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Sample records for situ optical spectroscopy

  1. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  2. Fast optical in situ spectroscopy in III-V MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspari, C.

    2007-09-29

    This work describes the application of optical in situ measurement techniques (reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy, RAS, and spectroscopic ellipsometry, SE) to processes that are important for the growth of III-V semiconductors like GaAs, InP, InAs and GaP in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Special emphasis is placed on the determination of the free carrier concentration (doping level) and the study of the thermal desorption properties of III-V oxides. A large part of this work is concerned with the development and the construction of a multichannel RAS setup that allows the recording of RAS spectra within fractions of a second. On the basis of benchmark measurements it was shown that the spectral resolution is sufficiently accurate for application in epitaxy. To demonstrate the recording of spectra with high temporal resolution, RAS monolayer oscillations during growth of GaAs were studied and it was shown that the surface changes periodically between a relatively smooth morphology with adsorbed methyl groups (type III) and a stepped, gallium-rich surface (type II). Furthermore the non-reversible process of growing InAs quantum dots on GaAs was studied. It was shown that the multichannel RAS is capable of detecting the 2D-3D transition as well as the following morphological change of the surface at high temporal resolution. For the measurement of the doping level, the relationship between the doping-induced internal electric field and the anisotropy of the sample was studied. To understand the effect of the so-called doping oscillations, a theoretical model was developed. For the investigation of the thermal desorption of the III-V oxides in MOVPE, a number of test series were realised. It was also found that the formation of the reconstructed surface is finished a considerable time after the SE transient indicates stable conditions (no further reduction of the oxide layer). The activation energy for oxide desorption from InAs, GaAs and InP was

  3. Remote in-situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Brian James

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) using optical fibers. Studies were performed to determine the optimal excitation and collection parameters for remote LIBS measurements of glasses, soils and paint. A number of fiber-optic LIBS probes were developed and used to characterize various samples by plasma emission spectroscopy. A novel method for launching high-power laser pulses into optical fibers without causing catastrophic failure is introduced. A systematic study of a number of commercially available optical fibers was performed to determine which optical fibers were best suited for delivering high-power laser pulses. The general design of an all fiber-optic LIBS probe is described and applied to the determination of Pb in soil. A fiber-optic probe was developed for the microanalysis of solid samples remotely by LIBS, Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging. The design of the probe allows for real-time sample imaging in-situ using coherent imaging fibers. This allows for precise atomic emission and Raman measurements to be performed remotely on samples in hostile or inaccessible environments. A novel technique was developed for collecting spectral plasma images using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The spatial and temporal characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of delay time. From the plasma images the distribution of Pb emission could be determined and fiber-optic designs could be optimized for signal collection. The performance of a two fiber LIBS probe is demonstrated for the determination of the amount of lead in samples of dry paint. It is shown that dry paint samples can be analyzed for their Pb content in-situ using a fiber-optic LIBS probe with detection limits well below the levels currently regulated by the Consumer Products Safety Commission. It is also shown that these measurements can be performed on both latex and enamel paints, and

  4. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... information about chemical equilibria, kinetics and molecular motion by monitoring changes in optical properties of the system. The five presented research projects are largely unrelated to each other both in aim and in what property is probed, however they are all connected in that they are fluorophore...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  5. Practical in-situ determination of ortho-para hydrogen ratios via fiber-optic based Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Liese-Marie; Knudson, James N.; Mocko, Michal; Renneke, Richard M.

    2016-02-21

    An experiment was designed and developed to prototype a fiber-optic-based laser system, which measures the ratio of ortho-hydrogen to para-hydrogen in an operating neutron moderator system at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source. Preliminary measurements resulted in an ortho to para ratio of 3.06:1, which is within acceptable agreement with the previously published ratio. The successful demonstration of Raman Spectroscopy for this measurement is expected to lead to a practical method that can be applied for similar in-situ measurements at operating neutron spallation sources.

  6. In-situ virtual metrology for the silicon-dioxide etch rate by using optical emission spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Boomsoo; Hong, Sangjeen

    2014-01-01

    As a useful tool for process control in a high volume semiconductor manufacturing environment, virtual metrology for the etch rate in a plasma etch process is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) data. Virtual metrology is a surrogate measurement taken from the process instead of from direct measurement, and it can provide in-situ metrology of a wafer's geometry from a predictive model. A statistical regression model that correlates the selected wavelengths of the optical emission spectra to the etch rate is established using the OES data collected over 20 experimental runs. In addition, an argon actinometry study is employed to quantify the OES data, and it provides valuable insight into the analysis of the OES data. The established virtual metrology model is further verified with an additional 20 runs of data. As a result, the virtual metrology model with both process recipe tool data and in-situ data shows higher prediction accuracy by as much as 56% compared with either the process recipe tool data or the in-situ data alone.

  7. Growth of pentacene on α -Al2O3 (0001) studied by in situ optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Fu, X.; Hohage, M.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Sun, L. D.

    2017-09-01

    The growth of pentacene thin films on a sapphire α -Al2O3 (0001) surface was investigated in situ using differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Two different film structures are observed depending on the substrate temperature. If pentacene is deposited at room temperature, a wetting layer consisting of flat-lying molecules is formed after which upright-standing molecular layers with a herringbone structure start to grow. At low substrate temperature of 100 K, the long molecular axis of the pentacene molecules remains parallel to the surface plane throughout the entire growth regime up to rather large thicknesses. Heating thin films deposited at 100 K to room temperature causes the pentacene molecules beyond the wetting layer to stand up and assemble into a herringbone structure. Another interesting observation is the dewetting of the first flat-lying monolayer upon exposure to air, leading to the condensation of islands consisting of upright-standing molecules. Our results emphasize the interplay between growth kinetics and thermodynamics and its influence on the molecular orientation in organic thin films.

  8. In-situ Optical Spectroscopy Investigation of Water and Its influence on Forsterite Transformation in Supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Thompson, C. J.; Joly, A. G.; Sklarew, D. S.; Poindexter, L.; Rosso, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from coal/gas-burning power plants is currently viewed as one of the most promising technologies for mitigating green house gas emissions. This strategy involves injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into deep geological formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline aquifers. The feasibility of this approach and the ultimate fate of the stored CO2 are determined by the interactions between scCO2, various minerals in the rock formations, and the host fluids. Currently, there is only limited knowledge about both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the physical and chemical processes that occur between scCO2 and relevant minerals, such as metal silicates and metal aluminosilicates, and the role of water activity for catalyzing mineral transformation reactions. In this work, we have developed a modular in situ optical spectroscopic platform that integrates a scCO2 generation and manipulation system with an array of optical and laser spectroscopies including UV-visible, IR, Raman and laser fluorescence spectroscopy. We have used the system to study i) the dissolution and quantification of H2O/D2O in scCO2 and ii) interaction between scCO2 and a model metal silicate, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), and the effects of the presence of water under variable pressure, temperature and water content. Our results showed that H2O and D2O have unique IR spectral features over a broad spectral range from 700 cm-1 to ~ 2900 cm-1 in scCO2 and their concentrations are directly proportional to the characteristic IR bands that correspond to their stretching (D2O) and bending frequencies (both D2O and H2O). These bands offer a unique spectroscopic signature useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the properties and reactivity of small amounts of H2O in scCO2. metal carbonation reactions relevant to sequestration.

  9. Reflectance-difference spectroscopy as an optical probe for in situ determination of doping levels in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lara-Velazquez, I.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guel-Sandoval, S.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi, SLP 78000 (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    We report on in situ Reflectance Difference Spectroscopy measurements carried out on GaAs(001). Measurements were performed at temperatures of 580 C and 430 C, in both n and p-type doped films and for both (2 x 4) and c(4 x 4) reconstructions. Samples employed were grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy with doping levels in the range from 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. We demonstrate the potential of Reflectance Difference Spectroscopy for impurity level determinations under growth conditions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  11. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  12. In-situ investigation of the order-disorder transition in Cu2ZnSnSe4 by optical transmission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Stroth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of disorder is one possible reason for the limited performance of kesterite solar cells. Therefore further knowledge of the order-disorder phase transition, of factors which influence the degree of order and of methods to determine this material property is still required. In this study we investigated the order-disorder transition in the kesterite material Cu2ZnSnSe4 by in-situ optical transmission spectroscopy during heat treatments. We show in-situ results for the temperature dependence of the band gap and its tailing properties. The influence of cooling rates on the phase transition was analyzed as well as the ordering kinetics during annealing at a constant temperature. The critical temperature of the phase transition was determined and the existence of a control temperature range is shown, which allows for controlling the degree of order by the cooling rate within this range. Additionally we performed Raman analysis to link Raman spectra to the degree of order in Cu2ZnSnSe4. A correlation between the intensity ratio of A-modes as well as B-/ E- Raman modes and the degree of order was found.

  13. In-situ optical spectroscopy and electronic properties of pyrrole sub-monolayers on Ga-rich GaAs(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, Thomas; Ewald, Marcel; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Kneissl, Michael; Esser, Norbert; Vogt, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    We report on the characterization of sub-monolayers of pyrrole adsorbed on Ga-rich GaAs(001) surfaces. The interfaces were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) in a spectral range between 1.5 and 8 eV. The adsorption of pyrrole on Ga-rich GaAs(001) modifies the RAS spectrum of the clean GaAs surface significantly at the surface transitions at 2.2 and 3.5 eV indicating a chemisorption of the molecules. By the help of transients at these surface transitions during the adsorption process, we were able to prepare different molecular coverages from a sub-monolayer up to a complete molecular layer. The different coverages of pyrrole were imaged by STM and electronically characterized by STS. The measurements reveal that the adsorbed molecules electronically insulate the surface and indicate the formation of new interface states around −3.5 and +4.2 eV. The RAS measurements in the UV region show new anisotropies in the spectral range of the optical transitions of the adsorbed pyrrole molecules. Our measurements demonstrate the potential of optical and electronic spectroscopy methods for the characterization of atomically thin molecular layers on semiconductor surfaces allowing a direct access to the properties of single adsorbed molecules.

  14. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  15. HOMES - Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HOMES (Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy) is a space telescope that employs a double dispersion architecture, using a holographic optical element...

  16. Supraconductor magnet for optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.; Buhler, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superconductive magnet system for optic spectroscopy has been built. It includes an elaborate support structure, a LN2/LHe cryostat with its supplies and controls and a superconductive magnet of the split pole type equipped with a superconductive switch. A vertically introduced sample in the LHe bath, on request subcooled down to 2.2K is observed through two optical passages. Magnet characteristics are as follows : - clear bore 35mm - clear split 20mm - central field 6.33 Teslas - homogeneity over 10mm D.S.V.: 1% [fr

  17. Designing a miniaturised heated stage for in situ optical measurements of solid oxide fuel cell electrode surfaces, and probing the oxidation of solid oxide fuel cell anodes using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Brightman, E.; Maher, R.; Offer, G. J.; Duboviks, V.; Heck, C.; Cohen, L. F.; Brandon, N. P.

    2012-01-01

    A novel miniaturised heated stage for in operando optical measurements on solid oxide fuel cell electrode surfaces is described. The design combines the advantages of previously reported designs, namely, (i) fully controllable dual atmosphere operation enabling fuel cell pellets to be tested in operando with either electrode in any atmosphere being the focus of study, and (ii) combined electrochemical measurements with optical spectroscopy measurements with the potential for highly detailed study of electrochemical processes; with the following advances, (iii) integrated fitting for mounting on a mapping stage enabling 2-D spatial characterisation of the surface, (iv) a compact profile that is externally cooled, enabling operation on an existing microscope without the need for specialized lenses, (v) the ability to cool very rapidly, from 600 °C to 300 °C in less than 5 min without damaging the experimental apparatus, and (vi) the ability to accommodate a range of pellet sizes and thicknesses. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  18. In-situ optical emission spectroscopy for a better control of hybrid sputtering/evaporation process for the deposition of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posada, Jorge; Jubault, Marie [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, UMR 7174, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Bousquet, Angélique; Tomasella, Eric [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institute of Chemistry of Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF), CNRS-UMR 6296, 24 Avenue des Landais, 63171 Aubière (France); Lincot, Daniel [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, UMR 7174, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we have developed a hybrid one-step co-sputtering/evaporation Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) process, where Cu, In and Ga are sputtered simultaneously with the thermal evaporation of selenium, thus avoiding the H{sub 2}Se use. An appropriate control of the selenium flux is very important to prevent the target poisoning and hence some material flux variations. Indeed, the control of the CIGS composition must be rigorous to ensure reproducible solar cell properties. In this regard, a study of the correlations between plasma species and thin film composition, structure and morphology has been performed by varying power values and Se evaporation temperature in the 170 to 230 °C range. We started by studying the plasma with a powerful technique: optical emission spectroscopy, following light emissions from different plasma species: sputtered Cu, Ga, In but also evaporated Se. Hence, we determined the Se flow threshold avoiding target poisoning and the main parameter controlling the CIGS composition. Obviously, we also focused our interest on the material. We measured film composition and thickness of the samples with X-ray fluorescence and by energy dispersive X-ray. Different phases formed during the process were identified by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The optoelectronic cell properties showed promising efficiency of 10.3% for an absorber with composition ratios of [Cu]/([In] + [Ga]) = 1.02 and [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.44. Finally, this work shows that we are able to control this hybrid process and thus the structure and composition of CIGS thin film for industrial transfer in the photovoltaic field. - Highlights: • We have developed a hybrid one-step co-sputtering/evaporation Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} process. • Correlations between plasma species and thin film composition have been performed. • We determined the Se flow threshold avoiding target poisoning. • Efficient small-area CIGS cells with 10.3% efficiency were fabricated.

  19. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzmán, C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the f......We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency...

  20. Noise and detection in ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montelatici, V.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring techniques suitable for ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy are analyzed and source of noise identified. The choice of optical detector is for photoelectrical devices. It is shown that the shot noise of phototubes is the most important noise source

  1. Portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Dong Binjiang; Zeng Liping; Shen Tingyun

    2000-01-01

    The author describes a portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system, which consists of a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector, an integrative spectroscopy card, a notebook computer and spectroscopy software. The spectrometer addresses applications in environmental or nuclear accident in situ γ spectroscopy measurements, and gives valid quantitative results of radionuclide concentrations per unit volume (Bq/kg) or unit area (Bq/cm 2 ) in the soil and absorbed dose rate in air at 1 m above ground (Gy/h)

  2. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  3. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Kim, E.; Andresen, N.C.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.; Minor, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 are performed in situ.

  4. In situ Raman spectroscopy studies of bulk and surface metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk V-P-O and model supported vanadia catalysts were investigated with in situ Raman spectroscopy during n-butane oxidation to maleic anhydride in order to determine the fundamental molecular structure-reactivity/selectivity insights that can be obtained from such experiments. The in situ Raman

  5. Optical spectroscopy for food and beverages control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Anna Grazia; Ciaccheri, Leonardo; Mencaglia, Andrea Azelio

    2011-08-01

    A selection of spectroscopy-based, fiber optic and micro-optic devices is presented. They have been designed and tested for monitoring the quality and safety of typical foodstuffs. The VIS-NIR spectra, considered as product fingerprints, allowed to discriminating the geographic region of production and to detecting nutritional and nutraceutic indicators.

  6. In situ Observation of Direct Electron Transfer Reaction of Cytochrome c Immobilized on ITO Electrode Modified with 11-{2-[2-(2-Methoxyethoxy)ethoxy]ethoxy}undecylphosphonic Acid Self-assembled Monolayer Film by Electrochemical Slab Optical Waveguide Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Okabe, Hirotaka; Omura, Ayako; Nakano, Miki; Miyake, Koji

    2017-01-01

    To immobilize cytochrome c (cyt.c) on an ITO electrode while keeping its direct electron transfer (DET) functionality, the ITO electrode surface was modified with 11-{2-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy]ethoxy}undecylphosphonic acid (CH 3 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) 3 C 11 H 22 PO(OH) 2 , M-EG 3 -UPA) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film. After a 100-times washing process to exchange a phosphate buffer saline solution surrounding cyt.c and ITO electrode to a fresh one, an in situ observation of visible absorption spectral change with slab optical waveguide (SOWG) spectroscopy showed that 87.7% of the cyt.c adsorbed on the M-EG 3 -UPA modified ITO electrode remained on the ITO electrode. The SOWG absorption spectra corresponding to oxidized and reduced cyt.c were observed with setting the ITO electrode potential at 0.3 and -0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively, while probing the DET reaction between cyt.c and ITO electrode occurred. The amount of cyt.c was evaluated to be about 19.4% of a monolayer coverage based on the coulomb amount in oxidation and reduction peaks on cyclic voltammetry (CV) data. The CV peak current maintained to be 83.4% compared with the initial value for a M-EG 3 -UPA modified ITO electrode after 60 min continuous scan with 0.1 V/s between 0.3 and -0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl.

  7. Spectroscopy and optical diagnostics for gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Ronald K; Goldenstein, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to the science that governs the interaction of light and matter (in the gas phase). It provides readers with the basic knowledge to exploit the light-matter interaction to develop quantitative tools for gas analysis (i.e. optical diagnostics) and understand and interpret the results of spectroscopic measurements. The authors pair the basics of gas‐phase spectroscopy with coverage of key optical diagnostic techniques utilized by practicing engineers and scientists to measure fundamental flow‐field properties. The text is organized to cover three sub‐topics of gas‐phase spectroscopy: (1) spectral line positions, (2) spectral line strengths, and (3) spectral lineshapes by way of absorption, emission, and scattering interactions. The latter part of the book describes optical measurement techniques and equipment. Key subspecialties include laser induced fluorescence, tunable laser absorption spectroscopy, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. It is ideal for students an...

  8. Principles of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Principles of Laser Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics is an essential textbook for graduate students studying the interaction of optical fields with atoms. It also serves as an ideal reference text for researchers working in the fields of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics. The book provides a rigorous introduction to the prototypical problems of radiation fields interacting with two- and three-level atomic systems. It examines the interaction of radiation with both atomic vapors and condensed matter systems, the density matrix and the Bloch vector, and applications involving linear absorptio

  9. Structural, optical spectroscopy, optical conductivity, dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    13

    different methods of preparation [36-41]. The electrical insulator materials with low refractive index and low absorption are needed for various optical devices, such as low loss waveguides, resonators, photonic crystals, distributed Bragg reflectors, light-emitting diodes, passive splitters, biosensors, attenuators and filters ...

  10. XIX International Youth School on Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The XIX International Youth School on Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy (COOS2015) was held in Kazan, Russia, from October 5 to October 7 at the Nikolai Lobachevsky Scientific Library of Kazan Federal University. The School follows the global tendency toward comprehensive studies of matter properties and its interaction with electromagnetic fields. Since 1997 more than 100 famous scientists from USA, Germany, Ukraine, Belarussia and Russia had plenary lecture presentations. This is the right place, where over 1000 young scientists had an opportunity to participate in hot discussions regarding the latest scientific news. Many young people have submitted interesting reports on photonics, quantum electronics, laser physics, quantum optics, traditional optical and laser spectroscopy, non-linear optics, material science and nanotechnology. Here we are publishing the full-size papers prepared from the most interesting lectures and reports selected by the Program Committee of the School. (paper)

  11. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  12. Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Correlated Spin Orbit Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Unlimited UU UU UU UU 14-06-2016 15-Mar-2013 14-Mar-2016 Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Correlated Spin-Orbit Phases The views...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ultrafast optical spectroscopy , nonlinear optical spectroscopy , iridates, cuprates REPORT...California Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91125 -0001 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy and

  13. Corrosion product characterisation by fibre optic raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzonas, D.A.; Rochefort, P.A.; Turner, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Fibre optic Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterise secondary-side deposits removed from CANDU steam generators. The deposits examined were in the form of powders, millimetre-sized flakes, and deposits on the surfaces of pulled steam generator tubes. The compositions of the deposits obtained using Raman spectroscopy are similar to the compositions obtained using other ex-situ analytical techniques. A semi-quantitative estimate of amounts of the major components can be obtained from the spectra. It was noted that the signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman spectra decreased as the amount of magnetite in the deposit increased, as a result of absorption of the laser light by the magnetite. The conversion of magnetite to hematite by the laser beam was observed when high laser powers were used. The Raman spectra of larger flake samples clearly illustrate the inhomogeneous nature of the deposits. (author)

  14. Combined In Situ Illumination-NMR-UV/Vis Spectroscopy: A New Mechanistic Tool in Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegerer, Andreas; Nitschke, Philipp; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2018-06-18

    Synthetic applications in photochemistry are booming. Despite great progress in the development of new reactions, mechanistic investigations are still challenging. Therefore, we present a fully automated in situ combination of NMR spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and illumination to allow simultaneous and time-resolved detection of paramagnetic and diamagnetic species. This optical fiber-based setup enables the first acquisition of combined UV/Vis and NMR spectra in photocatalysis, as demonstrated on a conPET process. Furthermore, the broad applicability of combined UVNMR spectroscopy for light-induced processes is demonstrated on a structural and quantitative analysis of a photoswitch, including rate modulation and stabilization of transient species by temperature variation. Owing to the flexibility regarding the NMR hardware, temperature, and light sources, we expect wide-ranging applications of this setup in various research fields. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. A New Optical Design for Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. L.

    2002-05-01

    We present an optical design concept for imaging spectroscopy, with some advantages over current systems. The system projects monochromatic images onto the 2-D array detector(s). Faint object and crowded field spectroscopy can be reduced first using image processing techniques, then building the spectrum, unlike integral field units where one must first extract the spectra, build data cubes from these, then reconstruct the target's integrated spectral flux. Like integral field units, all photons are detected simultaneously, unlike tunable filters which must be scanned through the wavelength range of interest and therefore pay a sensitivity pentalty. Several sample designs are presented, including an instrument optimized for measuring intermediate redshift galaxy cluster velocity dispersions, one designed for near-infrared ground-based adaptive optics, and one intended for space-based rapid follow-up of transient point sources such as supernovae and gamma ray bursts.

  16. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. Optical spectroscopy of ten extragalactic radiosources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, S.; Riley, J.M.; Saunders, R.

    1989-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of ten objects associated with extra-galactic radiosources, using the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. Redshifts are measured for four radiogalaxies (B20217 + 36A + B, 3C73, 0648 + 19A, 0648 + 19B) and for a galaxy which is probably associated with a double radio-source with highly unusual properties (0951 + 37); existing redshifts are confirmed for two radiogalaxies (4C39.04, 4C40.08); and a tentative redshift of z=2.87 measured for the quasar 3C82. (author)

  18. Polarized light in optics and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kliger, David S

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive introduction to polarized light provides students and researchers with the background and the specialized knowledge needed to fully utilize polarized light. It provides a basic introduction to the interaction of light with matter for those unfamiliar with photochemistry and photophysics. An in-depth discussion of polarizing optics is also given. Different analytical techniques are introduced and compared and introductions to the use of polarized light in various forms of spectroscopy are provided.Key Features* Starts at a basic level and develops tools for resear

  19. Optical frequency comb Faraday rotation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Alexandra C.; Westberg, Jonas; Wysocki, Gerard; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate optical frequency comb Faraday rotation spectroscopy (OFC-FRS) for broadband interference-free detection of paramagnetic species. The system is based on a femtosecond doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator and a fast-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The sample is placed in a DC magnetic field parallel to the light propagation. Efficient background suppression is implemented via switching the direction of the field on consecutive FTS scans and subtracting the consecutive spectra, which enables long-term averaging. In this first demonstration, we measure the entire Q- and R-branches of the fundamental band of nitric oxide in the 5.2-5.4 µm range and achieve good agreement with a theoretical model.

  20. In situ light spectroscopy in the environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Langhammer, C.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    the LSPR signal coming from the whole specimen, providing information complementary to the TEM analysis. During any ETEM experiment the electron beam effect on the sample is a difficult issue to address and rule out. In addition, if a reaction has to be followed in situ in the ETEM, the information...... is often recorded on a limited portion of the sample. Being able to probe the sample with INPS and ETEM at the same time allows parallel investigation at the local and macro scale, as well as aids the assessment of beam effects. A dedicated custom TEM specimen holder containing two optical fibers, five...... electrical contacts, a fixed miniaturized optical bench for light handling and a heating element (Fig. 1) has been designed. A system of pre-aligned mirrors and a MEMS heater are implemented in the holder. The system is primarily designed for use in combination with LSPR spectroscopy, but it is flexible...

  1. Elementary Steps of Faujasite Formation Followed by in Situ Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prodinger, Sebastian [Institute; Vjunov, Aleksei [Institute; Hu, Jian Zhi [Institute; Fulton, John L. [Institute; Camaioni, Donald M. [Institute; Derewinski, Miroslaw A. [Institute; Lercher, Johannes A. [Institute; Department

    2018-01-24

    Ex situ and in situ spectroscopy was used to identify the kinetics of processes during the formation of the faujasite (FAU) zeolite lattice from a hydrous gel. Using solid-state 27Al MAS NMR, the autocatalytic transformation from the amorphous gel into the crystalline material was monitored. Al-XANES shows that most Al already adopts a tetrahedral coordination in the X-ray-amorphous aluminosilicate at the beginning of the induction period, which hardly changes throughout the rest of the synthesis. Using 23Na NMR spectroscopy, environments in the growing zeolite crystal were identified and used to define the processes in the stepwise formation of the zeolite lattice. The end of the induction period was accompanied by a narrowing of the 27Al and 23Na MAS NMR peak widths, indicating the increased long-range order. The experiments show conclusively that the formation of faujasite occurs via the continuous formation and subsequent condensation of intermediary sodalite-like units that constitute the key building block of the zeolite. Acknowledgement The authors thank T. Huthwelker for assistance with XAFS experiment setup at the Swiss Light Source (PSI, Switzerland). Further, we would like to acknowledge V. Shutthanandan and B.W. Arey for performing Helium ion microscopy as well as Z. Zhao, N.R. Jaeger, M. Weng, C. Wan and M. Hu for aiding in the NMR experimental procedure. T. Varga is acknowledged for his help with the capillary XRD. A.V., D.M.C., J.H., J.L.F and J.A.L. were supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. S.P. and M.A.D. acknowledge support by the Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales (MS3 Initiative) conducted under Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program at PNNL. The in situ NMR experiments were supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Part of the research

  2. Optical Biopsy Using Tissue Spectroscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman S Nishioka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Optical biopsy’ or ‘optical diagnostics’ is a technique whereby light energy is used to obtain information about the structure and function of tissues without disrupting them. In fluorescence spectroscopy, light energy (usually provided by a laser is used to excite tissues and the resulting fluorescence provides information about the target tissue. Its major gastrointestinal application has been in the evaluation of colonic polyps, in which it can reliably distinguish malignant from benign lesions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT has been used in the investigation of Barrett’s epithelium (and dysplasia, although a variety of other applications are feasible. For example, OCT could assist in the identification and staging of mucosal and submucosal neoplasms, the grading of inflammation in the stomach and intestine, the diagnosis of biliary tumours and the assessment of villous architecture. OCT differs from endoscopic ultrasound, a complementary modality, in that it has a much higher resolution but lesser depth of penetration. The images correlate with the histopathological appearance of tissues, and the addition of Doppler methods may enable it to evaluate the vascularity of tumours and the amount of blood flow in varices. Refinements in these new optical techniques will likely make them valuable in clinical practice, although their specific roles have yet to be determined.

  3. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics.

  4. In situ optical emission study on the role of C2 in the synthesis of singlewalled carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available applications. In this study, the authors have applied in situ optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to study the plasma in the laser-furnace method to synthesize SWCNTs. In particular, the authors have investigated the temporal and spatial behavior of C2 as well...

  5. A new FSA approach for in situ γ ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caciolli, A.; Baldoncini, M.; Bezzon, G.P.; Broggini, C.; Buso, G.P.; Callegari, I.; Colonna, T.; Fiorentini, G.; Guastaldi, E.; Mantovani, F.; Massa, G.; Menegazzo, R.; Mou, L.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand of environmental radioactivity monitoring comes both from the scientific community and from the society. This requires accurate, reliable and fast response preferably from portable radiation detectors. Thanks to recent improvements in the technology, γ spectroscopy with sodium iodide scintillators has been proved to be an excellent tool for in-situ measurements for the identification and quantitative determination of γ ray emitting radioisotopes, reducing time and costs. Both for geological and civil purposes not only 40 K, 238 U, and 232 Th have to be measured, but there is also a growing interest to determine the abundances of anthropic elements, like 137 Cs and 131 I, which are used to monitor the effect of nuclear accidents or other human activities. The Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) approach has been chosen to analyze the γ spectra. The Non Negative Least Square (NNLS) and the energy calibration adjustment have been implemented in this method for the first time in order to correct the intrinsic problem related with the χ 2 minimization which could lead to artifacts and non physical results in the analysis. A new calibration procedure has been developed for the FSA method by using in situ γ spectra instead of calibration pad spectra. Finally, the new method has been validated by acquiring γ spectra with a 10.16 cm × 10.16 cm sodium iodide detector in 80 different sites in the Ombrone basin, in Tuscany. The results from the FSA method have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detectors on soil samples collected particular, the 137 Cs isotopes has been implemented in the analysis since it has been found not negligible during the in-situ measurements. - Highlights: ► The Full Spectrum Analysis technique is investigated with sodium iodide scintillator. ► Artifacts due to the free chi 2 minimization in standard FSA are solved applying the NNLS. ► New calibration approach has been developed without using

  6. Isotopic analysis using optical spectroscopy (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenkorn, S.

    1963-01-01

    The isotopic displacement in the atomic lines of certain elements (H, He, Li, Ne, Sr, Hg, Pb, U, Pu) is used for dosing these elements isotopically. The use of the Fabry-Perot photo-electric interference spectrometer is shown to be particularly adapted for this sort of problem: in each case we give on the one hand the essential results obtained with this apparatus, and on the other hand the results previously obtained with a conventional apparatus (grating, photographic plate). These results together give an idea of the possibilities of optical spectroscopy: in the best case, the precision which may be expected is of the order of 1 to 2 per cent for isotopes whose concentration is about 1 per cent. (author) [fr

  7. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of GEO Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tammaso; Lederer, Susan M.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Bedard, Donald

    2013-01-01

    We report on optical reflection spectroscopy of geosynchronous (GEO) objects in the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. These observations were obtained using imaging spectrographs on the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to determine the composition of these objects by comparing these spectral observations with ground-based laboratory measurements of spacecraft materials. The observations are all low resolution (1 nm after smoothing) obtained through a 5 arcsecond wide slit and using a grism as the dispersing element. The spectral range covered was from 450 nm to 800 nm. All spectra were flux calibrated using observations of standard stars with the exact same instrumental setup. An effort was made to obtain all observations within a limited range of topocentric phase angle, although the solar incident angle is unknown due to the lack of any knowledge of the attitude of the observed surface at the time of observation.

  8. In situ Spectroscopy of Solid-State Chemical Reaction in PbBr2-Deposited CsBr Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Matsunaga, Toshihiro; Saito, Tadaaki; Asada, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    It is possible to measure the fundamental optical absorption spectra of CsPbBr3 and Cs4PbBr6, whose stability is predicted by the study of phase diagram in the binary system CsBr-PbBr2, by means of in situ optical absorption and reflection spectroscopy of thermally induced solid-state chemical reaction in PbBr2-deposited CsBr crystals. On heavy annealing of the crystals, the Pb2+ ions are uniformly dispersed in the crystal matrix. The present experiment provides a novel method for measuring intrinsic optical absorption of ternary metal halides and also for in situ monitoring of doping metal halide crystal with impurities (metal ions or halogen ions).

  9. Monitoring soft tissue coagulation by optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihachev, A.; Lihacova, I.; Heinrichs, H.; Spigulis, J.; Trebst, T.; Wehner, M.

    2017-12-01

    Laser tissue welding (LTW) or laser tissue soldering (LTS) is investigated since many years for treatment of incisions, wound closure and anastomosis of vessels [1, 2]. Depending on the process, a certain temperature in the range between 65 °C to 85 °C must be reached and held for a few seconds. Care has to be taken not to overheat the tissue, otherwise necrosis or tissue carbonization may occur and will impair wound healing. Usually the temperature is monitored during the process to control the laser power [3]. This requires either bulky equipment or expensive and fragile infrared fibers to feed the temperature signal to an infrared detector. Alternatively, changes in tissue morphology can be directly observed by analysis of spectral reflectance. We investigate spectral changes in the range between 400 nm to 900 nm wavelength. Characteristic spectral changes occur when the temperature of tissue samples increase above 70 °C which is a typical setpoint value for temperature control of coagulation. We conclude that simple spectroscopy in the visible range can provide valuable information during LTS and LTW and probably replace the delicate measurement of temperature. A major advantage is that optical measurements can be performed using standard optical fibers and can be easily integrated into a surgical tool.

  10. Micro-optical instrumentation for process spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocombe, Richard A.; Flanders, Dale C.; Atia, Walid

    2004-12-01

    Traditional laboratory ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared spectroscopy instruments are tabletop-sized pieces of equipment that exhibit very high performance, but are generally too large and costly to be widely distributed for process control applications or used as spectroscopic sensors. Utilizing a unique, and proven, micro-optical technology platform origi-nally developed, qualified and deployed in the telecommunications industry, we have developed a new class of spectro-scopic micro-instrumentation that has laboratory quality resolution and spectral range, with superior speed and robust-ness. The fundamentally lower cost and small form factor of the technology will enable widespread use in process moni-toring and control. This disruption in the ground rules of spectroscopic analysis in these processes is enabled by the re-placement of large optics and detector arrays with a high-finesse, high-speed micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) tunable filter and a single detector, that enable the manufacture of a high performance and extremely rugged spectrome-ter in the footprint of a credit card. Specific process monitoring and control applications discussed in the paper include pharmaceutical, gas sensing and chemical processing applications.

  11. In-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy with MIMOS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, Iris, E-mail: fleischi@uni-mainz.de; Klingelhoefer, Goestar [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany); Morris, Richard V. [NASA Johnson Space Center (United States); Schroeder, Christian [University of Bayreuth and University of Tuebingen (Germany); Rodionov, Daniel [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany); Souza, Paulo A. de [Tasmanian ICT Centre (Australia); Collaboration: MIMOS II Team

    2012-03-15

    The miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer MIMOS II was developed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. Two MIMOS II instruments were successfully deployed on the martian surface as payload elements of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and have returned data since landing in January 2004. Moessbauer spectroscopy has made significant contributions to the success of the MER mission, in particular identification of iron-bearing minerals formed through aqueous weathering processes. As a field-portable instrument and with backscattering geometry, MIMOS II provides an opportunity for non-destructive in-situ investigations for a range of applications. For example, the instrument has been used for analyses of archaeological artifacts, for air pollution studies and for in-field monitoring of green rust formation. A MER-type MIMOS II instrument is part of the payload of the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission, scheduled for launch in November 2011, with the aim of exploring the composition of the martian moon Phobos. An advanced version of the instrument, MIMOS IIA, that incorporates capability for elemental analyses, is currently under development.

  12. In-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy with MIMOS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, Iris; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Morris, Richard V.; Schröder, Christian; Rodionov, Daniel; Souza, Paulo A. de

    2012-01-01

    The miniaturized Mössbauer spectrometer MIMOS II was developed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. Two MIMOS II instruments were successfully deployed on the martian surface as payload elements of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and have returned data since landing in January 2004. Mössbauer spectroscopy has made significant contributions to the success of the MER mission, in particular identification of iron-bearing minerals formed through aqueous weathering processes. As a field-portable instrument and with backscattering geometry, MIMOS II provides an opportunity for non-destructive in-situ investigations for a range of applications. For example, the instrument has been used for analyses of archaeological artifacts, for air pollution studies and for in-field monitoring of green rust formation. A MER-type MIMOS II instrument is part of the payload of the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission, scheduled for launch in November 2011, with the aim of exploring the composition of the martian moon Phobos. An advanced version of the instrument, MIMOS IIA, that incorporates capability for elemental analyses, is currently under development.

  13. In situ observation of lithium hydride hydrolysis by DRIFT spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awbery, Roy P.; Broughton, Duncan A.; Tsang, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline LiH was studied in situ using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy to investigate the effect water vapour has on the rate of production of the corrosion products, particularly LiOH. The reaction rate of the formation of surface LiOH was monitored by measurement of the hydroxyl (OH) band at 3676 cm -1 . The initial hydrolysis rate of LiH exposed to water vapour at 50% relative humidity was found to be almost two times faster than LiH exposed to water vapour at 2% relative humidity. The hydrolysis rate was shown to be initially very rapid followed by a much slower, almost linear rate. The change in hydrolysis rate was attributed to the formation of a coherent layer of LiOH on the LiH surface. Exposure to lower levels of water vapour appeared to result in the formation of a more coherent corrosion product, resulting in effective passivation of the surface to further attack from water

  14. True resolution enhancement for optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Justin T.; Oleske, Jeffrey B.

    2018-02-01

    Resolving spectrally adjacent peaks is important for techniques, such as tracking small shifts in Raman or fluorescence spectra, quantifying pharmaceutical polymorph ratios, or molecular orientation studies. Thus, suitable spectral resolution is a vital consideration when designing most spectroscopic systems. Most parameters that influence spectral resolution are fixed for a given system (spectrometer length, grating groove density, excitation source, CCD pixel size, etc.). Inflexible systems are non-problematic if the spectrometer is dedicated for a single purpose; however, these specifications cannot be optimized for different applications with wider range resolution requirements. Data processing techniques, including peak fitting, partial least squares, or principal component analysis, are typically used to achieve sub-optical resolution information. These techniques can be plagued by spectral artifacts introduced by post-processing as well as the subjective implementation of statistical parameters. TruRes™, from Andor Technology, uses an innovative optical means to greatly improve and expand the range of spectral resolutions accessible on a single setup. True spectral resolution enhancement of >30% is achieved without mathematical spectral alteration, dataprocessing, or spectrometer component changes. Discreet characteristic spectral lines from Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and atomic calibration sources are now fully resolved from spectrally-adjacent peaks under otherwise identical configuration. TruRes™ has added advantage of increasing the spectral resolution without sacrificing bandpass. Using TruRes™ the Kymera 328i resolution can approach that of a 500 mm focal spectrometer. Furthermore, the bandpass of a 500 mm spectrograph with would be 50% narrower than the Kymera 328i with all other spectrometer components constant. However, the Kymera 328i with TruRes™ is able to preserve a 50% wider bandpass.

  15. In situ differential reflectance spectroscopy of thin crystalline films of PTCDA on different substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, Holger; Nitsche, Robert; Dienel, Thomas; Leo, Karl; Fritz, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    We report an investigation of the excitonic properties of thin crystalline films of the archetypal organic semiconductor PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) grown on poly- and single crystalline surfaces. A sensitive setup capable of measuring the optical properties of ultrathin organic molecular crystals via differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is presented. This tool allows to carry out measurements in situ, i.e., during the actual film growth, and over a wide spectral range, even on single crystalline surfaces with high symmetry or metallic surfaces, where widely used techniques like reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) or fluorescence excitation spectroscopy fail. The spectra obtained by DRS resemble mainly the absorption of the films if transparent substrates are used, which simplifies the analysis. In the case of mono- to multilayer films of PTCDA on single crystalline muscovite mica(0001) and Au(111) substrates, the formation of the solid state absorption from monomer to dimer and further to crystal-like absorption spectra can be monitored

  16. A portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Dong Binjiang; Zeng Liping

    1999-01-01

    The author describes a portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system, which consists of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, an integrative spectroscopy card, a notebook computer and the spectroscopy software. The spectrometer addresses applications in environmental or nuclear accident in situ γ spectroscopy measurements, and gives valid quantitative results of radionuclide concentrations per unit volume (Bq/kg) or per unit area (Bq/cm 2 ) in the soil and absorbed dose rate in air 1 m above ground (Gy/h)

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  18. Plasma control using neural network and optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byungwhan; Bae, Jung Ki; Hong, Wan-Shick

    2005-01-01

    Due to high sensitivity to process parameters, plasma processes should be tightly controlled. For plasma control, a predictive model was constructed using a neural network and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce OES dimensionality. This approach was applied to an oxide plasma etching conducted in a CHF 3 /CF 4 magnetically enhanced reactive ion plasma. The etch process was systematically characterized by means of a statistical experimental design. Three etch outputs (etch rate, profile angle, and etch rate nonuniformity) were modeled using three different approaches, including conventional, OES, and PCA-OES models. For all etch outputs, OES models demonstrated improved predictions over the conventional or PCA-OES models. Compared to conventional models, OES models yielded an improvement of more than 25% in modeling profile angle and etch rate nonuniformtiy. More than 40% improvement over PCA-OES model was achieved in modeling etch rate and profile angle. These results demonstrate that nonreduced in situ data are more beneficial than reduced one in constructing plasma control model

  19. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, F.; Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  20. Growth and optical spectroscopy of synthetic diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudryj, A.V.; Larionova, T.P.; Shakin, I.A.; Gysakov, G.A.; Dubrov, G.A.; Tikhonov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    It is studied the growth and optical properties of synthetic diamonds, which may be used for detection of ionizing radiation, optical windows, heat removal, ultraviolet and thermo sensors, optoelectronic devices. Optical properties of diamonds (grown in different technological conditions) were studied in temperature range 78 - 300 K by means of measuring transmission in spectral band 0.2 - 25 μm, photoluminescence and registration of luminescence excitation spectra in spectral band 0.2 - 2 μm

  1. Brillouin micro-spectroscopy through aberrations via sensorless adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrei, Eitan; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2018-04-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy is a powerful optical technique for non-contact viscoelastic characterizations which has recently found applications in three-dimensional mapping of biological samples. Brillouin spectroscopy performances are rapidly degraded by optical aberrations and have therefore been limited to homogenous transparent samples. In this work, we developed an adaptive optics (AO) configuration designed for Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to engineer the incident wavefront and correct for aberrations. Our configuration does not require direct wavefront sensing and the injection of a "guide-star"; hence, it can be implemented without the need for sample pre-treatment. We used our AO-Brillouin spectrometer in aberrated phantoms and biological samples and obtained improved precision and resolution of Brillouin spectral analysis; we demonstrated 2.5-fold enhancement in Brillouin signal strength and 1.4-fold improvement in axial resolution because of the correction of optical aberrations.

  2. Optical coherence techniques for plasma doppler spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.; Michael, C.; Glass, F.; Cheetham, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    A new electro-optically Modulated Optical Solid-State (MOSS) interferometer has been constructed for measurement of the low order spectral moments of line emission from optically thin radiant media. The instrument, which is based on the principle of the Fourier transform spectrometer, has high etendue and is rugged, compact and inexpensive. By employing electro-optical path-length modulation techniques, the spectral information is transferred to the temporal frequency domain and can be obtained using a single photodetector. Specifically, the zeroth moment (brightness) is given by the average signal level, the first moment (shift) by the modulation phase and the second moment (line width) by the modulation amplitude. (author)

  3. In-situ optical profilometry of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, G.N.; Cornblum, E.O.; Grabish, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of flaw geometry is crucial in the stress analysis of flaws found in the thin-walled Zirconium alloy pressure tubes of CANDU reactors. While ultrasonic inspection can provide much of the required data, the measurement of the sharpness, or root-radius, at the bottom of a flaw has not so far been possible in-situ. This paper will describe the application of optical profilometry techniques, to measure directly the depth and root-radius of open inside-surface flaws, within a flooded reactor pressure tube. The tool uses a rad-tolerant television camera, custom optics and light stripe generators to collect digitized image data from three different views of a flaw. Software has been developed to manage the collection of the image data and provide a full range of display and automated analysis options. The tool has recently been used successfully to measure fretting flaws in the 100--250 micron deep range

  4. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2018-01-30

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  5. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  6. In-Situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 1/29/10-9/30/10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In situ optical studies of oxidation/reduction kinetics on SOFC cermet anodes 5a...0572 In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Montana State University...of Research In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Principal Investigator Robert Walker Organization

  7. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  8. Optical Spectroscopy Of Charged Quantum Dot Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, M.; Bracker, A. S.; Stinaff, E. A.; Doty, M. F.; Gammon, D.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2007-04-01

    Coupling between two closely spaced quantum dots is observed by means of photoluminescence spectroscopy. Hole coupling is realized by rational crystal growth and heterostructure design. We identify molecular resonances of different excitonic charge states, including the important case of a doubly charged quantum dot molecule.

  9. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G. [GREMI, Université-CNRS, BP6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R., E-mail: mohamed-ramzi.ammar@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Strunskus, T. [Institute of Material Science, Chritian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  10. New insights on electrochemical hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbons by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Leyva García, Sarai; Morallón Núñez, Emilia; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Béguin, François; Lozano Castelló, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was exploited to analyze the interaction between carbon and hydrogen during electrochemical hydrogen storage at cathodic conditions. Two different activated carbons were used and characterized by different electrochemical techniques in two electrolytes (6 M KOH and 0.5 M Na2SO4). The in situ Raman spectra collected showed that, in addition to the D and G bands associated to the graphitic carbons, two bands appear simultaneously at about 1110 and 1500 cm−1 under cath...

  11. Two-dimensional spectroscopy at infrared and optical frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    This Perspective on multidimensional spectroscopy in the optical and infrared spectral regions focuses on the principles and the scientific and technical challenges facing these new fields. The methods hold great promise for advances in the visualization of time-dependent structural changes in complex systems ranging from liquids to biological assemblies, new materials, and fundamental physical processes. The papers in this special feature on multidimensional spectroscopy in chemistry, physic...

  12. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  13. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  14. Inertial and interference effects in optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karstens, W; Smith, D Y

    2015-01-01

    Interference between free-space and material components of the displacement current plays a key role in determining optical properties. This is illustrated by an analogy between the Lorentz optical model and a-c circuits. Phase shifts in material-polarization currents, which are inertial, relative to the non-inertial vacuum-polarization current cause interference in the total displacement current and, hence, variation in E-M wave propagation. If the displacement-current is reversed, forward propagation is inhibited yielding the semimetallic reflectivity exhibited by intrinsic silicon. Complete cancellation involves material currents offsetting free-space currents to form current-loops that correspond to plasmons. (paper)

  15. [Application of in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy to analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Lin, Cheng-yan; Yu, Wen-quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ai-guo

    2010-01-01

    Identification of salts is a principal problem for analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. The fluid inclusions from deep natural gas reservoirs in Minfeng sub-sag were analyzed by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The type of fluid inclusions was identified by Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The Raman spectra show that the inclusions contain methane-bearing brine aqueous liquids. The fluid inclusions were analyzed at -180 degrees C by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The spectra show that inclusions contain three salts, namely NaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2. Sodium chloride is most salt component, coexisting with small calcium chloride and little magnesium chloride. The origin of fluids in inclusions was explained by analysis of the process of sedimentation and diagenesis. The mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs was also given in this paper. The results of this study indicate that in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy is an available method to get the composition of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. Based on the analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy with combination of the history of sedimentation and diagenesis, the authors can give important evidence for the type and mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs.

  16. In situ scanning probe spectroscopy at nanoscale solid/liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, W.; Hugelmann, M.; Hugelmann, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemistry provides unique features for the preparation of low-dimensional structures, but in situ spectroscopy with atomic/molecular resolution at such structures is at present not well established yet. This paper shows that in situ scanning probe spectroscopy at solid/liquid interfaces can be utilized to study electronic properties at nanoscale, if appropriate conditions are applied. Tunneling spectroscopy provides information about tunneling barrier heights and electronic states in the tunneling gap, as shown on Au(1 1 1) substrates, contact spectroscopy allows for transport measurements at single nanostructures, as shown at Au/n-Si(1 1 1) nanodiodes. The influence of the electrolytic environment on spectroscopic investigations is not a principal limitation, but offers additional degrees of freedom, which allow, for example, spectroscopic studies of potential dependent surface phenomena at solid/liquid interfaces

  17. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  18. Monitoring the in-situ oxide growth on uranium by ultraviolet-visible reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweke, Danielle; Maimon, Chen; Chernia, Zelig; Livneh, Tsachi

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the in-situ monitoring of oxide growth on U-0.1 wt. % Cr by means of UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy in the thickness range of ˜20-150 nm. Two different approaches are presented: In the "modeling approach," we employ a model for a metallic substrate covered by a dielectric layer, while taking into account the buildup of oxygen gradient and surface roughness. Then, we fit the simulated spectra to the experimental one. In the "extrema analysis," we derive an approximated analytical expression, which relates the oxide thickness to the position of the extrema in the reflectance spectra based on the condition for optical interference of the reflected light. Good agreement is found between the values extracted by the two procedures. Activation energy of ˜21 kcal/mole was obtained by monitoring the oxide growth in the temperature range of 22-90 °C. The upper bound for the thickness determination is argued to be mostly dictated by cracking and detachment processes in the formed oxide.

  19. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M S; Dhez, O; Denmat, S Le; Felici, R; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2008-01-01

    The in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies with X-ray microbeams adds a variety of new possibilities to the panoply of synchrotron radiation techniques. This paper describes an optics-free Atomic Force Microscope that can be directly installed on most of the synchrotron radiation end-stations for combined X-ray and atomic force microscopy experiments. The instrument can be used for atomic force imaging of the investigated sample or to locally measure the X-ray absorption or diffraction, or it can also be used to mechanically interact with the sample while simultaneously taking spectroscopy or diffraction measurements. The local character of these measurements is intrinsically linked with the use of the Atomic Force Microscope tip. It is the sharp tip that gives the opportunity to measure the photons flux impinging on it, or to locally measure the absorption coefficient or the shape of the diffraction pattern. At the end an estimation of the limits of the various techniques presented is also discussed.

  20. In situ monitoring of cocrystals in formulation development using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Takashi; Tanabe, Yuta; Kojima, Takashi; Miura, Masaru; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Fukami, Toshiro

    2018-05-05

    In recent years, to guarantee a quality-by-design approach to the development of pharmaceutical products, it is important to identify properties of raw materials and excipients in order to determine critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Feedback obtained from real-time analyses using various process analytical technology (PAT) tools has been actively investigated. In this study, in situ monitoring using low-frequency (LF) Raman spectroscopy (10-200 cm -1 ), which may have higher discriminative ability among polymorphs than near-infrared spectroscopy and conventional Raman spectroscopy (200-1800 cm -1 ), was investigated as a possible application to PAT. This is because LF-Raman spectroscopy obtains information about intermolecular and/or lattice vibrations in the solid state. The monitoring results obtained from Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystal indicate that LF-Raman spectroscopy is applicable to in situ monitoring of suspension and fluidized bed granulation processes, and is an effective technique as a PAT tool to detect the conversion risk of cocrystals. LF-Raman spectroscopy is also used as a PAT tool to monitor reactions, crystallizations, and manufacturing processes of drug substances and products. In addition, a sequence of conversion behaviors of Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystals was determined by performing in situ monitoring for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-10-22

    We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminated by exploiting their different emission spectral ranges as in luminescence linear spectroscopy. We then demonstrate SHG imaging of a filler, plaster, composed of bassanite particles which exhibit a non centrosymmetric crystal structure. We also show that SHG/2PEF imaging enables the visualization of wood microstructure through typically 60 µm-thick coatings by revealing crystalline cellulose (SHG signal) and lignin (2PEF signal) in the wood cell walls. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as a promising non-destructive and contactless tool for in situ 3D investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  2. Optical spectroscopy of ancient paper and textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missori, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient paper and textiles represent a striking example of optically inhomogenous materials whose optical responses are strongly governed by scattering effects. In order to recover the absorption coefficient from non-invasive and nondestructive reflectance measurements a specific approach based on Kubelka-Munk two-flux theory must be applied. In this way quantitative chemical information, such as chromophores concentration, can be obtained, as well as quantitative spectra of additional substances such as pigments or dyes. Results on a folio of the Codex on the Flight of Birds by Leonardo da Vinci and a linen cloth dated back to 1653 and called the Shroud of Arquata, a copy of the Shroud of Turin, will be presented.

  3. Optical characterization of semiconductors infrared, Raman, and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Perkowitz, Sidney

    1993-01-01

    This is the first book to explain, illustrate, and compare the most widely used methods in optics: photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman scattering. Written with non-experts in mind, the book develops the background needed to understand the why and how of each technique, but does not require special knowledge of semiconductors or optics. Each method is illustrated with numerous case studies. Practical information drawn from the authors experience is given to help establish optical facilities, including commercial sources for equipment, and experimental details. For industrial sci

  4. Seeing through Musculoskeletal Tissues: Improving In Situ Imaging of Bone and the Lacunar Canalicular System through Optical Clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Ian M.; Miola, Joseph P.; David, Michael A.; Smith, Melanie K.; Price, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In situ, cells of the musculoskeletal system reside within complex and often interconnected 3-D environments. Key to better understanding how 3-D tissue and cellular environments regulate musculoskeletal physiology, homeostasis, and health is the use of robust methodologies for directly visualizing cell-cell and cell-matrix architecture in situ. However, the use of standard optical imaging techniques is often of limited utility in deep imaging of intact musculoskeletal tissues due to the highly scattering nature of biological tissues. Drawing inspiration from recent developments in the deep-tissue imaging field, we describe the application of immersion based optical clearing techniques, which utilize the principle of refractive index (RI) matching between the clearing/mounting media and tissue under observation, to improve the deep, in situ imaging of musculoskeletal tissues. To date, few optical clearing techniques have been applied specifically to musculoskeletal tissues, and a systematic comparison of the clearing ability of optical clearing agents in musculoskeletal tissues has yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study we tested the ability of eight different aqueous and non-aqueous clearing agents, with RIs ranging from 1.45 to 1.56, to optically clear murine knee joints and cortical bone. We demonstrated and quantified the ability of these optical clearing agents to clear musculoskeletal tissues and improve both macro- and micro-scale imaging of musculoskeletal tissue across several imaging modalities (stereomicroscopy, spectroscopy, and one-, and two-photon confocal microscopy) and investigational techniques (dynamic bone labeling and en bloc tissue staining). Based upon these findings we believe that optical clearing, in combination with advanced imaging techniques, has the potential to complement classical musculoskeletal analysis techniques; opening the door for improved in situ investigation and quantification of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26930293

  5. Seeing through Musculoskeletal Tissues: Improving In Situ Imaging of Bone and the Lacunar Canalicular System through Optical Clearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Berke

    Full Text Available In situ, cells of the musculoskeletal system reside within complex and often interconnected 3-D environments. Key to better understanding how 3-D tissue and cellular environments regulate musculoskeletal physiology, homeostasis, and health is the use of robust methodologies for directly visualizing cell-cell and cell-matrix architecture in situ. However, the use of standard optical imaging techniques is often of limited utility in deep imaging of intact musculoskeletal tissues due to the highly scattering nature of biological tissues. Drawing inspiration from recent developments in the deep-tissue imaging field, we describe the application of immersion based optical clearing techniques, which utilize the principle of refractive index (RI matching between the clearing/mounting media and tissue under observation, to improve the deep, in situ imaging of musculoskeletal tissues. To date, few optical clearing techniques have been applied specifically to musculoskeletal tissues, and a systematic comparison of the clearing ability of optical clearing agents in musculoskeletal tissues has yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study we tested the ability of eight different aqueous and non-aqueous clearing agents, with RIs ranging from 1.45 to 1.56, to optically clear murine knee joints and cortical bone. We demonstrated and quantified the ability of these optical clearing agents to clear musculoskeletal tissues and improve both macro- and micro-scale imaging of musculoskeletal tissue across several imaging modalities (stereomicroscopy, spectroscopy, and one-, and two-photon confocal microscopy and investigational techniques (dynamic bone labeling and en bloc tissue staining. Based upon these findings we believe that optical clearing, in combination with advanced imaging techniques, has the potential to complement classical musculoskeletal analysis techniques; opening the door for improved in situ investigation and quantification of musculoskeletal

  6. Quantum optics, molecular spectroscopy and low-temperaturespectroscopy: general discussion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orrit, M.; Evans, G.; Cordes, T.; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 184, Sep (2015), 275-303 ISSN 1359-6640 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04020156 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum optics * molecular spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.544, year: 2015

  7. Linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy: Spectral, temporal and spatial resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Marcher

    1997-01-01

    Selected linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopies are being described with special emphasis on the possibility of obtaining simultaneous spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The potential of various experimental techniques is being demonstrated by specific examples mostly taken from inve...... investigations of the electronic, and opto-electronic, properties of semiconductor nanostructures....

  8. Single Step In Situ Synthesis and Optical Properties of Polyaniline/ZnO Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline/ZnO nanocomposites were prepared by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer in the presence of different weight percentages of ZnO nanostructures. The steric stabilizer added to prevent the agglomeration of nanostructures in the polymer matrix was found to affect the final properties of the nanocomposite. ZnO nanostructures of various morphologies and sizes were prepared in the absence and presence of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS surfactant under different reaction conditions like in the presence of microwave radiation (microwave oven, under pressure (autoclave, under vacuum (vacuum oven, and at room temperature (ambient condition. The conductivity of these synthesized nanocomposites was evaluated using two-probe method and the effect of concentration of ZnO nanostructures on conductivity was observed. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and UV-visible (UV-VIS spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize nanocomposites. The optical energy band gap of the nanocomposites was calculated from absorption spectra and ranged between 1.5 and 3.21 eV. The reported values depicted the blue shift in nanocomposites as compared to the band gap energies of synthesized ZnO nanostructures. The present work focuses on the one-step synthesis and potential use of PANI/ZnO nanocomposite in molecular electronics as well as in optical devices.

  9. A Novel Optical Diagnostic for In Situ Measurements of Lithium Polysulfides in Battery Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Najmus; Silva, Cody J; Maupin, C Mark; Porter, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    An optical diagnostic technique to determine the order and concentration of lithium polysulfides in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery electrolytes has been developed. One of the major challenges of lithium-sulfur batteries is the problem of polysulfide shuttling between the electrodes, which leads to self-discharge and loss of active material. Here we present an optical diagnostic for quantitative in situ measurements of lithium polysulfides using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Simulated infrared spectra of lithium polysulfide molecules were generated using computational quantum chemistry routines implemented in Gaussian 09. The theoretical spectra served as a starting point for experimental characterization of lithium polysulfide solutions synthesized by the direct reaction of lithium sulfide and sulfur. Attenuated total reflection FT-IR spectroscopy was used to measure absorption spectra. The lower limit of detection with this technique is 0.05 M. Measured spectra revealed trends with respect to polysulfide order and concentration, consistent with theoretical predictions, which were used to develop a set of equations relating the order and concentration of lithium polysulfides in a sample to the position and area of a characteristic infrared absorption band. The diagnostic routine can measure the order and concentration to within 5% and 0.1 M, respectively.

  10. Determination of redox-active centers in praseodymium doped ceria by in situ-XANES spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Praseodymium doped ceria, a material of interest for electrochemical flue gas purification, was investigated with in situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy between room temperature and 500°C in air and diluted nitrogen(II) oxide (NO/Ar) (1% NO in Ar). For temperatures above 400°C...

  11. Photoswitchable Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in 5-Phenylazopyrimidines Revealed By In Situ Irradiation NMR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Eliška; Čechová, Lucie; Kind, J.; Janeba, Zlatko; Thiele, C. M.; Dračínský, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2018), s. 492-498 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : azopyrimidines * heterocycles * hydrogen bonds * NMR spectroscopy * UV/Vis in situ irradiation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  12. Solid Acid-Catalyzed Cellulose Hydrolysis Monitored by In Situ ATR-IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.; Grisel, R.J.H.; Smit, A.T.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The solid acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose was studied under elevated temperatures and autogenous pressures using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy. Standards of cellulose and pure reaction products, which include glucose, fructose, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid (LA), formic acid, and

  13. Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander A; Hepburn, John W; Milner, Valery

    2014-03-07

    We demonstrate a new spectroscopic method for studying electronic transitions in molecules with extremely broad range of angular momentum. We employ an optical centrifuge to create narrow rotational wave packets in the ground electronic state of (16)O2. Using the technique of resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization, we record the spectrum of multiple ro-vibrational transitions between X(3)Σg(-) and C(3)Πg electronic manifolds of oxygen. Direct control of rotational excitation, extending to rotational quantum numbers as high as N ≳ 120, enables us to interpret the complex structure of rotational spectra of C(3)Πg beyond thermally accessible levels.

  14. In situ gas temperature measurements by UV-absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2009-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A(2)Sigma(+) uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path....... The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 degrees C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m....

  15. Theoretical optical spectroscopy of complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, A. Mosca; Violante, C.; Missori, M.; Bechstedt, F.; Teodonio, L.; Ippoliti, E.; Carloni, P.; Guidoni, L.; Pulci, O.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We review some theoretical condensed matter ab initio spectroscopic computational techniques. ► We show several applications ranging from 0 to 3 dimensional systems. ► For each system studied, we show which kind of information it is possible to obtain by performing these calculations. -- Abstract: We review here some of the most reliable and efficient computational theoretical ab initio techniques for the prediction of optical and electronic spectroscopic properties and show some important applications to molecules, surfaces, and solids. We investigate the role of the solvent in the optical absorption spectrum of indole molecule. We study the excited-state properties of a photo-active minimal model molecule for the retinal of rhodopsin, responsible for vision mechanism in animals. We then show a study about spectroscopic properties of Si(1 1 1) surface. Finally we simulate a bulk system: paper, that is mainly made of cellulose, a pseudo-crystalline material representing 40% of annual biomass production in the Earth

  16. Theoretical optical spectroscopy of complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, A. Mosca, E-mail: adriano.mosca.conte@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Violante, C., E-mail: claudia.violante@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Missori, M., E-mail: mauro.missori@isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00016 Monterotondo Scalo (Rome) (Italy); Bechstedt, F., E-mail: bech@ifto.physik.uni-jena.de [Institut fur Festkorpertheorie und -optik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Teodonio, L. [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Istituto centrale per il restauro e la conservazione del patrimonio archivistico e librario (IC-RCPAL), Italian Minister for Cultural Heritage, Via Milano 76, 00184 Rome (Italy); Ippoliti, E.; Carloni, P. [German Research School for Simulation Sciences, Julich (Germany); Guidoni, L., E-mail: leonardo.guidoni@univaq.it [Università degli Studi di L’Aquila, Dipartimento di Chimica e Materiali, Via Campo di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Pulci, O., E-mail: olivia.pulci@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We review some theoretical condensed matter ab initio spectroscopic computational techniques. ► We show several applications ranging from 0 to 3 dimensional systems. ► For each system studied, we show which kind of information it is possible to obtain by performing these calculations. -- Abstract: We review here some of the most reliable and efficient computational theoretical ab initio techniques for the prediction of optical and electronic spectroscopic properties and show some important applications to molecules, surfaces, and solids. We investigate the role of the solvent in the optical absorption spectrum of indole molecule. We study the excited-state properties of a photo-active minimal model molecule for the retinal of rhodopsin, responsible for vision mechanism in animals. We then show a study about spectroscopic properties of Si(1 1 1) surface. Finally we simulate a bulk system: paper, that is mainly made of cellulose, a pseudo-crystalline material representing 40% of annual biomass production in the Earth.

  17. Thermodynamics of Silica Dissolution From In-situ Raman +Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. K.; Fumagalli, P.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2001-12-01

    Solubilities of cations, such as silicon, in water strongly effect both the physical and thermodynamical properties of supercritical metamorphic fluids. Modeling the thermodynamics of fluid-rock interactions requires therefore a profound understanding of cation dissolution and aqueous speciation. In-situ Raman experiments of the silica-water system were performed in an externally heated Bassett-type diamond-anvil cell at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan. Natural quartz samples (from Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming) were loaded in the sample chamber with de-ionized or spectrographic water. All experiments used doubly polished rhenium gaskets with a thickness of 200 μ m, diameter of 1.0 mm, and a 500 μ m drillhole for the sample chamber. Temperature was measured using K-type thermocouples wrapped around both the upper and lower diamond anvils. Pressures are obtained on the basis of the shift of the 464 cm-1 Raman mode of quartz. In-situ Raman spectra were collected from 250-1200 cm-1, focusing on the vibrational modes of aqueous silica species at temperatures up to 700 ° C and pressures up to 14 kbar. We observed Si-O stretching modes attributable to dimer (H6Si2O7, 965 cm-1) and monomer (H4SiO4, 771 cm-1) aqueous silica species. The relative intensities of these two bands as a function of isochoric heating place constraints on the energetics of the polymerization reaction, if we assume that the intensity ratio is linearly related to concentration ratio. We have been able to perform experiments along two different isochores (0.9 and 0.75 g/cm3, respectively) from which we are able to derive the enthalpy of reaction.

  18. Optical spectroscopy of f-element compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnall, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the energies and intensities of transitions observed in the optical spectra of lanthanide (Ln) and actinide (An) compounds can typically be measured with a high degree of accuracy. The observed transitions can then be directly represented as upper state energy levels where the structure is induced by the environment. A discussion is presented of the systematic theoretical interpretation of these transitions both in terms of energy level structure and transition probability. Particularly for the trivalent lanthanides and actinides, the detail to which the interpretation can be carried is unique in the periodic table. The electronic structure of organometallic lanthanides and actinides is emphasized in the discussion. It is made clear that this type of ligand does not present any unique interpretive problems. The basic framework of the interpretation is not dependent upon the specific ionic environment. On the other hand, organometallic compounds represent a particularly interesting group in which to study excited state relaxation

  19. Condensed matter optical spectroscopy an illustrated introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ionita, Iulian

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Symmetry and the Symmetry GroupsSymmetry Elements and Symmetry OperationsPoint Groups and Molecular SymmetrySymmetry Classification of MoleculesMatrix Representation of Symmetry TransformationGroup RepresentationsProperties of Irreducible RepresentationsTables of CharactersSymmetry of Crystals and Space GroupsRotation Groups and OperatorsExamples of SymmetryStudy QuestionsReferencesCrystal Field TheoryStates and Energies of Free Atoms and IonsOptical Spectra of Ionic CrystalsImpurities in Crystal Lattice: Splitting of Levels and Terms in Lattice SymmetryWeak Crystalline Field of Octahedral SymmetryEffect of a Weak Crystalline Field of Lower SymmetriesSplitting of Multielectron dn Configurations in the Crystalline FieldJahn-Teller EffectConstruction of Energy-Level DiagramsTanabe-Sugano DiagramsExample of the Co IonLimitations of the Crystal Field TheoryStudy QuestionsReferencesSymmetry and Molecular Orbitals TheoryMolecular OrbitalsHybridization Scheme for σ OrbitalsHybridization Scheme for π Orbi...

  20. In situ spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemistry of uranium in high-temperature alkali chloride molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovov, Ilya B; Volkovich, Vladimir A; Charnock, John M; Kralj, Brett; Lewin, Robert G; Kinoshita, Hajime; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A

    2008-09-01

    Soluble uranium chloride species, in the oxidation states of III+, IV+, V+, and VI+, have been chemically generated in high-temperature alkali chloride melts. These reactions were monitored by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium(VI) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was used to determine the immediate coordination environment about the uranium. The dominant species in the melt was [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). Further analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure data and Raman spectroscopy of the melts quenched back to room temperature indicated the possibility of ordering beyond the first coordination sphere of [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). The electrolytic generation of uranium(III) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was also investigated. Anodic dissolution of uranium metal was found to be more efficient at producing uranium(III) in high-temperature melts than the cathodic reduction of uranium(IV). These high-temperature electrolytic processes were studied by in situ electronic absorption spectroelectrochemistry, and we have also developed in situ X-ray absorption spectroelectrochemistry techniques to probe both the uranium oxidation state and the uranium coordination environment in these melts.

  1. In situ Raman Spectroscopy of Oxide Films on Zirconium Alloy in Simulated PWR Primary Water Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The two layered oxide structure is formed in pre-transition oxide for the zirconium alloy in high temperature water environment. It is known that the corrosion rate is related to the volume fraction of zirconium oxide and the pores in the oxides; therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the oxidation behavior in the pretransition zirconium oxide in high-temperature water chemistry. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was used for in situ investigations for characterizing the phase of zirconium oxide. In situ Raman spectroscopy is a well-suited technique for investigating in detail the characteristics of oxide films in a high-temperature corrosion environment. In previous studies, an in situ Raman system was developed for investigating the oxides on nickel-based alloys and low alloy steels in high-temperature water environment. Also, the early stage oxidation behavior of zirconium alloy with different dissolved hydrogen concentration environments in high temperature water was treated in the authors' previous study. In this study, a specific zirconium alloy was oxidized and investigated with in situ Raman spectroscopy for 100 d oxidation, which is close to the first transition time of the zirconium alloy oxidation. The ex situ investigation methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to further characterize the zirconium oxide structure. As oxidation time increased, the Raman peaks of tetragonal zirconium oxide were merged or became weaker. However, the monoclinic zirconium oxide peaks became distinct. The tetragonal zirconium oxide was just found near the O/M interface and this could explain the Raman spectra difference between the 30 d result and others.

  2. In-situ Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy of Mg Electrodeposition at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yimin A.; Yin, Zuwei; Farmand, Maryam; Yu, Young-Sang; Shapiro, David A.; Liao, Hong-Gang; Liang, Wen-I.; Chu, Ying-Hao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-02-01

    We report the study of Mg cathodic electrochemical deposition on Ti and Au electrode using a multimodal approach by examining the sample area in-situ using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Magnesium Aluminum Chloride Complex was synthesized and utilized as electrolyte, where non-reversible features during in situ charging-discharging cycles were observed. During charging, a uniform Mg film was deposited on the electrode, which is consistent with the intrinsic non-dendritic nature of Mg deposition in Mg ion batteries. The Mg thin film was not dissolvable during the following discharge process. We found that such Mg thin film is hexacoordinated Mg compounds by in-situ STXM and XAS. This study provides insights on the non-reversibility issue and failure mechanism of Mg ion batteries. Also, our method provides a novel generic method to understand the in situ battery chemistry without any further sample processing, which can preserve the original nature of battery materials or electrodeposited materials. This multimodal in situ imaging and spectroscopy provides many opportunities to attack complex problems that span orders of magnitude in length and time scale, which can be applied to a broad range of the energy storage systems.

  3. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-...

  4. Structural and optical characterization of In_2O_3/PANI nanocomposite prepared by in-situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeoo, Shashi; Sharma, Mamta; Goswamy, J.; Singh, Gurinder

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline-indium oxide (In_2O_3/PANI) nanocomposite have been prepared by in-situ polymerization of aniline and as-synthesized In_2O_3 nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of In_2O_3/PANI nanocomposite. TEM analysis shows In_2O_3 nanoparticles are embedded in PANI nanofibers. FTIR spectra show the good interactions between PANI nanofibers and In_2O_3 nanoparticles. The band gap and electronic transitions in In_2O_3/PANI nanocomposite is determined by using UV/Vis spectra.

  5. Examination of human brain tumors in situ with image-localized H-1 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyten, P.R.; Segebarth, C.; Baleriaux, D.; Den Hollander, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Human brain tumors were examined in situ by combined imaging and H-1 MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Water-suppressed localized H-1 MR spectra obtained from the brains of normal volunteers show resonances from lactate, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine, and choline. Several patients suffering from different brain tumors were examined, showing spectral changes in the region of 0.5-1.5 ppm; spectral editing showed that these changes were not due to lactic acid, but to lipid signals. The NAA signal was decreased in the tumors as compared with normal brain. This study shows that H-1 MR spectroscopy can monitor submillimolar changes in chemical composition of human brain tumors in situ

  6. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Chromium Oxide Catalysts: Reactivity Studies with Methanol and Butane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of methanol and butane with supported chromium oxide catalysts under oxidizing and reducing conditions were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of the specific oxide support (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, Nb2O5, 3% SiO2/TiO2, 3% TiO2/SiO2, and a physical mixture of SiO2

  7. Observation of methanol behavior in fuel cells in situ by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Oc Hee; Han, Kee Sung; Shin, Chang Woo; Lee, Juhee; Kim, Seong-Soo; Um, Myung Sup; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Soo-Kil; Ha, Heung Yong

    2012-04-16

    The chemical conversion of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells was followed in situ by NMR spectroscopy. Comparing data of the methanol oxidation on Pt and PtRu anode catalysts allowed the role of Ru in both Faradaic and non-Faradaic reactions to be investigated. The spatial distributions of chemicals could also be determined. (Picture: T1-T4=inlet and outlet tubes.). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. In-situ investigation of the calcination process of mixed oxide xerogels with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitz, J C [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The controlled calcination of materials derived by sol-gel reactions is important for the evolution of the final structure. Raman spectroscopy is an ideal tool for the identification of surface species under in-situ conditions, as demonstrated in the following for the example of a molybdenum oxide-silica xerogel. Raman spectra of this particular sample were recorded at temperatures as high as 1173 K, and compared with those of a reference material.(author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of solid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rkiouak, L; Tang, M J; Camp, J C J; McGregor, J; Watson, I M; Cox, R A; Kalberer, M; Ward, A D; Pope, F D

    2014-06-21

    The heterogeneous interactions of gas molecules on solid particles are crucial in many areas of science, engineering and technology. Such interactions play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and in heterogeneous catalysis, a key technology in the energy and chemical industries. Investigating heterogeneous interactions upon single levitated particles can provide significant insight into these important processes. Various methodologies exist for levitating micron sized particles including: optical, electrical and acoustic techniques. Prior to this study, the optical levitation of solid micron scale particles has proved difficult to achieve over timescales relevant to the above applications. In this work, a new vertically configured counter propagating dual beam optical trap was optimized to levitate a range of solid particles in air. Silica (SiO2), α-alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2) and polystyrene were stably trapped with a high trapping efficiency (Q = 0.42). The longest stable trapping experiment was conducted continuously for 24 hours, and there are no obvious constraints on trapping time beyond this period. Therefore, the methodology described in this paper should be of major benefit to various research communities. The strength of the new technique is demonstrated by the simultaneous levitation and spectroscopic interrogation of silica particles by Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the adsorption of water upon silica was investigated under controlled relative humidity environments. Furthermore, the collision and coagulation behaviour of silica particles with microdroplets of sulphuric acid was followed using both optical imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Setup for in situ deep level transient spectroscopy of semiconductors during swift heavy ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Sugam; Katharria, Y S; Safvan, C P; Kanjilal, D

    2008-05-01

    A computerized system for in situ deep level characterization during irradiation in semiconductors has been set up and tested in the beam line for materials science studies of the 15 MV Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. This is a new facility for in situ irradiation-induced deep level studies, available in the beam line of an accelerator laboratory. It is based on the well-known deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. High versatility for data manipulation is achieved through multifunction data acquisition card and LABVIEW. In situ DLTS studies of deep levels produced by impact of 100 MeV Si ions on Aun-Si(100) Schottky barrier diode are presented to illustrate performance of the automated DLTS facility in the beam line.

  11. Study of the effective inverse photon efficiency using optical emission spectroscopy combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The hydrocarbon impurities formation is inevitable due to wall erosion in a long pulse high performance scenario with carbon-based plasma facing materials in fusion devices. The standard procedure to determine the chemical erosion yield in situ is by means of inverse photon efficiency D/XB. In this work, the conversion factor between CH4 flux and photon flux of CH A → X transition (effective inverse photon efficiency PE-1) was measured directly using a cascaded arc plasma simulator with argon/methane. This study shows that the measured PE-1 is different from the calculated D/XB. We compared the photon flux measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calculated by electron impact excitation of CH(X) which was diagnosed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). It seems that charge exchange and dissociative recombination processes are the main channels of CH(A) production and removal which lead to the inconsistency of PE -1 and D/XB at lower temperature. Meanwhile, the fraction of excited CH(A) produced by dissociative recombination processes was investigated, and we found it increased with Te in the range from 4% to 13% at Te definition instead of D/XB since the electron impact excitation is not the only channel of CH(A) production. These results have an effect on evaluating the yield of chemical erosion in divertor of fusion device.

  12. Insights into reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis revealed by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Teresa

    2010-12-01

    This tutorial review intends to show the possibilities of in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and the nature of the active sites in heterogeneous catalysis. After a brief overview of the more usual experimental devices used for in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy measurements, some examples of applications taken from the recent literature will be presented. It will be shown that in situ NMR spectroscopy allows: (i) the identification of stable intermediates and transient species using indirect methods, (ii) to prove shape selectivity in zeolites, (iii) the study of reaction kinetics, and (iv) the determination of the nature and the role played by the active sites in a catalytic reaction. The approaches and methodology used to get this information will be illustrated here summarizing the most relevant contributions on the investigation of the mechanisms of a series of reactions of industrial interest: aromatization of alkanes on bifunctional catalysts, carbonylation reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide, ethylbenzene disproportionation, and the Beckmann rearrangement reaction. Special attention is paid to the research carried out on the role played by carbenium ions and alkoxy as intermediate species in the transformation of hydrocarbon molecules on solid acid catalysts.

  13. Direct dry transfer of CVD graphene to an optical substrate by in situ photo-polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Felipe; Muñoz, Pablo A. R.; Phelan, Ciaran; Romani, Eric C.; Larrudé, Dunieskys R. G.; Freire, Fernando L.; Thoroh de Souza, Eunézio A.; de Matos, Christiano J. S.; Fechine, Guilhermino J. M.

    2018-05-01

    Here, we report on a method that allows graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to be directly transferred to an optically transparent photo resin, by in situ photo-polymerization of the latter, with high efficiency and low contamination. Two photocurable resins, A and B, with different viscosities but essentially the same chemical structure, were used. Raman spectroscopy and surface energy results show that large continuous areas of graphene were transferred with minimal defects to the lower viscosity resin (B), due to the better contact between the resin and graphene. As a proof-of-principle optical experiment, graphene on the polymeric substrate was subjected to high-intensity femtosecond infrared pulses and third-harmonic generation was observed with no noticeable degradation of the sample. A sheet third-order susceptibility χ (3) = 0.71 ×10-28m3V-2 was obtained, matching that of graphene on a glass substrate. These results indicate the suitability of the proposed transfer method, and of the photo resin, for the production of nonlinear photonic components and devices.

  14. Optical Absorption Spectroscopy for Gas Analysis in Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge

    important gas species of the low-temperature circulating fluidized bed gasifier. At first, a special gas cell,the hot gas flow cell (HGC), was build up and veried. In this custom-made gas cell, the optical properties, the so-called absorption cross-sections, of the most important sulfur and aromatic...... compounds were determined in laboratory experiments. By means of the laboratory results and spectroscopic databases,the concentrations of the major gas species and the aromatic compounds phenol and naphthalene were determined in extraction and in-situ measurements....

  15. Optical spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas for standoff isotopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Brumfield, B. E.; LaHaye, N. L.; Hartig, K. C.; Phillips, M. C.

    2018-06-01

    lineshapes, as opposed to emission spectroscopy which requires higher plasma temperatures to be able to detect thermally excited emission. Improvements in laser and detection systems and spectroscopic techniques have allowed for isotopic measurements to be carried out at standoff distances under ambient atmospheric conditions, which have expanded the applicability of optical spectroscopy-based isotopic measurements to a variety of scientific fields. These technological advances offer an in-situ measurement capability that was previously not available. This review will focus on isotope detection through emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy of atoms and molecules in a laser-produced plasma formed from a solid sample. A description of the physics behind isotope shifts in atoms and molecules is presented, followed by the physics behind solid sampling of laser ablation plumes, optical methods for isotope measurements, the suitable physical conditions of laser-produced plasma plumes for isotopic analysis, and the current status. Finally, concluding remarks will be made on the existing knowledge/technological gaps identified from the current literature and suggestions for the future work.

  16. Optical spectroscopy using gas-phase femtosecond laser filamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhner, Johanan; Levis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser filamentation occurs as a dynamic balance between the self-focusing and plasma defocusing of a laser pulse to produce ultrashort radiation as brief as a few optical cycles. This unique source has many properties that make it attractive as a nonlinear optical tool for spectroscopy, such as propagation at high intensities over extended distances, self-shortening, white-light generation, and the formation of an underdense plasma. The plasma channel that constitutes a single filament and whose position in space can be controlled by its input parameters can span meters-long distances, whereas multifilamentation of a laser beam can be sustained up to hundreds of meters in the atmosphere. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding and use of laser filaments for spectroscopic investigations of molecules. A theoretical framework of filamentation is presented, along with recent experimental evidence supporting the established understanding of filamentation. Investigations carried out on vibrational and rotational spectroscopy, filament-induced breakdown, fluorescence spectroscopy, and backward lasing are discussed.

  17. Process control with optical emission spectroscopy in triode ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenoja, K.; Korhonen, A.S.; Sulonen, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques used to prepare, e.g., hard TiN, HfN, or ZrN coatings include a great variety of processes ranging from reactive evaporation to sputtering and ion plating. In ion plating one effective way to enhance ionization is to use a negatively biased hot filament. The use of an electron emitting filament brings an extra variable to be taken into account in developing the process control. In addition, proper control of the evaporation source is critical in ensuring reproducible results. With optical emission spectroscopy (OES) it should be possible to control the coating process more accurately. The stoichiometry and the composition of the growing coating may then be ensured effectively in subsequent runs. In this work the application of optical emission spectroscopy for process control in triode ion plating is discussed. The composition of the growing coating is determined experimentally using the relative intensities of specific emission lines. Changes in the evaporation rate and the gas flow can be seen directly from emission line intensities. Even the so-called poisoning of the evaporation source with reactive gas can be detected. Several experimental runs were carried out and afterwards the concentration profiles of the deposited coatings were checked with the nuclear resonance broadening (NRB) method. The results show the usefulness of emission spectroscopy in discharge control

  18. In situ 119Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy used to study lithium insertion in c-Mg2Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldon, L.; Ionica, C. M.; Lippens, P. E.; Larcher, D.; Tarascon, J.-M.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reactions of Li with c-Mg 2 Sn have been investigated by in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy of 119 Sn and X-ray diffraction. The lithiation transforms initially c-Mg 2 Sn part into Li x Mg 2 Sn alloy (x 2 MgSn ternary alloy. In situ Moessbauer spectroscopy provides valuable information on local environment of tin and swelling behavior and cracking of the particles during discharge and charge processes.

  19. Next generation in-situ optical Raman sensor for seawater investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomijeca, A.; Kwon, Y.-H.; Ahmad, H.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.

    2012-04-01

    We introduce the next generation of optical sensors based on a combination of surfaced enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) suited for investigations of tiny concentrations of pollutions in the seawater. First field measurements were carried out in the Arctic area which is of global interest since it is more affected by global warming caused climatic changes than any other areas of our planet and it is a recipient for many toxic organic pollutants. A significant long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants to Svalbard is mainly originated from industrialized countries in Europe and North America during the last decades. Therefore, the main interest is to investigate the Arctic water column and also the sediments. Standard chemical methods for water/sediment analysis are extremely accurate but complex and time-consuming. The primary objective of our study was to develop a fast response in-situ optical sensor for easy to use and quick analysis. The system comprises several components: a handheld measurement head containing a 671 nm microsystem diode laser and the Raman optical bench, a laser driver electronics board, a custom-designed miniature spectrometer with an optical resolution of 8 cm-1 and a netbook to control the spectrometer as well as for data evaluation. We introduced for the first time the portable Raman sensor system on an Artic sea-trial during a three week cruise on board of the James Clark Ross research vessel in August 2011. Numerous Raman and SERS measurements followed by SERDS evaluations were taken around locations 78° N and 9° E. Different SERS substrates developed for SERS measurements in sea-water were tested for their capability to detect different substances (PAHs) in the water down to very small (nmol/l) concentrations. Stability tests of the substrates were carried out also for the applicability of our system e.g. on a mooring. Details of the in-situ Raman sensor were presented

  20. In situ spectroscopy of ligand exchange reactions at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, Rebecca; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles with their tunable optical and electronic properties are of great interest for a wide range of applications. Often the ligands at the surface of the nanoparticles have to be exchanged in a second step after particle formation in order to obtain a desired surface functionalization. For many techniques, this process is not accessible in situ . In this review, we present second-harmonic scattering (SHS) as an inherently surface sensitive and label-free optical technique to probe the ligand exchange at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles in situ and in real time. First, a brief introduction to SHS and basic features of the SHS of nanoparticles are given. After that, we demonstrate how the SHS intensity decrease can be correlated to the thiol coverage which allows for the determination of the Gibbs free energy of adsorption and the surface coverage. (topical review)

  1. Local optical spectroscopy of opaline photonic crystal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhia, T.; Baranchikov, A. E.; Gorelik, V. S.; Klimonsky, S. O.

    2017-09-01

    The homogeneity of opaline films obtained by vertical deposition of colloidal SiO2 microparticles has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local optical spectroscopy. It was found that the particle size distribution is narrowed during the deposition, the microstructure of the films improves, and the reflection peak in the first photonic stop band increases and narrows. These changes may be due to the fact that large microparticles, whose mass significantly exceeds the average mass, leave the solution in the course of time, falling on the bottom of the vessel under gravity. It is established that the microstructure of opaline films is improved with a decrease in thickness.

  2. Optical Second Harmonic Spectroscopy of Boron-Reconstructed Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, D.; Downer, M. C.; Ekerdt, J. G.; Arzate, N.; Mendoza, Bernardo S.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Wu, R. Q.

    2000-01-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy is used to probe Si(001) following thermal decomposition of diborane at the surface. Incorporation of boron (B) at second layer substitutional sites at H-free Si(001) intensifies and redshifts the E 1 SHG spectral peak, while subsequent H termination further intensifies and blueshifts E 1 , in sharp contrast to the effect of bulk B doping or nonsubstitutional B. Ab initio pseudopotential and semiempirical tight binding calculations independently reproduce these unique trends, and attribute them to the surface electric field associated with charge transfer to electrically active B acceptors, and rehybridization of atomic bonds. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  3. Study of optical emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy is an excellent tool for quantitative multielement trace analysis. This paper describes the performance of a computer-controlled sequential measurement system. Chemical and ionization interferences are shown to be negligible due to the characteristics of the inductively coupled plasma, spectral interferences are eliminated by using a high-resolution monochromator and computer data handling. Good accuracy is achieved for most of the interesting elements, as is shown from both an interlaboratory test and from comparison of the results of water samples from the rivers Elbe and Weser with those achieved with neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis. (orig.) [de

  4. Online quantitative monitoring of live cell engineered cartilage growth using diffuse fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads S; Albro, Michael B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has the potential to improve the outcome for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The successful clinical translation of this technique as part of a therapy requires the ability to measure extracellular matrix (ECM) production of engineered tissues in vitro, in order to ensure quality control and improve the likelihood of tissue survival upon implantation. Conventional techniques for assessing the ECM content of engineered cartilage, such as biochemical assays and histological staining are inherently destructive. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, represents a non-invasive technique for in situ biochemical characterization. Here, we outline current roadblocks in translational Raman spectroscopy in TE and introduce a comprehensive workflow designed to non-destructively monitor and quantify ECM biomolecules in large (>3 mm), live cell TE constructs online. Diffuse near-infrared fiber-optic Raman spectra were measured from live cell cartilaginous TE constructs over a 56-day culturing period. We developed a multivariate curve resolution model that enabled quantitative biochemical analysis of the TE constructs. Raman spectroscopy was able to non-invasively quantify the ECM components and showed an excellent correlation with biochemical assays for measurement of collagen (R 2  = 0.84) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) (R 2  = 0.86). We further demonstrated the robustness of this technique for online prospective analysis of live cell TE constructs. The fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy strategy developed in this work offers the ability to non-destructively monitor construct growth online and can be adapted to a broad range of TE applications in regenerative medicine toward controlled clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of TiAlN thin film annealed under O2 by in situ time of flight direct recoil spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions and ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempez, A.; Bensaoula, A.; Schultz, A.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation of an amorphous TiAlN coating has been studied by in situ direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS) and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI) and ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DRS and MSRI monitored the changes in surface composition as the sample was heated to 460 deg. C under an 18 O 2 pressure of 10 -6 Torr. Angular resolved XPS data were acquired for thickness-dependence information. The initial surface was partially oxidized from air exposure. Both DRS and XPS showed the Al-rich near surface and the presence of N in the subsurface. As shown by DRS and MSRI, oxidation at elevated temperatures yielded surface nitrogen loss and Ti enrichment. XPS confirmed the preferential formation of TiO 2 on the surface. This study also provides a comparison between the direct recoil (neutrals and ions) and the ionic recoil signals. In our conditions, the negative ionic fraction of all elements except H tracks their true surface content variations given by DRS. The results were compared with early work performed on identical samples. In this case the TiAlN film was oxidized with an O 2 pressure in the mTorr range and the surface changes are followed in situ by positive MSRI and XPS. This experiment also indicates that Al and N are buried under TiO 2 but from 600 deg. C

  6. Development of graphene process control by industrial optical spectroscopy setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursenko, O.; Lukosius, M.; Lupina, G.; Bauer, J.; Villringer, C.; Mai, A.

    2017-06-01

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices depends strongly on the availability of fast and nondestructive characterization methods of graphene grown by CVD on large diameter production wafers [1-3] which are in the interest of the semiconductor industry. Here, a high-throughput optical metrology method for measuring the thickness and uniformity of large-area graphene sheets is demonstrated. The method is based on the combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry and normal incidence reflectometry in UV-Vis wavelength range (200-800 nm) with small light spots ( 30 μm2) realized in wafer optical metrology tool. In the first step graphene layers were transferred on a SiO2/Si substrate in order to determine the optical constants of graphene by the combination of multi-angle ellipsometry and reflectometry. Then these data were used for the development of a process control recipe of CVD graphene on 200 mm Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. The graphene layer quality was additionally monitored by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy measurements were performed for micro topography evaluation. In consequence, a robust recipe for unambiguous thickness monitoring of all components of a multilayer film stack, including graphene, surface residuals or interface layer underneath graphene and surface roughness is developed. Optical monitoring of graphene thickness uniformity over a wafer has shown an excellent long term stability (s=0.004 nm) regardless of the growth of interfacial GeO2 and surface roughness. The sensitivity of the optical identification of graphene during microelectronic processing was evaluated. This optical metrology technique with combined data collection exhibit a fast and highly precise method allowing one an unambiguous detection of graphene after transferring as well as after the CVD deposition process on a Ge(100)/Si(100) wafer. This approach is well suited for industrial applications due to its repeatability and flexibility.

  7. Combining optical trapping in a microfluidic channel with simultaneous micro-Raman spectroscopy and motion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Penelope F.; Saunter, Christopher D.; Girkin, John M.

    2014-03-01

    Since their invention by Ashkin optical tweezers have demonstrated their ability and versatility as a non-invasive tool for micromanipulation. One of the most useful additions to the basic optical tweezers system is micro-Raman spectroscopy, which permits highly sensitive analysis of single cells or particles. We report on the development of a dual laser system combining two spatial light modulators to holographically manipulate multiple traps (at 1064nm) whilst undertaking Raman spectroscopy using a 532nm laser. We can thus simultaneously trap multiple particles and record their Raman spectra, without perturbing the trapping system. The dual beam system is built around micro-fluidic channels where crystallisation of calcium carbonate occurs on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads. The setup is designed to simulate at a microscopic level the reactions that occur on items in a dishwasher, where permanent filming of calcium carbonate on drinking glasses is a problem. Our system allows us to monitor crystal growth on trapped particles in which the Raman spectrum and changes in movement of the bead are recorded. Due to the expected low level of crystallisation on the bead surfaces this allows us to obtain results quickly and with high sensitivity. The long term goal is to study the development of filming on samples in-situ with the microfl.uidic system acting as a model dishwasher.

  8. Ion scattering spectroscopy studies of zirconium dioxide thin films prepared in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.J.; Netterfield, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Low energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy has been used to investigate, in situ, thin films of zirconium dioxide deposited by evaporation and ion-assisted deposition. It is shown that when a film is deposited to an average thickness of 0.3 nm +- 0.03, as measured by in situ ellipsometry, complete coverage of the substrate occurs. 'Ion-assisted films have detectably higher Zr surface concentrations and reduced low-energy sputter peaks. Inelastic tailing effects in the Zr scattering peak for 2 keV 4 He + are found to come from particles scattered from approximately the first 7 nm of the oxide surface. The influence of primary ion energy on the Zr/O ratio is also examined. (author)

  9. Scanning, non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Johannes D; Mireles, Miguel; Morales-Dalmau, Jordi; Farzam, Parisa; Martínez-Lozano, Mar; Casanovas, Oriol; Durduran, Turgut

    2016-02-01

    A scanning system for small animal imaging using non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (ncDOS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (ncDCS) is presented. The ncDOS uses a two-dimensional spectrophotometer retrieving broadband (610-900 nm) spectral information from up to fifty-seven source-detector distances between 2 and 5 mm. The ncDCS data is simultaneously acquired from four source-detector pairs. The sample is scanned in two dimensions while tracking variations in height. The system has been validated with liquid phantoms, demonstrated in vivo on a human fingertip during an arm cuff occlusion and on a group of mice with xenoimplanted renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  11. In-situ Raman spectroscopy as a characterization tool for carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitz, J -C; Joho, F B; Novak, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Lithium intercalation and de-intercalation into/from graphite electrodes in a nonaqueous electrolyte has been studied using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Our experiments give information on the electrode-electrolyte interface with improved spatial resolution. The spectra taken from the electrode surface change with electrode potential. In this way, information on the nature of the chemical species present during charging and discharging half cycles is gained. For the first time, mapping techniques were applied to investigate if lithium intercalation proceeds homogeneously on the carbon electrode. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs.

  12. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  13. Raman spectroscopy for in-situ characterisation of steam generator deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochefort, P.A.; Guzonas, D.A.; Turner, C.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the effort to develop in-situ characterisation of steam generator deposits using remote raman spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition and semi-quantitative measurement of their concentrations. Information on the composition of the deposits is necessary in order to establish the optimal cleaning conditions and procedures. Furthermore, the composition of the deposits also provides information on the conditions that exist within the steam generator and the feedtrain. The raman spectra of the three most common iron oxide phases found in the CANDU deposits (hematite, magnetite and nickel ferrite) are shown

  14. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs

  15. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  16. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  17. Resonant Optical Gradient Force Interaction for Nano-Imaging and-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 053042 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053042 PAPER Resonant optical gradient force interaction for nano-imaging and -spectroscopy...HonghuaUYang andMarkus BRaschke Department of Physics , Department of Chemistry, and JILA,University of Colorado, Boulder, CO80309,USA E-mail...honghua.yang@colorado.edu andmarkus.raschke@colorado.edu Keywords:nano spectroscopy, optical force, near-field optics Abstract The optical gradient force

  18. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    We present noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS), a recently developed technique for sensitive, broadband, and high resolution spectroscopy. In NICE-OFCS an optical frequency comb (OFC) is locked to a high finesse cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency precisely equal to (a multiple of) the cavity free spectral range. Since each comb line and sideband is transmitted through a separate cavity mode in exactly the same way, any residual frequency noise on the OFC relative to the cavity affects each component in an identical manner. The transmitted intensity contains a beat signal at the modulation frequency that is immune to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity, in a way similar to continuous wave noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The light transmitted through the cavity is detected with a fast-scanning Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) and the NICE-OFCS signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform of the synchronously demodulated interferogram. Our NICE-OFCS system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity with a finesse of ˜9000 and a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We measured NICE-OFCS signals from the 3νb{1}+νb{3} overtone band of CO_2 around 1.57 μm and achieved absorption sensitivity 6.4×10-11cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element, corresponding to a minimum detectable CO_2 concentration of 25 ppb after 330 s integration time. We will describe the principles of the technique and its technical implementation, and discuss the spectral lineshapes of the NICE-OFCS signals. A. Khodabakhsh, C. Abd Alrahman, and A. Foltynowicz, Opt. Lett. 39, 5034-5037 (2014). J. Ye, L. S. Ma, and J. L. Hall, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 6-15 (1998). A. Khodabakhsh, A. C. Johansson, and A. Foltynowicz, Appl. Phys. B (2015) doi:10.1007/s00340-015-6010-7.

  19. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroner, Anna B., E-mail: anna.kroner@diamond.ac.uk; Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110DE (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Khaled M. H. [UK Catalysis Hub, Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110FA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  20. In Situ Spectroscopy and Mechanistic Insights into CO Oxidation on Transition-Metal-Substituted Ceria Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Joseph S.; Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Hong, Wesley T.; Risch, Marcel; Giordano, Livia [Dipartimento; Mansour, Azzam N. [Naval; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2017-09-12

    Herein we investigate the reaction intermediates formed during CO oxidation on copper-substituted ceria nanoparticles (Cu0.1Ce0.9O2–x) by means of in situ spectroscopic techniques and identify an activity descriptor that rationalizes a trend with other metal substitutes (M0.1Ce0.9O2–x, M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) performed under catalytic conditions demonstrates that O2– transfer occurs at dispersed copper centers, which are redox active during catalysis. In situ XAS reveals a dramatic reduction at the copper centers that is fully reversible under catalytic conditions, which rationalizes the high catalytic activity of Cu0.1Ce0.9O2–x. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) show that CO can be oxidized to CO32– in the absence of O2. We find that CO32– desorbs as CO2 only under oxygen-rich conditions when the oxygen vacancy is filled by the dissociative adsorption of O2. These data, along with kinetic analyses, lend support to a mechanism in which the breaking of copper–oxygen bonds is rate-determining under oxygen-rich conditions, while refilling the resulting oxygen vacancy is rate-determining under oxygen-lean conditions. On the basis of these observations and density functional calculations, we introduce the computed oxygen vacancy formation energy (Evac) as an activity descriptor for substituted ceria materials and demonstrate that Evac successfully rationalizes the trend in the activities of M0.1Ce0.9O2–x catalysts that spans three orders of magnitude. The applicability of Evac as a useful design descriptor is demonstrated by the catalytic performance of the ternary oxide Cu0.1La0.1Ce0.8O2–x, which has an apparent activation energy rivaling those of state-of-the-art Au/TiO2 materials. Thus, we suggest that cost-effective catalysts for CO oxidation can be rationally designed by judicious choice of substituting

  1. Electronic structure of antiferromagnetic UN and UPtGe single crystals from optical and magneto-optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marutzky, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the study of the magneto-optical Kerr effect and the determination of the optical constants by means of ellipsometry and Fourier-transformation infrared spectroscopy of UN and UPtGe is described. In UPtGe an optical anisotropy was detected over a spectral range from 6 meV to 32 eV. (HSI)

  2. In situ semi-quantitative analysis of polluted soils by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaël, Amina; Bousquet, Bruno; Michel-Le Pierrès, Karine; Travaillé, Grégoire; Canioni, Lionel; Roy, Stéphane

    2011-05-01

    Time-saving, low-cost analyses of soil contamination are required to ensure fast and efficient pollution removal and remedial operations. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been successfully applied to in situ analyses of polluted soils, providing direct semi-quantitative information about the extent of pollution. A field campaign has been carried out in Brittany (France) on a site presenting high levels of heavy metal concentrations. Results on iron as a major component as well as on lead and copper as minor components are reported. Soil samples were dried and prepared as pressed pellets to minimize the effects of moisture and density on the results. LIBS analyses were performed with a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, 60 mJ per 10 ns pulse, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with a diameter of 500 μm on the sample surface. Good correlations were obtained between the LIBS signals and the values of concentrations deduced from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This result proves that LIBS is an efficient method for optimizing sampling operations. Indeed, "LIBS maps" were established directly on-site, providing valuable assistance in optimizing the selection of the most relevant samples for future expensive and time-consuming laboratory analysis and avoiding useless analyses of very similar samples. Finally, it is emphasized that in situ LIBS is not described here as an alternative quantitative analytical method to the usual laboratory measurements but simply as an efficient time-saving tool to optimize sampling operations and to drastically reduce the number of soil samples to be analyzed, thus reducing costs. The detection limits of 200 ppm for lead and 80 ppm for copper reported here are compatible with the thresholds of toxicity; thus, this in situ LIBS campaign was fully validated for these two elements. Consequently, further experiments are planned to extend this study to other chemical elements and other

  3. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  4. Application of optical emission spectroscopy to high current proton sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, G; Mazzaglia, M; Nicolosi, D; Mascali, D; Reitano, R; Celona, L; Leonardi, O; Leone, F; Naselli, E; Neri, L; Torrisi, G; Gammino, S; Zaniol, B

    2017-01-01

    Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) represents a very reliable technique to carry out non-invasive measurements of plasma density and plasma temperature in the range of tens of eV. With respect to other diagnostics, it also can characterize the different populations of neutrals and ionized particles constituting the plasma. At INFN-LNS, OES techniques have been developed and applied to characterize the plasma generated by the Flexible Plasma Trap, an ion source used as 'testbench' of the proton source built for European Spallation Source. This work presents the characterization of the parameters of a hydrogen plasma in different conditions of neutral pressure, microwave power and magnetic field profile, along with perspectives for further upgrades of the OES diagnostics system. (paper)

  5. The application of UV LEDs for differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2018-04-01

    Modern UV LEDs represent a potentially very advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular xenon arc lamps, which are the most common light sources in trace gas-analyzers. So, the light-emitting diodes are very attractive for use of as light sources for Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes have now allowed us to construct a portable, long path DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. First of all, we are talking about the measurement of sulphur dioxide, carbon disulphide and, oxides of chlorine and bromine. The parallel measurements of sulfur dioxide using a certified gas analyzer, were conducted and showed good correlation.

  6. Spectral staining of tumor tissue by fiber optic FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Reiner; Steiner, Gerald; Kano, Angelique; Richter, Tom; Bergmann, Ralf; Rodig, Heike; Johannsen, Bernd; Kobelke, Jens

    2003-07-01

    Infrared (IR) optical fiber have aroused great interest in recent years because of their potential in in-vivo spectroscopy. This potential includes the ability to be flexible, small and to guide IR light in a very large range of wavelengths. Two types - silver halide and chalcogenide - infrared transmitting fibers are investigated in the detection of a malignant tumor. As a test sample for all types of fibers we used a thin section of an entire rat brain with glioblastoma. The fibers were connected with a common infrared microscope. Maps across the whole tissue section with more than 200 spectra were recorded by moving the sample with an XY stage. Data evaluation was performed using fuzzy c-means cluster analysis (FCM). The silver halide fibers provided excellent results. The tumor was clearly discernible from healthy tissue. Chalcogenide fibers are not suitable to distinguish tumor from normal tissue because the fiber has a very low transmittance in the important fingerprint region.

  7. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  8. Proceedings of the Third Symposium Optical Spectroscopy SOS-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassler, D.; Feller, K.H.; Wilhelmi, B.

    1985-01-01

    The main topics of the symposium were: 1) new developments and applications of laser spectroscopy including time resolved UV/VIS spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and laser Raman spectroscopy, 2) dynamics and photokinetics of molecular systems, and 3) spectroscopy and photoprocesses in organized biological systems

  9. In-situ Raman spectroscopy. A method to study and control the growth of microcrystalline silicon for thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthmann, Stefan

    2012-08-22

    This work deals with the design and application of a novel experiment, which enables in-situ Raman measurements during the parallel plate plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of {mu}cSi:H. Measurements of the crystalline volume fraction (I{sub C}{sup RS}) and the temperature of a growing film are carried out using the novel setup. To enable in-situ Raman measurement of central regions of the coated substrate in a PECVD system, optical access under normal incidence is necessary. An experimental setup in which an optical feed-through was integrated into a PECVD electrode was developed. This setup introduces a disturbance to the electrical field which sustains the plasma. By designing metallic shields the impact of the feed through was reduced considerably at low optical losses. The homogeneity of films deposited with the novel setup in different growth regimes was studied. A correlation between the magnitude of the inhomogeneity caused by the feed-through and the characteristics of the deposition regimes is found. Raman spectroscopy demands the illumination of a sample with a laser and the collection of the scattered radiation. Due to absorption of the laser light the temperature of the illuminated film is increased. Since the temperature determines the properties of a growing film the laser-induced temperature increase was studied. By pulsing the laser radiation of minimal temperature increase at maximal signal intensity was obtained. The crystalline volume fraction of a growing {mu}cSi:H layer was determined in-situ with the novel setup. A minimal temporal resolution of less than 17.5 s at sufficient signal-to-noise-ratio was achieved, which corresponds to less than 9 nm of deposited material during one measurement interval at the industrial standard growth rate of 0.5 nm/s. The obtained results were compared to depth resolved measurements which were carried out after the deposition. An excellent agreement between both methods validates the reliability

  10. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon laser plasma ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon laser plasma generated by an Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 7 ns, fluence 4-52 J cm-2) is studied by optical emission spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight. Up to C4+ ions are detected with the ion flux strongly dependent on the laser fluence. The increase in ion charge with the laser fluence is accompanied by observation of multicharged ion lines in the optical spectra. The time-integrated electron temperature Te is calculated from the Boltzmann plot using the C II lines at 392.0, 426.7, and 588.9 nm. Te is found to increase from ∼0.83 eV for a laser fluence of 22 J cm-2 to ∼0.90 eV for 40 J cm-2. The electron density ne is obtained from the Stark broadened profiles of the C II line at 392 nm and is found to increase from ∼ 2 . 1 × 1017cm-3 for 4 J cm-2 to ∼ 3 . 5 × 1017cm-3 for 40 J cm-2. Applying an external electric field parallel to the expanding plume shows no effect on the line emission intensities. Deconvolution of ion time-of-flight signal with a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for each charge state results in an ion temperature Ti ∼4.7 and ∼6.0 eV for 20 and 36 J cm-2, respectively.

  12. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiter, U; Lind, K; Barklem, P S; Asplund, M; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2–10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 10 5 stars. (paper)

  13. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 105 stars.

  14. Semiclassical Path Integral Calculation of Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provazza, Justin; Segatta, Francesco; Garavelli, Marco; Coker, David F

    2018-02-13

    Computation of nonlinear optical response functions allows for an in-depth connection between theory and experiment. Experimentally recorded spectra provide a high density of information, but to objectively disentangle overlapping signals and to reach a detailed and reliable understanding of the system dynamics, measurements must be integrated with theoretical approaches. Here, we present a new, highly accurate and efficient trajectory-based semiclassical path integral method for computing higher order nonlinear optical response functions for non-Markovian open quantum systems. The approach is, in principle, applicable to general Hamiltonians and does not require any restrictions on the form of the intrasystem or system-bath couplings. This method is systematically improvable and is shown to be valid in parameter regimes where perturbation theory-based methods qualitatively breakdown. As a test of the methodology presented here, we study a system-bath model for a coupled dimer for which we compare against numerically exact results and standard approximate perturbation theory-based calculations. Additionally, we study a monomer with discrete vibronic states that serves as the starting point for future investigation of vibronic signatures in nonlinear electronic spectroscopy.

  15. IDENTIFICATIONS OF FIVE INTEGRAL SOURCES VIA OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Suzanne C.; Tomsick, John A.; Chaty, Sylvain; Heras, Juan A. Zurita; Rodriguez, Jerome; Walter, Roland; Kaaret, Philip; Kalemci, Emrah; Oezbey, Mehtap

    2009-01-01

    The International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) is discovering hundreds of new hard X-ray sources, many of which remain unidentified. We report on optical spectroscopy of five such sources for which X-ray observations at lower energies (∼0.5-10 keV) and higher angular resolutions than INTEGRAL have allowed for unique optical counterparts to be located. We find that INTEGRAL Gamma-Ray (IGR) J16426+6536 and IGR J22292+6647 are Type 1 Seyfert active galactic nuclei (with IGR J16426+6536 further classified as a Seyfert 1.5) which have redshifts of z = 0.323 and z = 0.113, respectively. IGR J18308-1232 is identified as a cataclysmic variable (CV), and we confirm a previous identification of IGR J19267+1325 as a magnetic CV. IGR J18214-1318 is identified as an obscured high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB), which are systems thought to have a compact object embedded in the stellar wind of a massive star. We combine Chandra fluxes with distances based on the optical observations to calculate X-ray luminosities of the HMXB and CVs, finding L 0.3-10keV = 5 x 10 36 erg s -1 for IGR J18214-1318, L 0.3-10keV = 1.3 x 10 32 erg s -1 for IGR J18308-1232, and L 0.3-10keV = 6.7 x 10 32 erg s -1 for IGR J19267+1325.

  16. Coherent Femtosecond Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Optical Imaging on the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Vasily

    Optical properties of many materials and macroscopic systems are defined by ultrafast dynamics of electronic, vibrational, and spin excitations localized on the nanoscale. Harnessing these excitations for material engineering, optical computing, and control of chemical reactions has been a long-standing goal in science and technology. However, it is challenging due to the lack of spectroscopic techniques that can resolve processes simultaneously on the nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal scales. This thesis describes the fundamental principles, implementation, and experimental demonstration of a novel type of ultrafast microscopy based on the concept of adiabatic plasmonic nanofocusing. Simultaneous spatio-temporal resolution on a nanometer-femtosecond scale is achieved by using a near-field nonlinear optical response induced by ultrafast surface plasmon polaritons nanofocused on a metal tip. First, we study the surface plasmon response in metallic structures and evaluate its prospects and limitations for ultrafast near-field microscopy. Through plasmon emission-based spectroscopy, we investigate dephasing times and interplay between radiative and non-radiative decay rates of localized plasmons and their modification due to coupling. We identify a new regime of quantum plasmonic coupling, which limits the achievable spatial resolution to several angstroms but at the same time provides a potential channel for generating ultrafast electron currents at optical frequencies. Next, we study propagation of femtosecond wavepackets of surface plasmon polaritons on a metal tip. In time-domain interferometric measurements we detect group delays that correspond to slowing of the plasmon polaritons down to 20% of the speed of light at the tip apex. This provides direct experimental verification of the plasmonic nanofocusing mechanism and suggests enhanced nonlinear optical interactions at the tip apex. We then measure a plasmon-generated third-order nonlinear optical

  17. Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundiff, Steven T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-05-03

    This final report describes the activities undertaken under grant "Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots". The goal of this program was to implement optical 2-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy and apply it to electronic excitations, including excitons, in semiconductors. Specifically of interest are quantum wells that exhibit disorder due to well width fluctuations and quantum dots. In both cases, 2-D spectroscopy will provide information regarding coupling among excitonic localization sites.

  18. Optical Spectroscopy and Multiphoton Imaging for the Diagnosis and Characterization of Hyperplasias in the Mouse Mammary Gland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skala, Melissa C

    2007-01-01

    .... Optical spectroscopy, in vivo and in vitro microscopy studies indicate that optical methods show great promise for the early diagnosis of cancer, and may potentially provide biologically relevant...

  19. In situ beamline analysis and correction of active optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon; Sawhney, Kawal

    2012-11-01

    At the Diamond Light Source, pencil-beam measurements have enabled long-wavelength slope errors on X-ray mirror surfaces to be examined under ultra-high vacuum and beamline mounting without the need to remove the mirror from the beamline. For an active mirror an automated procedure has been implemented to calculate the actuator settings that optimize its figure. More recently, this in situ pencil-beam method has been applied to additional uses for which ex situ measurements would be inconvenient or simply impossible. First, it has been used to check the stability of the slope errors of several bimorph mirrors at intervals of several weeks or months. Then, it also proved useful for the adjustment of bender and sag compensation actuators on mechanically bent mirrors. Fits to the bending of ideal beams have been performed on the slope errors of a mechanically bent mirror in order to distinguish curvatures introduced by the bending actuators from gravitational distortion. Application of the optimization procedure to another mechanically bent mirror led to an improvement of its sag compensation mechanism.

  20. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  1. Validation of interventional fiber optic spectroscopy with MR Spectroscopy, MAS-NMR spectroscopy, high-performance thin-layer chromatography, and histopathology for accurate hepatic fat quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabé, R.; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Molengraaf, R. van de; Lamerichs, R.; Pikkemaat, J.; Sio, C.F.; Hendriks, B.H.W.; Sterenborg, H.J.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To validate near-infrared (NIR)-based optical spectroscopy measurements of hepatic fat content using a minimally invasive needle-like probe with integrated optical fibers, enabling real-time feedback during percutaneous interventions. The results were compared with magnetic resonance

  2. Single-step in-situ synthesis and optical properties of ZnSe nanostructured dielectric nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chirantan; Rahaman Molla, Atiar; Tarafder, Anal; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, 700032 Kolkata (India); Kr Mishra, Manish; De, Goutam [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Nano-Structured Materials Division, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, 700032 Kolkata (India); Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, G. P. [Glass and Advanced Ceramics Division, Bhaba Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, 400085 Mumbai (India)

    2014-04-07

    This work provides the evidence of visible red photoluminescent light emission from ZnSe nanocrystals (NCs) grown within a dielectric (borosilicate glass) matrix synthesized by a single step in-situ technique for the first time and the NC sizes were controlled by varying only the concentration of ZnSe in glass matrix. The ZnSe NCs were investigated by UV-Vis optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sizes of the ZnSe NCs estimated from the TEM images are found to alter in the range of 2–53 nm. Their smaller sizes of the NCs were also calculated by using the optical absorption spectra and the effective mass approximation model. The band gap enlargements both for carrier and exciton confinements were evaluated and found to be changed in the range of 0–1.0 eV. The Raman spectroscopic studies showed blue shifted Raman peaks of ZnSe at 295 and 315 cm{sup −1} indicating phonon confinement effect as well as compressive stress effect on the surface atoms of the NCs. Red photoluminescence in ZnSe-glass nanocomposite reveals a broad multiple-peak structure due to overlapping of emission from NC size related electron-hole recombination (∼707 nm) and emissions from defects to traps, which were formed due to Se and Zn vacancies signifying potential application in photonics.

  3. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single

  5. Structure and Optical Properties of Titania-PDMS Hybrid Nanocomposites Prepared by In Situ Non-Aqueous Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine R. M. Dalod

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid materials are attractive due to the combination of properties from the two distinct types of materials. In this work, transparent titania-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid materials with up to 15.5 vol. % TiO2 content were prepared by an in situ non-aqueous method using titanium (IV isopropoxide and hydroxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane as precursors. Spectroscopy (Fourier transform infrared, Raman, Ultraviolet-visible, ellipsometry and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis allowed to describe in detail the structure and the optical properties of the nanocomposites. Titanium alkoxide was successfully used as a cross-linker and titania-like nanodomains with an average size of approximately 4 nm were shown to form during the process. The resulting hybrid nanocomposites exhibit high transparency and tunable refractive index from 1.42 up to 1.56, depending on the titania content.

  6. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  7. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh; Chou, Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn 1-x Co x O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (∼20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected

  8. In situ measurements of fuel retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy in TEXTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Stoschus, H.; Brezinsek, S.; Samm, U.; TEXTOR Team

    2011-12-01

    In future fusion devices such as ITER tritium retention due to tritium co-deposition in mixed material layers can be a serious safety problem. Laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) can measure the hydrogen content of hydrogenic carbon layers locally on plasma-facing components, while hydrogen is used as a tritium substitute. For several years, this method has been applied in the TEXTOR tokamak in situ during plasma operation to monitor the hydrogen content in space and time. This work shows the LIDS signal reproducibility and studies the effects of different plasma conditions, desorption distances from the plasma and different laser energies using a dedicated sample with constant hydrogen amount. Also the LIDS signal evaluation procedure is described in detail and the detection limits for different conditions in the TEXTOR tokamak are estimated.

  9. Reactive molecular beam epitaxial growth and in situ photoemission spectroscopy study of iridate superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-quality (001-oriented perovskite [(SrIrO3m/(SrTiO3] superlattices (m=1/2, 1, 2, 3 and ∞ films have been grown on SrTiO3(001 epitaxially using reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Compared to previously reported superlattices synthesized by pulsed laser deposition, our superlattices exhibit superior crystalline, interface and surface structure, which have been confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The transport measurements confirm a novel insulator-metal transition with the change of dimensionality in these superlattices, and our first systematic in situ photoemission spectroscopy study indicates that the increasing strength of effective correlations induced by reducing dimensionality would be the dominating origin of this transition.

  10. Real-time monitoring of high-gravity corn mash fermentation using in situ raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Steven R; Peretti, Steven W; Lamb, H Henry

    2013-06-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was employed for real-time monitoring of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corn mash by an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An accurate univariate calibration model for ethanol was developed based on the very strong 883 cm(-1) C-C stretching band. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) calibration models for total starch, dextrins, maltotriose, maltose, glucose, and ethanol were developed using data from eight batch fermentations and validated using predictions for a separate batch. The starch, ethanol, and dextrins models showed significant prediction improvement when the calibration data were divided into separate high- and low-concentration sets. Collinearity between the ethanol and starch models was avoided by excluding regions containing strong ethanol peaks from the starch model and, conversely, excluding regions containing strong saccharide peaks from the ethanol model. The two-set calibration models for starch (R(2)  = 0.998, percent error = 2.5%) and ethanol (R(2)  = 0.999, percent error = 2.1%) provide more accurate predictions than any previously published spectroscopic models. Glucose, maltose, and maltotriose are modeled to accuracy comparable to previous work on less complex fermentation processes. Our results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is capable of real time in situ monitoring of a complex industrial biomass fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first PLS-based chemometric modeling of corn mash fermentation under typical industrial conditions, and the first Raman-based monitoring of a fermentation process with glucose, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides present. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of potassium for in-situ geochronology on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipe, Christopher B., E-mail: stipec@seattleu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Guevara, Edward; Brown, Jonathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Rossman, George R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is explored for the development of an in-situ K-Ar geochronology instrument for Mars. Potassium concentrations in standard basaltic glasses and equivalent rock samples in their natural form are quantified using the potassium doublet at 766.49 and 769.90 nm. Measurement precision varies from 0.5 to 5.5 (% RSD) over the 3.63% to 0.025% potassium by weight for the standard samples, and little additional precision is achieved above 20 laser shots at 5 locations. For the glass standards, the quantification limits are 920 and 66 ppm for non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. For the basaltic rocks, the quantification limits are 2650 and 328 ppm for the non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. The heterogeneity of the rock samples leads to larger variations in potassium signal; however, normalizing the potassium peak by base area at 25 locations on the rock improved calibration accuracy. Including only errors in LIBS measurements, estimated age errors for the glasses range from approximately {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma samples to {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma samples. For the basaltic rocks, the age errors are approximately {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma samples and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of basaltic glasses and rocks by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of potassium for K-Ar dating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an instrument for in-situ geochronology on Mars. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limit is 35 ppm, relative standard deviations range from 0.5% to 5.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated errors for the glass standards range from {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma; estimated errors for the basaltic rocks range from {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma.

  12. Molecular Interaction of a New Antibacterial Polymer with a Supported Lipid Bilayer Measured by an in situ Label-Free Optical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Horvath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the antibacterial polymer–branched poly(ethylene imine substituted with quaternary ammonium groups, PEO and alkyl chains, PEI25QI5J5A815–with a solid supported lipid bilayer was investigated using surface sensitive optical waveguide spectroscopy. The analysis of the optogeometrical parameters was extended developing a new composite layer model in which the structural and optical anisotropy of the molecular layers was taken into consideration. Following in situ the change of optical birefringence we were able to determine the composition of the lipid/polymer surface layer as well as the displacement of lipid bilayer by the antibacterial polymer without using additional labeling. Comparative assessment of the data of layer thickness and optical anisotropy helps to reveal the molecular mechanism of antibacterial effect of the polymer investigated.

  13. In-situ optical profilometry of CANDU fuel channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, G.N.; Cornblum, E.O.; Grabish, M.G. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Nuclear Technology Services, Pickering, ON (Canada); Mader, D.L.; Kuurstra, J.C.; McNabb, S.C. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the application of optical profilometry techniques, to measure directly the depth and root-radius of open inside-surface flaws, within a flooded reactor pressure tube. The use of optical profilometry in one form or another is not new. Systems typically make use of scanned laser beams to perform tasks such as weld bead profiling and contour mapping of various solid objects. The specific application of such techniques within the harsh, confined environmental conditions described herein is thought to be somewhat unique and has provided some technical challenges. A brief outline of the fuel channel geometry will be given together with the basics of the profilometry technique employed. This will be followed by a detailed description of the in-channel tooling, key features of the data collection and analysis software and operational experience. (UK).

  14. In-situ optical prolifometry of CANDU fuel channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, G.N.; Cornblum, E.O.; Grabish, M.G. [Ontario Hydro, Pickering, ON (Canada). Pickering Generating Station; Mader, D.L.; Kuurstra, J.C.; McNabb, S.C. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    This paper will describe the application of optical profilometry techniques, to measure directly the depth and root-radius of open inside-surface flaws, within a flooded reactor pressure tube. The use of optical profilometry in one form or another is not new. Systems typically make use of scanned laser beams to perform tasks such as weld bead profiling and contour mapping of various solid objects. The specific application of such techniques within the harsh, confined environmental conditions described herein is thought to be somewhat unique and has provided some technical challenges. A brief outline of the fuel channel geometry will be given together with the basics of the profilometry technique employed. This will be followed by a detailed description of the in-channel tooling, key features of the data collection and analysis software and operational experience. (Author).

  15. In situ visualization of thermal distortions of synchrotron radiation optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, P.; Kazimirov, A.; Bazarov, I.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new in situ method to measure heating-induced distortions of the surface of the first monochromator crystal exposed to high-power white synchrotron radiation beam. The method is based on recording the image of a stationary grid of dots captured by a CCD camera as reflected from the surface of a crystal with and without a heat load. The three-dimensional surface profile (heat bump) is then reconstructed from the distortions of the original pattern. In experiments performed at the CHESS A2 wiggler beam line we measured the heat bumps with the heights of up to 600 nm produced by a wiggler beam with total power in the range of 15-60 W incident on the (1 1 1) Si crystal at various angles between 3 deg. and 15 deg

  16. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Richland, WA; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W [Richland, WA; Wind, Robert A [Kennewick, WA

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  17. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  18. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of zirconium alloy oxide conductivity: Relationship to hydrogen pickup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couet, Adrien; Motta, Arthur T.; Ambard, Antoine; Livigni, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ electrochemistry on zirconium alloys in 360 °C pure water show oxide layer resistivity changes during corrosion. • A linear relationship is observed between oxide resistivity and instantaneous hydrogen pickup fraction. • The resistivity of the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 (and thus its hydrogen pickup fraction) is higher than on Zr-2.5Nb. - Abstract: Hydrogen pickup during nuclear fuel cladding corrosion is a critical life-limiting degradation mechanism for nuclear fuel. Following a program dedicated to zirconium alloys, corrosion, it has been hypothesized that oxide electronic resistivity determines hydrogen pickup. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 and Zr-2.5Nb alloys in 360 °C water. The oxide resistivity was measured as function of time. The results show that as the oxide resistivity increases so does the hydrogen pickup fraction. The resistivity of the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 is higher than on Zr-2.5Nb, resulting in a higher hydrogen pickup fraction of Zircaloy-4, compared to Zr-2.5Nb.

  19. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-07-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short.

  20. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-01-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short. (paper)

  1. Optical Spectroscopy to Guide Photodynamic Therapy of Head and Neck Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Dominic J.; Karakullukcu, M. Baris; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Kanick, Stephen Chad; van Veen, Robert P. L.; Amelink, Arjen; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Tan, I. Bing

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to other interstitial applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT), optical guidance or monitoring in the head and neck is at a very early stage of development. The present paper reviews the use of optical approaches, in particular optical spectroscopy, that have been used or have the

  2. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fib...

  3. An in situ Raman spectroscopy study of stress transfer between carbon nanotubes and polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Minfang; Winey, Karen I; Osswald, Sebastian; Gogotsi, Yury

    2009-01-01

    The transfer mechanism of applied stress in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy on composite fibers. These SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposite fibers have no specific SWCNT-polymer interactions and the high degree of nanotube alignment minimizes the contributions from nanotube-nanotube interactions. Although tensile testing found significantly improved overall mechanical properties of the fibers, effective stress transfer to SWCNTs is limited to a small strain regime (ε<0.2%). At higher strains, the stress on the SWCNTs decreases due to the slippage at the nanotube-polymer interface. Slippage was also evident in scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces produced by tensile testing of the composite fibers. Above ε = 0.2%, the strain-induced slippage was accompanied by irreversible responses in stress and Raman peak shifts. This paper shows that efficient stress transfer to nanotubes as monitored by Raman spectroscopy is crucial to improving the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites and to detecting internal damage in nanocomposites.

  4. Preferential adsorption of NH3 gas molecules on MWCNT defect sites probed using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chimowa, George

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The preferential adsorption of NH(sub3) gas molecules on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that the full widths at half maximum of the G band and the intensity ratio I(sub2D...

  5. Kinetics of Hydrolysis of Acetic Anhydride by In-Situ FTIR Spectroscopy: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Shaker; Erkey, Can

    2005-01-01

    A reaction kinetics experiment for the chemical engineering undergraduate laboratory course was developed in which in-situ Fourier Transfer Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure reactant and product concentrations. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride was determined by experiments carried out in a batch reactor. The results…

  6. Optical excitation spectroscopy of the Luna 24 sample 24125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telfer, D.J.; Fielder, G.

    1980-01-01

    Luminescence optical excitation spectroscopy carried out at room temperature on sample L24125 with light made monochromatic from a 450 W xenon source has shown that Fe 3+ ions are present in the plagioclase component at concentrations such that the ligand field bands of this species are observed. The spectrum closely resembles that of Fe 3+ in plagioclase-rich Apollo samples and in terrestrial calcic plagioclases, including synthetic material activated with this ion. Although the amount of sample was small (5 mg) compared with those for which comparison spectra were obtained (30 mg) and the albedo was lower, resolution of spectral bands was achieved with the aid of a digital signal averager, giving an eight-fold enhancement of signal:noise ratio. It would be very instructive and of great value to compare these results with those obtained for samples from the same core but at several different depths and also with an 'interior' rock (as opposed to breccia) sample suite, for which the Fe 3+ luminescence centres would be relatively well shielded from environmental influences, particularly those implicated in the formation of Fe 0 (metal) and Fe 2+ in the lunar regolith. (author)

  7. Optical spectroscopy and high pressure on emeralds: synthetic and natural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Alejo, M. A.; Hernández-Alcántara, J. M.; Flores Jiménez, C.; Calderón, T.; Murrieta S., H.; Camarillo García, E.

    2011-09-01

    Emerald, natural and synthetic, are the subject of study by means of optical spectroscopy techniques. Particularly, natural emeralds have been considered as a gemstone in jewelry not being so the synthetic ones. But, in general, the properties of these are very good for applications, for instance as a laser system, due to the impurities control. In this work a comparison between natural and synthetic emeralds is done. Chromium ions are the main responsible of the characteristic fascinating green color of these gemstones, entering in the crystals in octahedral sites. Absorption at room temperature show up two broad bands in the visible region and two narrow bands called the R-lines. That spectrum corresponds to trivalent chromium ions in an octahedral site, as it happens in ruby and alexandrite. On other hand, photoemission arises in the range 640-850 nm. at room temperature . It is shown that the luminescence spectra changes as the temperature is lowered. The effect on the main peak of luminescence when high pressure is applied on small samples of emerald shows as a linear function.

  8. Charge transfer in carbon nanotube actuators investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Hughes, M.; Windle, A.H.; Robertson, J.

    2004-01-01

    Charge transfer dynamics on the surface of single-wall carbon nanotube sheets is investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy in order to understand the actuation mechanism of an electrochemical actuator and to determine associated parameters. We built an actuator from single-wall carbon nanotube mat and studied its actuation in several alkali metal (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline earth (Ca) halide and sulfate solutions in order to clarify the role of counterion as mobile ions in the film. The variation of bonding with applied potential was monitored using in situ Raman spectroscopy. This is because Raman can detect changes in C-C bond length: the radial breathing mode at ∼190 cm-1 varies inversely with the nanotube diameter, and the G band at ∼1590 cm-1 varies with the axial bond length. In addition, the intensities of both the modes vary with the emptying/depleting or filling of the bonding and antibonding states due to electrochemical charge injection. We discussed the variation of peak height and wave numbers of these modes providing valuable information concerning electrochemical charge injection on the carbon nanotube mat surface. We found in-plane microscopic compressive strain (∼-0.25%) and the equivalent charge transfer per carbon atom (f c ∼-0.005) as an upper bound for the actuators studied hereby. It is demonstrated that though the present analysis does comply with the proposition for the actuation principle made earlier, the quantitative estimates are significantly lower if compared with those of reported values. Furthermore, the extent of variation, i.e., coupled electro-chemo-mechanical response of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) mat depended upon the type of counterion used (Group I versus Group II). The cyclic voltammetry and ac electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results were described briefly, which help to demonstrate well-developed capacitive behavior of SWNT mat and to estimate the specific capacitances as well. Summarizing, the

  9. Multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic tissue Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-12-03

    We report a novel method making use of multivariate reference signals of fused silica and sapphire Raman signals generated from a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of in vivo tissue Raman measurements in real time. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression modeling is applied to extract the characteristic internal reference Raman signals (e.g., shoulder of the prominent fused silica boson peak (~130 cm(-1)); distinct sapphire ball-lens peaks (380, 417, 646, and 751 cm(-1))) from the ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the analytical value of this novel multivariate reference technique, a rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe is used for in vivo oral tissue Raman measurements (n = 25 subjects) under 785 nm laser excitation powers ranging from 5 to 65 mW. An accurate linear relationship (R(2) = 0.981) with a root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.5 mW can be obtained for predicting the laser excitation power changes based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, which is superior to the normal univariate reference method (RMSE = 6.2 mW). A root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.4 mW (R(2) = 0.985) can also be achieved for laser power prediction in real time when we applied the multivariate method independently on the five new subjects (n = 166 spectra). We further apply the multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of gelatin tissue phantoms that gives rise to an RMSEP of ~2.0% (R(2) = 0.998) independent of laser excitation power variations. This work demonstrates that multivariate reference technique can be advantageously used to monitor and correct the variations of laser excitation power and fiber coupling efficiency in situ for standardizing the tissue Raman intensity to realize quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo, which is particularly appealing in

  10. Support Effects in Catalysis Studied by in-situ Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and in-situ X-Ray Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Griffin John

    Kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst. In order to establish a paradigm for metal-support interactions using colloidally synthesized Pt nanoparticles the ability of the organic capping agent to inhibit reactivity and interaction with the support must first be assessed. Pt nanoparticles capped by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), and those from which the PVP is removed by UV light exposure, are investigated for two reactions, the hydrogenation of ethylene and the oxidation of methanol. It is shown that prior to PVP removal the particles are moderately active for both reactions. Following removal, the activity for the two reactions diverges, the ethylene hydrogenation rate increases 10-fold, while the methanol oxidation rate decreases 3-fold. To better understand this effect the capping agent prior to, and the residual carbon remaining after UV treatment are probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Prior to removal no major differences are observed when the particles are exposed to alternating H2 and O2 environments. When the PVP is removed, carbonaceous fragments remain on the surface that dynamically restructure in H2 and O2. These fragments create a tightly bound shell in an oxygen environment and a porous coating of hydrogenated carbon in the hydrogen environment. Reaction rate measurements of thermally cleaned PVP and oleic acid capped particles show this effect to be independent of cleaning method or capping agent. In all this demonstrates the ability of the capping agent to mediate nanoparticle catalysis

  11. Isotopic analysis using optical spectroscopy (1963); Analyse isotopique par spectroscopie optique (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstenkorn, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The isotopic displacement in the atomic lines of certain elements (H, He, Li, Ne, Sr, Hg, Pb, U, Pu) is used for dosing these elements isotopically. The use of the Fabry-Perot photo-electric interference spectrometer is shown to be particularly adapted for this sort of problem: in each case we give on the one hand the essential results obtained with this apparatus, and on the other hand the results previously obtained with a conventional apparatus (grating, photographic plate). These results together give an idea of the possibilities of optical spectroscopy: in the best case, the precision which may be expected is of the order of 1 to 2 per cent for isotopes whose concentration is about 1 per cent. (author) [French] Le deplacement isotopique dans les raies atomiques de certains elements (H, He, Li, Ne, Sr, Hg, Pb, U, Pu) est utilise pour effectuer le dosage isotopique de ces elements. L'utilisation du spectrometre interferentiel Fabry-Perot photoelectrique se revele particulierement adapte a ce genre de probleme: dans chaque cas, nous donnons d'une part l'essentiel des resultats obtenus avec cet appareil, et d'autre part, les resultats obtenus anterieurement a l'aide de l'appareillage classique (reseau, plaque photographique). L'ensemble de ces informations donne une idee des possibilites offertes par la spectroscopie optique: dans le meilleur des cas, la precision que l'on peut esperer est de l'ordre de 1 a 2 pour cent pour des isotopes dont la concentration est de l'ordre de 1 pour cent. (auteur)

  12. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 μm-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 μm-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to

  13. Comprehensive validation scheme for in situ fiber optics dissolution method for pharmaceutical drug product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Tahseen; Liu, Qian Julie; Vivilecchia, Richard; Joshi, Yatindra

    2009-03-01

    There has been a growing interest during the past decade in the use of fiber optics dissolution testing. Use of this novel technology is mainly confined to research and development laboratories. It has not yet emerged as a tool for end product release testing despite its ability to generate in situ results and efficiency improvement. One potential reason may be the lack of clear validation guidelines that can be applied for the assessment of suitability of fiber optics. This article describes a comprehensive validation scheme and development of a reliable, robust, reproducible and cost-effective dissolution test using fiber optics technology. The test was successfully applied for characterizing the dissolution behavior of a 40-mg immediate-release tablet dosage form that is under development at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey. The method was validated for the following parameters: linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, and robustness. In particular, robustness was evaluated in terms of probe sampling depth and probe orientation. The in situ fiber optic method was found to be comparable to the existing manual sampling dissolution method. Finally, the fiber optic dissolution test was successfully performed by different operators on different days, to further enhance the validity of the method. The results demonstrate that the fiber optics technology can be successfully validated for end product dissolution/release testing. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  14. Using Deep UV Raman Spectroscopy to Identify In Situ Microbial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapers, H. M.; Wanger, G.; Amend, J.; Orphan, V. J.; Bhartia, R.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial communities living in close association with lithic substrates play a critical role in biogeochemical cycles. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms and their abiotic substrates requires knowledge of microbial activity. Identifying active cells adhered to complex environmental substrates, especially in low biomass systems, remains a challenge. Stable isotope probing (SIP) provides a means to trace microbial activity in environmental systems. Active members of the community take up labeled substrates and incorporate the labels into biomolecules that can be detected through downstream analyses. Here we show for the first time that Deep UV (248 nm) Raman spectroscopy can differentiate microbial cells labeled with stable isotopes. Previous studies have used Raman spectroscopy with a 532 nm source to identify active bacterial cells by measuring a Raman shift between peaks corresponding to amino acids incorporating 13C compared to controls. However, excitation at 532 nm precludes detection on complex substrates due to high autofluorescence of native minerals. Excitation in the DUV range offers non-destructive imaging on mineral surfaces - retaining critical contextual information. We prepared cultures of E. coli grown in 50 atom% 13C glucose spotted onto Al wafers to test the ability of DUV Raman spectroscopy to differentiate labeled and unlabeled cells. For the first time, we are able to demonstrate a distinct and repeatable shift between cells grown in labeled media and unlabeled media when imaged on Al wafers with DUV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra are dominated by the characteristic Raman bands of guanine. The dominant marker peak for guanine attributed to N7-C8 and C8-N9 ring stretching and C8-H in-plane bending, is visible at 1480 cm-1 in the unlabeled cells and is blue-shifted by 20 wavenumbers to 1461 cm-1 in the labeled cells. The ability of DUV Raman to effectively identify regions containing cells that have incorporated isotopic

  15. Effect of mechanical optical clearing on near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelson, Christopher R; Vogt, William C; King-Casas, Brooks; LaConte, Stephen M; Rylander, Christopher G

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is a broadly utilized technology with many emerging applications including clinical diagnostics, sports medicine, and functional neuroimaging, to name a few. For functional brain imaging NIR light is delivered at multiple wavelengths through the scalp and skull to the brain to enable spatial oximetry measurements. Dynamic changes in brain oxygenation are highly correlated with neural stimulation, activation, and function. Unfortunately, NIRS is currently limited by its low spatial resolution, shallow penetration depth, and, perhaps most importantly, signal corruption due to light interactions with superficial non-target tissues such as scalp and skull. In response to these issues, we have combined the non-invasive and rapidly reversible method of mechanical tissue optical clearing (MOC) with a commercially available NIRS system. MOC utilizes a compressive loading force on tissue, causing the lateral displacement of blood and water, while simultaneously thinning the tissue. A MOC-NIRS Breath Hold Test displayed a ∼3.5-fold decrease in the time-averaged standard deviation between channels, consequentially promoting greater channel agreement. A Skin Pinch Test was implemented to negate brain and muscle activity from affecting the recorded signal. These results displayed a 2.5-3.0 fold increase in raw signal amplitude. Existing NIRS instrumentation has been further integrated within a custom helmet device to provide a uniform force distribution across the NIRS sensor array. These results showed a gradual decrease in time-averaged standard deviation among channels with an increase in applied pressure. Through these experiments, and the development of the MOC-NIRS helmet device, MOC appears to provide enhancement of NIRS technology beyond its current limitations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical impedancemetry for nutrition behavior characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchik, Alexey; Pavlov, Konstantin; Vilenskii, Maksim; Popov, Mikhail

    2017-07-01

    Unhealthy nutrition trends determination technique is described. Combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical impedancemetry will lead to development of a healthcare device that will predict unhealthy eating habits and decrease risk factors of diseases development.

  17. Innovative Applications of In Situ Gamma Spectroscopy for Non-destructive Assay of Transuranic Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watters, D.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Duke, S.J.; Nicosia, W.C.

    2009-01-01

    Cabrera Services (CABRERA), under contract to National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), supported the transuranic (TRU) waste reduction initiative at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CABRERA developed advanced NDA techniques for oversized boxes (OSB) and drums using in situ gamma spectroscopy during several phases of the project. A more thorough characterization method was employed during the planning phase of the project to better understand the TRU content and distribution within each container, while a comprehensive NDA program was designed and implemented during the intrusive phase that guided waste segregation and re-packaging of both TRU and low-level wastes (LLW). NSTec took receipt of 58 oversized boxes of suspect TRU waste from Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). TRU waste is defined as greater than 3.7 kilobecquerels per gram [kBq/g] (100 nanocuries (nCi)/g) activity from alpha-emitting radionuclides with atomic number greater than 92 having a half-life greater than 20 years. Each box was custom-made to house a variety of suspect TRU wastes resulting from years of weapons program research, development, and testing. Since their arrival at NTS, the boxes have undergone several iterations of non-destructive assay (NDA) in preparation for the comprehensive repackaging effort. NDA has included two rounds of in situ gamma spectroscopy and real-time radiography (RTR) scans that were videotaped. Contents have been confirmed to include glove boxes, HEPA filters and their housings, and assorted process equipment and piping. TRU content was determined via directly measuring plutonium-239 (Pu-239), americium-241 (Am-241), and other radionuclides, while adding calculated results for non-measurable nuclides using reliable scaling factors developed from acceptable knowledge (AK). Advantages of CABRERA's NDA methods included: - More NDA information is available in the same amount of counting time, allowing NSTec to make more

  18. In-situ optical emission spectrometry during galvanostatic aluminum anodising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, D.; Van Overmeere, Q.; Santoro, R.; Proost, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report on the use of optical emission spectrometry (OES) for the online detection of changes in the Al concentration ejected in a 1.0 mol dm -3 sulphuric acid electrolyte during galvanostatic anodising of Al thin film substrates. The technique relies on the coupling of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometer to a specially designed electrochemical flow cell. This has allowed to correlate, for the first time, the kinetics of Al dissolution to well-established morphological changes related to porous anodic oxide formation and growth. A deconvolution algorithm was first developed in order to decompose the experimental ICP/OES signal into elementary distributions, each one characteristic for a specific kinetic regime. The highest dissolution rate systematically occurred during the first step, associated with barrier oxide formation. This is followed by a systematic decrease in the rate of Al dissolution during pore formation. During steady-state porous oxide growth, the Al dissolution rate increases again, but still remains below the level established during barrier oxide growth. In each of these three kinetic regimes, a linear variation of the Al dissolution rate with current density was observed in the range 0.5-5.0 mA cm -2 , with slope values of, respectively, 35 ± 2, 24 ± 2 and 28 ± 1 μg C -1 . Regarding the temporal transitions between the different regimes, a desynchronisation was observed between the kinetic (dissolution) and morphological transitions, the time offset going in opposite directions for barrier and steady-state porous oxide growth. Finally, using the measured Al dissolution rates, the current density dependence of the film formation efficiency for both porous and barrier oxide growth has been established.

  19. Spectroscopy and photophysics of self-organized zinc porphyrin nanolayers. 1. Optical spectroscopy of excitonic interactions involving the soret band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, H.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Schaafsma, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    The photophysical properties of excited singlet states of zinc tetra-(p-octylphenyl)-porphyrin in 5-25-nm-thick films spin-coated onto quartz slides have been investigated by optical spectroscopy. Analysis of the polarized absorption spectra using a dipole-dipole exciton model with two mutually

  20. Synthesis and Study of Optical Properties of Graphene/TiO2 Composites Using UV-VIS Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, P. B.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Graphene and TiO2 were synthesized using electrochemical exfoliation and co-precipitation methods, respectively. An ex situ approach was adopted for the graphene/TiO2 composites. The conformation of graphene in the TiO2 samples was examined through X-ray diffraction. Optical properties of the as-synthesised composites such as optical absorption, extinction coefficient, refractive index, real dielectric constant, imaginary dielectric constant, dissipation factor, and optical conductivity were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The varying concentration of graphene in TiO2 affects the optical properties which appear different for 10 wt.% as compared to 5 wt.% graphene/ TiO2 composite. The composites exhibit an absorption peak at 300 nm with a decrease in band gap for 10 wt.% as compared to 5 wt.% graphene/TiO2 composite. The maximum optical conductivity for the graphene/TiO2 composite of 10 wt.% was found to be 1.86·10-2 Ω-1·m-1 at 300 nm.

  1. Coral Reef Color: Remote and In-Situ Imaging Spectroscopy of Reef Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs are threatened at local to global scales by a litany of anthropogenic impacts, including overfishing, coastal development, marine and watershed pollution, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification. However, available data for the primary indicator of coral reef condition — proportional cover of living coral — are surprisingly sparse and show patterns that contradict the prevailing understanding of how environment impacts reef condition. Remote sensing is the only available tool for acquiring synoptic, uniform data on reef condition at regional to global scales. Discrimination between coral and other reef benthos relies on narrow wavebands afforded by imaging spectroscopy. The same spectral information allows non-invasive quantification of photosynthetic pigment composition, which shows unexpected phenological trends. There is also potential to link biodiversity with optical diversity, though there has been no effort in that direction. Imaging spectroscopy underlies the light-use efficiency model for reef primary production by quantifying light capture, which in turn indicates biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation. Reef calcification is strongly correlated with primary production, suggesting the possibility for an optics-based model of that aspect of reef function, as well. By scaling these spectral models for use with remote sensing, we can vastly improve our understanding of reef structure, function, and overall condition across regional to global scales. By analyzing those remote sensing products against ancillary environmental data, we can construct secondary models to predict reef futures in the era of global change. This final point is the objective of CORAL (COral Reef Airborne Laboratory), a three-year project funded under NASA's Earth Venture Suborbital-2 program to investigate the relationship between coral reef condition at the ecosystem scale and various nominal biogeophysical forcing parameters.

  2. In-situ reactive of x-ray optics by glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.D.; Garrett, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    We have developed a method of in-situ reactive glow discharge cleaning of x-ray optical surfaces which is capable of complete removal of carbon contamination. Our work is the first to successfully clean an entire optical system in-situ and characterize its performance at short wavelengths (as low as 10 /angstrom/). The apparatus required is quite simple and can easily be fitted to most existing UHV (ultra high vacuum) mirror boxes of monochromators. The advantages of this technique over previously available methods include dramatic improvements in instrument performance and reductions in down time since the whole process typically takes a few days. This paper will briefly describe our results and detail the experimental considerations for application of the technique on different monochromator geometries. Possible improvements and extensions of the technique are also discussed

  3. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  4. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  5. Mid-infrared spectroscopy using optical waveguides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, M.

    2000-05-01

    As part of the European research project SOFIE - 'Spectroscopy using Optical Fibers in the Marine Environment', a portable sensor system for chlorinated hydrocarbons and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in seawater has been developed. A robust, miniaturized FT-IR spectrometer for in-situ underwater pollution monitoring applications was designed and built, based on parts from a Bruker Vector 22 FT-IR instrument. The assembled instrument, enclosed in a sealed aluminum pressure vessel is capable of maintenance-free operation in the oceans down to depths of 300 meters. It can be incorporated either in a tow frame or a remotely operated vehicle. A suitable sensor head geometry, optimized in terms of sensitivity and hydrodynamics alike, was developed and connected to the underwater FT-IR spectrometer. Due to the modular design, various sensor head configurations can be realized, ensuring easy adaptation of the instrument to future tasks. In a laboratory set-up using an ATR-crystal as a simplified sensor head, the sensor performance was investigated. The sensor is capable of detecting a wide range of chlorinated hydrocarbons and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sea- and river water down to the low ppb-range. Varying amounts of salinity, turbidity or humin acids, as well as seawater pollutants like aliphatic hydrocarbons or phenols, do not influence the sensor characteristics. In addition, the sensor exhibits a good long-time stability and a low susceptibility to sensor fouling. (author)

  6. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS as a Sensor for Thin Film and Quantum Dot Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinke Tang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS is usually applied as a biosensor system to the sorption-desorption of proteins to waveguide surfaces. Here, we show that OWLS can be used to monitor the quality of oxide thin film materials and of coatings of pulsed laser deposition synthesized CdSe quantum dots (QDs intended for solar energy applications. In addition to changes in data treatment and experimental procedure, oxide- or QD-coated waveguide sensors must be synthesized. We synthesized zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4 coated (Si,TiO2 waveguide sensors, and used OWLS to monitor the relative mass of the film over time. Films lost mass over time, though at different rates due to variation in fluid flow and its physical effect on removal of film material. The Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique was used to deposit CdSe QD coatings on waveguides. Sensors exposed to pH 2 solution lost mass over time in an expected, roughly exponential manner. Sensors at pH 10, in contrast, were stable over time. Results were confirmed with atomic force microscopy imaging. Limiting factors in the use of OWLS in this manner include limitations on the annealing temperature that maybe used to synthesize the oxide film, and limitations on the thickness of the film to be studied. Nevertheless, the technique overcomes a number of difficulties in monitoring the quality of thin films in-situ in liquid environments.

  7. Coupling effects in heterostructures of pentacene and perfluorinated pentacene studied by optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broch, Katharina; Heinemeyer, Ute; Hinderhofer, Alexander; Gerlach, Alexander; Schreiber, Frank [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Tuebingen (Germany); Anger, Falk [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Tuebingen (Germany); MATGAS 2000 AIE, Campus de la UAB, Bellaterra (Spain); Osso, Oriol [MATGAS 2000 AIE, Campus de la UAB, Bellaterra (Spain); Scholz, Reinhard [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Heterostructures of organic semiconductors gain increasing interest in the last years because of their potential applications in organic electronics. To optimize those devices the understanding of the intermolecular coupling is crucial. Therefore, we investigate the optical absorption spectra of heterostructures and possible differences to the spectra of their single components. The combination of pentacene (PEN) with perfluorinated pentacene (PFP) is promising due to their similar geometric structure which can give rise to coevaporated films with a significant level of intermixing and accordingly an efficient intermolecular coupling. Indeed, performing in-situ-measurements with differential reflectance spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry we find features in the absorption spectra of mixed films that cannot be explained by a linear combination of the single film spectra. In the energy range between 1.4 eV and 2.4 eV spectra of PFP and PEN single and coevaporated films with different mixing ratios are compared and possible theoretical scenarios for coupling effects are discussed.

  8. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  9. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.; Golovchak, R.; Zurawska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of γ-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge 23.5 Sb 11.8 S 64.7 glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Electrochromic characteristics of a nickel borate thin film investigated by in situ XAFS and UV/vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaaki; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Mineo, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    The electrochromic transition of a nickel borate thin film between colorless and brown was examined by means of in situ XAFS and UV/vis spectroscopy. The XAFS spectra showed that the average valence state of the nickel species in the film changed from +2.1 to +3.8 following the application of an electrode potential. Additionally, a broad peak at 700 nm was observed during in situ UV/vis absorption measurements on the application of a positive potential. These results suggest that the nickel borate film reversibly forms a NiOOH structure with a domain size of several nanometers during the electrochromic reaction. (author)

  11. Ultrahigh-vacuum in situ electrochemistry with solid polymer electrolyte and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of polypyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skotheim, T.A.; Florit, M.I.; Melo, A.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A new in situ combined electrochemistry and x-ray-photoelectron-spectroscopy (XPS) technique using solid polymer electrolytes has been used to characterize electrically conducting films of polypyrrole perchlorate. The technique allows in situ electrochemical oxidation and reduction (doping and undoping) in ultrahigh vacuum and the simultaneous study of the polymer with XPS as a function of its electrochemical potential. We demonstrate that some anion species interact strongly electrostatically with the nitrogen heteroatoms. We also show conclusively that the electrochemistry of polypyrrole is highly irreversible

  12. Design of a facility for the in situ measurement of catalytic reaction by neutron scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuai; Cheng, Yongqiang; Daemen, Luke L.; Lutterman, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Catalysis is a critical enabling science for future energy needs. The next frontier of catalysis is to evolve from catalyst discovery to catalyst design, and for this next step to be realized, we must develop new techniques to better understand reaction mechanisms. To do this, we must connect catalytic reaction rates and selectivities to the kinetics, energetics, and dynamics of individual elementary steps and relate these to the structure and dynamics of the catalytic sites involved. Neutron scattering spectroscopies offer unique capabilities that are difficult or impossible to match by other techniques. The current study presents the development of a compact and portable instrumental design that enables the in situ investigation of catalytic samples by neutron scattering techniques. The developed apparatus was tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory and includes a gas handling panel that allows for computer hookups to control the panel externally and online measurement equipment such as coupled GC-FID/TCD (Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector/Thermal Conductivity Detector) and MS (Mass Spectrometry) to characterize offgassing while the sample is in the neutron scattering spectrometer. This system is flexible, modular, compact, and portable enabling its use for many types of gas-solid and liquid-solid reactions at the various beamlines housed at the SNS.

  13. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  14. In situ analysis of dynamic laminar flow extraction using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hua-Lin; Qiu, Yang; Chang, Yu-Long; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we performed micro-scale dynamic laminar flow extraction and site-specific in situ chloride concentration measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the diffusion process of chloride ions from an oil phase to a water phase under laminar flow. In contrast to common logic, we used SERS intensity gradients of Rhodamine 6G to quantitatively calculate the concentration of chloride ions at specific positions on a microfluidic chip. By varying the fluid flow rates, we achieved different extraction times and therefore different chloride concentrations at specific positions along the microchannel. SERS spectra from the water phase were recorded at these different positions, and the spatial distribution of the SERS signals was used to map the degree of nanoparticle aggregation. The concentration of chloride ions in the channel could therefore be obtained. We conclude that this method can be used to explore the extraction behaviour and efficiency of some ions or molecules that enhance the SERS intensity in water or oil by inducing nanoparticle aggregation.

  15. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy of Oligoaniline Intermediates Created under Alkaline Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šeděnková, Ivana; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava

    2014-12-26

    The progress of the oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an alkaline aqueous medium has been monitored in situ by attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The growth of the microspheres and of the film at the ATR crystal surface, as well as the changes proceeding in the surrounding aqueous medium, are reflected in the spectra. The evolution of the spectra and the changes in the molecular structure occurring during aniline oxidation in alkaline medium are discussed with the help of differential spectra. Several processes connected with the various stages of aniline oxidation were distinguished. The progress of hydrolysis of the aniline in water and further an oxidation of aminophenol to benzoquinone imines in the presence of peroxydisulfate in alkaline medium have been detected in the spectra in real time. The precipitated solid oxidation product was analyzed by mass spectrometry. It is composed of oligomers, mainly trimers to octamers, of various molecular structures incorporating in addition to aniline constitutional units also p-benzoquinone or p-benzoquinoneimine moieties.

  16. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of Zr-1%Nb under VVER primary circuit conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Pajkossy, Tamas

    2002-01-01

    Oxide layers were grown on tubular samples of Zr-1%Nb under conditions simulating those in VVER-type pressurised water reactors, viz. in near-neutral borate solutions in an autoclave at 290 deg. C. These samples were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy which was found to be suitable to follow in situ the corrosion process. A -CPE ox parallel R ox - element was used to characterise the oxide layer on Zr-1%Nb. Both the CPE ox coefficient, σ ox , and the parallel resistance, R ox , were found to be thickness dependent. The layer thickness, however, can only be calculated after a calibration procedure. The temperature dependence of the CPE ox element was also found to be anomalous while the temperature dependence of R ox indicates that the oxide layer has semiconductor properties. The relaxation time - defined as (R ox σ ox ) 1/α - was found to be quasi-independent of oxidation time and temperature; thus it is characteristic to the oxide layer on Zr-1%Nb

  17. Confined methane-water interfacial layers and thickness measurements using in situ Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Bruno; Liu, Yukun; Rizkin, Benjamin; Hartman, Ryan L

    2017-11-07

    Gas-liquid interfaces broadly impact our planet, yet confined interfaces behave differently than unconfined ones. We report the role of tangential fluid motion in confined methane-water interfaces. The interfaces are created using microfluidics and investigated by in situ 1D, 2D and 3D Raman spectroscopy. The apparent CH 4 and H 2 O concentrations are reported for Reynolds numbers (Re), ranging from 0.17 to 8.55. Remarkably, the interfaces are comprised of distinct layers of thicknesses varying from 23 to 57 μm. We found that rarefaction, mixture, thin film, and shockwave layers together form the interfaces. The results indicate that the mixture layer thickness (δ) increases with Re (δ ∝ Re), and traditional transport theory for unconfined interfaces does not explain the confined interfaces. A comparison of our results with thin film theory of air-water interfaces (from mass transfer experiments in capillary microfluidics) supports that the hydrophobicity of CH 4 could decrease the strength of water-water interactions, resulting in larger interfacial thicknesses. Our findings help explain molecular transport in confined gas-liquid interfaces, which are common in a broad range of societal applications.

  18. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments.

  19. In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smentkowski, V. S.

    1999-04-22

    Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd functionality of the MSRI analyzer provides surface information not obtained when either MSRI or SIMS is used independently.

  20. Investigating Low-Cost Optical Spectroscopy for Sensing Pressure Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirchandani, Smruti Suresh

    Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy has been used widely to characterize tissue properties for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This thesis focuses on the use of spectroscopy for early pressure ulcer detection. The most common early diagnosis technique for pressure ulcers is a blanch test. A major issue with a blanch test is that it is purely visual and cannot be visibly observed on dark skinned individuals. Studies have already proven that spectroscopy can be used to detect blanch response in skin across light and dark skinned individuals. The portable reflectance spectroscopy setup showed that pressure changes to the skin can be detected spectroscopically. Some work on an iPhone based spectrometer was also done to have a low-cost spectroscopy alternative to the usual DRS equipment. This study failed to develop an iPhone based spectrometer but various factors that can be changed to better this research have been mentioned in this thesis.

  1. Electrospray deposition of fullerenes in ultra-high vacuum: in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterley, Christopher J; Perdigao, LuIs M A; Saywell, Alex; Magnano, Graziano; Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C; Dhanak, Vinod R; Beton, Peter H; O'Shea, James N

    2007-01-01

    Electrospray deposition of fullerenes on gold has been successfully observed by in situ room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and photoemission spectroscopy. Step-edge decoration and hexagonal close-packed islands with a periodicity of 1 nm are observed at low and multilayer coverages respectively, in agreement with thermal evaporation studies. Photoemission spectroscopy shows that fullerenes are being deposited in high purity and are coupling to the gold surface as for thermal evaporation. These results open a new route for the deposition of thermally labile molecules under ultra-high vacuum conditions for a range of high resolution surface science techniques

  2. Development of a mobile system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and dedicated to in situ analysis of polluted soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet, B.; Travaille, G.; Ismael, A.; Canioni, L.; Michel-Le Pierres, K.; Brasseur, E.; Roy, S.; Le Hecho, I.; Larregieu, M.; Tellier, S.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Boriachon, T.; Wazen, P.; Diard, A.; Belbeze, S.

    2008-01-01

    Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is successfully applied to the full laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of soil samples, defining classes according to the concentrations of the major elements. The large variability of the LIBS data is related to the heterogeneity of the samples and the representativeness of the data is finally discussed. Then, the development of a mobile LIBS system dedicated to the in-situ analysis of soils polluted by heavy metals is described. Based on the use of ten-meter long optical fibers, the mobile system allows deported measurements. Finally, the laser-assisted drying process studied by the use of a customized laser has not been retained to overcome the problem of moisture

  3. Development of a mobile system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and dedicated to in situ analysis of polluted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, B.; Travaillé, G.; Ismaël, A.; Canioni, L.; Michel-Le Pierrès, K.; Brasseur, E.; Roy, S.; le Hecho, I.; Larregieu, M.; Tellier, S.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Boriachon, T.; Wazen, P.; Diard, A.; Belbèze, S.

    2008-10-01

    Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is successfully applied to the full laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of soil samples, defining classes according to the concentrations of the major elements. The large variability of the LIBS data is related to the heterogeneity of the samples and the representativeness of the data is finally discussed. Then, the development of a mobile LIBS system dedicated to the in-situ analysis of soils polluted by heavy metals is described. Based on the use of ten-meter long optical fibers, the mobile system allows deported measurements. Finally, the laser-assisted drying process studied by the use of a customized laser has not been retained to overcome the problem of moisture.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of in situ annealed InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.J.M. de; Somintac, A.; Estacio, E.; Salvador, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nonresonant Raman scattering measurements were performed on a three-layered sample of in situ annealed InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots. The thermal annealing step was done during the growth of each GaAs spacer layer, where the substrate temperature was raised from 530 deg. C to 580 deg. C as measured by a pyrometer. Three Raman signals are clearly seen at 264 cm -1 , 268 cm -1 , and 271.5 cm -1 which can be attributed to the longitudinal optic (LO) phonons of the dots. These three different signals are attributed to different degrees of In/Ga alloying or intermixing in each dot layer as a consequence of the different thermal treatments that each layer was subjected to. The Raman signal of the wetting layer (WL) is remarkably weak and suggests erosion of the wetting layer. In contrast, Raman scattering measurements on an unannealed sample show two overlapping features at 259.5 cm -1 and 261.5 cm -1 , which are attributed to the LO phonons of the dots. The WL signal is clearly observed at 251.5 cm -1 . To support our Raman observations, the appearance of a strong higher-energy peak in photoluminescence measurements suggests that alloying did occur in the annealed sample

  5. Electrical and optical spectroscopy for quantitative screening of hepatic steatosis in donor livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, B L; Wilkinson, T D; Robertson, P A [Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 OFA (United Kingdom); Wells, A C; Watson, C J E [University Department of Surgery, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Box 202, Level 9, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 OCQ (United Kingdom); Virtue, S; Vidal-Puig, A, E-mail: mclaugb@gmail.co [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QR (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-21

    Macro-steatosis in deceased donor livers is increasingly prevalent and is associated with poor or non-function of the liver upon reperfusion. Current assessment of the extent of steatosis depends upon the macroscopic assessment of the liver by the surgeon and histological examination, if available. In this paper we demonstrate electrical and optical spectroscopy techniques which quantitatively characterize fatty infiltration in liver tissue. Optical spectroscopy showed a correlation coefficient of 0.85 in humans when referenced to clinical hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) sections in 20 human samples. With further development, an optical probe may provide a comprehensive measure of steatosis across the liver at the time of procurement.

  6. Oxygenation level and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor estimated by diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu.; Volovetsky, A. B.; Shilyagina, N. Yu.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using diffuse optical spectroscopy the level of oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor in comparison with normal muscle tissue of mice have been studied. Subcutaneously growing SKBR-3 was used as a tumor model. Continuous wave fiber probe diffuse optical spectroscopy system was employed. Optical properties extraction approach was based on diffusion approximation. Decreased blood oxygen saturation level and increased total hemoglobin content were demonstrated in the neoplasm. The main reason of such differences between tumor and norm was significant elevation of deoxyhemoglobin concentration in SKBR-3. The method can be useful for diagnosis of tumors as well as for study of blood flow parameters of tumor models with different angiogenic properties.

  7. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: comparison of classification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachabé, Rami; Evers, Daniel J.; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Lucassen, Gerald W.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Peeters, Marie-Jeanne Vrancken; van der Hage, Jos A.; Oldenburg, Hester S.; Wesseling, Jelle; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ from 52 patients were measured. A model deriving from the diffusion theory was applied to the measured spectra in order to extract clinically relevant parameters such as blood, water, lipid, and collagen volume fractions, β-carotene concentration, average vessels radius, reduced scattering amplitude, Mie slope, and Mie-to-total scattering fraction. Based on a classification and regression tree algorithm applied to the derived parameters, a sensitivity-specificity of 98%-99%, 84%-95%, 81%-98%, 91%-95%, and 83%-99% were obtained for discrimination of adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ, respectively; and a multiple classes overall diagnostic performance of 94%. Sensitivity-specificity values obtained for discriminating malignant from nonmalignant tissue were compared to existing reported studies by applying the different classification methods that were used in each of these studies. Furthermore, in these reported studies, either lipid or β-carotene was considered as adipose tissue precursors. We estimate both chromophore concentrations and demonstrate that lipid is a better discriminator for adipose tissue than β-carotene.

  8. In Situ Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Analyte-Specific Monitoring of Glucose and Ammonium in Streptomyces coelicolor Fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nanna; Ödman, Peter; Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili

    2010-01-01

    was used as a model process. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models were calibrated for glucose and ammonium based on NIR spectra collected in situ. To ensure that the models were calibrated based on analyte-specific information, semisynthetic samples were used for model calibration in addition...... resulting in a RMSEP of 1.1 g/L. The prediction of ammonium based on NIR spectra collected in situ was not satisfactory. A comparison with models calibrated based on NIR spectra collected off line suggested that this is caused by signal attenuation in the optical fibers in the region above 2,000 nm...

  9. The mechanism of borax crystallization using in situ optical microscopy and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharso, G.; Parkinson, M.; Ogden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The quality of high-purity borax depends both on the concentrations of the impurities and the product appearance, which are mainly determined by the size and morphology of the crystals. Thus, knowledge about crystallization of borax is of direct relevance to the industrial production of borax. In addition, fundamental studies of borax crystallization will provide results of relevance to the crystallization of other economically important materials. An investigation into the fundamental mechanism of crystal growth of borax from aqueous solution was carried out, as a model system. The investigation focussed on the growth mechanism, and the influence of factors such as solution supersaturation, temperature, crystal size and solution flow on the rate of crystal growth. In situ optical microscopy was used to determine growth rates of three different faces of borax crystals at 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg C, at various concentrations. It was found that the growth rate increases with increasing temperature and supersaturation. At low concentration , growth on the (010), (001), and (111) faces occurs via a spiral growth mechanism and at high concentration birth and spread is the principal mechanism operating. The activation energy for the different mechanisms was determined. Examination by ex situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) showed features suggesting that the (100), (010), (001) faces of borax crystals grow by spiral mechanism at low concentration and two dimensional nucleation at high concentration. These experiments support the data obtained from in situ optical microscopy. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  10. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO 3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples. - Highlights: ► Did the detection of strontium, cerium, and cesium in CaCO 3 and graphite matrices. ► The detection of these elements was performed in a systematic manner. ► Univariate calibration curves were used to determine strontium detection. ► Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis built improved statistical models. ► Limits of detection are comparable or better in case of cerium and cesium.

  11. Conductivity percolation in loosely compacted microcrystalline cellulose: An in situ study by dielectric spectroscopy during densification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Frenning, Göran; Gråsjö, Johan; Alderborn, Göran; Strømme, Maria

    2006-10-19

    The present study aims at contributing to a complete understanding of the water-induced ionic charge transport in cellulose. The behavior of this transport in loosely compacted microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) powder was investigated as a function of density utilizing a new type of measurement setup, allowing for dielectric spectroscopy measurement in situ during compaction. The ionic conductivity in MCC was found to increase with increasing density until a leveling-out was observed for densities above approximately 0.7 g/cm3. Further, it was shown that the ionic conductivity vs density followed a percolation type behavior signifying the percolation of conductive paths in a 3D conducting network. The density percolation threshold was found to be between approximately 0.2 and 0.4 g/cm3, depending strongly on the cellulose moisture content. The observed percolation behavior was attributed to the forming of interparticulate bonds in the MCC and the percolation threshold dependence on moisture was linked to the moisture dependence of particle rearrangement and plastic deformation in MCC during compaction. The obtained results add to the understanding of the density-dependent water-induced ionic transport in cellulose showing that, at given moisture content, the two major parameters determining the magnitude of the conductivity are the connectedness of the interparticluate bonds and the connectedness of pores with a diameter in the 5-20 nm size range. At densities between approximately 0.7 and 1.2 g/cm3 both the bond and the pore networks have percolated, facilitating charge transport through the MCC compact.

  12. In-situ characterization of meat aging with diode-laser Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heinar; Blum, Jenny; Sowoidnich, Kay; Sumpf, Bernd; Schwägele, Fredi; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2009-05-01

    Due to the narrow linewidth signals and its fingerprinting nature, Raman spectra provide information about the molecular structure and composition of the samples. In this paper, the applicability of Raman spectroscopy is shown for the in-situ characterization of the aging of meat. Miniaturized diode lasers are utilized as light sources with excitation wavelengths of 671 nm and 785 nm with a view to the development of a portable field device for meat. As test sample, musculus longissimus dorsi from pork was taken. The chops were stored refrigerated at 5 °C and Raman spectra were measured daily from slaughter up to three weeks. Throughout the entire period of one month, the Raman spectra preserve the basic spectral features identifying the samples as meat. More specific, the spectra exhibit gradual changes of the Raman signals and they show a time-dependent modification of the background signal which arises from a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). To analyze the time-correlation of the complex spectra, multivariate statistical methods are employed. By means of principal components analysis (PCA) a distinction of spectra is found on the time scale between day 8 and 10. This corresponds to the transition from ripened meat to meat at and beyond the limit of inedibility. After ca. 10 days of storage at 5 °C the microbial load is overwhelming and LIF increases. The results of the Raman measurements depending on the storage time of meat are discussed in the context of reference analyses which have been performed in parallel.

  13. Support effects in catalysis studied by in-situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ x-ray spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Griffin John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-14

    Here, kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst.

  14. In situ analyses of Ag speciation in tissues of cucumber and wheat using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In situ analyses of Ag speciation in tissues of cucumber and wheat using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy showing spectral fitting and linear...

  15. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P., E-mail: philippe.hebert@cea.fr; Doucet, M. [CEA, DAM, Le RIPAULT, F-37620 Monts (France); Resseguier, T. de [Institut P' , UPR CNRS 3346, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, F-86961 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  16. Effects of in situ plasma treatment on optical and electrical properties of index-matched transparent conducting oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yong Hwan; Yoo, Hana; Choi, Bum Ho; Kim, Young Baek; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Dong Chan

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of in situ plasma-treatment on optical and electrical properties of index-matched indium tin oxide (IMITO) thin film. To render the IMITO-coated surface hydrophilic and study the optical and electrical characteristics, we performed in situ oxygen plasma post-treatment without breaking vacuum. The 94.6% transmittance in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm) increased on average to 96.4% and the maximum transmittance reached 98% over a broad wavelength range. The surface roughness and sheet resistance improved from 0.9 nm and 200 Ω/sq to 0.0905 nm and 100 Ω/sq, respectively, by in situ plasma post-treatment. We confirmed by contact angle measurement that the hydrophobic IMITO surface was altered to hydrophilic. The improved optical and electrical characteristics of in situ plasma-treated IMITO makes it adequate for high-resolution liquid crystal on silicon displays.

  17. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. In situ measurement of some soil properties in paddy soil using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wenjun

    Full Text Available In situ measurements with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIR provide an efficient way for acquiring soil information of paddy soils in the short time gap between the harvest and following rotation. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility to predict a series of soil properties including organic matter (OM, organic carbon (OC, total nitrogen (TN, available nitrogen (AN, available phosphorus (AP, available potassium (AK and pH of paddy soils in Zhejiang province, China. Firstly, the linear partial least squares regression (PLSR was performed on the in situ spectra and the predictions were compared to those with laboratory-based recorded spectra. Then, the non-linear least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM algorithm was carried out aiming to extract more useful information from the in situ spectra and improve predictions. Results show that in terms of OC, OM, TN, AN and pH, (i the predictions were worse using in situ spectra compared to laboratory-based spectra with PLSR algorithm (ii the prediction accuracy using LS-SVM (R2>0.75, RPD>1.90 was obviously improved with in situ vis-NIR spectra compared to PLSR algorithm, and comparable or even better than results generated using laboratory-based spectra with PLSR; (iii in terms of AP and AK, poor predictions were obtained with in situ spectra (R2<0.5, RPD<1.50 either using PLSR or LS-SVM. The results highlight the use of LS-SVM for in situ vis-NIR spectroscopic estimation of soil properties of paddy soils.

  19. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor); Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on in situ Raman scattering and photoluminescence of silica optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilodeau, T.G.; Ewing, K.J.; Nau, G.M.; Aggarwal, I.D.

    1995-01-01

    Raman fiber optic chemical sensors provide remote situ characterization capability. One application of Raman fiber optic chemical sensors is the characterization of the contents of nuclear waste tanks. In these tanks it is expected that approximately 20 meters of optical fiber will be exposed to radiation levels between 100 and 1,000 rads/hour. In support of this work two silica optical fiber types (one a communications grade fiber and the other nominally radiation resistant) have been tested at the radiation levels expected in the tanks. Luminescence and Raman scattering measurements have been performed in situ with 488-nm excitation on two types of silica optical fiber exposed to a constant low to moderate dose rate of gamma radiation of 880 rads(Si)/hour from a 60 Co source for a total dose of greater than 45 krads. The nominally radiation-resistant fiber was also excited with 514.5-nm and near-infrared 830-nm laser radiation. The rate of the silica Raman signal decrease is more than three times greater for the visible excitation wavelengths than for the 830-nm excitation for the radiation resistant fiber. The behavior of the 650-nm photoluminescence line upon irradiation was different for the two fibers studied, both in terms of the shift of the 650-nm line and rate of increase of the normalized photoluminescence intensity. In all cases the photoluminescence from the fibers was less than the Raman intensity. No radioluminescence was observed in either fiber. The radiation resistant fiber exhibited photo bleaching effects on the Raman transmission when photoannealed with 488-nm laser light

  1. Effect of ionizing radiation on in situ Raman scattering and photoluminescence of silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, T. G.; Ewing, K. J.; Nau, G. M.; Aggarwai, I. D.

    1995-02-01

    Raman fiber optic chemical sensors provide remote in situ characterization capability. One application of Raman fiber optic chemical sensors is the characterization of the contents of nuclear waste tanks. In these tanks it is expected that approximately 20 meters of optical fiber will be exposed to radiation levels between 100 and 1000 rads/hour. In support of this work two silica optical fiber types (one a communications grade fiber and the other nominally radiation resistant) have been tested at the radiation levels expected in the tanks. Luminescence and Raman scattering measurements have been performed in situ with 488-nm excitation on two types of silica optical fiber exposed to a constant low to moderate dose rate of gamma radiation of 880 rads(Si)/hour from a /sup 60/Co source for a total dose of greater than 45 krads. The nominally radiation-resistant fiber was also excited with 514.5-nm and near-infrared 830-nm laser radiation. The rate of the silica Raman signal decrease is more than three times greater for the visible excitation wavelengths than for the 830-nm excitation for the radiation resistant fiber. The behavior of the 650-nm photoluminescence line upon irradiation was different for the two fibers studied, both in terms of the shift of the 650-nm line and rate of increase of the normalized photoluminescence intensity. In all cases the photoluminescence from the fibers was less than the Raman intensity. No radioluminescence was observed in either fiber. The radiation resistant fiber exhibited photobleaching effects on the Raman transmission when photoannealed with 488-nm laser light.

  2. Spectroscopy and Biosensing with Optically Resonant Dielectric Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnok, Alex; Caldarola, Martin; Bonod, Nicolas; Alú, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Resonant dielectric nanoparticles (RDNs) made of materials with large positive dielectric permittivity, such as Si, GaP, GaAs, have become a powerful platform for modern light science, enabling various fascinating applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. In addition to light localization at the nanoscale, dielectric nanostructures provide electric and magnetic resonant responses throughout the visible and infrared spectrum, low dissipative losses and optical heating, low doping effec...

  3. Optical spectroscopy techniques can accurately distinguish benign and malignant renal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couapel, Jean-Philippe; Senhadji, Lotfi; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Verhoest, Grégory; Lavastre, Olivier; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Bensalah, Karim

    2013-05-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: There is little known about optical spectroscopy techniques ability to evaluate renal tumours. This study shows for the first time the ability of Raman and optical reflectance spectroscopy to distinguish benign and malignant renal tumours in an ex vivo environment. We plan to develop this optical assistance in the operating room in the near future. To evaluate the ability of Raman spectroscopy (RS) and optical reflectance spectroscopy (ORS) to distinguish benign and malignant renal tumours at surgery. Between March and October 2011, RS and ORS spectra were prospectively acquired on surgical renal specimens removed for suspicion of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Optical measurements were done immediately after surgery. Optical signals were normalised to ensure comparison between spectra. Initial and final portions of each spectrum were removed to avoid artefacts. A support vector machine (SVM) was built and tested using a leave-one-out cross-validation. Classification scores, including accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were calculated on the entire population and in patients with tumours of 700 optical spectra were obtained and submitted to SVM classification. The SVM could recognise benign and malignant renal tumours with an accuracy of 96% (RS) and 88% (ORS) in the whole population and with an accuracy of 93% (RS) and 95% (ORS) in the present subset of small renal tumours (Benign and malignant renal tumours can be accurately discriminated by a combination of RS and ORS. In vivo experiments are needed to further assess the value of optical spectroscopy techniques. © 2012 BJU International.

  4. Applications of in situ optical measurements in ecological and biogeochemical studies - a framework for a user-driven national network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Pellerin, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Aiken, G.; Stumpner, P.

    2010-12-01

    A critical challenge for understanding the dynamics between water quality, and ecological processes is obtaining data at time scales in which changes occur. Traditional, discrete sampling, approaches for data collection are often limited by analytical and field costs, site access, and logistical challenges, for long-term sampling at a large number of sites. The timescales of change, however, are often minutes, hours, or years. In situ optical (absorbance and fluorescence) instruments offer opportunities to help overcome these difficulties by directly or indirectly measuring constituents of interest. In situ optical instrumentation have been in use in oceanographic studies for well over 50 years, and as advances in the science, engineering and technology of these sensors have improved, optical sensors have become more commercially viable and available for research. We present several examples that highlight applications of in situ optical measurements for understanding dynamics in stream, river, and estuary systems. Examples illustrate the utility of in situ optical sensors for studies over short-duration events of days to weeks (diurnal cycles, tidal cycles, storm events and snowmelt periods) as well as longer-term continuous monitoring for months to years. We also highlight applied in situ optical measurements as proxies for constituents that are difficult and expensive to measure at high spatiotemporal resolution, for example, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, mercury and methylmercury, trihalomethane precursors, harmful algal blooms, and others. We propose that relatively simple absorbance and fluorescence measurements made in situ could be incorporated into short and long-term ecological research and monitoring programs, resulting in advanced understanding of sources that contribute to water quality improvements or degradation, contaminant and carbon cycling, and the occurrence and persistence of harmful algal blooms. Linking these efforts

  5. In-situ formation compaction monitoring in deep reservoirs by use of fiber optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ikeda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have devised a new in situ monitoring method for the amount of stratified compaction in borehole drilled several hundred meters underground. This newly developed epoch-making monitoring system differs from conventional monitoring methods for land subsidence in that it is designed to continuously monitor the amounts of displacement in several intervals separately, using optical fibers fitted in the sensor assembly. This report presents results from a deep observation well. This is a continued report from the previous one on EISOLS 2010.

  6. In situ process monitoring in selective laser sintering using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael R.; Lewis, Adam; Park, Jongwan; McElroy, Austin B.; Estrada, Arnold D.; Fish, Scott; Beaman, Joseph J.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2018-04-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) is an efficient process in additive manufacturing that enables rapid part production from computer-based designs. However, SLS is limited by its notable lack of in situ process monitoring when compared with other manufacturing processes. We report the incorporation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) into an SLS system in detail and demonstrate access to surface and subsurface features. Video frame rate cross-sectional imaging reveals areas of sintering uniformity and areas of excessive heat error with high temporal resolution. We propose a set of image processing techniques for SLS process monitoring with OCT and report the limitations and obstacles for further OCT integration with SLS systems.

  7. Force-detected nanoscale absorption spectroscopy in water at room temperature using an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Alexander; Black, Jacob W.; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2018-04-01

    Measuring absorption spectra of single molecules presents a fundamental challenge for standard transmission-based instruments because of the inherently low signal relative to the large background of the excitation source. Here we demonstrate a new approach for performing absorption spectroscopy in solution using a force measurement to read out optical excitation at the nanoscale. The photoinduced force between model chromophores and an optically trapped gold nanoshell has been measured in water at room temperature. This photoinduced force is characterized as a function of wavelength to yield the force spectrum, which is shown to be correlated to the absorption spectrum for four model systems. The instrument constructed for these measurements combines an optical tweezer with frequency domain absorption spectroscopy over the 400-800 nm range. These measurements provide proof-of-principle experiments for force-detected nanoscale spectroscopies that operate under ambient chemical conditions.

  8. Evaluation of a compact spectrograph for in-situ and stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analyses of geological samples on Mars missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salle, Beatrice; Cremers, David A.; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger C.; Fichet, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is actively under development for future use on surface probes to Mars. The analytical method can be deployed for in-situ and/or stand-off analysis with the latter embodiment providing the greatest advantages compared to previous and current elemental analysis methods used for planetary surface analysis. For this application, LIBS must be thoroughly investigated in terms of analytical capabilities and flight-rated instruments must be developed. Because of the low pressure of the predominantly CO 2 atmosphere on Mars, studies are needed to understand analytical requirements and to determine performance under these conditions. Stand-off analysis demands the most stringent requirements on instrumentation. Therefore, it must be determined if the high performance components that are normally used in a typical LIBS laboratory setup, which are generally not optimized for small size and weight, are essential to obtain the maximum scientific return from a mission. A key component of a LIBS apparatus is the detection system consisting of a spectrograph and a detector. Here we present an evaluation of one design of a compact spectrograph (Ocean Optics HR2000) for in-situ and stand-off LIBS analyses of geological samples under Mars atmospheric conditions

  9. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  10. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also.

  11. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

  12. In situ Raman spectroscopy of LiFePO4: size and morphology dependence during charge and self-discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Sun, Chunwen; Theivanayagam, Murali G; Applestone, Danielle; Dylla, Anthony G; Manthiram, Arumugam; Henkelman, Graeme; Goodenough, John B; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-10-25

    Previous studies of the size dependent properties of LiFePO4 have focused on the diffusion rate or phase transformation pathways by bulk analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction and electrochemistry. In this work, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to study the surface phase change during charge and self-discharge on a more localized scale for three morphologies of LiFePO4: (1) 25 ± 6 nm width nanorods, (2) 225 ± 6 nm width nanorods and (3) ∼2 μm porous microspheres. Both the large nanorod and microsphere geometries showed incomplete delithiation at the end of charge, which was most likely caused by anti-site defects along the 1D diffusion channels in the bulk of the larger particles. Based on the in situ Raman measurements, all of the morphologies studied exhibited self-discharge with time. Among them, the smallest FePO4 particles self-discharged (lithiated) the fastest. While nanostructuring LiFePO4 can offer advantages in terms of lowering anti-site defects within particles, it also creates new problems due to high surface energies that allow self-discharge. The in situ Raman spectroscopy also showed that carbon coating did not provide significant improvement to the stability of the lithiated particles.

  13. Spectral studies of ocean water with space-borne sensor SCIAMACHY using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vountas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods enabling the retrieval of oceanic parameter from the space borne instrumentation Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS are presented. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT measures back scattered solar radiation at a spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm. The DOAS method was used for the first time to fit modelled Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS in liquid water and in situ measured phytoplankton absorption reference spectra to optical depths measured by SCIAMACHY. Spectral structures of VRS and phytoplankton absorption were clearly found in these optical depths. Both fitting approaches lead to consistent results. DOAS fits correlate with estimates of chlorophyll concentrations: low fit factors for VRS retrievals correspond to large chlorophyll concentrations and vice versa; large fit factors for phytoplankton absorption correspond with high chlorophyll concentrations and vice versa. From these results a simple retrieval technique taking advantage of both measurements is shown. First maps of global chlorophyll concentrations were compared to the corresponding MODIS measurements with very promising results. In addition, results from this study will be used to improve atmospheric trace gas DOAS-retrievals from visible wavelengths by including these oceanographic signatures.

  14. In situ dc oxygen‐discharge cleaning system for optical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Tsuneharu; Shidara, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Yagishita, Akira; Sato, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    In situ dc oxygen‐discharge cleaning arrangements have been developed at the Photon Factory for the removal of carbon contamination from optical surfaces. A high cleaning rate could be achieved by producing an oxygen plasma close to the optical elements with special care taken to avoid any harmful effects from the discharge; contaminant carbon was completely removed within a few hours, at most. This short exposure time and the use of dry oxygen gas resulted in a restoration of the original ultrahigh vacuum without a bakeout. Results with a Seya‐Namioka beamline for gas‐phase experiments showed a flux enhancement amounting to a factor of 50, and results with a grasshopper beamline showed a nearly complete recovery of the light intensity, even at the carbon K edge

  15. In situ dc oxygen-discharge cleaning system for optical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, T.; Shidara, T.; Tanaka, K.; Yagishita, A.; Sato, S.

    1989-01-01

    In situ dc oxygen-discharge cleaning arrangements have been developed at the Photon Factory for the removal of carbon contamination from optical surfaces. A high cleaning rate could be achieved by producing an oxygen plasma close to the optical elements with special care taken to avoid any harmful effects from the discharge; contaminant carbon was completely removed within a few hours, at most. This short exposure time and the use of dry oxygen gas resulted in a restoration of the original ultrahigh vacuum without a bakeout. Results with a Seya-Namioka beamline for gas-phase experiments showed a flux enhancement amounting to a factor of 50, and results with a grasshopper beamline showed a nearly complete recovery of the light intensity, even at the carbon K edge

  16. Iterative procedure for in-situ EUV optical testing with an incoherent source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaka, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Zakhor, Avideh

    2009-12-01

    We propose an iterative method for in-situ optical testing under partially coherent illumination that relies on the rapid computation of aerial images. In this method a known pattern is imaged with the test optic at several planes through focus. A model is created that iterates through possible aberration maps until the through-focus series of aerial images matches the experimental result. The computation time of calculating the through-focus series is significantly reduced by a-SOCS, an adapted form of the Sum Of Coherent Systems (SOCS) decomposition. In this method, the Hopkins formulation is described by an operator S which maps the space of pupil aberrations to the space of aerial images. This operator is well approximated by a truncated sum of its spectral components.

  17. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification.

  18. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  19. Spectroscopy of Molecules in Extreme Rotational States Using AN Optical Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Amy S.; Toro, Carlos; Echibiri, Geraldine; Liu, Qingnan

    2012-06-01

    Our lab has developed a high-power optical centrifuge that is capable of trapping and spinning large number densities of molecules into extreme rotational states. By coupling this device with high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy, we measure the time-resolved behavior and energy profiles of individual ro-vibrational states of molecules in very high rotational states. Recent results will be discussed on the spectroscopy of new rotational states, collisional dynamics in the optical centrifuge, spatially-dependent energy profiles and possibilities for new chemistry induced by centrifugal forces.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of optical properties in CdS thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajić J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of CdS thin films were investigated applying atomic force microscopy (AFM and Raman spectroscopy. CdS thin films were prepared by using thermal evaporation technique under base pressure 2 x 10-5 torr. The quality of these films was investigated by AFM spectroscopy. We apply Raman scattering to investigate optical properties of CdS thin films, and reveal existence of surface optical phonon (SOP mode at 297 cm-1. Effective permittivity of mixture were modeled by Maxwell - Garnet approximation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45003

  1. In situ detection of cancerous kidney tissue by means of fiber ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablinskas, Valdas; Velicka, Martynas; Pucetaite, Milda; Urboniene, Vidita; Ceponkus, Justinas; Bandzeviciute, Rimante; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Sakharova, Tatiana; Bibikova, Olga; Steiner, Gerald

    2018-02-01

    The crucial goal of kidney-sparing surgical resection of a malignant tumor is complete removal of the cancerous tissue. The exact border between the cancerous and normal tissues is not always possible to identify by naked eye, therefore, a supplementary intraoperative diagnosis is needed. Unfortunately, intraoperative pathology methods used nowadays are time consuming and of inadequate quality rendering not definitive diagnosis. It has recently been shown that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy can be used for fast discrimination between cancerous and normal kidney tissues by analyzing the collected spectra of the tissue touch imprint smears. Most prominent differences are obtained in the wavenumber region from 950 cm-1 to 1250 cm-1, where the spectral bands due to the molecular vibrations of glycogen arise in the spectra of cancerous tissue smears. Such method of detection of cancerous tissue is limited by requirement to transfer the suspected tissue from the body to the FTIR instrument and stamp it on an ATR crystal of the spectrometer. We propose a spectroscopic tool which exploits the same principle of detection of cancerous cells as mentioned above, but does not require the tissue to be transferred from the body to the spectrometer. The portable spectrometer used in this design is equipped with fiber ATR probe and a sensitive liquid nitrogen cooled MCT detector. The design of the fiber probe allows the ATR tip to be changed easily in order to use only new sterilized tips for each measurement point of the tissue. It also enables sampling multiple areas of the suspected tissue with high lateral resolution which, in turn, increases accuracy with which the marginal regions between normal and cancerous tissues can be identified. Due to the loss of optical signal in the fiber probe the spectra have lower signal-to-noise ratio than in the case of standard ATR sampling setup. However, software for the spectral analysis used with the fiber probe design is still able to distinguish

  2. Interface Energy Alignment of Atomic-Layer-Deposited VOx on Pentacene: an in Situ Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Gao, Yuanhong; Guo, Zheng; Su, Yantao; Wang, Xinwei

    2017-01-18

    Ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) vanadium oxide (VO x ) interlayer has recently been demonstrated for remarkably reducing the contact resistance in organic electronic devices (Adv. Funct. Mater. 2016, 26, 4456). Herein, we present an in situ photoelectron spectroscopy investigation (including X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies) of ALD VO x grown on pentacene to understand the role of the ALD VO x interlayer for the improved contact resistance. The in situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations allow us to monitor the ALD growth process of VO x and trace the evolutions of the work function, pentacene HOMO level, and VO x defect states during the growth. The initial VO x growth is found to be partially delayed on pentacene in the first ∼20 ALD cycles. The underneath pentacene layer is largely intact after ALD. The ALD VO x is found to contain a high density of defect states starting from 0.67 eV below the Fermi level, and the energy level of these defect states is in excellent alignment with the HOMO level of pentacene, which therefore allows these VO x defect states to provide an efficient hole-injection pathway at the contact interface.

  3. Insight into the structure of Pd/ZrO2 during the total oxidation of methane using combined in situ XRD, X.-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; van Vegten, Niels; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-01-01

    The structure of palladium during the total combustion of methane has been studied by a combination of the complementary in situ techniques X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The study demonstrates that finely dispersed and oxidized palladium is most active f...

  4. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros [Livermore, CA; Fitzgerald, Jason [Sacramento, CA; Troppmann, Christoph [Sacramento, CA; Michalopoulou, Andromachi [Athens, GR

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  5. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  6. Kinoform optics applied to X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, A R; Narayanan, S; Sprung, M; Su, J-D; Evans-Lutterodt, K; Isakovic, A F; Stein, A

    2010-05-01

    Moderate-demagnification higher-order silicon kinoform focusing lenses have been fabricated to facilitate small-angle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments. The geometric properties of such lenses, their focusing performance and their applicability for XPCS measurements are described. It is concluded that one-dimensional vertical X-ray focusing via silicon kinoform lenses significantly increases the usable coherent flux from third-generation storage-ring light sources for small-angle XPCS experiments.

  7. A flexible multi-stimuli in situ (S)TEM: Concept, optical performance, and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Börrnert, Felix; Müller, Heiko; Riedel, Thomas; Linck, Martin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Haider, Max.; Büchner, Bernd; Lichte, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    The progress in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy development had led to an unprecedented knowledge of the microscopic structure of functional materials at the atomic level. Additionally, although not widely used yet, electron holography is capable to map the electric and magnetic potential distributions at the sub-nanometer scale. Nevertheless, in situ studies inside a (scanning) transmission electron microscope ((S)TEM) are extremely challenging because of the much restricted size and accessibility of the sample space. Here, we introduce a concept for a dedicated in situ (S)TEM with a large sample chamber for flexible multi-stimuli experimental setups and report about the electron optical performance of the instrument. We demonstrate a maximum resolving power of about 1 nm in conventional imaging mode and substantially better than 5 nm in scanning mode while providing an effectively usable “pole piece gap” of 70 mm. - Highlights: • A concept for a (S)TEM with a large sample chamber is outlined. • An actual microscope is modified and has now a 70 mm high sample space. • The resolving power is about 1 nm in TEM and better than 5 nm in STEM mode. • Possible dedicated in situ microscopes with present technology are discussed

  8. A flexible multi-stimuli in situ (S)TEM: Concept, optical performance, and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börrnert, Felix, E-mail: felix.boerrnert@triebenberg.de [Speziallabor Triebenberg, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); IFW Dresden, PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Müller, Heiko; Riedel, Thomas; Linck, Martin [CEOS GmbH, Englerstraße 28, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Haider, Max. [CEOS GmbH, Englerstraße 28, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Büchner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Lichte, Hannes [Speziallabor Triebenberg, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The progress in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy development had led to an unprecedented knowledge of the microscopic structure of functional materials at the atomic level. Additionally, although not widely used yet, electron holography is capable to map the electric and magnetic potential distributions at the sub-nanometer scale. Nevertheless, in situ studies inside a (scanning) transmission electron microscope ((S)TEM) are extremely challenging because of the much restricted size and accessibility of the sample space. Here, we introduce a concept for a dedicated in situ (S)TEM with a large sample chamber for flexible multi-stimuli experimental setups and report about the electron optical performance of the instrument. We demonstrate a maximum resolving power of about 1 nm in conventional imaging mode and substantially better than 5 nm in scanning mode while providing an effectively usable “pole piece gap” of 70 mm. - Highlights: • A concept for a (S)TEM with a large sample chamber is outlined. • An actual microscope is modified and has now a 70 mm high sample space. • The resolving power is about 1 nm in TEM and better than 5 nm in STEM mode. • Possible dedicated in situ microscopes with present technology are discussed.

  9. Preliminary results of in situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnostics on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Li, Cong; Xiao, Qingmei; Liu, Ping; Fang, Ding; Mao, Hongmin; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Dongye; Ding, Hongbin; Luo, Guang-Nan; EAST Team

    2017-02-01

    Post-mortem methods cannot fulfill the requirement of monitoring the lifetime of the plasma facing components (PFC) and measuring the tritium inventory for the safety evaluation. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed as a promising method for the in situ study of fuel retention and impurity deposition in a tokamak. In this study, an in situ LIBS system was successfully established on EAST to investigate fuel retention and impurity deposition on the first wall without the need of removal tiles between plasma discharges. Spectral lines of D, H and impurities (Mo, Li, Si, … ) in laser-induced plasma were observed and identified within the wavelength range of 500-700 nm. Qualitative measurements such as thickness of the deposition layers, element depth profile and fuel retention on the wall are obtained by means of in situ LIBS. The results demonstrated the potential applications of LIBS for in situ characterization of fuel retention and co-deposition on the first wall of EAST. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB105002, 2015GB109001, and 2013GB109005), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575243, 11605238, 11605023), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ765), and Korea Research Council of Fundamental Science and Technology (KRCF) under the international collaboration & research in Asian countries (PG1314).

  10. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  11. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Structural and optical characteristics of in-situ sputtered highly oriented 15R-SiC thin films on different substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Satyendra; Jaiswal, Jyoti; Malik, Gaurav; Kumar, Brijesh; Chandra, Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we have reported the in-situ fabrication of nanocrystalline rhombohedral silicon carbide (15R-SiC) thin films by RF-magnetron sputtering at 800 °C substrate temperature. The structural and optical properties were investigated for the films grown on four different substrates (ZrO2, MgO, SiC, and Si). The contact angle measurement was performed on all the substrates to investigate the role of interfacial surface energy in nucleation and growth of the films. The XRD measurement revealed the growth of (1 0 10) orientation for all the samples and demonstrated better crystallinity on Si substrate, which was further corroborated by the TEM results. The Raman spectroscopy confirmed the growth of rhombohedral phase with 15R polytype. Surface characteristics of the films have been investigated by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, FTIR, and atomic force microscope (AFM) to account for chemical composition, bonding, and root mean square surface roughness (δrms). The optical dispersion behavior of 15R-SiC thin films was examined by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry in the wide spectral range (246-1688 nm), including the surface characteristics in the optical model. The non-linear optical parameters (χ3 and n2) of the samples have been calculated by the Tichy and Ticha relation using a single effective oscillator model of Wemple and Didomenico. Additionally, our optical results provided an alternative way to measure the ratio of carrier concentration to the effective mass (N/m*). These investigated optical parameters allow one to design and fabricate optoelectronic, photonic, and telecommunication devices for deployment in extreme environment.

  13. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  14. Mechanical Anisotropy and Pressure Induced Structural Changes in Piroxicam Crystals Probed by In Situ Indentation and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimunda, Praveena; Hintsala, Eric; Asif, Syed; Mishra, Manish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The ability to correlate mechanical and chemical characterization techniques in real time is both lacking and powerful tool for gaining insights into material behavior. This is demonstrated through use of a novel nanoindentation device equipped with Raman spectroscopy to explore the deformation-induced structural changes in piroxicam crystals. Mechanical anisotropy was observed in two major faces ( 0bar{1}1 ) and (011), which are correlated to changes in the interlayer interaction from in situ Raman spectra recorded during indentation. The results of this study demonstrate the considerable potential of an in situ Raman nanoindentation instrument for studying a variety of topics, including stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms, mechanochemistry, and solid state reactivity under mechanical forces that occur in molecular and pharmaceutical solids.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components; Espectrometria Raman con componentes opticos simples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula [Direccion de Investigacion y Desarrollo, Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)

    2014-07-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  16. Differential Optical-absorption Spectroscopy (doas) System For Urban Atmospheric-pollution Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Edner, H; Ragnarson, P; Spannare, S; Svanberg, Sune

    1993-01-01

    We describe a fully computer-controlled differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for atmospheric air pollution monitoring. A receiving optical telescope can sequentially tune in to light beams from a number of distant high-pressure Xe lamp light sources to cover the area of a medium-sized city. A beam-finding servosystem and automatic gain control permit unattended long-time monitoring. Using an astronomical code, we can also search and track celestial sources. Selected wavelength ...

  17. Broad bandwidth frequency domain instrument for quantitative tissue optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Tuan H.; Coquoz, Olivier; Fishkin, Joshua B.; Anderson, Eric; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical properties of turbid media, e.g., tissue, can be accurately quantified noninvasively using methods based on diffuse reflectance or transmittance, such as frequency domain photon migration (FDPM). Factors which govern the accuracy and sensitivity of FDPM-measured optical properties include instrument performance, the light propagation model, and fitting algorithms used to calculate optical properties from measured data. In this article, we characterize instrument, model, and fitting uncertaintics of an FDPM system designed for clinical use and investigate how each of these factors affects the quantification of NIR absorption (μ a ) and reduced scattering (μ s ' ) parameters in tissue phantoms. The instrument is based on a 500 MHz, multiwavelength platform that sweeps through 201 discrete frequencies in as little as 675 ms. Phase and amplitude of intensity modulated light launched into tissue, i.e., diffuse photon density waves (PDW), are measured with an accuracy of ±0.30 degree sign and ±3.5%, while phase and amplitude precision are ±0.025 degree sign and ±0.20%, respectively. At this level of instrument uncertainty, simultaneous fitting of frequency-dependent phase and amplitude nonlinear model functions derived from a photon diffusion approximation provides an accurate and robust strategy for determining optical properties from FDPM data, especially for media with high absorption. In an optical property range that is characteristic of most human tissues in the NIR (5x10 -3 a -2 mm -1 , 0.5 s ' -1 ), we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the multifrequency, simultaneous-fit approach allows μ a and μ s ' to be quantified with an accuracy of ±5% and ±3%, respectively. Although exceptionally high levels of precision can be obtained using this approach ( a and μ s ' . (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  18. Methyl mercury dynamics in a tidal wetland quantified using in situ optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Downing, B.D.; Boss, E.; Pellerin, B.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Byington, A.A.; Heim, W.A.; Stephenson, M.; Fujii, R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed monomethylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in a tidal wetland over three seasons using a novel method that employs a combination of in situ optical measurements as concentration proxies. MeHg concentrations measured over a single spring tide were extended to a concentration time series using in situ optical measurements. Tidal fluxes were calculated using modeled concentrations and bi-directional velocities obtained acoustically. The magnitude of the flux was the result of complex interactions of tides, geomorphic features, particle sorption, and random episodic events such as wind storms and precipitation. Correlation of dissolved organic matter quality measurements with timing of MeHg release suggests that MeHg is produced in areas of fluctuating redox and not limited by buildup of sulfide. The wetland was a net source of MeHg to the estuary in all seasons, with particulate flux being much higher than dissolved flux, even though dissolved concentrations were commonly higher. Estimated total MeHg yields out of the wetland were approximately 2.5 μg m−2 yr−1—4–40 times previously published yields—representing a potential loading to the estuary of 80 g yr−1, equivalent to 3% of the river loading. Thus, export from tidal wetlands should be included in mass balance estimates for MeHg loading to estuaries. Also, adequate estimation of loads and the interactions between physical and biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands might not be possible without long-term, high-frequency in situ measurements.

  19. Magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopy of noble metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, L.; Uba, S.; Antonov, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical (MO) response of the noble metals Cu, Ag, and Au in the joint experimental and ab initio theoretical study is reported. The magneto-optical polar Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra of the noble-metal films were measured with the high sensitivity in the applied magnetic field of 1.5 T over the photon energy range 0.74-5.8 eV. Complete set of the optical conductivity tensor elements was determined precisely from the MOKE and the optical spectra measured at the same energy points. The importance of the off-diagonal intraband Drude-type transitions is demonstrated explicitly for each noble metal and found to be a substantial contribution to the observed spectra. It is shown that the first-principles calculations using the spin-polarized fully relativistic Dirac linear-muffin-tin-orbital method with the inclusion of correlation effects by GGA+U approach reproduce well the experimental spectra and allow to explain the microscopic origin of the noble metals' magneto-optical response in terms of interband transitions. Although the energy band structures of Cu, Ag, and Au are very similar, there are some distinctive differences in bandwidths and the energy positions of the bands (especially in X and L symmetry points), mainly due to different spin-orbit splitting and differences in the spatial extent of 3 d , 4 d , and 5 d valence wave functions of noble metals. It was found that the small differences in the band positions lead to significant differences in the MO properties of three noble metals. Although the spin-orbit interaction in Au is about six times larger than in Cu, and approximately two times larger than in Ag, the absolute value of Kerr rotation in Au is of the same magnitude as in Cu and one order of magnitude smaller as compared to Ag. The sharp Kerr effect spectral peak in Ag is not due to the electronic interband transitions, but rather to the plasma-edge splitting. The band-by-band decomposition of the Cu, Ag, and Au MO spectra is presented and the

  20. Measurement of ZnO/Al2O3 Heterojunction Band Offsets by in situ X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hong-Wen; Zhang Hong; Wang Xue-Min; Zhao Yan; Yan Da-Wei; Jiang Zhong-Qian; Yao Gang; Zeng Ti-Xian; Wu Wei-Dong

    2013-01-01

    ZnO films are grown on c-sapphire substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy. The band offsets of the ZnO/Al 2 O 3 heterojunction are studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band of Al 2 O 3 is found to be 3.59±0.05eV below that of ZnO. Together with the resulting conduction band offset of 2.04±0.05eV, this indicates that a type-I staggered band line exists at the ZnO/Al 2 O 3 heterojunction

  1. Optical spectroscopy of known and suspected Herbig-Haro objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.; Fuller, G.A.; California Univ., Berkeley)

    1985-01-01

    Optical spectra of a number of suspected Herbig-Haro objects are presented. From these, the nature of these nebulosities are determined. Several of the nebulae are of very high density, perhaps due to their extreme youth. Extinctions measured toward DG Tau HH and the L1551 IRS 5 optical jet are in each case substantially less than the stellar values. It is suggested that this phenomenon reflects the existence of appreciably thick circumstellar dust disks around these, and two additional, exciting stars. Shock model diagnostics suggest that the emission lines in these Herbig-Haro nebulae arise in modest velocity shocks with sizable preshock densities in several cases. Radial velocities enable lower limits to be placed on the mass loss rates of those stars that have been detected in the radio continuum. 39 references

  2. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated with th...... with two dyes, fluorescein, and Bodipy 650/665 X, showed good linear behavior over a wide range of concentrations. Minimally detected concentrations were 250 pM for fluorescein and 100 nM for Bodipy....

  3. Holography and thermalization in optical pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, A.; Craps, B.; Galli, F.; Keränen, V.; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Zaanen, J.

    2018-04-01

    Using holography, we model experiments in which a 2 +1 D strange metal is pumped by a laser pulse into a highly excited state, after which the time evolution of the optical conductivity is probed. We consider a finite-density state with mildly broken translation invariance and excite it by oscillating electric field pulses. At zero density, the optical conductivity would assume its thermalized value immediately after the pumping has ended. At finite density, pulses with significant dc components give rise to slow exponential relaxation, governed by a vector quasinormal mode. In contrast, for high-frequency pulses the amplitude of the quasinormal mode is strongly suppressed, so that the optical conductivity assumes its thermalized value effectively instantaneously. This surprising prediction may provide a stimulus for taking up the challenge to realize these experiments in the laboratory. Such experiments would test a crucial open question faced by applied holography: are its predictions artifacts of the large N limit or do they enjoy sufficient UV independence to hold at least qualitatively in real-world systems?

  4. Saturation spectroscopy of an optically opaque argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Ben; Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2018-02-01

    A pure argon (Ar) plasma formed by a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge was analyzed using Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy. The expected line shape was a characteristic of sub-Doppler spectra in the presence of velocity-changing collisions, a narrow Lorentzian centered on a Doppler pedestal, but the observed line shapes contain a multi-peak structure, attributed to opacity of the medium. Laser absorption and inter-modulated fluorescence spectroscopy measurements were made to validate opacity as a driving factor of the observed line shapes. Spectral line shapes are further complicated by the spatial dependence of the pump laser, probe laser and of the absorbing medium, as well as the large absorbance of the transition under investigation. A numerical line shape was derived by accounting for the spatial variation of the pump and probe with a saturated line shape obtained from the rate equations for an equivalent two-level system. This simulated line shape shows good qualitative agreement with the trends observed in the data.

  5. In situ UV-Vis spectroscopy in gas-liquid-solid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemmet, C.P.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) spectroscopy in a slurry of particles, a packed bubble column, and a trickle bed to assess the changes in the state of an active component on the surface of the solid support. As a model system, insoluble pH indicators

  6. Seeing the light: Applications of in situ optical measurements for understanding DOM dynamics in river systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Fleck, J.; Shanley, J. B.; Aiken, G.; Boss, E.; Fujii, R.

    2009-12-01

    A critical challenge for understanding the sources, character and cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is making measurements at the time scales in which changes occur in aquatic systems. Traditional approaches for data collection (daily to monthly discrete sampling) are often limited by analytical and field costs, site access and logistical challenges, particularly for long-term sampling at a large number of sites. The ability to make optical measurements of DOM in situ has been known for more than 50 years, but much of the work on in situ DOM absorbance and fluorescence using commercially-available instruments has taken place in the last few years. Here we present several recent examples that highlight the application of in situ measurements for understanding DOM dynamics in riverine systems at intervals of minutes to hours. Examples illustrate the utility of in situ optical sensors for studies of DOM over short-duration events of days to weeks (diurnal cycles, tidal cycles, storm events and snowmelt periods) as well as longer-term continuous monitoring for months to years. We also highlight the application of in situ optical DOM measurements as proxies for constituents that are significantly more difficult and expensive to measure at high frequencies (e.g. methylmercury, trihalomethanes). Relatively simple DOM absorbance and fluorescence measurements made in situ could be incorporated into short and long-term ecological research and monitoring programs, resulting in advanced understanding of organic matter sources, character and cycling in riverine systems.

  7. In-plane spectroscopy with optical fibers and liquid-filled APEX™ glass microcuvettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, William R; Tantawi, Khalid Hasan; Williams, John D; Waddell, Emanuel; Fedorov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Chemical etching and laser drilling of microstructural glass results in opaque or translucent sidewalls, limiting the optical analysis of glass microfluidic devices to top down or non-planar topologies. These non-planar observation topologies prevent each layer of a multilayered device from being independently optically addressed. However, novel photosensitive glass processing techniques in APEX™ have resulted in microfabricated glass structures with transparent sidewalls. Toward the goal of a transparent multilayered glass microfluidic device, this study demonstrates the ability to perform spectroscopy with optical fibers and microcuvettes fabricated in photosensitive APEX™ glass. (technical note)

  8. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  9. Diameter grouping in bulk samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes from optical absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.; Dunsch, L.; Bauer, H.-D.; Reibold, M.; Knupfer, M.; Friedlein, R.; Pichler, T.; Jost, O.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the mean characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in soot produced by the laser vaporization of graphite has been analyzed using optical absorption spectroscopy. The abundance and mean diameter of the nanotubes were found to be most influenced by

  10. Diagnosis of the local thermal equilibrium by optical emission spectroscopy in the evolution of electric discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J.; Pacheco P, M.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A.; Velazquez P, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work applies the technique of optical emission spectroscopy to diagnose the temperature of the species generated in plasma in the transition to glow discharge arc. Whit this diagnosis is possible to determine the local thermal equilibrium conditions of the discharge. (Author)

  11. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  12. Spectroscopic properties of a self-assembled zinc porphyrin tetramer I. Steady state optical spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yatskou, M.M.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Donker, H.; Schaafsma, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    Aggregation of zinc mono-(4-pyridyl)-triphenylporphyrin (ZnPyP) in toluene and polystyrene/toluene mixtures has been investigated by steady-state optical spectroscopy. The Q-band absorption spectra, as well as the fluorescence spectra, show a temperature-dependent red shift as a result of ligation

  13. Study of the interaction of Tb (III) with dextran through fluorescence spectroscopy and optical rotatory dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Sandra S.; Rodrigues, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the interaction of Tb(III) with dextran in aqueous solution was perform using fluorescence spectroscopy and optical rotatory dispersion. The results indicate the formation of a complex with the displacent of water from the cation coordinated sphere by hydroxyl groups at the second and third carbon atoms of the monomer unit. (Author) [pt

  14. Optical spectroscopy: current advances and future applications in cancer diagnostics and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Daniel; Evers, D.J.; Hendriks, B.; Lucassen, G.W.; Lucassen, Gerald; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy (OS) is a tissue-sensing technique that could enhance cancer diagnosis and treatment in the near future. With OS, tissue is illuminated with a selected light spectrum. Different tissue types can be distinguished from each other based on specific changes in the reflected light

  15. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Plasma in Hybrid Pulsed Laser Deposition System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Jelínek, Miroslav; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, Suppl. D (2002), s. 292-298 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * pulsed laser deposition * RF discharge Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  16. Remote Spectroscopy in the Visible Using Fibers on the Optical Internet Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rafael A. S.; de Oliveira, Anderson R.; Zilio, Sergio C.

    2010-01-01

    The work presented here demonstrates the feasibility of using the single-mode fibers of an optical Internet network to deliver visible light between separate laboratories as a way to perform remote spectroscopy in the visible for teaching purposes. The coupling of a broadband light source into the single-mode fiber (SMF) and the characterization…

  17. Novel Chiroptical Analysis of Hemoglobin by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotein hemoglobin (Hb) was studied using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity (SERROA). The SERROA results are analyzed and compared with the SERRS, and the later to the resonance Raman (RRS) performed on Hb...

  18. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of cross-beam pulsed laser ablation on graphite targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangines, R.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-beam pulsed laser ablation with two delayed lasers is performed on two perpendicular graphite targets. The time delay between lasers is varied by up to 5 μs, and physical changes on the second plasma, due to the interaction with the first generated one, are determined by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy

  19. Portable, Fiber-Based, Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy (DRS) Systems for Estimating Tissue Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Chang, Kevin; Klein, Daniel; Deng, Yu Feng; Chang, Vivide; Phelps, Janelle E; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state diffuse reflection spectroscopy is a well-studied optical technique that can provide a noninvasive and quantitative method for characterizing the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissues. Here, we compare three fiber-based diffuse reflection spectroscopy systems that were assembled to create a light-weight, portable, and robust optical spectrometer that could be easily translated for repeated and reliable use in mobile settings. The three systems were built using a broadband light source and a compact, commercially available spectrograph. We tested two different light sources and two spectrographs (manufactured by two different vendors). The assembled systems were characterized by their signal-to-noise ratios, the source-intensity drifts, and detector linearity. We quantified the performance of these instruments in extracting optical properties from diffuse reflectance spectra in tissue-mimicking liquid phantoms with well-controlled optical absorption and scattering coefficients. We show that all assembled systems were able to extract the optical absorption and scattering properties with errors less than 10%, while providing greater than ten-fold decrease in footprint and cost (relative to a previously well-characterized and widely used commercial system). Finally, we demonstrate the use of these small systems to measure optical biomarkers in vivo in a small-animal model cancer therapy study. We show that optical measurements from the simple portable system provide estimates of tumor oxygen saturation similar to those detected using the commercial system in murine tumor models of head and neck cancer.

  20. Glow discharge lamp: a light source for optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwanathan, K.S.; Srinivasan, V.; Nalini, S.; Mahalingam, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A glow discharge lamp based on a modified version of the Grimm design has been fabricated. Its utility as a radiation source for optical emmission spectrography by standardising a method for the analysis of low alloy steels using a set of certified standards from DMRL, Hyderabad, has been demonstrated. A model has been proposed where the sputtering rates of different metals have been correlated with their heats of sublimation, metallic radii and densities. Sputtering rates of ten different metals obtained from literature have been used to test this model, and the correlation appears to be excellent. (author). 19 re fs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Classification of Several Optically Complex Waters in China Using in Situ Remote Sensing Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Shen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Determining the dominant optically active substances in water bodies via classification can improve the accuracy of bio-optical and water quality parameters estimated by remote sensing. This study provides four robust centroid sets from in situ remote sensing reflectance (Rrs (λ data presenting typical optical types obtained by plugging different similarity measures into fuzzy c-means (FCM clustering. Four typical types of waters were studied: (1 highly mixed eutrophic waters, with the proportion of absorption of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, phytoplankton, and non-living particulate matter at approximately 20%, 20%, and 60% respectively; (2 CDOM-dominated relatively clear waters, with approximately 45% by proportion of CDOM absorption; (3 nonliving solids-dominated waters, with approximately 88% by proportion of absorption of nonliving particulate matter; and (4 cyanobacteria-composed scum. We also simulated spectra from seven ocean color satellite sensors to assess their classification ability. POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER, Sentinel-2A, and MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS were found to perform better than the rest. Further, a classification tree for MERIS, in which the characteristics of Rrs (709/Rrs (681, Rrs (560/Rrs (709, Rrs (560/Rrs (620, and Rrs (709/Rrs (761 are integrated, is also proposed in this paper. The overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient of the proposed classification tree are 76.2% and 0.632, respectively.

  2. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionigi, F.; Hansen, O.; Nielsen, M. G.; Chorkendorff, I.; Vesborg, P. C. K.; Pedersen, T.

    2013-01-01

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ∼0.4 and ∼4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented

  3. Optical Fiber-Tip Sensors Based on In-Situ µ-Printed Polymer Suspended-Microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mian; Ouyang, Xia; Wu, Jushuai; Zhang, A Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Wai, P K A

    2018-06-05

    Miniature optical fiber-tip sensors based on directly µ-printed polymer suspended-microbeams are presented. With an in-house optical 3D μ-printing technology, SU-8 suspended-microbeams are fabricated in situ to form Fabry⁻Pérot (FP) micro-interferometers on the end face of standard single-mode optical fiber. Optical reflection spectra of the fabricated FP micro-interferometers are measured and fast Fourier transform is applied to analyze the cavity of micro-interferometers. The applications of the optical fiber-tip sensors for refractive index (RI) sensing and pressure sensing, which showed 917.3 nm/RIU to RI change and 4.29 nm/MPa to pressure change, respectively, are demonstrated in the experiments. The sensors and their optical µ-printing method unveil a new strategy to integrate complicated microcomponents on optical fibers toward 'lab-on-fiber' devices and applications.

  4. Optical emission and mass spectroscopy of plasma processes in reactive DC pulsed magnetron sputtering of aluminium oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Pokorný, Petr; Bočan, Jiří; Fitl, Přemysl; Lančok, Ján; Musil, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2010), 697-700 ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100718; GA AV ČR KAN400100653; GA ČR GP202/09/P324 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : reactive magnetron sputtering * alumina * plasma spectroscopy * mass spectroscopy * optical emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2010

  5. Spectroscopy of molecules in very high rotational states using an optical centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liwei; Toro, Carlos; Bell, Mack; Mullin, Amy S

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a high power optical centrifuge for measuring the spectroscopy of molecules in extreme rotational states. The optical centrifuge has a pulse energy that is more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than in earlier instruments. The large pulse energy allows us to drive substantial number densities of molecules to extreme rotational states in order to measure new spectroscopic transitions that are not accessible with traditional methods. Here we demonstrate the use of the optical centrifuge for measuring IR transitions of N2O from states that have been inaccessible until now. In these studies, the optical centrifuge drives N2O molecules into states with J ~ 200 and we use high resolution transient IR probing to measure the appearance of population in states with J = 93-99 that result from collisional cooling of the centrifuged molecules. High resolution Doppler broadened line profile measurements yield information about the rotational and translational energy distributions in the optical centrifuge.

  6. Optical frequency comb for high resolution hydrogen spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoult, O.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we perform an absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-3S transition in atomic hydrogen, in order to improve the uncertainties on both the Rydberg constant and the Lamb shift L1S. In the experiment, a CW stabilized Ti:Sa laser is doubled twice in LBO (LiB 3 O 5 ) and BBO (β-BaB 2 O 4 ) crystals. The 1S-3S transition is excited by two photons at 205 nm in an optical cavity colinear with the atomic beam, at room temperature. The remaining second-order Doppler effect is compensated by a quadratic Stark effect resulting from an applied static magnetic field. An optical frequency comb is used to compare directly the Ti:Sa frequency with the microwave frequency standard. We detect fluorescence at 656 nm thanks to a CCD camera. Fitting the experimental data with our calculated line shapes leads to a value of the second-order Doppler effect in disagreement with approximative predictions for the 1S-3S frequency. We suggest the existence of stray electric fields as a possible systematic effect. The slides of the defence of the thesis have been added at the end of the document. (author)

  7. Localization Spectroscopy of a Single Ion in an Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Olivier Philippe Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing-wave. Bes...... as a new tool for future cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the Ion trap group at Aarhus University.......-wave. Besides providing a better understanding of the dynamics of an ion subjected to varying trapping conditions, this work establishes a basis for future studies of various quantum many-body physics models, for manipulations of the structure of large ion Coulomb crystals, and for optimization...... of the interaction between light and matter in connection with quantum information experiments. In addition to the deep, three-dimensional harmonic potential of the linear Paul trap which confines the ion in regions of several millimeters, one of the directions of the ion motion is constrained by the application...

  8. An overview on applications of optical spectroscopy in cervical cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilakapati Murali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the treatment modalities, cervical cancers are one of the leading causes of cancer death among women. Pap smear and colposcopy are the existing screening methods and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. However, these methods have been shown to be prone to reporting errors, which could be due to their subjective interpretation. Radiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the locally advanced stages of cervical cancers. The typical treatment regimen spans over 4 months, from the first fraction of radiation to clinical assessment of tumor response to radiotherapy. It is often noticed that due to intrinsic properties of tumors, patients with the same clinical stage and histological type respond differently to radiotherapy. Hence, there exists a need for the development of new methods for early diagnosis as well as for early prediction of tumor radioresponse. Optical spectroscopic methods have been shown to be potential alternatives for use in cancer diagnosis. In this review, we provide a brief background on the anatomy and histology of the uterine cervix and the etiology of cervical cancers; we briefly discuss the optical spectroscopic approach to cervical cancer diagnosis. A very brief discussion on radiation therapy and radiation resistance is also provided. We also share our experiences with the Raman spectroscopic methodologies in cervical cancer diagnosis as well as in the prediction of tumor radioresponse.

  9. A pilot study on the use of optical spectroscopy to detection of liver fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabila, A; La Rosa, J. de; Stolik, S.; Escobedo, C.; Suarez Alvarez, K.; Lopez Navarrete, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary study to evaluate the use of optical spectroscopy as a tool to detect liver fibrosis. In vivo fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired from male rats in which fibrosis were induced by means of carbon tetrachloride. Spectral measurements were obtained using a portable system with an excitation source of 365 nm and a fiber-optic probe. The livers from rats with fibrosis showed an increase in fluorescence and diffuse reflectance intensity when compared to normal liver tissue. A support vector machine discrimination algorithm based on fluorescence and diffuse reflectance intensities at 493 and 365 nm was developed. This algorithm yields a sensitivity and specificity of 88% and 94%, respectively, in differentiating fibrotic liver from normal liver tissue. the results obtained in this study suggest that optical spectroscopy could be worthy of further exploration in patients. (Author)

  10. In-Situ Measurement of Chirality of Molecules and Molecular Assemblies with Surface Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hongfei

    2012-01-01

    Developments in quantitative measurement and analysis in nonlinear surface spectroscopy, namely, second harmonic generation linear dichroism (SHG-LD) and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy linear dichroism (SFG-VS-LD), provide new opportunities for probing the surface chirality of monolayers and thin films. In this book chapter, the up-to-date theoretical background and experimental methodology, as well as examples and future perspectives on the developments with surface nonlinear spectroscopy in surface chirality studies are to be summarized and outlined for general readers.

  11. In situ deuterium inventory measurements of a-C:D layers on tungsten in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, N; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Huber, A; Laengner, M; Möller, S; Nonhoff, M; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Xiao, Q; Zlobinski, M; Samm, U; Giesen, T F

    2014-01-01

    Laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) is a diagnostic to provide temporally and spatially resolved in situ measurements of tritium retention and material migration in order to characterize the status of the first wall in future fusion devices. In LIAS, a ns-laser pulse ablates the first nanometres of the first wall plasma-facing components into the plasma edge. The resulting line radiation by plasma excitation is observed by spectroscopy. In the case of the full ionizing plasma and with knowledge of appropriate photon efficiencies for the corresponding line emission the amount of ablated material can be measured in situ. We present the photon efficiency for the deuterium Balmer α-line resulting from ablation in TEXTOR by performing LIAS on amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:D) layers deposited on tungsten substrate of thicknesses between 0.1 and 1.1 μm. An experimental inverse photon efficiency of [(D/(XB))] D α (EXP) a-C:D→ LIAS D =75.9±23.4 was determined. This value is a factor 5 larger than predicted values from the ADAS database for atomic injection of deuterium under TEXTOR plasma edge conditions and about twice as high, assuming normal wall recycling and release of molecular deuterium and break-up of D 2 via the molecular ion which is usually observed at the high temperature tokamak edge (T e  > 30 eV). (paper)

  12. In situ oxidation state profiling of nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes using line-imaging Raman spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, S.M.; Schwartz, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    Metal hexacyanoferrate compounds show promise as electrochemically switchable ion exchange materials for use in the cleanup of radioactive wastes such as those found in storage basins and underground tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Reported is the use of line-imaging Raman spectroscopy for the in situ determination of oxidation state profiles in nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes under potential control in an electrochemical cell. Line-imaging Raman spectroscopy is used to collect 256 contiguous Raman spectra every ∼5 microm from thin films (ca. 80 nm) formed by electrochemical derivatization of nickel electrodes. The cyanide stretching region of the Raman spectrum of the film is shown to be sensitive to iron oxidation state and is modeled by both univariate and multivariate correlations. Although both correlations fit the calibration set well, the multivariate (principle component regression or PCR) model's predictions of oxidation state are less sensitive to noise in the spectrum, yielding a much smoother oxidation state profile than the univariate model. Oxidation state profiles with spatial resolution of approximately 5 microm are shown for a nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrode in reduced, intermediate, and oxidized states. In situ oxidation state profiles indicate that the 647.1 nm laser illumination photo-oxidizes the derivatized electrodes. This observation is confirmed using photoelectrochemical methods

  13. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  14. Two-Photon Vibrational Spectroscopy using local optical fields of gold and silver nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Harald

    2007-03-01

    Spectroscopic effects can be strongly affected when they take place in the immediate vicinity of metal nanostructures due to coupling to surface plasmons. We introduce a new approach that suggests highly efficient two-photon labels as well as two-photon vibrational spectroscopy for non-destructive chemical probing. The underlying spectroscopic effect is the incoherent inelastic scattering of two photons on the vibrational quantum states performed in the enhanced local optical fields of gold nanoparticles, surface enhanced hyper Raman scattering (SEHRS). We infer effective two-photon cross sections for SEHRS on the order of 10^5 GM, similar or higher than the best known cross sections for two-photon fluorescence. SEHRS combines the advantages of two-photon spectroscopy with the structural information of vibrational spectroscopy, and the high sensitivity and nanometer-scale local confinement of plasmonics-based spectroscopy.

  15. In situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy exploring molecular changes of drug-treated cancer cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lijia; Huang, Dianshuai; Wang, Hailong; Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuping; Chang, Yixin; Li, Hui; Yang, Ying-Wei; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2015-02-17

    Investigating the molecular changes of cancer cell nucleus with drugs treatment is crucial for the design of new anticancer drugs, the development of novel diagnostic strategies, and the advancement of cancer therapy efficiency. In order to better understand the action effects of drugs, accurate location and in situ acquisition of the molecular information of the cell nuclei are necessary. In this work, we report a microspectroscopic technique called dark-field and fluorescence coimaging assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, combined with nuclear targeting nanoprobes, to in situ study Soma Gastric Cancer (SGC-7901) cell nuclei treated with two model drugs, e.g., DNA binder (Hoechst33342) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin, Dox) via spectral analysis at the molecular level. Nuclear targeting nanoprobes with an assembly structure of thiol-modified polyethylene glycol polymers (PEG) and nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLS) around gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared to achieve the amplified SERS signals of biomolecules in the cell nuclei. With the assistance of dark field/fluorescence imaging with simultaneous location, in situ SERS spectra in one cell nucleus were measured and analyzed to disclose the effects of Hoechst33342 and Dox on main biomolecules in the cell nuclei. The experimental results show that this method possesses great potential to investigate the targets of new anticancer drugs and the real-time monitoring of the dynamic changes of cells caused by exogenous molecules.

  16. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  17. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  18. Photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy of single optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Paul A.; Cremer, Johannes W.; Signorell, Ruth

    2017-08-01

    Photoacoustics have been widely used for the study of aerosol optical properties. To date, these studies have been performed on particle ensembles, with minimal ability to control for particle size. Here, we present our singleparticle photoacoustic spectrometer. The sensitivity and stability of the instrument is discussed, along with results from two experiments that illustrate the unique capabilities of this instrument. In the first experiment, we present a measurement of the particle size-dependence of the photoacoustic response. Our results confirm previous models of aerosol photoacoustics that had yet to be experimentally tested. The second set of results reveals a size-dependence of photochemical processes within aerosols that results from the nanofocusing of light within individual droplets.

  19. Cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with optical feedback cw diode lasers for gas phase analysis and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Robert; Chu, Johnny; Hippler, Michael

    2012-10-21

    A variant of cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS) is introduced, in which diode laser radiation at 635 nm is coupled into an external linear optical cavity composed of two highly reflective mirrors. Using optical feedback stabilisation, build-up of circulating laser power by 3 orders of magnitude occurs. Strong Raman signals are collected in forward scattering geometry. Gas phase CERS spectra of H(2), air, CH(4) and benzene are recorded to demonstrate the potential for analytical applications and fundamental molecular studies. Noise equivalent limits of detection in the ppm by volume range (1 bar sample) can be achieved with excellent linearity with a 10 mW excitation laser, with sensitivity increasing with laser power and integration time. The apparatus can be operated with battery powered components and can thus be very compact and portable. Possible applications include safety monitoring of hydrogen gas levels, isotope tracer studies (e.g., (14)N/(15)N ratios), observing isotopomers of hydrogen (e.g., radioactive tritium), and simultaneous multi-component gas analysis. CERS has the potential to become a standard method for sensitive gas phase Raman spectroscopy.

  20. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossabi, J.; Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F.; Lee, L.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site

  1. High definition in-situ electro-optical characterization for Roll to Roll printed electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Resume: Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed organic electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility...... and molecular packing of the polymer semiconductor material. Unfortunately, the analysis of such materials is generally performed with destructive techniques, which are hard to make compatible with in situ measurements, and pose a great obstacle for the mass production of printed electronics devices. A rapid......-photon induced photoluminescence (TPPL) and second harmonic response. We anticipate that this non-linear optical method will substantially contribute to the understanding of printed electronic devices and demonstrate it as a promising novel tool for non-destructive and facile testing of materials during printing...

  2. Fiber-optic pH sensor for in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, M.H.; Dureault, B.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility of a fiber-optic pH sensor was carried out. The pH sensor is composed of an optode connected to the transmitter-receiver apparatus (Optolec H) through a 100 m-long fiber. Three diodes of carefully chosen wavelengths are located in the Optolec H and emit through a bundle of nine fibers to the end of the optode where the oncoming light is reflected on an immobilized pH-indicator-based spherical bead of resin and sent back for analysis to the Optolec H through a central fiber. The influence of ionic strength as well as precision, response time, and lifetime have been determined. This device is to be used for routine in-situ measurements in an underground laboratory devoted to studies in connection with nuclear waste repositories where harsh conditions are encountered for direct collection of waters and traditional post-determination with a pH-meter

  3. In situ chemical characterization of waste sludges using FTIR-based fiber optic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Jeppson, D.W.; Lockrem, L.L.; Blewett, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    The characterization of unknown mixed wastes is a mandatory step in today's climate of strict environmental regulations. Cleaning up the nuclear and chemical wastes that have accumulated for 50 years at the Hanford Site is the largest single cleanup task in the United States today. The wastes are stored temporarily in carbon steel single- and double-shell tanks that are buried in tank farms at the Site. In the 1950s, a process to scavenge radioactive cesium and other soluble radionuclides in the wastes was developed to create additional tank space for waste storage. This scavenging process involved treatment of the wastes with alkali cyanoferrates and nickel sulfate to precipitate 137 Cs in the presence of nitrate oxidant. Recent safety issues have focused on the stability of cyanoferrate-bearing wastes with large quantities of nitrates and nitrites. Nitrate has been partially converted to nitrite as a result of radiolysis during more than 35 years of storage. The major safety issue is the possibility of the presence of local hot spots enriched in 137 Cs and 90 Sr that under optimum conditions can self-heat causing dry out and a potential runaway reaction of the cyanoferrates with the nitrates/nitrites). For waste tank safety, accurate data of the concentration and distribution of cyanoferrates in the tanks are needed. Because of the extensive sampling required and the highly restricted activities allowed in the tank farms, simulated tank wastes are used to provide an initial basis for identifying and quantifying realistic concerns prior to waste remediation. Fiber optics provide a tool for the remote and in situ characterization of hazardous and toxic materials. This study is focused on near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) fiber optic sensors for in situ chemical characterization of Hanford Site waste sludges

  4. Optical spectroscopy of the Ce-doped multicomponent garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canimoglu, A.; Karabulut, Y.; Ayvacikli, M.; Muresan, L.E.; Perhaita, I.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.; Garcia Guinea, J.; Karali, T.; Can, N.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report our results referring to the preparation of Ce doped Y 2.22 MgGa 2 Al 2 SiO 12 , Y 1.93 MgAl 4 SiO 12 and Y 2.22 Gd 0.75 Ga 2 Al 3 O 12 using solid state reaction at high temperature. Several complementary methods (i.e. powder x-ray diffraction (XRPD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) were studied to examine the effects of the synthesis procedure on the morphology and structure. XRD analyses revealed that all compounds include yttrium aluminate phase with garnet structure. Cathodoluminescence (CL), radioluminescence (RL) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out for clarification of relationship between host lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. Luminescence emission of phosphors is peaked at 530 nm assigned to 5d-4f transitions of the dopant Ce 3+ ions with a broad emission band in 400–700 nm range. Under electron irradiation, the emission spectrum of Ce doped (YGd) 3 Ga 2 Al 3 O 12 is well defined and has a characteristic fairly narrow and sharp emission band peaking at 312 nm and 624 nm corresponding to transition of 6 P 7/2 → 8 S 7/2 and 6 G J → 6 P J (Gd 3+ ), respectively. We suggest some of phosphors might be excellent phototherapy phosphor materials under electron excitation. - Highlights: • Ce-doped Multicomponent Garnets were prepared solid state reaction method. • The shape and size of phosphor particles were examined. • The narrow band UV B emission due to Gd 3+ ions were observed.

  5. Titanium monoxide spectroscopy following laser-induced optical breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.; Keszler, Anna; Nemes, László; Hornkohl, James O.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates Titanium Monoxide (TiO) in ablation-plasma by employing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with 1 to 10 TW/cm 2 irradiance, pulsed, 13 nanosecond, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The analysis of TiO is based on our first accurate determination of transition line strengths for selected TiO A-X, B-X, and E-X transitions, particularly TiO A-X γ and B-X γ′ bands. Electric dipole line strengths for the A 3 Φ-X 3 δ and B 3 Π-X 3 δ bands of TiO are computed. The molecular TiO spectra are observed subsequent to laser-induced breakdown (LIB). We discuss analysis of diatomic molecular spectra that may occur simultaneously with spectra originating from atomic species. Gated detection is applied to investigate the development in time of the emission spectra following LIB. Collected emission spectra allow one to infer micro-plasma parameters such as temperature and electron density. Insight into the state of the micro-plasma is gained by comparing measurements with predictions of atomic and molecular spectra. Nonlinear fitting of recorded and computed diatomic spectra provides the basis for molecular diagnostics, while atomic species may overlap and are simultaneously identified. Molecular diagnostic approaches similar to TiO have been performed for diatomic molecules such as AlO, C 2 , CN, CH, N 2 , NH, NO and OH.

  6. Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite films studied by magneto-optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lišková-Jakubisová, E., E-mail: liskova@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Višňovský, Š. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague (Czech Republic); Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J. [Nanotechnology Center, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Sahoo, Subasa C. [Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala 671314 (India); Prasad, Shiva [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Venkataramani, N. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bohra, Murtaza [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), Okinawa (Japan); Krishnan, R. [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS-UVSQ, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78935 Versailles (France)

    2015-05-07

    Ferrimagnetic Zn-ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) films can be grown with the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of 40 Oe at 9.5 GHz without going through a high temperature processing. This presents interest for applications. The work deals with laser ablated ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films deposited at O{sub 2} pressure of 0.16 mbar onto fused quartz substrates. The films about 120 nm thick are nanocrystalline and their spontaneous magnetization, 4πM{sub s}, depends on the nanograin size, which is controlled by the substrate temperature (T{sub s}). At T{sub s} ≈ 350 °C, where the grain distribution peaks around ∼20–30 nm, the room temperature 4πM{sub s} reaches a maximum of ∼2.3 kG. The films were studied by magnetooptical polar Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy at photon energies between 1 and 5 eV. The complementary characteristics were provided by spectral ellipsometry (SE). Both the SE and MOKE spectra confirmed ferrimagnetic ordering. The structural details correspond to those observed in MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} spinels. SE experiments confirm the insulator behavior. The films display MOKE amplitudes somewhat reduced with respect to those in Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to a lower degree of spinel inversion and nanocrystalline structure. The results indicate that the films are free of oxygen vacancies and Fe{sup 3+}-Fe{sup 2+} exchange.

  7. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, R C; Gleason-Villagran, R; Cheang-Wong, J C; Crespo-Sosa, A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Lopez-Suarez, A; Oliver, A; Reyes-Esqueda, J A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Torres-Torres, C [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Zacatenco, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. 07338 (Mexico); Rangel-Rojo, R, E-mail: reyes@fisica.unam.mx [CICESE/Depto. de Optica, A.P. 360, Ensenada, B. C. 22860 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the nonlinear absorption and refraction of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites, which consist of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in matrices of SiO{sub 2}. We performed this study at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique in the picosecond regime. The wavelengths were selected accordingly to the absorption spectra of the nanocomposites, choosing wavelengths into the inter- and intra-band transitions regions, including the surface plasmon (SP) resonance, as well as in the transparent region. For the anisotropic nanocomposites, the polarization and the incident angle were varied in order to evaluate the different components of the third order susceptibility tensor, {chi}{sup (3)}. We observed dramatic changes of sign for both, nonlinear refraction and absorption, when passing from Au to Ag and/or varying the wave length. The results accentuate the importance of the hot-electrons contribution to the nonlinear optical response at this temporal regime, when compared to inter-band and intra-band transitions contributions.

  8. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, R C; Gleason-Villagran, R; Cheang-Wong, J C; Crespo-Sosa, A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Lopez-Suarez, A; Oliver, A; Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Torres-Torres, C; Rangel-Rojo, R

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the nonlinear absorption and refraction of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites, which consist of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in matrices of SiO 2 . We performed this study at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique in the picosecond regime. The wavelengths were selected accordingly to the absorption spectra of the nanocomposites, choosing wavelengths into the inter- and intra-band transitions regions, including the surface plasmon (SP) resonance, as well as in the transparent region. For the anisotropic nanocomposites, the polarization and the incident angle were varied in order to evaluate the different components of the third order susceptibility tensor, χ (3) . We observed dramatic changes of sign for both, nonlinear refraction and absorption, when passing from Au to Ag and/or varying the wave length. The results accentuate the importance of the hot-electrons contribution to the nonlinear optical response at this temporal regime, when compared to inter-band and intra-band transitions contributions.

  9. THz dynamics of nanoconfined water by ultrafast optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Torre, R

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the vibrational dynamics and structural relaxation of water nanoconfined in porous silica samples with a pore size of 4 nm at different levels of hydration and temperature. We used the time-resolved optical Kerr effect (OKE), a spectroscopic technique that enables investigation of ultrafast water dynamics in a wide time (0.1–10 ps) or frequency (10 – 0.1 THz) window. At low hydration levels corresponding to two complete superficial water layers, no freezing occurs and the water remains mobile at all investigated temperatures. Meanwhile, at full hydration we witness a partial ice formation at about 248 K that coexists with the surface water remaining in the supercooled state. At low hydration, both structural and vibrational dynamics show significant modifications compared to bulk liquid water. This is due to the strong interaction of the water molecules with silica surfaces. Inner water, however, reveals relaxation dynamics very similar to bulk water. (paper)

  10. An in situ Raman spectroscopy system for long-term corrosion experiments in high temperature water up to 673 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Tani, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    A Raman spectroscopy system has been developed, in order to identify oxides formed on the surfaces of metals and steels in high temperature water up to 673 K. A supercritical water loop system including a Raman cell was installed. The design of the loop system is up to 673 K and 40 MPa. The Raman cell has a diamond window without window-to-metal packing. Raman spectrum of alumina plate was measured at room temperature, at 523 and at 673 K under pressure of 25 MPa. A long-term measurement was also performed at 523 K and 25 MPa for 117.5 h. In all cases intense Raman peaks attributed to alumina were observed. Raman spectrum of anatase particles in suspension was measured at 673 K and 25 MPa. The results show that the Raman spectroscopy system developed in the present study works well not only for plate sample but also for suspension. Raman spectra observed for titanium plate in high temperature water of 673 K and 25 MPa show growth of several Raman peaks with time up to 257 h. The peaks disappeared after cooled down to room temperature. The experimental results have demonstrated importance of in situ Raman spectroscopy. (author)

  11. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  12. Structural and optical characterization of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PANI nanocomposite prepared by in-situ polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeoo, Shashi; Sharma, Mamta, E-mail: mamta.phy85@gmail.com; Goswamy, J. [Department of Applied Sciences (Physics), UIET, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160 014 (India); Singh, Gurinder [Department of Applied Sciences (Physics), UIET, PUSSGSRC, Hoshiarpur (Punjab) (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline-indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PANI) nanocomposite have been prepared by in-situ polymerization of aniline and as-synthesized In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PANI nanocomposite. TEM analysis shows In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are embedded in PANI nanofibers. FTIR spectra show the good interactions between PANI nanofibers and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The band gap and electronic transitions in In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PANI nanocomposite is determined by using UV/Vis spectra.

  13. Optical spectroscopy versus mass spectrometry: The race for fieldable isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshick, C.M.; Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Several techniques have been developed to provide on-site isotopic analyses, including decay-counting and mass spectrometry, as well as methods that rely on the accessibility of optical transitions for isotopic selectivity (e.g., laser-induced fluorescence and optogalvanic spectroscopy). The authors have been investigating both mass spectrometry and optogalvanic spectroscopy for several years. Although others have considered these techniques for isotopic analysis, the authors have focussed on the use of a dc glow discharge for atomization and ionization, and a demountable discharge cell for rapid sample exchange. The authors' goal is a fieldable instrument that provides useful uranium isotope ratio information

  14. DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) urban pollution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Vossler, T. L.

    1991-05-01

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. Over path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (03), sulfur dioxide (SO2) nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HNO2) formaldehyde (HCHO), benzene, toluene, and o-xylene were measured. Nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) were monitored over path 3 (143 m). The data quality and data capture depended on the compound being measured and the path over which it was measured. Data quality criteria for each compound were chosen such that the average relative standard deviation would be less than 25%. Data capture ranged from 43% for o-xylene for path 1 to 95% for ozone for path 2. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene concentrations measured over path 2, which crossed over an interstate highway, were higher than concentrations measured over path 1, implicating emissions from vehicles on the highway as a significant source of these compounds. Federal Reference Method (FRN) instruments were located near the DOAS light receivers and measurements of 03, NO2, and NO were made concurrently with the DOAS. Correlation coefficients greater than 0.85 were obtained between the DOAS and FRM's; however, there was a difference between the mean values obtained by the two methods for 03 and NO. A gas chromatograph for measuring volatile organic compounds was operated next to the FRN's. Correlation coefficients of about 0.66 were obtained between the DOAS and GC measurements of benzene and o- xylene. However, the correlation coefficient between the DOAS and GC measurements of toluene averaged only 0.15 for the two DOAS measurement paths. The lack of correlation and other factors indicate the possibility of a localized source of toluene near the GC. In general, disagreements between the two measurement methods could be caused by atmospheric inhomogeneities or interferences in the DOAS and other methods.

  15. End point detection in ion milling processes by sputter-induced optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.; Dorian, M.; Tabei, M.; Elsea, A.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic optical emission from the sputtered material during ion milling processes can provide an unambiguous indication of the presence of the specific etched species. By monitoring the intensity of a representative emission line, the etching process can be precisely terminated at an interface. Enhancement of the etching end point is possible by using a dual-channel photodetection system operating in a ratio or difference mode. The installation of the optical detection system to an existing etching chamber has been greatly facilitated by the use of optical fibers. Using a commercial ion milling system, experimental data for a number of etching processes have been obtained. The result demonstrates that sputter-induced optical emission spectroscopy offers many advantages over other techniques in detecting the etching end point of ion milling processes

  16. In situ Biofilm Quantification in Bioelectrochemical Systems by using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Sam D; Sleutels, Tom; Pereira, Joao; Iorio, Matteo; Borsje, Casper; Zamudio, Julian A; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Buisman, Cees J N; Ter Heijne, Annemiek

    2018-04-25

    Detailed studies of microbial growth in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are required for their suitable design and operation. Here, we report the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a tool for in situ and noninvasive quantification of biofilm growth on electrodes (bioanodes). An experimental platform is designed and described in which transparent electrodes are used to allow real-time, 3D biofilm imaging. The accuracy and precision of the developed method is assessed by relating the OCT results to well-established standards for biofilm quantification (chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total N content) and show high correspondence to these standards. Biofilm thickness observed by OCT ranged between 3 and 90 μm for experimental durations ranging from 1 to 24 days. This translated to growth yields between 38 and 42 mgCODbiomass  gCODacetate -1 at an anode potential of -0.35 V versus Ag/AgCl. Time-lapse observations of an experimental run performed in duplicate show high reproducibility in obtained microbial growth yield by the developed method. As such, we identify OCT as a powerful tool for conducting in-depth characterizations of microbial growth dynamics in BESs. Additionally, the presented platform allows concomitant application of this method with various optical and electrochemical techniques. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  17. Nondestructive and in situ determination of graphene layers using optical fiber Fabry–Perot interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Cheng; Peng, Xiaobin; Liu, Qianwen; Fan, Shangchun; Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao

    2017-01-01

    Thickness measurement plays an important role for characterizing optomechanical behaviors of graphene. From the view of graphene-based Fabry–Perot (F–P) sensors, a simple, nondestructive and in situ method of determining the thickness of nanothick graphene membranes was demonstrated by using optical fiber F–P interference. Few-layer/multilayer graphene sheets were suspendedly adhered onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125 µ m inner diameter by van der Waals interactions to construct micro F–P cavities. Along with the Fresnel’s law and complex index of refraction of the membrane working as a light reflector of an F–P interferometer, the optical reflectivity of graphene was modeled to investigate the effects of light wavelength and temperature. Then the average thickness of graphene membranes were extracted by F–P interference demodulation, and yielded a very strong cross-correlation coefficient of 99.95% with the experimental results observed by Raman spectrum and atomic force microscope. The method could be further extended for determining the number of layers of other 2D materials. (paper)

  18. In situ measurements of the optical absorption of dioxythiophene-based conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Schwendeman, I.; Ihas, B. C.; Clark, R. J.; Cornick, M.; Nikolou, M.; Argun, A.; Reynolds, J. R.; Tanner, D. B.

    2011-05-01

    Conjugated polymers can be reversibly doped by electrochemical means. This doping introduces new subband-gap optical absorption bands in the polymer while decreasing the band-gap absorption. To study this behavior, we have prepared an electrochemical cell allowing in situ measurements of the optical properties of the polymer. The cell consists of a thin polymer film deposited on gold-coated Mylar behind which is another polymer that serves as a counterelectrode. An infrared transparent window protects the upper polymer from ambient air. By adding a gel electrolyte and making electrical connections to the polymer-on-gold films, one may study electrochromism in a wide spectral range. As the cell voltage (the potential difference between the two electrodes) changes, the doping level of the conjugated polymer films is changed reversibly. Our experiments address electrochromism in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly(3,4-dimethylpropylenedioxythiophene) (PProDOT-Me2). This closed electrochemical cell allows the study of the doping induced subband-gap features (polaronic and bipolaronic modes) in these easily oxidized and highly redox switchable polymers. We also study the changes in cell spectra as a function of polymer thickness and investigate strategies to obtain cleaner spectra, minimizing the contributions of water and gel electrolyte features.

  19. In-SITU Raman Spectroscopy of Single Microparticle Li-Intercalation Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokko, Kaoru; Shi, Qing-Fang; Stefan, Ionel C.; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    Modifications in the vibrational properties of a single microparticle of LiMn2O4 induced by extraction and subsequent injection of Li(+) into the lattice have been monitored in situ via simultaneous acquisition of Raman scattering spectra and cyclic voltammetry data in 1M LiC1O4 solutions in ethylene carbonate (EC):diethyl carbonate (DEC) mixtures (1:1 by volume). Statistical analyses of the spectra in the range 15 < SOD < 45%, where SOD represents the state of discharge (in percent) of the nominally fully charged material, i.e. lambda-MnO2, were found to be consistent with the coexistence of two distinct phases of lithiated metal oxide in agreement with information derived from in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements involving more conventional battery-type electrodes.

  20. Metal-filled carbon nanotube based optical nanoantennas: bubbling, reshaping, and in situ characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zheng; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Xudong; Fan, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Dong, Lixin

    2012-09-21

    Controlled fabrication of metal nanospheres on nanotube tips for optical antennas is investigated experimentally. Resembling soap bubble blowing using a straw, the fabrication process is based on nanofluidic mass delivery at the attogram scale using metal-filled carbon nanotubes (m@CNTs). Two methods have been investigated including electron-beam-induced bubbling (EBIB) and electromigration-based bubbling (EMBB). EBIB involves the bombardment of an m@CNT with a high energy electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), with which the encapsulated metal is melted and flowed out from the nanotube, generating a metallic particle on a nanotube tip. In the case where the encapsulated materials inside the CNT have a higher melting point than what the beam energy can reach, EMBB is an optional process to apply. Experiments show that, under a low bias (2.0-2.5 V), nanoparticles can be formed on the nanotube tips. The final shape and crystallinity of the nanoparticles are determined by the cooling rate. Instant cooling occurs with a relatively large heat sink and causes the instant shaping of the solid deposit, which is typically similar to the shape of the molten state. With a smaller heat sink as a probe, it is possible to keep the deposit in a molten state. Instant cooling by separating the deposit from the probe can result in a perfect sphere. Surface and volume plasmons characterized with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) prove that resonance occurs between a pair of as-fabricated spheres on the tip structures. Such spheres on pillars can serve as nano-optical antennas and will enable devices such as scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probes, scanning anodes for field emitters, and single molecule detectors, which can find applications in bio-sensing, molecular detection, and high-resolution optical microscopy.

  1. In situ Raman spectroscopy of topological insulator BiTe films with varying thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, C.; Zhu, X.; Nilsson, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new state of quantum matter with a band gap in bulk and conducting surface states. In this work, the Raman spectra of topological insulator Bi2Te3 films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been measured by an in situ ultrahigh vacuum (UHV...... effects and symmetry breaking. In addition, an obvious change was observed at 3 QL when a Dirac cone formed. These results offer some new information about the novel quantum states of TIs....

  2. Comparison on in situ and laboratory gamma-ray spectroscopy of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In situ - ray spectroscopic method of measeruments, using the calibration factor by Zombori et al, and laboratory method for soil samples were carried out in Ibadan, SW Nigeria. The average specific activities of 40K, 238U and 232Th in the soil were 299.0 16.5 Bqkg-1, 40.0 5.8 Bqkg-1 and 95.0 7.8 Bqkg-1, respectively, by in ...

  3. Optical spectroscopy, optical conductivity, dielectric properties and new methods for determining the gap states of CuSe thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, G.B.; Yahia, I.S.; Fadel, M.; Fouad, S.S.; Romcevic, N.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The structural, optical dispersion parameters and the Raman spectroscopy have been studied for CuSe thin films. → X-ray diffraction results indicate the amorphous nature of the thermally evaporated CuSe thin films. → The refractive index shows an anomalous dispersion at the lower wavelength (absorption region) and a normal dispersion at the higher wavelengths (transparent region). → The refractive index dispersion obeys the single oscillator model proposed by Wemple and DiDomenico WDD model and the single oscillator parameters were determined. → The band gap of CuSe thin films was determined by three novel methods i.e. (relaxation time, real and imaginary dielectric constant and real and imaginary optical conductivity) which in a good agreement with the Tauc band gap value. - Abstract: The paper describes the structural and optical properties of CuSe thin films. X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that CuSe thin film has an amorphous structure. Transmittance T(λ) and reflectance R(λ) measurements in the wavelength range (300-1700 nm) were used to calculate the refractive index n(λ), the absorption index and the optical dispersion parameters according to Wemple and Didomenico WDD model. The dispersion curve of the refractive index shows an anomalous dispersion in the absorption region and a normal dispersion in the transparent region. The optical bandgap has been estimated and confirmed by four different methods. The value for the direct bandgap for the as-deposited CuSe thin film approximately equals 2.7 eV. The Raman spectroscopy was used to identify and quantify the individual phases presented in the CuSe films.

  4. Electronic and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Malin B; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Österlund, Lars; Baldissera, Gustavo; Persson, Clas; Valyukh, Iryna; Arwin, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of nanocrystalline WO 3 thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering at different total pressures (P tot ) were studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Monoclinic films prepared at low P tot show absorption in the near infrared due to polarons, which is attributed to a strained film structure. Analysis of the optical data yields band-gap energies E g ≈ 3.1 eV, which increase with increasing P tot by 0.1 eV, and correlate with the structural modifications of the films. The electronic structures of triclinic δ-WO 3 , and monoclinic γ- and ε-WO 3 were calculated using the Green function with screened Coulomb interaction (GW approach), and the local density approximation. The δ-WO 3 and γ-WO 3 phases are found to have very similar electronic properties, with weak dispersion of the valence and conduction bands, consistent with a direct band-gap. Analysis of the joint density of states shows that the optical absorption around the band edge is composed of contributions from forbidden transitions (>3 eV) and allowed transitions (>3.8 eV). The calculations show that E g in ε-WO 3 is higher than in the δ-WO 3 and γ-WO 3 phases, which provides an explanation for the P tot dependence of the optical data. (paper)

  5. Electronic and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Malin B.; Baldissera, Gustavo; Valyukh, Iryna; Persson, Clas; Arwin, Hans; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Österlund, Lars

    2013-05-01

    The optical and electronic properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering at different total pressures (Ptot) were studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Monoclinic films prepared at low Ptot show absorption in the near infrared due to polarons, which is attributed to a strained film structure. Analysis of the optical data yields band-gap energies Eg ≈ 3.1 eV, which increase with increasing Ptot by 0.1 eV, and correlate with the structural modifications of the films. The electronic structures of triclinic δ-WO3, and monoclinic γ- and ε-WO3 were calculated using the Green function with screened Coulomb interaction (GW approach), and the local density approximation. The δ-WO3 and γ-WO3 phases are found to have very similar electronic properties, with weak dispersion of the valence and conduction bands, consistent with a direct band-gap. Analysis of the joint density of states shows that the optical absorption around the band edge is composed of contributions from forbidden transitions (>3 eV) and allowed transitions (>3.8 eV). The calculations show that Eg in ε-WO3 is higher than in the δ-WO3 and γ-WO3 phases, which provides an explanation for the Ptot dependence of the optical data.

  6. Feasibility Study on Fiber-optic Radiation Sensor for Remote Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hyesu; Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun and others

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors. As a result, the BGO was suitable for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor due to its high scintillation output and exact photoelectric peak for the gamma-ray energy. The basic principle of radiation detection is to detect the signals caused by interactions between radiations and materials. There are various types of radiation detectors depending on types of radiation to be detected and physical quantities to be measured. As one of the radiation detectors, a fiber-optic radiation sensor using a scintillator and an optical fiber has two advantages such as no space restraint and remote sensing. Moreover, in nuclear environments, this kind of sensor has immunities for electromagnetic field, temperature, and pressure. Thus, the fiber-optic radiation sensor can be used in various fields including nondestructive inspection, radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy. As a fundamental study of the fiber-optic radiation sensor for remote gamma-ray spectroscopy, in this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors

  7. Two-color mid-infrared spectroscopy of optically doped semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forcales, M.; Klik, M.A.J.; Vinh, N.Q.; Phillips, J.; Wells, J-P.R.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2003-01-01

    Optical doping is an attractive method to tailor photonic properties of semiconductor matrices for development of solid-state electroluminescent structures. For practical applications, thermal stability of emission obtained from these materials is required. Thermal processes can be conveniently investigated by two-color spectroscopy in the visible and the mid-infrared. Free-electron laser is a versatile high-brilliance source of radiation in the latter spectral range. In this contribution, we briefly review some of the results obtained recently by the two-color spectroscopy with a free-electron laser in different semiconductors optically doped with rare earth and transition metal ions. Effects leading to both enhancement and quenching of emission from optical dopants will be presented. For InP:Yb, Si:Er, and Si:Cu activation of particular optically induced non-radiative recombination paths will be shown. For Si:Er and Si:Ag, observation of a low temperature optical memory effect will be reported

  8. In-situ UV-Visible and Raman spectroscopy for gas-liquid-solid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemmet, C.P.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the use of UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy to measure the state of a solid in a multiphase reactor. A slurry of particles and a packed bubble column were used. As this study is a proof of principle a model for an active catalyst system, insoluble pH indicators deposited on the

  9. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Isotopically Engineered Graphene Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.003, year: 2015

  10. Using Raman spectroscopy and SERS for in situ studies of rhizosphere bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohseni, Hooman; Agahi, Massoud H.; Razeghi, Manijeh; Polisetti, Sneha; Baig, Nameera; Bible, Amber; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Doktycz, Mitchel; Bohn, Paul W.

    2015-08-21

    Bacteria colonize plant roots to form a symbiotic relationship with the plant and can play in important role in promoting plant growth. Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique to study these bacterial systems and the chemical signals they utilize to interact with the plant. We present a Raman study of Pantoea YR343 that was isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus deltoides (Eastern Cottonwood). Pantoea sp. YR343 produce yellowish carotenoid pigment that play a role in protection against UV radiation, in the anti-oxidative pathways and in membrane fluidity. Raman spectroscopy is used to non-invasively characterize the membrane bound carotenoids. The spectra collected from a mutant strain created by knocking out the crtB gene that encodes a phytoene synthase responsible for early stage of carotenoid biosynthesis, lack the carotenoid peaks. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is being employed to detect the plant phytoharmone indoleacetic acid that is synthesized by the bacteria. This work describes our recent progress towards utilizing Raman spectroscopy as a label free, non-destructive method of studying plant-bacteria interactions in the rhizosphere.

  11. Optical biopsy of breast tissue using differential path-length spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Robert L P van; Amelink, Arjen; Menke-Pluymers, Marian; Pol, Carmen van der; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M

    2005-01-01

    Differential path-length spectroscopy (DPS) was used to determine the local optical properties of breast tissue in vivo. DPS measurements were made on healthy and malignant breast tissue using a fibre-optic needle probe, and were correlated to the histological outcome of core-needle biopsies taken from the same location as the measurements. DPS yields information on the local tissue blood content, the local blood oxygenation, the average micro-vessel diameter, the β-carotene concentration and the scatter slope. Our data show that malignant breast tissue is characterized by a significant decrease in tissue oxygenation and a higher blood content compared to normal breast tissue

  12. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Human Skin Using a Commercial Fiber Optic Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodriguez, M. Cunill; Montiel, S. Vazquez y; Castro, Jorge; Rodriguez, A. Cornejo; Gutierrez, J. L.; Martinez, F.; Gutierrez, B.; Orozco, E.

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a reliable and easy to implement technique in human tissue characterization. In this work we evaluate the performance of the commercial USB4000 miniature fiber optic spectrometer in the in-vivo measurement of the diffuse reflectance spectra of different healthy skin sites and lesions in a population of 54 volunteers. Results show, that this spectrometer reproduces well the typical signatures of skin spectra over the 400-1000 nm region. Remarkable spectral differences exist between lesions and normal surrounding skin. A diffusion-based model was used to simulate reflectance spectra collected by the optical probe of the system

  13. Real time and in situ determination of lead in road sediments using a man-portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunat, J.; Fortes, F.J. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Laserna, J.J. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: laserna@uma.es

    2009-02-02

    In situ, real time levels of lead in road sediments have been measured using a man-portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyzer. The instrument consists of a backpack and a probe housing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser head delivering 50 mJ per pulse at 1064 nm. Plasma emission was collected and transmitted via fiber optic to a compact cross Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with a linear CCD array allocated in the backpack together with a personal computer. The limit of detection (LOD) for lead and the precision measured in the laboratory were 190 {mu}g g{sup -1} (calculated by the 3{sigma} method) and 9% R.S.D. (relative standard deviation), respectively. During the field campaign, averaged Pb concentration in the sediments were ranging from 480 {mu}g g{sup -1} to 660 {mu}g g{sup -1} depending on the inspected area, i.e. the entrance, the central part and the exit of the tunnel. These results were compared with those obtained with flame-atomic absorption spectrometry (flame-AAS). The relative error, expressed as [100(LIBS result - flame AAS result)/(LIBS result)], was approximately 14%.

  14. In Situ Detection of Trace Furfural in Aqueous Solution Based on Au Nanoparticle/Au Film Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Furfural is an important chemical solvent and intermediate. Sensitive detection of this compound has attracted great interest in various fields. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS is a highly sensitive method for material detection because of its optical enhancement effect of plasmonic nanostructures. This study presents a simple and versatile method to synthesize a SERS substrate, where polyaminothiophenol (PATP was used to realize the stable combination of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs and Au film via self-assembly. The near-field electric field distribution was calculated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation to determine the parameters responsible for electric field enhancement. The simulation results show that SERS enhanced factors are sensitive to interparticle spacing and materials for solid support but insensitive to particle size. Moreover, the experimental results show that the optimized substrates with the highest Raman activity were formed by six layers of 60 nm AuNPs decorated on a 30 nm thick Au film, thereby validating the simulation results. The SERS factor of the optimal substrates is approximately 5.57 × 103, and the in situ detection limit is 4.8 ppm. The 3D Raman spectra, relative standard deviation values for major peaks, and changes in signal intensity with time show the good reproducibility and stability of the substrates.

  15. In situ time-resolved X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy of selenite reduction by siderite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badaut, V.; Schlegel, M.L.; Descostes, M.; Moutiers, G.

    2012-01-01

    The reduction oxidation-reaction between aqueous selenite (SeO 3 2- ) and siderite (FeCO 3 (s)) was monitored by in situ, time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the selenium K edge in a controlled electrochemical environment. Spectral evolutions showed that more than 60% of selenite was reduced at the siderite surface after 20 h of experiment, at which time the reaction was still incomplete. Fitting of XANES spectra by linear combination of reference spectra showed that selenite reaction with siderite is essentially a two-step process, selenite ions being immobilized on siderite surface prior to their reduction. A kinetic model of the reduction step is proposed, allowing to identify the specific contribution of surface reduction. These results have strong implications for the retention of selenite by corrosion products in nuclear waste repositories and in a larger extent for the fate of selenium in the environment. (authors)

  16. Precise in situ etch depth control of multilayered III−V semiconductor samples with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kathrin Kleinschmidt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS equipment is applied to monitor dry-etch processes (here specifically reactive ion etching (RIE of monocrystalline multilayered III–V semiconductors in situ. The related accuracy of etch depth control is better than 16 nm. Comparison with results of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS reveals a deviation of only about 4 nm in optimal cases. To illustrate the applicability of the reported method in every day settings for the first time the highly etch depth sensitive lithographic process to form a film lens on the waveguide ridge of a broad area laser (BAL is presented. This example elucidates the benefits of the method in semiconductor device fabrication and also suggests how to fulfill design requirements for the sample in order to make RAS control possible.

  17. In-situ annotation of carbohydrate diversity, abundance, and degradability in highly complex mixtures using NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Many functions of carbohydrates depend on the detection of short structural motifs, approximately up to hexasaccharide length, by receptors or catalysts. This study investigates the usefulness of state-of-the-art 1H–13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for characterizing the diversity......, abundance, and degradability of such short structural motifs in plant-derived carbohydrates. Assignments of carbohydrate signals for 1H–13C NMR spectra of beer, wine, and fruit juice yield up to >130 assignments in situ, i.e. in individual samples without separation or derivatization. More than 500...... structural motifs can be resolved over a concentration range of ~103 in experiments of a few hours duration. The diversity of carbohydrate units increases according to power laws at lower concentrations for both cereal and fruit-derived samples. Simple graphs resolve the smaller overall contribution of more...

  18. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. By assessing the eccentricity of the elliptic shape of a 2D optical correlation spectrum the value of the underlying frequency-frequency correlation function can be retrieved through a very simple relationship. This method yielded both intuitive clues and a quantitative measure of the dynamics of the system.

  19. The Properties of Post-Starburst Quasars Based on Optical Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Cales, Sabrina L.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Shang, Zhaohui; Runnoe, Jessie C.; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Canalizo, Gabriela; Hiner, Kyle D.; Stoll, R.; Ganguly, Rajib; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of a sample of 38 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) at z ~ 0.3, 29 of which have morphological classifications based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. These broad-lined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) possess the spectral signatures of massive intermediate-aged stellar populations making them potentially useful for studying connections between nuclear activity and host galaxy evolution. We model the spectra in order to determine the ages and masses of the host stell...

  20. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS) as a Sensor for Thin Film and Quantum Dot Corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hao; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Wenyong; Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke

    2012-01-01

    Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) is usually applied as a biosensor system to the sorption-desorption of proteins to waveguide surfaces. Here, we show that OWLS can be used to monitor the quality of oxide thin film materials and of coatings of pulsed laser deposition synthesized CdSe quantum dots (QDs) intended for solar energy applications. In addition to changes in data treatment and experimental procedure, oxide- or QD-coated waveguide sensors must be synthesized. We synthesi...

  1. Implementation of a lock-in amplifier for optical spectroscopy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homs, R.; Puron, E.

    2012-01-01

    The experimental set-up of an optical spectroscopy measurement based on virtual instrumentation is presented. A lock-in amplifier has been implemented by applying digital signal processing techniques to a PC-based data acquisition board. The application was developed in C++, on top of open source Qt/Qwt graphical framework. The emission spectral of reference light sources were measured in order to calibrate and validate the system. (Author)

  2. Self-absorption influence on the optical spectroscopy of zinc oxide laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Posada, E; Arronte, M A; Ponce, L; Rodriguez, E; Flores, T [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Unidad Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Lunney, J G, E-mail: edeposada@ipn.mx [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy is used to study the laser ablation process of ZnO targets. It is demonstrated that even if Partial Local Thermal Equilibrium is present, self absorption process leads to a decrease of recorded lines emission intensities and have to be taken into account to obtain correct values of such parameters. It is presented a method that combines results of both Langmuir probe technique and Anisimov model to obtain correct values of plasma parameters.

  3. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-01

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  4. A versatile optical microscope for time-dependent single-molecule and single-particle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yang, Haw

    2018-03-28

    This work reports the design and implementation of a multi-function optical microscope for time-dependent spectroscopy on single molecules and single nanoparticles. It integrates the now-routine single-object measurements into one standalone platform so that no reconfiguration is needed when switching between different types of sample or spectroscopy modes. The illumination modes include evanescent field through total internal reflection, dark-field illumination, and epi-excitation onto a diffraction-limited spot suitable for confocal detection. The detection modes include spectrally resolved line imaging, wide-field imaging with dual-color capability, and two-color single-element photon-counting detection. The switch between different spectroscopy and data acquisition modes is fully automated and executed through computer programming. The capability of this microscope is demonstrated through selected proof-of-principle experiments.

  5. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  6. Blue- and red-shifts of V2O5 phonons in NH3 environment by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke Akande, Amos; Machatine, Augusto Goncalo Jose; Masina, Bathusile; Chimowa, George; Matsoso, Boitumelo; Roro, Kittessa; Duvenhage, Mart-Mari; Swart, Hendrik; Bandyopadhyay, Jayita; Sinha Ray, Suprakas; Wakufwa Mwakikunga, Bonex

    2018-01-01

    A layer of ~30 nm V2O5/100 nm-SiO2 on Si was employed in the in situ Raman spectroscopy in the presence of NH3 effluent from a thermal decomposition of ammonium acetate salt with the salt heated at 100 °C. When the layer is placed at 25 °C, we observe a reversible red-shift of 194 cm-1 V2O5 phonon by 2 cm-1 upon NH3 gas injection to saturation, as well as a reversible blue-shift of the 996 cm-1 by 4 cm-1 upon NH3 injection. However when the sensing layer is placed at 100 °C, the 194 cm-1 remains un-shifted while the 996 cm-1 phonon is red-shifted. There is a decrease/increase in intensity of the 145 cm-1 phonon at 25 °C/100 °C when NH3 interacts with V2O5 surface. Using the traditional and quantitative gas sensor tester system, we find that the V2O5 sensor at 25 °C responds faster than at 100 °C up to 20 ppm of NH3 beyond which it responds faster at 100 °C than at 25 °C. Overall rankings of the NH3 gas sensing features between the two techniques showed that the in situ Raman spectroscopy is faster in response compared with the traditional chemi-resistive tester. Hooke’s law, phonon confinement in ~51 nm globular particles with ~20 nm pore size and physisorption/chemisorption principles have been employed in the explanation of the data presented.

  7. Low temperature hydrogen plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of copper studied using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; Rai, Vikrant R.; Agarwal, Sumit; Thissen, Nick F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal technique to deposit ultrathin, conformal, and continuous metal thin films. However, compared to the ALD of binary materials such as metal oxides and metal nitrides, the surface reaction mechanisms during metal ALD are not well understood. In this study, the authors have designed and implemented an in situ reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (IRAS) setup to study the surface reactions during the ALD of Cu on Al 2 O 3 using Cu hexafluoroacetylacetonate [Cu(hfac) 2 ] and a remote H 2 plasma. Our infrared data show that complete ligand-exchange reactions occur at a substrate temperature of 80 °C in the absence of surface hydroxyl groups. Based on infrared data and previous studies, the authors propose that Cu(hfac) 2 dissociatively chemisorbs on the Al 2 O 3 surface, where the Al-O-Al bridge acts as the surface reactive site, leading to surface O-Cu-hfac and O-Al-hfac species. Surface saturation during the Cu(hfac) 2 half-cycle occurs through blocking of the available chemisorption sites. In the next half-reaction cycle, H radicals from an H 2 plasma completely remove these surface hfac ligands. Through this study, the authors have demonstrated the capability of in situ IRAS as a tool to study surface reactions during ALD of metals. While transmission and internal reflection infrared spectroscopy are limited to the first few ALD cycles, IRAS can be used to probe all stages of metal ALD starting from initial nucleation to the formation of a continuous film

  8. Fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy (45°x: 45°) for color analysis of dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Federighi, Veronica; Sykes, Ros; Lodi, Giovanni; Sardella, Andrea; Carrassi, Antonio; Varoni, Elena M

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the application of a fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) prototype probe for 45°x: 45° FORS for determining color of dental materials. A portable spectrophotometer with a highly manageable fiber optics co-axial probe was used to apply 45°x: 45° FORS for color matching in restorative dentistry. The color coordinates in CIELAB space of two dental shade guides and of the corresponding photopolymerized composites were collected and compared. The 45°x: 45° FORS with the co-axial probe (test system), the integrating sphere spectroscopy (reference system) and a commercial dental colorimeter (comparator system) were used to collect data and calculate color differences (ΔE and ΔE00). FORS system displayed high repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy. ΔE and ΔE00 values between the shade-guide, each other, and the corresponding composites resulted above the clinically acceptable limit. The 45°x: 45° FORS test system demonstrated suitable in vitro performance for dental composite color evaluation. 45°x: 45° fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy allows reliable color analysis of small surfaces of dental composites, favoring the color matching of material with the closely surrounding dental tissue, and confirming significant color differences between shade guide tabs and photo-polymerized composites.

  9. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae-Ryon Kong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA of 1.0 from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22. A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests.

  10. Time domain diffuse optical spectroscopy: In vivo quantification of collagen in breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Farina, Andrea; Ieva, Francesca; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy provides non-invasively the optical characterization of highly diffusive media, such as biological tissues. Light pulses are injected into the tissue and the effects of light propagation on re-emitted pulses are interpreted with the diffusion theory to assess simultaneously tissue absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. Performing spectral measurements, information on tissue composition and structure is derived applying the Beer law to the measured absorption and an empiric approximation to Mie theory to the reduced scattering. The absorption properties of collagen powder were preliminarily measured in the range of 600-1100 nm using a laboratory set-up for broadband time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy. Optical projection images were subsequently acquired in compressed breast geometry on 218 subjects, either healthy or bearing breast lesions, using a portable instrument for optical mammography that operates at 7 wavelengths selected in the range 635-1060 nm. For all subjects, tissue composition was estimated in terms of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipids, and collagen. Information on tissue microscopic structure was also derived. Good correlation was obtained between mammographic breast density (a strong risk factor for breast cancer) and an optical index based on collagen content and scattering power (that accounts mostly for tissue collagen). Logistic regression applied to all optically derived parameters showed that subjects at high risk for developing breast cancer for their high breast density can effectively be identified based on collagen content and scattering parameters. Tissue composition assessed in breast lesions with a perturbative approach indicated that collagen and hemoglobin content are significantly higher in malignant lesions than in benign ones.

  11. A Compilation of Global Bio-Optical in Situ Data for Ocean-Colour Satellite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Andre; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Brotus, Vanda; Groom, Steve; Grant, Michael; Taberner, Malcolm; Antoine, David; Arnone, Robert; Balch, William M.; Barker, Kathryn; hide

    2016-01-01

    A compiled set of in situ data is important to evaluate the quality of ocean-colour satellite-data records. Here we describe the data compiled for the validation of the ocean-colour products from the ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI). The data were acquired from several sources (MOBY, BOUSSOLE, AERONET-OC, SeaBASS, NOMAD, MERMAID, AMT, ICES, HOT, GePCO), span between 1997 and 2012, and have a global distribution. Observations of the following variables were compiled: spectral remote-sensing reflectances, concentrations of chlorophyll a, spectral inherent optical properties and spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients. The data were from multi-project archives acquired via the open internet services or from individual projects, acquired directly from data providers. Methodologies were implemented for homogenisation, quality control and merging of all data. No changes were made to the original data, other than averaging of observations that were close in time and space, elimination of some points after quality control and conversion to a standard format. The final result is a merged table designed for validation of satellite-derived ocean-colour products and available in text format. Metadata of each in situ measurement (original source, cruise or experiment, principal investigator) were preserved throughout the work and made available in the final table. Using all the data in a validation exercise increases the number of matchups and enhances the representativeness of different marine regimes. By making available the metadata, it is also possible to analyse each set of data separately. The compiled data are available at doi:10.1594PANGAEA.854832 (Valente et al., 2015).

  12. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy with MIMOS II at Rio Tinto, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, I; Klingelhoefer, G; Wehrheim, S; Ebert, S; Panthoefer, M; Blumers, M; Schmanke, D; Maul, J; Schroeder, C [Institut fuer Anorganische und analytische Chemie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Rull, F, E-mail: fleischi@uni-mainz.d [Unidad Asociada UVA-CSIC, al Centro de AstrobiologIa, Universidad de Valladolid, 47006-Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    The Rio Tinto, located in southwest Spain, exhibits a nearly constant, acidic pH-value along its course. Due to the formation of sulfate minerals, Rio Tinto is considered a potential analogue site for sulfate-rich regions on Mars, in particular at the landing site of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, where the ferric sulfate mineral jarosite was identified with Opportunity's Moessbauer spectrometer. Primary and secondary mineralogy was investigated in situ with portable Raman and Moessbauer spectrometers at four different Rio Tinto sampling sites. The two techniques analyse different sample portions due to their specific field of view and sampling depth and provide complementary mineralogical information.

  13. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy with MIMOS II at Rio Tinto, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, I; Klingelhoefer, G; Wehrheim, S; Ebert, S; Panthoefer, M; Blumers, M; Schmanke, D; Maul, J; Schroeder, C; Rull, F

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Tinto, located in southwest Spain, exhibits a nearly constant, acidic pH-value along its course. Due to the formation of sulfate minerals, Rio Tinto is considered a potential analogue site for sulfate-rich regions on Mars, in particular at the landing site of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, where the ferric sulfate mineral jarosite was identified with Opportunity's Moessbauer spectrometer. Primary and secondary mineralogy was investigated in situ with portable Raman and Moessbauer spectrometers at four different Rio Tinto sampling sites. The two techniques analyse different sample portions due to their specific field of view and sampling depth and provide complementary mineralogical information.

  14. Phthalocyanine identification in paintings by reflectance spectroscopy. A laboratory and in situ study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldi, G.; Caglio, S.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of identifying pigments using non invasive (n.i.) analyses has gained increasing importance in the field of spectroscopy applied to art conservation and art studies. Among the large set of pigments synthesized and marketed during 20th century, surely phthalocyanine blue and green pigments occupy an important role in the field of painting (including restoration) and printing, thanks to their characteristics like brightness and fastness. This research focused on the most used phthalocyanine blue (PB15:1 and PB15:3) and green pigments (PG7), and on the possibility to identify these organic compounds using a methodology like reflectance spectroscopy in the UV, visible and near IR range (UV-vis-NIR RS), performed easily through portable instruments. Laboratory tests and three examples carried out on real paintings are discussed.

  15. Use of in situ FT-Raman spectroscopy to study the kinetics of the transformation of carbamazepine polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Laura E; Timmins, Peter; Williams, Adrian C; York, Peter

    2004-10-29

    The solid-state transformation of carbamazepine from form III to form I was examined by Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy. Using a novel environmental chamber, the isothermal conversion was monitored in situ at 130 degrees C, 138 degrees C, 140 degrees C and 150 degrees C. The rate of transformation was monitored by taking the relative intensities of peaks arising from two CH bending modes; this approach minimised errors due to thermal artefacts and variations in power intensities or scattering efficiencies from the samples in which crystal habit changed from a characteristic prism morphology (form III) to whiskers (form I). The solid-state transformation at the different temperatures was fitted to various solid-state kinetic models of which four gave good fits, thus indicating the complexity of the process which is known to occur via a solid-gas-solid mechanism. Arrhenius plots from the kinetic models yielded activation energies from 344 kJ mol(-1) to 368 kJ mol(-1) for the transformation. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of drug polymorphic type which can be of value for at-line in-process control.

  16. Pressure-induced amorphization and reactivity of solid dimethyl acetylene probed by in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiwen; Daljeet, Roshan; Kieran, Arielle; Song, Yang

    2018-06-01

    Conjugated polymers are prominent semiconductors that have unique electric conductivity and photoluminescence. Synthesis of conjugated polymers under high pressure is extremely appealing because it does not require a catalyst or solvent used in conventional chemical methods. Transformation of acetylene and many of its derivatives to conjugated polymers using high pressure has been successfully achieved, but not with dimethyl acetylene (DMA). In this work, we present a high-pressure study on solid DMA using a diamond anvil cell up to 24.4 GPa at room temperature characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that solid DMA exists in a phase II crystal structure and is stable up to 12 GPa. Above this pressure, amorphization was initiated and the process was completed at 24.4 GPa. The expected polymeric transformation was not evident upon compression, but only observed upon decompression from a threshold compression pressure (e.g. 14.4 GPa). In situ florescence measurements suggest excimer formation via crystal defects, which induces the chemical reactions. The vibrational spectral analysis suggests the products contain the amorphous poly(DMA) and possibly additional amorphous hydrogenated carbon material.

  17. SO2 EMISSION MEASUREMENT BY DOAS (DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND COSPEC (CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY AT MERAPI VOLCANO (INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The SO2 is one of the volcanic gases that can use as indicator of volcano activity. Commonly, SO2 emission is measured by COSPEC (Correlation Spectroscopy. This equipment has several disadvantages; such as heavy, big in size, difficulty in finding spare part, and expensive. DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy is a new method for SO2 emission measurement that has advantages compares to the COSPEC. Recently, this method has been developed. The SO2 gas emission measurement of Gunung Merapi by DOAS has been carried out at Kaliadem, and also by COSPEC method as comparation. The differences of the measurement result of both methods are not significant. However, the differences of minimum and maximum result of DOAS method are smaller than that of the COSPEC. It has range between 51 ton/day and 87 ton/day for DOAS and 87 ton/day and 201 ton/day for COSPEC. The measurement of SO2 gas emission evaluated with the seismicity data especially the rockfall showed the presence of the positive correlation. It may cause the gas pressure in the subsurface influencing instability of 2006 eruption lava.   Keywords: SO2 gas, Merapi, DOAS, COSPEC

  18. Study of atmospheric air AC glow discharge using optical emission spectroscopy and near infrared diode laser cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Wang, Chuji; Dibble, Theodore S.

    2008-11-01

    AC glow discharges were generated in atmospheric pressure by applying high voltage AC in the range of 3500-15000 V to a pair of stainless steel electrodes separated by an air gap. The discharges were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). The electronic (Tex), vibrational (Tv), and rotational (Tr) temperatures were measured. Spectral stimulations of the emission spectra of several vibronic bands of the 2^nd positive system of N2, the 1^st negative system of N2^+, the (0,1,2,3-0) bands of NO (A-X), and the (0-0) band of OH (A-X), which were obtained under various plasma operating conditions, show that Tr, Tv, and Tex are in the ranges of 2000 - 3800, 3500 - 5000, and 6000 - 10500^ K, respectively. Emission spectra show that OH concentration increases while NO concentration decreases with an increase of electrode spacing. The absorption spectra of H2O and OH overtone in the near infrared (NIR) were measured by the cw-CRDS with a telecommunications diode laser at wavelength near 1515 nm.

  19. Interaction of nanodiamond with in situ generated sp-carbon chains probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Kalbáč, Martin; Osawa, E.; Dunsch, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 14 (2006), s. 3113-3116 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040306; GA MŠk LC510 Grant - others:NEDO International Grant(XE) 20041T081 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : carbyne * diamond * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.884, year: 2006

  20. NO2 trace measurements by optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrillard-Courtillot, I.; Foldes, T.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    In order to reach the sub-ppb NO2 detection level required for environmental applications in remote areas, we are developing a spectrometer that exploits a technique that we introduced several years ago, named Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) [1]. It allows very sensitive and selective measurements, together with the realization of compact and robust set-ups as was subsequently demonstrated during measurements campaigns in harsh environments [2,3]. OF-CEAS benefits from the optical feedback (OF) to efficiently inject a cw-laser in a high finesse cavity (typically F >10 000). Absorption spectra are acquired on a small spectral region (~1 cm-1) that enables selective and quantitative measurements at a fast acquisition rate (~10 Hz) with a detection limit of several 10-10 cm-1 as reported in this paper. Spectra are obtained with high spectral resolution (~150 MHz) and are self calibrated by cavity rind-down measurements regularly performed (typically every second). Therefore, OF-CEAS appears very attractive for NO2 trace detection. This work is performed in the blue spectral region where NO2 has intense electronic transitions. Our setup involves a commercial extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) working at room temperature around 411nm. A first setup was developed [4] to demonstrate that OF sensitivity of ECDL is fully consistent with this technique, initially introduced with distributed feedback diode lasers in the near infrared region. In this paper we will report on a new set-up developed for in-situ measurements with proper mechanical, acoustic and thermal insulation. Additionally, new data processing was implemented allowing real time concentration measurements. It is based on a reference spectra recorded under controlled conditions by OF-CEAS and used later to fit the observed spectra. We will present measurements performed with calibrated NO2 reference samples demonstrating a good linearity of the apparatus. The minimum detectable

  1. In situ optical water-quality sensor networks - Workshop summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Horsburgh, Jeffery S.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced in situ optical water-quality sensors and new techniques for data analysis hold enormous promise for furthering scientific understanding of aquatic systems. These sensors measure important biogeochemical parameters for long deployments, enabling the capture of data at time scales over which they vary most meaningfully. The high-frequency, real-time water-quality data they generate provide opportunities for early warning of water-quality deterioration, trend detection, and science-based decision support. However, developing networks of optical sensors in freshwater systems that report reliable and comparable data across and between sites remains a challenge to the research and monitoring community. To address this, the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) convened a joint 3-day workshop (June 8-10, 2011) at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepardstown, West Virginia, to explore ways to coordinate development of standards and applications for optical sensors, and improve handling, storing, and analyzing the continuous data they produce. The workshop brought together more than 60 scientists, program managers, and vendors from universities, government agencies, and the private sector. Several important outcomes emerged from the presentations and breakout sessions. There was general consensus that making intercalibrated measurements requires that both manufacturers and users better characterize and calibrate the sensors under field conditions. For example, the influence of suspended particles, highly colored water, and temperature on optical sensors remains poorly understood, but consistently accounting for these factors is critical to successful deployment and for interpreting results in different settings. This, in turn, highlights the lack of appropriate standards for sensor calibrations, field checks, and characterizing interferences, as well as methods for

  2. In situ airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties during photochemical pollution events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Cachier, H.

    2005-02-01

    Dry aerosol optical properties (scattering, absorbing coefficients, and single scattering albedo) were derived from in situ airborne measurements during two photochemical pollution events (25 and 26 June) observed during the Experience sur Site pour Contraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospherique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment. Two flights were carried out during daytime (one during the morning and one at noon) over a domain, allowing the investigation of how an air pollution event affects the particle optical properties. Both horizontal distribution and vertical profiles are presented. Results from the horizontal mapping show that plumes of enhanced scattering and absorption are formed in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during the day in the sea breeze-driven outflow of the coastal urban-industrial area of Marseille-Fos de Berre. The domain-averaged scattering coefficient (at 550 nm) over land σs changes from 35 (28) Mm-1 during land breeze to 63 (43) Mm-1 during sea breeze on 25 June (26 June), with local maxima reaching > 100 Mm-1. The increase in the scattering coefficient is associated with new particle formation, indicative of secondary aerosol formation. Simultaneously, the domain-averaged absorption coefficient increases from 5.6 (3.4) Mm-1 to 9.3 (8.0) Mm-1. The pollution plume leads to strong gradients in the single scattering albedo ωo over the domain studied, with local values as low as 0.73 observed inside the pollution plume. The role of photochemistry and secondary aerosol formation during the 25 June case is shown to increase ωo and to make the aerosol more `reflecting' while the plume moves away from the sources. The lower photochemical activity, observed in the 26 June case, induces a relatively higher contribution of black carbon, making the aerosol more absorbing. Results from vertical profiles at a single near-urban location in the domain indicate that the changes in optical properties happen almost entirely within

  3. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X., E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.cn; Li, W.; Guo, H., E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Quantum Information Technology, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup −12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  4. FORS, Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy con gli spettrometri miniaturizzati per l’identificazione dei pigmenti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Cosentino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractQuesto articolo riporta i risultati del test di un sistema FORS (Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy assemblato con componenti Ocean Optics. Questa ditta ha sviluppato una linea di spettrometri miniaturizzati e dal costo estremamente contenuto. Le trascurabili dimensioni e peso di questo sistema FORS lo rendono uno strumento assolutamente adatto alle indagini dell’arte in cantiere. Sono stati testati 54 pigmenti storici in polvere e stesi con gomma arabica, tempera all’uovo, olio e affresco. Il sistema è stato provato su un quadro dell’800 e su opere murali del barocco siciliano.   This paper shows the results of the testing of a FORS (Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy system assembled with Ocean Optics components and featuring a USB4000 miniaturized and low cost spectrometer. The small dimensions and little weight of this FORS system make it adapt for the specific needs of art examination in the field. 54 historical pigments have been tested both in powder and laid with gum Arabic, egg tempera, linseed oil and fresco. The FORS system was also tested on a 1800s oil painting and on 1700s Sicilian baroque murals and the results compared with multispectral imaging analysis.   

  5. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.; Bernard, M.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Hall, C.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnston, R.; Lake, P.; Lawrence, J.

    1999-01-01

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm 3 ) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  6. In situ Raman spectroscopy of phase transformation in CrOx-Y2O3 system at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Liqiong; Lu Jiqing; Bi Qingyuan; Pu Zhiying; Guo Ming; Wang Yuejuan; Luo Mengfei

    2010-01-01

    A CrO x -Y 2 O 3 sample was prepared by a deposition-precipitation method and phase transformation of the sample under N 2 and air atmospheres was characterized by in situ Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. It was found that when the CrO x -Y 2 O 3 sample was heated, CrO 3 transformed to YCrO 4 and then to YCrO 3 and Cr 2 O 3 . Also, the transformation started from the surface region of the sample and then extended to the bulk, due to the fact that the phase transformation was detected by Raman spectroscopy at lower temperature compared to that by XRD. In addition, both atmosphere and temperature had influence on the phase transformation in the surface region, while the phase transformation in the bulk was merely dependent on the temperature. It was also found that low oxidation state Cr(III) species on the surface could be re-oxidized to high oxidation state Cr(V) or Cr(VI) species when the thermal treated sample was exposed to ambient air.

  7. Sensing local pH and ion concentration at graphene electrode surfaces using in situ Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haotian; Poudel, Nirakar; Hou, Bingya; Shen, Lang; Chen, Jihan; Benderskii, Alexander V; Cronin, Stephen B

    2018-02-01

    We report a novel approach to probe the local ion concentration at graphene/water interfaces using in situ Raman spectroscopy. Here, the upshifts observed in the G band Raman mode under applied electrochemical potentials are used to determine the charge density in the graphene sheet. For voltages up to ±0.8 V vs. NHE, we observe substantial upshifts in the G band Raman mode by as much as 19 cm -1 , which corresponds to electron and hole carrier densities of 1.4 × 10 13 cm -2 and Fermi energy shifts of ±430 meV. The charge density in the graphene electrode is also measured independently using the capacitance-voltage characteristics (i.e., Q = CV), and is found to be consistent with those measured by Raman spectroscopy. From charge neutrality requirements, the ion concentration in solution per unit area must be equal and opposite to the charge density in the graphene electrode. Based on these charge densities, we estimate the local ion concentration as a function of electrochemical potential in both pure DI water and 1 M KCl solutions, which span a pH range from 3.8 to 10.4 for pure DI water and net ion concentrations of ±0.7 mol L -1 for KCl under these applied voltages.

  8. Mechanistic studies of chemical looping desulfurization of Mn-based oxides using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    König, C.F.J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Seemann, M.; Clemens, F.; Garderen, N. van; Biollaz, S.M.A.; Schildhauer, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mn sorbents remove H 2 S from hot syngas in chemical looping desulfurization process. • State of Mn followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. • Two-step mechanism explains the formation of SO 2 under reducing conditions. - Abstract: Cleaning of producer gas from biomass gasification is required for further processing, e.g. to avoid catalyst poisoning in subsequent conversion steps. High-temperature gas cleaning, of which sulfur removal is an important part, is a promising way to improve the overall efficiency of biomass conversion. In a high temperature “chemical looping desulfurization” process, a sorbent material, here manganese oxide, is cycled between producer gas from the gasifier to remove sulfur species, and an oxidizing atmosphere, in which the sulfur species are released as SO 2 . Alternatively, the use of such material as reactive bed material could be integrated into an allothermal dual fluidized bed gasifier. In a laboratory reactor, we subjected manganese-based materials to a periodically changing gas atmosphere, simulating a “chemical looping desulfurization” reactor. The “fuel reactor” gas contained H 2 , CO, CH 4 and H 2 S, similar as in the producer gas, and the “oxidizing reactor” contained diluted O 2 . Mass spectrometry showed that most of the H 2 S is taken up by the sample in the “fuel reactor” part, while also some unwanted SO 2 is generated in the “fuel reactor” part. Most of the sulfur is released in the oxidizing reactor. Simultaneous in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Mn materials during different stages of the chemical looping desulfurization process showed that the initial Mn 3 O 4 is transformed in the presence of H 2 S to MnS via a MnO intermediate in the fuel reactor. Oxygen from the reduction of Mn 3 O 4 oxidizes some H 2 S to the undesired SO 2 in the fuel reactor. Upon exposure to O 2 , MnS is again oxidized to Mn 3 O 4 via MnO, releasing SO

  9. Non-invasive in situ identification and band assignments of diazepam, flunitrazepam and methadone hydrochloride with FT-near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H

    2011-03-20

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) has evolved into an important rapid, direct and non-invasive technique in drugs analysis. In this study, the suitability of NIR spectroscopy to identify two benzodiazepine derivatives, diazepam and flunitrazepam, and a synthetic opiate, methadone hydrochloride, inside USP vials and probe the solid-state form of diazepam presents in tablets has been explored. The results show the potential of NIR spectroscopy for rapid, in situ and non-destructive identification of drugs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-01-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  12. New insight in the template decomposition process of large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals: an in situ UV-Vis/fluorescence micro-spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karwacki, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824283; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2011-01-01

    A combination of in situ UV-Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy was used to study the template decomposition process in large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals. Correlation of polarized light dependent UV-Vis absorption spectra with confocal fluorescence emission spectra in the 400–750 nm region

  13. The effect of water on the stability of iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles in hydrogen and syngas followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuene, P.C.; Moodley - Gengan, P.; Scheijen, F.J.E.; Fredriksson, H.O.A.; Lancee, R.J.; Kropf, J.; Miller, J.T.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water on iron-based nanoparticles under hydrogen and syngas was investigated by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The iron oxide (¿-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, dispersed as a monolayer on flat silica surfaces, were readily converted into metallic iron in dry hydrogen at 350 °C and into

  14. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, legal representative, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Bilayer 12C/13C Graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Farhat, H.; Kong, J.; Janda, Pavel; Kavan, Ladislav; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2011), s. 1957-1963 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : graphene * bilayer * Raman Spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 13.198, year: 2011

  16. The Bone Black Pigment Identification by Noninvasive, In Situ Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Daveri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two real case studies, an oil painting on woven paper and a cycle of mural paintings, have been presented to validate the use of infrared reflection spectroscopy as suitable technique for the identification of bone black pigment. By the use of the sharp weak band at 2013 cm−1, it has been possible to distinguish animal carbon-based blacks by a noninvasive method. Finally, an attempt for an eventual assignment for the widely used sharp band at 2013 cm−1 is discussed.

  17. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  18. Spectroelectrochemical study of polyphenylene by in situ external reflection FT-IR spectroscopy. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvarnstroem, C.; Ivaska, A.

    1994-01-01

    In situ external reflection FT-IR measurements are performed during cyclic voltammetric scans on electrochemically polymerized polyphenylene films. The films are polymerized either in 0.1 or 0.8 M biphenyl in 0.1 M TBABF 4 in acetonitrile. Changes in the IR spectrum of films of different thicknesses are studied when the films are potentially cycled from the neutral to the oxidized states of the polymer. No differences between films made in high or low dimer concentration can be observed in the spectra. The potential-dependent insertion and expulsion of solvent, residual water, anions and cations in and out of the film have different behaviour in films of different thicknesses. Changes in the structure of the segments in the film, from the benzenoid form into the quinoid form, can be followed. Differences between the first and subsequent cyclic potential scans are observed. (orig.)

  19. Platforms for hyperspectral imaging, in-situ optical and acoustical imaging in urbanized regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Oney, Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral measurements of the water surface of urban coastal waters are presented. Oblique bidirectional reflectance factor imagery was acquired made in a turbid coastal sub estuary of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida and along coastal surf zone waters of the nearby Atlantic Ocean. Imagery was also collected using a pushbroom hyperspectral imager mounted on a fixed platform with a calibrated circular mechatronic rotation stage. Oblique imagery of the shoreline and subsurface features clearly shows subsurface bottom features and rip current features within the surf zone water column. In-situ hyperspectral optical signatures were acquired from a vessel as a function of depth to determine the attenuation spectrum in Palm Bay. A unique stationary platform methodology to acquire subsurface acoustic images showing the presence of moving bottom boundary nephelometric layers passing through the acoustic fan beam. The acoustic fan beam imagery indicated the presence of oscillatory subsurface waves in the urbanized coastal estuary. Hyperspectral imaging using the fixed platform techniques are being used to collect hyperspectral bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) measurements from locations at buildings and bridges in order to provide new opportunities to advance our scientific understanding of aquatic environments in urbanized regions.

  20. Optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudel, H.U.

    1985-01-01

    Electronic excitations can be affected by exchange interactions in magnetically coupled systems. Exchange-induced energy splittings in the ground and excited states of dimers and higher cluster of paramagnetic transition metal ions are deduced from luminescence and absorption spectra. An exchange mechanism provides intensity for nominally spin-forbidden transitions. Combined exciton-magnon transitions are characteristic of magnetically ordered materials. Excitation energy transfer can occur as a consequence of exchange couplings in magnetically concentrated materials

  1. Quantitative in situ monitoring of an elevated temperature reaction using a water-cooled mid-infrared fiber-optic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaurin, P; Crabb, N C; Wells, I; Worsfold, P J; Coombs, D

    1996-04-01

    A novel water-cooled mid-infrared fiber-optic probe is described which is heatable to 230 °C. The probe has chalcogenide fibers and a ZnSe internal reflection element and is compact and fully flexible, allowing access to a wide range of standard laboratory reaction vessels and fume cupboard arrangements. Performance is demonstrated via the in situ analysis of an acid-catalyzed esterification reaction in toluene at 110 °C, and the results are compared with those from a conventional extractive sampling loop flow cell arrangement. Particular emphasis is given to the quantitative interpretation of the spectroscopic data, using gas chromatographic reference data. Calibration data are presented for univariate and partial least squares models, with an emphasis on procedures for improving the quality of interpreparation calibration and prediction through the use of focused reference analysis regimes. Subset univariate procedures are presented that yield relative errors of spectroscopy combined with bias correction partial least squares procedures for the efficient in situ quantitative analysis of laboratory scale reactions.

  2. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  3. Interface electronic properties of co-evaporated MAPbI3 on ZnO(0001): In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Li, Xiaoli; Huang, Feng; Zhong, Dingyong; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the interface electronic properties of ZnO(0001)/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 were investigated by both X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 thin films were grown on single crystalline ZnO(0001) substrate in situ by co-evaporation of PbI 2 and CH 3 NH 3 I at room temperature with various thickness from 1.5 nm to 190 nm. It was found that the conduction band minimum of ZnO lies 0.3 eV below that of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , while the valence band maximum of ZnO lies 2.1 eV below that of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , implying that the electrons can be effectively transported from CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 to ZnO, and the holes can be blocked in the same time. A PbI 2 rich layer was initially formed at the interface of ZnO(0001)/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 during the growth. As a consequence, an interface barrier was built up which may prevent the electron transport at the interface.

  4. Fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of gastric dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-06-23

    This study aims to assess the clinical utility of a rapid fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique developed for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric precancer during endoscopic examination. We have developed a real-time fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy system capable of simultaneously acquiring both fingerprint (FP) (i.e., 800-1800 cm(-1)) and high-wavenumber (HW) (i.e., 2800-3600 cm(-1)) Raman spectra from gastric tissue in vivo at endoscopy. A total of 5792 high-quality in vivo FP/HW Raman spectra (normal (n = 5160); dysplasia (n = 155), and adenocarcinoma (n = 477)) were acquired in real-time from 441 tissue sites (normal (n = 396); dysplasia (n = 11), and adenocarcinoma (n = 34)) of 191 gastric patients (normal (n = 172); dysplasia (n = 6), and adenocarcinoma (n = 13)) undergoing routine endoscopic examinations. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPCV) were implemented to develop robust spectral diagnostic models. The FP/HW Raman spectra differ significantly between normal, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the stomach, which can be attributed to changes in proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and the bound water content. PLS-DA and LOPCV show that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy provides diagnostic sensitivities of 96.0%, 81.8% and 88.2%, and specificities of 86.7%, 95.3% and 95.6%, respectively, for the classification of normal, dysplastic and cancerous gastric tissue, superior to either the FP or HW Raman techniques alone. Further dichotomous PLS-DA analysis yields a sensitivity of 90.9% (10/11) and specificity of 95.9% (380/396) for the detection of gastric dysplasia using FP/HW Raman spectroscopy, substantiating its clinical advantages over white light reflectance endoscopy (sensitivity: 90.9% (10/11), and specificity: 51.0% (202/396)). This work demonstrates that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy technique has great promise for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric

  5. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  6. Potential prospects in archaeological research by using optical spectroscopy through a black glass ocular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, P.; Meulebroeck, W.; Thienpont, H.; Nys, K.

    The aim of this paper is to draw attention to the potential usefulness of optical spectroscopy within the archaeological discourse. We therefore use the standardized color coordinates and the transmittance spectra in the region between 350- 1650 nm of nine fragmented Roman black glass artifacts from archaeological contexts in Avenches (Switzerland) and an intact piece from Tongeren (Belgium). Firstly, we demonstrate how the use of UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy can help the archaeologist in understanding the various excavated features containing glass artifacts. The analysis of the optical spectra of Roman black glass artifacts demonstrates in the first place that an object has a very homogenous composition. The clustering of the different fragments with characteristic spectra permits to connect the pieces from various areas of an excavation to one single object or to several objects from the same batch. These results provide the archaeologist the possibility to merge recognized layers or to connect different features in the surrounding area. Secondly, we demonstrate how the use of UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy can help improve the analysis process. This inexpensive method can facilitate a more convenient and purposive sampling by means of a preliminary inquiry, selecting the most interesting pieces out of a large group of artifacts suitable for chemical analysis.

  7. Acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerization: in situ, real-time monitoring using nir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. E. Colmán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the ability of on-line NIR spectroscopy for the prediction of the evolution of monomer concentration, conversion and average particle diameter in acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerization was evaluated. The spectral ranges were chosen as those representing the decrease in concentration of monomer. An increase in the baseline shift indicated that the NIR spectra were affected by particle size. Multivariate partial least squares calibration models were developed to relate NIR spectra collected by the immersion probe with off-line conversion and polymer particle size data. The results showed good agreement between off-line data and values predicted by the NIR calibration models and these latter were also able to detect different types of operational disturbances. These results indicate that it is possible to monitor variables of interest during acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerizations.

  8. In Situ X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Model Catalysts: At the Edge of the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, S.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Gustafson, J.; Martin, N. M.; Fernandes, V. R.; Borg, A.; Liu, Z.; Chang, R.; Matera, S.; Reuter, K.; Lundgren, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HP-XPS) and first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo study addressing the nature of the active surface in CO oxidation over Pd(100). Simultaneously measuring the chemical composition at the surface and in the near-surface gas phase, we reveal both O-covered pristine Pd(100) and a surface oxide as stable, highly active phases in the near-ambient regime accessible to HP-XPS. Surprisingly, no adsorbed CO can be detected during high CO2 production rates, which can be explained by a combination of a remarkably short residence time of the CO molecule on the surface and mass-transfer limitations in the present setup.

  9. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm-1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm-1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm-1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  10. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  11. Ultrafast wavelength multiplexed broad bandwidth digital diffuse optical spectroscopy for in vivo extraction of tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torjesen, Alyssa; Istfan, Raeef; Roblyer, Darren

    2017-03-01

    Frequency-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy (FD-DOS) utilizes intensity-modulated light to characterize optical scattering and absorption in thick tissue. Previous FD-DOS systems have been limited by large device footprints, complex electronics, high costs, and limited acquisition speeds, all of which complicate access to patients in the clinical setting. We have developed a new digital DOS (dDOS) system, which is relatively compact and inexpensive, allowing for simplified clinical use, while providing unprecedented measurement speeds. The dDOS system utilizes hardware-integrated custom board-level direct digital synthesizers and an analog-to-digital converter to generate frequency sweeps and directly measure signals utilizing undersampling at six wavelengths modulated at discrete frequencies from 50 to 400 MHz. Wavelength multiplexing is utilized to achieve broadband frequency sweep measurements acquired at over 97 Hz. When compared to a gold-standard DOS system, the accuracy of optical properties recovered with the dDOS system was within 5.3% and 5.5% for absorption and reduced scattering coefficient extractions, respectively. When tested in vivo, the dDOS system was able to detect physiological changes throughout the cardiac cycle. The new FD-dDOS system is fast, inexpensive, and compact without compromising measurement quality.

  12. Characterization of tunable light source by optical parametric oscillator for high resolution spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J. W. [Ewha Womens Univ., Seoul (Korea); Rhee, B. G. [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea); Park, S. W. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea); Noh, J. W. [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    A tunable light source is developed by the optical parametric oscillator, which is very useful for a high resolution spectroscopy. The electronic structure of molecules and atoms can be examined by a proper coherent light source. Optical parametric oscillator provides light sources stable and widely tunable. In this work, the characteristics of the parametric optical generation are examined in the LiNbO{sub 3}. The theoretical analysis as well as the experimental measurement is performed. The pump laser is a second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser, and the parametric gain is measured. The characteristics of singly resonant oscillator and doubly resonant oscillator is studied as a function of temperature. It is found that 1mole% MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} crystal provides the tunability from 0.6{mu}m to 3.0{mu}m wavelength. Both the critical and noncritical phase matching are studied. The optical damage occurring in a congruent LiNbO{sub 3} crystal was not observed in 1mole% MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} crystal, opening a possibility for a high power optical parametric oscillation generation. The current work can be extended to an experiment employing the fundamental Nd:YAG as pump to provide a coherent light source for the study of molecular vibrations. 28 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  13. Reduction Dynamics of Doped Ceria, Nickel Oxide, and Cermet Composites Probed Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robert C; Shearing, Paul R; Brightman, Edward; Brett, Dan J L; Brandon, Nigel P; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    The redox properties of gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) and nickel oxide (NiO) composite cermets underpin the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells. Although these systems have been widely studied, a full comprehension of the reaction dynamics at the interface of these materials is lacking. Here, in situ Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the redox cycle is used to investigate the interplay between the dynamic and competing processes of hydrogen spillover and water dissociation on the doped ceria surface. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, the redox process in pure CGO and NiO is studied when exposed to wet and dry hydrogen and is compared to the cermet behavior. In dry hydrogen, CGO reduces relatively rapidly via a series of intermediate phases, while NiO reduces via a single-step process. In wet reducing atmospheres, however, the oxidation state of pure CGO is initially stabilized due to the dissociation of water by reduced Ce(III) and subsequent incorporation of oxygen into the structure. In the reduction process involving the composite cermet, the close proximity of the NiO improves the efficiency and speed of the composite reduction process. Although NiO is already incorporated into working cells, these observations suggest direct routes to further improve cell performance.

  14. In situ NMR spectroscopy of supercapacitors: insight into the charge storage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Trease, Nicole M; Trognko, Lorie; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-18

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode-electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations.

  15. Spectroelectrochemical study of polyphenylene by in situ external reflection FT-IR spectroscopy. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvarnstroem, C.; Ivaska, A.

    1994-01-01

    In situ spectroelectrochemical measurements with external reflection FT-IR are performed at different stages of polymerization of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.8 M biphenyl in 0.1 M TBABF 4 in acetonitrile. The biphenyl concentration is not found to have any effect on the structure of the polymer formed. Formation of oligomers and the ratio of ortho/para-substituted polymer chains during film growth are studied. The first coupling of dimers to oligomers is found to take place in the vicinity of the electrode surface and at a later stage of polymerization the oligomers start to form polymer film on the electrode. A mixed para and ortho coupling resulting in crosslinking between chains is observed already at the early stage of polymerization. However, when a lower current density is used a more ordered polymer structure is obtained. A breakdown of the polymer film due to overoxidation can be seen when the potential is increased to 2.0 V. (orig.)

  16. Controlling the optical path length in turbid media using differential path-length spectroscopy: fiber diameter dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaspers, O. P.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Amelink, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the path length for the differential path-length spectroscopy (DPS) fiber optic geometry for a wide range of optical properties and for fiber diameters ranging from 200 mu m to 1000 mu m. Phantom measurements show that the path length is nearly constant for scattering

  17. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: a comparison of classification methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabe, R.; Evers, D.; Hendriks, B.H.W.; Lucassen, G.W.; Van der Voort, M.; Wesseling, J.; Rutgers, E. J.; Vrancken Peeters, M.J.; Hage, J.A.van der; Oldenbeng, H.S.; Ruers, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma and ductal

  18. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: comparison of classification methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabé, Rami; Evers, Daniel; Evers, Daniel J.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; Lucassen, Gerald W.; Lucassen, Gerald; van der Voort, Marjolein; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Vrancken Peeters, Marie-Jeanne; van der Hage, Jos A.; Oldenburg, Hester S.; Wesseling, Jelle; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal

  19. From Selenium- to Tellurium-Based Glass Optical Fibers for Infrared Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lucas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements, and have been studied for several decades regarding different applications. Among them, selenide glasses exhibit excellent infrared transmission in the 1 to 15 µm region. Due to their good thermo-mechanical properties, these glasses could be easily shaped into optical devices such as lenses and optical fibers. During the past decade of research, selenide glass fibers have been proved to be suitable for infrared sensing in an original spectroscopic method named Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS. FEWS has provided very nice and promising results, for example for medical diagnosis. Then, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. In parallel, the study of telluride glasses, which can have transmission up to 28 µm due to its atom heaviness, has been intensified thanks to the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA. The development of telluride glass fiber enables a successful observation of CO2 absorption band located around 15 µm. In this paper we review recent results obtained in the Glass and Ceramics Laboratory at Rennes on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

  20. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2018-02-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes.

  1. Development of micro-optics for high-resolution IL spectroscopy with a proton microbeam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, Wataru; Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2014-01-01

    Confocal optics for ion luminescence (IL) was developed for the precise analysis of the chemical composition of microscopic targets with an external proton microbeam probe. Anti-reflection-coated confocal micro-lens optics with an effective focus area of approximately 800 × 800 μm was installed on the microbeam line of a single-ended accelerator. Chromatic aberrations of the confocal optics were examined at wavelengths of 300–900 nm. An electrically-cooled back-thinned charge coupled device spectrometer with a wavelength resolution of 0.5 nm was used for the microscopic spectroscopy and IL imaging of microscopic mineral targets. Simultaneous microscopic IL and micro-PIXE analysis were performed using an external 3 MeV H + microbeam with a current of less than 100 pA. A spectral resolution of 3 nm was achieved for a single IL peak which corresponded to Cr 3+ impurities in a single-crystal of aluminum oxide. The use of IL spectroscopy and imaging for aerosol targets revealed microscopic distributions of the chemical and elemental composition in the atmosphere

  2. Mechanism for microwave heating of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane characterized by in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasei, Yugo; Yamakami, Takuya; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Ushida, Kiminori; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-05-01

    Microwave heating is widely used to accelerate organic reactions and enhance the activity of enzymes. However, the detailed molecular mechanism for the effect of microwave on chemical reactions is not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of microwave heating on organic compounds, we have developed an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy. (1)H NMR spectra of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane (PCH3) in the liquid crystalline and isotropic phases were observed under microwave irradiation. When the temperature was regulated at slightly higher than the phase transition temperature (Tc=45 °C) under a gas flow temperature control system, liquid crystalline phase mostly changed to the isotropic phase. Under microwave irradiation and with the gas flow temperature maintained at 20 °C, which is 25 °C below the Tc, the isotropic phase appeared stationary as an approximately 2% fraction in the liquid crystalline phase. The temperature of the liquid crystalline state was estimated to be 38 °C according to the line width, which is at least 7 °C lower than the Tc. The temperature of this isotropic phase should be higher than 45 °C, which is considered to be a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by microwave irradiation. Microwaves at a power of 195 W were irradiated to the isotropic phase of PCH3 at 50 °C and after 2 min, the temperature reached 220 °C. The temperature of PCH3 under microwave irradiation was estimated by measurement of the chemical shift changes of individual protons in the molecule. These results demonstrate that microwave heating generates very high temperature within a short time using an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectrometer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  4. Collinear laser spectroscopy of manganese isotopes using optical pumping in ISCOOL

    CERN Multimedia

    Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Reponen, M; Campbell, P; Procter, T J

    Recently, optical pumping of ions has been achieved inside an ion beam cooler-buncher. By illuminating the central axis of the cooler with laser light, subsequent decay populates selected ionic metastable states. This population enhancement is retained as the ion beam is delivered to an experimental station. In the case of collinear laser spectroscopy, transitions can then be excited from a preferred metastable level, rather than the ground-state. This proposal seeks to establish and develop the technique for ISCOOL. As a test of efficiency, this will be applied to the study of $^{55-66}$Mn isotopes using collinear laser spectroscopy-expanding an earlier study where the benefit of the technique was demonstrated. This will provide nuclear spins, magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole moments and changes in mean-square charge radii across N = 40 shell closure candidate and into a region where an onset of deformation, and a new "island of inversion" is predicted.

  5. Deep-level optical spectroscopy investigation of N-doped TiO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yoshitaka; Morikawa, Takeshi; Ohwaki, Takeshi; Taga, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    N-doped TiO 2 films were deposited on n + -GaN/Al 2 O 3 substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering and subsequently crystallized by annealing at 550 deg. C in flowing N 2 gas. The N-doping concentration was ∼8.8%, as determined from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Deep-level optical spectroscopy measurements revealed two characteristic deep levels located at ∼1.18 and ∼2.48 eV below the conduction band. The 1.18 eV level is probably attributable to the O vacancy state and can be active as an efficient generation-recombination center. Additionally, the 2.48 eV band is newly introduced by the N doping and contributes to band-gap narrowing by mixing with the O 2p valence band

  6. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patridge, Christopher J. [NRC/NRL Cooperative Research Associate, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Love, Corey T., E-mail: corey.love@nrl.navy.mil [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Swider-Lyons, Karen E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Twigg, Mark E. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Code 6812, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ramaker, David E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6189, U.S. Naval Research laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The local structure of nanoscale (∼10–40 nm) LiCoO{sub 2} is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO{sub 2} nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (Δμ) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a Δμ EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO{sub 2}. • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2} and difference spectra. • Full multiple

  7. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patridge, Christopher J.; Love, Corey T.; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.; Twigg, Mark E.; Ramaker, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The local structure of nanoscale (∼10–40 nm) LiCoO 2 is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO 2 nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO 2 metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (Δμ) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a Δμ EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO 2 as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO 2 . - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO 2 to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO 2 . • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO 2 and difference spectra. • Full multiple scattering calculations are used to

  8. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  9. Structural investigations of LiFePO4 electrodes and in situ studies by Fe X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Aniruddha; Bergmann, Uwe; Cramer, S.P.; Cairns, Elton J.

    2005-01-01

    Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) have been performed on electrodes containing LiFePO 4 to determine the local atomic and electronic structure and their stability with electrochemical cycling. A versatile electrochemical in situ cell has been constructed for long-term soft and hard X-ray experiments for the structural investigation on battery electrodes during the lithium-insertion/extraction processes. The device is used here for an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of lithium insertion/extraction in a LiFePO 4 electrode, where the electrode contained about 7.7 mg of LiFePO 4 on a 20 μm thick Al-foil. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) have been performed on this electrode to determine the local atomic and electronic structure and their stability with electrochemical cycling. The initial state (LiFePO 4 ) showed iron to be in the Fe 2+ state corresponding to the initial state (0.0 mAh) of the cell, whereas in the delithiated state (FePO 4 ) iron was found to be in the Fe 3+ state corresponding to the final charged state (3 mAh). XANES region of the XAS spectra revealed a high spin configuration for the two states (Fe (II), d 6 and Fe (III), d 5 ). The results confirm that the olivine structure of the LiFePO 4 and FePO 4 is retained by the electrodes in agreement with the XRD observations reported previously. These results confirm that LiFePO 4 cathode material retains good structural short-range order leading to superior cycling capability

  10. Multi-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography for the discrimination of colonic adenocarcinoma from normal colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Bellini, Nicola; Riches, Andrew; Dholakia, Kishan; Herrington, C. Simon

    2013-01-01

    We report a multimodal optical approach using both Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in tandem to discriminate between colonic adenocarcinoma and normal colon. Although both of these non-invasive techniques are capable of discriminating between normal and tumour tissues, they are unable individually to provide both the high specificity and high sensitivity required for disease diagnosis. We combine the chemical information derived from Raman spectroscopy with the texture parameters extracted from OCT images. The sensitivity obtained using Raman spectroscopy and OCT individually was 89% and 78% respectively and the specificity was 77% and 74% respectively. Combining the information derived using the two techniques increased both sensitivity and specificity to 94% demonstrating that combining complementary optical information enhances diagnostic accuracy. These data demonstrate that multimodal optical analysis has the potential to achieve accurate non-invasive cancer diagnosis. PMID:24156073

  11. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  12. Optical feedback in dfb quantum cascade laser for mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terabayashi, Ryohei, E-mail: terabayashi.ryouhei@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Sonnenschein, Volker, E-mail: volker@nagoya-u.jp; Tomita, Hideki, E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp; Hayashi, Noriyoshi, E-mail: hayashi.noriyoshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kato, Shusuke, E-mail: katou.shuusuke@f.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Jin, Lei, E-mail: kin@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Masahito, E-mail: yamanaka@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishizawa, Norihiko, E-mail: nishizawa@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Sato, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.sato@sekisui.com; Nozawa, Kohei, E-mail: kohei.nozawa@sekisui.com; Hashizume, Kenta, E-mail: kenta.hashizume@sekisui.com; Oh-hara, Toshinari, E-mail: toshinari.ohara@sekisui.com [Sekisui Medical Co., Ltd., Drug Development Solutions Center (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo, E-mail: t-iguchi@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    A simple external optical feedback system has been applied to a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and a clear effect of feedback was observed. A long external feedback path length of up to 4m can decrease the QCL linewidth to around 50kHz, which is of the order of the transmission linewidth of our high finesse ring-down cavity. The power spectral density of the transmission signal from high finesse cavity reveals that the noise at frequencies above 20kHz is reduced dramatically.

  13. Optical spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas for standoff isotopic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2018-04-20

    This review article covers the present status of isotope detection through emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy of atoms and molecules in a laser-produced plasma formed from a solid sample. A description of the physics behind isotope shifts in atoms and molecules is presented, followed by the physics behind solid sampling of laser ablation plumes, optical methods for isotope measurements, the suitable physical conditions of laser-produced plasma plumes for isotopic analysis, and the current status. Finally, concluding remarks will be made on the existing gaps between previous works in the literature and suggestions for future work.

  14. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  15. High resolution optical spectroscopy of air-induced electrical instabilities in n-type polymer semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Riccardo; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2012-07-03

    We use high-resolution charge-accumulation optical spectroscopy to measure charge accumulation in the channel of an n-type organic field-effect transistor. We monitor the degradation of device performance in air, correlate the onset voltage shift with the reduction of charge accumulated in the polymer semiconductor, and explain the results in view of the redox reaction between the polymer, water and oxygen in the accumulation layer. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M; Bilal, M; Anwar, S; Rehman, A; Ahmed, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were acquired from 18 blood serum samples using a laser at 532 nm as the excitation source. A multivariate regression model based on partial least-squares regression is developed that uses Raman spectra to predict dengue infection with leave-one-sample-out cross validation. The prediction of dengue infection by our model yields correlation coefficient r 2 values of 0.9998 between the predicted and reference clinical results. The model was tested for six unknown human blood sera and found to be 100% accurate in accordance with the clinical results. (letter)

  17. Identification of Intermediates in Zeolite-Catalyzed Reactions Using In-situ UV/Vis Micro- Spectroscopy and a Complementary Set of Molecular Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelsoet, K.L.J.; Qian, Q.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34138609X; De Meyer, T.; De Wispelaere, K.; De Sterck, B.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Waroquier, M.; Van Speybroeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    The optical absorption properties of (poly)aromatic hydrocarbons occluded in a nanoporous environment were investigated by theoretical and experimental methods. The carbonaceous species are an essential part of a working catalyst for the methanol-toolefins (MTO) process. In situ UV/Vis microscopy

  18. Optical spectroscopy of Eu3+ doped Th(MoO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskar, Meera; Phatak, Rohan; Gupta, Santhosh; Natarajan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Eu 3+ is often used as a structural probe, because of the relative simplicity of its energy-level structure and dependence on its site symmetry in the host material. The phonon energy of the host for rare-earth ions is a crucial factor to be considered for developing luminescent materials.Thorium molybdate can satisfy both low phonon energy environment for rare-earth ions and good chemical and mechanical stabilities for practical use. Thus Eu 3+ doped Th(MoO 4 ) 2 are expected to be a good promising optical materials. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report on optical spectroscopy of Eu 3+ doped thorium molybdate and thus work has been carried out and discussed in this paper

  19. Spectroscopy of optically selected BL Lac objects and their γ-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrinelli, A.; Treves, A.; Farina, E. P.; Landoni, M. [Università degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Falomo, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Foschini, L.; Sbarufatti, B., E-mail: angela.sandrinelli@brera.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We present Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of nine BL Lac objects of unknown redshift belonging to the list of optically selected radio-loud BL Lac candidates. We explore their spectroscopic properties and possible link with gamma-ray emission. From the new observations we determine the redshifts of four objects from faint emission lines or from absorption features of their host galaxies. In three cases we find narrow intervening absorptions from which a lower limit to the redshift is inferred. For the remaining two featureless sources, lower limits to the redshift are deduced from the absence of spectral lines. A search for γ counterpart emission shows that six out of the nine candidates are Fermi γ-ray emitters and we find two new detections. Our analysis suggests that most of the BL Lac objects still lacking redshift information are most likely located at high redshifts.

  20. Towards optical fibre based Raman spectroscopy for the detection of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J.; Koziej, Lukasz; Williams, Huw D.; Elson, Daniel S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common post-surgical complications that remain significant clinical problems, as they are associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. As such, there is significant interest in the development of minimally invasive techniques that permit early detection of SSIs. To this end, we are applying a compact, clinically deployable Raman spectrometer coupled to an optical fibre probe to the study of bacteria, with the long term goal of using Raman spectroscopy to detect infection in vivo. Our system comprises a 785 nm laser diode for excitation and a commercial (Ocean Optics, Inc.) Raman spectrometer for detection. Here we discuss the design, optimisation and validation of this system, and describe our first experiences interrogating bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) in vitro.

  1. Investigation of optical pump on dielectric tunability in PZT/PT thin film by THz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jie; Luo, Chunya; Rao, Yunkun; Ling, Furi; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-07-11

    The dielectric spectra of single-layer PbTiO3 (PT), single-layer PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) and multilayer PZT/PT thin films under an external optical field were investigated at room temperature by time-domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Results showed that the real part of permittivity increased upon application of an external optical field, which could be interpreted as hardening of the soft mode and increasing of the damping coefficient and oscillator strength. Furthermore, the central mode was observed in the three films. Among the dielectric property of the three thin films studied, the tunability of the PZT/PT superlattice was the largest.

  2. Spectrally selective molecular doped solids: spectroscopy, photophysics and their application to ultrafast optical pulse processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaup, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The persistent spectral hole-burning (PSHB) phenomenon observed in molecular doped polymers cooled down to liquid helium temperatures allows the engraving of spectral structures in the inhomogeneous absorption profile of the material. This phenomenon known since 1974 has became a fruitful field for the study of the intimacy of complex molecular systems in the solid state, revealing high-resolution spectroscopy, photophysics, photochemistry and dynamics of molecular doped amorphous media, organic as well as inorganic. A PSHB molecular doped solid can be programmed in spectral domain and therefore, it can be converted in an optical processor capable to achieve user-defined optical functions. Some aspects of this field are illustrated in the present paper. An application is presented where a naphthalocyanine doped polymer film is used in a demonstrative experiment to prove that temporal aberration free re-compression of ultra-short light pulses is feasible. Perspectives for the coherent control of light fields or photochemical processes are also evoked

  3. Circularly polarized infrared and visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy: Vibrational optical activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Sangheon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2005-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies utilizing either circularly polarized ir or circularly polarized visible beams were theoretically investigated by considering the infrared and visible sum-frequency-generation (IV-SFG) schemes. In addition to the purely electric dipole-allowed chiral component of the IV-SFG susceptibility, the polarizability-electric quadrupole hyperpolarizability term also contributes to the vibrationally resonant IV-SFG susceptibility. The circular-intensity-difference signal is shown to be determined by the interferences between the all-electric dipole-allowed chiral component and the polarizability-electric-dipole or electric-dipole-electric-quadrupole Raman optical activity tensor components. The circularly polarized SFG methods are shown to be potentially useful coherent spectroscopic tools for determining absolute configurations of chiral molecules in condensed phases

  4. Challenges and opportunities in clinical translation of biomedical optical spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian C.; Jermyn, Michael; Leblond, Frederic

    2018-03-01

    Medical devices face many hurdles before they enter routine clinical practice to address unmet clinical needs. This is also the case for biomedical optical spectroscopy and imaging systems that are used here to illustrate the opportunities and challenges involved. Following initial concept, stages in clinical translation include instrument development, preclinical testing, clinical prototyping, clinical trials, prototype-to-product conversion, regulatory approval, commercialization, and finally clinical adoption and dissemination, all in the face of potentially competing technologies. Optical technologies face additional challenges from their being extremely diverse, often targeting entirely different diseases and having orders-of-magnitude differences in resolution and tissue penetration. However, these technologies can potentially address a wide variety of unmet clinical needs since they provide rich intrinsic biochemical and structural information, have high sensitivity and specificity for disease detection and localization, and are practical, safe (minimally invasive, nonionizing), and relatively affordable.

  5. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  6. Plasmonic optical antenna design for performing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharintsev, S S; Fishman, A I; Salakhov, M Kh; Hoffmann, G G

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights optical plasmonic antennas designed with dc-pulsed low-voltage electrochemical etching of a gold wire for implementing tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements. We demonstrate a versatile electrochemical system that allows one to engineer TERS-active metallic gold tips with diverse shapes and sizes in a highly reproducible fashion. The underlying etching mechanism at a voltage-driven meniscus around a gold wire immersed into an electrolyte is discussed in detail. We show that the developed method is suitable to produce not only the simplest geometries such as cones and spheroids, but more complex designs. Attempts have been made to design plasmonic tapered antennas with quasi-uniformly spaced nano-sized bumps on the mesoscopic zone for the extra surface plasmon-light coupling. The capability of the patterned antenna to enhance and localize optical fields is demonstrated with near-field Raman microscopy and spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes bundles. (paper)

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pořízka, P.; Demidov, A.; Kaiser, J.; Keivanian, J.; Gornushkin, I.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pořízka, P. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Demidov, A. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Keivanian, J. [Institute for Mining, Technical University Clausthal, Erzstraße 18, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gornushkin, I. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, U. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Chemistry Department, Humboldt Univerisät zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Straße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Riedel, J., E-mail: jens.riedel@bam.de [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  9. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  10. Clinical research device for ovarian cancer detection by optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet C-visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ronie; Chandrasekaran, Archana; Brewer, Molly A.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Utzinger, Urs

    2010-09-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer could greatly increase the likelihood of successful treatment. However, present detection techniques are not very effective, and symptoms are more commonly seen in later stage disease. Amino acids, structural proteins, and enzymatic cofactors have endogenous optical properties influenced by precancerous changes and tumor growth. We present the technical details of an optical spectroscopy system used to quantify these properties. A fiber optic probe excites the surface epithelium (origin of 90% of cases) over 270 to 580 nm and collects fluorescence and reflectance at 300 to 800 nm with four or greater orders of magnitude instrument to background suppression. Up to four sites per ovary are investigated on patients giving consent to oophorectomy and the system's in vivo optical evaluation. Data acquisition is completed within 20 s per site. We illustrate design, selection, and development of the components used in the system. Concerns relating to clinical use, performance, calibration, and quality control are addressed. In the future, spectroscopic data will be compared with histological biopsies from the corresponding tissue sites. If proven effective, this technique can be useful in screening women at high risk of developing ovarian cancer to determine whether oophorectomy is necessary.

  11. Photoacoustic spectroscopy applied to the optical characterization of calcium phosphates for biomedical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez G, M. [ESFM-IPN, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz O, A. [CINVESTAV, Dept. of Physics, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS), based on the Rosencwaig and Gersho model, has been used for thermal and optical characterization of diverse materials. The use of PAS has become an important tool because is a nondestructive and no contact analytical technique. Furthermore its use to measure optical absorption spectra has advantages over the usual transmission measurements due to important features as the fact that scattered light does not disturb the measurements significantly and also the sample don't need to be prepared to have good quality surfaces. Then the optical properties of biological samples can be easily investigated with this technique. In the present study PAS is applied to obtain the optical absorption spectra of hydroxyapatite (HAp) [Ca{sub 10} (PO{sub 4} ){sub 6} (OH ){sub 2}] and bioactive calcium phosphates. The spectra of these samples ranged from 300 to 800 nm. All samples were prepared in a power form with particle size < 741m. Complementary studies X-ray diffraction and EDC were performed. (Author)

  12. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1, 1975--January 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and optical spectroscopy experiments were performed on several systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactions, and response to radiation of atoms, molecules, and ions. Results on the following studies are reported: the direct observation of level anticrossing and mixing effects in excited molecular triplet states; anomalous zero-field splittings in the lowest triplet state of 1-iodonaphthalene; evidence for second-order spin-orbit coupling and spin delocalization effects in the lowest triplet state of benzophenone; direct observation of the optical absorption spectra of reactive free radicals at room temperature; measurements of the activation and thermodynamic parameters of several cyclohexenyl and cyclohexanonyl radicals; complete analyses of the level anticrossing and cross relaxation spectra of oriented molecular triplet states; solutions to the spin Hamiltonian for S = 1, I = 5/2 systems in both zero-field and high-field, an improvement by a factor of ten in the resolution of ODMR experiments in high field; and measurements of the optical and magnetic resonance properties of a series of halogenated naphthalenes in their lowest triplet states

  13. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cobalt Perovskite Surfaces under Cathodic Polarization at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Hong, Wesley T.; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Liu, Zhi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Heterostructured oxide interfaces have demonstrated enhanced oxygen reduction reaction rates at elevated temperatures (∼500-800 C); however, the physical origin underlying this enhancement is not well understood. By using synchrotron-based in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), we focus on understanding the surface electronic structure, elemental composition, and chemical nature of epitaxial La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113), (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214), and LSC214-decorated LSC113 (LSC 113/214) thin films as a function of applied electrical potentials (0 to -800 mV) at 520 C and p(O2) of 1 × 10-3 atm. Shifts in the top of the valence band binding energy and changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s spectral components under applied bias reveal key differences among the film chemistries, most notably in the degree of Sr segregation to the surface and quantity of active oxygen sites in the perovskite termination layer. These differences help to identify important factors governing the enhanced activity of oxygen electrocatalysis observed for the LSC113/214 heterostructured surface. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Determination of surface concentrations of individual molecule-layers used in nanoscale biosensors by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Punzet, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    For the development of nanowire sensors for chemical and medical detection purposes, the optimal functionalization of the surface is a mandatory component. Quantitative ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used in situ to investigate the step-by-step layer formation of typical functionalization protocols and to determine the respective molecule surface concentrations. BSA, anti-TNF-α and anti-PSA antibodies were bound via 3-(trimethoxy)butylsilyl aldehyde linkers to silicon-oxide surfaces in order to investigate surface functionalization of nanowires. Maximum determined surface concentrations were 7.17 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for BSA, 1.7 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for anti-TNF-α antibody, 6.1 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for anti-PSA antibody, 3.88 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for TNF-α and 7.0 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for PSA. Furthermore we performed antibody-antigen binding experiments and determined the specific binding ratios. The maximum possible ratio of 2 was obtained at bulk concentrations of the antigen in the μg ml -1 range for TNF-α and PSA. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag_2Se quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S.; Román-Zamorano, J. F.; Flores-Valenzuela, J.; Flores-Acosta, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag_2Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H_8Si_8Al_8O_1_2 represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag_2Se)_n represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  17. In situ chemical state analysis of buried polymer/metal adhesive interface by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Ikenaga, Eiji; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Oji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical state analysis of the buried rubber/brass interface is conducted by HAXPES. • Ultrathin rubber films are prepared on the brass surface by two methods. • A high density of Cu 2 S is found on the rubber side of the buried adhesive layer. • The chemical states of the buried and exposed interfaces are compared. - Abstract: Chemical state analysis of adhesive interfaces is important to understand an adhesion mechanism between two different materials. Although photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is an ideal tool for such an analysis, the adhesive interfaces must be exposed to the surface because PES is essentially a surface sensitive technique. However, an in situ observation is possible by hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) owing to its large probing depth. In the present study, HAXPES is applied to investigate the adhesive interface between rubber and brass without exposing the interface. It is demonstrated that copper sulfides formed at the buried rubber/brass interface are distinguished from S-containing species in the rubber overlayer. The chemical state of the buried interface is compared with that of the “exposed” interface prepared by so-called a filter-paper method

  18. In Situ Nondestructive Analysis of Kalanchoe pinnata Leaf Surface Structure by Polarization-Modulation Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Enami, Shinichi; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2017-12-14

    The outermost surface of the leaves of land plants is covered with a lipid membrane called the cuticle that protects against various stress factors. Probing the molecular-level structure of the intact cuticle is highly desirable for understanding its multifunctional properties. We report the in situ characterization of the surface structure of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves using polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Without sample pretreatment, PM-IRRAS measures the IR spectra of the leaf cuticle of a potted K. pinnata plant. The peak position of the CH 2 -related modes shows that the cuticular waxes on the leaf surface are mainly crystalline, and the alkyl chains are highly packed in an all-trans zigzag conformation. The surface selection rule of PM-IRRAS revealed the average orientation of the cuticular molecules, as indicated by the positive and negative signals of the IR peaks. This unique property of PM-IRRAS revealed that the alkyl chains of the waxes and the main chains of polysaccharides are oriented almost perpendicular to the leaf surface. The nondestructive, background-free, and environmental gas-free nature of PM-IRRAS allows the structure and chemistry of the leaf cuticle to be studied directly in its native environment.

  19. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cobalt Perovskite Surfaces under Cathodic Polarization at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2013-08-08

    Heterostructured oxide interfaces have demonstrated enhanced oxygen reduction reaction rates at elevated temperatures (∼500-800 C); however, the physical origin underlying this enhancement is not well understood. By using synchrotron-based in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), we focus on understanding the surface electronic structure, elemental composition, and chemical nature of epitaxial La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113), (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214), and LSC214-decorated LSC113 (LSC 113/214) thin films as a function of applied electrical potentials (0 to -800 mV) at 520 C and p(O2) of 1 × 10-3 atm. Shifts in the top of the valence band binding energy and changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s spectral components under applied bias reveal key differences among the film chemistries, most notably in the degree of Sr segregation to the surface and quantity of active oxygen sites in the perovskite termination layer. These differences help to identify important factors governing the enhanced activity of oxygen electrocatalysis observed for the LSC113/214 heterostructured surface. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. In situ Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy as a tool to discriminate volcanic rocks and magmatic series, Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, C.P.M., E-mail: clement.roux@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Rakovský, J.; Musset, O. [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Monna, F. [Laboratoire ARTéHIS, UMR 6298 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon (France); Buoncristiani, J.-F.; Pellenard, P.; Thomazo, C. [Laboratoire Biogéosciences, UMR 6282 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon (France)

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the potentialities of a lab-made pLIBS (portable Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) to sort volcanic rocks belonging to various magmatic series. An in-situ chemical analysis of 19 atomic lines, including Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Si, Sr and Ti, from 21 sampled rocks was performed during a field exploration in Iceland. Iceland was chosen both for the various typologies of volcanic rocks and the rugged conditions in the field in order to test the sturdiness of the pLIPS. Elemental compositions were also measured using laboratory ICP-AES measurements on the same samples. Based on these latter results, which can be used to identify three different groups of volcanic rocks, a classification model was built in order to sort pLIBS data and to categorize unknown samples. Using a reliable statistical scheme applied to LIBS compositional data, the classification capability of the pLIBS system is clearly demonstrated (90–100% success rate). Although this prototype does not provide quantitative measurements, its use should be of particular interest for future geological field investigations. - Highlights: • Portable LIBS applied to field geology • Fast semi-quantitative geochemical analysis of volcanic rocks and magmatic series • Discriminant analysis and statistical treatments for LIBS compositional data.

  1. Study on in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement of anodic reaction in SO_2 depolarized electrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Lulu; Zhang Ping; Chen Songzhe; Wang Laijun

    2014-01-01

    SO_2 depolarized electrolysis (SDE) is the pivotal reaction in hybrid sulfur process, one of the most promising approaches for mass hydrogen production without CO_2 emission. The net result of hybrid sulfur process is to split water into hydrogen and oxygen at a relatively low voltage, which will dramatically decrease the energy consumption for the production of hydrogen. The potential loss of SDE process could be separated into four components, i.e. reversible cell potential, anode overpotential, cathode overpotential and ohmic loss. So far, it has been identified that the total cell potential for the SO_2 depolarized electrolyzer is dominantly controlled by sulfuric acid concentration of the anolyte and electrolysis temperature of the electrolysis process. In this work, an in-situ Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement of the anodic SDE reaction was conducted. Results show that anodic overpotential is mainly resulted from the SO_2 oxidation reaction other than ohmic resistance or mass transfer limitation. This study extends the understanding to SDE process and gives suggestions for the further improvement of the SDE performance. (author)

  2. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag{sub 2}Se quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico); Cortez-Valadez, M., E-mail: jose.cortez@unison.mx, E-mail: manuelcortez@live.com [Universidad de Sonora, CONACYT-Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico); Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico); Román-Zamorano, J. F. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico en Electroquímica (Mexico); Flores-Valenzuela, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (Mexico); Flores-Acosta, M. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico)

    2017-02-15

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag{sub 2}Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H{sub 8}Si{sub 8}Al{sub 8}O{sub 12} represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag{sub 2}Se){sub n} represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  3. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Frisbie, Daniel [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering.

  4. Analysis of In-Situ Spectral Reflectance of Sago and Other Palms: Implications for Their Detection in Optical Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon Santillan, Jojene; Makinano-Santillan, Meriam

    2018-04-01

    We present a characterization, comparison and analysis of in-situ spectral reflectance of Sago and other palms (coconut, oil palm and nipa) to ascertain on which part of the electromagnetic spectrum these palms are distinguishable from each other. The analysis also aims to reveal information that will assist in selecting which band to use when mapping Sago palms using the images acquired by these sensors. The datasets used in the analysis consisted of averaged spectral reflectance curves of each palm species measured within the 345-1045 nm wavelength range using an Ocean Optics USB4000-VIS-NIR Miniature Fiber Optic Spectrometer. This in-situ reflectance data was also resampled to match the spectral response of the 4 bands of ALOS AVNIR-2, 3 bands of ASTER VNIR, 4 bands of Landsat 7 ETM+, 5 bands of Landsat 8, and 8 bands of Worldview-2 (WV2). Examination of the spectral reflectance curves showed that the near infra-red region, specifically at 770, 800 and 875 nm, provides the best wavelengths where Sago palms can be distinguished from other palms. The resampling of the in-situ reflectance spectra to match the spectral response of optical sensors made possible the analysis of the differences in reflectance values of Sago and other palms in different bands of the sensors. Overall, the knowledge learned from the analysis can be useful in the actual analysis of optical satellite images, specifically in determining which band to include or to exclude, or whether to use all bands of a sensor in discriminating and mapping Sago palms.

  5. ANALYSIS OF IN-SITU SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE OF SAGO AND OTHER PALMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR DETECTION IN OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Santillan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a characterization, comparison and analysis of in-situ spectral reflectance of Sago and other palms (coconut, oil palm and nipa to ascertain on which part of the electromagnetic spectrum these palms are distinguishable from each other. The analysis also aims to reveal information that will assist in selecting which band to use when mapping Sago palms using the images acquired by these sensors. The datasets used in the analysis consisted of averaged spectral reflectance curves of each palm species measured within the 345–1045 nm wavelength range using an Ocean Optics USB4000-VIS-NIR Miniature Fiber Optic Spectrometer. This in-situ reflectance data was also resampled to match the spectral response of the 4 bands of ALOS AVNIR-2, 3 bands of ASTER VNIR, 4 bands of Landsat 7 ETM+, 5 bands of Landsat 8, and 8 bands of Worldview-2 (WV2. Examination of the spectral reflectance curves showed that the near infra-red region, specifically at 770, 800 and 875 nm, provides the best wavelengths where Sago palms can be distinguished from other palms. The resampling of the in-situ reflectance spectra to match the spectral response of optical sensors made possible the analysis of the differences in reflectance values of Sago and other palms in different bands of the sensors. Overall, the knowledge learned from the analysis can be useful in the actual analysis of optical satellite images, specifically in determining which band to include or to exclude, or whether to use all bands of a sensor in discriminating and mapping Sago palms.

  6. Detection and Identification of potentially toxic elements in urban soil using in situ spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Kopel, Daniella; Wittenberg, Lea

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic urban soils are the foundation of the urban green infrastructure, the green net quality is as good as each of its patches. In early days of pedology urban soil has been recognized with respect to contamination and the risks for human health but in study performed since the 70s, the importance of urban soil for the urban ecology became increasingly significant. Urban soils are highly disturbed land that was created by the process of urbanization. The dominant agent in the creation of urban soils is human activity which modifies the natural soil through mixing, filling or by contamination of land surfaces so as to create a layer of urban soil which can be more than 50 cm thick. The objective of this study is to determine the extent to which field spectroscopy methods can be used to extend the knowledge of toxic elements in urban soils. The majority of the studies on urban soils concentrate on identifying and mapping of known pollution mostly certain heavy metals, we are focusing on almost non disturbed soils where no direct disturbance occurred but the urban matrix inflicted on it. The elements in those soils where an-knowns features. In this study a top-down analysis is applied for detecting the presence of minerals, organic matter and pollutants in mixed soil samples. Results of the proposed top-down unmixing method suggest that the analysis is made very fast due to the simplified hierarchy which avoids the high-learning curve associated with unmixing algorithms showed that the most abundant components were coarse organic matter 12% followed by concrete dust, plastic crumbs, other man made materials, clay and other minerals. The results of the soils pH, measured electrometrically and the particle size distribution, measured by Laser diffraction, indicate there is no big different between the samples particle size distribution and the pH values of the samples but they are not significantly different from the expected, except for the OM percentage which

  7. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  8. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  9. Role of Bi promotion and solvent in platinum-catalyzed alcohol oxidation probed by in situ X-ray absorption and ATR-IR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, C.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Ferri, D.

    2010-01-01

    the catalysts under working conditions using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), aiming at uncovering the roles of the metal promoter and the reaction medium. XAS confirms that Bi is oxidized more easily than Pt, maintaining the catalytic...... surfaces than on step or kink sites. Side products, CO and benzoate species, appearing during the reaction reveal that the geometric suppression of undesired reactions does not occur to the same extent on Pt-based catalysts as on Pd, suggesting that decarbonylation of the produced aldehyde on Pt may occur...

  10. Fabrication of Cheap Optical Transducers (CHOTs) on film carriers for in-situ application and generation of surface acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageeva, V; Stratoudaki, T; Clark, M; Somekh, M G

    2015-01-01

    Cheap optical transducers (CHOTs) are patterns on the surface of a component activated by lasers to generate and detect ultrasound. Excited optically, with minimal surface impact, and fully customizable, CHOTs provide a simple alternative to conventional piezoelectric transducers, offering wireless, remote operation. Of particular interest is application of CHOTs for in-situ ultrasonic inspection of hard-to reach and complex-geometry components such as those of aero-engines. A suitable fabrication method has been developed to allow in-situ application of CHOTs onto large size and curved components, as well as those already in service, challenging for current laboratory-based micro-patterning methods. This work describes the fabrication of a transferable g-CHOT for generation of ultrasound. The g- CHOT has been made on an SU8 carrier film using a sacrificial polystyrene layer, allowing the transducer to be transferred from the substrate and subsequently delivered and applied to the surface of the sample in-situ. The functionality of the fabricated transducer is demonstrated by detection of the Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) generated by the g-CHOT transferred onto glass and aluminium samples

  11. Characterization of the ground state dynamics of proteorhodopsin by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, Jochen; Scholz, Frank; Löhr, Frank; Reckel, Sina; Roos, Christian; Blum, Michaela; Braun, Markus; Glaubitz, Clemens; Dötsch, Volker; Wachtveitl, Josef; Schwalbe, Harald

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of proteorhodopsin (PR), solubilized in diC7PC, a detergent micelle, by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy at T = 323 K. Insights into the dynamics of PR at different time scales could be obtained and dynamic hot spots could be identified at distinct, functionally relevant regions of the protein, including the BC loop, the EF loop, the N-terminal part of helix F and the C-terminal part of helix G. We further characterize the dependence of the photocycle on different detergents (n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside DDM; 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine diC7PC) by ultrafast time-resolved UV/VIS spectroscopy. While the photocycle intermediates of PR in diC7PC and DDM exhibit highly similar spectral characteristics, significant changes in the population of these intermediates are observed. In-situ NMR experiments have been applied to characterize structural changes during the photocycle. Light-induced chemical shift changes detected during the photocycle in diC7PC are very small, in line with the changes in the population of intermediates in the photocycle of proteorhodopsin in diC7PC, where the late O-intermediate populated in DDM is missing and the population is shifted towards an equilibrium of intermediates states (M, N, O) without accumulation of a single populated intermediate.

  12. Optical Frequency Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy with Resolution Exceeding the Limit Set by the Optical Path Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Rutkowski, Lucile; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Maslowski, Piotr; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin; Fermann, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) based on optical frequency combs (OFC) allow detection of broadband molecular spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios within acquisition times orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIRs based on thermal sources. Due to the pulsed nature of OFCs the interferogram consists of a series of bursts rather than a single burst at zero optical path difference (OPD). The comb mode structure can be resolved by acquiring multiple bursts, in both mechanical FTS systems and dual-comb spectroscopy. However, in all existing demonstrations the resolution was ultimately limited either by the maximum available OPD between the interferometer arms or by the total acquisition time enabled by the storage memory. We present a method that provides spectral resolution exceeding the limit set by the maximum OPD using an interferogram containing only a single burst. The method allows measurements of absorption lines narrower than the OPD-limited resolution without any influence of the instrumental lineshape function. We demonstrate this by measuring undistorted CO2 and CO absorption lines with linewidth narrower than the OPD-limited resolution using OFC-based mechanical FTS in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. The near-infrared system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a high finesse cavity, while the mid-infrared system is based on a Tm:fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator coupled to a multi-pass cell. We show that the method allows acquisition of high-resolution molecular spectra with interferometer length orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIR. Mandon, J., G. Guelachvili, and N. Picque, Nat. Phot., 2009. 3(2): p. 99-102. Zeitouny, M., et al., Ann. Phys., 2013. 525(6): p. 437-442. Zolot, A.M., et al., Opt. Lett., 2012. 37(4): p. 638-640.

  13. Optical tool for salinity detection by remote sensing spectroscopy: application on Oran watershed, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Dehni; Mourad, Lounis

    2017-07-01

    Soil salinity is a complex problem that affects groundwater aquifers and agricultural lands in the semiarid regions. Remote sensing and spectroscopy database systems provide accuracy for salinity autodetection and dynamical delineation. Salinity detection techniques using polychromatic wavebands by field geocomputation and experimental data are time consuming and expensive. This paper presents an automated spectral detection and identification of salt minerals using a monochromatic waveband concept from multispectral bands-Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) and spectroscopy United States Geological Survey database. For detecting mineral salts related to electrolytes, such as electronical and vibrational transitions, an integrated approach of salinity detection related to the optical monochromatic concept has been addressed. The purpose of this paper is to discriminate waveband intrinsic spectral similarity using the Beer-Lambert and Van 't Hoff laws for spectral curve extraction such as transmittance, reflectance, absorbance, land surface temperature, molar concentration, and osmotic pressure. These parameters are primordial for hydrodynamic salinity modeling and continuity identification using chemical and physical approaches. The established regression fitted models have been addressed for salt spectroscopy validation for suitable calibration and validation. Furthermore, our analytical tool is conducted for better decision interface using spectral salinity detection and identification in the Oran watershed, Algeria.

  14. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  15. In situ SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on the pH-dependant adsorption of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on silver electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan, E-mail: dany@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Jia, Shaojie [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Fodjo, Essy Kouadio [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, University Felix Houphouet Boigny, 22 BP 582, Abidjan 22, Cote d’Ivoire (Cote d' Ivoire); Xu, Hu [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Wang, Yuhong, E-mail: yuhong_wang502@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Deng, Wei [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: The orientation of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) has been investigated by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (in situ SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) on silver surface. - Highlights: • The adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on Ag electrode is influenced by the pH. • The pH-dependant adsorption of AQ-2-COOH has been confirmed by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (in situ SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS). • The results can provide insights into electron transfer reactions of AQ-2-COOH in biological systems. - Abstract: In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) are used to investigate the redox reaction and adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on an Ag electrode at different pH values. The obtained results indicate that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed tilted on the Ag electrode through O-atom of ring carbonyl in a potential range from −0.3 to −0.5 V vs. SCE, but the orientation turns to more tilted orientation with both O-atom of the ring carbonyl and carboxylate group in positive potential region for pH 6.0 and 7.4. However, at pH 10.0, the orientation adopts tilted conformation constantly on the Ag electrode with both O-atom of the anthraquinone ring and carboxylate group in the potential range from −0.3 to −0.5 V vs. SCE or at positive potentials. Moreover, the adsorption behavior of AQ-2-COOH has been further confirmed by AR-XPS on the Ag surface. Proposed reasons for the observed changes in orientation are presented.

  16. In situ analysis of the Zn(S,O) buffer layer preparation for chalcopyrite solar cells by Zn L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauermann, Iver; Kropp, Timo; Vottier, Damien; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Aziz, Emad F

    2009-02-23

    Bridging the gap between high-vacuum soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and real systems under ambient conditions probes chemical reactions in situ during deposition and annealing processes. The origin of highly efficient buffer layers in Zn(S,O) is the complex formation between Zn(2+) and the S=C group of thiourea (see schematic), which allows ligand-to-metal and metal-to-ligand charge transfer (LMCT and MLCT).

  17. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Living Mammalian Cells: An Enabling Tool for Sulfur Metabolomics. in Situ Observation of Uptake of Taurine Into MDCK Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnida, M.; Sneeden, E.Yu; Whitin, J.C.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.; Korbas, M.; George, G.N.

    2009-06-01

    Sulfur is essential for life, with important roles in biological structure and function. However, because of a lack of suitable biophysical techniques, in situ information about sulfur biochemistry is generally difficult to obtain. Here, we present an in situ sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-XAS) study of living cell cultures of the mammalian renal epithelial MDCK cell line. A great deal of information is retrieved from a characteristic sulfonate feature in the X-ray absorption spectrum of the cell cultures, which can be related to the amino acid taurine. We followed the time and dose dependence of uptake of taurine into MDCK cell monolayers. The corresponding uptake curves showed a typical saturation behavior with considerable levels of taurine accumulation inside the cells (as much as 40% of total cellular sulfur). We also investigated the polarity of uptake of taurine into MDCK cells, and our results confirmed that uptake in situ is predominantly a function of the basolateral cell surface.

  18. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy of model random and biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yici

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopy and microscopy applied to biomedical science are emerging as new and rapidly growing areas which offer important insight into basic phenomena. Ultrafast NLO processes provide temporal, spectral and spatial sensitivities complementary or superior to those achieved through conventional linear optical approaches. The goal of this thesis is to explore the potential of two fundamental NLO processes to produce noninvasive histological maps of biological tissues. Within the goal of the thesis, steady state intensity, polarization and angular measurements of second- and third-harmonic generations (SHG, THG) have been performed on model random scattering and animal tissue samples. The nonlinear optical effects have been evaluated using models. Conversion efficiencies of SHG and THG from animal tissue interfaces have been determined, ranging from 10-7 to 10-10. The changes in the multiharmonic signals were found to depend on both local and overall histological structures of biological samples. The spectral signatures of two photon excitation induced fluorescence from intrinsic fluorophores have been acquired and used to characterize the physical state and types of tissues. Two dimensional scanning SHG and TPF tomographic images have been obtained from in vitro animal tissues, normal and diseased human breast tissues, and resolved subsurface layers and histo-chemical distributions. By combining consecutive 2D maps, a 3D image can be produced. The structure and morphology dependence of the SH signal has been utilized to image and evaluate subsurface tumor progression depth. Second harmonic microscopy in model random and biological cells has been studied using a CCD camera to obtain direct images from subcellular structures. Finally, near infrared (NIR) NLO spectroscopy and microscopy based on SHG and TPF have demonstrated high spatial resolution, deeper penetration depth, low level photo-damaging and enhanced morphological sensitivity for

  19. In-situ biofouling assessment in spacer filled channels using optical coherence tomography (OCT): 3D biofilm thickness mapping

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2017-01-13

    Membrane systems for water purification can be seriously hampered by biofouling. The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate biofilms in membrane systems has recently increased due to the ability to do the characterization in-situ and non-destructively The OCT biofilm thickness map is presented for the first time as a tool to assess biofilm spatial distribution on a surface. The map allows the visualization and evaluation of the biofilm formation and growth in membrane filtration systems through the use of a false color scale. The biofilm development was monitored with OCT to evaluate the suitability of the proposed approach. A 3D time series analysis of biofilm development in a spacer filled channel representative of a spiral-wound membrane element was performed. The biofilm thickness map enables the time-resolved and spatial-resolved evaluation and visualization of the biofilm deposition pattern in-situ non-destructively.

  20. On the investigation of electronic defect states in ZnO thin films by space charge spectroscopy with optical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Wenckstern, Holger von; Pickenhain, Rainer; Grundmann, Marius

    2012-09-01

    Electronic defect states in a n-type conducting zinc oxide thin film sample were investigated by means of space charge spectroscopy focussing on levels in the midgap region as well as on hole traps. To overcome the experimental difficulties arising from the wide bandgap and the lack of p-type conduction, optical excitation was employed to measure the emission of trapped charge carriers from these levels. Therefore - besides deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements - photo-capacitance, optically chopped photo-current, minority carrier transient spectroscopy, and optical capacitance-voltage experiments were conducted. In doing so, a midgap level labelled T4, and hole traps labelled TH1 and TH2 were detected. In the case of T4 and TH1 the photo-ionisation cross-section spectra were determined.

  1. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s 5 ) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s 3 ) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations. (paper)

  2. The development of in situ photon-in/photon-out soft X-ray spectroscopy on beamline 7.0.1 at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Development of various cells for in-situ electronic structure study. ► Gas cell for study of gas molecules and catalytic reactions. ► Liquid cell for study of molecular liquids and ion salvation. ► In-situ cell for study of electrochemical reactions. -- Abstract: This is a mini-review about the development of various cells built over the years for in situ electronic structure study of gas molecules, molecular liquids, gas/solid and liquid/solid interfaces. In the study of gas molecules, the role of the parity selection rule in the case of homonuclear diatomic molecules (N 2 and O 2 ) is revealed and illustrated by the resonant X-ray emission spectra, while the occurrence of forbidden transitions in CO 2 is explained in terms of dynamical symmetry breaking due to vibronic coupling. X-ray emission spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the molecular structure of liquid water, liquid methanol, methanol–water mixtures, as well as cation–water solutions, and to reveal the influence of the intermolecular interaction on the local electronic structure of water molecules. The in situ soft X-ray spectroscopy experimental studies of electrochemical reactions were also performed under ambient conditions

  3. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND NEBULAR OXYGEN ABUNDANCES OF THE SPITZER/SINGS GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustakas, John; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Tremonti, Christy A.; Dale, Daniel A.; Smith, John-David T.; Calzetti, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    We present intermediate-resolution optical spectrophotometry of 65 galaxies obtained in support of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). For each galaxy we obtain a nuclear, circumnuclear, and semi-integrated optical spectrum designed to coincide spatially with mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We make the reduced, spectrophotometrically calibrated one-dimensional spectra, as well as measurements of the fluxes and equivalent widths of the strong nebular emission lines, publicly available. We use optical emission-line ratios measured on all three spatial scales to classify the sample into star-forming, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and galaxies with a mixture of star formation and nuclear activity. We find that the relative fraction of the sample classified as star forming versus AGN is a strong function of the integrated light enclosed by the spectroscopic aperture. We supplement our observations with a large database of nebular emission-line measurements of individual H II regions in the SINGS galaxies culled from the literature. We use these ancillary data to conduct a detailed analysis of the radial abundance gradients and average H II-region abundances of a large fraction of the sample. We combine these results with our new integrated spectra to estimate the central and characteristic (globally averaged) gas-phase oxygen abundances of all 75 SINGS galaxies. We conclude with an in-depth discussion of the absolute uncertainty in the nebular oxygen abundance scale.

  4. Multi-distance diffuse optical spectroscopy with a single optode via hypotrochoidal scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Matthew B; Roblyer, Darren

    2018-02-15

    Frequency-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy (FD-DOS) is an established technique capable of determining optical properties and chromophore concentrations in biological tissue. Most FD-DOS systems use either manually positioned, handheld probes or complex arrays of source and detector fibers to acquire data from many tissue locations, allowing for the generation of 2D or 3D maps of tissue. Here, we present a new method to rapidly acquire a wide range of source-detector (SD) separations by mechanically scanning a single SD pair. The source and detector fibers are mounted on a scan head that traces a hypotrochoidal pattern over the sample that, when coupled with a high-speed FD-DOS system, enables the rapid collection of dozens of SD separations for depth-resolved imaging. We demonstrate that this system has an average error of 4±2.6% in absorption and 2±1.8% in scattering across all SD separations. Additionally, by linearly translating the device, the size and location of an absorbing inhomogeneity can be determined through the generation of B-scan images in a manner conceptually analogous to ultrasound imaging. This work demonstrates the potential of single optode diffuse optical scanning for depth resolved visualization of heterogeneous biological tissues at near real-time rates.

  5. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  6. Ultrafast optical pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy of strongly correlated electron materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averitt, R.D.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Thorsmolle, V.K.; Jia, Quanxi; Lobad, A.I.; Trugman, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    We have used optical-pump far-infrared probe spectroscopy to probe the low energy electron dynamics of high temperature superconductors and colossal magnetoresistance manganites. For the superconductor YBa2Cu3O7, picosecond conductivity measurements probe the interplay between Cooper-pairs and quasiparticles. In optimally doped films, the recovery time for long-range phase-coherent pairing increases from ∼1.5 ps at 4K to ∼3.5 ps near Tc, consistent with the closing of the superconducting gap. For underdoped films, the measured recovery time is temperature independent (3.5 ps) in accordance with the presence of a pseudogap. Ultrafast picosecond measurements of optically induced changes in the absolute conductivity of La0:7M0:3MnO3 thin films (M = Ca, Sr) from 10K to ∼0.9Tc reveal a two-component relaxation. A fast, ∼2 ps, conductivity decrease arises from optically induced modification of the effective phonon temperature. The slower component, related to spin-lattice relaxation, has a lifetime that increases upon approaching Tc from below in accordance with an increasing spin specific heat. Our results indicate that for T<< Tc, the conductivity is determined by incoherent phonons while spin fluctuations dominate near Tc.

  7. Combination of the optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy method with electrochemical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szendro, I.; Erdelyi, K.; Fabian, M. [MicroVacuum Ltd., Kerekgyarto u.: 10, H-1147 Budapest (Hungary); Puskas, Zs. [Minvasive Ltd., Goldmann Gy. ter 3., H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Adanyi, N. [Central Food Research Institute, H-1537 Budapest, P.O.B. 393 (Hungary); Somogyi, K. [MicroVacuum Ltd., Kerekgyarto u.: 10, H-1147 Budapest (Hungary)], E-mail: karoly.somogyi@microvacuum.com

    2008-09-30

    Optical waveguides are normally sensitive to the surrounding media and also to the surface contaminations. The effective refractive index changes at the surface. Various sensor systems were developed based on this effect. One of the most sensitive and effective methods is the optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS). At the same time, electrochemical methods are widely used both in inorganic and organic chemistry, and also advantages in microbiology were demonstrated. In this work, efforts are made and results are presented for the combination of these two methods for simultaneous measurement of refractive index and electrical current changes caused by the presence of cells/molecules/ions to be investigated. An electrically conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) nanolayer is deposited and activated on the top of the OWLS planar waveguide oxide layer. ITO layers serve as working electrodes in the electrochemical measurements. The basic setup and an integrated system are demonstrated here. Measurements using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, toluidine blue solutions, and KCl and TRIS solutions as buffer and transport media are represented. Measurements show both the changes detected by the sensor layer and the effect of the applied potential in cyclic and chrono voltammetric measurements. Results demonstrate an effective combination of optical and electrochemical methods.

  8. Guidesonde: Targeting meteorological dropsonde with optical and in-situ sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exists a programmatic need across several government agencies for both UAV and manned aircraft to be able to deploy in-situ observation sensors within areas of...

  9. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of zirconium metal in air: Special features of the plasma produced by a long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ayumu; Ohba, Hironori; Toshimitsu, Masaaki; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Ruas, Alexandre; Sakka, Tetsuo; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2018-04-01

    The decommissioning of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is an essential issue in nuclear R&D. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (Fiber-optic LIBS) could be used for in-situ elemental analysis of the inside of the damaged reactors. To improve the performances under difficult conditions, using a long-pulse laser can be an efficient alternative. In this work, the emission spectra of zirconium metal in air obtained for a normal-pulse laser (6 ns) and a long-pulse laser (100 ns) (wavelength: 1064 nm, pulse energy: 12.5 mJ, spot diameter: 0.35 mm) are compared to investigate the fundamental aspects of fiber-optic LIBS with the long-pulse laser. The spectral features are considerably different: when the long-pulse laser is used, the atomic and molecular emission is remarkably enhanced. The enhancement of the atomic emission at the near infrared (NIR) region would lead to the observation of emission lines with minimum overlapping. To understand the differences in the spectra induced respectively from the normal-pulse laser and the long-pulse laser, photodiode signals, time-resolved spectra, plasma parameters, emission from the ambient air, and emission regions are investigated, showing the particular characteristics of the plasma produced by the long-pulse laser.

  10. Oxygen surface exchange kinetics measurement by simultaneous optical transmission relaxation and impedance spectroscopy: Sr(Ti,Fe)O3-x thin film case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicola H; Kim, Jae Jin; Tuller, Harry L

    2018-01-01

    We compare approaches to measure oxygen surface exchange kinetics, by simultaneous optical transmission relaxation (OTR) and AC-impedance spectroscopy (AC-IS), on the same mixed conducting SrTi 0.65 Fe 0.35 O 3-x film. Surface exchange coefficients were evaluated as a function of oxygen activity in the film, controlled by gas partial pressure and/or DC bias applied across the ionically conducting yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate. Changes in measured light transmission through the film over time (relaxations) resulted from optical absorption changes in the film corresponding to changes in its oxygen and oxidized Fe (~Fe 4+ ) concentrations; such relaxation profiles were successfully described by the equation for surface exchange-limited kinetics appropriate for the film geometry. The k chem values obtained by OTR were significantly lower than the AC-IS derived k chem values and k q values multiplied by the thermodynamic factor (bulk or thin film), suggesting a possible enhancement in k by the metal current collectors (Pt, Au). Long-term degradation in k chem and k q values obtained by AC-IS was also attributed to deterioration of the porous Pt current collector, while no significant degradation was observed in the optically derived k chem values. The results suggest that, while the current collector might influence measurements by AC-IS, the OTR method offers a continuous, in situ , and contact-free method to measure oxygen exchange kinetics at the native surfaces of thin films.

  11. Oxygen surface exchange kinetics measurement by simultaneous optical transmission relaxation and impedance spectroscopy: Sr(Ti,Fe)O3-x thin film case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicola H.; Kim, Jae Jin; Tuller, Harry L.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We compare approaches to measure oxygen surface exchange kinetics, by simultaneous optical transmission relaxation (OTR) and AC-impedance spectroscopy (AC-IS), on the same mixed conducting SrTi0.65Fe0.35O3-x film. Surface exchange coefficients were evaluated as a function of oxygen activity in the film, controlled by gas partial pressure and/or DC bias applied across the ionically conducting yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate. Changes in measured light transmission through the film over time (relaxations) resulted from optical absorption changes in the film corresponding to changes in its oxygen and oxidized Fe (~Fe4+) concentrations; such relaxation profiles were successfully described by the equation for surface exchange-limited kinetics appropriate for the film geometry. The kchem values obtained by OTR were significantly lower than the AC-IS derived kchem values and kq values multiplied by the thermodynamic factor (bulk or thin film), suggesting a possible enhancement in k by the metal current collectors (Pt, Au). Long-term degradation in kchem and kq values obtained by AC-IS was also attributed to deterioration of the porous Pt current collector, while no significant degradation was observed in the optically derived kchem values. The results suggest that, while the current collector might influence measurements by AC-IS, the OTR method offers a continuous, in situ, and contact-free method to measure oxygen exchange kinetics at the native surfaces of thin films. PMID:29511391

  12. Design and implementation of a laser-based absorption spectroscopy sensor for in situ monitoring of biomass gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros Salazar, David; Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Seiser, Reinhard; Cattolica, Robert J.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2017-12-01

    Research to demonstrate in situ laser-absorption-based sensing of H2O, CH4, CO2, and CO mole fraction is reported for the product gas line of a biomass gasifier. Spectral simulations were used to select candidate sensor wavelengths that optimize sensitive monitoring of the target species while minimizing interference from other species in the gas stream. A prototype sensor was constructed and measurements performed in the laboratory at Stanford to validate performance. Field measurements then were demonstrated in a pilot scale biomass gasifier at West Biofuels in Woodland, CA. The performance of a prototype sensor was compared for two sensor strategies: wavelength-scanned direct absorption (DA) and wavelength-scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lasers used had markedly different wavelength tuning response to injection current, and modern distributed feedback lasers (DFB) with nearly linear tuning response to injection current were shown to be superior, leading to guidelines for laser selection for sensor fabrication. Non-absorption loss in the transmitted laser intensity from particulate scattering and window fouling encouraged the use of normalized WMS measurement schemes. The complications of using normalized WMS for relatively large values of absorbance and its mitigation are discussed. A method for reducing adverse sensor performance effects of a time-varying WMS background signal is also presented. The laser absorption sensor provided measurements with the sub-second time resolution needed for gasifier control and more importantly provided precise measurements of H2O in the gasification products, which can be problematic for the typical gas chromatography sensors used by industry.

  13. [In situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy study of CO adsorption on Ni2P/mesoporous molecule sieve catalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian-qian; Ji, Sheng-fu; Wu, Ping-yi; Hu, Lin-hua; Huang, Xiao-fan; Zhu, Ji-qin; Li, Cheng-yue

    2009-05-01

    Abstract The supported nickel phosphate precursors were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using nickel nitrate as nickel source, diammonium hydrogen phosphate as phosphorus source, and MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15 and SBA-16 as supports, respectively. Then, the supported Ni2 P catalysts were prepared by temperature-programmed reduction in flowing Hz from their nickel phosphate precursors. The in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis with the probe molecule CO was carried out to characterize the surface properties. The results indicated that there were significant differences in the spectral features of the samples. The upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on mesoporous molecule sieve was attributed to weak physical adsorption. There are four different kinds of upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on Ni2 P/MCM-41 catalyst with the following assignments: (1) the formation of Ni(CO)4 at 2055 cm(-1). (2) CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0

  14. An optical and dielectric spectroscopy study of Er.sup.3+./sup.-doped KTaO.sub.3./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trepakov, Vladimír; Skvortsov, A.; Poletaev, N.; Potůček, Zdeněk; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 248, č. 12 (2011), s. 2908-2915 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/09/J017; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Er 3+ centres * IR spectroscopy * optical absorption photoluminescence * potassium tantalate * THz spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2011

  15. Optical Comb from a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator for Spectroscopy and Astronomy Instruments Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nam; Thompson, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The most accurate astronomical data is available from space-based observations that are not impeded by the Earth's atmosphere. Such measurements may require spectral samples taken as long as decades apart, with the 1 cm/s velocity precision integrated over a broad wavelength range. This raises the requirements specifically for instruments used in astrophysics research missions -- their stringent wavelength resolution and accuracy must be maintained over years and possibly decades. Therefore, a stable and broadband optical calibration technique compatible with spaceflights becomes essential. The space-based spectroscopic instruments need to be calibrated in situ, which puts forth specific requirements to the calibration sources, mainly concerned with their mass, power consumption, and reliability. A high-precision, high-resolution reference wavelength comb source for astronomical and astrophysics spectroscopic observations has been developed that is deployable in space. The optical comb will be used for wavelength calibrations of spectrographs and will enable Doppler measurements to better than 10 cm/s precision, one hundred times better than the current state-of-the- art.

  16. Optical reflection spectroscopy of thick corrosion layers on 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, R.A.; Persans, P.D.; Strohmayer, W.; Parkinson, V.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion resistant structural materials of both iron and nickel based alloys are used in the electric power industry for the construction of the coolant loops of both conventional and nuclear power generating stations. These materials, in the presence of high temperature (e.g. 287 o C), high pH (e.g. 10.0 at 20 o C) water with dissolved hydrogen will oxidize and form corrosion films that are double metal oxides (or spinels) of the form AB 2 O 4 . This work describes optical reflectivity techniques that have been developed to study the growth of these films in situ. The optical technique uses a dual-beam specular reflection spectrometer to measure the spectrum of reflected light in small angle (i.e. o ) scatter. The reflection spectra are then calibrated using a set of corrosion coupons with corrosion films that are well known. Results are compared with models based on multilayer reflection and Mie scattering from a particle size distribution. Surface roughness is found to be the dominant cause of reduced reflection as the films grow

  17. Creating an optical spectroscopy system for use in a primary care clinical setting (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Gould, Bradley; Wu, Wenli; Konda, Vani; Yang, Leslie W.; Koons, Ann; Feder, Seth; Valuckaite, Vesta; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    While there are a plethora of in-vivo spectroscopic techniques that have demonstrated the ability to detect a number of diseases in research trials, very few techniques have successfully become a fully realized clinical technology. This is primarily due to the stringent demands on a clinical device for widespread implementation. Some of these demands include: simple operation requiring minimal or no training, safe for in-vivo patient use, no disruption to normal clinic workflow, tracking of system performance, warning for measurement abnormality, and meeting all FDA guidelines for medical use. Previously, our group developed a fiber optic probe-based optical sensing technique known as low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS) to quantify tissue ultrastructure in-vivo. Now we have developed this technique for the application of prescreening patients for colonoscopy in a primary care (PC) clinical setting. To meet the stringent requirements for a viable medical device used in a PC clinical setting, we developed several novel components including an automated calibration tool, optical contact sensor for signal acquisition, and a contamination sensor to identify measurements which have been affected by debris. The end result is a state-of-the-art medical device that can be realistically used by a PC physician to assess a person's risk for harboring colorectal precancerous lesions. The pilot study of this system shows great promise with excellent stability and accuracy in identifying high-risk patients. While this system has been designed and optimized for our specific application, the system and design concepts are universal to most in-vivo fiber optic based spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1, 1976--January 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, D.W.

    1976-11-01

    Zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and optical spectroscopy experiments have been performed on several systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactions, and response to radiation of atoms, molecules, and ions in their ground and/or excited electronic states. Particularly noteworthy results for the present contract year include the determination of the complete magnetic and optical properties of the lowest triplet states of 1-chloro, 1-bromo, and 1-iodonaphthalene, the development of a microscopic model for the intramolecular heavy-atom effect in the /sup 3/(..pi..,..pi..*) states of aromatic molecules, a detailed analysis of the angular dependence of the hyperfine and quadrupole structure in triplet 1-bromonaphthalene, observation of proton hyperfine structure in the hf ODMR spectra of short-lived triplet states, a definitive paper on the relative importance of spin delocalization and second-order spin-orbit coupling effects in /sup 3/(n,..pi..*) benzophenone (a phototype photochemical system), a detailed analysis of the level-anticrossing spectra of several triplet state benzophenones which exhibit hyperfine structure in the cross-relaxation region (thus permitting the determination of key magnetic parameters in the complete absence of perturbing microwave or radiofrequency fields), optical detection of ground-state NQR transitions in host crystal molecules, the observation of strong radiofrequency transitions near avoided crossing points in Zeeman energy level diagrams of photoexcited triplet states, the construction of zero-field ODMR, ODENDOR, and hf ODENDOR spectrometers, measurements of the activation parameters for ring interconversions of several free radicals containing five- and six-membered rings, and experimental proof that the triplet state of trimethylenemethane (a key reactive intermediate in organic chemistry) is the ground state.

  19. Sky subtraction at the Poisson limit with fibre-optic multiobject spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R.; Parkinson, H.

    2010-11-01

    We report on the limitations of sky-subtraction accuracy for long-duration fibre-optic multiobject spectroscopy of faint astronomical sources during long-duration exposures. We show that while standard sky subtraction techniques yield accuracies consistent with the Poisson noise limit for exposures of 1h duration, there are large-scale systematic defects that inhibit the sensitivity gains expected on the summation of longer duration exposures. For the AAOmega system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope, we identify a limiting systematic sky-subtraction accuracy, which is reached after integration times of 4-10h. We show that these systematic defects can be avoided through the use of the fibre nod-and-shuffle (N+S) observing mode, but with a potential cost in observing efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that these disadvantages can be overcome through the application of a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) sky-subtraction routine. Such an approach minimize systematic residuals across long-duration exposures, allowing deep integrations. We apply the PCA approach to over 200h of on-sky observations and conclude that for the AAOmega system, the residual error in long-duration observations falls at a rate proportional to τ-0.32 in contrast to the τ-0.5 rate expected from theoretical considerations. With this modest rate of decline, the PCA approach represents a more efficient mode of observation than the N+S technique for observations in the sky limited regime with durations of 10-100h (even before accounting for the additional signal-to-noise ratio and targeting efficiency losses often associated with the N+S technique). This conclusion has important implications for the observing strategies of the next generation of fibre-optics redshift surveys with existing facilities as well as design implications for fibre-optic systems destined for new facilities. It argues against the use of the inherently inefficient N+S technique for faint object fibre-optic survey

  20. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... characterized by using phenotypic, API and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. One hundred and fifty-seven (157) strains were isolated from 13 cheese samples, and identification test was performed for 83 strains. At the end of the study, a total of 22 Lactococcus sp., 36 Enterecoccus ...