with elastomeric materials, and provide easy access to the on/off button. The most distinctive feature is the longitudinal shape of the handle of the specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing and control technologies. This handle angles downward at the top end and provides additional advantages through improved grip security and visibility. Yet all three toothbrushes have different opportunities for improvement. The Sonicare Flex Care toothbrush has a cluttered and complicated user interface that is difficult to read. The disadvantages of the Oral-B Smart Series 5000 toothbrush are related to its physical dimensions and audible feedback. The specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing afid control technologies is surprising to use with its changes in speeds, brush movements, and resulting changes in audible feedback.

  4. Materials technologies of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory materials performance is a key element in achieving reliable operation of light water reactors. Outstanding performance under rigorous operational conditions has been exhibited by pressure boundary components, core internals, fuel cladding, and other critical components of these systems. Corrosion and stress corrosion phenomena have, however, had an impact on plant availability, most notably relating to pipe cracking in BWR systems and steam generator corrosion in PWR systems. These experiences have stimulated extensive development activities by the nuclear industry in improved NDE techniques, investigation of corrosion phenomena, as well as improved materials and repair processes. This paper reviews key materials performance aspects of light water reactors with particular emphasis on the progress which has been made in modeling of corrosion phenomena, control of the plant operating environment, advanced material development, and application of sophisticated repair procedures. Implementation of this technology provides the basis for improved plant availability

  5. Report on achievements in fiscal 1998. Project of research and development of regional consortium (Development of energy saving type manufacturing process of smart material having electromagnetic wave absorbing function utilizing microwave-hydrothermal process); 1999 nendo micro ha - suinetsuho wo riyoshita denjiyha kyushu kino wo yusuru smart zairyo no sho energy gata seizo process no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The present research is aimed at developing an energy saving manufacturing process of a smart material having electromagnetic wave absorbing function in conventionally undeveloped bands as high as 30 MHz to 60 GHz. The process is composed of design, synthesis and forming of hybrid electromagnetic wave absorbing materials in which such magnetically permeable substance and conductive substance as ferrite is covered on fabrics having large dielectric loss through controlling the particle diameters and membrane thickness by using the microwave-hydrothermal process. The following researches have been performed: (1) development of smart material design and hybrid process technology, (2) evaluation on the electromagnetic wave absorbing function, (3) development of a manufacturing process for a smart forming material, and (4) development of a process for processing fabric material surface utilizing ocean resources. In Item (1), electromagnetic wave shielding function of 30 dB or higher was found provided in 200 MHz to 2 GHz bands. Calcium silicate and ferrite were manufactured by using the microwave-hydrothermal process, and calcium silicate was formed with energy being saved by using the hydrothermal curing process. In Item (2), TR17301A made by the Advanced Corporation was used to structure a system to evaluate the field in the vicinity of electric field and magnetic field. In Item (3), a ferrite forming material manufacturing process was developed. In Item (4), an attempt was carried out on forming ferrite by using reactions of nickel salt and iron salt. (NEDO)

  6. Simultaneous Structural Health Monitoring and Vibration Control of Adaptive Structures Using Smart Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hyun Kim

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of actuators and sensors using smart materials enabled various applications including health monitoring and structural vibration control. In this study, a robust control technique is designed and implemented in order to reduce vibration of an active structure. Special attention is given to eliminating the possibility of interaction between the health monitoring system and the control system. Exploiting the disturbance decoupling characteristic of the sliding mode observer, it is demonstrated that the proposed observer can eliminate the possible high frequency excitation from the health monitoring system. At the same time, a damage identification scheme, which tracks the changes of mechanical impedance due to the presence of damage, has been applied to assess the health condition of structures. The main objective of this paper is to examine the potential of combining the two emerging techniques together. Using the collocated piezoelectric sensors/actuators for vibration suppression as well as for health monitoring, this technique enabled to reduce the number of system components, while enhancing the performance of structures. As an initial study, both simulation and experimental investigations were performed for an active beam structure. The results show that this integrated technique can provide substantial vibration reductions, while detecting damage on the structure at the same time.

  7. Reversible motion of twin boundaries in AZ31 alloy and new design of magnesium alloys as smart materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, Peter; Ostapovets, Andriy; Jäger, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 56, APR (2014), s. 509-516 ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GPP108/12/P054 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnesium alloy * twinning * texture * smart material Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.501, year: 2014

  8. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  9. Smart Grid: Smart Customer Policy Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    In September 2010, the International Energy Agency (IEA) held a workshop on the regulatory, market and consumer policies necessary to ensure that smart grids are deployed with adequate consideration of their risks and benefits to all stakeholders. This was one of several workshops that brought together energy providers, network operators, technology developers, regulators, customers and government policy makers to discuss smart grid technology and policy. The Smart Grid - Smart Customer Policies workshop allowed stakeholders to: gain a perspective on key issues and barriers facing early deployment of smart grids; hear expert opinion on regulatory, consumer and market challenges to smart grids; discuss smart grid-smart customer policy priorities; and build consensus on the technology and policy ingredients needed for customer-friendly smart grid deployments. Drawing on workshop discussions, the following paper lays out a logical framework to maximise the benefits and minimise the risks that smart grids pose for customers. The paper also describes key policy research questions that will guide future IEA research on this topic.

  10. Novel Materials for Photovoltaic Technologies: Preprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alivisatos, P.; Carter, S.; Ginley, D.; Nozik, A.; Meyer, G.; Rosenthal, S.

    1999-01-01

    While existing photovoltaic technologies continue to advance, there are still many exciting opportunities in the area of novel materials. These opportunities arise because there is a substantial need for reducing the costs associated with the preparation and processing of photovoltaics, and because the theoretically possible photovoltaic efficiencies have yet to be achieved in practical devices. Thus it remains reasonable to continue photovoltaic research activity aimed at entirely new approaches to processing and at entirely new materials as the active media. This group identified three areas for further consideration: (a) Nano/molecular composites and hierarchical structures; (b) Organic semiconductors; and (c) Hot carrier devices

  11. Photocatalytic materials and technologies for air purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hangjuan; Koshy, Pramod; Chen, Wen-Fan; Qi, Shaohua; Sorrell, Charles Christopher

    2017-03-05

    Since there is increasing concern for the impact of air quality on human health, the present work surveys the materials and technologies for air purification using photocatalytic materials. The coverage includes (1) current photocatalytic materials for the decomposition of chemical contaminants and disinfection of pathogens present in air and (2) photocatalytic air purification systems that are used currently and under development. The present work focuses on five main themes. First, the mechanisms of photodegradation and photodisinfection are explained. Second, system designs for photocatalytic air purification are surveyed. Third, the photocatalytic materials used for air purification and their characteristics are considered, including both conventional and more recently developed photocatalysts. Fourth, the methods used to fabricate these materials are discussed. Fifth, the most significant coverage is devoted to materials design strategies aimed at improving the performance of photocatalysts for air purification. The review concludes with a brief consideration of promising future directions for materials research in photocatalysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Achieving Outcomes With Innovative Smart Pump Technology: Partnership, Planning, and Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jennifer; Vitoux, Rachel R; Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Colineri, Lori

    2018-04-09

    A 5-time designated Magnet academic medical center partnered with its infusion systems supplier to successfully integrate 1327 smart pumps across 45 departments with an aggressive 3-month timeline. The team also achieved quality improvement (QI) outcomes through increased drug library compliance and decreased alerts with their new technology. This large academic medical center needed to implement innovative wireless infusion pump technology in a short time frame. The approach involved a strong partnership from the medical center and the supplier, with extensive planning and collaboration among the clinical nurse specialists and consultants from both organizations to accomplish QI goals. Lean principles were also followed to enhance efficiency and accountability. Quality improvement outcomes included 100% drug library compliance across all 6 intensive care units, a decrease in pump alert rates from 4.18% to 0.79%, and a decrease in pump programming correction rate from 0.36% to 0.06%. A partnership led to a large implementation being completed efficiently across an academic medical center. Through these joint efforts, quality of care was improved within a short period of time.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  13. Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

    2004-12-01

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

  14. Towards smart environments using smart objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayr, Martin; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Münch, Ulli

    2011-01-01

    Barcodes, RFID, WLAN, Bluetooth and many more technologies are used in hospitals. They are the technological bases for different applications such as patient monitoring, asset management and facility management. However, most of these applications exist side by side with hardly any integration and even interoperability is not guaranteed. Introducing the concept of smart objects inspired by the Internet of Things can improve the situation by separating the capabilities and functions of an object from the implementing technology such as RFID or WLAN. By aligning technological and business developments smart objects have the power to transform a hospital from an agglomeration of technologies into a smart environment.

  15. Trends in biomedical engineering: focus on Smart Bio-Materials and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Bozzini, Sabrina; Candiani, Gabriele; Cigada, Alberto; De Nardo, Luigi; Farè, Silvia; Ganazzoli, Fabio; Gastaldi, Dario; Levi, Marinella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Migliavacca, Francesco; Osellame, Roberto; Petrini, Paola; Raffaini, Giuseppina; Resnati, Giuseppe; Vena, Pasquale; Vesentini, Simone; Zunino, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The present article reviews on different research lines, namely: drug and gene delivery, surface modification/modeling, design of advanced materials (shape memory polymers and biodegradable stents), presently developed at Politecnico di Milano, Italy. For gene delivery, non-viral polycationic-branched polyethylenimine (b-PEI) polyplexes are coated with pectin, an anionic polysaccharide, to enhance the polyplex stability and decrease b-PEI cytotoxicity. Perfluorinated materials, specifically perfluoroether, and perfluoro-polyether fluids are proposed as ultrasound contrast agents and smart agents for drug delivery. Non-fouling, self-assembled PEG-based monolayers are developed on titanium surfaces with the aim of drastically reducing cariogenic bacteria adhesion on dental implants. Femtosecond laser microfabrication is used for selectively and spatially tuning the wettability of polymeric biomaterials and the effects of femtosecond laser ablation on the surface properties of polymethylmethacrylate are studied. Innovative functionally graded Alumina-Ti coatings for wear resistant articulating surfaces are deposited with PLD and characterized by means of a combined experimental and computational approach. Protein adsorption on biomaterials surfaces with an unlike wettability and surface-modification induced by pre-adsorbed proteins are studied by atomistic computer simulations. A study was performed on the fabrication of porous Shape Memory Polymeric structures and on the assessment of their potential application in minimally invasive surgical procedures. A model of magnesium (alloys) degradation, in a finite element framework analysis, and a bottom-up multiscale analysis for modeling the degradation mechanism of PLA matrices was developed, with the aim of providing valuable tools for the design of bioresorbable stents.

  16. Plasma-treated polyethylene film: A smart material applied for Salmonella Typhimurium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng-Ubol, Triranat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Phinyocheep, Pranee, E-mail: scppo@mahidol.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Daniel, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense (LPEC-UMR CNRS 6087), Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085, Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Panbangred, Watanalai [Department of Biotechnology and Mahidol University-Osaka University Collaborative Research Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology (MU-OU: CRC), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pilard, Jean-Francois [Unite de Chimie Organique Moleculaire et Macromoleculaire (UCO2M-UMR CNRS 6011), Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Thouand, Gerald; Durand-Thouand, Marie-Jose [Genie des Procedes Environnement et Agroalimentaire (GEPEA UMR CNRS 6144), Departement Genie Biologique, IUT de la Roche/Yon, Universite de Nantes, 18 Bd G. Defferre, 85035 La Roche sur Yon (France)

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness worldwide and is not allowed to be present in any food in all countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a simple alternative method for the detection of Salmonella based on functionalized polyethylene (PE) surfaces. Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model bacterium. PE film was treated using dielectric plasma in order to alter the wettability of the PE surface and consequently introduce functionality on the surface. The PE film characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of C=O stretching of ketones, aldehydes and carboxylic acids. The antibodies against O or H antigens of Salmonella and S. Typhimurium were then respectively immobilized on the PE surface after activation of the carboxylic group using NHS/EDC followed by protein A. The evidences from ATR-FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy showed the presence of S. Typhimurium attached to the plasma treated PE surfaces via the two types of anti-Salmonella antibody. The plasma treated PE film developed is simple and allows efficient association of bacterial cells on the treated surfaces without the necessity of time-consuming centrifugation and washing steps for isolation of the cells. This material is considered to be a smart material applicable for S. Typhimurium detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed a functionalized polyethylene film for bacterial detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified the surface of polyethylene film by plasma treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to analyze the functionality on the PE surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduced Salmonella Typhimurium on the modified PE film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM revealed the presence of S. Typhimurium on the plasma treated PE film.

  17. Plasma-treated polyethylene film: A smart material applied for Salmonella Typhimurium detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng-Ubol, Triranat; Phinyocheep, Pranee; Daniel, Philippe; Panbangred, Watanalai; Pilard, Jean-François; Thouand, Gerald; Durand-Thouand, Marie-José

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness worldwide and is not allowed to be present in any food in all countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a simple alternative method for the detection of Salmonella based on functionalized polyethylene (PE) surfaces. Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model bacterium. PE film was treated using dielectric plasma in order to alter the wettability of the PE surface and consequently introduce functionality on the surface. The PE film characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of C=O stretching of ketones, aldehydes and carboxylic acids. The antibodies against O or H antigens of Salmonella and S. Typhimurium were then respectively immobilized on the PE surface after activation of the carboxylic group using NHS/EDC followed by protein A. The evidences from ATR-FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy showed the presence of S. Typhimurium attached to the plasma treated PE surfaces via the two types of anti-Salmonella antibody. The plasma treated PE film developed is simple and allows efficient association of bacterial cells on the treated surfaces without the necessity of time-consuming centrifugation and washing steps for isolation of the cells. This material is considered to be a smart material applicable for S. Typhimurium detection. Highlights: ► We developed a functionalized polyethylene film for bacterial detection. ► We modified the surface of polyethylene film by plasma treatment. ► ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to analyze the functionality on the PE surface. ► We introduced Salmonella Typhimurium on the modified PE film. ► SEM revealed the presence of S. Typhimurium on the plasma treated PE film.

  18. Strategies and technologies for nuclear materials stewardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.; Hanson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for future nuclear materials management and utilization from proliferation and long-term waste perspectives is described. It is aimed at providing flexible and robust responses to foreseeable nuclear energy scenarios. The strategy also provides for a smooth transition, in terms of technology development and facility implementation, to possible future use of breeder reactor technology. The strategy incorporates features that include minimization of stocks of separated plutonium; creation of a network of secure interim, retrievable storage facilities; and development and implementation of a system of Integrated Actinide Conversion Systems (IACS) aimed at near and far-term management of plutonium and other actinides. Technologies applicable to such IACS concepts are discussed as well as a high-level approach for implementation. (author)

  19. Strategies and technologies for nuclear materials stewardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.; Hanson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for future nuclear materials management and utilization from proliferation and long-term waste perspectives is described. It is aimed at providing flexible and robust responses to foreseeable nuclear energy scenarios. The strategy also provides for a smooth transition, in terms of technology development and facility implementation, to possible future use of breeder reactor technology. The strategy incorporates features that include minimization of stocks of separated plutonium; creation of a network of secure interim, retrievable storage facilities; and development and implementation of a system of Integrated Actinide Conversion Systems (IACS) aimed at near and far-term management of plutonium and other actinides. Technologies applicable to such IACS concepts are discussed as well as a high-level approach for implementation

  20. Integration of Wireless Technologies in Smart University Campus Environment: Framework Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamayseh, Yaser; Mardini, Wail; Aljawarneh, Shadi; Yassein, Muneer Bani

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors are particularly interested in enhancing the education process by integrating new tools to the teaching environments. This enhancement is part of an emerging concept, called smart campus. Smart University Campus will come up with a new ubiquitous computing and communication field and change people's lives radically by…

  1. USING THE HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT TOOLBOX TO FACILITATE PROCUREMENT: THE CASE OF SMART PUMPS IN A CANADIAN HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the experience of a Canadian hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) unit that performed the traditional functions of the HTA process along with many other activities to facilitate the choice of smart pumps. A rapid literature review was initiated, but little evidence was found. Moreover, the evidence provided was too far from our hospital context. To help our decision makers, we offered them a list of various services based on the skills of our HTA unit staff. To involve our HTA unit in the choice of the new smart pumps led to a strong collaboration between hospital services. After a rapid review on smart pumps, we proceeded to establish the clinical needs, followed by an evaluation of technical features. To ascertain clinical needs, we participated in the establishment of a conformity list for the tender, a failure and mode-effect analysis, an audit on the use of actual smart pumps, and simulation exercises with nurses and doctors to evaluate the ease of use and ergonomics. With regard to technical tests, these were mainly conducted to identify potential dysfunction and to assess the efficiency of the pump. This experience with smart pumps was useful for evidence-based procurement and led to the formulation of a nine-step process to guide future work. HTA units and agencies are faced with rapid development of new technologies that may not be supported by sufficient amount of pertinent published evidence. Under these circumstances, approaches other than evidence-based selection might provide useful information. Because these activities may be different from those related to classic HTA, this widens the scope of what can be done in HTA to support decision making.

  2. Material Technologies Developments for Solar Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrafiotis, C.; Pagkoura, C.; Lorentzou, S.; Hoguet, J.C.; Konstandopoulos, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    The present work presents recent activities of our Laboratory in the field of solar-aided hydrogen production materials and reactor technologies that can be fully integrated into solar thermal power plants. Emphasis is given on structured monolithic solar reactors where ceramic supports optimized to absorb solar radiation and develop sufficiently high temperatures, are coated with active materials to perform a variety of 'solar-aided' reactions such as water splitting or natural gas reforming. Particular examples discussed include properties'' assessment of monolithic ceramic honeycombs used as volumetric solar thermal reactors/receivers, synthesis of active water-splitting redox materials for the production of hydrogen and their tailored deposition upon porous supports and design, operation simulation and performance optimization of structured monolithic solar hydrogen production reactors. (authors)

  3. Smart home in a box: usability study for a large scale self-installation of smart home technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Tilke, Dominique; Adams, Taylor; Crandall, Aaron S; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluates the ability of users to self-install a smart home in a box (SHiB) intended for use by a senior population. SHiB is a ubiquitous system, developed by the Washington State University Center for Advanced Studies in Adaptive Systems (CASAS). Participants involved in this study are from the greater Palouse region of Washington State, and there are 13 participants in the study with an average age of 69.23. The SHiB package, which included several different types of components to collect and transmit sensor data, was given to participants to self-install. After installation of the SHiB, the participants were visited by researchers for a check of the installation. The researchers evaluated how well the sensors were installed and asked the resident questions about the installation process to help improve the SHiB design. The results indicate strengths and weaknesses of the SHiB design. Indoor motion tracking sensors are installed with high success rate, low installation success rate was found for door sensors and setting up the Internet server.

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of the Impact Localization of a Passive Smart Composite Plate Fabricated Using Piezoelectric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. S. Dezfouli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two passive smart composite plates are fabricated using one and two PZT patches that are cheaper than the PZT wafer. The composite plate is fabricated in low temperature through the hand lay-up method to avoid PZT patch decoupling and wire spoiling. The locus of the impact point is identified using the output voltage to identify the impact location using one sensor. The output voltages of the sensors are analyzed to identify the impact location using two sensors. The locations of the impacts are determined based on the crossing points of two circles and the origin of an intended Cartesian coordinate system that is concentric with one of the sensors. This study proposes the impact location identification of the passive smart composite using the low-cost PZT patch PIC155 instead of common embedded materials (wafer and element piezoelectric.

  5. From Smart Rooms to Smart Hotels

    OpenAIRE

    Petrevska, Biljana; Cingoski, Vlatko; Gelev, Saso

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a potential path that new hotels have to satisfy to improve their status from a hotel with smart rooms towards a full-scale smart hotel facility. It presents a possible transitional way including innovative applications based on modern information technology for ambient settings in the domain of hotel industry that aims to improve the quality of offered services towards clients, starting from the present level of smart rooms. The main objective i...

  6. Advances in superconducting materials and electronics technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    Technological barriers blocking the early implementation of ceramic oxide high critical temperature [Tc] and LHe Nb based superconductors are slowly being dismantled. Spearheading these advances are mechanical engineers with diverse specialties and creative interests. As the technology expands, most engineers have recognized the importance of inter-disciplinary cooperation. Cooperation between mechanical engineers and material and system engineers is of particular importance. Recently, several problems previously though to be insurmountable, has been successfully resolved. These accomplishment were aided by interaction with other scientists and practitioners, working in the superconductor research and industrial communities, struggling with similar systems and materials problems. Papers published here and presented at the 1990 ASME Winter Annual Meeting held in Dallas, Texas 25-30 November 1990 can be used as a bellwether to gauge the progress in the development of both ceramic oxide and low temperature Nb superconducting device and system technologies. Topics are focused into two areas: mechanical behavior of high temperature superconductors and thermal and mechanical problems in superconducting electronics

  7. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  8. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamini, Andrea E., E-mail: andrea.bergamini@empa.ch [Empa, Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanical Integrity of Energy Systems, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Zündel, Manuel [ETH Zürich, Institute of Mechanical Systems, Leonhardstrasse 21, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Ermanni, Paolo [ETH Zürich, Composite Materials and Adaptive Structures Laboratory, Leonhardstrasse 21, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Delpero, Tommaso [Empa, Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanical Integrity of Energy Systems, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Ruzzene, Massimo [Georgia Institute of Technology, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    approach to smart materials.

  9. Strategies for Power Line Communications Smart Metering Network Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Sendin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart Grids are becoming a reality all over the world. Nowadays, the research efforts for the introduction and deployment of these grids are mainly focused on the development of the field of Smart Metering. This emerging application requires the use of technologies to access the significant number of points of supply (PoS existing in the grid, covering the Low Voltage (LV segment with the lowest possible costs. Power Line Communications (PLC have been extensively used in electricity grids for a variety of purposes and, of late, have been the focus of renewed interest. PLC are really well suited for quick and inexpensive pervasive deployments. However, no LV grid is the same in any electricity company (utility, and the particularities of each grid evolution, architecture, circumstances and materials, makes it a challenge to deploy Smart Metering networks with PLC technologies, with the Smart Grid as an ultimate goal. This paper covers the evolution of Smart Metering networks, together with the evolution of PLC technologies until both worlds have converged to project PLC-enabled Smart Metering networks towards Smart Grid. This paper develops guidelines over a set of strategic aspects of PLC Smart Metering network deployment based on the knowledge gathered on real field; and introduces the future challenges of these networks in their evolution towards the Smart Grid.

  10. Smart E-Beam for Defect Identification & Analysis in the Nanoscale Technology Nodes: Technical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Oberai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical beam has been the veteran inspector of semiconductor wafer production house, ever since the birth of integrated circuit (IC. As technology and market place raise the bar on chip density, Moore’s law stretches to the limit. Due to its inherent physical limitations, the optical method just cannot see the measuring rod of silicon industry getting recalibrated to finer nano-scales. Electron Beam Inspection (EBI, by virtue of its high resolution, has started to rule the nodes at 10 nm and below. As the geometries shrink, defects can reside deep within the structures. EBI can find those tiny defects, which otherwise go scot-free with optical tools. However, EBI suffers the handicap of poor performance and low throughput. It is therefore essential to complement EBI by judiciously crafting out the methods for getting the desired performance, a subject matter to which, this article is committed to. The research torchlights the critical EBI throughput problem to round-up “care-areas”. Such guided and focused inspection augments throughput, thereby positioning EBI as the industrial grade candidate in finer nanometer segment. Besides gearing up to current trends, the smart EBI school of thought is inspirational, to fuel the aspirations for 1 nanometer scale.

  11. Trans advanced surface laser ablation (TransPRK) outcomes using SmartPulseTechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanides, Ioannis M; Kymionis, George D

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate early visual rehabilitation, post-operative pain, epithelial healing and haze after transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (TransPRK) using the SmartPulseTechnology (SPT) of Schwind Amaris (Schwind eye-tech-solutions GmbH, Kleinostheim, Germany). This was a retrospective comparative evaluation of a cohort of myopic patients undergoing TransPRK with SPT (group 1), with one matched control group that underwent conventional TransPRK (group 2). All cases had a 6-month post-operative follow-up including visual acuity and slit-lamp examination. Subjective evaluation of pain was recorded post-operatively. 49 eyes of 25 patients in group 1 and 40 eyes of 20 patients in group 2 were enrolled. The patients' visual rehabilitation was significantly faster in group 1, one day and one week post-operatively (P0.05). TransPRK using SPT provides promising results in the early post-operative period. Visual rehabilitation, re-epithelialization and pain were faster in the early post-operative period in group 1 in comparison with group 2. Haze formation was not significantly different between the two groups; however, it was consistently less in group 1. Copyright © 2016 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART)-On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) - On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  13. The role of information and communication technology in developing smart education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslina; Zarlis, Muhammad; Mawengkang, Herman; Sembiring, R. W.

    2017-09-01

    The right to get a proper education for every citizen had been regulated by the government, but not all citizens have the same opportunity. This is due to the other factors in the nation's infrastructure, Frontier, Outermost, and Disadvantaged (3T) which have not beenaccomodatedto access information and communication technology (ICT), and the ideal learning environment in order to pursue knowledge. This condition could be achieved by reforming higher education. Such reforms include the provision of educational services in the form of a flexible learner-oriented, and to change the curriculum with market based.These changes would include the provision of lecturers, professors, and professional teaching force. Another important effort is to update the quality of higher education with resource utilization. This paper proposes a new education business model to realize the Smart Education (SE), with an orientation on the proven skills and competitive.SE is the higher education system to optimize output (outcome) learning with combine individual learning and collaboration techniques based network system, informal practice learning and formal theory. UtilizingICT resources can improve the quality and access to higher education in supporting activities of higher education.This paper shows that ICT resources can support virtual connected with the use of shared resources, such as resource of information, learning resources, computing resources, and human resources.

  14. Smart Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floarea NASTASE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reforms in electronic business have presented new opportunities to use smart card technology as an enabling tool. The network-centric applications, where resources are located throughout the Internet and access to them is possible from any location, require authenticated access and secured transactions. Smart cards represent an ideal solution: they offers an additional layer of electronic security and information assurance for user authentication, confidentiality, non-repudiation, information integrity, physical access control to facilities, and logical access control to an computer systems.

  15. Design, processing and characterization of mechanically alloyed galfenol & lightly rare-earth doped FeGa alloys as smart materials for actuators and transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Parisa

    Smart materials find a wide range of application areas due to their varied response to external stimuli. The different areas of application can be in our day to day life, aerospace, civil engineering applications, and mechatronics to name a few. Magnetostrictive materials are a class of smart materials that can convert energy between the magnetic and elastic states. Galfenol is a magnetostrictive alloy comprised primarily of the elements iron (Fe) and gallium (Ga). Galfenol exhibits a unique combination of mechanical and magnetostrictive (magnetic) properties that legacy smart materials do not. Galfenol's ability to function while in tension, mechanical robustness and high Curie temperature (600 °C) is attracting interest for the alloy's use in mechanically harsh and elevated temperature environments. Applications actively being investigated include transducers for down-hole use, next-generation fuel injectors, sensing, and energy harvesting devices. Understanding correlations between microstructure, electronic structure, and functional response is key to developing novel magnetostrictive materials for sensor and actuator technologies. To this end, in the first part of this thesis we report successful fabrication and investigation of magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of mechanically alloyed Fe81Ga19 compounds. For the first time, we could measure magnetostrictive properties of mechanically alloyed FeGa compounds. A maximum saturation magnetostriction of 41 ppm was achieved which is comparable to those measured from polycrystalline FeGa alloys prepared by other processing techniques, namely gas atomization and cold rolling. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale production of FeGa polycrystalline alloys powders by a simple and cost-effective mechanical alloying technique. In the second part of this work, we report for the first time, experimental results pertaining to successful fabrication and advanced characterization of a series

  16. GET SMART: EPA'S SMARTE INITIATIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA's Office of Research and Development with the assistance of the U.S.-German Bilateral Working Group and the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), is developing Site-specific Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools (SMART) that will help stakeholders over...

  17. Applying RFID technology in nuclear materials management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y.; Norair, J.P.; Bellamy, S.; Shuler, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) of US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM), Office of Safety Management and Operations (EM-60), has developed a radio frequency identification (RFID) system for the management of nuclear materials. Argonne National Laboratory, a PCP supporting laboratory, and Savi Technology, a Lockheed Martin Company, are collaborating in the development of the RFID system, a process that involves hardware modification (form factor, seal sensor and batteries), software development and irradiation experiments. Savannah River National Laboratory and Argonne will soon field test the active RFID system on Model 9975 drums, which are used for storage and transportation of fissile and radioactive materials. Potential benefits of the RFID system are enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real time access of status and history data, and overall cost effectiveness

  18. Smart contracts that are smart and can function as legal contracts - A Review of Semantic Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    von Wendland, Marcelle

    2018-01-01

    Blockchain and Distributed ledger Technologies are increasingly becoming key enablers for vital innovation in financial services, manufacturing, government and other industries. One of the biggest challenges though is the level of support for semantics by most of the Block Chain and Distributed Ledger technologies. This paper reviews and categorises common block chain and DLT approaches and introduces a new approach to Blockchain / DLT promising to resolve the semantic problems inherent in ot...

  19. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut TM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  20. 智能电网的关键技术与功能实现%Key Technology and Function Realization for Smart Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐德明; 徐健; 姚晓玲

    2011-01-01

    介绍了智能电网的概念、主要特征及其与现有电网的差异;总结了包括先进的电网设备、参数量测、智能电网通信技术、信息管理系统、智能调度、分布式能源接入等智能电网的关键技术,并从智能控制中心、智能变电站、智能线路、智能需求侧管理4个主要方面分析了智能电网的实现;指出具有清洁、安全、灵活、经济、友好等性能的智能电网将成为未来电网的发展方向。%Introduction was made to concepts, main features of smart grid and differences with existing power grid. This paper summarized the key technologies of smart grid, including advanced power grid equipment, parameters measurement, communication technology of smart grid, information management system, smart dispatch, distributed energy connecting-in etc. Analysis was made to the realization of smart grid from four main aspects such as smart control center, smart substation, smart line and management of smart requirements. It is pointed out that smart grid with cleaning, safety, flexibility, economy and friendly performances will be the direction of development for future power grid.

  1. Sustainable smart cities creating spaces for technological, social and business development

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Dag; Yábar, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides the most current research on smart cities. Specifically, it focuses on the economic development and sustainability of smart cities and examines how to transform older industrial cities into sustainable smart cities. It aims to identify the role of the following elements in the creation and management of smart cities: • Citizen participation and empowerment • Value creation mechanisms • Public Administration • Quality of life and sustainability • Democracy • ICT • Private Initiatives and Entrepreneurship Regardless of their size, all cities are ultimately agglomerations of people and institutions. Agglomeration economies make it possible to attain minimum efficiencies of scale in the organization and delivery of services. However, the economic benefits do not constitute the main advantage of a city. A city’s status rest on three dimensions: (1) political impetus, which is the result of citizens’ participation and the public administration’s agenda; (2) applications deri...

  2. Challenging 'smart' in smart city strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Knudsen, Jacob

    and development. Focusing on processes of citizen participation and co-creation as the main driving force, we introduce a concept of 'smart city at eye level'. The introduction of new media technology and new media uses need to emerge from a profound understanding of the wants, needs and abilities of the citizens......Smart city strategies concern the improvement of economic and political efficiency and the enabling of social, cultural and urban development (Hollands 2008) and covers a variety of fields from improving infrastructures, social and cultural development, resilience strategies (e.g. green energy......), improving schools, social welfare institutions, public and private institutions etc. The 'smart' in smart city strategies implies that these efforts are accomplished by the introduction and embedding of smart media technology into the very fabric of society. This is often done in a top-down and technology...

  3. Design of Kocerin (Smart box interactive Media basic character building on fraction material in the islamic yunior high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    achmad buchori buchori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available abstract Childhood is the Future of the nation should nourished the soul and soul to a review of Children Become Smart, Skilled And Good character. Early child Age Class 7 MTs should be developed gross motor and fine motor skills through play activities. One of Duties and Obligations For the teacher is Constantly working to improve the quality of education by having innovation-innovation learning The prayer only is with using Media Learning to appeal for Students, praying only Media is kocerin (smart box Interactive That can be motivating students to review more Understanding A problem Shape Game The proposed hearts and can be cause of imagination and creative thinking stimulus prepare Son. This research is R & D to develop a media review Kocerin For Students MTs / SMP. Research shows that the product has been validated by 2 kocerin orangutan expert validator material and Learning Media with score  averaged 93.5 and 95.5 means that products used kocerin feasible to review Learning Process in MTs, has applied MTsN 2 Semarang, response then children Very Enthusiastic WITH percentage More Than 90% children Enthusiastic follow with learning Media with smart box interactive in MTsN 2 Semarang. Keywords: Kotak cerdas interaktif, Fractions, MTs

  4. Economic impact of V2G technology in a smart microgrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadis, Anestis G.; Polyzakis, Apostolos; Vokas, Georgios A.

    2018-05-01

    With serious concerns on global warming and energy crisis, there are plenty of motivations for developing and commercializing plug-in Electric Vehicles (EVs). It is believed that substitution of EVs for conventional fuel vehicles can help reduce the greenhouse gases emission, increase the energy efficiency, enhance the integration of renewable energy, and so forth. These advantages originate from the double role of the electrical vehicle's battery. Thus, it may constitute firstly a controllable load that we are able to optimally control at convenient time frames and secondly, it may store and inject energy, acting as a storage device. Nowadays, a number of EVs use power grids around the world to charge and discharge their batteries. Smart Microgrids (SMs) seem to be the best solution for the management of modern Low Voltage (LV) grids with Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and EVs. Among these technologies, EVs pose both a risk by increasing the peak load as well as an opportunity for the existing energy management systems by charging and discharging electricity with the help of Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) technology. The key to the implementation of V2G is how to effectively integrate information into energy conversion, transmission and distribution. V2G should be carried out within the framework of SM, so that the status information of power grid can be perceived. In this paper, a Low Voltage (LV) SM derived from an interconnection bus is considered which is characterized by the presence of DERs units and EVs. Firstly, an overview of plug in EV technologies is examined and then the main purpose of the paper is to investigate the effects of V2G charging and discharging strategies in a SM. With EVs and absence of DERs is considered as the base case. For each scenario, two different charging technologies are examined (Dump Charging and V2G) in terms of operational cost. All data are taken from Hellenic Distribution/Transmission System Operators and Hellenic Operator of

  5. In-Situ MVA of CO2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab D. [West Virginia Univ. Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Capability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a long period of time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak, in a timely manner, in order to implement proper remediation activities. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or near surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2 . This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered as the basis for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. PDGs were installed, and therefore were considered in the numerical model, at the injection well and an observation well. Upon completion of the history matching process, high frequency pressure data from PDGs were generated using the history matched numerical model using different CO2 leakage scenarios. Since pressure signal behaviors were too complicated to de-convolute using any existing mathematical formulations, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced for this purpose. An Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) was developed as the result of this effort using the machine learning and pattern recognition technologies. The ILDS

  6. Survey of Regulatory and Technological Developments Concerning Smart Metering in the European Union Electricity Market

    OpenAIRE

    VASCONCELOS, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Smart metering is a crucial factor for the efficient functioning of the Internal Electricity Market, as well as for the successful implementation of European Union policies related to energy efficiency, renewable energy and security of supply. The report first outlines the potential benefits of smart meters for consumers, suppliers, metering companies, distribution network operators and public interest. Next the report provides a short overview of the legal framework governing metering activi...

  7. The space technology demand on materials and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, J.

    1983-01-01

    Space technology requires a rational and accurate policy of materials and processes selection. This paper examines some areas of space technology where materials and process problems have occurred in the past and how they can be solved in the future.

  8. Towards the Smart World. Smart Platform: Infrastructure and Analytics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Velthausz, D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation the author outlines the 'smart world' concept and how technology (smart infrastructure, analytics) can foster smarter cities, smarter regions and a smarter world....

  9. Progress in III-V materials technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ian R.

    2004-12-01

    Compound semiconductors, in the form of GaAs and InP have achieved major commercial significance in areas of application such as mobile communications, displays and telecoms and offer a versatility of function beyond the capabilities of Si. III-V compounds, and in particular GaAs, have since their early development been the subject of defence related interest. Support from this sector established the basic materials technologies and nurtured development up until their commercial breakthrough into consumer products. GaAs, for example, now provides essential components for mobile phones and CD / DVD players. An overview is presented of the crystal growth and processing methods used in the manufacture of these materials. Current state of the art characteristics on crystal form and quality are discussed, together with the evolution of single crystal growth techniques. Consideration is given to how these principal compounds together with the minor materials, InSb, GaSb and InAs are employed in diverse applications over a broad spectral range, together with information on markets and future perspectives.

  10. Composite materials from new textile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, M. A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes in a general way the most important of the advanced textile technologies which are oriented to the manufacturing of organic matrix composite materials, the paper presents their applications and the possibilities of future development. The use of these advanced weaving techniques allows the production of near-net-shaped preforms, which results in important savings in processing costs; moreover, these textile processes offer the possibility of introducing out-of plane reinforcing fibres, so there is an important increment of the impact strength and the damage tolerance of the final material.

    En el presente artículo se describen, de forma genérica, las más importantes de las tejedurías avanzadas destinadas a la fabricación de materiales compuestos de matriz orgánica, presentándose sus aplicaciones y futuras posibilidades de desarrollo. La utilización de estos procesos de tejeduría avanzados permite la elaboración de preformas cercanas a la forma final de la pieza, lo que se traduce en importantes reducciones en los costes de fabricación; además, estos procesos textiles ofrecen la posibilidad de introducir fibras de refuerzo fuera del plano, aumentando de forma considerable la resistencia a impacto y la tolerancia al daño del material final.

  11. Correcting and coating thin walled X-ray Optics via a combination of controlled film deposition and magnetic smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Melville

    The project goal is to demonstrate that thin walled (price. Since the desired surface area for the next generation X-ray telescope is >10x that of Chandra, the >10x requirement is then for >200 m^2 of surface area with a surface finish of better than 0.5 nm. Therefore, replication of some sort is called for. Because no replication technology has been shown to achieve ≤1" angular resolution, post fabrication figure corrections are likely going to be necessary. Some have proposed to do this in orbit and others prelaunch including us. Our prelaunch approach is to apply in-plane stresses to the thin walled mirror shells via a magnetic field. The field will be held in by some magnetically hard material such as NiCo. By use of a so called magnetic smart material (MSM) such as Terfenol-D, we already shown that strong enough stresses can be generated. Preliminary work has also shown that the magnetic field can be held in well enough to apply the figure correcting stresses pre-launch. What we call "set-it and forget-it." However, what is unique about our approach is that at the cost of complexity and some areal coverage, our concept will also accommodate in-orbit adjustments. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge ours is one of two known stress modification processes that are bi-axial. Our plan is first to validate set-it and forget-it first on cantilevers and then to expand this to working on 5 cm x 5 cm pieces. We will work both with NiCo and glass or Si coated with Terfenol-D. Except for the NiCo, substrates we will also coat the samples with NiCo in order to have a film that will hold in the magnetic field. As part of the coating process, we will control the stress of the film by varying the voltage bias while coating. The bias stress control can be used to apply films with minimal stress such as Terfenol-D and X-ray reflecting coatings such as Ir. Ir is a highly desirable coating for soft X-ray astronomy mirrors that can have significant built in stress unless

  12. Smart nanomaterials for biomedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonmo; Tripathi, Anuj; Singh, Deepti

    2014-10-01

    Nanotechnology has become important in various disciplines of technology and science. It has proven to be a potential candidate for various applications ranging from biosensors to the delivery of genes and therapeutic agents to tissue engineering. Scaffolds for every application can be tailor made to have the appropriate physicochemical properties that will influence the in vivo system in the desired way. For highly sensitive and precise detection of specific signals or pathogenic markers, or for sensing the levels of particular analytes, fabricating target-specific nanomaterials can be very useful. Multi-functional nano-devices can be fabricated using different approaches to achieve multi-directional patterning in a scaffold with the ability to alter topographical cues at scale of less than or equal to 100 nm. Smart nanomaterials are made to understand the surrounding environment and act accordingly by either protecting the drug in hostile conditions or releasing the "payload" at the intended intracellular target site. All of this is achieved by exploiting polymers for their functional groups or incorporating conducting materials into a natural biopolymer to obtain a "smart material" that can be used for detection of circulating tumor cells, detection of differences in the body analytes, or repair of damaged tissue by acting as a cell culture scaffold. Nanotechnology has changed the nature of diagnosis and treatment in the biomedical field, and this review aims to bring together the most recent advances in smart nanomaterials.

  13. Smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Bae

    2001-11-01

    This book describes press smart grid from basics to recent trend. It is divided into ten chapters, which deals with smart grid as green revolution in energy with introduction, history, the fields, application and needed technique for smart grid, Trend of smart grid in foreign such as a model business of smart grid in foreign, policy for smart grid in U.S.A, Trend of smart grid in domestic with international standard of smart grid and strategy and rood map, smart power grid as infrastructure of smart business with EMS development, SAS, SCADA, DAS and PQMS, smart grid for smart consumer, smart renewable like Desertec project, convergence IT with network and PLC, application of an electric car, smart electro service for realtime of electrical pricing system, arrangement of smart grid.

  14. Application of BIM technology in green building material management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhineng, Tong

    2018-06-01

    The current green building materials management system in China's construction industry is not perfect, and there are still many shortcomings. Active construction of green building materials management system based on BIM technology, combined with the characteristics of green building materials and its relationship with BIM technology application, is urgently needed to better realize the scientific management of green building materials.

  15. Accelerating the discovery of materials for clean energy in the era of smart automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Daniel P.; Roch, Loïc M.; Saikin, Semion K.; Kreisbeck, Christoph; Sheberla, Dennis; Montoya, Joseph H.; Dwaraknath, Shyam; Aykol, Muratahan; Ortiz, Carlos; Tribukait, Hermann; Amador-Bedolla, Carlos; Brabec, Christoph J.; Maruyama, Benji; Persson, Kristin A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2018-05-01

    The discovery and development of novel materials in the field of energy are essential to accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy. Bringing recent technological innovations in automation, robotics and computer science together with current approaches in chemistry, materials synthesis and characterization will act as a catalyst for revolutionizing traditional research and development in both industry and academia. This Perspective provides a vision for an integrated artificial intelligence approach towards autonomous materials discovery, which, in our opinion, will emerge within the next 5 to 10 years. The approach we discuss requires the integration of the following tools, which have already seen substantial development to date: high-throughput virtual screening, automated synthesis planning, automated laboratories and machine learning algorithms. In addition to reducing the time to deployment of new materials by an order of magnitude, this integrated approach is expected to lower the cost associated with the initial discovery. Thus, the price of the final products (for example, solar panels, batteries and electric vehicles) will also decrease. This in turn will enable industries and governments to meet more ambitious targets in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions at a faster pace.

  16. Electrochemically Smart Bimetallic Materials Featuring Group 11 Metals: In-situ Conductive Network Generation and Its Impact on Cell Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Esther [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Our results for this program “Electrochemically smart bimetallic materials featuring Group 11 metals: in-situ conductive matrix generation and its impact on battery capacity, power and reversibility” have been highly successful: 1) we demonstrated material structures which generated in-situ conductive networks through electrochemical activation with increases in conductivity up to 10,000 fold, 2) we pioneered in situ analytical methodology to map the cathodes at several stages of discharge through the use of Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to elucidate the kinetic dependence of the conductive network formation, and 3) we successfully designed synthetic methodology for direct control of material properties including crystallite size and surface area which showed significant impact on electrochemical behavior.

  17. Physics and technology of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled; elements of nuclear reactor physics; structure and properties of materials (including radiation effects); fuel materials (uranium, plutonium, thorium); structural materials (including - aluminium, zirconium, stainless steels, ferritic steels, magnesium alloys, neutron irradiation induced changes in the mechanical properties of structural materials); moderator materials (including - nuclear graphite, natural (light) water, heavy water, beryllium, metal hydrides); materials for reactor reactivity control; coolant materials; shielding materials; nuclear fuel elements; nuclear material recovery from irradiated fuel and recycling; quality control of nuclear materials; materials for fusion reactors (thermonuclear fusion reaction, physical processes in fusion reactors, fuel materials, materials for blanket and cooling system, structural materials, materials for magnetic devices, specific problems of material irradiation). (U.K.)

  18. Smart Book Charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnapongse, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Smart book charts for TPSM: Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET), Conformal Ablative TPS (CA-TPS), 3D Woven Multifunctional Ablative TPS (3D MAT), and Adaptable, Deployable, Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT).

  19. An Emotion Aware Task Automation Architecture Based on Semantic Technologies for Smart Offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of the Internet of Things leads to new opportunities for the contemporary notion of smart offices, where employees can benefit from automation to maximize their productivity and performance. However, although extensive research has been dedicated to analyze the impact of workers’ emotions on their job performance, there is still a lack of pervasive environments that take into account emotional behaviour. In addition, integrating new components in smart environments is not straightforward. To face these challenges, this article proposes an architecture for emotion aware automation platforms based on semantic event-driven rules to automate the adaptation of the workplace to the employee’s needs. The main contributions of this paper are: (i) the design of an emotion aware automation platform architecture for smart offices; (ii) the semantic modelling of the system; and (iii) the implementation and evaluation of the proposed architecture in a real scenario. PMID:29748468

  20. Securing Sensitive Flight and Engine Simulation Data Using Smart Card Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a smart card prototype capable of encrypting and decrypting disk files required to run a distributed aerospace propulsion simulation. Triple Data Encryption Standard (3DES) encryption is used to secure the sensitive intellectual property on disk pre, during, and post simulation execution. The prototype operates as a secure system and maintains its authorized state by safely storing and permanently retaining the encryption keys only on the smart card. The prototype is capable of authenticating a single smart card user and includes pre simulation and post simulation tools for analysis and training purposes. The prototype's design is highly generic and can be used to protect any sensitive disk files with growth capability to urn multiple simulations. The NASA computer engineer developed the prototype on an interoperable programming environment to enable porting to other Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capable operating system environments.