WorldWideScience

Sample records for slow nonradiative decay

  1. Ultrafast Nonradiative Decay and Excitation Energy Transfer by Carotenoids in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen

    This dissertation investigates the photophysical and structural dynamics that allow carotenoids to serve as efficient excitation energy transfer donor to chlorophyll acceptors in photosynthetic light harvesting proteins. Femtosecond transient grating spectroscopy with optical heterodyne detection has been employed to follow the nonradiative decay pathways of carotenoids and excitation energy transfer to chlorophylls. It was found that the optically prepared S2 (11Bu+) state of beta-carotene decays in 12 fs fs to populate an intermediate electronic state, Sx, which then decays nonradiatively to the S 1 state. The ultrafast rise of the dispersion component of the heterodyne transient grating signal reports the formation of Sx intermediate since the rise of the dispersion signal is controlled by the loss of stimulated emission from the S2 state. These findings were extended to studies of peridinin, a carbonyl substituted carotenoid that serves as a photosynthetic light-harvesting chromophore in dinoflagellates. Numerical simulations using nonlinear response formalism and the multimode Brownian oscillator model assigned the Sx intermediate to a torsionally distorted structure evolving on the S2 potential surface. The decay of the Sx state is promoted by large amplitude out-of-plane torsional motions and is significantly retarded by solvent friction owing to the development of an intramolecular charge transfer character in peridinin. The slowing of the nonradiative decay allows the Sx state to transfer significant portion of the excitation energy to chlorophyll a acceptors in the peridinin-chlorophyll a protein. The results of heterodyne transient grating study on peridinin-chlorophyll a protein suggests two distinct energy transfer channels from peridinin to chlorophyll a: a 30 fs process involving quantum coherence and delocalized peridinin-Chl states and an incoherent, 2.5 ps process involving the distorted S2 state of peridinin. The torsional evolution on the S2

  2. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, Thomas S., E-mail: t.blacker@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Marsh, Richard J., E-mail: richard.marsh@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Duchen, Michael R., E-mail: m.duchen@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bain, Angus J., E-mail: a.bain@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► NADH and NADPH have a high rate of non-radiative excited state decay. ► Conformational relaxation is shown to be a significant non-radiative pathway. ► The Kramers equation describes the barrier crossing dynamics of the relaxation. ► Conformational restriction upon enzyme binding will alter NAD(P)H lifetimes. - Abstract: In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water–glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers–Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  3. A multi-timescale map of radiative and nonradiative decay pathways for excitons in CdSe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; McArthur, Eric A; Weiss, Emily A

    2011-03-22

    A combination of transient absorption (TA) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopies performed on solution-phase samples of colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) allows the construction of a time-resolved, charge carrier-resolved map of decay from the first excitonic state of the QD. Data from TA and TRPL yield the same six exponential components, with time constants ranging from ∼1 ps to 50 ns, for excitonic decay. Comparison of TA signals in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions enables determination of the relative contributions of electron and hole dynamics to each decay component, and comparison of TA and TRPL reveals that each component represents a competition between radiative and nonradiative decay pathways. In total, these data suggest that the QD sample comprises at least three distinct populations that differ in both the radiative and nonradiative decay pathways available to the excitonic charge carriers, and provide evidence for multiple emissive excitonic states in which the hole is not in the valence band, but rather a relaxed or trapped state.

  4. Femtosecond Heterodyne Transient Grating Detection of Conformational Dynamics in the S0 (11Ag-) State of Carotenoids After Nonradiative Decay of the S2 (11Bu+) State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Jerome D.; Ghosh, Soumen; Bishop, Michael M.; Lafountain, Amy M.; Frank, Harry A.; Beck, Warren F.

    Transient grating spectroscopy was used to study the dynamics of nonradiative decay of the S1 (21Ag-) state in ß-carotene and peridinin after optical preparation of the S2) state. The kinetics of the recovery of the absorption and dispersion components of the third-order signal exhibit significantly different time constants. For β-carotene in benzonitrile, the absorption and dispersion recovery time constants are 11.6 and 10.2 ps. For peridinin in methanol, the time constants are 9.9 and 7.4 ps. These results indicate that the initial product of the decay of the S1 state is a conformationally displaced structure. The decay rate for the S1 state and the conformational relaxation rate are both slowed in peridinin as the polarity of the solvent decreases; in ethyl acetate, the conformational relaxation time constant is 45 ps, which rules out a dominant contribution from vibrational cooling. These results indicate that the S1 state develops intramolecular charge transfer character owing to distortions along torsional and out-of-plane coordinates, with a pyramidal structure favored as the most stable conformation. Recovery of the photoselected ground state conformation involves a reverse charge-transfer event followed by relaxation to a planar structure. Work supported by Photosynthetic Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0010847.

  5. Multiphonon scattering and non-radiative decay in ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, K.; Tokunaga, M.; Okamoto, H.; Fujita, Y. [Interdisciplinary Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue 690-8504 (Japan); Senthilkumar, O. [Research Project Promotion Institute, Shimane University, Matsue 690-8504 (Japan); Lin, J.; Urban, B.; Neogi, A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton 76203 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using a simple evaporation technique at pressures of 75 and 760 torr. A wide visible emission was recorded from both samples using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The presence of green emission at 530 nm is due to deep level defects of vacant zinc V{sub Zn}, and/or their complexes in the ZnO band gap. The fundamental optical phonon modes were identified in addition to multiphonon combination of optical and acoustical overtones and nitrogen related local vibrational modes using Raman backscattering. The existence of multiphonons induces the non-radiative processes. The life time of both the radiative and non-radiative processes is discussed using time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopic results (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Fluorescence Quenching of Alpha-Fetoprotein by Gold Nanoparticles: Effect of Dielectric Shell on Non-Radiative Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Wang, A.-Qing; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching spectrometry was applied to study the interactions between gold colloidal nanoparticles and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Experimental results show that the gold nanoparticles can quench the fluorescence emission of adsorbed AFP effectively. Furthermore, the intensity of fluorescence emission peak decreases monotonously with the increasing gold nanoparticles content. A mechanism based on surface plasmon resonance-induced non-radiative decay was investigated to illuminate the effect of a dielectric shell on the fluorescence quenching ability of gold nanoparticles. The calculation results show that the increasing dielectric shell thickness may improve the monochromaticity of fluorescence quenching. However, high energy transfer efficiency can be obtained within a wide wavelength band by coating a thinner dielectric shell.

  7. Slow decay of magnetic fields in open Friedmann universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, John D.; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic fields in Friedmann universes can experience superadiabatic growth without departing from conventional electromagnetism. The reason is the relativistic coupling between vector fields and spacetime geometry, which slows down the decay of large-scale magnetic fields in open universes, compared to that seen in perfectly flat models. The result is a large relative gain in magnetic strength that can lead to astrophysically interesting B fields, even if our Universe is only marginally open today

  8. Multiscale approach combining nonadiabatic dynamics with long-time radiative and non-radiative decay: Dissociative ionization of heavy rare-gas tetramers revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janeček, Ivan; Janča, T.; Naar, P.; Kalus, R.; Gadéa, F. X.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 4 (2013), s. 1-12 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : atomic clusters * electromagnetic decays * electron impact dissociation * electron impact ionisation * isomerism * krypton * nonradiative transitions * xenon Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2013 http://jcp.aip.org/resource/1/jcpsa6/v138/i4/p044303_s1?isAuthorized=no

  9. Nonradiative Decay Route of Cinnamate Derivatives Studied by Frequency and Time Domain Laser Spectroscopy in the Gas Phase, Matrix Isolation FTIR Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebata, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    The nonraddiative dececy route involving trans → cis photo-isomerization from the S_1 (ππ*) state has been investigated for several trans-cinnamate derivatives, which are known as sunscreen reagents. We examined two types of substitution effects. One is structural isomer such as ortho-, meta-, and para-hydroxy-methylcinnmate (o-, m-, p-HMC). The S_1 lifetime of p-HMC is less than 8 ps at zero-point level, and it undergoes rapid S_1 → ^1nπ* → T_1 decay via multiple conical intersections. Finally, the trans → cis isomerization proceeds in the T_1 state. On the other hand, both o- and m-HMC show very slow decay. Their S_1 lifetimes are in the order of 100 ps even at the excess energy of 2000-3000 \\wn. The other is the effect of the complexity of ester group in para-subsitituted species, such as para-methoxy-methyl, -ethyl and -2ethylhexyl cinnamate (p-MMC, p-MEC, p-M2EHC). p-MMC and p-MEC show sharp S_0 → S_1 (ππ*) vibronic bands, while p-M2EHC shows only broad structureless feature even under the jet-cooled condition. In addition, we found that the S_0 → ^1nπ* absorption appears at 1000 \\wn below the S_0 → S_1 (ππ*) transition in p-MEC and p-M2EHC, but not in p-MMC. Thus, the complexity of the ester group is very important for the appearance of the ^1nπ* state.

  10. On the mechanism of non-radiative decay of blue fluorescent protein chromophore: New insight from the excited-state molecular dynamics simulations and potential energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Liu, Jian-Yong; Zhou, Pan-Wang

    2017-11-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation based on the ab initio on-the-fly surface hopping dynamics simulations and potential energy surfaces calculations has been performed to unveil the mechanism of the photoinduced non-adiabatic relaxation process of the isolated blue fluorescent protein (BFP) chromophore in gas phase. The data analysis presents that the dominant reaction coordinate of the BFP chromophore is driven by a rotation motion around the CC double bridging bond, which is in remarkable difference with a previous result which supports a Hula-Twist rotation pattern. Such behavior is consistent with the double bond rotation pattern of the GFP neutral chromophore. In addition, the dynamics simulations give an estimated decay time of 1.1 ps for the S1 state, which is agrees well with the experimental values measured in proteins. The present work offers a straightforward understanding for the decay mechanism of the BFP chromophore and suggestions of the photochemical properties of analogous protein chromophores. We hope the current work would be helpful for further exploration of the BFP photochemical and photophysical properties in various environments, and can provide guidance and prediction for rational design of the fluorescent proteins catering for different demands.

  11. The slow control system of the GERDA double beta decay experiment at Gran Sasso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugnera, R; Garfagnini, A; Gigante, G; Hemmer, S; Zinato, D; Costa, F; Lippi, I; Michelotto, M; Ur, C

    2012-01-01

    GERDA is an experiment designed and built to study double beta decays of 76 Ge. It is currently in operation at the Gran Sasso underground laboratories (LNGS). A custom slow control system has been designed to monitor and control all the critical parameters for the proper functioning of the experiment. The main sub-components of the experiment (Cryostat, Clean Room, Water Tank, electronic crates and temperatures, High Voltage Systems, Radon Monitor and Source Insertion System) are constantly monitored by several distributed clients which write acquired data to a relational database (PostgreSQL). The latter allows to maintain a history of the whole experiment and, performing correlation between different and independent components, is useful to debug possible system malfunctions. The system is complemented by a Web server, a lightweight and efficient interface to the user on shifts and to the on-call experts, and by a dedicated Alarm dispatcher which distributes the errors generated by the components to the users allowing to react in short time. The whole project has been built around open source and custom software.

  12. Slow-release fluoride devices for the control of dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee-Yee; Clarkson, Jan E; Dobbyn-Ross, Lorna; Bhakta, Smriti

    2018-03-01

    Slow-release fluoride devices have been investigated as a potentially cost-effective method of reducing dental caries in people with high risk of disease. This is the second update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2006 and previously updated in 2014. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different types of slow-release fluoride devices on preventing, arresting, or reversing the progression of carious lesions on all surface types of primary (deciduous) and permanent teeth. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 23 January 2018); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 12) in the Cochrane Library (searched 23 January 2018); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 23 January 2018); and Embase Ovid (1980 to 23 January 2018). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials (23 January 2018). We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing slow-release fluoride devices with an alternative fluoride treatment, placebo, or no intervention in all age groups. The main outcome measures sought were changes in numbers of decayed, missing, and filled teeth or surfaces (DMFT/DMFS in permanent teeth or dmft/dmfs in primary teeth), and progression of carious lesions through enamel and into dentine. We conducted data collection and analysis using standard Cochrane review methods. At least two review authors independently performed all the key steps in the review such as screening of abstracts, application of inclusion criteria, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. We resolved discrepancies through discussions or arbitration by a third or fourth review author. We found no evidence comparing slow

  13. Fluorescence quenching of dye molecules near gold nanoparticles: radiative and nonradiative effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulkeith, E.; Morteani, A.C.; Niedereichholz, T.; Klar, T.A.; Feldman, J.; Levi, S.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; Möller, M.; Gittins, D.I.

    2002-01-01

    The radiative and nonradiative decay rates of lissamine dye molecules, chemically attached to differently sized gold nanoparticles, are investigated by means of time-resolved fluorescence experiments. A pronounced fluorescence quenching is observed already for the smallest nanoparticles of 1  nm

  14. Intrinsic non-radiative voltage losses in fullerene-based organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Fan, Yeli; Tropiano, Manuel; McGarry, Kathryn A.; Zeika, Olaf; Riede, Moritz K.; Douglas, Christopher J.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Organic solar cells demonstrate external quantum efficiencies and fill factors approaching those of conventional photovoltaic technologies. However, as compared with the optical gap of the absorber materials, their open-circuit voltage is much lower, largely due to the presence of significant non-radiative recombination. Here, we study a large data set of published and new material combinations and find that non-radiative voltage losses decrease with increasing charge-transfer-state energies. This observation is explained by considering non-radiative charge-transfer-state decay as electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime, being facilitated by a common skeletal molecular vibrational mode. Our results suggest an intrinsic link between non-radiative voltage losses and electron-vibration coupling, indicating that these losses are unavoidable. Accordingly, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of single-junction organic solar cells would be reduced to about 25.5% and the optimal optical gap increases to 1.45-1.65 eV, that is, 0.2-0.3 eV higher than for technologies with minimized non-radiative voltage losses.

  15. From Nonradiating Sources to Directionally Invisible Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Elisa

    The goal of this dissertation is to extend the understanding of invisible objects, in particular nonradiating sources and directional nonscattering scatterers. First, variations of null-field nonradiating sources are derived from Maxwell's equations. Next, it is shown how to design a nonscattering scatterer by applying the boundary conditions for nonradiating sources to the scalar wave equation, referred to here as the "field cloak method". This technique is used to demonstrate directionally invisible scatterers for an incident field with one direction of incidence, and the influence of symmetry on the directionality is explored. This technique, when applied to the scalar wave equation, is extended to show that a directionally invisible object may be invisible for multiple directions of incidence simultaneously. This opens the door to the creation of optically switchable, directionally invisible objects which could be implemented in couplers and other novel optical devices. Next, a version of the "field cloak method" is extended to the Maxwell's electro-magnetic vector equations, allowing more flexibility in the variety of directionally invisible objects that can be designed. This thesis concludes with examples of such objects and future applications.

  16. Linear nonradial pulsation theory. Lecture 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    Many of the upper main-sequence stars pulsate in spheroidal nonradial modes. We know this to be true in numerous cases, as we have tabulated for the #betta# Cephei and delta Scuti variables in previous lectures. However, we cannot identify the actual mode for any star except for the low-order pressure p and f modes of our sun. It remains a great challenge to clearly state what really is occurring, in the process we learn more about how stars evolve and pulsate

  17. Linear theory radial and nonradial pulsations of DA dwarf stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.; Cox, A.N.; Hodson, S.; Pesnell, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Los Alamos stellar envelope and radial linear non-adiabatic computer code, along with a new Los Alamos non-radial code are used to investigate the total hydrogen mass necessary to produce the non-radial instability of DA dwarfs

  18. Ultrafast Physics Behind the Nonradiative Relaxation Process of Chromium Ions in Forsterite Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros Gregorios

    The nonradiative relaxation following photoexcitation has been studied in Cr^{4+} -doped forsterite (Mg_2SiO _4) using picosecond laser excitation and ultrasensitive photon counting detection. The experimental techniques utilized were time resolved antiStokes Raman scattering and up-converted hot and ordinary luminescence. The up-converted hot luminescence technique allowed the investigation of the upper state nonradiative relaxation of the excited state manifold of Cr^{4+ }-doped forsterite. The excitation involves the absorption of two photons per photoexcited ion in a two-step absorption. Discrete peaks are observed in the hot up-converted luminescence spectrum and are attributed to the population of nonequilibrium vibronic levels during the deexcitation of the ions by phonon emission. This work reveals that the phonon modes participating in the initial steps of the nonradiative relaxation of the photoexcited ions have energies 218 +/- 20, 325 +/- 20, 365 +/- 20 and 513 +/- 12 cm^ {-1}. The shape of the luminescence spectral envelope suggests two electronic bottlenecks at ~2.1 and ~2.45 eV associated with slower rates of vibrational relaxation at different parts of the excited state manifold. Time resolved measurements indicated that the average time for phonon emission is of the order of hundreds of fs. Information on the nonequilibrium phonon dynamics of the 225, 335 and 370 cm^{-1} modes of forsterite has been obtained using time resolved Raman scattering. Laser pulses of 450 fs in duration and 590 nm in wavelength were used to excite the Cr ions 2.1 eV above the ground state. The probe pulses (obtained from the same laser) are monitoring the nonequilibrium phonon population through the intensity of the antiStokes Raman lines at various pump-probe delay times. Experiments were performed at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The observed nonequilibrium phonon populations are associated with the overall complex nonradiative decay following the excitation of

  19. Nonradial pulsations of hot evolved stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    There are three classes of faint blue variable stars: the ZZ Ceti variables (DAV degenerate dwarfs), the DBV variables (DB degenerate dwarfs), and the GW Vir variables (DOV degenerate dwarfs). None of these classes of variable stars were known at the time of the last blue star meeting. Observational and theoretical studies of the ZZ Ceti variables, the DBV variables, and the GW Vir variables have shown them to be pulsating in nonradial g-modes. The cause of the pulsation has been determined for each class of variable star and, in all cases, also involves predictions of the stars envelope composition. The predictions are that the ZZ Ceti variables must have pure hydrogen surface layers, the DBV stars must have pure helium surface layers, and the GW Vir stars must have carbon and oxygen rich surface layers with less than 30% (by mass) of helium. Given these compositions, it is found that pulsation driving occurs as a result of the kappa and gamma effects operating in the partial ionization zones of either hydrogen or helium. In addition, a new driving mechanism, called convection blocking, also occurs in these variables. For the GW Vir variables, it is the kappa and gamma effects in the partial ionization regions of carbon and oxygen. 45 refs

  20. Photoinduced dynamics of a cyanine dye: parallel pathways of non-radiative deactivation involving multiple excited-state twisted transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Nuñez, Vicente; Espinoza, Eli M; Larsen, Jillian M; Bao, Duoduo; Shi, Dewen; Mac, Jenny T; Anvari, Bahman; Vullev, Valentine I

    2015-04-01

    Cyanine dyes are broadly used for fluorescence imaging and other photonic applications. 3,3'-Diethylthiacyanine (THIA) is a cyanine dye composed of two identical aromatic heterocyclic moieties linked with a single methine, -CH 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 . The torsional degrees of freedom around the methine bonds provide routes for non-radiative decay, responsible for the inherently low fluorescence quantum yields. Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we determined that upon photoexcitation, the excited state relaxes along two parallel pathways producing three excited-state transients that undergo internal conversion to the ground state. The media viscosity impedes the molecular modes of ring rotation and preferentially affects one of the pathways of non-radiative decay, exerting a dominant effect on the emission

  1. Intermediate bands versus levels in non-radiative recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luque, Antonio; Marti, Antonio; Antolin, Elisa; Tablero, Cesar

    2006-01-01

    There is a practical interest in developing semiconductors with levels situated within their band gap while preventing the non-radiative recombination that these levels promote. In this paper, the physical causes of this non-radiative recombination are analyzed and the increase in the density of the impurities responsible for the mid-gap levels to the point of forming bands is suggested as the means of suppressing the recombination. Simple models supporting this recommendation and helping in its quantification are presented

  2. Radiative and non-radiative relaxation of excitons in strain-compensated quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kujiraoka, M.; Ishi-Hayase, J.; Akahane, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Ema, K.; Sasaki, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the population dynamics of excitons in strain-compensated InAs quantum dots (QDs) using a pump-probe technique under resonant excitation. Precise control of polarization directions of incident pulses enabled us to selectively estimate population lifetimes for two orthogonally polarized exciton ground states according to polarization selection rules. Measured decay times of the probe transmissions were highly dependent on the polarization directions of the exciton states. We found that the ratio of the decay times for the orthogonally polarized states is in quantitative agreement with the ratio of square of the transition dipole moments. This indicates that radiative recombination processes have a dominant effect on the population dynamics and that non-radiative and spin relaxations are negligible in our QDs. As a result, we can estimate the radiative lifetimes to be 1.0±0.1 and 1.7±0.2 ns for orthogonally polarized exciton ground states

  3. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzoli, Fabio; Giorgioni, Anna; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Miglio, Leo; Gallacher, Kevin; Millar, Ross W.; Paul, Douglas J.; Isa, Fabio; Biagioni, Paolo; Isella, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO_2 in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  4. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Fabio; Giorgioni, Anna; Gallacher, Kevin; Isa, Fabio; Biagioni, Paolo; Millar, Ross W.; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Miglio, Leo

    2016-06-01

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO2 in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  5. Disentangling nonradiative recombination processes in Ge micro-crystals on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzoli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pezzoli@unimib.it; Giorgioni, Anna; Gatti, Eleonora; Grilli, Emanuele; Bonera, Emiliano; Miglio, Leo [LNESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, via Cozzi 55, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Gallacher, Kevin; Millar, Ross W.; Paul, Douglas J. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Isa, Fabio [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Biagioni, Paolo [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Isella, Giovanni [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano and IFN-CNR, Polo Territoriale di Como, Via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2016-06-27

    We address nonradiative recombination pathways by leveraging surface passivation and dislocation management in μm-scale arrays of Ge crystals grown on deeply patterned Si substrates. The time decay photoluminescence (PL) at cryogenic temperatures discloses carrier lifetimes approaching 45 ns in band-gap engineered Ge micro-crystals. This investigation provides compelling information about the competitive interplay between the radiative band-edge transitions and the trapping of carriers by dislocations and free surfaces. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the temperature dependence of the PL, combined with capacitance data and finite difference time domain modeling, demonstrates the effectiveness of GeO{sub 2} in passivating the surface of Ge and thus in enhancing the room temperature PL emission.

  6. Non-radiation induced signals in TL dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, U.; Weinstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    One source of background signals, which are non-radiation related, is the reader system and it includes dark current, external contaminants and electronic spikes. These factors can induce signals equivalent to several hundredths of mSv. Mostly, the effects are minimised by proper design of the TLD reader, but some effects are dependent on proper operation of the system. The other main group of background signals originate in the TL crystal and is due to tribothermoluminescence, dirt, chemical reactions and stimulation by visible or UV light. These factors can have a significant contribution, equivalent to over several mSv, depending on whether the crystal is bare or protected by PTFE. Working in clean environments, monitoring continuously the glow curve and performing glow curve deconvolution are suggested to minimise non-radiation induced spurious signals. (author)

  7. Solute concentration dependence of the decay curves of the liquid scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Masayoshi; Niki, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    The decay curves of the liquid scintillation of 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in toluene by the irradiation of β ray from 14 C were measured. Solute concentration dependences of the decay times of the fast and slow components were studied. The decay time tau sub(f) of the fast component of the air saturated scintillator was the smallest at 1.8x10 -2 --4.5x10 -2 mol/l, and about (3.4--3.5)ns. When the concentration became less than 1.8x10 -2 mol/l, the peak of the decay curve became roundish and the pulse width became large. The increase of the necessary time for the energy transfer due to the difficulty of the nonradiative transfer from excited solvent molecules to the solute was the reason. When the concentration became less than about 2.26x10 -3 mol/l, tau sub(f) became larger and the energy transfer became radiative. The pulse width and tau sub(f) were very small because of oxygen quenching compared with oxygen free. At higher concentrations such as 1.6x10 -1 and 2.3x10 -1 mol/l, the effect of the PPO excimer was observed on the fast component, and tau sub(f) became larger apparently. This denied the presumption of the close relation between PPO molecular interaction and the slow component together with the fact that the decay time tau sub(s) of the slow component was independent of PPO concentration. (auth.)

  8. Vacancy decay in endohedral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the fullerene shell dramatically affects the radiative and Auger vacancy decay of an endohedral atom A-C 60 . The collectivized electrons of the C 60 shell add new possibilities for radiative and nonradiative decays similar to that in ordinary atoms where the vacancies in the initial and final state almost always belong to different subshells. It is shown that the smallness of the atomic shell radii as compared to that of the fullerene shell provides an opportunity to derive the simple formulas for the probabilities of the electron transitions. It is shown that the radiative and Auger (or Koster-Kronig) widths of the vacancy decay due to electron transition in the atom A in A-C 60 acquire an additional factor that can be expressed via the polarizability of the C 60 at transition energy. It is demonstrated that due to an opening of the nonradiative decay channel for vacancies in subvalent subshells the decay probability increases by five to six orders of magnitude

  9. Suppressing Nonradiative Recombination in Crown-Shaped Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwangwook [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ju, Gunwu [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Na, Byung Hoon [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Jho, Young-Dahl [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Myoung, NoSoung [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Yim, Sang-Youp [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology; Kim, Hyung-jun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Lee, Yong Tak [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

    2018-02-06

    We examined the structural and optical properties of a crown-shaped quantum well (CSQW) to suppress nonradiative recombination. To reduce carrier loss in defect traps at the well/barrier interface, the CSQW was designed to concentrate carriers in the central region by tailoring the bandgap energy. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements showed that the CSQW had a high activation energy and low potential fluctuation. In addition, the long carrier lifetime of the CSQW at high temperatures can be interpreted as indicating a decrease in carrier loss at defect traps.

  10. Nonradiative state in essential oils from aromatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.K.

    1992-10-01

    Emission and absorption spectra of oils (Mint species and Cymbopogan species) have been recorded in the visible and ultraviolet region using JY3CS spectrofluoremeter and Backman DU-70 spectrophotometer respectively. Our results show the presence of strong nonradiative state in the ultraviolet region. It is also found that the fluorescence intensity of these oils are comparable to that of Rh 6G dye in methanol solution. The main spectral features in the absorption spectra of mint species are found to be due to the absorption of menthol and menthone. Spearmint oil shows an extra absorption band which is not present in Japanese and Peppermint oils. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs

  11. Slow briefs: slow food....slow architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Crotch, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    We are moving too fast…fast lives, fast cars, fast food…..and fast architecture. We are caught up in a world that allows no time to stop and think; to appreciate and enjoy all the really important things in our lives. Recent responses to this seemingly unstoppable trend are the growing movements of Slow Food and Cittaslow. Both initiatives are, within their own realms, attempting to reverse speed, homogeny, expediency and globalisation, considering the values of regionality, patience, craft, ...

  12. Nonlinear behavior of nonradial oscillations in ε Per

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors conducted a simultaneous spectroscopic/photometric campaign of ε Per (BO.7 III) during five nights in November, 1984. The spectroscopic data consist of 300 observations of the Si III λλ4552-74 triplet, while the photometric data were obtained at two different observatories. In both sets of data they find a dominant 3.85+-.02 hr. period. The analysis of line profiles in the context of nonradial pulsation (NRP) indicates this oscillation is caused by a -m=iota =4 mode. In this context the line profiles also indicate the presence of a secondary -m=iota =6 mode with a period of 2.25+-.03 hr, an oscillation below the detection threshold in the photometric data. These periodicities and mode identifications have been reported by Penrod on other occasions. They may be considered to be stable except that their amplitudes vary from epoch to epoch

  13. Decay dynamics of blue-green luminescence in meso-porous MCM-41 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.; Liu, Y.L.; Wang, C.K.; Shen, J.L.; Cheng, P.W.; Cheng, C.F.; Ko, C.-H.; Lin, T.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) was performed to investigate the decay of blue-green luminescence in MCM-41 nanotubes. The PL decay exhibits a clear nonexponential profile, which can be fitted by a stretched exponential function. In the temperature range from 50 to 300 K the photogenerated carriers become thermally activated with a characteristic energy of 29 meV, which is an indication of the phonon-assisted nonradiative process. The temperature dependence of the lifetime of PL decay has been explained using a model based on the radiative recombination of localized carriers and the phonon-assisted nonradiative recombination

  14. Non-radiative Exciton Decay in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, Mark; Swan, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Experiments have shown step-wise changes in the fluorescence intensity from single-walled carbon nanotubes [1,2]. It has been proposed that the underlying mechanism for the step-wise changes is diffusion-limited quenching of excitons at defects [1]. This property has been used to demonstrate single-molecule detection for biological applications [3]. We perform a Monte-Carlo simulation of nanotube fluorescence with a diffusion-limited quenching model. The fluorescence intensity is seen to depend on the mean-square distance between defects, implying a nonlinear dependence on the number of defects. The intensity for consecutive defect counts can overlap depending on the positions of the defects. [4pt] [1] Cognet, L. et al. Science 316, 1465-1468 (2007).[0pt] [2] Jin, H. et al. Nano Lett. 8, 4299-4304 (2008).[0pt] [3] Heller, D. A. et al. Nature Nanotech. 4, 114-120 (2009).

  15. Nonradiative excitation of the muonic atom 238U as an inverse conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeshin, F.F.; Nesterenko, V.U.

    1982-01-01

    The probabilities of nonradiation nuclear excitation are calculated for different muon transitions in the muonic atom 238 U. Microscopic nuclear wave functions, obtained within the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model and the muonic conversion coefficients have been used. The probability of nonradiation nuclear excitation for the muonic transitions 2p → 1s and 3p → 1s has been found to be equal to 0.3. It is predicted that nonradiative E3 transitions 3d → 2p can take place with the probability 0.08-0.10. The dynamic effect of nuclear structure on the probability of nonradiative nuclear excitation is taken into account. The estimates of 238 U fissility fission branching at nonradiation transitions are also obtained

  16. Aspects of radiative K{sup +}{sub e3} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, B. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Mueller, E.H. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); University of Edinburgh, School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Gasser, J.; Schmid, M. [Universitaet Bern, Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Bern (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    We re-investigate the radiative charged kaon decay K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}e{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub e}{gamma} [K{sub e3{gamma}}{sup {+-}}] in chiral perturbation theory, merging the chiral expansion with Low's theorem. We thoroughly analyze the precision of the predicted branching ratio relative to the non-radiative decay channel. Structure dependent terms and their impact on differential decay distributions are investigated in detail, and the possibility to see effects of the chiral anomaly in this decay channel is emphasized. (orig.)

  17. Aspects of radiative K+e3 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, B.; Mueller, E.H.; Gasser, J.; Schmid, M.

    2007-01-01

    We re-investigate the radiative charged kaon decay K ± →π 0 e ± ν e γ [K e3γ ± ] in chiral perturbation theory, merging the chiral expansion with Low's theorem. We thoroughly analyze the precision of the predicted branching ratio relative to the non-radiative decay channel. Structure dependent terms and their impact on differential decay distributions are investigated in detail, and the possibility to see effects of the chiral anomaly in this decay channel is emphasized. (orig.)

  18. Slow Antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielse, G.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Le Sage, D.; Guise, N.; Larochelle, P.C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Pittner, H.; Herrmann, M.; Walz, J.; Haensch, T.W.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Slow antihydrogen is now produced by two different production methods. In Method I, large numbers of H atoms are produced during positron-cooling of antiprotons within a nested Penning trap. In a just-demonstrated Method II, lasers control the production of antihydrogen atoms via charge exchange collisions. Field ionization detection makes it possible to probe the internal structure of the antihydrogen atoms being produced - most recently revealing atoms that are too tightly bound to be well described by the guiding center atom approximation. The speed of antihydrogen atoms has recently been measured for the first time. After the requested overview, the recent developments are surveyed

  19. A model of two-stream non-radial accretion for binary X-ray pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipunov, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    The general case of non-radial accretion is assumed to occur in real binary systems containing X-ray pulsars. The structure and the stability of the magnetosphere, the interaction between the magnetosphere and accreted matter, as well as evolution of neutron star in close binary system are examined within the framework of the two-stream model of nonradial accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Observable parameters of X-ray pulsars are explained in terms of the model considered. (orig.)

  20. Recombination dynamics of excitons with low non-radiative component in semi-polar (10-11)-oriented GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Guizal, B.; Izyumskaya, N.; Monavarian, M.; Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2014-01-01

    Optical properties of GaN/Al 0.2 Ga 0.8 N multiple quantum wells grown with semi-polar (10-11) orientation on patterned 7°-off Si (001) substrates have been investigated. Studies performed at 8 K reveal the in-plane anisotropic behavior of the QW photoluminescence (PL) intensity for this semi-polar orientation. The time resolved PL measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 8 to 295 K to deduce the effective recombination decay times, with respective radiative and non-radiative contributions. The non-radiative component remains relatively weak with increasing temperature, indicative of high crystalline quality. The radiative decay time is a consequence of contribution from both localized and free excitons. We report an effective density of interfacial defects of 2.3 × 10 12 cm −2 and a radiative recombination time of τ loc  = 355 ps for the localized excitons. This latter value is significantly larger than those reported for the non-polar structures, which we attribute to the presence of a weak residual electric field in the semi-polar QW layers

  1. Recombination dynamics of excitons with low non-radiative component in semi-polar (10-11)-oriented GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Guizal, B.; Izyumskaya, N.; Monavarian, M.; Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2014-09-01

    Optical properties of GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8N multiple quantum wells grown with semi-polar (10-11) orientation on patterned 7°-off Si (001) substrates have been investigated. Studies performed at 8 K reveal the in-plane anisotropic behavior of the QW photoluminescence (PL) intensity for this semi-polar orientation. The time resolved PL measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 8 to 295 K to deduce the effective recombination decay times, with respective radiative and non-radiative contributions. The non-radiative component remains relatively weak with increasing temperature, indicative of high crystalline quality. The radiative decay time is a consequence of contribution from both localized and free excitons. We report an effective density of interfacial defects of 2.3 × 1012 cm-2 and a radiative recombination time of τloc = 355 ps for the localized excitons. This latter value is significantly larger than those reported for the non-polar structures, which we attribute to the presence of a weak residual electric field in the semi-polar QW layers.

  2. Recombination dynamics of excitons with low non-radiative component in semi-polar (10-11)-oriented GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Guizal, B. [CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Université Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Izyumskaya, N.; Monavarian, M.; Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23238 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    Optical properties of GaN/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N multiple quantum wells grown with semi-polar (10-11) orientation on patterned 7°-off Si (001) substrates have been investigated. Studies performed at 8 K reveal the in-plane anisotropic behavior of the QW photoluminescence (PL) intensity for this semi-polar orientation. The time resolved PL measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 8 to 295 K to deduce the effective recombination decay times, with respective radiative and non-radiative contributions. The non-radiative component remains relatively weak with increasing temperature, indicative of high crystalline quality. The radiative decay time is a consequence of contribution from both localized and free excitons. We report an effective density of interfacial defects of 2.3 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} and a radiative recombination time of τ{sub loc} = 355 ps for the localized excitons. This latter value is significantly larger than those reported for the non-polar structures, which we attribute to the presence of a weak residual electric field in the semi-polar QW layers.

  3. Evidence for the TICT mediated nonradiative deexcitation process for the excited coumarin-1 dye in high polarity protic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Atanu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumbhakar, Manoj [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pal, Haridas [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2005-08-29

    Photophysical properties of coumarin-1 (C1) dye in different protic solvents have been investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Correlation of the Stokes' shifts ({delta}{nu}-bar ) with the solvent polarity ({delta}f) suggests the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character for the dye fluorescent state. Fluorescence quantum yields ({phi}{sub f}) and lifetimes ({tau}{sub f}) of the dye show an abrupt reduction in high polarity solvents having {delta}f >{approx}0.28. In these solvents {tau}{sub f} is seen to be strongly temperature dependent, though it is temperature independent in solvents with {delta}f <{approx}0.28. It is inferred that in high polarity protic solvents there is a participation of an additional nonradiative decay process via the involvement of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. Unlike present results, no involvement of TICT state was observed even in strongly polar aprotic solvent like acetonitrile. It is indicated that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the dye with protic solvents in addition with the solvent polarity helps in the stabilization of the TICT state for C1 dye. Unlike most TICT molecules, the activation barrier ({delta}E{sub a}) for the TICT mediated nonradiative process for C1 dye is seen to increase with solvent polarity. This is rationalized on the basis of the assumption that the TICT to ground state conversion is the activation-controlled rate-determining step for the present system than the usual ICT to TICT conversion as encountered for most other TICT molecules.

  4. Ultrafast endothermic transfer of non-radiative exciplex state to radiative excitons in polyfluorene random copolymer for blue electroluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Dhanashree A.; Dey, Amrita; Johnson, Kerr; Lu, L.-P.; Friend, Richard H.; Kabra, Dinesh

    2018-04-01

    We report a blue-emitting random copolymer (termed modified Aryl-F8) consisting of three repeat units of polydioctylfluorene (F8), Aryl-polydioctylfluorene (Aryl-F8), and an aromatic amine comonomer unit, poly(bis-N,Ν'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4 phenylenediamine) chemically linked to get an improved charge carrier balance without compromising on the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield with respect to the Aryl-F8 homo-polymer. The measured photoluminescence quantum efficiency (˜70%) of the blue-emitting polymer is comparable to or greater than the individual monomer units. The time resolved PL spectra from the modified Aryl-F8 are similar to those of Arylated-poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4 phenylenediamine) (PFB) even at a time scale of 100-250 ps, indicating an ultrafast energy transfer from the (Aryl-F8 or F8):Arylated-PFB interface to Arylated-PFB, i.e., endothermic transfer of non-radiative exciplex to a radiative molecular exciton. Furthermore, the presence of non-radiative exciplex is confirmed by the photoluminescence decay profile and temperature dependent PL spectra. The luminance efficiency achieved for the modified Aryl-F8 polymer light-emitting diodes is ˜11 cd A-1 with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of ˜4.5%, whereas it is 0.05 cd/A with an EQE of ˜0.025% for Aryl-F8. Almost two orders of higher efficiency is achieved due to the improved charge carrier balance from the random copolymer without compromising on the photoluminescence yield.

  5. Modeling of the Dynamics of Non-radiative Energy Transfer in Tm3+, Tb3+: LiYF4-Based Electronic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Miranda, A.; Castaño, V. M.

    2017-08-01

    The fluorescent decay of the levels 3H4 and 3F4 of Tm3+ in LiYF4 crystals doped with Tb3+ and Eu3+ was mathematically modeled to estimate the optimal doping levels to maximize the laser emission at 1.5 μm of the transition 3H4 → 3F4. The analysis is carried out both through the solution of the master energy transfer equations that govern the non-radiative processes of energy and Monte Carlo simulations. The analysis is improved with the experimental data of the fluorescence decay to include quadrupole and dipole interactions simultaneously. The importance of considering these interactions is that the optimal concentrations of impurities predicted for these luminescent systems are lower than those reported with the use of traditional models.

  6. Some immune reactions of the personnel, subjected to combined effect of ionizing radiation and non-radiation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubin, V.M.; Litver, B.Ya.; Zykova, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    Some factors of nonspecific bodily protection (bactericidal capacity, complement, lysozyme, beta lysins of blood serum) are analyzed in gamma defectoscopists and in workers exposed to occupational factors of nonradiation nature. A number of alterations in immunity indices in persons exposed to combined radiation and nonradiation factors (stimulation of beta lysins, increased levels of antitissue antibodies, etc.) had has been revealed. These alterations appear to have resulted from the potentiation of the effects from ionizing radiation and nonradiation nature factors

  7. Photoacoustic Determination of Non-radiative Relaxation Time of Absorbing Centers in Maize Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2017-07-01

    Using non-destructive photothermal techniques, it is possible to characterize non-homogenous materials to obtain its optical and thermal properties through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). In photoacoustic (PA) phenomena, there are transient states of thermal excitation, when samples absorb the incident light; these states manifest an excitation process that generates the PA signal, being in direct relation with the non-radiative relaxation times with the sample absorbent centers. The objective of this study was to determine the non-radiative relaxation times associated with different absorbent centers of corn seeds ( Zea mays L.), by using PAS. A frequency scan was done at different wavelengths (350 nm, 470 nm and 650 nm) in order to obtain the non-radiative relaxation times with different types of maize seeds.

  8. Stability of radial and non-radial pulsation modes of massive ZAMS models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, A.P.; Pausenwein, A.; Weiss, W.W.; Hajek, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have computed non-adiabatic eigenvalues for radial and non-radial pulsation modes of star models between 80 and 120 M solar with composition of chi=0.70 and Z=0.02. The radial fundamental mode is unstable in models with mass greater than 95 M solar , but the first overtone mode is always stable. The non-radial modes are all stable for all models, but the iota=2 f-mode is the closest to being driven. The non-radial modes are progressively more stable with higher iota and with higher n (for both rho- and g-modes). Thus, their results indicate that radial pulsation limits the upper mass of a star

  9. Voltage Losses in Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Contributions of Intramolecular Vibrations to Nonradiative Recombinations

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2017-12-18

    The large voltage losses usually encountered in organic solar cells significantly limit the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of these devices, with the result that the current highest PCE values in single-junction organic photovoltaic remain smaller than for other solar cell technologies, such as crystalline silicon or perovskite solar cells. In particular, the nonradiative recombinations to the electronic ground state from the lowest-energy charge-transfer (CT) states at the donor-acceptor interfaces in the active layer of organic devices, are responsible for a significant part of the voltage losses. Here, to better comprehend the nonradiative voltage loss mechanisms, a fully quantum-mechanical rate formula is employed within the framework of time-dependent perturbation theory, combined with density functional theory. The objective is to uncover the specific contributions of intramolecular vibrations to the CT-state nonradiative recombinations in several model systems, which include small-molecule and polymer donors as well as fullerene and nonfullerene acceptors.

  10. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  11. Effect of Molecular Packing and Charge Delocalization on the Nonradiative Recombination of Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2016-09-05

    In organic solar cells, a major source of energy loss is attributed to nonradiative recombination from the interfacial charge transfer states to the ground state. By taking pentacene–C60 complexes as model donor–acceptor systems, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of how molecular packing and charge delocalization impact these nonradiative recombination rates at donor–acceptor interfaces is provided.

  12. FROM SLOW FOOD TO SLOW TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bac Dorin Paul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the effects of globalization is the faster pace of our lives. This rhythm can be noticed in all aspects of life: travel, work, shopping, etc. and it has serious negative effects. It has become common knowledge that stress and speed generate serious medical issues. Food and eating habits in the modern world have taken their toll on our health. However, some people took a stand and argued for a new kind of lifestyle. It all started in the field of gastronomy, where a new movement emerged – Slow Food, based on the ideas and philosophy of Carlo Petrini. Slow Food represents an important adversary to the concept of fast food, and is promoting local products, enjoyable meals and healthy food. The philosophy of the Slow Food movement developed in several directions: Cittaslow, slow travel and tourism, slow religion and slow money etc. The present paper will account the evolution of the concept and its development during the most recent years. We will present how the philosophy of slow food was applied in all the other fields it reached and some critical points of view. Also we will focus on the presence of the slow movement in Romania, although it is in a very early stage of development. The main objectives of the present paper are: to present the chronological and ideological evolution of the slow movement; to establish a clear separation of slow travel and slow tourism, as many mistake on for the other; to review the presence of the slow movement in Romania. Regarding the research methodology, information was gathered from relevant academic papers and books and also from interviews and discussions with local entrepreneurs. The research is mostly theoretical and empirical, as slow food and slow tourism are emerging research themes in academic circles.

  13. Non-radial oscillations of rotating stars and their relevance to the short-period oscillations of cataclysmic variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaloizou, J.; Pringle, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    The usual hypothesis, that the short-period coherent oscillations seen in cataclysmic variables are attributable to g modes in a slowly rotating white dwarf, is considered. It is shown that this hypothesis is untenable for three main reasons: (i) the observed periods are too short for reasonable white dwarf models, (ii) the observed variability of the oscillations is too rapid and (iii) the expected rotation of the white dwarf, due to accretion, invalidates the slow rotation assumption on which standard g-mode theory is based. The low-frequency spectrum of a rotating pulsating star is investigated taking the effects of rotation fully into account. In this case there are two sets of low-frequency modes, the g modes, and modes similar to Rossby waves in the Earth's atmosphere and oceans, which are designated r modes. Typical periods for such modes are 1/m times the rotation period of the white dwarfs outer layers (m is the aximuthal wavenumber). It is concluded that non-radial oscillations of rotating white dwarfs can account for the properties of the oscillations seen in dwarf novae. Application of these results to other systems is also discussed. (author)

  14. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  15. Non-radiative recombination losses in polymer light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuik, M.; Koster, L. J. A.; Dijkstra, A. G.; Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Blom, P. W. M.

    We present a quantitative analysis of the loss of electroluminescence in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) due to the combination of non-radiative trap-assisted recombination and exciton quenching at the metallic cathode. It is

  16. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  17. The CUORE slow monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, L.; Biare, D.; Cappelli, L.; Cushman, J. S.; Del Corso, F.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Hickerson, K. P.; Moggi, N.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Schmidt, B.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Welliver, B.; Winslow, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    CUORE is a cryogenic experiment searching primarily for neutrinoless double decay in 130Te. It will begin data-taking operations in 2016. To monitor the cryostat and detector during commissioning and data taking, we have designed and developed Slow Monitoring systems. In addition to real-time systems using LabVIEW, we have an alarm, analysis, and archiving website that uses MongoDB, AngularJS, and Bootstrap software. These modern, state of the art software packages make the monitoring system transparent, easily maintainable, and accessible on many platforms including mobile devices.

  18. Slow evaporation method and enhancement in photoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nescence (PL) properties and decay time of phosphors were studied at room temperature. The YPO4 ... Keywords. Slow evaporation method; YPO4 : Eu3+, Bi3+; quenching effect; optical material. 1. ... intensity of Eu3+-doped compounds such as CaMoO4 : Bi3+, .... Figure 4 shows FESEM images of YPO4 : Eu3+ and Bi3+.

  19. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geiger–Nuttall plots were studied for different clusters and are found to be linear. Inclusion of proximity potential will not produce much deviation to linear nature of Geiger–Nuttall plots. It is observed that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slow down the exotic decay process. These findings support the earlier observations ...

  20. Tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, A.

    1994-09-01

    The most recent experimental results of τ physics are reviewed. The covered topics include precision measurements of semihadronic τ decay and their impact on tau branching ratio budget, the current status of the tau consistency test, a determination of Michel parameters and τ neutrino helicity, and upper limits on lepton-number violating τ decays. (orig.)

  1. Gravitational waves from nonlinear couplings of radial and polar nonradial modes in relativistic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Nagar, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    The postbounce oscillations of newly-born relativistic stars are expected to lead to gravitational-wave emission through the excitation of nonradial oscillation modes. At the same time, the star is oscillating in its radial modes, with a central density variation that can reach several percent. Nonlinear couplings between radial oscillations and polar nonradial modes lead to the appearance of combination frequencies (sums and differences of the linear mode frequencies). We study such combination frequencies using a gauge-invariant perturbative formalism, which includes bilinear coupling terms between different oscillation modes. For typical values of the energy stored in each mode we find that gravitational waves emitted at combination frequencies could become detectable in galactic core-collapse supernovae with advanced interferometric or wideband resonant detectors

  2. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  3. Momentum-energy of the non-radiating electromagnetic field: open problems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L

    2006-01-01

    This paper inspects more closely the problem of the momentum and energy of a bound (non-radiative) electromagnetic (EM) field. It has been shown that for an isolating system of non-radiative non-relativistic mechanically free charged particles, a transformation of mechanical to EM momentum and vice versa occurs in accordance with the requirement P-vector G =const, where P-vector G = P-vector M + Σ i N q i A-vector i is the canonical momentum (N>1 is the number of particles, q is the charge, A-vector is the vector potential, P-vector M is the mechanical momentum of the system). Then dP-vector M /dt = -(d/dt)Σq i A-vector i represents the self-force, acting on this isolating system due to violation of Newton's third law in EM interaction. This equation is not applicable to an isolated charged particle, and the problems of its self-action and its own EM momentum have been examined. Analysing the systems of non-radiative particles, where the retardation is not negligible ('dynamical' systems in our definition) it has been found that the total momentum is the same at the initial and final stationary states of such systems, but it varies with time during the dynamical processes. It means a violation of continuous conservation of the total momentum, if the bound EM field spreads at the light velocity c. Finally, the compatibility of the energy conservation law and the Lentz rule for retarded non-radiative EM field has been examined. It has been shown that for dynamical systems the energy conservation law comes into a certain contradiction with the finite (light) spread velocity for the bound EM field

  4. Effects of the impurity-host interactions on the nonradiative processes in ZnS:Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablero, C.

    2010-11-01

    There is a great deal of controversy about whether the behavior of an intermediate band in the gap of semiconductors is similar or not to the deep-gap levels. It can have significant consequences, for example, on the nonradiative recombination. In order to analyze the behavior of an intermediate band, we have considered the effect of the inward and outward displacements corresponding to breathing and longitudinal modes of Cr-doped ZnS and on the charge density for different processes involved in the nonradiative recombination using first-principles. This metal-doped zinc chalcogenide has a partially filled band within the host semiconductor gap. In contrast to the properties exhibited by deep-gap levels in other systems, we find small variations in the equilibrium configurations, forces, and electronic density around the Cr when the nonradiative recombination mechanisms modify the intermediate band charge. The charge density around the impurity is equilibrated in response to the perturbations in the equilibrium nuclear configuration and the charge of the intermediate band. The equilibration follows a Le Chatelier principle through the modification of the contribution from the impurity to the intermediate band and to the valence band. The intermediate band introduced by Cr in ZnS for the concentrations analyzed makes the electronic capture difficult and later multiphonon emission in the charge-transfer processes, in accordance with experimental results.

  5. Non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in dogs: 14 cases (1996 - 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago ePeralta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaws is an entity of major clinical impact characterized by chronically exposed necrotic mandibular or maxillary bone. Its clinicopathological characteristics and possible inciting or risk factors are well described in humans but only anecdotally reported in dogs. Treatment modalities and outcome vary depending on the inciting factors involved and the extent and severity of the lesions. The objectives of this study were to retrospectively describe the clinicopathological features of non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in a series of 14 dogs, identify possible inciting or risk factors, and report on the surgical treatment and outcome. For all patients, the medical records were used to collect information regarding signalment, clinical signs, characteristics of the oral, jaw and dental lesions, diagnostic imaging findings, histopathological and microbiological analysis, treatment performed and outcome. The data collected showed that non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws appears to be an infrequent clinical entity but of significant impact in dogs; that a history of systemic antibiotics and dental disease is common among affected dogs; that previous dental extractions are commonly associated with ONJ sites; that using a systematic diagnostic approach is essential for diagnosis; and that thorough surgical débridement combined with a course of oral antibiotics was effective in the described dogs affected by advanced non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

  6. [Comparison of chemical quality characteristics between radial striations and non-radial striations in tuberous root of Rehmannia glutinosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Miao; Li, Ya-Jing; Geng, Xiao-Tong; Wang, Feng-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Yi

    2017-11-01

    An HPLC method was established to determine the contents of catalpol, acteoside, rehmaionoside A, rehmaionoside D, leonuride in three part of Rehmanni glutinosa in Beijing No.1 variety R. glutinosa during the growth period, This method, in combination with its HPLC fingerprint was used to evaluate its overall quality characteristics.The results showed that:① the content of main components of R. glutinosa varied in different growth stages ;② there was a great difference of the content of main components between theradial striations and the non-radial striations; ③ the two sections almost have the same content distribution of catalpol, acteoside and rehmaionoside D; ④the content of rehmaionoside A in non-radial striations was higher than that in radial striations,while the content of leonuride in radial striations was higher than that in non-radial striations.; ⑤the HPLC fingerprint of radial striations, non-radial striations and whole root tuber were basically identical, except for the big difference in the content of chemical components. The result of clustering displayed that the radial striations, non-radial striations, and whole root were divided into two groups. In conclusion, there was a significant difference in the quality characteristics of radial striations and non-radial striations of R. glutinosa. This research provides a reference for quality evaluation and geoherbalism of R. glutinosa. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  7. Too slow, for Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, N.

    2011-01-01

    Too slow, for Milton was written in 2011, as part of a memorial project for Milton Babbitt. The piece borrows harmonies from Babbitt's Composition for 12 Instruments (harmonies which Babbitt had in turn borrowed from Schoenberg's Ode to Napoleon), but unfolds them as part of a musical texture characterised by repetition, resonance, and a slow rate of change. As Babbitt once told me that my music was 'too slow', this seemed an appropriately obstinate form of homage.

  8. Using nonradial pulsations to determine the envelope composition of very evolved stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical studies of the ZZ Ceti variables (DA degenerate dwarfs), the DBV variables (DB degenerate dwarfs), and the GW Vir variables (DO degenerate dwarfs) have shown them to be pulsating in nonradial g + -modes. The pulsation mechanism has been identified for each class of variable star and, in all cases, involves predictions of the stars envelope composition. The ZZ Ceti variables must have pure hydrogen surface layers, the DBV stars must have pure helium surface layers, and the GW Vir stars must have carbon and oxygen rich surface layers. 44 refs

  9. Statistical analysis of time-resolved emission from ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots: Interpretation of exponential decay models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Driel, A.F.; Nikolaev, I.S.; Vergeer, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of time-resolved spontaneous emission decay curves from ensembles of emitters, such as semiconductor quantum dots, with the aim of interpreting ubiquitous non-single-exponential decay. Contrary to what is widely assumed, the density of excited emitters...... and the intensity in an emission decay curve are not proportional, but the density is a time integral of the intensity. The integral relation is crucial to correctly interpret non-single-exponential decay. We derive the proper normalization for both a discrete and a continuous distribution of rates, where every...... decay component is multiplied by its radiative decay rate. A central result of our paper is the derivation of the emission decay curve when both radiative and nonradiative decays are independently distributed. In this case, the well-known emission quantum efficiency can no longer be expressed...

  10. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  11. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  12. Non-radial radiative transfer in clese binaries. Application to the bolometric reflection effect in W UMa stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustylnik, I.

    1977-01-01

    In near-contact binary systems a significant portion of the total amount of the radiative energy is blocked between the facing hemispheres of two component stars. This circumstance combined with the lack of spherical symmetry of the radiation field may give rise to non-radial radiative transport. It is shown for a case of a spherical stellar atmosphere illuminated by a parallel beam of radiation that anisotropic scattering may be responsible for the non-radial component of the radiative flux. The effect of non-radial radiative transfer in close binaries would increase the total energy output observed at elongations at the expense of the radiative energy seen during conjunctions and would lead to colour changes qualitatively resembling those observed in many W UMa stars. Presumably it will be difficult to distinguish periodical light changes due to non-radial radiative transfer from those caused by distortions of the components or gravitational darkening. An order-of-magnitude estimate is made with the result that the bolometric amplitude of the non-radially scattered light probably does not exceed one per cent of the total luminosity of a binary system. (author)

  13. A singular-value method for reconstruction of nonradial and lossy objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Astheimer, Jeffrey; Waag, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Efficient inverse scattering algorithms for nonradial lossy objects are presented using singular-value decomposition to form reduced-rank representations of the scattering operator. These algorithms extend eigenfunction methods that are not applicable to nonradial lossy scattering objects because the scattering operators for these objects do not have orthonormal eigenfunction decompositions. A method of local reconstruction by segregation of scattering contributions from different local regions is also presented. Scattering from each region is isolated by forming a reduced-rank representation of the scattering operator that has domain and range spaces comprised of far-field patterns with retransmitted fields that focus on the local region. Methods for the estimation of the boundary, average sound speed, and average attenuation slope of the scattering object are also given. These methods yielded approximations of scattering objects that were sufficiently accurate to allow residual variations to be reconstructed in a single iteration. Calculated scattering from a lossy elliptical object with a random background, internal features, and white noise is used to evaluate the proposed methods. Local reconstruction yielded images with spatial resolution that is finer than a half wavelength of the center frequency and reproduces sound speed and attenuation slope with relative root-mean-square errors of 1.09% and 11.45%, respectively.

  14. Fluorescence and Nonradiative Properties of Nd3+ in Novel Heavy Metal Contained Fluorophosphate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju H. Choi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate new series of heavy metal containing fluorophosphate glass system. The fluorescence and nonradiative properties of Nd3+ ions are investigated as a function of Nd2O3 concentration. The variation of intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, and Ω6 is determined from absorption spectra. The spontaneous probability (A and branching ratio (β are determined using intensity parameters. The emission cross sections for the 4F3/2→4I13/2 transition, which is calculated by Fuchtbabauer-Ladenburg method, decrease from 6.1×10−21 to 3.0×10−21(pm2 and those for the 4F3/2→4I11/2 transition decrease from 3.51×10−20 to 1.7×10−20 as Nd2O3 concentration increase up to 3 wt%. The nonradiative relaxation is analyzed in terms of multiphonon relaxation and concentration quenching due to energy transfer among Nd3+ ions. Finally, the above results obtained at 1 wt %Nd2O3 are compared with some of reported laser host glasses which indicated the potentials for broadband-amplifiers and high-power laser applications.

  15. Environmental efficiency analysis of transportation system in China: A non-radial DEA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, Ning; Danao, Denise; Zhang, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Many countries are worried about reducing energy consumption and environmental pollution while increasing the productivity and efficiency of their industries. This study intends to contribute to the literature by proposing a non-radial DEA model with the slacks-based measure (SBM) to analyze the environmental efficiency of China's transportation sector. The results show that most of the provinces in China do not have an eco-efficient transportation industry. The environmental efficiency levels in most of the provinces are lower than 50% of the ideal or target level. Therefore, China's transportation industry is environmentally very inefficient. China can reduce a great deal of carbon emissions in each province ranging from at least 1.6 million TOEs in Qinghai and at most 33 million TOEs in Guangdong and Shanghai. - Highlights: • Propose a non-radial DEA model with the slacks-based measure. • Analyze the environmental efficiency of China's transportation sector. • China's transportation industry is environmentally very inefficient. • Millions of TOE carbon emissions can be reduced in most of the provinces

  16. Origin of Non-Radiative Voltage Losses in Fullerene-Based Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    The open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells (OSCs) is low as compared to the optical gap of the absorber molecules, indicating high energy losses per absorbed photon. These voltage losses arise only partly due to necessity of an electron transfer event to dissociate the excitons. A large part of these voltage losses is due to recombination of photo-generated charge carriers, including inevitable radiative recombination. In this work, we study the non-radiative recombination losses and we find that they increase when the energy difference between charge transfer (CT) state and ground state decreases. This behavior is in agreement with the \\x9Denergy gap law for non-radiative transition\\x9D, which implies that internal conversion from CT state to ground state is facilitated by skeletal molecular vibrations. This intrinsic loss mechanism, which until now has not been thoroughly considered for OSCs, is different in its nature as compared to the commonly considered inorganic photovoltaic loss mechanisms of defect, surface, and Auger recombination. As a consequence, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of a single junction OSC reduces by 25% as compared to the Shockley-Queisser limit for an optimal optical gap of the main absorber between (1.45-1.65) eV.

  17. Temperature variation of non-radiative recombination rate in a-Si:H films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogihara, C. [Department of Applied Science, Yamaguchi University, Ube 755-8611 (Japan); Morigaki, K. [Department of Electrical and Digital-System Engineering, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); resent address: C-305, 2-12 Wakabadai, Inagi, Tokyo 206-0824 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Temperature variation of the recombination rates has been investigated for the electron-hole pairs responsible for defect PL in a defective a-Si:H film as grown. The results are compared with those obtained for a high-quality a-Si:H film after illumination. The results of the nonradiative recombination rate are fitted by a theoretical prediction for the case of strong electron-phonon coupling in the case of the defective a-Si:H film similarly to the case of the illuminated high-quality a-Si:H film. Difference between the frequency of the phonon associated with the non-radiative recombination process in the defective a-Si:H film and that in the illuminated highquality a-Si:H film is discussed by considering the influence of the amorphous network in the a-Si:H films affected by the preparation conditions and the nature of the native and photo-created defects. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Very slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.

    1983-01-01

    The history is briefly presented of the research so far of very slow neutrons and their basic properties are explained. The methods are described of obtaining very slow neutrons and the problems of their preservation are discussed. The existence of very slow neutrons makes it possible to perform experiments which may deepen the knowledge of the fundamental properties of neutrons. Their wavelength approximates that of visible radiation. The possibilities and use are discussed of neutron optical systems (neutron microscope) which could be an effective instrument for the study of the detailed arrangement, especially of organic substances. (B.S.)

  19. Evidence for non-radial fields in the Sun's photosphere and a possible explanation of the polar magnetic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, T.

    1975-01-01

    The appearance of the Hα fibrils suggests the presence of magnetic fields inclined at noticeably non-radial angles in the Sun's chromosphere. Evidence is presented to suggest that these angles continue into the photosphere. The presence even of small non-radial inclinations can significantly affect the appearance of regions observed by a longitudinal mangetograph. In particular, a simple bipolar loop can appear unbalanced when viewed near the limb. It is suggested that the observed polar signal may be nothing more than a geometric effect arising when a balanced but systematically aligned array of bipolar pairs is viewed at an angle. (Auth.)

  20. Global well-posedness and scattering for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the nonradial case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigong Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy-critical, focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the nonradial case reads as follows: \\[i\\partial_t u = -\\Delta u -|u|^{\\frac{4}{N-2}}u,\\quad (x,0=u_0 \\in H^1 (\\mathbb{R}^N,\\quad N\\geq 3.\\] Under a suitable assumption on the maximal strong solution, using a compactness argument and a virial identity, we establish the global well-posedness and scattering in the nonradial case, which gives a positive answer to one open problem proposed by Kenig and Merle [Invent. Math. 166 (2006, 645–675].

  1. Transformer Industry Productivity Slows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Phyllis Flohr

    1981-01-01

    Annual productivity increases averaged 2.4 percent during 1963-79, slowing since 1972 to 1.5 percent; computer-assisted design and product standardization aided growth in output per employee-hour. (Author)

  2. The slow decay and quick revival of self-deception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Zoë; Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I.; Ariely, Dan

    2015-01-01

    People demonstrate an impressive ability to self-deceive, distorting misbehavior to reflect positively on themselves—for example, by cheating on a test and believing that their inflated performance reflects their true ability. But what happens to self-deception when self-deceivers must face reality, such as when taking another test on which they cannot cheat? We find that self-deception diminishes over time only when self-deceivers are repeatedly confronted with evidence of their true ability (Study 1); this learning, however, fails to make them less susceptible to future self-deception (Study 2). PMID:26347666

  3. The Slow Decay and Quick Revival of Self-Deception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe eChance

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available People demonstrate an impressive ability to self-deceive, distorting misbehavior to reflect positively on themselves—for example, by cheating on a test and believing that their inflated performance reflects their true ability. But what happens to self-deception when self-deceivers must face reality, such as when taking another test on which they cannot cheat? We find that self-deception diminishes over time only when self-deceivers are repeatedly confronted with evidence of their true ability (Study 1; this learning, however, fails to make them less susceptible to future self-deception (Study 2.

  4. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  5. Enhanced non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid III-nitride structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. M.; Athanasiou, M.; Bai, J.; Liu, B.; Wang, T.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of surface states has been investigated in hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures that employ high efficiency, nearfield non-radiative energy transfer (NRET) coupling. The structures utilize blue emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays to minimize the separation with a yellow emitting F8BT coating. Surface states due to the exposed III-nitride surfaces of the nanostructures are found to reduce the NRET coupling rate. The surface states are passivated by deposition of a silicon nitride layer on the III-nitride nanorod surface leading to reduced surface recombination. A low thickness surface passivation is shown to increase the NRET coupling rate by 4 times compared to an un-passivated hybrid structure. A model is proposed to explain the increased NRET rate for the passivated hybrid structures based on the reduction in surface electron depletion of the passivated InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods surfaces

  6. Methodological aspects of hygienic standardization of complex radiation and non-radiation effects on human organizm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, A.N.; Sanovskaya, M.S.; Bronshtejn, I.Eh.; Orobej, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the necessary requirements for the methodics of substantiating the hygienic standards for a combined effect of radiation and nonradiation factors on workers engaged in electronic, radio engineering branches of industry and a number of nuclear-physical units. These approaches were used in planning and conducting of investigations on hygienic evaluation of a combined effect of ionizing radiation, electromagnetic UHF radiation, noise and other factors. Along with experimental investigations on small laboratory animals, clinico-physiological examinations of people affected by a combined or predominantely separate effect of the above-mentioned factors have been carried out for many years. The material obtaed has been subjected to mathematical treatment with the use of dispersion analysis. The results testify to the intensification of the effect under conditions of a combined action of X-ray and UHF radiations and noise

  7. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness in female nonradiation workers of a monazite processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Sujata; Maniyan, C.G.; Pillai, P.M.B.; Khan, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Chest wall thickness (CWT) was estimated in fifty four female nonradiation workers of a monazite processing plant by biometric measurements. The CWT ranged from 4.12 cm to 6.94 cm giving an average of 5.19 ± 0.76 cm. CWT was found to have very good correlation with percent Body Fat and abdominal circumference but poor correlation with Body Mass Index, Body Build Index, Slenderness, age etc. CWT increases with age especially in the upper middle-aged group (> 35 years). A single measurement of abdominal circumference can be used to estimate CWT with 94 % accuracy. A factor of 0.0587 was derived to estimate CWT from abdominal circumference. The study also showed that about 11 % of the subjects were obese. The results obtained will be very useful for the accurate measurement of Low Energy Photons like 239 Pu and 241 Am deposited in the lung. (author)

  8. Non-Radial Oscillation Modes of Superfluid Neutron Stars Modeled with CompOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Jaikumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We compute the principal non-radial oscillation mode frequencies of Neutron Stars described with a Skyrme-like Equation of State (EoS, taking into account the possibility of neutron and proton superfluidity. Using the CompOSE database and interpolation routines to obtain the needed thermodynamic quantities, we solve the fluid oscillation equations numerically in the background of a fully relativistic star, and identify imprints of the superfluid state. Though these modes cannot be observed with current technology, increased sensitivity of future Gravitational-Wave Observatories could allow us to observe these oscillations and potentially constrain or refine models of dense matter relevant to the interior of neutron stars.

  9. The influence of non-radiation factors on the kinetics of radioactive iodine metabolism in thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalistratova, V.S.; Filatov, V.V.; Shavrina, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Estimation of the role non-radiation factors which may influence the dose formation in the most of all irradiated organs is considered very important for the normalization of radioactive isotopes of iodine. The significance of this problem was noted in some recent publications of NCARE. Since a human population which is being irradiated can be affected by the environmental temperature (43-45 deg and 4-6 deg C) and light (complete darkness and darkness for 21 hours) as well as vaccines (dysentery and typhoid) and alcohol (ethanol solutions of 0,02; 0,2; 2,0; and 20,0% concentration) were used as modifying factors. Iodine-125 administrated per os (0,8-1,3 MBq/rat) was used as a model for studying metabolism kinetics of radioactive iodine isotopes. Vaccination of animals results in a change of iodine-125 accumulation level in the thyroid depending on the time interval between an injection of the vaccine and administration of the radionuclide: one day after vaccination the levels of accumulation and the tissue doses formed by radionuclide in the thyroid were decreased by 1,5-2,0 times;14 days after vaccination they were increased by 1,5 times. Accumulation of iodine-125 in other endocrinal organs (pituitary and adrenal glands) was increased. The effect is independent of the type of injected vaccine. A single administration of 2,0-20,0% ethanol caused an increase of iodine-125 content in the thyroid. Chronical exposure to ethanol resulted in a decrease of iodine accumulation in the critical organ by 30% and the tissue doses accumulated by the thyroid, accordingly. Administration 0,02-0,2% ethanol did not affect metabolism kinetics of iodine-125. A single and chronical exposure to higher temperatures (43-45 deg C) decreased accumulation levels and absorbed doses of iodine-125 in the thyroid (by 30-50%) and delayed an elimination of the radionuclide from this organ. Lower temperatures of the environment (4-6 deg C), shorter light day and complete darkness did not affect

  10. Strong non-radial propagation of energetic electrons in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Veronig, A.

    2018-06-01

    Analyzing the sequence of solar energetic electron events measured at both STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) spacecraft during 17-21 July 2014, when their orbital separation was 34°, we found evidence of a strong non-radial electron propagation in the solar corona below the solar wind source surface. The impulsive electron events were associated with recurrent flare and jet (hereafter flare/jet) activity at the border of an isolated coronal hole situated close to the solar equator. We have focused our study on the solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 17 July 2014, during which both spacecraft detected a similar impulsive and anisotropic energetic electron event suggesting optimal connection of both spacecraft to the parent particle source, despite the large angular separation between the parent flare and the nominal magnetic footpoints on the source surface of STA and STB of 68° and 90°, respectively. Combining the remote-sensing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations, in-situ plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data we investigated and discuss here the origin and the propagation trajectory of energetic electrons in the solar corona. We find that the energetic electrons in the energy range of 55-195 keV together with the associated EUV jet were injected from the flare site toward the spacecraft's magnetic footpoints and propagate along a strongly non-radial and inclined magnetic field below the source surface. From stereoscopic (EUV) observations we estimated the inclination angle of the jet trajectory and the respective magnetic field of 63° ± 11° relative to the radial direction. We show how the flare accelerated electrons reach very distant longitudes in the heliosphere, when the spacecraft are nominally not connected to the particle source. This example illustrates how ballistic backmapping can occasionally fail to characterize the magnetic connectivity during SEP events. This finding also provides an additional mechanism (one among others

  11. SPS slow extraction septa

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    SPS long straight section (LSS) with a series of 5 septum tanks for slow extraction (view in the direction of the proton beam). There are 2 of these: in LSS2, towards the N-Area; in LSS6 towards the W-Area. See also Annual Report 1975, p.175.

  12. AGS slow extraction improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, J.W.; Smith, G.A.; Sandberg, J.N.; Repeta, L.; Weisberg, H.

    1979-01-01

    Improvement of the straightness of the F5 copper septum increased the AGS slow extraction efficiency from approx. 80% to approx. 90%. Installation of an electrostatic septum at H2O, 24 betatron wavelengths upstream of F5, further improved the extraction efficiency to approx. 97%

  13. PF slow positron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, A.; Enomoto, A.; Kurihara, T.

    1993-01-01

    A new slow-positron source is under construction at the Photon Factory. Positrons are produced by bombarding a tantalum rod with high-energy electrons; they are moderated in multiple tungsten vanes. We report here the present status of this project. (author)

  14. Slow relaxation in weakly open rational polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokshenev, Valery B; Vicentini, Eduardo

    2003-07-01

    The interplay between the regular (piecewise-linear) and irregular (vertex-angle) boundary effects in nonintegrable rational polygonal billiards (of m equal sides) is discussed. Decay dynamics in polygons (of perimeter P(m) and small opening Delta) is analyzed through the late-time survival probability S(m) approximately equal t(-delta). Two distinct slow relaxation channels are established. The primary universal channel exhibits relaxation of regular sliding orbits, with delta=1. The secondary channel is given by delta>1 and becomes open when m>P(m)/Delta. It originates from vertex order-disorder dual effects and is due to relaxation of chaoticlike excitations.

  15. Slow wave cyclotron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Lin, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    Cyclotron masers such as Gyrotrons and the Autoresonance Masers, are fast wave devices: the electromagnetic wave's phase velocity v rho , is greater than the electron beam velocity, v b . To be able to convert the beam kinetic energy into radiation in these devices the beam must have an initial transverse momentum, usually obtained by propagating the beam through a transverse wiggler magnet, or along a nonuniform guide magnetic field before entry into the interaction region. Either process introduces a significant amount of thermal spread in the beam which degrades the performance of the maser. However, if the wave phase velocity v rho v b , the beam kinetic energy can be converted directly into radiation without the requirement of an initial transverse beam momentum, making a slow wave cyclotron maser a potentially simpler and more compact device. The authors present the linear and nonlinear physics of the slow wave cyclotron maser and examine its potential for practical application

  16. Slow-transit Constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Philips, Sidney F.

    2001-08-01

    Idiopathic slow-transit constipation is a clinical syndrome predominantly affecting women, characterized by intractable constipation and delayed colonic transit. This syndrome is attributed to disordered colonic motor function. The disorder spans a spectrum of variable severity, ranging from patients who have relatively mild delays in transit but are otherwise indistinguishable from irritable bowel syndrome to patients with colonic inertia or chronic megacolon. The diagnosis is made after excluding colonic obstruction, metabolic disorders (hypothyroidism, hypercalcemia), drug-induced constipation, and pelvic floor dysfunction (as discussed by Wald ). Most patients are treated with one or more pharmacologic agents, including dietary fiber supplementation, saline laxatives (milk of magnesia), osmotic agents (lactulose, sorbitol, and polyethylene glycol 3350), and stimulant laxatives (bisacodyl and glycerol). A subtotal colectomy is effective and occasionally is indicated for patients with medically refractory, severe slow-transit constipation, provided pelvic floor dysfunction has been excluded or treated.

  17. Neutron emission from 9Be nucleus under the action of β+ and γ radiation emitted in radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Dak Bang; Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Miller, M.B.; Mikhajlov, L.V.; Fam Zui Khien; Kharisov, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The neutron yield from the 9 Be nucleus under the action of beta and gamma-radiation emitted at the radiative decay of 11 C, 62 Cu, 66 Ga, 74 Br isotopes is measured. These isotopes differ essentially by the emitted radiation spectra. The contribution of various processes ((γ, n)-reactions, inelastic scattering and positron nonradiative annihilation) to the neutron yield observed is determined [ru

  18. The numerical evaluation on non-radiative multiphonon transition rate from different electronic bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bangfen.

    1985-10-01

    A numerical calculation on the non-radiative multiphonon transition probability based on the adiabatic approximation (AA) and the static approximation (SA) has been accomplished in a model of two electronic levels coupled to one phonon mode. The numerical results indicate that the spectra based on different approximations are generally different apart from those vibrational levels which are far below the classical crossing point. For large electron-phonon coupling constant, the calculated transition rates based on AA are more reliable; on the other hand, for small transition coupling the transition rates near or beyond the cross region are quite different for two approximations. In addition to the diagonal non-adiabatic potential, the mixing and splitting of the original static potential sheets are responsible for the deviation of the transition rates based on different approximations. The relationship between the transition matrix element and the vibrational level shift, the Huang-Rhys factor, the separation of the electronic levels and the electron-phonon coupling is analysed and discussed. (author)

  19. Luminescence of Quantum Dots by Coupling with Nonradiative Surface Plasmon Modes in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.J.; van de Lagemaat, J.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic coupling between quantum dots (QDs) and surface plasmons (SPs) is investigated by a luminescence spectroscopy based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We show that tunneling luminescence from the dot is excited by coupling with the nonradiative plasmon mode oscillating at the metallic tunneling gap formed during the STM operation. This approach to the SP excitation reveals aspects of the SP-QD coupling not accessible to the more conventional optical excitation of SPs. In the STM, luminescence from the dot is observed when and only when the SP is in resonance with the fundamental transition of the dot. The tunneling luminescence spectrum also suggests that excited SP-QD hybrid states can participate in the excitation of QD luminescence. Not only the SP excitation regulates the QD luminescence but the presence of the dot at the tunneling gap imposes restrictions to the SP that can be excited in the STM, in which the SP cannot exceed the energy of the fundamental transition of the dot. The superior SP-QD coupling observed in the STM is due to the tunneling gap acting as a tunable plasmonic resonator in which the dot is fully immersed.

  20. Constraints on decay plus oscillation solutions of the solar neutrino problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Anjan S.; Massó, Eduard; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2002-12-01

    We examine the constraints on the nonradiative decay of neutrinos from the observations of solar neutrino experiments. The standard oscillation hypothesis among three neutrinos solves the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems. The decay of a massive neutrino mixed with the electron neutrino results in the depletion of the solar neutrino flux. We introduce neutrino decay in the oscillation hypothesis and demand that decay does not spoil the successful explanation of solar and atmospheric observations. We obtain a lower bound on the ratio of the lifetime over the mass of ν2, τ2/m2>22.7 s/MeV for the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution of the solar neutrino problem and τ2/m2>27.8 s/MeV for the vacuum oscillation solution (at 99% C.L.).

  1. Three-Phased Wake Vortex Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; Switzer, George S.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed parametric study is conducted that examines vortex decay within turbulent and stratified atmospheres. The study uses a large eddy simulation model to simulate the out-of-ground effect behavior of wake vortices due to their interaction with atmospheric turbulence and thermal stratification. This paper presents results from a parametric investigation and suggests improvements for existing fast-time wake prediction models. This paper also describes a three-phased decay for wake vortices. The third phase is characterized by a relatively slow rate of circulation decay, and is associated with the ringvortex stage that occurs following vortex linking. The three-phased decay is most prevalent for wakes imbedded within environments having low-turbulence and near-neutral stratification.

  2. Exposure of ionizing radiation to non-radiation workers from nuclear medicine patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, J.; Smart, R.C.; McKay, E.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Occasionally, patients are required to have several tests in one day. They may be injected with radio-isotopes in the morning, have other investigations during the absorption period and then return to nuclear medicine for imaging later in the day. Recently, the NSW Department of Health issued a circular concerning exposure to sonographers from ionizing radiation emitted from nuclear medicine patients. The object of this study is to establish a model of emissions from nuclear medicine patients and to measure the exposure to other health workers who may be in close contact with these patients. Dose rate measurements were acquired for patients injected with 99 Tc m and 67 Ga for the following studies: heart, thyroid, lung, bone, biliary and lymphoma. Measurements were taken at 10 cm increments to 1 m and at time intervals of 0,1,2 and 24 h post-injection. In addition, 5 sonographers were issued with TLDs to be worn on the waist and fingers for a period of 3 months. The dose limit for a non-radiation worker is 1000 μSv (ICRP 60). The external dose rate measurements indicate that, assuming a sonographer is seated approximately 30 cm from a patient injected with 800 MBq 99 Tc m -HDP for a bone scan, 1 h post-injection, the sonographer would receive a dose of 11 μSv for a 30 min ultrasound scan. In practice, only 4 nuclear medicine patients were scanned in the ultrasound department during the 5 week monitoring period and the sonographers' TLDs recorded no radiation dose. In conclusion, the average exposure to sonographers from nuclear medicine patients is well within the limits recommended by the ICRP. However, in accordance with the ALARA principle where practicable, any ultrasound examination should be performed prior to nuclear medicine studies

  3. Decay Spectroscopy for Nuclear Astrophysics: {beta}-delayed Proton Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aysto, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pollacco, E.; Kebbiri, M. [CEA/IRFU Saclay (France); Pascovici, G. [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    Decay spectroscopy is one of the oldest indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics. We have developed at TAMU techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. These allowed us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of {sup 23}Al, {sup 27}P, {sup 31}Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg(crucial for the depletion of {sup 22}Na in novae), {sup 26m}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si and {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}){sup 31}S(bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. More recently we have radically improved the technique using a gas based detector we call AstroBox.

  4. A non-radial oscillation mode in an accreting millisecond pulsar?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmayer, Tod [Astrophysics Science Division and Joint Space-Science Institute, NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mahmoodifar, Simin [Department of Physics and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present results of targeted searches for signatures of non-radial oscillation modes (such as r- and g-modes) in neutron stars using RXTE data from several accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs). We search for potentially coherent signals in the neutron star rest frame by first removing the phase delays associated with the star's binary motion and computing fast Fourier transform power spectra of continuous light curves with up to 2{sup 30} time bins. We search a range of frequencies in which both r- and g-modes are theoretically expected to reside. Using data from the discovery outburst of the 435 Hz pulsar XTE J1751–305 we find a single candidate, coherent oscillation with a frequency of 0.5727597 × ν{sub spin} = 249.332609 Hz, and a fractional Fourier amplitude of 7.46 × 10{sup –4}. We estimate the significance of this feature at the 1.6 × 10{sup –3} level, slightly better than a 3σ detection. Based on the observed frequency we argue that possible mode identifications include rotationally modified g-modes associated with either a helium-rich surface layer or a density discontinuity due to electron captures on hydrogen in the accreted ocean. In the latter case the presence of sufficient hydrogen in this ultracompact system with a likely helium-rich donor would present an interesting puzzle. Alternatively, the frequency could be identified with that of an inertial mode or a core r-mode modified by the presence of a solid crust; however, the r-mode amplitude required to account for the observed modulation amplitude would induce a large spin-down rate inconsistent with the observed pulse timing measurements. For the AMXPs XTE J1814–338 and NGC 6440 X–2 we do not find any candidate oscillation signals, and we place upper limits on the fractional Fourier amplitude of any coherent oscillations in our frequency search range of 7.8 × 10{sup –4} and 5.6 × 10{sup –3}, respectively. We briefly discuss the prospects and sensitivity for

  5. Radiative and nonradiative lifetimes in excited states of Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in Ne matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, U.; Schwentner, N.

    1979-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation with its intense continuum and its excellent time structure has been exploited for time resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the solid state. By selective excitation of n = 1, n' = 1 and n = 2 exciton states of Xe, Kr and Ar atoms in Ne matrix we were able to identify the emitting states involved. Lifetimes within the cascade of radiative and radiationless relaxation between excited states as well as the radiative lifetimes for transitions to the ground state have been derived from the decay curves. Energy positions and radiative lifetimes of the emitting states correspond quite well with those of the free atoms. Radiative and radiationless relaxation processes take place within the manifold of excited states of the guest atoms. The rate constants for radiationless decay confirm an energy gap law. The order of the radiationless processes reaches in some cases extremely high values. Selection rules for spin and angular momentum are essential to understand the observed radiationless transition rates. (orig.)

  6. Regimes of radiative and nonradiative transitions in transport through an electronic system in a photon cavity reaching a steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar; Jonsson, Thorsteinn H.; Bernodusson, Maria Laura; Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Sitek, Anna; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    We analyze how a multilevel many-electron system in a photon cavity approaches the steady state when coupled to external leads. When a plunger gate is used to lower cavity photon dressed one- and two-electron states below the bias window defined by the external leads, we can identify one regime with nonradiative transitions dominating the electron transport, and another regime with radiative transitions. Both transitions trap the electrons in the states below the bias bringing the system into a steady state. The order of the two regimes and their relative strength depends on the location of the bias window in the energy spectrum of the system and the initial conditions.

  7. Magnetic monopole catalysis of proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.; Salvino, D.

    1986-09-01

    Catalysis of proton decay by GUT magnetic monopoles (the Rubakov-Callan effect) is discussed. Combining a short-distance cross section calculation by Bernreuther and Craigie with the long-distance velocity dependent distortion factors of Arafune and Fukugita, catalysis rate predictions which can be compared with experiment are obtained. At present, hydrogen rich detectors such as water (H 2 O) and methane (CH 4 ) appear to be particularly well suited for observing catalysis by very slow monopoles. 17 refs., 1 fig

  8. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  9. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  10. Initial decay process of radicals induced in irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kameya, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine radial decay behaviors of γ-irradiated food, we analyzed radicals in the food using ESR. We detected the ESR signal of specimens just several minutes after irradiation. The singlet signal intensity at g=2.0, originated from organic free radicals was increased as followed by the increasing radiation dose. Singlet signal intensity that increased by γ-irradiation was decreased with time. The phenomena of decay of the ESR singlet signal showed two phase that are rapid decay and slow decay. It was suggested that those two phase decay is due to at least the two radical species. Also we concluded that after three hours of radiation treatment long life radical as ESR signal intensity was detected in irradiated specimen; black pepper, green coffee bean and ginseng, showed the same decay phenomena. But the signal intensity of irradiated black pepper was three times larger than that of irradiated green coffee bean and irradiated ginseng. (author)

  11. Coaxial slow source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, R.D.; Jarboe, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) are a class of compact toroid with not toroidal field. The field reversed theta pinch technique has been successfully used for formation of FRCs since their inception in 1958. In this method an initial bias field is produced. After ionization of the fill gas, the current in the coil is rapidly reversed producing the radial implosion of a current sheath. At the ends of the coil the reversed field lines rapidly tear and reconnect with the bias field lines until no more bias flux remains. At this point, vacuum reversed field accumulates around the configuration which contracts axially until an equilibrium is reached. When extrapolating the use of such a technique to reactor size plasmas two main shortcomings are found. First, the initial bias field, and hence flux in a given device, which can be reconnected to form the configuration is limited from above by destructive axial dynamics. Second, the voltages required to produce rapid current reversal in the coil are very large. Clearly, a low voltage formation technique without limitations on flux addition is desirable. The Coaxial Slow Source (CSS) device was designed to meet this need. It has two coaxial theta pinch coils. Coaxial coil geometry allows for the addition of as much magnetic flux to the annular plasma between them as can be generated inside the inner coil. Furthermore the device can be operated at charging voltages less than 10 kV and on resistive diffusion, rather than implosive time scales. The inner coil is a novel, concentric, helical design so as to allow it to be cantilevered on one end to permit translation of the plasma. Following translation off the inner coil the Annular Field Reversed Configuration would be re-formed as a true FRC. In this paper we investigate the formation process in the new parallel configuration., CSSP, in which the inner and outer coils are connected in parallel to the main capacitor bank

  12. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  13. Fluorescence Decay Dynamics of Ethidium Bromide in Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Ah Young; Min Yung

    2010-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetimes of EB in five polymers covering LDPE, HDPE, PC, PS, and PAA were measured by picosecond time-correlated single photon counting. The lifetime change of EB has been previously described by hydrogen bonding ability. In this work, we have observed that the lifetime of EB depends strongly on the Young's modulus of medium. Thus, it is possible that the fluorescence decay dynamics of EB could be influenced by medium rigidity rather than hydrogen bonding ability in polymer. The medium influence on the fluorescence decay dynamics of ethidium bromide (EB) has been investigated in various environments. For example, Ohmstead and Kearns related the fluorescence lifetime of EB to the excited-state proton transfer process. In addition, they reported that the solvent viscosity plays a minor role in the excited state decay process of EB. Chirico et al. measured the fluorescence decay of EB as 1.7 ns in water and 6.5 ns in ethanol and concluded that hydrogen bonding ability is a key factor for the nonradiative relaxation. Pal et al. measured the fluorescence decay time of EB in acetone, acetonitrile, and their mixtures. They observed that the fluorescence decay processes were independent on the solvent polarity. These results show that the EB lifetime does not depend much on polarity or viscosity, but is mainly influenced by hydrogen bonding. Overall, EB is one of most widely used dyes for probing DNA. When EB is intercalated into the helical structure of DNA, a large increase in the fluorescence lifetime has been observed in comparison with water environment, and the fluorescence enhancement was attributed to the blocking of the excited-state proton transfer

  14. Population-genetic approach to standardization of radiation and non-radiation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, I.

    2006-01-01

    population level. Of 65 analyses of association between diseases and unfavorable effects and various genetic polymorphic systems, 27 had negative results. Other 38 had significant, i.e. positive results. Respective G.S.R.R. varied accordingly in the range from 1.2 to 2.5. Averaged G.S.R.R. for some genetic systems ranged from 1.4 to 1.9. More stable and closer values of averaged G.S.R.R. calculated for various categories of effects: pathologies due to radiation and non-radiation factors - 1.51; non-tumor (1,47) and tumor (1,54) diseases; average life expectancy - 1.34. Population-averaged or integral value of G.S.R.R. was about 1.5. This value can be used as genetic predisposition coefficient (C.G.P.) for correction in averaging of environmental population level factors. Such correction can be done by decreasing of permissible standard value by the value of C.G.P. to calculate population-genetic standard. It should be noted that population-genetic standards decrease risk of development of unfavorable consequences due to effect of environmental factors in individuals with genetic predisposition to the general population level. An important advantage of this approach is that there is no need to account for all existing variations of genetic predisposition to multiform unfavorable environmental factors

  15. X-ray spectroscopy studies of nonradiative energy transfer processes in luminescent lanthanide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacold, Joseph I.

    Luminescent materials play important roles in energy sciences, through solid state lighting and possible applications in solar energy utilization, and in biomedical research and applications, such as in immunoassays and fluorescence microscopy. The initial excitation of a luminescent material leads to a sequence of transitions between excited states, ideally ending with the emission of one or more optical-wavelength photons. It is essential to understand the microscopic physics of this excited state cascade in order to rationally design materials with high quantum efficiencies or with other fine-tuning of materials response. While optical-wavelength spectroscopies have unraveled many details of the energy transfer pathways in luminescent materials, significant questions remain open for many lanthanide-based luminescent materials. For organometallic dyes in particular, quantum yields remain limited in comparison with inorganic phosphors. This dissertation reports on a research program of synchrotron x-ray studies of the excited state electronic structure and energy-relaxation cascade in trivalent lanthanide phosphors and dyes. To this end, one of the primary results presented here is the first time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy studies of the transient 4f excited states in lanthanide-activated luminescent dyes and phosphors. This is a new application of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy that makes it possible to directly observe and, to some extent, quantify intramolecular nonradiative energy transfer processes. We find a transient increase in 4f spectral weight associated with an excited state confined to the 4f shell of trivalent Eu. This result implies that it is necessary to revise the current theoretical understanding of 4f excitation in trivalent lanthanide activators: either transient 4f-5d mixing effects are much stronger than previously considered, or else the lanthanide 4f excited state has an unexpectedly large contribution

  16. NON-RADIAL OSCILLATIONS IN M-GIANT SEMI-REGULAR VARIABLES: STELLAR MODELS AND KEPLER OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stello, Dennis; Compton, Douglas L.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Bellamy, Beau [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Hans [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); García, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Université Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mathur, Savita, E-mail: stello@physics.usyd.edu.au [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The success of asteroseismology relies heavily on our ability to identify the frequency patterns of stellar oscillation modes. For stars like the Sun this is relatively easy because the mode frequencies follow a regular pattern described by a well-founded asymptotic relation. When a solar-like star evolves off the main sequence and onto the red giant branch its structure changes dramatically, resulting in changes in the frequency pattern of the modes. We follow the evolution of the adiabatic frequency pattern from the main sequence to near the tip of the red giant branch for a series of models. We find a significant departure from the asymptotic relation for the non-radial modes near the red giant branch tip, resulting in a triplet frequency pattern. To support our investigation we analyze almost four years of Kepler data of the most luminous stars in the field (late K and early M type) and find that their frequency spectra indeed show a triplet pattern dominated by dipole modes even for the most luminous stars in our sample. Our identification explains previous results from ground-based observations reporting fine structure in the Petersen diagram and sub-ridges in the period-luminosity diagram. Finally, we find ''new ridges'' of non-radial modes with frequencies below the fundamental mode in our model calculations, and we speculate they are related to f modes.

  17. Assessing the performance of Taiwan’s environmental protection system with a non-radial network DEA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chin-wei; Chiu, Yung-ho; Fang, Wei-ta; Shen, Neng

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies involving environmental performance purely focus on analyzing environmental or waste treatment efficiencies. This study combines various aspects of environmental protection and establishes a non-radial network DEA approach to evaluate the performance of an environmental protection system. The empirical methodology assumes that the system consists of three stages: administrative, executive processes, and protection effectiveness. The executive process includes waste treatment and pollution auditing divisions. In addition to assessing efficiencies, the empirical evaluation further explores the internal and external influences on performances and contributes implications and suggestions for environmental policy makers. The proposed model is utilized to gauge the performance of an environmental protection system for 20 municipalities in Taiwan. The results indicate the following: (1) for improving environmental quality, the government needs to put forth greater efforts in environmental audits; (2) improving productivity per unit so as to increase achievements in the executive process is more important for raising performance on environmental work, in addition to increasing workers and equipment for environmental protection; (3) a high degree of industrialization negatively influences administrative efficiency and educated residents have a greater comprehension for administrative operations, which can help in efficient budget utilization. - Highlights: • A non-radial network DEA approach to evaluate the Performance of Environmental Protection System. • The performance of waste treatment performs better than the efficiency of auditing. • Governmental expenditure is more efficiently utilized in the administrative process. • The effectiveness of achieved protection is a critical indicator for revealing environmental quality in a region

  18. Scenario-based energy efficiency and productivity in China: A non-radial directional distance function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Zhou, P.; Zhou, D.Q.

    2013-01-01

    Improving energy efficiency and productivity is one of the most cost-effective ways for achieving the sustainable development target in China. This paper employs non-radial directional distance function approach to empirically investigate energy efficiency and energy productivity by including CO 2 emissions as an undesirable output. Three production scenarios, namely energy conservation (EC), energy conservation and emission reduction (ECER), and energy conservation, emission reduction and economic growth (ECEREG), are specified to assess China's energy efficiency and productivity growth during the period of Eleventh Five-Year Plan. Our empirical results show that there exist substantial differences in China's total-factor energy efficiency and productivity under different scenarios. Under the ECEREG scenario, the national average total-factor energy efficiency score was 0.6306 in 2005–2010, while the national average total-factor energy productivity increased by 0.27% annually during the period. The main driving force for energy productivity growth in China was energy technological change rather than energy efficiency change. - Highlights: • China's regional energy efficiency and productivity in 2005–2010 are evaluated. • Three production scenarios are considered. • Non-radial directional distance function with CO 2 emissions is employed. • Technological change is the main driver for China's energy productivity growth

  19. Kaon decay experiments at J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanjo, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Three kaon-decay experiments, E14 (KOTO), E36, and E06 (TREK), are being performed or planned in the Hadron Experimental Facility of J-PARC. The J-PARC accelerator provides 30-GeV intense proton beam with a slow-extraction method, which is one of the key points to achieve the physics goals for the experiments. In this article, the features of the kaon decay as a tool to explore new physics beyond the Standard Model are explained. The J-PARC accelerator and the Hadron Experimental Facility are briefly described. The three kaon-decay experiments are introduced, all of which are sensitive to the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (author)

  20. Slow Tourism: Exploring the discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Slow travel’ and ‘slow tourism’ are relatively new, but contested, concepts. This paper examines the meanings ascribed to them in the academic literature and websites targeted at potential tourists. It finds concurrence on aspects of savouring time at the destination and investing time to appreciate the locality, its people, history, culture and products, but detects different emphases. The academic literature stresses the benefits to the destination and global sustainability, while the websites focus on the personal benefits and ways of becoming a ‘slow tourist’. Food and drink epitomise the immersion in and absorption of the destination and the multi-dimensional tourism experience, contrasted with the superficiality of mainstream tourism. The paper discusses whether tourists practising slow tourism without using the label are slow tourists or not.

  1. Energy Decay Laws in Strongly Anisotropic Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sebastien; Politano, Helene

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the influence of a uniform magnetic field B 0 =B 0 e parallel on energy decay laws in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The nonlinear transfer reduction along B 0 is included in a model that distinguishes parallel and perpendicular directions, following a phenomenology of Kraichnan. We predict a slowing down of the energy decay due to anisotropy in the limit of strong B 0 , with distinct power laws for energy decay of shear- and pseudo-Alfven waves. Numerical results from the kinetic equations of Alfven wave turbulence recover these predictions, and MHD numerical results clearly tend to follow them in the lowest perpendicular planes

  2. Slow light in moving media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, U.; Piwnicki, P.

    2001-06-01

    We review the theory of light propagation in moving media with extremely low group velocity. We intend to clarify the most elementary features of monochromatic slow light in a moving medium and, whenever possible, to give an instructive simplified picture.

  3. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contraception - slow-release hormonal methods; Progestin implants; Progestin injections; Skin patch; Vaginal ring ... might want to consider a different birth control method. SKIN PATCH The skin patch is placed on ...

  4. SYMPOSIUM: Rare decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-04-15

    Late last year, a symposium entitled 'Rare Decays' attracted 115 participants to a hotel in Vancouver, Canada. These participants were particle physicists interested in checking conventional selection rules to look for clues of possible new behaviour outside today's accepted 'Standard Model'. For physicists, 'rare decays' include processes that have so far not been seen, explicitly forbidden by the rules of the Standard Model, or processes highly suppressed because the decay is dominated by an easier route, or includes processes resulting from multiple transitions.

  5. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  6. Axigluon decays of toponium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faustov, R.N.; Vasilevskaya, I.G.

    1990-01-01

    Chiral-colour model predicts the existence of axigluons which is an octet of massive axial-vector gauge bosons. In this respect toponium decays into axigluons and gluons are of interest. The following toponium decays are considered: θ → Ag, θ → AAg, θ → ggg → AAg. The width of toponium S-state decays is calculated under various possible values of axigluon mass

  7. Decay of 143La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachot, J.; Dousson, S.; Monnand, E.; Schussler, F.

    1976-01-01

    The decay of 143 La has been investigated. Sources have been obtained from 2 isotope separators (ISERE, OSIRIS). 12 gamma rays, with the most intense at 620keV representing only 1.4% of decay, have been attributed to the 143 La decay. A level scheme has been found and compared with the one deduced from (d,p) and (n,γ) reactions on 142 Ce [fr

  8. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sinai, Yohai Bar; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2011-01-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not comple...

  9. Non-radiative recombination process in BGaAs/GaAs alloys: Two layer photothermal deflection model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilahi, S., E-mail: ilehi_soufiene@yahoo.fr [Université de Carthage, Unité de Recherche de caractérisation photothermique et modélisation, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs de Nabeul (IPEIN), 8000 Merazka, Nabeul (Tunisia); Baira, M.; Saidi, F. [Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir. Avenue de l’Environnement, Monastir 5019 (Tunisia); Yacoubi, N. [Université de Carthage, Unité de Recherche de caractérisation photothermique et modélisation, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs de Nabeul (IPEIN), 8000 Merazka, Nabeul (Tunisia); Auvray, L. [Laboratoire Multimateriaux et Interfaces, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, 43, Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Maaref, H. [Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir. Avenue de l’Environnement, Monastir 5019 (Tunisia)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •We have developed a two layer photothermal deflection model. •We have determined the electronic properties of BGaAs/GaAs alloys. •We have studied the boron effect in the electronic parameters. -- Abstract: Photo-thermal deflection technique PTD is used to study the nonradiative recombination process in BGaAs/GaAs alloy with boron composition of 3% and 8% grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A two layer theoretical model has been developed taking into account both thermal and electronic contribution in the photothermal signal allowing to extract the electronic parameters namely electronic diffusivity, surface and interface recombination. It is found that the increase of boron composition alters the BGaAs epilayers transport properties.

  10. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  11. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, T

    2002-01-01

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses sup 5 sup 8 Co, sup 6 sup 4 Cu, sup 1 sup 1 C, sup 1 sup 3 N, sup 1 sup 5 O and sup 1 sup 8 F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihil...

  12. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Toshikazu

    2002-01-01

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses 58 Co, 64 Cu, 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihilation excitation and positron reemission microscope are developed. (S.Y.)

  13. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudzenko, N.; Hatch, M.; Bazyka, D.; Dyagil, I.; Reiss, R.F.; Brenner, A.; Chumak, V.; Babkina, N.; Zablotska, L.B.; Mabuchi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods: In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results: After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions: These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. - Highlights: • A unique population – a cohort of 110,645 Chernobyl clean-up workers from Ukraine. • Followed 1986–2006 for leukemia, interviewed about non-radiation risk factors. • Petroleum exposure increased risk for non-CLL leukemias, particularly CML. • No risk factor other than radiation was found for CLL.

  14. The origins and properties of intrinsic nonradiative recombination centers in wide bandgap GaN and AlGaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichibu, S. F.; Uedono, A.; Kojima, K.; Ikeda, H.; Fujito, K.; Takashima, S.; Edo, M.; Ueno, K.; Ishibashi, S.

    2018-04-01

    The nonradiative lifetime (τNR) of the near-band-edge emission in various quality GaN samples is compared with the results of positron annihilation measurement, in order to identify the origin and to determine the capture-cross-section of the major intrinsic nonradiative recombination centers (NRCs). The room-temperature τNR of various n-type GaN samples increased with decreasing the concentration of divacancies composed of a Ga vacancy (VGa) and a N vacancy (VN), namely, VGaVN. The τNR value also increased with increasing the diffusion length of positrons, which is almost proportional to the inverse third root of the gross concentration of all point defects. The results indicate that major intrinsic NRC in n-type GaN is VGaVN. From the relationship between its concentration and τNR, its hole capture-cross-section is estimated to be about 7 × 10-14 cm2. Different from the case of 4H-SiC, the major NRCs in p-type and n-type GaN are different: the major NRCs in Mg-doped p-type GaN epilayers are assigned to multiple vacancies containing a VGa and two (or three) VNs, namely, VGa(VN)n (n = 2 or 3). The ion-implanted Mg-doped GaN films are found to contain larger size vacancy complexes such as (VGa)3(VN)3. In analogy with GaN, major NRCs in Al0.6Ga0.4N alloys are assigned to vacancy complexes containing an Al vacancy or a VGa.

  15. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, N., E-mail: gudznat@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Hatch, M., E-mail: hatchm@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bazyka, D., E-mail: Bazyka@yahoo.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Dyagil, I., E-mail: leuk@ukr.net [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Reiss, R.F., E-mail: rfr1@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Brenner, A., E-mail: brennera@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chumak, V., E-mail: Chumak.vadim@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Babkina, N., E-mail: natalie.babkina@gmail.com [National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Zablotska, L.B., E-mail: lydia.zablotska@ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Mabuchi, K., E-mail: mabuchik@mail.nih.gov [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Background: Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. Methods: In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. Results: After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions: These data – the first from a working population in Ukraine – add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. - Highlights: • A unique population – a cohort of 110,645 Chernobyl clean-up workers from Ukraine. • Followed 1986–2006 for leukemia, interviewed about non-radiation risk factors. • Petroleum exposure increased risk for non-CLL leukemias, particularly CML. • No risk factor other than radiation was found for CLL.

  16. The Potential of/for 'Slow': Slow Tourists and Slow Destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Slow tourism practices are nothing new; in fact, they were once the norm and still are for millions of people whose annual holiday is spent camping, staying in caravans, rented accommodation, with friends and relations or perhaps in a second home, who immerse themselves in their holiday environment, eat local food, drink local wine and walk or cycle around the area. So why a special edition about slow tourism? Like many aspects of life once considered normal (such as organic farming or free-range eggs, the emergence of new practices has highlighted differences and prompted a re-evaluation of once accepted practices and values. In this way, the concept of ‘slow tourism’ has recently appeared as a type of tourism that contrasts with many contemporary mainstream tourism practices. It has also been associated with similar trends already ‘branded’ slow: slow food and cittaslow (slow towns and concepts such as mindfulness, savouring and well-being.

  17. Direct comparison of photoluminescence lifetime and defect densities in ZnO epilayers studied by time-resolved photoluminescence and slow positron annihilation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koida, T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); NICP, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda 102-0071 (Japan); Uedono, A. [Institute of Applied Physics and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8755 (Japan); Sota, T. [Department of Electrical, Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Shinjuku 169-8555 (Japan); Kawasaki, M. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8755 (Japan); Combinatorial Materials Exploration and Technology (COMET), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Chichibu, S.F. [NICP, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda 102-0071 (Japan); Photodynamics Research Center, RIKEN, Sendai 980-0868 (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    The roles of point defects and defect complexes governing nonradiative processes in ZnO epilayers were studied using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and slow positron annihilation measurements. The density or size of Zn vacancies (V{sub Zn}) decreased and the nonradiative PL lifetime ({tau}{sub nr}) increased with higher growth temperature for epilayers grown on a ScAlMgO{sub 4} substrate. Accordingly, the steady-state free excitonic PL intensity increased with increase in {tau}{sub nr} at room temperature. The use of a homoepitaxial substrate further decreased the V{sub Zn} concentration. However, no perfect relation between {tau}{sub nr} and the density or size of V{sub Zn} or other positron scattering centers was found. The results indicated that nonradiative recombination processes are governed not solely by single point defects, but by certain defect species introduced by the presence of V{sub Zn} such as vacancy complexes. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Certain nuclear beta decay transitions normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations can be induced to occur by the application of an electromagnetic field. Such decays can be useful in the controlled production of power, and in fission waste disposal

  19. B decays to baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We note that two-body decays to baryons are suppressed relative to three- and four-body decays. In most of these analyses, the invariant baryon–antibaryon mass shows an enhancement near the threshold. We propose a phenomenological interpretation of this quite common feature of hadronization to baryons.

  20. Multiple preequilibrium decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1987-11-01

    Several treatments of multiple preequilibrium decay are reviewed with emphasis on the exciton and hybrid models. We show the expected behavior of this decay mode as a function of incident nucleon energy. The algorithms used in the hybrid model treatment are reviewed, and comparisons are made between predictions of the hybrid model and a broad range of experimental results. 24 refs., 20 figs

  1. Aspects of B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-01-01

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B → D (*) l anti ν decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B → D (*) l anti ν decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B 0 s →J/ψφ and B 0 →J/ψK S,L decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B 0 - anti B 0 mixing phase. (orig.)

  2. Slow, stopped and stored light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, G.; Scully, M.

    2005-01-01

    Light that can been slowed to walking pace could have applications in telecommunications, optical storage and quantum computing. Whether we use it to estimate how far away a thunderstorm is, or simply take it for granted that we can have a conversation with someone on the other side of the world, we all know that light travels extremely fast. Indeed, special relativity teaches us that nothing in the universe can ever move faster than the speed of light in a vacuum: 299 792 458 ms sup - sup 1. However, there is no such limitation on how slowly light can travel. For the last few years, researchers have been routinely slowing light to just a few metres per second, and have recently even stopped it dead in its tracks so that it can be stored for future use. Slow-light has considerable popular appeal, deriving perhaps from the importance of the speed of light in relativity and cosmology. If everyday objects such as cars or people can travel faster than 'slow' light, for example, then it might appear that relativistic effects could be observed at very low speeds. Although this is not the case, slow light nonetheless promises to play an important role in optical technology because it allows light to be delayed for any period of time desired. This could lead to all-optical routers that would increase the bandwidth of the Internet, and applications in optical data storage, quantum information and even radar. (U.K.)

  3. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  4. Decay of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, H.

    1985-01-01

    The pionic and non-mesonic decays of hypernuclei are discussed. In the first part, various decay processes which could be useful to obtain information of hypernuclear structure are discussed. The experimental data concerning the pionic and non-mesonic decays are discussed in the second part. As the experimental data, there are only few lifetime data and some crude data on the non-mesonic to π decay ratio. In the third and the fourth parts, some theoretical analyses are made on the pionic and the nonmesonic decays. DDHF calculation was performed for Λ and N systems by using Skyrme type ΛN and NN effective interactions. A suppression factor of the order of 10 -3 for A nearly equal 100 was obtained. (Aoki, K.)

  5. Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Rare loop-induced decays are sensitive to New Physics in many Standard Model extensions. In this paper we discuss the reconstruction of the radiative penguin decays $B^0_d \\to K^{*0} \\gamma, B^0_s \\to \\phi \\gamma , B^0_d \\to \\omega \\gamma, \\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda \\gamma$, the electroweak penguin decays $B^0_d \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-, B^+_u \\to K^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, the gluonic penguin decays $B^0_d \\to \\phi K^0_S, B^0_s \\to \\phi \\phi$, and the decay $B^0_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ at LHCb. The selection criteria, evaluated efficiencies, expected annual yields and $B/S$ estimates are presented.

  6. Slow Images and Entangled Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swordy, Simon

    2007-01-01

    I will discuss some recent experiments using slow light and entangled photons. We recently showed that it was possible to map a two dimensional image onto very low light level signals, slow them down in a hot atomic vapor while preserving the amplitude and phase of the images. If time remains, I will discuss some of our recent work with time-energy entangled photons for quantum cryptography. We were able to show that we could have a measurable state space of over 1000 states for a single pair of entangled photons in fiber.

  7. Pulsar slow-down epochs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.; Novello, M.

    1981-01-01

    The relative importance of magnetospheric currents and low frequency waves for pulsar braking is assessed and a model is developed which tries to account for the available pulsar timing data under the unifying aspect that all pulsars have equal masses and magnetic moments and are born as rapid rotators. Four epochs of slow-down are distinguished which are dominated by different braking mechanisms. According to the model no direct relationship exists between 'slow-down age' and true age of a pulsar and leads to a pulsar birth-rate of one event per hundred years. (Author) [pt

  8. Charm Decays at BABAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.

    2004-01-01

    The results of several studies of charmed mesons and baryons at BABAR are presented. First, searches for the rare decays D 0 → l + l - are presented and new upper limits on these processes are established. Second, a measurement of the branching fraction of the isospin-violating hadronic decay D* s (2112) + → D s + π 0 relative to the radiative decay D* s (2112) + → D s + γ is made. Third, the decays of D* sJ (2317) + and D sJ (2460) + mesons are studied and ratios of branching fractions are measured. Fourth, Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the Λ c + are examined and their branching fractions measured relative to Cabibbo-allowed modes. Fifth, the Χ c 0 is studied through its decays to Χ - π + and (Omega) - K + ; in addition to measuring the ratio of branching fractions for Χ c 0 produced from the c(bar c) continuum, the uncorrected momentum spectrum is measured, providing clear confirmation of Χ c 0 production in B decays

  9. Iconic decay in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Britta; Kappenman, Emily S; Robinson, Benjamin M; Fuller, Rebecca L; Luck, Steven J; Gold, James M

    2011-09-01

    Working memory impairment is considered a core deficit in schizophrenia, but the precise nature of this deficit has not been determined. Multiple lines of evidence implicate deficits at the encoding stage. During encoding, information is held in a precategorical sensory store termed iconic memory, a literal image of the stimulus with high capacity but rapid decay. Pathologically increased iconic decay could reduce the number of items that can be transferred into working memory before the information is lost and could thus contribute to the working memory deficit seen in the illness. The current study used a partial report procedure to test the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia (n = 37) display faster iconic memory decay than matched healthy control participants (n = 28). Six letters, arranged in a circle, were presented for 50 ms. Following a variable delay of 0-1000 ms, a central arrow cue indicated the item to be reported. In both patients and control subjects, recall accuracy decreased with increasing cue delay, reflecting decay of the iconic representation of the stimulus array. Patients displayed impaired memory performance across all cue delays, consistent with an impairment in working memory, but the rate of iconic memory decay did not differ between patients and controls. This provides clear evidence against faster loss of iconic memory representations in schizophrenia, ruling out iconic decay as an underlying source of the working memory impairment in this population. Thus, iconic decay rate can be added to a growing list of unimpaired cognitive building blocks in schizophrenia.

  10. Weak radiative hyperon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.L.; Booth, E.C.; Gall, K.P.; McIntyre, E.K.; Miller, J.P.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Bassalleck, B.; Hall, J.R.; Larson, K.D.; Wolfe, D.M.; Fickinger, W.J.; Robinson, D.K.; Hallin, A.L.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Measday, D.F.; Noble, A.J.; Waltham, C.E.; Hessey, N.P.; Lowe, J.; Horvath, D.; Salomon, M.

    1990-01-01

    New measurements of the Σ + and Λ weak radiative decays are discussed. The hyperons were produced at rest by the reaction K - p → Yπ where Y = Σ + or Λ. The monoenergetic pion was used to tag the hyperon production, and the branching ratios were determined from the relative amplitudes of Σ + → pγ to Σ + → pπ 0 and Λ → nγ to Λ → nπ 0 . The photons from weak radiative decays and from π 0 decays were detected with modular NaI arrays. (orig.)

  11. SYMPOSIUM: Rare decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Late last year, a symposium entitled 'Rare Decays' attracted 115 participants to a hotel in Vancouver, Canada. These participants were particle physicists interested in checking conventional selection rules to look for clues of possible new behaviour outside today's accepted 'Standard Model'. For physicists, 'rare decays' include processes that have so far not been seen, explicitly forbidden by the rules of the Standard Model, or processes highly suppressed because the decay is dominated by an easier route, or includes processes resulting from multiple transitions

  12. Slowing Quantum Decoherence by Squeezing in Phase Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jeannic, H.; Cavaillès, A.; Huang, K.; Filip, R.; Laurat, J.

    2018-02-01

    Non-Gaussian states, and specifically the paradigmatic cat state, are well known to be very sensitive to losses. When propagating through damping channels, these states quickly lose their nonclassical features and the associated negative oscillations of their Wigner function. However, by squeezing the superposition states, the decoherence process can be qualitatively changed and substantially slowed down. Here, as a first example, we experimentally observe the reduced decoherence of squeezed optical coherent-state superpositions through a lossy channel. To quantify the robustness of states, we introduce a combination of a decaying value and a rate of decay of the Wigner function negativity. This work, which uses squeezing as an ancillary Gaussian resource, opens new possibilities to protect and manipulate quantum superpositions in phase space.

  13. A slowing-down problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I; Pershagen, B

    1958-06-15

    An infinitely long circular cylinder of radius a is surrounded by an infinite moderator. Both media are non-capturing. The cylinder emits neutrons of age zero with a constant source density of S. We assume that the ratios of the slowing-down powers and of the diffusion constants are independent of the neutron energy. The slowing-down density is calculated for two cases, a) when the slowing-down power of the cylinder medium is very small, and b) when the cylinder medium is identical with the moderator. The ratios of the slowing-down density at the age {tau} and the source density in the two cases are called {psi}{sub V}, and {psi}{sub M} respectively. {psi}{sub V} and {psi}{sub M} are functions of y=a{sup 2}/4{tau}. These two functions ({psi}{sub V} and {psi}{sub M}) are calculated and tabulated for y = 0-0.25.

  14. Numerical modeling of slow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews previous attempt and the present status of efforts to understand the structure of slow shocks by means of time dependent numerical calculations. Studies carried out using MHD or hybrid-kinetic codes have demonstrated qualitative agreement with theory. A number of unresolved issues related to hybrid simulations of the internal shock structure are discussed in some detail. 43 refs., 8 figs

  15. Development of slow positron beam lines and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Nagendra Nath

    2018-05-01

    A positron is an antiparticle of an electron that can be formed in diverse methods: natural or artificial β-decay process, fission and fusion reactions, and a pair production of electron-positron occurred in the reactor and the high energy accelerator centers. Usually a long-lifetime radio isotope is customized for the construction of a slow positron beam lines in many laboratories. The typical intensity of this beam depends upon the strength of the positron source, moderator efficiency, and guiding, pulsing, focusing and detecting systems. This article will review a few positron beam lines and their potential applications in research, especially in the Positronium Bose-Einstein Condensation.

  16. Teleportation via decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    therefore normally plays a negative role in quantum information processing [1]. ... of a decay be used in a fruitful way for quantum information process- ing? ..... The model independent portions of the analysis of communication through a noisy.

  17. Decay of Hoyle state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-02

    Nov 2, 2014 ... T K RANA, C BHATTACHARYA, S KUNDU, ... of various direct 3α decay mechanisms of the Hoyle state. ... Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. ... FMD predicts a compact triangle shape and LEFT predicts a bent arm chain structure,.

  18. RARE KAON DECAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-01-01

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type

  19. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... Anyhow, the 'multi-isotope' ansatz is needed to compensate for matrix element ... The neccessary half-life requirement to touch this ... site energy depositions (like double beta decay) and multiple site interactions (most of.

  20. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... milk, ice cream, honey, sugar, soda, dried fruit, cake, cookies, hard candy and mints, dry cereal, and ... teeth can wear down and gums may recede, making teeth more vulnerable to root decay. Older adults ...

  1. Inflaton decay in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yanagida, T.T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for the Early Universe

    2007-06-15

    We discuss inflaton decay in supergravity, taking account of the gravitational effects. It is shown that, if the inflaton has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, it generically couples to any matter fields that appear in the superpotential at the tree level, and to any gauge sectors through anomalies in the supergravity. Through these processes, the inflaton generically decays into the supersymmetry breaking sector, producing many gravitinos. The inflaton also directly decays into a pair of the gravitinos. We derive constraints on both inflation models and supersymmetry breaking scenarios for avoiding overproduction of the gravitinos. Furthermore, the inflaton naturally decays into the visible sector via the top Yukawa coupling and SU(3){sub C} gauge interactions. (orig.)

  2. Inflaton decay in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F.; Yanagida, T.T.; Tokyo Univ.

    2007-06-01

    We discuss inflaton decay in supergravity, taking account of the gravitational effects. It is shown that, if the inflaton has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, it generically couples to any matter fields that appear in the superpotential at the tree level, and to any gauge sectors through anomalies in the supergravity. Through these processes, the inflaton generically decays into the supersymmetry breaking sector, producing many gravitinos. The inflaton also directly decays into a pair of the gravitinos. We derive constraints on both inflation models and supersymmetry breaking scenarios for avoiding overproduction of the gravitinos. Furthermore, the inflaton naturally decays into the visible sector via the top Yukawa coupling and SU(3) C gauge interactions. (orig.)

  3. Double beta decay: experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2006-01-01

    The results obtained so far and those of the running experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The plans for second generation experiments, the techniques to be adopted and the expected sensitivities are compared and discussed

  4. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  5. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  6. Tau decays into kaons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkemeier, M.; Mirkes, E.

    1995-04-01

    Predictions for semi-leptonic decay rates of the τ lepton into two meson final states and three meson final states are derived. The hadronic matrix elements are expressed in terms of form factors, which can be predicted by chiral Lagrangians supplemented by informations about all possible low-lying resonances in the different channels. Isospin symmetry relations among the different final states are carefully taken into account. The calculated brancing ratios are compared with measured decay rates where data are available

  7. Iconic Decay in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Britta; Kappenman, Emily S.; Robinson, Benjamin M.; Fuller, Rebecca L.; Luck, Steven J.; Gold, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Working memory impairment is considered a core deficit in schizophrenia, but the precise nature of this deficit has not been determined. Multiple lines of evidence implicate deficits at the encoding stage. During encoding, information is held in a precategorical sensory store termed iconic memory, a literal image of the stimulus with high capacity but rapid decay. Pathologically increased iconic decay could reduce the number of items that can be transferred into working memory before the info...

  8. Annihilation decays of bottomonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Antony Prakash; Bhat, Manjunath; D'Souza, Praveen P.; Vijaya Kumar, K.B.

    2016-01-01

    The bound state of a bottom quark b and its anti quark b-bar known as bottomonium was first seen in the spectrum of μμ"- pairs produced in 400 GeV proton-nucleus collisions at Fermilab. It was discovered as spin triplet states ϒ(1S), ϒ(2S) and ϒ(3S) by E288 collaboration at Fermilab. We have calculated annihilation decay widths of bottomonium states. The calculated decay widths are presented

  9. The unappreciated slowness of conventional tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Larsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most tourists are not consciously engaging in ‘slow travel’, but a number of travel behaviours displayed by conventional tourists can be interpreted as slow travel behaviour. Based on Danish tourists’ engagement with the distances they travel across to reach their holiday destination, this paper explores unintended slow travel behaviours displayed by these tourists. None of the tourists participating in this research were consciously doing ‘slow travel’, and yet some of their most valued holiday memories are linked to slow travel behaviours. Based on the analysis of these unintended slow travel behaviours, this paper will discuss the potential this insight might hold for promotion of slow travel. If unappreciated and unintentional slow travel behaviours could be utilised in the deliberate effort of encouraging more people to travel slow, ‘slow travel’ will be in a better position to become integrated into conventional travel behaviour.

  10. Rare psi decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, R.

    1986-01-01

    Slightly more than ten years have passed since the psi was discovered, yet the study of psi decays continues to be an active and fruitful area of research. One reason for such longevity is that each successive experiment has increased their sensitivity over previous experiments either by improving detection efficiency or by increasing statistics. This has allowed the observation and, in some cases, detailed studies of rare psi decays. Branching ratios of ≅10-/sup 4/ are now routinely studied, while certain decay channels are beginning to show interesting effects at the 10-/sup 5/ level. Future experiments at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) have the potential for increasing sensitivities by one or two orders of magnitude, thus enabling many interesting studies impossible with current data samples. The author first examines the extent to which psi decays can be used to study electroweak phenomena. The remainder of this work is devoted to the more traditional task of using the psi to study quarks, gluons, and the properties of the strong interaction. Of particular interest is the study of radioactive psi decays, where a number of new particles have been discovered. Recent results regarding two of these particles, the θ(1700) and iota(1450), are discussed, as well as a study of the quark content of the eta and eta' using decays of the psi to vector-pseudoscalar final states

  11. Decays of supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Ohlsson, Tommy; Winter, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Supernova neutrinos could be well-suited for probing neutrino decay, since decay may be observed even for very small decay rates or coupling constants. We will introduce an effective operator framework for the combined description of neutrino decay and neutrino oscillations for supernova neutrinos, which can especially take into account two properties: one is the radially symmetric neutrino flux, allowing a decay product to be re-directed towards the observer even if the parent neutrino had a different original direction of propagation. The other is decoherence because of the long baselines for coherently produced neutrinos. We will demonstrate how to use this effective theory to calculate the time-dependent fluxes at the detector. In addition, we will show the implications of a Majoron-like decay model. As a result, we will demonstrate that for certain parameter values one may observe some effects which could also mimic signals similar to the ones expected from supernova models, making it in general harder to separate neutrino and supernova properties

  12. Rare and forbidden decays

    CERN Document Server

    Trampetic, Josip

    2002-01-01

    In these lectures I first cover radiative and semileptonic B decays, including the QCD corrections for the quark subprocesses. The exclusive modes and the evaluation of the hadronic matrix elements, i.e. the relevant hadronic form factors, are the second step. Small effects due to the long-distance, spectator contributions, etc. are discussed next. The second section we started with non-leptonic decays, typically $B \\to \\pi\\pi, K\\pi, \\rho\\pi,...$ We describe in more detail our prediction for decays dominated by the $b\\to s \\eta_c$ transition. Reports on the most recent experimental results are given at the end of each subsection. In the second part of the lectures I discuss decays forbidden by the Lorentz and gauge invariance, and due to the violation of the angular moment conservation, generally called the Standard Model-forbiden decays. However, the non-commutative QED and/or non-commutative Standard Model (NCSM), developed in a series of works in the last few years allow some of those decay modes. These ar...

  13. Mitigation of radon and thoron decay products by filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin; Meisenberg, Oliver; Chen Yongheng; Karg, Erwin; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of indoor radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) decay products is the most important source of exposure to ionizing radiation for the human respiratory tract. Decreasing ventilation rates due to energy saving reasons in new buildings suggest additional active mitigation techniques to reduce the exposure in homes with high radon and thoron concentrations but poor ventilation. Filtration techniques with HEPA filters and simple surgical mask material have been tested for their potential to reduce the indoor exposure in terms of the total effective dose for mixed radon and thoron indoor atmospheres. The tests were performed inside an experimental room providing stable conditions. Filtration (at filtration rates of 0.2 h -1 and larger) removes attached radon and thoron decay products effectively but indoor aerosol as well. Therefore the concentration of unattached decay products (which have a higher dose coefficient) may increase. The decrease of the attached decay product concentrations could be theoretically described by a slowly decreasing exponential process. For attached radon decay products, it exhibited a faster but weaker removal process compared to attached thoron decay products (- 70% for attached radon decay products and - 80% for attached thoron decay products at a filtration rate of 0.5 h -1 with an HEPA filter). The concentration of unattached thoron decay products increased distinctly during the filtration process (+ 300%) while that of unattached radon decay products rose only slightly though at a much higher level (+ 17%). In the theoretical description these observed differences could be attributed to the different half-lives of the nuclides. Considering both effects, reduced attached and increased unattached decay product concentrations, filtration could significantly decrease the total effective dose from thoron whereas the overall effect on radon dose is small. A permanent filtration is recommended because of the slow decrease of the

  14. Non-radiation risk factors for leukemia: A case-control study among chornobyl cleanup workers in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzenko, N; Hatch, M; Bazyka, D; Dyagil, I; Reiss, R F; Brenner, A; Chumak, V; Babkina, N; Zablotska, L B; Mabuchi, K

    2015-10-01

    Occupational and environmental exposure to chemicals such as benzene has been linked to increased risk of leukemia. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have also been found to affect leukemia risk. Previous analyses in a large cohort of Chornobyl clean-up workers in Ukraine found significant radiation-related increased risk for all leukemia types. We investigated the potential for additional effects of occupational and lifestyle factors on leukemia risk in this radiation-exposed cohort. In a case-control study of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among Chornobyl cleanup workers, we collected data on a range of non-radiation exposures. We evaluated these and other potential risk factors in analyses adjusting for estimated bone marrow radiation dose. We calculated Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals in relation to lifestyle factors and occupational hazards. After adjusting for radiation, we found no clear association of leukemia risk with smoking or alcohol but identified a two-fold elevated risk for non-CLL leukemia with occupational exposure to petroleum (OR=2.28; 95% Confidence Interval 1.13, 6.79). Risks were particularly high for myeloid leukemias. No associations with risk factors other than radiation were found for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. These data - the first from a working population in Ukraine - add to evidence from several previous reports of excess leukemia morbidity in groups exposed environmentally or occupationally to petroleum or its products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonradiative inter- and intramolecular energy transfer from the aromatic donor anisole to a synthesized photoswitchable acceptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Misra, Tapas; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa; De, Asish; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ganguly, Tapan

    2010-02-01

    We report steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements on acetonitrile (ACN) solutions of the model compounds, energy donor anisole (A) and a photoswitchable acceptor N,N'-1,2-phenylene di-p-tosylamide (B) and the multichromophore (M) where A and B are connected by a spacer containing both rigid triple (acetylenic) and flexible methylene bonds. Both steady state and time correlated single photon counting measurements demonstrate that though intermolecular energy transfer, of Forster type, between the donor and acceptor moieties occurs with rate 10(8)s(-1) but when these two reacting components are linked by a spacer (multichromophore, M) the observed transfer rate ( approximately 10(11)s(-1)) enhances. This seemingly indicates that the imposition of the spacer by inserting a triple bond may facilitate in the propagation of electronic excitation energy through bond. The time resolved fluorescence measurements along with the theoretical predictions using Configuration interaction singles (CIS) method by using 6-31G (d,p) basis set, implemented in the Gaussian package indicate the formations of the two excited conformers of B. The experimental findings made from the steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrate that, though two different isomeric species of the acceptor B are formed in the excited singlet states, the prevailing singlet-singlet nonradiative energy transfer route was found from the donor A to the relatively longer-lived isomeric species of B. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Room temperature elastic--plastic response of thin-walled tubes subjected to nonradial combinations of axial and torsional loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.C.

    1975-01-01

    Two tubular specimens of type 304 stainless steel with uniform thin walls were subjected to a program of segmental combined tension/compression and torsion loadings at room temperature. A proportional, or radial, loading into the plastic range was initially applied to each specimen. Two nonproportional (nonradial) loadings along straight line segments for which neither the loading paths nor their linear extrapolations passed through the origin of the stress space were then applied. The axial and torsional stress-strain curves for these segmental prestress loadings were plotted. Hence, the stress-strain response characteristics for nonproportional loadings as well as for proportional loading can be studied. In addition, the axial and torsional plastic strain components were calculated, and the total plastic strain trajectories were plotted in a plastic strain space. Finally, using results from a detailed study of yield surfaces, which was performed for the first specimen, a spectrum of initial and subsequent yield curves corresponding to the segmental prestress loadings is presented. (U.S.)

  17. Nonradiative lifetime extraction using power-dependent relative photoluminescence of III-V semiconductor double-heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, A. W., E-mail: alexandre.walker@ise.fraunhofer.de; Heckelmann, S.; Karcher, C.; Höhn, O.; Went, C.; Niemeyer, M.; Bett, A. W.; Lackner, D. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-04-21

    A power-dependent relative photoluminescence measurement method is developed for double-heterostructures composed of III-V semiconductors. Analyzing the data yields insight into the radiative efficiency of the absorbing layer as a function of laser intensity. Four GaAs samples of different thicknesses are characterized, and the measured data are corrected for dependencies of carrier concentration and photon recycling. This correction procedure is described and discussed in detail in order to determine the material's Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime as a function of excitation intensity. The procedure assumes 100% internal radiative efficiency under the highest injection conditions, and we show this leads to less than 0.5% uncertainty. The resulting GaAs material demonstrates a 5.7 ± 0.5 ns nonradiative lifetime across all samples of similar doping (2–3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}) for an injected excess carrier concentration below 4 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −3}. This increases considerably up to longer than 1 μs under high injection levels due to a trap saturation effect. The method is also shown to give insight into bulk and interface recombination.

  18. Decay pathway and high-temperature luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} in Ca{sub 2}Gd{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, M.D. [Engineering Materials Department, College of Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States)], E-mail: chambers@engineering.ucsb.edu; Rousseve, P.A.; Clarke, D.R. [Engineering Materials Department, College of Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    The temperature-dependent luminescence of Eu:Ca{sub 2}Gd{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and its decay pathways are investigated in order to assess the utility of the material as a thermometric phosphor. Non-radiative decays are found to compete with radiative processes even at room temperature. A decay pathway involving decay through charge-transfer states is proposed based on the decay profiles of emissions from {sup 5}D{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0} levels and on the temperature sensitivity of the spectra as observed after excitation by several wavelengths. The implications of this on solid-state lighting are also discussed.

  19. Neutron decay, semileptonic hyperon decay and the Cabibbo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The decay rates and formfactor ratios of neutron decay and semileptonic hyperon decays are compared in the framework of the Cabibbo model. The results indicate SU(3) symmetry breaking. The Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V us determined from these decays is in good agreement with the value determined from K→πeν decays, and with unitarity of the KM-matrix. (orig.)

  20. A Primer to Slow Light

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, U.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory-based optical analogs of astronomical objects such as black holes rely on the creation of light with an extremely low or even vanishing group velocity (slow light). These brief notes represent a pedagogical attempt towards elucidating this extraordinary form of light. This paper is a contribution to the book Artificial Black Holes edited by Mario Novello, Matt Visser and Grigori Volovik. The paper is intended as a primer, an introduction to the subject for non-experts, not as a det...

  1. Capillary waves in slow motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Tolan, Metin; Press, Werner; Madsen, Anders; Gruebel, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Capillary wave dynamics on glycerol surfaces has been investigated by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy performed at grazing angles. The measurements show that thermally activated capillary wave motion is slowed down exponentially when the sample is cooled below 273 K. This finding directly reflects the freezing of the surface waves. The wave-number dependence of the measured time constants is in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for overdamped capillary waves

  2. The fast slow TDPAC spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekic, B.; Koicki, S.; Manasijevic, M.; Ivanovic, N.; Koteski, V.; Milosevic, Z.; Radisavljevic, I.; Cavor, J.; Novakovic, N.; Marjanovic, D.

    2001-01-01

    A 2-BaF 2 detector - fast slow time spectrometer for time differential perturbed angular correlations (TDPAC) experiments is described. This apparatus has been developed in the Group for Hyperfine Interactions in the Institute for Nuclear Sciences in VINCA. The excellent time resolution combined with high efficiency offered by these detectors enables one high counting rate performance and is operating in the wide temperature range 78-1200 K. (author)

  3. CP violation in B decay

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    We review the physics of CP violation in B decays. After introducing the CKM matrix and how it causes CP violation, we cover three types of CP violation that can occur in B decays: CP violation in mixing, CP violation by mixing-decay interference, and CP violation in decay.

  4. Radioactive decay and labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter on radioactive decay and labeled compounds has numerous intext equations and worked, sample problems. Topics covered include the following: terms and mathematics of radioactive decay; examples of calculations; graphs of decay equations; radioactivity or activity; activity measurements; activity decay; half-life determinations; labeled compounds. A 20 problem set is also included. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  6. Hidden slow pulsars in binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Brookshaw, Leigh

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of the binary containing the slow pulsar PSR 1718-19 orbiting around a low-mass companion star adds new light on the characteristics of binary pulsars. The properties of the radio eclipses of PSR 1718-19 are the most striking observational characteristics of this system. The surface of the companion star produces a mass outflow which leaves only a small 'window' in orbital phase for the detection of PSR 1718-19 around 400 MHz. At this observing frequency, PSR 1718-19 is clearly observable only for about 1 hr out of the total 6.2 hr orbital period. The aim of this Letter is twofold: (1) to model the hydrodynamical behavior of the eclipsing material from the companion star of PSR 1718-19 and (2) to argue that a population of binary slow pulsars might have escaped detection in pulsar surveys carried out at 400 MHz. The possible existence of a population of partially or totally hidden slow pulsars in binaries will have a strong impact on current theories of binary evolution of neutron stars.

  7. Biphasic decay of the Ca transient results from increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Rajiv; Li, Yatong; Greensmith, David J.; Eisner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Ca leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor (RyR) reduces the amplitude of the Ca transient and slows its rate of decay.In the presence of β‐adrenergic stimulation, RyR‐mediated Ca leak produces a biphasic decay of the Ca transient with a fast early phase and a slow late phase.Two forms of Ca leak have been studied, Ca‐sensitising (induced by caffeine) and non‐sensitising (induced by ryanodine) and both induce biphasic decay of the Ca transient.Only Ca‐sensitising leak can be reversed by traditional RyR inhibitors such as tetracaine.Ca leak can also induce Ca waves. At low levels of leak, waves occur. As leak is increased, first biphasic decay and then slowed monophasic decay is seen. The level of leak has major effects on the shape of the Ca transient. Abstract In heart failure, a reduction in Ca transient amplitude and contractile dysfunction can by caused by Ca leak through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) and/or decreased activity of the SR Ca ATPase (SERCA). We have characterised the effects of two forms of Ca leak (Ca‐sensitising and non‐sensitising) on calcium cycling and compared with those of SERCA inhibition. We measured [Ca2+]i with fluo‐3 in voltage‐clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Increasing SR leak with either caffeine (to sensitise the RyR to Ca activation) or ryanodine (non‐sensitising) had similar effects to SERCA inhibition: decreased systolic [Ca2+]i, increased diastolic [Ca2+]i and slowed decay. However, in the presence of isoproterenol, leak produced a biphasic decay of the Ca transient in the majority of cells while SERCA inhibition produced monophasic decay. Tetracaine reversed the effects of caffeine but not of ryanodine. When caffeine (1 mmol l−1) was added to a cell which displayed Ca waves, the wave frequency initially increased before waves disappeared and biphasic decay developed. Eventually (at higher caffeine concentrations), the

  8. Sigma beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment to measure beta decays of the sigma particle. Sigmas produced by stopping a K - beam in a liquid hydrogen target decayed in the following reactions: Kp → Σπ; Σ → Neν. The electron and pion were detected by wire spark chambers in a magnetic spectrometer and by plastic scintillators, and were differentiated by a threshold gas Cherenkov counter. The neutron was detected by liquid scintillation counters. The data (n = 3) shell electrons or the highly excited electrons decay first. Instead, it is suggested that when there are two to five electrons in highly excited states immediately after a heavy ion--atom collision the first transitions to occur will be among highly excited Rydberg states in a cascade down to the 4s, 4p, and 3d-subshells. If one of the long lived states becomes occupied by electrons promoted during the collision or by electrons falling from higher levels, it will not decay until after the valence shell decays. LMM rates calculated to test the methods used are compared to previous works. The mixing coefficients are given in terms of the states 4s4p, 45sp+-, and 5s5p. The applicability of Cooper, Fano, and Prats' discussion of the energies and transition rates of doubly excited states is considered

  9. Beta and muon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-01-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  10. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  11. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A; Pascual, P

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  12. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  13. Weak interactions: muon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, A.M.; Sirlin, A.

    1975-01-01

    The traditional theory of the dominant mode of muon decay is presented, a survey of the experiments which have measured the observable features of the decay is given, and those things which can be learned about the parameters and nature of the theory from the experimental results are indicated. The following aspects of the theory of muon decay are presented first: general four-fermion theory, two-component theory of the neutrino, V--A theory, two-component and V--A theories vs general four-fermion theory, intermediate-boson hypothesis, radiative corrections, radiative corrections in the intermediate-boson theory, and endpoint singularities and corrections of order α 2 . Experiments on muon lifetime, isotropic electron spectrum, total asymmetry and energy dependence of asymmetry of electrons from polarized muons, and electron polarization are described, and a summary of experimental results is given. 7 figures, 2 tables, 109 references

  14. Observing and modeling the spectrum of a slow slip event: Constraints on the scaling of slow slip and tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Bartlow, N. M.; Ghosh, A.

    2017-12-01

    We estimate the normalized moment rate spectrum of a slow slip event in Cascadia and then attempt to reproduce it. Our goal is to further assess whether a single physical mechanism could govern slow slip and tremor events, with durations that span 6 orders of magnitude, so we construct the spectrum by parameterizing a large slow slip event as the sum of a number of subevents with various durations. The spectrum estimate uses data from three sources: the GPS-based slip inversion of Bartlow et al (2011), PBO borehole strain measurements, and beamforming-based tremor moment estimates of Ghosh et al (2009). We find that at periods shorter than 1 day, the moment rate power spectrum decays as frequencyn, where n is between 0.7 and 1.4 when measured from strain and between 1.2 and 1.4 when inferred from tremor. The spectrum appears roughly flat at periods of 1 to 10 days, as both the 1-day-period strain and tremor data and the 6-day-period slip inversion data imply a moment rate power of 0.02 times the the total moment squared. We demonstrate one way to reproduce this spectrum: by constructing the large-scale slow slip event as the sum of a series of subevents. The shortest of these subevents could be interpreted as VLFEs or even LFEs, while longer subevents might represent the aseismic slip that drives rapid tremor reverals, streaks, or rapid tremor migrations. We pick the subevent magnitudes from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution and place the events randomly throughout a 30-day interval. Then we assign each subevent a duration that scales with its moment to a specified power. Finally, we create a moment rate function for each subevent and sum all of the moment rates. We compute the summed slow slip moment rate spectra with two approaches: a time-domain numerical computation and a frequency-domain analytical summation. Several sets of subevent parameters can allow the constructed slow slip event to match the observed spectrum. One allowable set of parameters is of

  15. PSI: Very slow polarized muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At the 'pion factory' of the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute, a collaboration of PSI, Heidelberg and Zurich (ETH) has recently produced intense beams of positive muons which have kinetic energies as low as 10 eV and with complete polarization (spin orientation). The new results were achieved at a surface muon channel, transporting positive muons from the decay of positive pions stopped at the surface of a pion production target. Surface muons with 4 MeV kinetic energy were transported by a conventional secondary beam channel and partially stopped in a moderator consisting of a layer of solidified noble gas deposited on a cold metallic substrate

  16. Sequential decay of Reggeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Toshihiro

    1981-01-01

    Probabilities of meson production in the sequential decay of Reggeons, which are formed from the projectile and the target in the hadron-hadron to Reggeon-Reggeon processes, are investigated. It is assumed that pair creation of heavy quarks and simultaneous creation of two antiquark-quark pairs are negligible. The leading-order terms with respect to ratio of creation probabilities of anti s s to anti u u (anti d d) are calculated. The production cross sections in the target fragmentation region are given in terms of probabilities in the initial decay of the Reggeons and an effect of manyparticle production. (author)

  17. Do protons decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchfield, P.J.

    1984-09-01

    The experimental status of proton decay is reviewed after the Leipzig International conference, July 1984. A brief comparative description of the currently active experiments is given. From the overall samples of contained events it can be concluded that the experiments are working well and broadly agree with each other. The candidates for proton decay from each experiment are examined. Although several experiments report candidates at a higher rate than expected from background calculations, the validity of these calculations is still open to doubt. (author)

  18. 103Pd decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyavenko, V.S.; Borozenets, G.P.; Vishnevskij, I.N.; Zheltonozhskij, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    103 Pd decay in different chemical states has been investigated. The change of the partial half-life period equal to 0.67±0.15% has been detected. The γ-spectrum has been measured to a high precision. The new data have been obtained on population probabilities of 103 Rh excited states and the total energy of decay for 103 Pd has been determined to a high precision (543.0±0.8). The values of log ft have been determined

  19. Decay of 99Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Love, T.A.

    1976-01-01

    Relative intensities for K x-rays and gamma rays emanating from 99 Mo in equilibrium with its 99 Tc* daughter have been measured using several Ge photon detectors. Combining these intensities with an evaluated set of electron-conversion coefficients has provided a set of absolute intensities for the observed gamma rays. The absolute intensity for the dominant 140.5-keV gamma ray in 99 Tc was determined to be 90.7 +- 0.6/100 99 Mo disintegrations for 99 Mo decay in equilibrium with decay of the 99 Tc* daughter

  20. Supersymmetry in Z' decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcella, G.

    2014-01-01

    I study the phenomenology of new heavy neutral gauge bosons Z', predicted by Grand Unification Theories-driven U(1)' gauge groups and by the sequential standard model. BSM (Beyond Standard Model) decays into supersymmetric final states are accounted for, besides the SM (Standard Model) modes usually investigated. I give an estimate of the number of supersymmetric events in Z' decays possibly expected at LHC, as well as of the product of the Z' cross section times the branching fraction into electron and muon pairs. (author)

  1. Highly sensitive and quantitative FRET-FLIM imaging in single dendritic spines using improved non-radiative YFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Lee, Seok-Jin; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2008-08-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPFLIM) enables the quantitative measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in small subcellular compartments in light scattering tissue. We evaluated and optimized the FRET pair of mEGFP (monomeric EGFP with the A206K mutation) and REACh (non-radiative YFP variants) for TPFLIM. We characterized several mutants of REACh in terms of their "darkness," and their ability to act as a FRET acceptor for mEGFP in HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons. Since the commonly used monomeric mutation A206K increases the brightness of REACh, we introduced a different monomeric mutation (F223R) which does not affect the brightness. Also, we found that the folding efficiency of original REACh, as measured by the fluorescence lifetime of a mEGFP-REACh tandem dimer, was low and variable from cell to cell. Introducing two folding mutations (F46L, Q69M) into REACh increased the folding efficiency by approximately 50%, and reduced the variability of FRET signal. Pairing mEGFP with the new REACh (super-REACh, or sREACh) improved the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the mEGFP-mRFP or mEGFP-original REACh pair by approximately 50%. Using this new pair, we demonstrated that the fraction of actin monomers in filamentous and globular forms in single dendritic spines can be quantitatively measured with high sensitivity. Thus, the mEGFP-sREACh pair is suited for quantitative FRET measurement by TPFLIM, and enables us to measure protein-protein interactions in individual dendritic spines in brain slices with high sensitivity.

  2. Slow electrons kill the ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.

    2001-01-01

    A new method and apparatus (Trochoidal electron monochromator) to study the interactions of electrons with atoms, molecules and clusters was developed. Two applications are briefly reported: a) the ozone destruction in the atmosphere is caused by different reasons, a new mechanism is proposed, that slow thermal electrons are self added to the ozone molecule (O 3 ) with a high frequency, then O 3 is destroyed ( O 3 + e - → O - + O 2 ); b) another application is the study of the binding energy of the football molecule C60. (nevyjel)

  3. Blowup for flat slow manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a way of extending the blowup method, in the formulation of Krupa and Szmolyan, to flat slow manifolds that lose hyperbolicity beyond any algebraic order. Although these manifolds have infinite co-dimensions, they do appear naturally in certain settings; for example, in (a......) the regularization of piecewise smooth systems by tanh, (b) a particular aircraft landing dynamics model, and finally (c) in a model of earthquake faulting. We demonstrate the approach using a simple model system and the examples (a) and (b)....

  4. Blowup for flat slow manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, K. U.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a way of extending the blowup method, in the formulation of Krupa and Szmolyan, to flat slow manifolds that lose hyperbolicity beyond any algebraic order. Although these manifolds have infinite co-dimensions, they do appear naturally in certain settings; for example, in (a) the regularization of piecewise smooth systems by \\tanh , (b) a particular aircraft landing dynamics model, and finally (c) in a model of earthquake faulting. We demonstrate the approach using a simple model system and the examples (a) and (b).

  5. Visible luminescence peculiar to sintered silica nanoparticles: Spectral and decay properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Cannas, M., E-mail: marco.cannas@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Cangialosi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université St-Etienne, St-Etienne F-42000 (France); Spallino, L.; Gelardi, F.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We report that the sintering at 1000 °C of silica nanoparticles (an average diameter of 14 nm) produces a transparent sample that exhibits a bright visible emission under UV excitation. The use of time resolved luminescence spectroscopy and a tunable laser source allows us to single out three contributions centered at 1.96 eV, 2.41 eV and 3.43 eV. The excitation spectra of these emissions evidence bell shaped bands consistent with transitions between localized defects’ states. For each emission we study the intensity and the lifetime in the temperature range from 300 K down to 10 K, thus evidencing the competition between radiative and non-radiative processes in the optical cycle of luminescent centers. The comparison with the luminescence properties of silica, both nanoparticles and bulk, points out that the observed emissions are peculiar to the sintered silica network. - Highlights: • Solid-phase sintering at 1000 °C of silica nanoparticles produces a transparent sample. • Sintered silica nanoparticles emit a bright luminescence under UV excitation. • Three emissions, centered around 2.0 V, 2.4 eV and 3.4 eV, are distinguished on the basis of the excitation and decay properties. • The observed excitation/emission bands originate from localized defect states peculiar to the sintered silica network. • The luminescence efficiency decreases with temperature due to the activation of non-radiative channels.

  6. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-01-01

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of th...

  7. Integrated Photonics Enabled by Slow Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Chen, Yuntian; Ek, Sara

    2012-01-01

    In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources.......In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources....

  8. Triton beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.Y.; Wu, Y.; Ishikawa, S.; Sasakawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    Triton β-decay has been calculated using wave functions for 3 He and 3 H obtained from (Coulomb-modified) Faddeev equations for various interactions. We get a value for the Gamow-Teller matrix element of √3 (0.962±0.002) without regards to two- or three-nucleon inteactions. This value agrees with the experimental value. (orig.)

  9. Unparticles and muon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Mamta

    2008-01-01

    Recently Georgi has discussed the possible existence of 'Unparticles' describable by operators having non-integral scaling dimensions. With the interaction of these with the Standard Model particles being constrained only by gauge and Lorentz symmetries, it affords a new source for lepton flavour violation. Current and future muon decay experiments are shown to be very sensitive to such scenarios

  10. Unparticles and muon decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Ghosh, Dilip Kumar [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)], E-mail: dkghosh@physics.du.ac.in; Mamta [Department of Physics, S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

    2008-01-03

    Recently Georgi has discussed the possible existence of 'Unparticles' describable by operators having non-integral scaling dimensions. With the interaction of these with the Standard Model particles being constrained only by gauge and Lorentz symmetries, it affords a new source for lepton flavour violation. Current and future muon decay experiments are shown to be very sensitive to such scenarios.

  11. Gluons in quarkonium decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, K.; Walsh, T.

    1978-03-01

    We discuss what can be learned of the 3 S 1 quarkonium decay QantiQ → 3 gluoans QantiQ → γ + 2 gluons. The former is a way to find gluon jets and test QCD. The latter also allows us to measure gluoan + gluon → hadrons and look for pure gluonic resonances (glueballs). (orig.) [de

  12. Symmetry violating kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, P.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the muon number violating decay modes of the K-mesons is given. Subsequently, some new developments in the field of CP-violation are reviewed and the question of time-reversal invariance and the status of CPT-invariance are briefly considered. 42 references

  13. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepke, A.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental observation of neutrino oscillations and thus neutrino mass and mixing gives a first hint at new particle physics. The absolute values of the neutrino mass and the properties of neutrinos under CP-conjugation remain unknown. The experimental investigation of the nuclear double beta decay is one of the key techniques for solving these open problems

  14. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  15. Cosmology with decaying particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1984-09-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which an unstable massive relic particle species (denoted by X) has an initial mass density relative to baryons β -1 identically equal rho/sub X//rho/sub B/ >> 1, and then decays recently (redshift z less than or equal to 1000) into particles which are still relativistic today (denoted by R). We write down and solve the coupled equations for the cosmic scale factor a(t), the energy density in the various components (rho/sub X/, rho/sub R/, rho/sub B/), and the growth of linear density perturbations (delta rho/rho). The solutions form a one parameter (β) family of solutions; physically β -1 approx. = (Ω/sub R//Ω/sub NR/) x (1 + z/sub D/) = (ratio today of energy density of relativistic to nonrelativistic particles) x (1 + redshift of (decay)). We discuss the observational implications of such a cosmological model and compare our results to earlier results computed in the simultaneous decay approximation. In an appendix we briefly consider the case where one of the decay products of the X is massive and becomes nonrelativistic by the present epoch. 21 references

  16. Cosmology with decaying particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S.

    1984-09-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which an unstable massive relic particle species (denoted by X) has an initial mass density relative to baryons ..beta../sup -1/ identically equal rho/sub X//rho/sub B/ >> 1, and then decays recently (redshift z less than or equal to 1000) into particles which are still relativistic today (denoted by R). We write down and solve the coupled equations for the cosmic scale factor a(t), the energy density in the various components (rho/sub X/, rho/sub R/, rho/sub B/), and the growth of linear density perturbations (delta rho/rho). The solutions form a one parameter (..beta..) family of solutions; physically ..beta../sup -1/ approx. = (..cap omega../sub R//..cap omega../sub NR/) x (1 + z/sub D/) = (ratio today of energy density of relativistic to nonrelativistic particles) x (1 + redshift of (decay)). We discuss the observational implications of such a cosmological model and compare our results to earlier results computed in the simultaneous decay approximation. In an appendix we briefly consider the case where one of the decay products of the X is massive and becomes nonrelativistic by the present epoch. 21 references.

  17. Slowing down bubbles with sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Cedric; Dangla, Remie; Guinard, Marion

    2009-11-01

    We present experimental evidence that a bubble moving in a fluid in which a well-chosen acoustic noise is superimposed can be significantly slowed down even for moderate acoustic pressure. Through mean velocity measurements, we show that a condition for this effect to occur is for the acoustic noise spectrum to match or overlap the bubble's fundamental resonant mode. We render the bubble's oscillations and translational movements using high speed video. We show that radial oscillations (Rayleigh-Plesset type) have no effect on the mean velocity, while above a critical pressure, a parametric type instability (Faraday waves) is triggered and gives rise to nonlinear surface oscillations. We evidence that these surface waves are subharmonic and responsible for the bubble's drag increase. When the acoustic intensity is increased, Faraday modes interact and the strongly nonlinear oscillations behave randomly, leading to a random behavior of the bubble's trajectory and consequently to a higher slow down. Our observations may suggest new strategies for bubbly flow control, or two-phase microfluidic devices. It might also be applicable to other elastic objects, such as globules, cells or vesicles, for medical applications such as elasticity-based sorting.

  18. Molecular markers reliably predict post-harvest decay of fresh-cut lettuce in modified atmosphere packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh-cut lettuce is popular, but highly perishable product. Genetic studies of two bi-parental populations derived from crossing parents with rapid and slow rates of decay showed that the decay rate is heritable (broad spectrum heritability H2 of 0.56 – 0.87). The major genetic determinant of the d...

  19. Classification of decays involving variable decay chains with convolutional architectures

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Vidyo contribution We present a technique to perform classification of decays that exhibit decay chains involving a variable number of particles, which include a broad class of $B$ meson decays sensitive to new physics. The utility of such decays as a probe of the Standard Model is dependent upon accurate determination of the decay rate, which is challenged by the combinatorial background arising in high-multiplicity decay modes. In our model, each particle in the decay event is represented as a fixed-dimensional vector of feature attributes, forming an $n \\times k$ representation of the event, where $n$ is the number of particles in the event and $k$ is the dimensionality of the feature vector. A convolutional architecture is used to capture dependencies between the embedded particle representations and perform the final classification. The proposed model performs outperforms standard machine learning approaches based on Monte Carlo studies across a range of variable final-state decays with the Belle II det...

  20. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virotta, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate the critical slowing down of lattice QCD simulations. We perform a preliminary study in the quenched approximation where we find that our estimate of the exponential auto-correlation time scales as τ exp (a)∝a -5 , where a is the lattice spacing. In unquenched simulations with O(a) improved Wilson fermions we do not obtain a scaling law but find results compatible with the behavior that we find in the pure gauge theory. The discussion is supported by a large set of ensembles both in pure gauge and in the theory with two degenerate sea quarks. We have moreover investigated the effect of slow algorithmic modes in the error analysis of the expectation value of typical lattice QCD observables (hadronic matrix elements and masses). In the context of simulations affected by slow modes we propose and test a method to obtain reliable estimates of statistical errors. The method is supposed to help in the typical algorithmic setup of lattice QCD, namely when the total statistics collected is of O(10)τ exp . This is the typical case when simulating close to the continuum limit where the computational costs for producing two independent data points can be extremely large. We finally discuss the scale setting in N f =2 simulations using the Kaon decay constant f K as physical input. The method is explained together with a thorough discussion of the error analysis employed. A description of the publicly available code used for the error analysis is included.

  1. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  2. A fast-slow logic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hideo.

    1977-01-01

    A fast-slow logic system has been made for use in multi-detector experiments in nuclear physics such as particle-gamma and particle-particle coincidence experiments. The system consists of a fast logic system and a slow logic system. The fast logic system has a function of fast coincidences and provides timing signals for the slow logic system. The slow logic system has a function of slow coincidences and a routing control of input analog signals to the ADCs. (auth.)

  3. Slow kinetics of Brownian maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2014-07-18

    We study extreme-value statistics of Brownian trajectories in one dimension. We define the maximum as the largest position to date and compare maxima of two particles undergoing independent Brownian motion. We focus on the probability P(t) that the two maxima remain ordered up to time t and find the algebraic decay P ∼ t(-β) with exponent β = 1/4. When the two particles have diffusion constants D(1) and D(2), the exponent depends on the mobilities, β = (1/π) arctan sqrt[D(2)/D(1)]. We also use numerical simulations to investigate maxima of multiple particles in one dimension and the largest extension of particles in higher dimensions.

  4. Notes on spectrum and exponential decay in nonautonomous evolutionary equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pötzsche

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We first determine the dichotomy (Sacker-Sell spectrum for certain nonautonomous linear evolutionary equations induced by a class of parabolic PDE systems. Having this information at hand, we underline the applicability of our second result: If the widths of the gaps in the dichotomy spectrum are bounded away from $0$, then one can rule out the existence of super-exponentially decaying (i.e. slow solutions of semi-linear evolutionary equations.

  5. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  6. Traditional Procurement is too Slow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an exploratory interview survey of construction project participants aimed at identifying the reasons for the decrease in use of the traditional, lump-sum, procurement system in Malaysia. The results show that most people believe it is too slow. This appears to be in part due to the contiguous nature of the various phase and stages of the process and especially the separation of the design and construction phases. The delays caused by disputes between the various parties are also seen as a contributory factor - the most prominent cause being the frequency of variations, with design and scope changes being a particular source of discontent. It is concluded that an up scaling of the whole of the time related reward/penalty system may be the most appropriate measure for the practice in future.

  7. Slow pyrolysis of pistachio shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apaydin-Varol, Esin; Putun, Ersan; Putun, Ayse E [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-08-15

    In this study, pistachio shell is taken as the biomass sample to investigate the effects of pyrolysis temperature on the product yields and composition when slow pyrolysis is applied in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure to the temperatures of 300, 400, 500, 550, 700{sup o}C. The maximum liquid yield was attained at about 500-550{sup o}C with a yield of 20.5%. The liquid product obtained under this optimum temperature and solid products obtained at all temperatures were characterized. As well as proximate and elemental analysis for the products were the basic steps for characterization, column chromatography, FT-IR, GC/MS and SEM were used for further characterization. The results showed that liquid and solid products from pistachio shells show similarities with high value conventional fuels. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The TTI slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between the vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for a transversely isotropic media with titled symmetry axis {left parenthesis, less than bracket}TTI{right parenthesis, greater than bracket} requires solving a quartic polynomial, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the dispersion relation that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Ultrafast exciton decay in PbS quantum dots through simultaneous electron and hole recombination with a surface-localized ion pair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edme, Kedy; Bettis Homan, Stephanie; Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Weiss, Emily A., E-mail: e-weiss@northwestern.edu

    2016-06-01

    Highlights: • We synthesize complexes of PbS quantum dots (QDs) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). Each PbS QD spontaneously reduces up to 17 TCNQ molecules. • The photoluminescence of the PbS QDs is quenched in the presence of the reduced TCNQ species through ultrafast non-radiative, simultaneous decay of the electron and hole. • We assign this decay to a four-carrier, concerted charge recombination mechanism with the surface localized sulfur–TCNQ{sup x−} ion pair. - Abstract: This paper describes the ultrafast decay of the band-edge exciton in PbS quantum dots (QDs) through simultaneous recombination of the excitonic hole and electron with the surface localized ion pair formed upon adsorption of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). Each PbS QD (R = 1.8 nm) spontaneously reduces up to 17 TCNQ molecules upon adsorption of the TCNQ molecule to a sulfur on the QD surface. The photoluminescence of the PbS QDs is quenched in the presence of the reduced TCNQ species through ultrafast (⩽15-ps) non-radiative decay of the exciton; the rate constant for the decay process increases approximately linearly with the number of adsorbed, reduced TCNQ molecules. Near-infrared and mid-infrared transient absorption show that this decay occurs through simultaneous transfer of the excitonic electron and hole, and is assigned to a four-carrier, concerted charge recombination mechanism based on the observations that (i) the PL of the QDs recovers when spontaneously reduced TCNQ{sup 1−} desorbs from the QD surface upon addition of salt, and (ii) the PL of the QDs is preserved when another spontaneous oxidant, ferrocinium, which cannot participate in charge transfer in its reduced state, is substituted for TCNQ.

  10. JNDC FP decay data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tohru; Akiyama, Masatsugu

    1981-02-01

    The decay data file for fission product nuclides (FP DECAY DATA FILE) has been prepared for summation calculation of the decay heat of fission products. The average energies released in β- and γ-transitions have been calculated with computer code PROFP. The calculated results and necessary information have been arranged in tabular form together with the estimated results for 470 nuclides of which decay data are not available experimentally. (author)

  11. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  12. Character of decay instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polovin, R.V.; Demutskii, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    If the initial wave is unstable in the upper half plane Im ω>0 and there are no branch points of the quasiwave number, or if waves traveling in the same direction coalesce at a branch point, the instability is convective. On the other hand, if a branch point k(ω) does exist in the upper half-plane Im ω>0, and not all the waves that merge at this point travel in the same direction, the instability is absolute. A Green's function that describes the evolution of the perturbations of the initial wave in space and in time is constructed. The growth rates of the decay instability of the harmonics are determined. The produced waves are richer in harmonics than the initial waves. It is shown that the decay instability of an Alfven wave is absolute

  13. Decay of 57Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Scardino, A.M. dos.

    1987-01-01

    The decay of 57 Ni to 57 Co was studied by gamma ray spectroscopy using both singles and coincidence spectra. The sources were obtained with the 58 Ni (Y,n) 57 Ni reaction. Natural metallic nickel was irradiated in the bremsstrahluhng beam of the linear accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo with 30 MeV electrons. The singles espectra were taken with 104 cc HPGe detector and the coincidences espectra with 27 and 53cc Ge(Li) and 104 cc. HPGe detectors. The energies of transitions that follow the 57 Ni decay were measured using 56 Co as standard (which was obtained by (Y,np) reaction in 58 Ni) and taking into account the cascade cross-over relations. (author) [pt

  14. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  15. Decay /sup 133/Ba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K; Hasiza, M L; Grewal, B S; Sahota, H S

    1982-07-01

    The relative gamma ray intensities of transitions in the decay of /sup 133/Ba have been measured using an intrinsic Ge detector. The electron capture branching ratios have been determined for 81, 161, 384 and 437 keV levels. The attenuation effect of long half-life of 81 keV levels has been studied in solid and liquid media. The electron capture decay has been investigated by changing the concentration of ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) environment. The 5/2/sup +/ yields 5/2/sup +/ 79.67 keV transition has an E0 to E2 intensity qsub(k)sup(2) <= 0.31. 10 refs., 4 figures.

  16. SCALAR AND VECTOR NONLINEAR DECAYS OF LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVÉN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: js_zhao@pmo.ac.cn [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan 3 Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvén waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvén wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvén and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}<ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci} (k {sub 0} is wavenumber perpendicular to the background magnetic field, ω{sub 0} is frequency of the pump Alfvén wave, ρ {sub i} is ion gyroradius, and ω {sub ci} is ion-cyclotron frequency). The scalar decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvén and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}>ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci}, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ρ {sub i} k {sub 0} ≅ 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvén product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1ω{sub 0} and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  17. Hypernuclear weak decay puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, C.; Horvat, D.; Narancic, Z.; Krmpotic, F.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Tadic, D.

    2002-01-01

    A general shell model formalism for the nonmesonic weak decay of the hypernuclei has been developed. It involves a partial wave expansion of the emitted nucleon waves, preserves naturally the antisymmetrization between the escaping particles and the residual core, and contains as a particular case the weak Λ-core coupling formalism. The extreme particle-hole model and the quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation are explicitly worked out. It is shown that the nuclear structure manifests itself basically through the Pauli principle, and a very simple expression is derived for the neutron- and proton-induced decays rates Γ n and Γ p , which does not involve the spectroscopic factors. We use the standard strangeness-changing weak ΛN→NN transition potential which comprises the exchange of the complete pseudoscalar and vector meson octets (π,η,K,ρ,ω,K * ), taking into account some important parity-violating transition operators that are systematically omitted in the literature. The interplay between different mesons in the decay of Λ 12 C is carefully analyzed. With the commonly used parametrization in the one-meson-exchange model (OMEM), the calculated rate Γ NM =Γ n +Γ p is of the order of the free Λ decay rate Γ 0 (Γ NM th congruent with Γ 0 ) and is consistent with experiments. Yet the measurements of Γ n/p =Γ n /Γ p and of Γ p are not well accounted for by the theory (Γ n/p th p th > or approx. 0.60Γ 0 ). It is suggested that, unless additional degrees of freedom are incorporated, the OMEM parameters should be radically modified

  18. Meson radiative decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.J.; Kamal, A.N.

    1979-04-01

    The status of decays of the kind V → Pγ and P → Vγviewed with special emphasis on the work done by the authors in this field. The low experimental value of GAMMA(rho → πγ) remains the outstanding problem. The lastest preliminary numbers from a Fermi Laboratory experiment go in the right direction but not far enough. 15 references

  19. Decay of 83Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaohan; Shi Shuanghui; Gu Jiahui

    1997-01-01

    The decay of 83 Sr was reinvestigated using γ singles and γ-γ-t coincidence measurement. A new level scheme of Rb, which contains 41 excited levels and about 180 transitions, is constructed. 19 new levels were added to the old level scheme and 8 formerly adopted levels were denied. A new data set of branching ratio, log(ft) value and spin parity was obtained

  20. Difference in Understanding of the Need for Using Radiation in Various Fields between Students Majoring in Radiation and Non-Radiation Related Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Dept. of Radiological Tecknology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    As a way of improving social receptivity of using radiation, this study looked into the difference of understanding the need of using radiation in various fields between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies, who will influence public opinion in the long term. This study also provides data needed for developing efficient strategies for projects promoting the public's awareness of using radiation. Of the students in the 79 schools sampled, 24%(177) were in 4 year colleges and 146 were junior colleges in educational statistics service (http://cesi.kedi.re.kr) In November 2010 1,945 students were selected as a sample, and they were given surveys on the need of using radiation in different fields. As a result, both between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies showed a high level of understanding the need for radiation in the medical field and showed a low level of understanding of the need for radiation in the agricultural field. In all 6 fields of radiation use, students majoring in radiation related studies showed higher levels of understanding for the need to use radiation than students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies. In each field, male students and those who have experience medical radiation and relevant education had higher level of understanding. This shows we need to improve the understanding of the cases of female students and those who have not had experiences with medical radiation and to provide relevant education through various kinds of information. The characteristics of the groups that are shown in the results of this study are considered to be helpful for efficiently for project promoting the public's awareness of using radiation.

  1. Difference in Understanding of the Need for Using Radiation in Various Fields between Students Majoring in Radiation and Non-Radiation Related Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok

    2011-01-01

    As a way of improving social receptivity of using radiation, this study looked into the difference of understanding the need of using radiation in various fields between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies, who will influence public opinion in the long term. This study also provides data needed for developing efficient strategies for projects promoting the public's awareness of using radiation. Of the students in the 79 schools sampled, 24%(177) were in 4 year colleges and 146 were junior colleges in educational statistics service (http://cesi.kedi.re.kr) In November 2010 1,945 students were selected as a sample, and they were given surveys on the need of using radiation in different fields. As a result, both between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies showed a high level of understanding the need for radiation in the medical field and showed a low level of understanding of the need for radiation in the agricultural field. In all 6 fields of radiation use, students majoring in radiation related studies showed higher levels of understanding for the need to use radiation than students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies. In each field, male students and those who have experience medical radiation and relevant education had higher level of understanding. This shows we need to improve the understanding of the cases of female students and those who have not had experiences with medical radiation and to provide relevant education through various kinds of information. The characteristics of the groups that are shown in the results of this study are considered to be helpful for efficiently for project promoting the public's awareness of using radiation.

  2. MULTIFLUID MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENT DECAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, T. P.; O'Sullivan, S.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation that occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512 3 resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity, and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingly we find that, at least at these resolutions, the majority of the physics of multifluid turbulence can be captured by simply introducing fixed (in time and space) resistive terms into the induction equation without the need for a full multifluid MHD treatment. The velocity dispersion is also examined and, in common with previously published results, it is found not to be power law in nature.

  3. 152Eu decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonova, K.P.; Vinogradov, V.M.; Grigor'ev, E.P.; Zolotavin, A.V.; Makarov, V.M.; Sergeev, V.O.; Usynko, T.M.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the measurement of the relative intensities of the most intensive conversion lines of 152 Eu, the determination of as reliable as possible magnitudes of the intensities of γ-quanta using all the available data on γ-radiation of 152 Eu, the measurement of the interval conversion coefficients (ICC) for the most intensive γ-transitions, the determination of the probabilities of the 152 Eu β-decays to the 152 Sm and 152 Gd levels. The conversion lines of the most intensive γ-transitions in the 152 Eu decay are studied and the corresponding ICC are measured on the beta-spectrometers of π√2 and UMB type. The balance for the γ-transitions in the 152 Sm and 152 Gd daughter nuclei are presented. This balance is used to determine the absolute intensities of γ-rays (in terms of the percentage of the 152 Eu decays) and the probabilities of β-transitions to the levels of daughter nuclei. More accurate data on γ-rays and conversion electrons obtained can be used for the calibration of gamma and beta spectrometers

  4. RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS FROM BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, Gerald

    2003-08-28

    Electroweak penguin decays provide a promising hunting ground for Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The decay B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, which proceeds through an electromagnetic penguin loop, already provides stringent constraints on the supersymmetric (SUSY) parameter space. The present data samples of {approx}1 x 10{sup 8} B{bar B} events allow to explore radiative penguin decays with branching fractions of the order of 10{sup -6} or less. In this brief report they discuss a study of B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decay modes and a search for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma} decays.

  5. Shannon entropy and particle decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Millán, Pedro; García-Ferrero, M. Ángeles; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Porras Riojano, Ana; Sánchez García, Esteban M.

    2018-05-01

    We deploy Shannon's information entropy to the distribution of branching fractions in a particle decay. This serves to quantify how important a given new reported decay channel is, from the point of view of the information that it adds to the already known ones. Because the entropy is additive, one can subdivide the set of channels and discuss, for example, how much information the discovery of a new decay branching would add; or subdivide the decay distribution down to the level of individual quantum states (which can be quickly counted by the phase space). We illustrate the concept with some examples of experimentally known particle decay distributions.

  6. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  7. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  8. B decays to open charm

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073670

    2016-01-01

    Studies of $B$ meson decays to states involving open charm mesons in data recorded by the LHCb experiment have resulted in first observations of several new decay modes, including $B_s^{0} \\rightarrow D_s^{*\\mp} K^{\\pm}$, $B_s^{0} \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^{0} K_S^{0}$ and $B^{+} \\rightarrow D^{+} K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays. An upper limit has been placed on the branching fraction of $B_s^{0} \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^{0} f_0(980)$ decays. Measurements of other branching fractions, such as those of $B_s^{0} \\rightarrow D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ decays, are the most precise to date. Additionally, amplitude analyses of $B^{0} \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^{0} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B^{0} \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^{0} K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays have been performed, alongside the first $CP$ violation analysis using the Dalitz plot of $B^{0} \\rightarrow D K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays.

  9. Plant domestication slows pest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Lochab, Amaneet K; Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural practices such as breeding resistant varieties and pesticide use can cause rapid evolution of pest species, but it remains unknown how plant domestication itself impacts pest contemporary evolution. Using experimental evolution on a comparative phylogenetic scale, we compared the evolutionary dynamics of a globally important economic pest - the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - growing on 34 plant taxa, represented by 17 crop species and their wild relatives. Domestication slowed aphid evolution by 13.5%, maintained 10.4% greater aphid genotypic diversity and 5.6% higher genotypic richness. The direction of evolution (i.e. which genotypes increased in frequency) differed among independent domestication events but was correlated with specific plant traits. Individual-based simulation models suggested that domestication affects aphid evolution directly by reducing the strength of selection and indirectly by increasing aphid density and thus weakening genetic drift. Our results suggest that phenotypic changes during domestication can alter pest evolutionary dynamics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Applications of Slow Light in Telecommunications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Robert W; Gauthier, Daniel J; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2006-01-01

    .... Now, optical scientists are turning their attention toward developing useful applications of slow light, including controllable optical delay lines, optical buffers and true time delay methods...

  11. Planarizing cytosine: The S1 state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative dynamics of jet-cooled 5,6-trimethylenecytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachsel, Maria A.; Lobsiger, Simon; Schär, Tobias; Blancafort, Lluís; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    We measure the S0 → S1 spectrum and time-resolved S1 state nonradiative dynamics of the "clamped" cytosine derivative 5,6-trimethylenecytosine (TMCyt) in a supersonic jet, using two-color resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV holeburning, and ns time-resolved pump/delayed ionization. The experiments are complemented with spin-component scaled second-order approximate coupled cluster (SCS-CC2), time-dependent density functional theory, and multi-state second-order perturbation-theory (MS-CASPT2) ab initio calculations. While the R2PI spectrum of cytosine breaks off ˜500 cm-1 above its 000 band, that of TMCyt extends up to +4400 cm-1 higher, with over a hundred resolved vibronic bands. Thus, clamping the cytosine C5-C6 bond allows us to explore the S1 state vibrations and S0 → S1 geometry changes in detail. The TMCyt S1 state out-of-plane vibrations ν1', ν3', and ν5' lie below 420 cm-1, and the in-plane ν11', ν12', and ν23' vibrational fundamentals appear at 450, 470, and 944 cm-1. S0 → S1 vibronic simulations based on SCS-CC2 calculations agree well with experiment if the calculated ν1', ν3', and ν5' frequencies are reduced by a factor of 2-3. MS-CASPT2 calculations predict that the ethylene-type S1 ⇝ S0 conical intersection (CI) increases from +366 cm-1 in cytosine to >6000 cm-1 in TMCyt, explaining the long lifetime and extended S0 → S1 spectrum. The lowest-energy S1 ⇝ S0 CI of TMCyt is the "amino out-of-plane" (OPX) intersection, calculated at +4190 cm-1. The experimental S1 ⇝ S0 internal conversion rate constant at the S1(v'=0 ) level is kI C=0.98 -2.2 ṡ1 08 s-1, which is ˜10 times smaller than in 1-methylcytosine and cytosine. The S1(v'=0 ) level relaxes into the T1(3π π *) state by intersystem crossing with kI S C=0.41 -1.6 ṡ1 08 s-1. The T1 state energy is measured to lie 24 580 ±560 cm-1 above the S0 state. The S1(v'=0 ) lifetime is τ =2.9 ns, resulting in an estimated fluorescence quantum yield of Φf l=24 %. Intense

  12. Decay of 36K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    36 K was produced via the 36 Ar(p, n) 36 K reaction. Measurement of 27 β + delayed γ rays associated with the decay of 36 K implied 10 new β + branches to energy levels in 36 Ar. Branching ratios and logft values are calculated for the β + branches. Restrictions on spin and parity assignments for the 36 Ar levels are given, as well as branching ratios for γ transitions from these levels. The half-life of 36 K is determined to be 344 +- 3 msec

  13. η decays at Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, B.

    1991-01-01

    A facility dedicated to the production of η mesons has been installed at the Saturne synchrotron with the purpose of investigating rare decays of this meson. The η are produced by the pd → 3 Heη reaction near threshold and tagged by the detection of 3 He in a magnetic spectrometer (SPES2). A rate of 10 5 /s tagged η can be achieved. In the first experiment, η → μ + μ - , the μ will be detected in range telescopes. Magnetic spectrometers for lepton detection are considered for future experiments

  14. A Comparative Study on Biochar from Slow Pyrolysis of Corn Cob and Cassava Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Adilah Shariff; Nurhidayah Mohamed Noor; Alexander Lau; Muhammad Azwan Mohd Ali

    2016-01-01

    Biomass such as corn and cassava wastes if left to decay will release significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG) including carbon dioxide and methane. The biomass wastes can be converted into biochar via thermochemical process such as slow pyrolysis. This approach can reduce the biomass wastes as well as preserve its carbon content. Biochar has the potential to be used as a carbon sequester and soil amendment. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the corn cob, ...

  15. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence analysis of 1-MeV electron irradiation-induced nonradiative recombination centers in GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiancheng, Yi; Pengfei, Xiao; Yong, Zheng; Juan, Tang; Rong, Wang, E-mail: wangr@bnu.edu.cn

    2016-03-01

    The effects of irradiation of 1-MeV electrons on p{sup +}–n GaAs/Ge solar cells have been investigated by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements in the temperature range of 10–290 K. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy agrees well with the Varnish relation, and the thermal quenching of the total integrated PL intensity is well explained by the thermal quenching theory. Meanwhile, the thermal quenching of temperature-dependent PL confirmed that there are two nonradiative recombination centers in the solar cells, and the thermal activation energies of these centers are determined by Arrhenius plots of the total integrated PL intensity. Furthermore, the nonradiative recombination center, as a primary defect, is identified as the H3 hole trap located at E{sub v} + 0.71 eV at room temperature and the H2 hole trap located at E{sub v} + 0.41 eV in the temperature range of 100–200 K, by comparing the thermal activation and ionization energies of the defects.

  16. Nonradiative transitions in the media of different polarity and their simulation for 12'-apo-b-caroten-12'-al and 8'-apo-b-caroten-8'-al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovich, V.S.

    2014-01-01

    The theory of nonradiative transitions based on the model of orientation broadening of electronic levels has been used to interpret known data on the medium polarity and temperature effect on the S 1 (A g - ) state lifetime of 12'-apo-b-caroten-12'-al and 8'-apo-b-caroten-8'-al. The effect of promotion vibrations on the rate constant of the nonradiative transitions has been considered. The results allow assuming that the internal electric field produced by the environment heavily perturbs molecules of the pigments. In consequence of this, at both pigments in the excited S 1 (A g - ) state exist in the form of different conformers I and II. Their structure differs by 180° turn of the cyclohexene ring relative to the polyene chain. Conformer II dominates in the polar media, and it is in the intramolecular charge transfer state S 1 (A g - /ICT). In addition, it can also be in the charge separated state S 1 (A g - /CS) due to the fluctuations of internal electric field. (authors)

  17. Nonradiative Transitions in Media of Different Polarities and Their Modeling for 12'-Apo-β-Caroten-12'-Al and 8'-Apo-β-Caroten-8'-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovich, V. S.

    2014-09-01

    The theory of nonradiative transitions, based on the model of orientational broadening of electronic levels, is used to interpret known data on the effect of the polarity of the medium and temperature on the lifetime of the S 1( A {/g -}) state for 12'-apo-β-caroten-12'-al and 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al. The effect of promoting vibrations on the rate constant for nonradiative transitions is considered. The results make it possible to hypothesize that the internal electric field created by the environment strongly perturbs the pigment molecules. Consequently, in the excited S 1( A {/g -}) state, both pigments exist as different conformers I and II. Their structures differ by a 180° rotation of the cyclohexene ring relative to the polyene chain. Conformer II predominates in polar media, and is found in an intramolecular charge-transfer state S 1( A {/g -}/ ICT). In addition, as a result of fluctuations in the internal electric field, it can also be found in a charge-separated state S 1( A {/g -}/ CS).

  18. FRET structure with non-radiative acceptor provided by dye-linker-glass surface complex and single-molecule photodynamics by TIRFM-polarized imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Mashimo, Kei; Suzuki, Tetsu; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Oda, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    We present our recent study of microscopic single-molecule imaging on the artificial complex of tetramethylrhodamine linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface, i.e. an asymmetric fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) structure with non-radiative acceptor. In the synthesis of the complex, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers to introduce rather small photodynamic difference among them. This isomeric structure change will provide more or less a distinctive photophysical change in e.g. non-radiative relaxation rate. Our recent observation at room temperatures, so far, shows that such contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the fluorescent spot intensities; broad but distinctive multi-components appear. To identify the isomeric difference as a cause of structures, some configurational assumptions are necessary. One such basic prerequisite is that the transition dipoles of the chromophores should be oriented almost parallel to the glass surface. In order to make clear the modeling, we also provide preliminary experiments on the polarization dependence of the imaging under rotating polarization in epi-illumination

  19. Measuring the Total-Factor Carbon Emission Performance of Industrial Land Use in China Based on the Global Directional Distance Function and Non-Radial Luenberger Productivity Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Industry is a major contributor to carbon emissions in China, and industrial land is an important input to industrial production. Therefore, a detailed analysis of the carbon emission performance of industrial land use is necessary for making reasonable carbon reduction policies that promote the sustainable use of industrial land. This paper aims to analyze the dynamic changes in the total-factor carbon emission performance of industrial land use (TCPIL in China by applying a global directional distance function (DDF and non-radial Luenberger productivity index. The empirical results show that the eastern region enjoys better TCPIL than the central and western regions, but the regional gaps in TCPIL are narrowing. The growth in NLCPILs (non-radial Luenberger carbon emission performance of industrial land use in the eastern and central regions is mainly driven by technological progress, whereas efficiency improvements contribute more to the growth of NLCPIL in the western region. The provinces in the eastern region have the most innovative and environmentally-friendly production technologies. The results of the analysis of the influencing factors show implications for improving the NLCPIL, including more investment in industrial research and development (R&D, the implementation of carbon emission reduction policies, reduction in the use of fossil energy, especially coal, in the process of industrial production, actively learning about foreign advanced technology, properly solving the problem of surplus labor in industry and the expansion of industrial development.

  20. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b → sγ and b → se + e - decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered

  1. Pulsed radiation decay logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    There are provided new and improved well logging processes and systems wherein the detection of secondary radiation is accomplished during a plurality of time windows in a manner to accurately characterize the decay rate of the secondary radiation. The system comprises a well logging tool having a primary pulsed radiation source which emits repetitive time-spaced bursts of primary radiation and detector means for detecting secondary radiation resulting from the primary radiation and producing output signals in response to the detected radiation. A plurality of measuring channels are provided, each of which produces a count rate function representative of signals received from the detector means during successive time windows occurring between the primary radiation bursts. The logging system further comprises means responsive to the measuring channels for producing a plurality of functions representative of the ratios of the radiation count rates measured during adjacent pairs of the time windows. Comparator means function to compare the ratio functions and select at least one of the ratio functions to generate a signal representative of the decay rate of the secondary radiation

  2. Scaling, Intermittency and Decay of MHD Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarian, A.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a few recent developments that are important for understanding of MHD turbulence. First, MHD turbulence is not so messy as it is usually believed. In fact, the notion of strong non-linear coupling of compressible and incompressible motions along MHD cascade is not tenable. Alfven, slow and fast modes of MHD turbulence follow their own cascades and exhibit degrees of anisotropy consistent with theoretical expectations. Second, the fast decay of turbulence is not related to the compressibility of fluid. Rates of decay of compressible and incompressible motions are very similar. Third, viscosity by neutrals does not suppress MHD turbulence in a partially ionized gas. Instead, MHD turbulence develops magnetic cascade at scales below the scale at which neutrals damp ordinary hydrodynamic motions. Forth, density statistics does not exhibit the universality that the velocity and magnetic field do. For instance, at small Mach numbers the density is anisotropic, but it gets isotropic at high Mach numbers. Fifth, the intermittency of magnetic field and velocity are different. Both depend on whether the measurements are done in a local system of reference oriented along the local magnetic field or in the global system of reference related to the mean magnetic field

  3. Decay property of regularity-loss type of solutions in elastic solids with voids

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem; Messaoudi, Salim A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we consider two porous systems of nonclassical thermoelasticity in the whole real line. We discuss the long-time behaviour of the solutions in the presence of a strong damping acting, together with the heat effect, on the elastic equation and establish several decay results. Those decay results are shown to be very slow and of regularity-loss type. Some improvements of the decay rates have also been given, provided that the initial data belong to some weighted spaces. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  4. Decay property of regularity-loss type of solutions in elastic solids with voids

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we consider two porous systems of nonclassical thermoelasticity in the whole real line. We discuss the long-time behaviour of the solutions in the presence of a strong damping acting, together with the heat effect, on the elastic equation and establish several decay results. Those decay results are shown to be very slow and of regularity-loss type. Some improvements of the decay rates have also been given, provided that the initial data belong to some weighted spaces. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  5. Decay uncovered in nonverbal short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Tom; McKeown, Denis

    2014-02-01

    Decay theory posits that memory traces gradually fade away over the passage of time unless they are actively rehearsed. Much recent work exploring verbal short-term memory has challenged this theory, but there does appear to be evidence for trace decay in nonverbal auditory short-term memory. Numerous discrimination studies have reported a performance decline as the interval separating two tones is increased, consistent with a decay process. However, most of this tone comparison research can be explained in other ways, without reference to decay, and these alternative accounts were tested in the present study. In Experiment 1, signals were employed toward the end of extended retention intervals to ensure that listeners were alert to the presence and frequency content of the memoranda. In Experiment 2, a mask stimulus was employed in an attempt to distinguish between a highly detailed sensory trace and a longer-lasting short-term memory, and the distinctiveness of the stimuli was varied. Despite these precautions, slow-acting trace decay was observed. It therefore appears that the mere passage of time can lead to forgetting in some forms of short-term memory.

  6. Response of electret dosemeter to slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilardi, A.J.P.; Pela, C.A.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The response of electret dosemeter to slow neutrons exposure is cited, mentioning the preparation and the irradiation of dosemeter with Am-Be source. Some theory considerations about the response of electret dosemeter to slow and fast neutrons are also presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Tandem queue with server slow-down

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miretskiy, D.I.; Scheinhardt, W.R.W.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2007-01-01

    We study how rare events happen in the standard two-node tandem Jackson queue and in a generalization, the socalled slow-down network, see [2]. In the latter model the service rate of the first server depends on the number of jobs in the second queue: the first server slows down if the amount of

  8. Slow-light pulses in moving media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiurasek, J.; Leonhardt, U.; Parentani, R.

    2002-01-01

    Slow light in moving media reaches a counterintuitive regime when the flow speed of the medium approaches the group velocity of light. Pulses can penetrate a region where a counterpropagating flow exceeds the group velocity. When the counterflow slows down, pulses are reflected

  9. Can fast and slow intelligence be differentiated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partchev, I.; de Boeck, P.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1.

  10. Slow Movement/Slow University: Critical Engagements. Introduction to the Thematic Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie O'Neill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This thematic section emerged from two seminars that took place at Durham University in England in November 2013 and March 2014 on the possibilities for thinking through what a change movement towards slow might mean for the University. Slow movements have emerged in relation to a number of topics: Slow food, Citta slow and more recently, slow science. What motivated us in the seminars was to explore how far these movements could help us address the acceleration and intensification of work within our own and other universities, and indeed, what new learning, research, philosophies, practices, structures and governance might emerge. This editorial introduction presents the concept of the "slow university" and introduces our critical engagements with slow. The articles presented here interrogate the potentialities, challenges, problems and pitfalls of the slow university in an era of corporate culture and management rationality. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1403166

  11. Polarized (3) He Spin Filters for Slow Neutron Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T R; Chen, W C; Jones, G L; Babcock, E; Walker, T G

    2005-01-01

    Polarized (3)He spin filters are needed for a variety of experiments with slow neutrons. Their demonstrated utility for highly accurate determination of neutron polarization are critical to the next generation of betadecay correlation coefficient measurements. In addition, they are broadband devices that can polarize large area and high divergence neutron beams with little gamma-ray background, and allow for an additional spin-flip for systematic tests. These attributes are relevant to all neutron sources, but are particularly well-matched to time of flight analysis at spallation sources. There are several issues in the practical use of (3)He spin filters for slow neutron physics. Besides the essential goal of maximizing the (3)He polarization, we also seek to decrease the constraints on cell lifetimes and magnetic field homogeneity. In addition, cells with highly uniform gas thickness are required to produce the spatially uniform neutron polarization needed for beta-decay correlation coefficient experiments. We are currently employing spin-exchange (SE) and metastability-exchange (ME) optical pumping to polarize (3)He, but will focus on SE. We will discuss the recent demonstration of 75 % (3)He polarization, temperature-dependent relaxation mechanism of unknown origin, cell development, spectrally narrowed lasers, and hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping.

  12. Search for proton decay: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1984-01-01

    In interpreting contained events observed in various proton decay detectors one can sometimes postulate, though usually not unambiguously, a potential decay mode of the proton, called a candidate. It is called a candidate, because for any individual event it is not possible to exclude the possibility that it is instead due to cosmic ray background, chiefly atmospheric neutrinos. Some consistency checks are proposed which could help establish proton decay, if it does occur in the presently accessible lifetime window

  13. Rare beauty and charm decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, T.

    2016-01-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of b → sℓ"+ℓ"− decay processes.

  14. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-15

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Weak decays of heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1978-08-01

    The properties that may help to identify the two additional quark flavors that are expected to be discovered. These properties are lifetime, branching ratios, selection rules, and lepton decay spectra. It is also noted that CP violation may manifest itself more strongly in heavy particle decays than elsewhere providing a new probe of its origin. The theoretical progress in the understanding of nonleptonic transitions among lighter quarks, nonleptonic K and hyperon decay amplitudes, omega minus and charmed particle decay predictions, and lastly the Kobayashi--Maskawa model for the weak coupling of heavy quarks together with the details of its implications for topology and bottomology are treated. 48 references

  16. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the resutls on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monople giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excelent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that the decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  17. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-02-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the results on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monopole giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excellent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  18. Is Radioactive Decay Really Exponential?

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12,550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3,000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in ...

  19. Slow decay of photoconductivity caused by tin-related DX centres in AlGaAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žďánský, Karel; Hawkins, I.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (1999), s. 813-821 ISSN 0011-4626. [Czech-Chinese Workshop on Advanced Materials for Optoelectronics - AMFO'98. Prague, 15.06.1998-17.06.1998] Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) KSK1010601 Projekt 7/96/K:4074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : deep levels * III-V semiconductors * semiconductor junctions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.328, year: 1999

  20. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virotta, Francesco

    2012-02-21

    In this work we investigate the critical slowing down of lattice QCD simulations. We perform a preliminary study in the quenched approximation where we find that our estimate of the exponential auto-correlation time scales as {tau}{sub exp}(a){proportional_to}a{sup -5}, where a is the lattice spacing. In unquenched simulations with O(a) improved Wilson fermions we do not obtain a scaling law but find results compatible with the behavior that we find in the pure gauge theory. The discussion is supported by a large set of ensembles both in pure gauge and in the theory with two degenerate sea quarks. We have moreover investigated the effect of slow algorithmic modes in the error analysis of the expectation value of typical lattice QCD observables (hadronic matrix elements and masses). In the context of simulations affected by slow modes we propose and test a method to obtain reliable estimates of statistical errors. The method is supposed to help in the typical algorithmic setup of lattice QCD, namely when the total statistics collected is of O(10){tau}{sub exp}. This is the typical case when simulating close to the continuum limit where the computational costs for producing two independent data points can be extremely large. We finally discuss the scale setting in N{sub f}=2 simulations using the Kaon decay constant f{sub K} as physical input. The method is explained together with a thorough discussion of the error analysis employed. A description of the publicly available code used for the error analysis is included.

  1. CP violation in K decays and rare decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalla, G.

    1996-12-01

    The present status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is reviewed. In addition selected rare decays of both K and B mesons are discussed. The emphasis is in particular on observables that can be reliably calculated and thus offer the possibility of clean tests of standard model flavor physics. 105 refs

  2. Magnetically induced vacuum decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Shesheng

    2003-01-01

    We study the fermionic vacuum energy of vacua with and without application of an external magnetic field. The energetic difference of two vacua leads to the vacuum decaying and the vacuum energy being released. In the context of quantum field theories, we discuss why and how the vacuum energy can be released by spontaneous photon emission and/or paramagnetically screening the external magnetic field. In addition, we quantitatively compute the vacuum energy released, the paramagnetic screening effect, and the rate and spectrum of spontaneous photon emission. The possibilities of experimentally detecting such an effect of vacuum-energy release and that this effect accounts for the anomalous x-ray pulsar are discussed

  3. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  4. Weak decays of new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmus, G.

    1982-10-01

    The present experimental situation in tau-lepton, B-meson and charmed particle decays is reviewed. Special attention is paid to new lifetime measurements and in the case of B-meson decays to the rate of b → u compared to b → c. Results are compared with theoretical expectations. (author)

  5. On the Muon Decay Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhov, M V

    1996-01-01

    Predictions for the muon decay spectrum are usually derived from the derivative-free Hamiltonian. However, it is not the most general form of the possible interactions. Additional simple terms with derivatives can be introduced. In this work the distortion of the standard energy and angular distribution of the electrons in polarized muon decay caused by these terms is presented.

  6. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  7. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  8. Decay of the Bottom mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Van Phi; Duong Anh Duc

    1992-12-01

    The channels of the decay of Bottom mesons are deduced from a selection rule and the Lagrangians which are formed on the LxO(4) invariance and the principle of minimal structure. The estimation of the corresponding decay probabilities are considered. (author). 21 refs

  9. Experimental status of B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of a number of current B-meson decay topics. Topics reviewed are: B reconstruction, penguins and rare decay modes, is there a charm deficit?, V ub /V bc , new limit on FCNC. Results are presented

  10. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ''new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given

  11. Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thron, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment consists of a 1.1 Kton fine grained iron tracking calorimeter. It has a very isotropic detection structure which along with its flexible trigger will allow detection of multiparticle and neutrino proton decay modes. The detector has now entered its construction stage

  12. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form η Γ 1 with η being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for Γ 1 to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is << H then the decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/πM. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C(η) the scale factor and α determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities

  13. The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, I.N.; Pavlov, V.N.; Sidorin, A.O.; Yakovenko, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons based on the 22 Na isotope has been designed and constructed at JINR. Positrons emitted from radioactive source 22 Na have a very broad energy spectrum up to 0.5 MeV. To generate monochromatic beam of slow positrons the solid neon is used as a moderator. The solid neon allows forming slow positron beam of the energy of 1.2 eV at the spectrum width of 1 eV. The efficiency of moderation is 1 % of total positron flux

  14. Dystonia Associated with Idiopathic Slow Orthostatic Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kobylecki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to characterize the clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with slow orthostatic tremor.Case Report: The clinical and neurophysiological data of patients referred for lower limb tremor on standing were reviewed. Patients with symptomatic or primary orthostatic tremor were excluded. Eight patients were identified with idiopathic slow 4–8 Hz orthostatic tremor, which was associated with tremor and dystonia in cervical and upper limb musculature. Coherence analysis in two patients showed findings different to those seen in primary orthostatic tremor.Discussion: Slow orthostatic tremor may be associated with dystonia and dystonic tremor.

  15. Revealing the cluster of slow transients behind a large slow slip event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, William B; Rousset, Baptiste; Lasserre, Cécile; Campillo, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Capable of reaching similar magnitudes to large megathrust earthquakes [ M w (moment magnitude) > 7], slow slip events play a major role in accommodating tectonic motion on plate boundaries through predominantly aseismic rupture. We demonstrate here that large slow slip events are a cluster of short-duration slow transients. Using a dense catalog of low-frequency earthquakes as a guide, we investigate the M w 7.5 slow slip event that occurred in 2006 along the subduction interface 40 km beneath Guerrero, Mexico. We show that while the long-period surface displacement, as recorded by Global Positioning System, suggests a 6-month duration, the motion in the direction of tectonic release only sporadically occurs over 55 days, and its surface signature is attenuated by rapid relocking of the plate interface. Our proposed description of slow slip as a cluster of slow transients forces us to re-evaluate our understanding of the physics and scaling of slow earthquakes.

  16. Ultra-Rare B Decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    A good place to look for deviations from the Standard Model is in decay modes of B mesons, like purely leptonic decays B → lv, for which a very long Standard Model lifetime is due to an accidental suppression of the decay amplitude. For other rare decay modes involving no hadrons in the final state (e.g., B → γl+l-, B → γlvl and B → vv-barγ) new results on QCD factorization in exclusive processes show that all the decay rates are given in terms of a single universal form factor. Hence, trustworthy relations between different processes can be used to test the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. Sometimes, surprisingly, a large energy expansion may allow computation when a hadron is in the final state. An example is B → πl+l- which can be used to settle the ambiguity in α from a measurement of sin2α from CP asymmetries

  17. Effect of magnetic coupling on non-radiative relaxation time of Fe3+ sites on LaAl1-xFexO3 pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novatski, A.; Somer, A.; Maranha, F. G.; de Souza, E. C. F.; Andrade, A. V. C.; Antunes, S. R. M.; Borges, C. P. F.; Dias, D. T.; Medina, A. N.; Astrath, N. G. C.

    2018-02-01

    Inorganic pigments of the system LaAl1-xFexO3 were prepared by the Pechini and the Solid State Reaction (SSR) methods. Magnetic interactions and non-radiative relaxation time were analyzed by means of phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR results show a change in the magnetic behavior from paramagnetic (x = 0.2 and 0.4) to antiferromagnetic (x = 1.0), which is believed to be a result of the SSR preparation method. Trends in the optical absorption bands of the Fe3+ are attributed to their electronic transitions, and the increase in the band's intensity at 480 and 550 nm was assigned to the increase in the magnetic coupling between Fe-Fe. The phase-resolved method is capable of distinguishing between the two preparation methods, and it is possible to infer that SSR modifies the magnetic coupling of Fe-Fe with x.

  18. VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1984-09-01

    Sep 1, 1984 ... VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR by. L. A. Agu ... order as that of the screw-thread motor can be obtained. LIST OF .... The n stator have equal non- magnetic spacers .... induction motor. An.

  19. Slow and Fast Light, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program 2015 Phase I Solicitation S3.08: Slow and Fast Light, Torch Technologies in partnership...

  20. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriašov, Viačeslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; JuzeliÅ«nas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been a continuing interest in slow and stored light based on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect, because of their potential applications in quantum information manipulation. However, previous experimental works all dealt with the single-component slow light which cannot be employed as a qubit. In this work, we report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light (SSL) using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme. The oscillations between the two components, similar to the Rabi oscillation of a two-level system or a qubit, were observed. Single-photon SSL can be considered as two-color qubits. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory and quantum rotator for the two-color qubits. This work opens up a new direction in the slow light research.

  1. Elastic scattering of slow positrons by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Cherepkov, N.A.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Shapiro, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The s-, p-, d- and f-wave phaseshifts for elastic scattering of slow positrons by He are calculated using a simplified version of the random phase approximation with exchange, with virtual positronium formation effect taken into account. (author)

  2. A tilted transversely isotropic slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    for the vertical slowness that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement

  3. On novel mechanisms of slow ion induced electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, H.

    2000-09-01

    The present work has contributed in new ways to the field of slow ion induced electron emission. First, measurements of the total electron yield γ for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on atomically clean polycrystalline gold and graphite have been made. The respective yields were determined by current measurements and measurements of the electron number statistics. A new mechanism for kinetic emission (KE) below the so called 'classical threshold' was found and discussed. For a given ion species and impact velocity a slight decrease of the yields was found for ion charge state q = 1 toward 3, but no significant differences in KE yields for higher q values. Comparison of the results from gold and graphite showed overall similar behavior, but for C+ a relatively strong difference was observed and ascribed to more effective electron promotion in the C-C- than in the C-Au system. Secondly, for the very specific system H0 on LiF we investigated single electron excitation processes under grazing incidence conditions. In this way long-range interactions of hydrogen atoms with the ionic crystal surface could be probed. Position- and velocity-dependent electron production rates were found which indicate that an electron promotion mechanism is responsible for the observed electron emission. Thirdly, in order to investigate the importance of plasmon excitation and -decay in slow ion induced electron emission, measurements of electron energy distributions from impact of singly and doubly charged ions on poly- and monocrystalline aluminum surfaces were performed. From the results we conclude that direct plasmon excitation by slow ions occurs due to the potential energy of the projectile in a quasi-resonant fashion. The highest relative plasmon intensities were found for impact of 5 keV Ne+ on Al(111) with 5 % of the total yield. For impact of H + and H 2 + characteristical differences were observed for Al(111) and polycrystalline aluminum. We show that

  4. Is Slow Slip a Cause or a Result of Tremor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    While various modeling efforts have been conducted to reproduce subsets of observations of tremor and slow-slip events (SSE), a fundamental but yet unanswered question is whether slow slip is a cause or a result of tremor. Tremor is commonly regarded as driven by SSE. This view is mainly based on observations of SSE without detected tremors and on (frequency-limited) estimates of total tremor seismic moment being lower than 1% of their concomitant SSE moment. In previous studies we showed that models of heterogeneous faults, composed of seismic asperities embedded in an aseismic fault zone matrix, reproduce quantitatively the hierarchical patterns of tremor migration observed in Cascadia and Shikoku. To address the title question, we design two end-member models of a heterogeneous fault. In the SSE-driven-tremor model, slow slip events are spontaneously generated by the matrix (even in the absence of seismic asperities) and drive tremor. In the Tremor-driven-SSE model the matrix is stable (it slips steadily in the absence of asperities) and slow slip events result from the collective behavior of tremor asperities interacting via transient creep (local afterslip fronts). We study these two end-member models through 2D quasi-dynamic multi-cycle simulations of faults governed by rate-and-state friction with heterogeneous frictional properties and effective normal stress, using the earthquake simulation software QDYN (https://zenodo.org/record/322459). We find that both models reproduce first-order observations of SSE and tremor and have very low seismic to aseismic moment ratio. However, the Tremor-driven-SSE model assumes a simpler rheology than the SSE-driven-tremor model and matches key observations better and without fine tuning, including the ratio of propagation speeds of forward SSE and rapid tremor reversals and the decay of inter-event times of Low Frequency Earthquakes. These modeling results indicate that, in contrast to a common view, SSE could be a result

  5. Frequency response of slow beam extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Takeshi; Sato, Hikaru; Marutsuka, Katsumi; Shirakata, Masashi.

    1994-01-01

    A servo control system has been incorporated into the practical slow extraction system in order to stabilize the spill structure less than a few kHz. Frequency responses of the components of the servo-spill control system and the open-loop frequency response were measured. The beam transfer function of the slow extraction process was derived from the measured data and approximated using a simple function. This is utilized to improve the performance of the servo-loop. (author)

  6. Slow potentials in a melody recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleger, R; Schellberg, D

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study, slow negative shifts were found in the EEG of subjects listening to well-known melodies. The two experiments reported here were designed to investigate the variables to which these slow potentials are related. In the first experiment, two opposite hypotheses were tested: The slow shifts might express subjects' acquaintance with the melodies or, on the contrary, the effort invested to identify them. To this end, some of the melodies were presented in the rhythms of other melodies to make recognition more difficult. Further, melodies rated as very well-known and as very unknown were analysed separately. However, the slow shifts were not affected by these experimental variations. Therefore in the second experiment, on the one hand the purely physical parameters intensity and duration were varied, but this variation had no impact on the slow shifts either. On the other hand, recognition was made more difficult by monotonously repeating the pitch of the 4th tone for the rest of some melodies. The slow negative shifts were enhanced with these monotonous melodies. This enhancement supports the "effort" hypothesis. Accordingly, the ofter shifts obtained in both experiments might likewise reflect effort. But since the task was not demanding, it is suggested that these constant shifts reflect the effort invested for coping with the entire underarousing situation rather than with the task. Frequently, slow eye movements occurred in the same time range as the slow potentials, resulting in EOG potentials spreading to the EEG recording sites. Yet results did not change substantially when the EEG recordings were corrected for the influence of EOG potentials.

  7. Double Beta Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2008-01-01

    The importance of neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (DBD) is stressed in view of the recent results of experiments on neutrino oscillations which indicate that the difference between the squared masses of two neutrinos of different flavours is finite [For a recent review including neutrino properties and recent results see: Review of Particle Physics, J. of Phys. G: Nuclear and Particle Physics 33, 1]. As a consequence the mass of at least one neutrino has to be different from zero and it becomes imperative to determine its absolute value. The various experimental techniques to search for DBD are discussed together with the difficult problems of the evaluation of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. The upper limits on neutrino mass coming from the results of the various experiments are reported together with the indication for a non zero value by one of them not confirmed so far. The two presently running experiments on neutrinoless DBD are briefly described together with the already approved or designed second generation searches aiming to reach the values on the absolute neutrino mass indicated by the results on neutrino oscillations

  8. β-decay properties in the Cs decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzoni, G.; Lică, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Fraile, L. M.; IDS Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The study of the decay of neutron-rich Cs isotopes has two main objectives: on one side β decay is a perfect tool to access the low-spin structures in the daughter Ba nuclei, where the evolution of octupole deformed shapes can be followed, while, on the other hand, the study of the gross properties of these decays, in terms of decay rates and branching to delayed-neutron emission, are fundamental inputs for the modelling of the r-process in the Rare-Earth Elements peak. Results obtained at CERN-ISOLDE are discussed within this framework and compared to existing data and predictions from state-of-the-art nuclear models.

  9. Radioluminescence Decay Time Measurements in Silver-Doped Cadmium-Sulphide Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-induced radioluminescence decay times of CdS(Ag) crystals have been measured at temperatures ranging from 80 K to 300 K by using single-photon counting technique. These measurements indicate a complex and non-exponential type of decay time profiles, which are in general composed of two decay components, the fast one having about 3 ns and the slow one having about 6 ns. The decay times were found to be almost temperature independent. It was experimentally proved that the fast one is originating from the 594 nm emission line, whereas the slow one is originating from the 576 nm emission line. The whole wavelength-dependences of decay times (t 1 /e and t 1 /e 2 ) were also presented. The observation of fast and non-exponential decay times shows that the recombination mechanisms in CdS(Ag) crystals are not simple, responsible centers are not isolated, and there might be more than one radioluminescence center. This suggests the existence of

  10. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  11. Decay process of a magnetic island by forced reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, K.; Itoh, K.

    1991-03-01

    Time evolution of a magnetic island by forced reconnection, especially the decay process is analyzed. A simple slab model is used and the magnetic island is considered to have a single helicity. The plasma is assumed to be incompressible. The evolution time is affected by the presence of an original magnetic island. In the decay process, a current flows along the separatrix of the magnetic island, and the current layer width depends on the magnetic island width, when the island is relatively wide compared to the current layer. In the presence of a magnetic island, even if the magnetic Reynolds number S increases, the current layer does not become narrower. This leads to the slow evolution of the magnetic island. It is found that the time scale S 1 τ A is required to reach the last equilibrium regardless of the nonlinear terms. This is slower than that of the growth process, S 3/5 τ A . (author)

  12. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  13. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  14. Charm counting in b decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  15. Inflaton decay through supergravity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F.; Kawasaki, M.; Yanagida, T.T.; Tokyo Univ.

    2006-07-01

    We point out that supergravity effects enable the inflaton to decay into all matter fields, including the visible and the supersymmetry breaking sectors, once the inflaton acquires a non-vanishing vacuum expectation value. The new decay processes have great impacts on cosmology; the reheating temperature is bounded below; the gravitinos are produced by the inflaton decay in a broad class of the dynamical supersymmetry breaking models. We derive the bounds on the inflaton mass and the vacuum expectation value, which severely constrain high-scale inflations such as the hybrid and chaotic inflation models. (orig.)

  16. Flavor mixing and charm decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau Wang, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The results of mixing matrix determination and their implications on heavy quark decays are given. The decays of charm mesons D 0 , D + , F + into two pseudoscalar mesons are discussed in the framework of SU(3) symmetry. The charm decays are also discussed in terms of quark diagrams. It is demonstrated that the differences observed in the lifetimes of D 0 and D + , and in the branching ratios B(D 0 → K - K + ) and B(D 0 → π - π + ) can be easily incorporated. 3 figures

  17. Decays of the b quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, E.H.; Poling, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0 -anti B 0 mixing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent. (orig.)

  18. Carrier Decay and Diffusion Dynamics in Single-Crystalline CdTe as seen via Microphotoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Angelo; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2015-03-01

    The ability to spatially resolve the degree to which extended defects impact carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes is important for determining upper limits for defect densities in semiconductor devices. We show that a new spatially and temporally resolved photoluminescence (PL) imaging technique can be used to accurately extract carrier lifetimes in the immediate vicinity of dark-line defects in CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures. A series of PL images captured during the decay process show that extended defects with a density of 1.4x10-5 cm-2 deplete photogenerated charge carriers from the surrounding semiconductor material on a nanosecond time scale. The technique makes it possible to elucidate the interplay between nonradiative carrier recombination and carrier diffusion and reveals that they both combine to degrade the PL intensity over a fractional area that is much larger than the physical size of the defects. Carrier lifetimes are correctly determined from numerical simulations of the decay behavior by taking these two effects into account. Our study demonstrates that it is crucial to measure and account for the influence of local defects in the measurement of carrier lifetime and diffusion, which are key transport parameters for the design and modeling of advanced solar-cell and light-emitting devices. We acknowledge the financial support of the Department of Energy Office of Science under Grant No. DE-AC36-08GO28308.

  19. Three-body decays: structure, decay mechanism and fragment properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Jensen, A.S.; Fedorov, D.V.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Kirsebom, O.S.; Garrido, E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the three-body decay mechanisms of many-body resonances. R-matrix sequential description is compared with full Faddeev computation. The role of the angular momentum and boson symmetries is also studied. As an illustration we show the computed ?-particle energy distribution after the decay of 12 C(1 + ) resonance at 12.7 MeV. This article is based on the presentation by R. Alvarez-Rodriguez at the Fifth Workshop on Critical Stability, Erice, Sicily. (author)

  20. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  1. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Edward Tann [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  2. Slow brushing reduces heat pain in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljencrantz, J; Strigo, I; Ellingsen, D M; Krämer, H H; Lundblad, L C; Nagi, S S; Leknes, S; Olausson, H

    2017-08-01

    C-tactile (CT) afferents are unmyelinated low-threshold mechanoreceptors optimized for signalling affective, gentle touch. In three separate psychophysical experiments, we examined the contribution of CT afferents to pain modulation. In total, 44 healthy volunteers experienced heat pain and CT optimal (slow brushing) and CT sub-optimal (fast brushing or vibration) stimuli. Three different experimental paradigms were used: Concurrent application of heat pain and tactile (slow brushing or vibration) stimulation; Slow brushing, applied for variable duration and intervals, preceding heat pain; Slow versus fast brushing preceding heat pain. Slow brushing was effective in reducing pain, whereas fast brushing or vibration was not. The reduction in pain was significant not only when the CT optimal touch was applied simultaneously with the painful stimulus but also when the two stimuli were separated in time. For subsequent stimulation, the pain reduction was more pronounced for a shorter time interval between brushing and pain. Likewise, the effect was more robust when pain was preceded by a longer duration of brush stimulation. Strong CT-related pain reduction was associated with low anxiety and high calmness scores obtained by a state anxiety questionnaire. Slow brushing - optimal for CT activation - is effective in reducing pain from cutaneous heating. The precise mechanisms for the pain relief are as yet unknown but possible mechanisms include inhibition of nociceptive projection neurons at the level of the dorsal horn as well as analgesia through cortical mechanisms. Slow brushing stimuli - optimal for activation of C-tactile fibres - can reduce pain from cutaneous heating. No such effect was seen with fast brushing or vibration. These observations indicate the role of C-tactile fibres in pain modulation. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  3. Family symmetries and proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Kaplan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The proton decay modes p → K 0 e + and p → K 0 μ + may be visible in certain supersymmetric theories, and if seen would provide evidence for new flavor physics at extremely short distances. These decay modes can arise from the dimension five operator (Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 L 1,2 ), where Q i and L i are i th generation quark and lepton superfields respectively. Such an operator is not generated at observable levels due to gauge or Higgs boson exchange in a minimal GUT. However in theories that explain the fermion mass hierarchy, it may be generated at the Planck scale with a strength such that the decays p → K 0 ell + are both compatible with the proton lifetime and visible at Super-Kamiokande. Observable proton decay can even occur in theories without unification

  4. Weak Decays of Charmed Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Marc Gilles [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1986-05-01

    The lifetimes of charmed particles produced in interactions of high energy neutrinos with nucleons have been measured using a combination of a very high resolution emulsion-based vertex detector and a spectrometer allowing full kinematical reconstruction of the decays.

  5. CP violation in K decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs

  6. The decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs

  7. Nucleon decay in Soudan 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Soudan 2 detector is used to search for evidence of nucleon decay. Particular emphasis is put on searches for modes with multiple-charged particles in the final state, and for modes suggested by super-symmetric theories

  8. Rare KL decays at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnetzer, St.

    1997-01-01

    Recent results and the future prospects for rare K L decay at Fermilab are described. A summary of all rare decay results from E799 Phase I (the 1991 run) are presented. Three new results: K L → e + e - μ + μ - , K L → π 0 μe, and π 0 → e + e - e + e - are discussed in detail. Improvements for KTeV (the 1996-1997 run) are discussed and the expected sensitivities listed. Finally, the KAMI program for rare decays with the Main Injector (2000 and beyond) is presented with emphasis on a search for the decay K L → π 0 νν-bar at O(10 -12 ) single-event-sensitivity. (author)

  9. CP violation in B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1990-01-01

    The study of CP-violating effects in B decays will be a good test of whether CP violation is caused by the known weak interaction. If this is its origin, then large, cleanly-predicted CP-violating effects are expected in certain neutral B decays to hadronic CP eigenstates. The phenomenology of CP violation in the B system is reviewed, and the genesis of these large effects is explained. In this it is shown that large, cleanly-predicted effects are also expected in some decays to states which are not CP eigenstates. The combined study of the latter decays and those to CP eigenstates may make it possible to obtain a statistically-significant CP-violating signal with fewer B mesons that would otherwise be required

  10. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Äysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.

    2012-02-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A&M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23Al, 27P, 31Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22Na(p,γ)23Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22Na in novae), 26mAl(p,γ)27Si and 30P(p,γ)31S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  11. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trache, L; Banu, A; Hardy, J C; Iacob, V E; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Simmons, E; Spiridon, A; Tribble, R E; Saastamoinen, A; Jokinen, A; Äysto, J; Davinson, T; Lotay, G; Woods, P J; Pollacco, E

    2012-01-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A and M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23 Al, 27 P, 31 Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22 Na(p,γ) 23 Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22 Na in novae), 26m Al(p,γ) 27 Si and 30 P(p,γ) 31 S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  12. Beta decay of 22O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, F.; Dufour, J.P.; Moral, R. Del; Fleury, A.; Jean, D.; Pravikoff, M.S.; Geissel, H.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hanelt, E.

    1991-01-01

    22 O nuclei were produced as fragments of a 60 MeV/n 40 Ar beam interacting with a thick Be target. They were selected from all the produced nuclei with the LISE separator. γ spectra in coincidence with the β decay were measured. Partial decay scheme of 22 O is given. Similarities between experiments and calculations are discussed. (G.P.) 10 refs.; 3 figs

  13. The law of radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyrie, G

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with the law of radioactive decay (Rutherford-Sody's law) and the way to explain it to high-school or grammar-school students. The mathematical content of the law is recalled and its experimental validation is proposed through the study of the decay of a population of radon-220 atoms. The analysis of the experimental data is made easier by using software such as Generis, Regressi or even Excel

  14. The beta decay of hyperons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, A.; Garcia, A.; Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas); Kielanowski, P.; Texas Univ., Austin; Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City. Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados)

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the physics of the semileptonic decay of hyperons. After a general introduction and a description of the experimental results the Cabibbo theory is introduced for the theoretical description of these results. Then radiative and other corrections are discussed. Finally this decay is considered in the framework of broken SU(3). This book applies to graduate students and other ''non-specialists'' who want to get some insight into the physics of weak interactions. (HSI)

  15. Hadronic τ decays and QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davier, M.

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the τ lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  16. Study of charmonium rare decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brient, J.C.

    1986-09-01

    This thesis presents the study of rare decays of charmonium states formed in the interaction of an antiproton beam with an hydrogen gas jet target. Electromagnetic final states are used to sign the charmonium state formation (e + e - , e + e - + Χ, γγ). The selection of events used a two arms non magnetic spectrometer, with a charged track system, a threshold Cerenkov counter to tag the electron (positron), and an e.m. calorimeter. Energy scan technic have been used to observe the resonant formation through the excitation curves. Parameters of the states (mass, total and partial widths) are extracted from these curves using a statistical analysis. Two types of decays have been studied in this thesis: 1 P 1 charmonium state decay to the ψ (signed by its e + e - decay). In the energy scan around the center of gravity of the P charmonium states, we observe a cluster of 5 events, in a narrow mass range. This cluster correspond to a 2.7 σ signal. The most probable interpretation of this signal is given by a narrow resonance, with a mass of 3526. MeV. Due to the properties (mass, width and decay) of this signal, this could be interpreted as the 1 P 1 charmonium state. 2 photons decay of the η c and Χ 2 . 22 γγ events are observed, 15 in the η c region, and 7 in the Χ 2 region. This sample is interpreted as a direct observation of η c and Χ 2 decay into γγ. Parameters of these decays, (γγ partial width), are extracted using a maximum likekihood analysis. Theoretical models of charmonium explain correctly the properties of the charmonium, including the results presented in this thesis. 57 refs [fr

  17. Polarization bremsstrahlung in α decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Zon, B. A.; Kretinin, I. Yu.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism of formation of electromagnetic radiation that accompanies α decay and is associated with the emission of photons by electrons of atomic shells due to the scattering of α particles by these atoms (polarization bremsstrahlung) is proposed. It is shown that, when the photon energy is no higher than the energy of K electrons of an atom, polarization bremsstrahlung makes a significant contribution to the bremsstrahlung in α decay

  18. Parametric decay of the curvaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, K; Nurmi, S; Rigopoulos, G I

    2008-01-01

    We argue that the curvaton decay takes place most naturally by way of a broad parametric resonance. The mechanism is analogous to resonant inflaton decay but does not require any tuning of the curvaton coupling strength to other scalar fields. For low scale inflation and a correspondingly low mass scale for the curvaton, we speculate on observable consequences including the possibility of stochastic gravitational waves

  19. Beta decay and rhenium cosmochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashktorab, K.

    1992-01-01

    Among the problems which limit the use of the 187 Re/ 187 Os isobaric pair as a cosmochronometer for the age of the galaxy and the universe are the uncertainties in the partial half-lives of the continuum and bound state decays of 187 Re. While the total half-life of the decay is well established, the partial half-life for the continuum decay is uncertain, and several measurements are not compatible. A high temperature quartz proportional counter was used in this work to remeasure the continuum β - decay of 187 Re. The β endpoint energy for the decay of neutral 187 Re to singly ionized 187 Os of 2.75 ± 0.06 keV agrees with the earlier results. The corresponding half-life of (45 ± 3) x 10 9 years improves and agrees with the earlier measurement of Payne and Drever and refutes other measurements. Based on the new half-life for the continuum decay and a total half-life of (43.5 ± 1.3) x 10 9 years reported by Linder et al., the branching ratio for the bound state decay into discrete atomic states is estimated to be (3 ± 6)% in agreement with the most recent calculated theoretical branching ratio of approximately 1%. Anomalies in beta spectra reported by J.J. Simpson and others have been attributed to a 17 keV heavy-neutrino admixture. If confirmed, the implications from the existence of such a neutrino for particle and astrophysics would be significant. A multiwire open-quotes wall-lessclose quotes stainless steel proportional counter has been used in the present work to investigate the spectral shape of the β decay of 63 Ni. No anomalies in the spectral shape were observed which could be attributed to the presence of 17 keV heavy neutrino

  20. Hadronic {tau} decays and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  1. $\\Upsilon$ production in Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have searched for evidence of Upsilon production in 3.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1991-1995. No signals are observed for the decay chain Z -> Upsilon X; Upsilon -> l+l- (l= e, mu), therefore upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the following Z branching fractions: BR (Z -> Upsilon(1S) X) Upsilon(2S) X) Upsilon(3S) X) < 9.4 x 10**-5.

  2. Slow electron contribution to inelastic reflection anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podsvirov, O.A.; Kuznetsov, Yu.A.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is electron contribution with low energy (up to 1 keV) to the anisotropy of electron inelastic reflection (IRE) from silicon monocrystal (111) within 12-50 keV energy range of primary electrons. Experimental data on IRE anisotropy are presented: delay curves for silicon monocrystal, permitting to separate electrons with the energy up to 1 keV, dependences of IRE anisotropy on the energy of primary electrons for the systems - monocrystalline silicon-amorphous silicon film and delay curves for such systems (film thickness varies from 20 to 2000 A). Suggested is a phenomenologic model, permitting to take into account the contribution of slow electrons to IRE anisotropy: it is supposed, that three groups of electrons take part in the formation of the latter: elastic and inelastic reflected electrons, slow electrons, excited by primary electrons and slow electrons, generated by the reverse flow of the scattered electrons. Contribution of electrons, different by origin, to IRE anisotropy is evaluated in accordance with the experimental data on the basis of this model. It is stated, that slow electrons constitute approximately one half of the IRE anisotropy value, the contribution of both groups of slow electrons being approximately equal

  3. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  4. Magnon inflation: slow roll with steep potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adshead, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Blas, Diego [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Burgess, C.P.; Hayman, Peter [Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University,Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Patil, Subodh P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Geneva,24 Quai Ansermet, Geneva, CH-1211 (Switzerland)

    2016-11-04

    We find multi-scalar effective field theories (EFTs) that can achieve a slow inflationary roll despite having a scalar potential that does not satisfy G{sup ab}∂{sub a}V∂{sub b}V≪V{sup 2}/M{sub p}{sup 2} (where G{sub ab} is the target-space metric). They evade the usual slow-roll conditions on V because their kinetic energies are dominated by single-derivative terms rather than the usual two-derivative terms. Single derivatives dominate during slow roll and so do not require a breakdown of the usual derivative expansion that underpins calculational control in much of cosmology. The presence of such terms requires some sort of UV Lorentz-symmetry breaking during inflation (besides the usual cosmological breaking). Chromo-natural inflation provides one particular example of a UV theory that can generate the multi-field single-derivative terms we consider, and we argue that the EFT we find indeed captures the slow-roll conditions for its background evolution. We also show that our EFT can be understood as a multi-field generalization of the single-field Cuscuton models. The multi-field case introduces a new feature, however: the scalar kinetic terms define a target-space 2-form, F{sub ab}, whose antisymmetry gives new ways for slow roll to be achieved.

  5. Magnon Inflation: Slow Roll with Steep Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Adshead, Peter; Burgess, C P; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P

    2016-01-01

    We find multi-scalar effective field theories (EFTs) that can achieve a slow inflationary roll despite having a scalar potential that does not satisfy the usual slow-roll condition (d V)^2 << V^2/Mp^2. They evade the usual slow-roll conditions on $V$ because their kinetic energies are dominated by single-derivative terms rather than the usual two-derivative terms. Single derivatives dominate during slow roll and so do not require a breakdown of the usual derivative expansion that underpins calculational control in much of cosmology. The presence of such terms requires some sort of UV Lorentz-symmetry breaking during inflation (besides the usual cosmological breaking). Chromo-natural inflation provides an example of a UV theory that can generate the multi-field single-derivative terms we consider, and we argue that the EFT we find indeed captures the slow-roll conditions for the background evolution for Chromo-natural inflation. We also show that our EFT can be understood as a multi-field generalization ...

  6. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garfagnini, A.

    2014-08-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been per- formed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future. EXO and KamLAND-Zen experiments are based on the decay of Xe 136 , GERDA and MAJORANA experiments are based on the decay of Ge 76 , and the CUORE experiment is based on the decay of Te 130

  7. a Search for Nucleon Decay with Multiple Muon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas James

    A search was made for nucleon decays which result in multiple delayed muon decays using the HPW (Harvard -Purdue-Wisconsin) water Cerenkov detector. The HPW detector consists of 680 metric tons of purified water instrumented with 704 five-inch photomultiplier tubes. The phototubes are situated on a volume array with a lattice spacing of approximately one meter, and the inside walls of the detector are lined with mirrors. This combination of mirrors and a volume array of phototubes gives the HPW detector a low trigger energy threshold and a high muon decay detection efficiency. The detector is surrounded by wire chambers to provide an active shield, and is located at a depth of 1500 meters-of-water-equivalent in the Silver King Mine in Park City, Utah. The entire HPW data set, consisting of 17.2 million events collec- ted during 282 live days between May 1983 and October 1984, was analyzed. No contained events with multiple muon decays were found in a 180 ton fiducial volume. This is consistent with the background rate from neutrino interactions, which is expected to be 0.7 (+OR-) 0.2 events. The calculated lower lifetime limit for the decay mode p (--->) (mu)('+)(mu)('+)(mu)('-) is: (tau)/B.R. = 1 x 10('31) years (90% C.L.). Limits are calculated for ten other proton decay modes and five bound neutron decay modes, most of which are around 4 x 10('30) years (90% C.L.). No previous studies have reported results from direct searches for eight of these modes.

  8. Neutron slowing-down time in matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabod, Sebastien P., E-mail: sebastien.chabod@lpsc.in2p3.fr [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-21

    We formulate the neutron slowing-down time through elastic collisions in a homogeneous, non-absorbing, infinite medium. Our approach allows taking into account for the first time the energy dependence of the scattering cross-section as well as the energy and temporal distribution of the source neutron population in the results. Starting from this development, we investigate the specific case of the propagation in matter of a mono-energetic neutron pulse. We then quantify the perturbation on the neutron slowing-down time induced by resonances in the scattering cross-section. We show that a resonance can induce a permanent reduction of the slowing-down time, preceded by two discontinuities: a first one at the resonance peak position and an echo one, appearing later. From this study, we suggest that a temperature increase of the propagating medium in presence of large resonances could modestly accelerate the neutron moderation.

  9. Kinetic slow mode-type solitons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baumgärtel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional hybrid code simulations are presented, carried out in order both to study solitary waves of the slow mode branch in an isotropic, collisionless, medium-β plasma (βi=0.25 and to test the fluid based soliton interpretation of Cluster observed strong magnetic depressions (Stasiewicz et al., 2003; Stasiewicz, 2004 against kinetic theory. In the simulations, a variety of strongly oblique, large amplitude, solitons are seen, including solitons with Alfvenic polarization, similar to those predicted by the Hall-MHD theory, and robust, almost non-propagating, solitary structures of slow magnetosonic type with strong magnetic field depressions and perpendicular ion heating, which have no counterpart in fluid theory. The results support the soliton-based interpretation of the Cluster observations, but reveal substantial deficiencies of Hall-MHD theory in describing slow mode-type solitons in a plasma of moderate beta.

  10. Generalized slow roll for noncanonical kinetic terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    We show that the generalized slow roll approach for calculating the power spectrum where the inflationary slow roll parameters are neither small nor slowly varying can be readily extended to models with noncanonical kinetic terms in the inflaton action. For example, rapid sound speed variations can arise in Dirac-Born-Infeld models with features in the warp factor leading to features in the power spectrum. Nonetheless there remains a single source function for deviations that is simply related to the power spectrum. Empirical constraints on this source function can be readily interpreted in the context of features in the inflaton potential or sound speed.

  11. Fast and slow spindles during the sleep slow oscillation: disparate coalescence and engagement in memory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölle, Matthias; Bergmann, Til O; Marshall, Lisa; Born, Jan

    2011-10-01

    Thalamo-cortical spindles driven by the up-state of neocortical slow (memory consolidation during sleep. We examined interactions between SOs and spindles in human slow wave sleep, focusing on the presumed existence of 2 kinds of spindles, i.e., slow frontocortical and fast centro-parietal spindles. Two experiments were performed in healthy humans (24.5 ± 0.9 y) investigating undisturbed sleep (Experiment I) and the effects of prior learning (word paired associates) vs. non-learning (Experiment II) on multichannel EEG recordings during sleep. Only fast spindles (12-15 Hz) were synchronized to the depolarizing SO up-state. Slow spindles (9-12 Hz) occurred preferentially at the transition into the SO down-state, i.e., during waning depolarization. Slow spindles also revealed a higher probability to follow rather than precede fast spindles. For sequences of individual SOs, fast spindle activity was largest for "initial" SOs, whereas SO amplitude and slow spindle activity were largest for succeeding SOs. Prior learning enhanced this pattern. The finding that fast and slow spindles occur at different times of the SO cycle points to disparate generating mechanisms for the 2 kinds of spindles. The reported temporal relationships during SO sequences suggest that fast spindles, driven by the SO up-state feed back to enhance the likelihood of succeeding SOs together with slow spindles. By enforcing such SO-spindle cycles, particularly after prior learning, fast spindles possibly play a key role in sleep-dependent memory processing.

  12. Light storage via slow-light four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yun-Fei; Wang, Hai-Hua; Wei, Xiao-Gang; Li, Ai-Jun; Kang, Zhi-Hui; Wu, Jin-Hui; Zhang, Han-Zhuang; Xu, Huai-Liang; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a light storage via slow-light four-wave mixing in a solid-state medium with a four-level double lambda scheme. Using slow light based on electromagnetically induced transparency, we obtain a slowed four-wave mixing signal pulse together with the slowed probe pulse. During the propagation of light pulses, the storage and retrieval of both the slowed four-wave mixing pulse and the slowed probe pulse are studied by manipulating the intensities of the control fields. -- Highlights: ► A light storage via slow-light four-wave mixing is observed in a solid. ► The probe pulse is slowed under electromagnetically induced transparency. ► A slowed four-wave mixing pulse is obtained by slow light. ► The storage of slowed double pulses is studied.

  13. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  14. In-trap decay spectroscopy for ββ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in ββ decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from β decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and β detection with almost no β-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in ββ decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in ββ decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10 -5 and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating β background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge detectors, for the detection of X-rays, were

  15. Charm CPV and rare decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Morello, Michael Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Charm physics has been playing all along a role in particle physics, by contributing to the for-mulation of the Standard Model (SM) as it is known nowadays. The level of attention on it has tremendously increased in recent years because of the first experimental observations of the slow mixing rate of the $D^0 − \\overline{D}^0$ flavour oscillations, providing definitely a full range of probes, entirely complementary to the $B$ and $K$ mesons, for mixing and $CP$- violation. In fact the charm quark is the only up-type quark that manifests flavour oscillations. Only in recent years it has been possible to collect huge and very clean samples of $D$ meson decays, several orders of magnitude larger in size than in the past, allowing also for the first time approaching the small SM expectations for $CP$-violation below the $10^{−3}$ level. Thus, the dynamics of the charm quark can be probed for the presence of New Physics with negligible SM “background”, since any generic non-SM contribu-tion would naturall...

  16. Rare B decays, rare τ decays, and grand unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, M.; Yuan, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In multi-Higgs-boson extensions of the standard model, tree-level flavor-changing neutral currents exist naturally, unless suppressed by some symmetry. For a given rate, the exchanged scalar or pseudoscalar mass is very sensitive to the flavor-changing coupling between the first two generations. Since the Yukawa couplings of the first two generations are unknown and certainly very small, bounds which rely on some assumed value of this flavor-changing coupling are quite dubious. One might expect the size (and reliability) of the Yukawa couplings involving the third generation to be greater. In this paper, we consider processes involving τ's and B's, and determine the bounds on the flavor-changing couplings which involve third-generation fields. The strongest bound in the quark sector comes from B-bar B mixing and in the lepton sector, surprisingly, from μ→eγ. It is then noted that the flavor-changing couplings in the quark sector are related to those in the lepton sector in many grand unified theories, and one can ask whether an analysis of rare τ decays or rare B decays will provide the strongest constraints. We show that rare B decays provide the strongest bounds, and that no useful information can be obtained from rare τ decays. It is also noted that the most promising decay modes are B→Kμτ and B s →μτ, and we urge experimenters to look for rare decay modes of the B in which a τ is in the final state

  17. Quick-Connect, Slow-Disconnect Bolt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed bolt functions similarly to device described in article "Quick-Connect, Slow-Disconnect Nut" (MFS-28833). Bolt installed in standard threaded hole simply by pushing it into hole. Once inserted, bolt withdrawn only by turning it in conventional way.

  18. A slow component of classic Stroop interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phaf, R. Hans; Horsman, Hark H.; van der Moolen, Bas; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Schmand, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The interference in colour naming may extend beyond critical Stroop trials. This "slow'' effect was first discovered in emotional Stroop tasks, but is extended here to classical Stroop. In two experiments, meaningless coloured letter strings followed a colour word or neutral word. Student

  19. Slow Reading: Reading along "Lectio" Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, K. Jo-Ann; Badley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The medieval monastic movement preserved and developed reading practices--lectio--from ancient Greek pedagogy as a slow, mindful approach to reading for formation. This ancient way of reading, now better known as lectio divina, challenges the fast, pragmatic reading so characteristic of our time. We propose that the present moment may be ripe for…

  20. Slowed ageing, welfare, and population problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Biological studies have demonstrated that it is possible to slow the ageing process and extend lifespan in a wide variety of organisms, perhaps including humans. Making use of the findings of these studies, this article examines two problems concerning the effect of life extension on population size and welfare. The first--the problem of overpopulation--is that as a result of life extension too many people will co-exist at the same time, resulting in decreases in average welfare. The second--the problem of underpopulation--is that life extension will result in too few people existing across time, resulting in decreases in total welfare. I argue that overpopulation is highly unlikely to result from technologies that slow ageing. Moreover, I claim that the problem of underpopulation relies on claims about life extension that are false in the case of life extension by slowed ageing. The upshot of these arguments is that the population problems discussed provide scant reason to oppose life extension by slowed ageing.

  1. Response of electret dosemeter to slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilardi, A.J.P.; Pela, C.A.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The response of the electret dosemeter to exposition of slow neutrons is studied. Different external coatings are used on the dosemeter (polyethylene, alminium, polyethylene + boron, aluminium + boron) and exposure curves (with and without water) are compared. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Analysis of the neutron slowing down equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.; Karnick, H.

    1978-01-01

    The infinite series solution of the elementary neutron slowing down equation is studied using the theory of entire functions of exponential type and nonharmonic Fourier series. It is shown from Muntz--Szasz and Paley--Wiener theorems, that the set of exponentials ]exp(ilambda/sub n/u) ]/sup infinity//sub n/=-infinity, where ]lambda/sub n/]/sup infinity//sub n/=-infinity are the roots of the transcendental equation in slowing down theory, is complete and forms a basis in a lethargy interval epsilon. This distinctive role of the maximum lethargy change per collision is due to the Fredholm character of the slowing down operator which need not be quasinilpotent. The discontinuities in the derivatives of the collision density are examined by treating the slowing down equation in its differential-difference form. The solution (Hilbert) space is the union of a countable number of subspaces L 2 (-epsilon/2, epsilon/2) over each of which the exponential functions are complete

  3. Probabilistic Slow Features for Behavior Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafeiriou, Lazaros; Nicolaou, Mihalis A.; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Nikitidis, Symeon; Pantic, Maja

    A recently introduced latent feature learning technique for time-varying dynamic phenomena analysis is the so-called slow feature analysis (SFA). SFA is a deterministic component analysis technique for multidimensional sequences that, by minimizing the variance of the first-order time derivative

  4. Learning slow features for behavior analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafeiriou, Lazaros; Nicolaou, Mihalis A.; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Nikitids, Symeon; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    A recently introduced latent feature learning technique for time varying dynamic phenomena analysis is the socalled Slow Feature Analysis (SFA). SFA is a deterministic component analysis technique for multi-dimensional sequences that by minimizing the variance of the first order time derivative

  5. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  6. Preliminary characterization of slow growing rhizobial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we did some preliminary characterization of six slow growing rhizobial strains, isolated from Retama monosperma (L.) Boiss. root nodules sampled from 3 sites along the coast of Oran (CapeFalcon, Bousfer and MersElHadjadj) in Northwestern Algeria. Results of this study showed that all strains had a very ...

  7. Preliminary characterization of slow growing rhizobial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMPAQ

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... strains had a very slow growth rate in yeast malt (YM) agar medium, forming colonies less than 1 mm in ... dominant genus of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria ... Single colonies were picked up and checked for purity by.

  8. CRBRP decay heat removal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented

  9. Fine structure of cluster decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, O.

    1993-07-01

    Within the one level R-matrix approach the hindrance factors of the radioactive decays in which are emitted α and 14 C - nuclei are calculated. The generalization to radioactive decays in which are emitted heavier clusters such as e.g. 20 O, 24 Ne, 25 Ne, 28 Mg. 30 Mg, 32 Si and 34 Si is straightforward. The interior wave functions are supposed to be given by the shell model with effective residual interactions (e.g. the large scale shell model code-OXBASH - in the Michigan State University version for nearly spherical nuclei or by the enlarged superfluid model - ESM - recently proposed for deformed nuclei). The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster - nucleus double - folding model potential obtained with the M3Y interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of α - decay of 241 Am and 14 C -decay of 233 Ra. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained. (author). 78 refs, 2 figs, 6 tabs

  10. Results from TRX-2 slow field-reversed-theta-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slough, J.T.; Harding, D.; Hoffman, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    FRCs have been successfully generated in the TRX-2 slow risetime theta pinch. Initial studies indicate that the flux trapping through field reversal is about as good (''50%) as on TRX-1, although the quarter cycle time of the main coil was increased from 3 to 10 μsec. Formation studies have been started using the programmed formation techniques developed on TRX-1. The plasma dynamics are very similar to those exhibited in the faster rise TRX-1 experiments. The formation phase shows the same high degree of symmetry and reproducibility that was observed in TRX-1. Equilibrium behaviour of the FRCs formed is very similar to that observed on TRX-1, as long as impurity content is kept low. T/sub e/ + T/sub i/ temperatures of 400 to 500 eV are obtained and confirmed by impurity line broadening and decay rates. Flux and particle lifetimes ≅ 100 μsec have been observed and show the same strong scaling with x/sub s/ that was observed on TRX-1

  11. Measuring and slowing decoherence in Electromagnetically induced transparency medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuker, M.; Firstenberg, O.; Sagi, Y.; Ben-Kish, A.; Fisher, A.; Ron, A.; Davidson, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Electromagnetically induced transparency is a unique light-matter interaction that exhibits extremely narrow-band spectroscopic features along with low absorption. Recent interest in this phenomenon is driven by its possible applications in quantum information (slow light, storage of light), atomic clocks and precise magnetometers. The Electromagnetically induced transparency phenomenon takes place when an atomic ensemble is driven to a coherent superposition of its ground state sub-levels by two phase-coherent radiation fields. A key parameter of the Electromagnetically induced transparency medium, that limits its applicability, is the coherence lifetime of this superposition (decoherence rate). We have developed a simple technique to measure decay rates within the ground state of an atomic ensemble, and specifically the decoherence rate of the Electromagnetically induced transparency coherent superposition. Detailed measurements were performed in a Rubidium vapor cell at 60 - 80 with 30 Torr of Neon buffer gas. We have found that the Electromagnetically induced transparency decoherence is dominated by spin-exchange collisions between Rubidium atoms. We discuss the sensitivity of various quantum states of the atomic ensemble to spin exchange decoherence, and find a set of quantum states that minimize this effect. Finally, we demonstrate a unique quantum state which is both insensitive to spin exchange decoherence and constitutes an Electromagnetically induced transparency state of the medium

  12. Electrom emission from slow highly charged ions interacting with a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumayr, F.; Kurz, H.; Toeglhofer, K.; Winter, H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in investigating electron emission from slow highly charged ions approaching a metal surface is discussed. In particular, new informations on generation and decay of transient multiply excited ''hollow atoms'' developing during these processes have been gained from measurement of the statistics of emitted electrons (ES). ES and precise total electron yields derived from the former have been measured for normal incidence of slow (impact velocity 1/15.10 4 ms -1 ) multicharged ions N q+ (q≤6), Ne q+ (q≤10), Ar q+ (q≤16), Kr q+ (q≤10), Xe q+ (q≤10) and I q+ (q≤25) on clean polycrystalline gold. A classical over-barrier approach as recently introduced by Burgdoerfer et al. 1991 has been extended and successfully applied to model the measured impact-velocity dependences of total electron yields. In this way contributions from different electron emission mechanisms could be identified. (orig.)

  13. Small Coronal Holes Near Active Regions as Sources of Slow Solar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    We discuss the nature of the small areas of rapidly diverging, open magnetic flux that form in the strong unipolar fields at the peripheries of active regions (ARs), according to coronal extrapolations of photospheric field measurements. Because such regions usually have dark counterparts in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images, we refer to them as coronal holes, even when they appear as narrow lanes or contain sunspots. Revisiting previously identified “AR sources” of slow solar wind from 1998 and 1999, we find that they are all associated with EUV coronal holes; the absence of well-defined He i 1083.0 nm counterparts to some of these holes is attributed to the large flux of photoionizing radiation from neighboring AR loops. Examining a number of AR-associated EUV holes during the 2014 activity maximum, we confirm that they are characterized by wind speeds of ∼300–450 km s{sup −1}, O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratios of ∼0.05–0.4, and footpoint field strengths typically of order 30 G. The close spacing between ARs at sunspot maximum limits the widths of unipolar regions and their embedded holes, while the continual emergence of new flux leads to rapid changes in the hole boundaries. Because of the highly nonradial nature of AR fields, the smaller EUV holes are often masked by the overlying canopy of loops, and may be more visible toward one solar limb than at central meridian. As sunspot activity declines, the AR remnants merge to form much larger, weaker, and longer-lived unipolar regions, which harbor the “classical” coronal holes that produce recurrent high-speed streams.

  14. Decay-time measurements on 'pure' CsI scintillators prepared by different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszthelyi-Landori, S.; Foeldvari, I.; Voszka, R.; Fodor, Z.; Seres, Z.

    1990-05-01

    The discovery of the fast decay time of the pure CsI and the various results of the measured samples led to the investigation of decay time of CsI crystals prepared by different methods. Carefully grown or prepared pure CsI behaves as fast scintillators with well or totally suppressed slow decay component. The estimated fast/slow or fast/total ratio is related to the preparation method and to the remaining built-in contamination of the samples. The fast decay of pure CsI consists of two components with decay times of ≅1 and ≅10 ns - with an intensity ratio of 0.3 and 0.65 for gamma and for alpha radiation, respectively. This new ≅1 ns component and the ≅0.8 fast/total ratio may achieve an important role in many applications where fast timing properties are needed, substituting BaF 2 . (author) 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. Large electron capture-cross-section of the major nonradiative recombination centers in Mg-doped GaN epilayers grown on a GaN substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichibu, S. F.; Shima, K.; Kojima, K.; Takashima, S.; Edo, M.; Ueno, K.; Ishibashi, S.; Uedono, A.

    2018-05-01

    Complementary time-resolved photoluminescence and positron annihilation measurements were carried out at room temperature on Mg-doped p-type GaN homoepitaxial films for identifying the origin and estimating the electron capture-cross-section ( σ n ) of the major nonradiative recombination centers (NRCs). To eliminate any influence by threading dislocations, free-standing GaN substrates were used. In Mg-doped p-type GaN, defect complexes composed of a Ga-vacancy (VGa) and multiple N-vacancies (VNs), namely, VGa(VN)2 [or even VGa(VN)3], are identified as the major intrinsic NRCs. Different from the case of 4H-SiC, atomic structures of intrinsic NRCs in p-type and n-type GaN are different: VGaVN divacancies are the major NRCs in n-type GaN. The σ n value approximately the middle of 10-13 cm2 is obtained for VGa(VN)n, which is larger than the hole capture-cross-section (σp = 7 × 10-14 cm2) of VGaVN in n-type GaN. Combined with larger thermal velocity of an electron, minority carrier lifetime in Mg-doped GaN becomes much shorter than that of n-type GaN.

  16. Leakage of radioactive materials from particle accelerator facilities by non-radiation disasters like fire and flooding and its environmental impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A.; Jung, N. S.; Mokhtari Oranj, L.; Lee, H. S.

    2018-06-01

    The leakage of radioactive materials generated at particle accelerator facilities is one of the important issues in the view of radiation safety. In this study, fire and flooding at particle accelerator facilities were considered as the non-radiation disasters which result in the leakage of radioactive materials. To analyse the expected effects at each disaster, the case study on fired and flooded particle accelerator facilities was carried out with the property investigation of interesting materials presented in the accelerator tunnel and the activity estimation. Five major materials in the tunnel were investigated: dust, insulators, concrete, metals and paints. The activation levels on the concerned materials were calculated using several Monte Carlo codes (MCNPX 2.7+SP-FISPACT 2007, FLUKA 2011.4c and PHITS 2.64+DCHAIN-SP 2001). The impact weight to environment was estimated for the different beam particles (electron, proton, carbon and uranium) and the different beam energies (100, 430, 600 and 1000 MeV/nucleon). With the consideration of the leakage path of radioactive materials due to fire and flooding, the activation level of selected materials, and the impacts to the environment were evaluated. In the case of flooding, dust, concrete and metal were found as a considerable object. In the case of fire event, dust, insulator and paint were the major concerns. As expected, the influence of normal fire and flooding at electron accelerator facilities would be relatively low for both cases.

  17. Judd–Ofelt modeling, emission lifetimes and non-radiative relaxation for Er{sup 3+} doped Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} elpasolite crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiko, P.A. [ITMO University, 49 Kronverkskiy pr., St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Vilejshikova, E.V. [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Khaidukov, N.M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, 31 Leninskii Prospekt, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Méndez-Ramos, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna 38206, Tenerife (Spain); Mateos, X. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, c/ Marcellí Domingo, s/n., Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Yumashev, K.V., E-mail: k.yumashev@tut.by [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2017-05-15

    Absorption and emission properties of Er{sup 3+} ions in a cubic elpasolite crystal, Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6}, are modeled within the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory. The J-O intensity parameters have been determined: Ω{sub 2} = 0.665, Ω{sub 4} = 0.217 and Ω{sub 6} = 0.029 ×10{sup –20} cm{sup 2}. The elpasolite structure of Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} containing isolated [YF{sub 6}] polyhedra allows high Er{sup 3+} doping levels up to 100 at% without considerable concentration quenching of luminescence and exceptionally long lifetimes of the excited states (in particular, the radiative lifetimes of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} states are as long as 36.7 ms and 113.4 ms, respectively). It also shows weak non-radiative relaxation. Stimulated-emission cross-sections have been determined for the Er{sup 3+} transitions in Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} at ~2.7 and ~1.5 μm as well as in the visible spectral range.

  18. The influence of non-radiation induced ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes for dosimetry in the radiotherapy dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Lettau, C.; Fill, U.; Regulla, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    The yield of radicals induced by ionizing radiation in the amino acid alanine and its quantification by ESR spectroscopy has proven excellent reproducibility. Those radicals trapped in the crystal lattice are prevented from recombination providing a thermally very stable system. This allows alanine to be applied as a transfer dosemeter. With paraffin-alanine probes ESR dosimetry can be performed with a standard deviation of ± 0.5% in the dose range from 20 Gy up to 100 kGy. At 1 Gy dose level the error increases to ± 6%. This dose level is three orders of magnitude higher than the calculated detection threshold for alanine with modern X-band ESR spectrometers. It was found that the poor standard deviation at the 1 Gy dose level, is not mainly produced by a bad signal-to-noise ratio but by a variable non-radiation induced ESR background signal from the alanine probes within a batch. In the present study the main sources of error for ESR dosimetry in the dose range below 20 Gy were analyzed. The influences of the production process, UV light and humidity upon the ESR background signal from paraffin-alanine probes were investigated. Measurements are shown indicating a second stable structure of the alanine radical at room temperature. (author)

  19. ICP-MS Analysis of Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles as a Non-Radiative, Multiplex Approach to Quantify Biodistribution and Blood Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crayton, Samuel H.; Elias, Andrew; Al-Zaki, Ajlan; Cheng, Zhiliang; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in material science and chemistry have led to the development of nanoparticles with diverse physicochemical properties, e.g. size, charge, shape, and surface chemistry. Evaluating which physicochemical properties are best for imaging and therapeutic studies is challenging not only because of the multitude of samples to evaluate, but also because of the large experimental variability associated with in vivo studies (e.g. differences in tumor size, injected dose, subject weight, etc.). To address this issue, we have developed a lanthanide-doped nanoparticle system and analytical method that allows for the quantitative comparison of multiple nanoparticle compositions simultaneously. Specifically, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) with a range of different sizes and charges were synthesized, each with a unique lanthanide dopant. Following the simultaneous injection of the various SPIO compositions into tumor-bearing mice, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was used to quantitatively and orthogonally assess the concentration of each SPIO composition in serial blood samples and the resected tumor and organs. The method proved generalizable to other nanoparticle platforms, including dendrimers, liposomes, and polymersomes. This approach provides a simple, cost-effective, and non-radiative method to quantitatively compare tumor localization, biodistribution, and blood clearance of more than 10 nanoparticle compositions simultaneously, removing subject-to-subject variability. PMID:22100983

  20. Decay and Transmutation of Nuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Aarnio, Pertti A

    1999-01-01

    We present a computer code DeTra which solves analytically the Bateman equations governing the decay, build-up and transmutation of radionuclides. The complexity of the chains and the number of nuclides are not limited. The nuclide production terms considered include transmutation of the nuclides inside the chain, external production, and fission. Time dependent calculations are possible since all the production terms can be re-defined for each irradiation step. The number of irradiation steps and output times is unlimited. DeTra is thus able to solve any decay and transmutation problem as long as the nuclear data i.e. decay data and production rates, or cross sections, are known.

  1. The search for proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; McGrew, C.; Mohapatra, R.; Peterson, E.; Cline, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The conservation of the quantum number called baryon number, like lepton (or family) number, is an empirical fact even though there are very good reasons to expect otherwise. Experimentalists have been searching for baryon number violating decays of the proton and neutron for decades now without success. Theorists have evolved deep understanding of the relationship between the natural forces in the development of various Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) that nearly universally predict baryon number violating proton decay, or related phenomena like n-bar n oscillations. With this in mind, the Proton Decay Working Group reviewed the current experimental and theoretical status of the search for baryon number violation with an eye to the advancement in the next decade

  2. Particle creation during vacuum decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubakov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    The hamiltonian approach is developed with regard to the problem of particle creation during the tunneling process, leading to the decay of the false vacuum in quantum field theory. It is shown that, to the lowest order in (h/2π), the particle creation is described by the euclidean Schroedinger equation in an external field of a bounce. A technique for solving this equation is developed in an analogy to the Bogoliubov transformation technique, in the theory of particle creation in the presence of classical background fields. The technique is illustrated by two examples, namely, the particle creation during homogeneous vacuum decay and during the tunneling process leading to the materialization of the thin-wall bubble of a new vacuum in the metastable one. The curious phenomenon of intensive particle annihilation during vacuum decay is discussed and explicitly illustrated within the former example. The non-unitary extension of the Bogoliubov u, v transformations is described in the appendix. (orig.)

  3. Cusp effects in meson decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubis B.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in the π0 π0 invariant mass distribution of K+ → π0 π0 π+ decays. As originally pointed out by Cabibbo, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pion–pion scattering lengths to high precision. We present the non-relativistic effective field theory framework that permits to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner, including the effects of radiative corrections. Applications of the same formalism to other decay channels, in particular η and η′ decays, are also discussed.

  4. Observable signatures of inflaton decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battefeld, Diana; Battefeld, Thorsten [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Goettingen, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Gottingen (Germany); Giblin, John T. Jr.; Pease, Evan K., E-mail: dbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: tbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: peasee@kenyon.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022, U.S.A (United States)

    2011-02-01

    We numerically compute features in the power-spectrum that originate from the decay of fields during inflation. Using a simple, phenomenological, multi-field setup, we increase the number of fields from a few to thousands. Whenever a field decays, its associated potential energy is transferred into radiation, causing a jump in the equation of state parameter and mode mixing at the perturbed level. We observe discrete steps in the power-spectrum if the number of fields is low, in agreement with analytic arguments in the literature. These features become increasingly smeared out once many fields decay within a given Hubble time. In this regime we confirm the validity of the analytic approach to staggered inflation, which is based on a coarse-graining procedure. Our numerical approach bridges the aforementioned analytic treatments, and can be used in more complicated scenarios.

  5. B decays, an introductory survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Yaouanc, A.; Oliver, L.; Pene, O.; Raynal, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Some basic important theoretical tools which are currently used in b physics are overviewed. Heavy Quark Symmetry and its consequences for heavy to heavy and heavy to light semi-leptonic decays, as well as for leptonic decays, are briefly summarised. It is stressed that symmetry must be completed with dynamical calculations. A critical discussion of the nearest pole dominance (VMD) assumption is performed. Parton model and its higher twist corrections are discussed on the example of lifetimes. Finally, non-leptonic decays are considered via the example of the exclusive calculation of ΔΓ in the B s -B s -bar system. The popular factorization assumption is discussed and seems to be rather good. (author). 19 refs

  6. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs

  7. Mirror decay of $^{75}$Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Huikari, J; Algora, A; Cederkäll, J; Courtin, S; Dessagne, P; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Huang Wan Xia; Jokinen, A; Knipper, A; Maréchal, F; Miehé, C; Nácher, E; Peräjärvi, K; Poirier, E; Weissman, L; Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    The beta -decay of /sup 75/Sr to its mirror nucleus /sup 75/Rb was studied at the ISOLDE PSB facility at CERN by means of beta -delayed gamma and proton spectroscopy. The decay Q-value and beta -delayed gamma intensity were measured for the first time. These results, 10.60+or-0.22 MeV and 4.5/sub -0.7//sup +1.9/%, together with accurate measurements of the beta -decay half-life and beta -delayed proton branching ratio yielded the Gamow-Teller strength 0.35+or-0.05 for the mirror transition. Implications of the results on studies of deformation effects and on the path of the rapid proton capture process are discussed. (24 refs).

  8. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  9. Beta decay of 22O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, F.; Dufour, J.P.; Moral, R. del; Fleury, A.; Jean, D.; Pravikoff, M.S.; Delagrange, H.; Geissel, H.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hanelt, E.

    1989-01-01

    The beta-gamma spectroscopic study of 22 O is presented. This nucleus, produced as a projectile-like fragment from the interaction of a 60 MeV/n 40 Ar beam with a Be target, has been separated by the LISE spectrometer. Several gamma rays from 22 O decay have been observed, from which a half-life of (2.25±0.15) s has been determined. Accurate excitation energies have been deduced for several states in 22 F. A partial beta decay scheme of 22 O has been established. Experimental results have been compared with shell model calculations. (orig.)

  10. β decay of Na32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoon, C. M.; Sarazin, F.; Hackman, G.; Cunningham, E. S.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Koopmans, K. A.; Leslie, J. R.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Schwarzenberg, J.; Smith, M. B.; Svensson, C. E.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Washbrook, B.; Zganjar, E.

    2007-01-01

    The β-decay of Na32 has been studied using β-γ coincidences. New transitions and levels are tentatively placed in the level scheme of Mg32 from an analysis of γ-γ and β-γ-γ coincidences. The observation of the indirect feeding of the 2321 keV state in Mg32 removes some restrictions previously placed on the spin assignment for this state. No evidence of a state at 2117 keV in Mg32 is found. Previously unobserved weak transitions up to 5.4 MeV were recorded but could not be placed in the decay scheme of Na32.

  11. Search for neutrinoless τ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Krueger, A.; Nau, A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Schaefer, M.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R.D.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Toepfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Britton, D.I.; Charlesworth, C.E.K.; Edwards, K.W.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Prentice, J.D.; Saull, P.R.B.; Seidel, S.C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Van de Water, R.G.; Yoon, T.S.; Ressing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K.R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.

    1992-01-01

    Upper limits on branching ratios for six neutrinoless leptonic, 16 semileptonic, two radiative-leptonic, two radiative-hadronic and three purely hadronic τ decays have been determined. The results improve over previously published ones by about a factor of two. For the first time the lepton and baryon number violating decays τ - →anti pγ, τ - →anti pπ 0 and τ - →anti pη have been investigated. The 90% confidence level (CL) limits for the corresponding branching ratios amount to 2.9x10 -4 , 6.6x10 -4 and 1.3x10 -3 respectively. (orig.)

  12. The 49K beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.G.; Huck, A.; Klotz, G.; Knipper, A.; Miehe, C.; Walter, G.; Jonson, B.; Mattsson, S.; Ravn, H.L.; Kratz, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    The decay of 49 K has been studied through neutron and gamma spectroscopy techniques. The 49 K activity was formed by 600 MeV proton fragmentation reactions in a uranium carbide target. The observed β-strength, in addition to the general behaviour expected from the gross theory of β-decay, displays two resonances centered at about 6.5 MeV and 9.5 MeV in 49 Ca. This structure is discussed in simple shell-model terms. (orig.)

  13. Chiral quarks and proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadha, S.; Daniel, M.; Gounaris, G.J.; Murphy, A.J.

    1984-04-01

    The authors calculate the hadronic matrix elements of baryon decay operators using a chiral effective Lagrangian with quarks, gluons and Goldstone boson fields. The cases where the ΔB=1 operators arise from supersymmetric SU(5) GUT as well as the minimal SU(5) GUT model are studied. In each model the results depend on two parameters. In particular there is a range of values for the two parameters, where the dominant decay modes in the minimal SU(5) GUT are: p→etae + and n→π - e + . (author)

  14. Hadronic B decays at LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    We present recent results from the analysis of hadronic decays of B s 0 mesons at LHCb detector. The analyses use the data sample collected in 2011, which correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb -1 . A large variety of different decays are being studied in order to probe for signs of physics beyond the Standard Model. The statistics available in the 2011 data sample already allow sophisticated analysis techniques, such as the Dalitz-plot analysis and the angular analysis to be employed

  15. Experimental stress analysis of the attachment region of hemispherical shells with attached nozzles. Part 5c. Nonradial nozzle at 22-1/2 degrees 2.625 in. O.D.--2.5000 in. I.D., zero penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, R.L.; Holland, R.W.

    1975-06-01

    A continuing series of investigations has been conducted to determine experimentally the stress patterns for the junction region of spherical shells with radially and non-radially attached nozzles when subjected to internal pressure and various types of loadings on the nozzles. Results of the investigations conducted on a nonradially attached nozzle of 2.625 in.-OD, 2.500 in. ID, and finished flush with the inner surface of the hemisphere are reported. The nozzle was inclined at 22 1 / 2 0 from a radial axis. Stress values for the following types of loadings are tabulated: internal pressure applied to the hemisphere and nozzle assembly; an axial load applied collinear with nozzle; a pure torque applied in the radial plane of the nozzle; and a pure bending moment or axial couple applied in various axial planes of the nozzle. Various stress vs. profile curves are presented. These curves present the tabulated stress data in graphical format. (U.S.)

  16. The Monte-Carlo code DECAY to simulate the decay of baryon and meson resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenssgen, K.; Ritter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The code DECAY simulates the decay of unpolarized baryon and meson resonances in the laboratory frame. DECAY treats some resonances among these all baryon resonances of the spin 3/2 + decuplet and all meson resonances of the spin 1 - nonet. A given resonance decays via two or three particle decay steps until all decay products are stable particles. Program summary and code description are given. (author)

  17. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, W.-S.; Lo, C.-H.; Cheng, M.-L.; Chen Hongmin; Liu Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi; Nanda, D.; Tung, K.-L.; Huang, S.-H.; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, J.-Y.; Sun Yiming; Yu Changcheng; Zhang Renwu; Jean, Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes

  18. A tilted transversely isotropic slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2012-05-09

    The relation between vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis (TTI) requires solving a quartic polynomial equation, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of the perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the vertical slowness that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for a small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  19. Slow and fast light in semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Xue, Weiqi

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of slow and fast light effects in semiconductor waveguides entail interesting physics and point to a number of promising applications. In this review we give an overview of recent progress in the field, in particular focusing on the physical mechanisms of electromagnetically induced...... transparency and coherent population oscillations. While electromagnetically induced transparency has been the most important effect in realizing slowdown effects in atomic gasses, progress has been comparatively slow in semiconductors due to inherent problems of fast dephasing times and inhomogeneous...... broadening in quantum dots. The physics of electromagnetically induced transparency in semiconductors is discussed, emphasizing these limitations and recent suggestions for overcoming them. On the other hand, the mechanism of coherent population oscillations relies on wave mixing effects and is well suited...

  20. Slow Invariant Manifolds in Chemically Reactive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Samuel; Powers, Joseph M.

    2006-11-01

    The scientific design of practical gas phase combustion devices has come to rely on the use of mathematical models which include detailed chemical kinetics. Such models intrinsically admit a wide range of scales which renders their accurate numerical approximation difficult. Over the past decade, rational strategies, such as Intrinsic Low Dimensional Manifolds (ILDM) or Computational Singular Perturbations (CSP), for equilibrating fast time scale events have been successfully developed, though their computation can be challenging and their accuracy in most cases uncertain. Both are approximations to the preferable slow invariant manifold which best describes how the system evolves in the long time limit. Strategies for computing the slow invariant manifold are examined, and results are presented for practical combustion systems.

  1. Review of tau lepton decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the τ decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the ''1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the τ lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Why measure radon decay products?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.; Lettner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Combined development in spectrometry, instrumentation and ventilation modelling with its dependence on short- and long-term weather fluctuations renders possible a new, economical metrology for radon decay products. Short-term measurements can, with few restrictions, be converted to annual exposures of an accuracy superior to that from conventional medium-term Rn gas measurements. (orig.) [de

  3. Magnetic monopoles and baryon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, N.; Panagiotakopoulos, C.; Shafi, Q.

    1982-08-01

    The scattering of a non-relativistic quark from a GUT monopole is affected by the anomalous magnetic moment of the quark. In order that monopole catalysis of baryon decay can occur, it must be assumed that the anomalous magnetic moment decreases sufficiently rapidly below the QCD scale. (author)

  4. Observations of offshore bar decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    the upper shoreface, and finally a stage of decaying bar form through loss of sediment volume at the outer boundary of the upper shoreface. The phenomenon has been previously documented in the Netherlands, the USA, the Canadian Great Lakes, and in New Zealand, but our present understanding...

  5. On t-quark decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chizhov, M.V.

    1995-07-01

    An extended electroweak model with second rank antisymmetric tensor field is proposed. The effective interactions resulting from the exchange of these fields have specific dependence on the transfer momentum. This leads to the introduction of new model-independent muon decay parameters (Mod. Phys. Lett. A9 (1994) 2979), which can be measured experimentally in SLAC and TRIUMF. The new tensor interactions can effect the three-particles semileptonic meson decays (Mod. Phys. Lett. A8 (1993) 2753). In this connection it will be interesting to propose new experiments on K + → l + νγ, K + → π 0 l + ν decays in DAΦNE. The K L -K s mass difference sets constraints on the tensor particles masses. The mass of the lightest tensor particle could be less than the t-quark mass. Therefore the lightest tensor particle may give an additional to the W-boson contribution into the t- quark decay with the same signature. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  6. Rare pion and kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.

    1983-09-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The π→ eν/π→μ/ν branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K + → π + rho anti rho are reviewed

  7. Beta decay of Cu-56

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borcea, R; Aysto, J; Caurier, E; Dendooven, P; Doring, J; Gierlik, M; Gorska, M; Grawe, H; Hellstrom, M; Janas, Z; Jokinen, A; Karny, M; Kirchner, R; La Commara, M; Langanke, K; Martinez-Pinedo, G; Mayet, P; Nieminen, A; Nowacki, F; Penttila, H; Plochocki, A; Rejmund, M; Roeckl, E; Schlegel, C; Schmidt, K; Schwengner, R; Sawicka, M

    2001-01-01

    The proton-rich isotope Cu-56 was produced at the GSI On-Line Mass Separator by means of the Si-28(S-32, p3n) fusion-evaporation reaction. Its beta -decay properties were studied by detecting beta -delayed gamma rays and protons. A half-Life of 93 +/- 3 ms was determined for Cu-56. Compared to the

  8. Reinvestigation of 56Ni decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, B.; Norman, E.B.; Lesko, K.T.; Browne, E.; Larimer, R.

    1990-01-01

    In a series of experiments, we have reinvestigated the decay of the doubly magic nucleus 56 Ni, which is believed to be copiously produced in supernovae. We have confirmed its previously known decay scheme and half-life, and have searched for several rare decay modes. We establish an upper limit of 5.8x10 -7 for the branching ratio of the second forbidden unique β + decay to the 158-keV level in 56 Co, leading to a lower limit of 2.9x10 4 yr for the half-life of fully ionized 56 Ni nuclei in cosmic rays. We also establish an upper limit of 5.0x10 -3 for the branching ratio of the isospin forbidden Fermi electron capture transition to the 1451-keV level in 56 Co, which in turn leads to an upper limit of 124 keV for the isospin mixing Coulomb matrix element of the 56 Ni ground state

  9. Weak decays of stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    In this article we review recent advances in the field of weak decays and consider their implications for quantum chromodynamics (the theory of strong interactions) and electroweak theory (the combined theory of electromagnetic and weak interactions), which together form the ''Standard Model'' of elementary particles. (author)

  10. CDF results on B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    The authors present recent CDF results on B lifetimes, B meson mass measurements, ratios of branching ratios, and rare decays. In addition, they present the first measurement of time-dependent B d mixing at CDF. Several results have been updated and a few new ones included since the workshop

  11. Symmetry-violating kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, P.

    1979-01-01

    The content of this talk comprises two parts. In the first, an analysis of the muon number violating decay modes of the K-mesons is given. Subsequently, some new developments in the field of CP-violation are reviewed and the question of time-reversal invariance and the status of CPT-invariance are briefly considered. (auth)

  12. Hadronic decays of $W$ bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, III, Richard Paul [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for hadronic W decays in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton + neutrino + ≥ 4 jet events using a 109 pb -1 data sample of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  13. Constraining neutrinoless double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorame, L.; Meloni, D.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    A class of discrete flavor-symmetry-based models predicts constrained neutrino mass matrix schemes that lead to specific neutrino mass sum-rules (MSR). We show how these theories may constrain the absolute scale of neutrino mass, leading in most of the cases to a lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay effective amplitude.

  14. Alpha decay of 114Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocchi, C.; Janas, Z.; Batist, L.; Belleguic, V.; Doering, J.; Kapica, M.; Kirchner, R.; Roeckl, E.; Gierlik, M.; Zylicz, J.; Mahmud, H.; Schmidt, K.; Woods, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron-deficient isotope 114 Ba was produced in a fusion evaporation reaction at the GSI On-Line Mass Separator. We measured the α-particle energy of 114 Ba, the half-life of its daughter nucleus 110 Xe, and the α-decay branching ratios for 114 Ba, 110 Xe and 106 Te. (orig.)

  15. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chains from 294118 and, it can be seen that our predictions on the α decay ... The Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) .... Here the half-life is in seconds, Q-value is in MeV and Z is the atomic number of the.

  16. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... The decay properties of the isotopes of = 115, 117, 118 and 119 have been extensively investigated, focussing on the newly synthesized isotopes within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The half-lives have also been evaluated using the Viola–Seaborg ...

  17. Detecting decay in wood components

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.J. Ross; X. Wang; B.K. Brashaw

    2005-01-01

    This chapter presents a summary of the Wood and Timber Condition Assessment Manual. It focuses on current inspection techniques for decay detection and provides guidelines on the use of various non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods in locating and defining areas of deterioration in timber bridge components and other civil structures.

  18. Slowed demand ushers in summer season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This article is the June 1996 market summary in uranium market. During this reporting period, there were six deals in the U3O8 spot market and three long-term deals for U3O8. There were four deals for UF6 conversion, and the spot market for uranium separation services had no transactions. This was little change from the previous month's activities, and this slowness was reflected in the price trends of little or no increase

  19. Fundamental research with polarized slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupchitsky, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    In the last twenty years polarized beams of slow neutrons have been used effectively in fundamental research in nuclear physics. This book gives a thorough introduction to these experimental methods including the most recent techniques of generating and analyzing polarized neutron beams. It clearly shows the close relationship between elementary particle physics and nuclear physics. The book not only addresses specialists but also those interested in the foundations of elementary particle and nuclear physics. With 42 figs

  20. Testing algorithms for critical slowing down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cossu Guido

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the preliminary tests on two modifications of the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC algorithm. Both algorithms are designed to travel much farther in the Hamiltonian phase space for each trajectory and reduce the autocorrelations among physical observables thus tackling the critical slowing down towards the continuum limit. We present a comparison of costs of the new algorithms with the standard HMC evolution for pure gauge fields, studying the autocorrelation times for various quantities including the topological charge.

  1. SOFTWARE Manual for VMM3 Slow Control

    CERN Document Server

    Guth, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    For the New Small Wheel upgrade of the ATLAS detector a new readout chip, called VMM3(a), was developed. In order to provide this new technology to a larger community, the RD51 collaboration is integrating the VMM3 in their scalable readout system (SRS). For this purpose, a new slow control and calibration tool is necessary. This new software was developed and improved within a CERN Summer Student project.

  2. Theory of a slow-light catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    In diffraction catastrophes such as the rainbow, the wave nature of light resolves ray singularities and draws delicate interference patterns. In quantum catastrophes such as the black hole, the quantum nature of light resolves wave singularities and creates characteristic quantum effects related to Hawking radiation. This paper describes the theory behind a recent proposal [U. Leonhardt, Nature (London) 415, 406 (2002)] to generate a quantum catastrophe of slow light

  3. Theory of a slow-light catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2002-04-01

    In diffraction catastrophes such as the rainbow, the wave nature of light resolves ray singularities and draws delicate interference patterns. In quantum catastrophes such as the black hole, the quantum nature of light resolves wave singularities and creates characteristic quantum effects related to Hawking radiation. This paper describes the theory behind a recent proposal [U. Leonhardt, Nature (London) 415, 406 (2002)] to generate a quantum catastrophe of slow light.

  4. Theory of a Slow-Light Catastrophe

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2001-01-01

    In diffraction catastrophes such as the rainbow the wave nature of light resolves ray singularities and draws delicate interference patterns. In quantum catastrophes such as the black hole the quantum nature of light resolves wave singularities and creates characteristic quantum effects related to Hawking radiation. The paper describes the theory behind a recent proposal [U. Leonhardt, arXiv:physics/0111058, Nature (in press)] to generate a quantum catastrophe of slow light.

  5. Magnetic energy analyser for slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limberg, W.

    1974-08-01

    A differential spectrometer with high time and energy resolution has been developed using the principle of energy analysis with a longitudinal homogeneous magnetic field. This way it is possible to measure the energy distribution of low energy electrons (eV-range) in the presence of high energy electrons without distortions by secondary electrons. The functioning and application of the analyzer is demonstrated by measuring the energy distributions of slow electrons emitted by a filament. (orig.) [de

  6. γ-ray emission from slow pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, M.; Treves, A.

    1981-01-01

    The scope of this communication is to calculate the expected γ-ray flux from slow pulsars, neglecting the problem of the reliability of the observations. The key hypothesis is that since the γ-ray luminosity is a substantial fraction of Lsub(T) (the intrinsic energy loss), it should be produced in the vicinity of the speed of light radius. This comes from the well known argument of simultaneous conservation of energy and angular momentum. (Auth.)

  7. Slowing down modernity: A critique : A critique

    OpenAIRE

    Vostal , Filip

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The connection between modernization and social acceleration is now a prominent theme in critical social analysis. Taking a cue from these debates, I explore attempts that aim to 'slow down modernity' by resisting the dynamic tempo of various social processes and experiences. The issue of slowdown now accounts for a largely unquestioned measure, expected to deliver unhasty tempo conditioning good and ethical life, mental well-being and accountable democracy. In princip...

  8. Multiple photon emission in heavy particle decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakimori, K.; Burnett, T.H.; Cherry, M.L.

    1994-03-01

    Cosmic ray interactions, at energies above 1 TeV/nucleon, in emulsion chambers flown on high altitude balloons have yielded two events showing apparent decays of a heavy particle into one charged particle and four photons. The photons converted into electron pairs very close to the decay vertex. Attempts to explain this decay topology with known particle decays are presented. Unless both events represent a b → u transition, which is statistically unlikely, then other known decay modes for charmed or bottom particles do not account satisfactorily for these observations. This could indicate, possibly, a new decay channel. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Accelerated decay rates drive soil organic matter persistence and storage in temperate forests via greater mineral stabilization of microbial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.; Craig, M.; Turner, B. L.; Liang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate predicts soil organic matter (SOM) stocks at the global scale, yet controls on SOM stocks at finer spatial scales are still debated. A current hypothesis predicts that carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage in soils should be greater when decomposition is slow owing to microbial competition for nutrients or the recalcitrance of organic substrates (hereafter the `slow decay' hypothesis). An alternative hypothesis predicts that soil C and N storage should be greater in soils with rapid decomposition, owing to the accelerated production of microbial residues and their stabilization on soil minerals (hereafter the `stabilization hypothesis'). To test these alternative hypotheses, we quantified soil C and N to 1-m depth in temperate forests across the Eastern and Midwestern US that varied in their biotic, climatic, and edaphic properties. At each site, we sampled (1) soils dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tree species, which typically have fast decay rates and accelerated N cycling, (2) soils dominated by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) tree species, which generally have slow decay rates and slow N cycling, and (3) soils supporting both AM and ECM trees. To the extent that trees and theor associated microbes reflect and reinforce soil conditions, support for the slow decay hypothesis would be greater SOM storage in ECM soils, whereas support for the stabilization hypothesis would be greater SOM storage in AM soils. We found support for both hypotheses, as slow decomposition in ECM soils increased C and N storage in topsoil, whereas fast decomposition in AM soils increased C and N storage in subsoil. However, at all sites we found 57% greater total C and N storage in the entire profile in AM- soils (P stabilization hypothesis. Amino sugar biomarkers (an indicator of microbial necromass) and particle size fractionation revealed that the greater SOM storage in AM soils was driven by an accumulation of microbial residues on clay minerals and metal oxides. Taken together

  10. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  11. Slow movement execution in event-related potentials (P300).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Kumi; Sakuma, Haruo; Hirai, Takane

    2002-02-01

    We examined whether slow movement execution has an effect on cognitive and information processing by measuring the P300 component. 8 subjects performed a continuous slow forearm rotational movement using 2 task speeds. Slow (a 30-50% decrease from the subject's Preferred speed) and Very Slow (a 60-80% decrease). The mean coefficient of variation for rotation speed under Very Slow was higher than that under Slow, showing that the subjects found it difficult to perform the Very Slow task smoothly. The EEG score of alpha-1 (8-10 Hz) under Slow Condition was increased significantly more than under the Preferred Condition; however, the increase under Very Slow was small when compared with Preferred. After performing the task. P300 latency under Very Slow increased significantly as compared to that at pretask. Further, P300 amplitude decreased tinder both speed conditions when compared to that at pretask, and a significant decrease was seen under the Slow Condition at Fz, whereas the decrease under the Very Slow Condition was small. These differences indicated that a more complicated neural composition and an increase in subjects' attention might have been involved when the task was performed under the Very Slow Condition. We concluded that slow movement execution may have an influence on cognitive function and may depend on the percentage of decrease from the Preferred speed of the individual.

  12. Intermolecular energy transfer in binary systems of dye polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin-I.; Barashkov, Nikolay N.; Palsule, Chintamani P.; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Borst, Walter L.

    2000-10-01

    We present results and physical interpretations for the energy transfer mechanisms in two-component dye polymer systems. The data consist of fluorescence emission spectra and decays. Two dyes were embedded in an epoxypolymer base, and only they participated in the energy transfer. Following pulsed laser excitation of the donor dye, energy transfer took place to the accept dye. The possible transfer paths considered here were nonradiative and radiative transfer. The latter involves two steps, emission and absorption of a photon, and therefore is relatively slow, while nonradiative transfer is a fast single step resulting from direct Coulomb interactions. A predominantly nonradiative transfer is desirable for applications, for instance in wavelength shifters in high energy particle detection. We studied the concentration effects of the dyes on the energy transfer and obtained the relative quantum efficiencies of various wavelength shifters from the fluorescence emission spectra. For low acceptor concentrations, radiative transfer was found to dominate, while nonradiative transfer became dominant at increasing dye concentrations. The fluorescence decays were analyzed with a sum-of-exponentials method and with Förster kinetics. The sum of exponential model yielded mean decay times of the dye polymers useful for a general classification. The decay times decreased as desired with increasing acceptor concentration. The samples, in which nonradiative energy transfer dominated, were analyzed with Förster kinetics. As a result, the natural decay times of the donor and acceptor dyes and the critical radii for nonradiative energy transfer were obtained from a global best fit.

  13. Regional energy efficiency, carbon emission performance and technology gaps in China: A meta-frontier non-radial directional distance function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Xin; Zhou, Hongchen; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Aijun

    2015-01-01

    At present, China is the largest primary energy consumer and carbon emitter in the world. Meantime, China is a large transitional economy with significant regional gaps. Against such backgrounds, the calculated results of energy and carbon performance indicators may be biased, without considering heterogeneity across regions. To this end, after incorporating region-heterogeneity, this paper provides detailed information, regarding energy efficiency, carbon emission performance and the potential of carbon emission reductions from regional perspectives, which may be important and useful for policy makers. Our main findings are as follows. Firstly, there is significant group-heterogeneity across regions in China, in terms of energy efficiency and carbon emission performance. Secondly, there are no considerable differences between total-factor and single-factor performance indices, since there is limited substitutability between energy inputs and other production inputs. Finally, significant carbon emission reductions can be made by “catching up” for regions with low energy efficiency and carbon emission performance. Looking ahead, the Chinese government should adopt measures to promote improvements in terms of energy efficiency and carbon emission performance in the short term. -- Highlights: •We adopt a meta-frontier non-radial directional distance function analysis. •We provide detailed information regarding energy and carbon emission performance. •We find that there is significant region-heterogeneity in China. •There are no large differences between total- and single-factor performance indices. •It can make great contributions to carbon emission reductions by “catching up”

  14. New definition of the decay law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, M.I.

    1977-01-01

    Time evolution of unstable states is considered. The usual definition of the decay law is shown to be of a limited application. A more general definition is proposed. The decay law behaviour at long and short times is discussed

  15. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or...

  16. Parametric decay below the upper hybrid frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, E; Krause, K; Schlueter, H [Bochum Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik 2

    1977-03-21

    Parametric decay of the upper hybrid mode is observed between the electron cyclotron frequency and its first two harmonics. The decay products are identified as electron Bernstein and ion acoustic mode. The diagnostic results confirm the relevant dispersion relations.

  17. The π+ Decay of Light Hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1999-01-01

    The observed π + emission from the weak decay of the 4 Λ He hypernucleus has been an intriguing puzzle for more than 30 years, because the Lambda decays in free space only by emission of a π - or a π 0 . We re-examine this puzzling weak decay with our focus upon a decay mechanism involving the Σ + N r a rrow π + nN decay of a virtual Σ + , stemming from ΛN to ΣN conversion (mixing) within the hypernucleus. We emphasize the observed energy distribution of the observed π + s compared to that of π - s in standard mesonic decay as well as the isotropic angular distribution of the π + s. Competing suggestions to explain the positive pion weak decay have been offered. A possible search for π + decay from the other Λ hypernuclei is explored as means to test our hypothesis

  18. Radiation efficiency during slow crack propagation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestin, Camille; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    power-law decay function above the average fracture front speed, ⟨v⟩, and then establishing a relation of the type ηR ∝⟨v ⟩0.55. These observations suggest that the radiation efficiency in heterogeneous media is defined by a power law involving a lower exponent value than the one predicted for a homogeneous media, but is sensitive to the shape of the velocity distribution of the heterogeneous interface. Finally, when studying the case of similar events observed in natural conditions, such as seismic swarms associated to slow slip along a fault, we notice a good agreement between our results and the radiation efficiency computed for these field data.

  19. Black hole decay as geodesic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Kumar S.; Sen, Siddhartha

    2003-01-01

    We show that a formalism for analyzing the near-horizon conformal symmetry of Schwarzschild black holes using a scalar field probe is capable of describing black hole decay. The equation governing black hole decay can be identified as the geodesic equation in the space of black hole masses. This provides a novel geometric interpretation for the decay of black holes. Moreover, this approach predicts a precise correction term to the usual expression for the decay rate of black holes

  20. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-01-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B→B 1 B 2 -barγ are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b→sγ electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived

  1. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    April 2014 physics pp. 705–715. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei ... study on the feasibility of observing α decay chains from the isotopes of the ... studies on 284−286115 and 288−292117 will be a guide to future experiments. .... ratio of the α decay from the ground state of the parent nucleus to the level i of the.

  2. CP-violations in B decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent results on CP-violation measurements in decays from energy asymmetric -factory experiments are reported. Thanks to large accumulated data samples, CP-violations in decays in mixing-decay interference and direct CP-violation are now firmly established. The measurements of three angles of the unitarity ...

  3. Double beta decay: A theoretical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical possibility of double beta decay. The titles of the main sections of this paper are: Nuclear physics setting; Particle physics requirements; Kinematical features of the decay modes; Nuclear matrix elements; the Shell model and two-neutrino decay; Quasi-particle random phase approximation; and Future considerations. 18 refs., 7 tabs

  4. Beta decay of 22O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, F.; Dufour, J.P.; Del Moral, R.; Fleury, A.; Jean, D.; Pravikoff, M.S.; Geissel, H.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hanelt, E.

    1989-01-01

    The study of light nuclei far from stability has been recently renewed by the possibility of production through the projectile fragmentation of intermediate energy heavy ion beams at GANIL. The results presented here have been obtained with the Projectile Fragments Isotopic Separation method developed at the LISE spectrometer. 22 O is a Tz = 3 nucleus and is the first in a series of seven such nuclei in the sd shell extending from 22 O to 24 Mg. Although the half life of 22 O was previously measured by Murphy et al., the present study is the first beta-gamma spectroscopy on this neutron rich nucleus. Five gamma lines have been attributed to the β decay of 22 O with a measured half life of T = (2.25±0.15)s and a partial decay scheme has been established

  5. Lectures on rare B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiero, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a pedagogical presentation of the class of the rare charmless B decays with strange particles in the final state. These processes involve the flavour changing neutral current transition b → s and, thus, they are GIM suppresses. They constitute a specially promising ground to test the Standard Model and the possible presence of new physics beyond it. In particular I show that the radiative decays b → s + π and b → s + g are priviledged places to look for large supersymmetric enhancements. The author reviews both the present experimental and theoretical situations in this field and point out the challenges that we have to meet in the 90's to have rare B physics play a role comparable to that of rare K physics

  6. $\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  7. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments are carried out to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. The authors determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to ∼15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. (Auth.)

  8. Beta decay and strength distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    With the increasing accessibility of nuclei far from stability, experimenters find themselves faced more and more often with complex β-decay schemes: nuclei with over 5 MeV of β-decay energy, exhibiting hundreds and perhaps thousands of transitions. A detailed level-by-level exposition of such schemes - for example, by studying β-delayed γ-rays - is at best prohibitively time consuming, and at worst actually impossible with current techniques. Furthermore, even if reliable schemes are obtained experimentally, their confrontation with theory is severely limited by the absence of theories sufficiently complete to account for such complex spectra. At best, it is the details of the first few excited states and the general features of the rest that are useful for comparison. From both points of view, experimental and theoretical, there is strong motivation to find a broader perspective, emphasizing these general features without being overwhelmed by a proliferation of detail

  9. Protonic decay of oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the multiparticle theory of protonic decay, the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented spherical and deformed nuclei in the laboratory frame and in the internal coordinate frame of deformed parent nuclei are constructed with allowance for symmetry with respect to time inversion. It is shown that, because of the deep-subbarrier character of protonic decay, the adiabatic approximation is not applicable to describing the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented deformed nuclei and that the angular distribution of protons in the laboratory frame does not coincide with that in the internal coordinate frame. It is demonstrated that these angular distributions coincide only if the adiabatic and the semiclassical approximation are simultaneously valid

  10. Search for neutrinoless τ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Krueger, A.; Nau, A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Schaefer, M.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R.D.; Hast, C.; Herrera, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Toepfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Britton, D.I.; Charlesworth, C.E.K.; Edwards, K.W.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Prentice, J.D.; Saull, P.R.B.; Seidel, S.C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; Van de Water, R.G.; Yoon, T.S.; Ressling, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K.R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.

    1992-01-01

    Upper limits on branching ratios for six neutrinoless leptonic, 16 semileptonic, two radiative-leptonic, two radiative-hadronic and three purely hardronic τ decays have been determined. The results improve over previously published ones by about a factor of two. For the first time the lepton and baryon previously published ones by about a factor of two. For the first time the lepton and baryon number violating decays τ - →anti pγ, τ - →anti pπ 0 and τ - →anti pη have been investigated. The 90% confidence level (CL) limits for the corresponding branching ratios amount to 2.9x10 -4 , 6.6x10 -4 and 1.3x10 -3 respectively. (orig.)

  11. Beta decay of 46Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, T K; Gelberg, A; Sakurai, H; Yoneda, K; Aoi, N; Imai, N; Baba, H; Brentano, P von; Fukuda, N; Ichikawa, Y; Ishihara, M; Iwasaki, H; Kameda, D; Kishida, T; Lisetskiy, A F; Ong, H J; Osada, M; Otsuka, T; Suzuki, M K; Ue, K; Utsuno, Y; Watanabe, H

    2006-01-01

    The Gamow-Teller transition of 46 Cr to the N = Z odd-odd nucleus 46 V has been observed for the first time. By means of β-γ coincidence measurements, a γ-ray peak at 993 keV corresponding to the decay of the 1 + 1 state in 46 V was observed. The branching ratio of the decay to this state was found to be b GT = 0.25 ± 0.050. The half-life of 46 Cr was measured to be T 1/2 = 240 ± 140 ms. The transition strength was determined to be B(GT) = 0.64 ± 0.20. This result was compared with theoretical calculations

  12. Ce decay curves in Ce, Tb co-doped LaF3 and the energy transfer mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, R.E.; Swart, H.C.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Seed Ahmed, H.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Energy transfer phenomena can play an important role in the development of luminescent materials, and hosts co-doped with Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ ions continue to be actively studied. Several recent reports on Ce, Tb co-doped phosphors suggest different mechanisms for the energy transfer from Ce 3+ to Tb 3+ ions and further study is required to reach consensus on the mechanism or to understand why different mechanisms dominate in different hosts. A more direct method of analysis is proposed to distinguish between the different types of multipole energy transfer mechanisms. When applied to Ce, Tb co-doped LaF 3 , the experimental data shows a poor match to any of these models but is consistent with energy transfer through the exchange mechanism. The decay curves of Ce emission in Ce, Tb co-doped LaF 3 were also studied to obtain further insight on the energy transfer mechanism. Although the decrease in lifetime with increasing Tb concentration shows that energy transfer occurs through a non-radiative mechanism, the form of the decay curves does not correspond to what is expected for energy transfer via multipole interactions.

  13. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Lejeune, Michaël [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences d' Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-01-05

    The study aimed at collection of data regarding the transmissivity of freestanding graphene for electrons across their full energy scale down to the lowest energies. Here, we show that the electron transmissivity of graphene drops with the decreasing energy of the electrons and remains below 10% for energies below 30 eV, and that the slow electron transmissivity value is suitable for reliable determination of the number of graphene layers. Moreover, electrons incident below 50 eV release adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules and effectively clean graphene in contrast to faster electrons that decompose these molecules and create carbonaceous contamination.

  14. Quasistatic modelling of the coaxial slow source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.D.; Pietrzyk, Z.A.; Vlases, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    A new 1-D Lagrangian MHD numerical code in flux coordinates has been developed for the Coaxial Slow Source (CSS) geometry. It utilizes the quasistatic approximation so that the plasma evolves as a succession of equilibria. The P=P (psi) equilibrium constraint, along with the assumption of infinitely fast axial temperature relaxation on closed field lines, is incorporated. An axially elongated, rectangular plasma is assumed. The axial length is adjusted by the global average condition, or assumed to be fixed. In this paper predictions obtained with the code, and a limited amount of comparison with experimental data are presented

  15. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze - a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple ;crossover model; without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space-time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  16. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R.C.; Imel, G.R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  17. UA1: Z particle decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    A colour treated picture of the computer reconstruction of the real particle tracks emerging from a high energy proton-antiproton collision recorded in the UA1 detector at the SPS (converted to act as a collider). This picture shows the production of a Z particle that has decayed into a high energy electron and positron flying off in opposite directions (in yellow). The UA1 detector ran on the SPS accelerator at CERN between 1981 and 1993.

  18. Studies of charmless B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamarina Ríos Cibrán

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A non-exhaustive review of the analysis of charmless decays of B-mesons is presented. Particular emphasis is made in the Bs0 → ϕK¯*0$B_s^0, o ,phi {mathop Klimits^ ^{*0}}$ mode whose discovery and first determination branching fraction and angular parameters were reported for the first time at the LHCP 2013 conference.

  19. Digging the CNGS decay tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Products of the collision between a proton beam and a graphite target will pass through a horn containing an electric field that will produce a focused beam. These particles will decay into muon neutrinos within the tunnel that is being constructed in these images. The neutrinos will then travel 730 km to Gran Sasso in Italy where huge detectors will observe the beam to study a process called neutrino oscillation.

  20. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses nuclear structure from radioactive decay of the following: Neutron-Deficient Iridium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Platinum Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Gold Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Mercury Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Thallium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Samarium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Promethium Isotopes; Neutron-Deficient Neodymium Isotopes; and Neutron-Deficient Praseodymium Isotopes. Also discussed are Nuclear Systematics and Models

  1. Decays of the tau lepton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchat, P.R.

    1986-02-01

    Previous measurements of the branching fractions of the tau lepton result in a discrepancy between the inclusive branching fraction and the sum of the exclusive branching fractions to final states containing one charged particle. The sum of the exclusive branching fractions is significantly smaller than the inclusive branching fraction. In this analysis, the branching fractions for all the major decay modes are measured simultaneously with the sum of the branching fractions constrained to be one. The branching fractions are measured using an unbiased sample of tau decays, with little background, selected from 207 pb -1 of data accumulated with the Mark II detector at the PEP e + e - storage ring. The sample is selected using the decay products of one member of the γ + γ - pair produced in e + e - annihilation to identify the event and then including the opposite member of the pair in the sample. The sample is divided into subgroups according to charged and neutral particle multiplicity, and charged particle identification. The branching fractions are simultaneously measured using an unfold technique and a maximum likelihood fit. The results of this analysis indicate that the discrepancy found in previous experiments is possibly due to two sources. First, the leptonic branching fractions measured in this analysis are about one standard deviation higher than the world average. The measured leptonic branching fractions correspond to a tau lifetime of (3.0 +- 0.2) x 10 -13 s. Secondly, the total branching fraction to one charged hadron plus at least one neutral particle is measured to be (7 +- 3)% higher than the branching fraction expected from a combination of previous measurements and theoretical predictions. It is shown that decay modes involving the eta are not expected to contribute more than 3% to this excess

  2. Experimental observations on the decay of environmental DNA from bighead and silver carps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Richard F.; Klymus, Katy E.; Richter, Cathy; Guan, Xin; Farrington, Heather L.; Carr, Matthew R.; Thompson, Nathan; Chapman, Duane C.; Baerwaldt, Kelly L.

    2017-01-01

    rapid decay condition and a slow decay condition, and tracked eDNA decay over 91 days, we observed a 5.0× greater loss of eDNA by Day 5 under rapid decay conditions than under slow decay conditions. At the end of the trials, the differences in eDNA loss between the rapid decay and baseline and slow decay conditions were 0.1× and 3.3×, respectively. Our results strongly demonstrate the potential for environmental factors to influence eDNA fate and, thus, the interpretation of eDNA survey results.

  3. LHCb: Radiative Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Teodorescu, E

    2011-01-01

    The decay modes $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$ and $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ are promising laboratories for the search of New Physics effects, their properties being particularly sensitive to the presence of new heavy particles that may propagate virtually within the one-loop process involved in penguin diagrams. The penguin $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay has been observed by Belle with rather poor precision, $\\mathcal{B}$($B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$) = 57$^{+22}_{-19}$ x 10$^{-6}$, therefore, additional measurements are expected for this channel. With a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~36 pb$^{-1}$ collected in 2010, a clear and promising signal has been observed for the $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$. The mass resolution is dominated by the electromagnetic calorimeter energy resolution (ECAL is inter-calibrated at the ~2% level). A first hint of the $B_s \\to \\Phi \\gamma$  decay has also been observed. Given this preliminary results and the theory predictions, we expect that, with the data we will record in 2011, th...

  4. LHCb: Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Teodorescu, E

    2011-01-01

    The decay modes $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$ and $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ are promising laboratories for the search of New Physics effects, their properties being particularly sensitive to the presence of new heavy particles that may propagate virtually within the one-loop process involved in penguin diagrams. The penguin $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay has been observed by Belle with rather poor precision, $\\mathcal{B}$($B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$) = 57$^{+22}_{-19}$ x 10$^{-6}$, therefore, additional measurements are expected for this channel. With a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~36 pb$^{-1}$ collected in 2010, a clear and promising signal has been observed for the $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$. The mass resolution is dominated by the electromagnetic calorimeter energy resolution (ECAL is inter-calibrated at the ~2% level). A first hint of the $B_s \\to \\Phi \\gamma$  decay has also been observed. Given this preliminary results and the theory predictions, we expect that, with the data we will record in 2011, th...

  5. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojin Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to the prevalent fast fashion model, slow fashion has emerged as a way of enhancing sustainability in the fashion industry, yet how slow fashion can enhance profitability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specified the slow fashion attributes that contribute to creating perceived customer value, which subsequently increases a consumer’s intention to buy and pay a price premium for slow fashion products. An analysis of 221 U.S. consumer data revealed that delivering exclusive product value is significantly critical in creating customer value for slow fashion, and customer value, in turn, positively affects consumers’ purchase intentions. Further analysis also revealed that different slow fashion attributes distinctively affect customer value. This provides potential strategies on which slow fashion businesses can focus to secure an economically sustainable business model, thereby continuously improving environmental and social sustainability with the slow fashion ideal.

  6. Measurement of the decay B → D* l+ ν and determination of |Vcb| at Belle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabelsi, Karim; Dungel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and the HQET form factors ρ 2 , R 1 and R 2 for the decay B 0 → D*-l + ν using untagged Υ(4S) → B anti-B events. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V cb | is extracted and a test of the form factor parametrization is presented. The results are based on a large data sample recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e + e - collider. The measurement of the decay B + → anti-D* 0 l ν does not rely on charged slow pion reconstruction, and thus allows us to cross-check measurements of B 0 → D*- l+ ν. We also present measurements of the branching fraction and of the HQET form factors ρ 2 , R 1 and R 2 obtained with this decay. (author)

  7. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-12-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482-488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263-267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced.

  8. Growth and decay of surface charges in grafts of Teflon in electrets states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinelli, I.M.M.

    1971-01-01

    The greatest problem founded in a cardiovascular implant is the thrombus formation. Teflon grafts were used in electret state for prothesis in vena cava of dogs. To put these grafts in an electret state a corona discharge in air was used and homocharge was formed predominantly. To measure the formed surface charge the oscillating capacitor technique was used. In the electret state the grafts have showed an initial density of charge of 10- 8 C/cm 2 and the charge decay and time decay of the samples were measured under many conditions. We found two activation energies, E 2 =0.17 e V and E 3 =1.12 e V, due to rapid and slow decay, respectively. The charged grafts were sterilized with ethilene gas oxide and this process apparently did not influence the charges

  9. Chiral behaviour of the pion decay constant in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottini, Stefano [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    As increased statistics and new ensembles with light pions have become available within the CLS effort, we complete previous work by inspecting the chiral behaviour of the pion decay constant. We discuss the validity of Chiral Perturbation Theory ({chi}PT) and examine the results concerning the pion decay constant and the ensuing scale setting, the pion mass squared in units of the quark mass, and the ratio of decay constants f{sub K}=f{sub {pi}}; along the way, the relevant low-energy constants of SU(2) {chi}PT are estimated. All simulations were performed with two dynamical flavours of nonperturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson fermions, on volumes with m{sub {pi}}L{>=}4, pion masses{>=}192 MeV and lattice spacings down to 0.048 fm. Our error analysis takes into account the effect of slow modes on the autocorrelations.

  10. Evidence of sequential interatomic decay in argon trimers obtained by electron-triple-ion coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X-J; Saito, N; Fukuzawa, H; Morishita, Y; Stoychev, S; Kuleff, A; Suzuki, I H; Tamenori, Y; Richter, R; Pruemper, G; Ueda, K

    2007-01-01

    Sequential interatomic decay, where the first step is an Auger decay with interatomic character and the second step is a pure interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD), is identified in Ar trimers Ar 3 . The 2p hole state in Ar 3 decays via the L 2,3 M 1 M 2,3 Auger to the one-site two-hole states Ar ++ (3s -1 3p -1 )-Ar-Ar that couples to the two-site satellite states Ar + (3p -2 nl)-Ar + (3p -1 )-Ar. These states are subject to ICD to the states Ar + (3p -1 )-Ar + (3p -1 )-Ar + (3p -1 ), in which the nl electron fills the 3p hole in the same Ar site and one of the 3p electrons in the third Ar site is emitted as a slow ICD electron. This ICD process is identified unambiguously by electron-ion-ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy in which the kinetic energy of the slow ICD electron and the kinetic energy release among the three Ar + ions are measured in coincidence. (fast track communication)

  11. Density Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Driven by Alfvén Wave Parametric Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Badman, Samuel; Hellinger, Petr; Bale, Stuart D.

    2018-02-01

    Measurements and simulations of inertial compressive turbulence in the solar wind are characterized by anti-correlated magnetic fluctuations parallel to the mean field and density structures. This signature has been interpreted as observational evidence for non-propagating pressure balanced structures, kinetic ion-acoustic waves, as well as the MHD slow-mode. Given the high damping rates of parallel propagating compressive fluctuations, their ubiquity in satellite observations is surprising and suggestive of a local driving process. One possible candidate for the generation of compressive fluctuations in the solar wind is the Alfvén wave parametric instability. Here, we test the parametric decay process as a source of compressive waves in the solar wind by comparing the collisionless damping rates of compressive fluctuations with growth rates of the parametric decay instability daughter waves. Our results suggest that generation of compressive waves through parametric decay is overdamped at 1 au, but that the presence of slow-mode-like density fluctuations is correlated with the parametric decay of Alfvén waves.

  12. Imbricated slip rate processes during slow slip transients imaged by low-frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengliné, O.; Frank, W.; Marsan, D.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs) often occur in conjunction with transient strain episodes, or Slow Slip Events (SSEs), in subduction zones. Their focal mechanism and location consistent with shear failure on the plate interface argue for a model where LFEs are discrete dynamic ruptures in an otherwise slowly slipping interface. SSEs are mostly observed by surface geodetic instruments with limited resolution and it is likely that only the largest ones are detected. The time synchronization of LFEs and SSEs suggests that we could use the recorded LFEs to constrain the evolution of SSEs, and notably of the geodetically-undetected small ones. However, inferring slow slip rate from the temporal evolution of LFE activity is complicated by the strong temporal clustering of LFEs. Here we apply dedicated statistical tools to retrieve the temporal evolution of SSE slip rates from the time history of LFE occurrences in two subduction zones, Mexico and Cascadia, and in the deep portion of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield. We find temporal characteristics of LFEs that are similar across these three different regions. The longer term episodic slip transients present in these datasets show a slip rate decay with time after the passage of the SSE front possibly as t-1/4. They are composed of multiple short term transients with steeper slip rate decay as t-α with α between 1.4 and 2. We also find that the maximum slip rate of SSEs has a continuous distribution. Our results indicate that creeping faults host intermittent deformation at various scales resulting from the imbricated occurrence of numerous slow slip events of various amplitudes.

  13. Slow-light dynamics in nonlinear periodic waveguides couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, A.A.; Ha, S.; Powell, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    We predict pulse switching and reshaping through nonlinear mixing of two slow-light states with different phase velocities in the same frequency range, and report on the first experimental observation of slow-light tunneling between coupled periodic waveguides.......We predict pulse switching and reshaping through nonlinear mixing of two slow-light states with different phase velocities in the same frequency range, and report on the first experimental observation of slow-light tunneling between coupled periodic waveguides....

  14. Slow-light effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted.......In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted....

  15. Nonlinear Gain Saturation in Active Slow Light Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. The impact of slow-light propagation on the nonlinear gain saturation of the device is investigated.......We present a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. The impact of slow-light propagation on the nonlinear gain saturation of the device is investigated....

  16. Decay of solitons in an isotropic collisionless quasineutral plasma with isothermal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakholdin, I.B.; Zharkov, A.A.; Il'ichev, A.T.

    2000-01-01

    Soliton-type solutions of the complete unreduced system of transport equations describing the plane-parallel motions of an isotropic collisionless quasineutral plasma in a magnetic field with constant ion and electron temperatures are studied. The regions of the physical parameters for fast and slow magnetosonic branches, where solitons and generalized solitary waves - nonlocal soliton structures in the form of a soliton 'core' with asymptotic behavior at infinity in the form of a periodic low-amplitude wave - exist, are determined. In the range of parameters where solitons are replaced by generalized solitary waves, soliton-like disturbances are subjected to decay whose mechanisms are qualitatively different for slow and fast magnetosonic waves. A specific feature of the decay of such disturbances for fast magnetosonic waves is that the energy of the disturbance decreases primarily as a result of the quasistationary emission of a resonant periodic wave of the same nature. Similar disturbances in the form of a soliton core of a slow magnetosonic generalized solitary wave essentially do not emit resonant modes on the Alfven branch but they lose energy quite rapidly because of continuous emission of a slow magnetosonic wave. Possible types of shocks which are formed by two types of existing soliton solutions (solitons and generalized solitary waves) are examined in the context of such solutions

  17. JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This work deals with the JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data and is divided into four tables. The first table presents the origin of the JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data and subsequent modifications. The second one is a summary of the JEF-2.2 radioactive decay data file. The third one describes the JEF-2.2 fission products and the main decay and fission yield data. The last one consists of the main decay parameters from the JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI and JNDC-2.0 libraries. (O.L.). 100 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), 75 - Paris (France); Charles, J. [LPT, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  19. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tran, David [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy

    2012-05-15

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons.We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  20. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J.; Charles, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  1. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN

    2012-05-01

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons.We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  2. CP violation in rare K decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of rare K decays calls for a unified treatment of short- and long-distance aspects as provided by chiral perturbation theory. For the standard model with three generations, the theoretical predictions for signals of CP violation in those decays are reviewed. With direct CP violation as the main target, special emphasis is given to the charge asymmetries in charged K decays and to the especially rare decays K L → π 0 ll-bar. Time dependent rate asymmetries in K 0 decays and the longitudinal muon polarization in K L → μ + μ - are also discussed. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  3. Interaction of slow pions with atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troitskij, M.A.; Tsybul'nikov, A.V.; Chekunaev, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    Interactions of slow pions with atomic nuclei near to pion condensation are investigated. From comparison of experimental data with the theoretical calculation results on the basis of precise microscopic approach not bound with the random phase approximation (RPA) nuclear matter fundamental parameters near a critical point can be found. Optical potential of slow pions in nuclei, πN-scattering amplitudes and lengths, π-atom level isotopic shift, phenomenon of single-nucleon pion absorption by nucleus, phenomenon of nuclear critical opalescence are considered. The results of πN-scattering lengths calculation, sup(40-44)Ca, sup(24-29)Mg, sup(16-18)O π-atom level shift are presented. It is shown that the presence of π-condensate in nuclei can explain the observed suppression of p-wave potential terms. The phenomenon of single-nucleon pion absorption by nucleus is one of direct experiments which permits to reveal the π-condensate. The nuclear opalescence phenomenon is manifested in increase of pion photoproduction reaction cross section for account of nucleus proximity to π-condensation as compared with the calculated in the Fermi-gas model. The suggested method for calculating precondensate phenomena operates the better, the nearer is the system to the condensation threshold whereas the RPA method in this region is inapplicable

  4. Factors Contributing Decreased Performance Of Slow Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. L. Kannan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Back ground Even experienced teaching faculty and administrators can be challenged by learners who have not able to perform up to expected need in their annual performance of their students these students are called as slow learnersStruggle learners. There should be a designed study to foster discussion about diagnosing particular problems that contribute with meeting objectives of slow learners. Methodology The study was performed on the entire current first year of Medical students were all the three internal assessments of 250 students performance is taken in to consideration for the study. This study is of cross section type.After obtaining the list of all students marks in internal examination from medical education unit supporting mentors are contacted to meet the students and confidentiality is maintained throughout the study. After obtaining informed consent a questionnaire was administered to the students by the investigator. The questionnaire contains the following sections. Section I will be on the background characteristics of the student name age sex type of family. Section II will be on the details of their learning capabilities. Section III will focus on the awareness of the slow learners in which the precipitating factors contributing to them. Results The prevalence of slow learners as low achievers were contributed to be 32.4 percentages.The performance of the students is based on combination of all three internal assessment marks including theory and practical performance. In this the students age ranges from 17 to 21 years the mean age of student was contributed to be 17.81 and majority of the students were in the age group of 18 years which contributed to be 16867.2.In the present study majority were males 13252.8 compared to females 11847.2.but when study is compared to percentage of attendance majority of the individual 15177 scored more than 50 percentage of marks have more than 80 percentage of attendance but when

  5. Good, Clean, Fair: The Rhetoric of the Slow Food Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines the origins of the Slow Food movement before examining the ways in which Slow Food rhetoric seeks to redefine gastronomy and combat the more deleterious effects of globalization. In articulating a new gastronomy, Slow Food founder Carlo Petrini attempts to reconstruct the gastronomy of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, at once…

  6. Many-particle leptonic decays of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyul'ka, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Leptonic decays of light hypernuclei of the type /sup A/X/sub Λ/→/sup A/-1X+p+l - +nu-bar occurring with a fairly large energy release (compared to π - meson decays) are studied. The energy and angular distributions of the decay products are calculated taking into account the strong interaction in the final state in the p-/sup A/-1X system and also the Pauli principle. The study is carried out for different sets of the kinematic variables describing decays of this type. It is shown that the effect of the final-state interaction significantly determines the energy distributions of the interacting particles and weakly affects the analogous lepton distributions in decays of this type. It is shown that it is necessary to take this effect into account in analyzing other types of hypernuclear decays with a similar energy release, namely, mesonless decays

  7. Parametric decay of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in relativistic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorofeenko, V. G. [Institute for Advanced Studies (Austria); Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Parametric instability of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in plasma preheated to a relativistic temperature is considered. A set of self-similar nonlinear differential equations taking into account the electron “thermal” mass is derived and investigated. Small perturbations of the parameters of the heated plasma are analyzed in the linear approximation by using the dispersion relation determining the phase velocities of the fast and slow extraordinary waves. In contrast to cold plasma, the evanescence zone in the frequency range above the electron upper hybrid frequency vanishes and the asymptotes of both branches converge. Theoretical analysis of the set of nonlinear equations shows that the growth rate of decay instability increases with increasing initial temperature of plasma electrons. This result is qualitatively confirmed by numerical simulations of plasma heating by a laser pulse injected from vacuum.

  8. α-ternary decay of Cf isotopes, statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Jayesh George; Santhosh, K.P.

    2017-01-01

    The process of splitting a heavier nucleus to three simultaneous fragments is termed as ternary fission and compared to usual binary fission, it is a rare process. Depending on the nature of third particle either it is called light charged particle (LCP) accompanying fission if it is light or true ternary fission if all three fragments have nearly same mass distributions. After experimental observations in early seventies, initially with a slow pace, now theoretical studies in ternary fission has turned to a hot topic in nuclear decay studies especially in past one decade. Mean while various models have been developed, existing being modified and seeking for new with a hope that it can beam a little more light to the profound nature of nuclear interaction. In this study a statistical method, level density formulation, has been employed

  9. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-07

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze — a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space–time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  10. Interaction of slow electrons with surfaces. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komolov, S.A.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1976-01-01

    Total current spectroscopy (TCS) has been used to study the growth of films of gold and silver on (100) vanadium surfaces. A slow transition from TCS curves characteristic of vanadium to curves characteristic of the noble metals is observed, accompanied by an increase in the net work function - more rapid for silver than for gold. Vanadium characteristics are lost from the TCS curves for mean overlayer thicknesses > approximately 15A, and a simple analysis shows that the thickness of the surface zone from which TCS signals originate is approximately given by the electron mean free path. Observations of progressive attenuation of a characteristic vanadium feature with increasing mean thickness of overlayer permits separation into stages of nucleation and growth. There is a critical nucleus size of approximately 2A for silver and approximately 4A for gold. (Auth.)

  11. Limits of slow light in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2008-01-01

    in the group velocity acquiring a finite value above zero at the band-gap edges while attaining uperluminal values within the band gap. Simple scalings of the minimum and maximum group velocities with the imaginary part of the dielectric function or, equivalently, the linewidth of the broadened states......While ideal photonic crystals would support modes with a vanishing group velocity, state-of-the-art structures have still only provided a slow down by roughly two orders of magnitude. We find that the induced density of states caused by lifetime broadening of the electromagnetic modes results...... are presented. The results obtained are entirely general and may be applied to any effect which results in a broadening of the electromagnetic states, such as loss, disorder, and finite-size effects. This significantly limits the reduction in group velocity attainable via photonic crystals....

  12. Slow neutron scattering by water molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancic, V [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1970-07-01

    In this work some new, preliminary formulae for slow neutron scattering cross section calculation by heavy and light water molecules have been done. The idea was to find, from the sum which exists in well known Nelkin model, other cross sections in a more simple analytical form, so that next approximations may be possible. In order to sum a series it was starting from Euler-Mclaurin formula. Some new summation formulae have been derived there, and defined in two theorems. Extensive calculations, especially during the evaluation of residues, have been made at the CDC 3600 computer. validation of derived formulae was done by comparison with the BNL-325 results. Good agreement is shown. (author)

  13. Acoustic slow waves and the consolidation transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.L.; Plona, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the ultrasonic properties of unconsolidated (loose) glass beads and of lightly fused (consolidated) glass beads when the pore space is saturated with water. At a frequency of 500 kHz we have observed a single compressional wave in the former whose speed is 1.79 km/s and two distinct compressional waves with speeds 2.81 km/s and 0.96 km/s in the latter. The Biot theory is shown to give an accurate description of this phenomenon. We also analyze the acoustics of low temperature He ii in packed powder superleaks; either the fast wave for unconsolidated systems or the slow wave in a highly consolidated (fused) frame may be considered to be the 4th sound mode. In all such systems, the acoustic properties can be very simply understood by considering the velocities of propagation as continuous functions of the elastic moduli of the solid skeletal frames

  14. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-01-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze — a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space–time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe

  15. Slow speed object detection for haul trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-09-15

    Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

  16. Slow neutron scattering by water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancic, V.

    1970-01-01

    In this work some new, preliminary formulae for slow neutron scattering cross section calculation by heavy and light water molecules have been done. The idea was to find, from the sum which exists in well known Nelkin model, other cross sections in a more simple analytical form, so that next approximations may be possible. In order to sum a series it was starting from Euler-Mclaurin formula. Some new summation formulae have been derived there, and defined in two theorems. Extensive calculations, especially during the evaluation of residues, have been made at the CDC 3600 computer. validation of derived formulae was done by comparison with the BNL-325 results. Good agreement is shown. (author)

  17. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wetterich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze — a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space–time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  18. Slow creep in soft granular packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ishan; Fisher, Timothy S

    2017-05-14

    Transient creep mechanisms in soft granular packings are studied numerically using a constant pressure and constant stress simulation method. Rapid compression followed by slow dilation is predicted on the basis of a logarithmic creep phenomenon. Characteristic scales of creep strain and time exhibit a power-law dependence on jamming pressure, and they diverge at the jamming point. Microscopic analysis indicates the existence of a correlation between rheology and nonaffine fluctuations. Localized regions of large strain appear during creep and grow in magnitude and size at short times. At long times, the spatial structure of highly correlated local deformation becomes time-invariant. Finally, a microscale connection between local rheology and local fluctuations is demonstrated in the form of a linear scaling between granular fluidity and nonaffine velocity.

  19. Tagging charm with decay lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reay, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    With much detail, the author of this selection discusses two experiments which use the same physics but in different ways to obtain one same goala background - free sample of charm decays. One of the major purposes of gaining this sample is to measure one lifetime for charmed particles and to locate new particles. Continuing to discuss the first experiment, the Fermilab Experiment + 531, the author describes its methods, philosophy and two unexpected effects of the experiment. He turns then to discuss the CERN NA-15 experiment, describing its methods, findings and difficulties. Concluding his discussion on a positive note, the author is hopeful for the plans to continue more experimentation

  20. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.