WorldWideScience

Sample records for situ heat induced

  1. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  2. Induced current heating probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Ferguson, B.G.; Winstanley, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    An induced current heating probe is of thimble form and has an outer conducting sheath and a water flooded flux-generating unit formed from a stack of ferrite rings coaxially disposed in the sheath. The energising coil is made of solid wire which connects at one end with a coaxial water current tube and at the other end with the sheath. The stack of ferrite rings may include non-magnetic insulating rings which help to shape the flux. (author)

  3. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Nguyen, Scott Vinh

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  4. Subseabed Disposal Program In-Situ Heat Transfer Experiment (ISHTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, C.M.

    1983-05-01

    A heat transfer experiment is being developed in support of the Subseabed Disposal Program. The primary objectives of this experiment are: to provide information on the in situ response of seabed sediment to localized heating; to provide an opportunity to evaluate theoretical models of the response and to observe any unanticipated phenomena which may occur; and to develop and demonstrate the technology necessary to perform waste isolation oriented experiments on the seafloor at depths up to 6000 m. As presently envisaged, the heat transfer experiment will be conducted at a location in the central North Pacific though it could be performed anywhere that the ocean bottom is of the type deemed suitable for the disposal of nuclear waste material. The experiment will be conducted of the seafloor from a recoverable space-frame platform at a depth of approximately 6000 m. A 400-W isotopic heat source will be implanted in the illite sediment and the subsequent response of the sediment to the induced thermal field evaluated. After remote initiation of the experiment, a permanent record of the data obtained will be recorded on board the platform, with selected information transmitted to a surface vessel by acoustic telemetry. The experiment will be operational for one year, after which the entire platform will be recovered. Current plans call for the deployment of the experiment in 1986. Specific activities which will be pursued during the course of the experiment include: measurement of the thermal field; determination of the effective thermal conductivity of the sediment; measurement of pore pressure; evaluation of radionuclide migration processes; pore water sampling; sediment chemistry studies; sediment shear strength measurements; and coring operations in the immediate vicinity of the experiment for postexperiment analysis

  5. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ heating of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for IITRI Project C06787 entitled open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Heating of Soilclose quotes. A work plan for the above mentioned work was previously submitted. This QAPP describes the sampling and analysis of soil core-samples obtained from the K-25 Site (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where an in-situ heating and soil decontamination demonstration experiment will be performed. Soil samples taken before and after the experiment will be analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds. The Work Plan mentioned above provides a complete description of the demonstration site, the soil sampling plan, test plan, etc

  6. Tomographic Heating Holder for In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Fernández, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    distributions and changes in active surface area are quantified from tilt series of images acquired after subjecting the specimens to increasing temperatures. The porosity of the alumina support and the sintering mechanisms of the catalysts are shown to depend on distance from the heating filament....

  7. Nanocrystallinity induced by heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Meaz, T.M.; Bender Koch, C.

    1997-01-01

    Samples of akaganeite (beta-FeOOH) and goethite (alpha-FeOOH) have been studied after heating at various temperatures up to 800 C. X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy measurements showed that slightly below the temperatures at which the samples transform to hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) the oxy......Samples of akaganeite (beta-FeOOH) and goethite (alpha-FeOOH) have been studied after heating at various temperatures up to 800 C. X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy measurements showed that slightly below the temperatures at which the samples transform to hematite (alpha-Fe2O3...

  8. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-01-01

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the '70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid '80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern

  9. In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Chester Ledlie [Palo Alto, CA; Fowler, Thomas David [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri

    2009-08-18

    An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

  10. In-situ thermoelectrochemistry working with heated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Gründler, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This book represents the first rigorous treatment of thermoelectrochemistry, providing an overview that will stimulate electrochemists to develop and apply modern thermoelectrochemical methods. While classical static approaches are also covered, the emphasis lies on methods that make it possible to independently vary temperature such as in-situ heating of electrodes by means of electric current, microwaves or lasers. For the first time, "hot-wire electrochemistry" is examined in detail. The theoretical background presented addresses all aspects of temperature impacts in the context of electroc

  11. Crystallization of TiO2 Nanotubes by In Situ Heating TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2018-01-15

    The thermally-induced crystallization of anodically grown TiO2 amorphous nanotubes has been studied so far under ambient pressure conditions by techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and in situ X-ray diffraction, then looking at the overall response of several thousands of nanotubes in a carpet arrangement. Here we report a study of this phenomenon based on an in situ transmission electron microscopy approach that uses a twofold strategy. First, a group of some tens of TiO2 amorphous nanotubes was heated looking at their electron diffraction pattern change versus temperature, in order to determine both the initial temperature of crystallization and the corresponding crystalline phases. Second, the experiment was repeated on groups of few nanotubes, imaging their structural evolution in the direct space by spherical aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy. These studies showed that, differently from what happens under ambient pressure conditions, under the microscope’s high vacuum (p < 10−5 Pa) the crystallization of TiO2 amorphous nanotubes starts from local small seeds of rutile and brookite, which then grow up with the increasing temperature. Besides, the crystallization started at different temperatures, namely 450 and 380 °C, when the in situ heating was performed irradiating the sample with electron beam energy of 120 or 300 keV, respectively. This difference is due to atomic knock-on effects induced by the electron beam with diverse energy.

  12. Magnetic and in vitro heating properties of implants formed in situ from injectable formulations and containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) embedded in silica microparticles for magnetically induced local hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Renard, Pol-Edern; Lortz, Rolf; Senatore, Carmine; Rapin, Jean-Philippe; Buchegger, Franz; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich; Doelker, Eric; Jordan, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The biological and therapeutic responses to hyperthermia, when it is envisaged as an anti-tumor treatment modality, are complex and variable. Heat delivery plays a critical role and is counteracted by more or less efficient body cooling, which is largely mediated by blood flow. In the case of magnetically mediated modality, the delivery of the magnetic particles, most often superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), is also critically involved. We focus here on the magnetic characterization of two injectable formulations able to gel in situ and entrap silica microparticles embedding SPIONs. These formulations have previously shown suitable syringeability and intratumoral distribution in vivo. The first formulation is based on alginate, and the second on a poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL). Here we investigated the magnetic properties and heating capacities in an alternating magnetic field (141 kHz, 12 mT) for implants with increasing concentrations of magnetic microparticles. We found that the magnetic properties of the magnetic microparticles were preserved using the formulation and in the wet implant at 37 o C, as in vivo. Using two orthogonal methods, a common SLP (20 W g -1 ) was found after weighting by magnetic microparticle fraction, suggesting that both formulations are able to properly carry the magnetic microparticles in situ while preserving their magnetic properties and heating capacities. - Research highlights: → Magnetic formulations that form implants on injection into tissues are proposed for hyperthermia. → Superparamagnetic properties of the SPION-silica composite microparticles are preserved in the wet implants. → Heat-dissipating properties (SLP of 20 W/g of implant) support in vivo use.

  13. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira; Vinegar; Harold J.; Baker, Ralph Sterman; Heron, Goren

    2010-11-30

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  14. ATLAS IV in situ heating test in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guangjing; Li, Xiangling; Verstricht, Jan; Sillen, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The small scale in-situ ATLAS (Admissible Thermal Loading for Argillaceous Storage) tests are performed to assess the hydro-mechanical effects of a thermal transient on the host Boom clay at the HADES underground research facility in Mol, Belgium. The initial test set-up, consisting of a heater borehole and two observation boreholes, was installed in 1991-1992. The first test (later named 'ATLAS I') was then performed from July 1993 to June 1996; during this time, the heater dissipated a constant power of 900 W. During the second phase ('ATLAS II'), the heating power was doubled (1800 W) and maintained constant from June 1996 to May 1997. This was followed by shutdown and natural cooling starting from June 1997 on. To broaden the THM characterization of the Boom clay at a larger scale and at different temperature levels, the test set-up was extended in 2006 by drilling two additional instrumented boreholes (AT97E and AT98E). The heater was switched on again from April 2007 to April 2008 with a stepwise power increase, followed by an instantaneous shutdown. This phase is called 'ATLAS III'. The above tests have provided a large set of good quality and well documented data on temperature, pore water pressure and total stress; these data allowed to make several interesting observations regarding the thermal anisotropy and THM coupling in the Boom clay. The straightforward geometry and well defined boundary conditions of the tests facilitate the comparison between measurement and numerical modeling studies. Based on the three dimensional coupled THM modeling of the ATLAS III test, the good agreement between measurement and numerical modeling of temperature and pore water pressure yields a set of THM parameters and confirms the thermo-mechanical anisotropy of the Boom clay. To get a better insight in the anisotropic THM behavior of the Boom clay, a new upward instrumented borehole was drilled above the ATLAS heater at

  15. Furan: A critical heat induced dietary contaminant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariotti, María S.; Granby, Kit; Rozowski, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The presence of furan in a broad range of heat processed foods (0-6000 μg kg-1) has received considerable attention due to the fact that this heat induced contaminant is considered as a "possible carcinogenic compound to humans". Since a genotoxic mode of action could be associated with furan...... of some critical factors such as heating conditions, pH and matrix microstructure are discussed in order to propose some potential methodologies for furan mitigation in a wide range of heated foods. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  16. An exploration of unsaturated zone during in-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    In-situ heating test has been conducted to evaluate the influence of high temperature in an underground facility at a depth of 50 m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature and unsaturated zone. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heating test. As a result, the resistivity of the rock mass around the heating well was decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected by resistivity tomography. The results also suggested that resistivity was increased by unsaturation of rock mass around the heating well. (author)

  17. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brown, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Coopersmith, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fulmer, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Sessions, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Ali, M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  18. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100 degrees to 400 degrees C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C

  19. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Thomas David [Houston, TX

    2009-11-03

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  20. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  1. Diffusion induced by cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Tajima, T.; Hatori, T.; Pfirsch, D.

    1985-09-01

    The wave induced particle transport during the ion cyclotron resonance heating is studied in collisionless toroidal plasmas. It is shown that the previously neglected non-conservation of the toroidal angular momentum IP/sub phi/ caused by the toroidal wave component E/sub phi/ is necessary to allow particle diffusion and yields the leading diffusive contribution. While the induced ion transport for the rf power in contemporary experiments is of the order of the neoclassical value, that of fast alpha particles is quite large if resonance is present

  2. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  3. An optical technique to measure distortion in heat-treated parts in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Federico; Nash, Phillip

    2005-05-01

    Improvements in the properties of aluminum alloys have made them more popular for structural applications. Using the different heat treatments that are available, aluminum alloys can have a wide variation in properties for different types of applications. The appropriate heat treatments of these alloys are vital in providing the properties needed for their particular applications. Moreover, understanding the effects of heat treatments that may cause distortion to a part is critical. Most of the work carried out in this field is in the form of pre- and post-treatment analysis of a part. In this study, in-situ measurements of the distortions that a heat-treated part undergoes when subjected to rapid heating to temperatures near melting followed by slow cooling were carried out. A numerical model was built to simulate the experiment and the results are compared. This study will provide much-needed insight into the complex occurrences that aluminum parts undergo during heat treatment.

  4. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  5. A comparison of different methods for in-situ determination of heat losses form district heating pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Benny [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Energy Engineering (Denmark)

    1996-11-01

    A comparison of different methods for in-situ determination of heat losses has been carried out on a 273 mm transmission line in Copenhagen. Instrumentation includes temperature sensors, heat flux meters and an infrared camera. The methods differ with regard to time consumption and costs of applying the specific method, demand on accuracy of temperature measurements, sensitivity to computational parameters, e.g. the thermal conductivity of the soil, response to transients in water temperature and the ground, and steady state assumptions in the model used in the interpretation of the measurements. Several of the applied methods work well. (au)

  6. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

  7. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.

    1994-12-28

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

  8. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating

  9. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.

    1994-01-01

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI's EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area

  10. Quantitative thermography and methods for in-situ determination of heat losses from district heating networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, B. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The course and seminar summarizing application of infrared thermography in district heating systems control gathered Danish specialists with 5 contributions on the subject. Maintenance of the heat distribution pipelines and thermographic inspection of the systems are essential in order to avoid heat losses. (EG)

  11. Heat transfer characteristics of induced mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Y.; Lahav, C.; Szanto, M.; Shai, I.

    1996-01-01

    In the present work we focus our attention on the opposed Induced Mixed Convection case, i.e. the flow field structure in a vertical cylinder, closed at its bottom, opens at the top, and being heated circumferentially. The paper reports an experimental study of this complex heat transfer process. For a better understanding of the flow field and the related heat transfer process, two different experimental systems were built. The first was a flow visualization system, with water as the working fluid, while the second system enabled quantitative measurements of the temperature field in air. All the experiments were performed in the turbulent flow regime. In order to learn about all possible flow regimes, the visualization tests were conducted in three different length-to-diameter ratios (1/d=1,5,10). Quantitative measurements of the cylindrical wall temperature, as well as the radial and axial temperature profiles in the flow field, were taken in the air system. Based on the visualization observation and the measured wall temperature profile, it was found that the OIMC can be characterized by three main regimes: a mixing regime at the top, a central turbulent core and a boundary layer type of flow adjacent to the heated wall. (authors)

  12. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-01-01

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design

  13. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.

    1994-08-16

    Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

  14. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  15. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  16. Management Plan: Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this project IITRI will demonstrate an in situ soil heating technology for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants present in the soil. In Situ heating will be accomplished by the application of 60 Hz AC power to the soil. The soil will be heated to a temperature of about 90 degree C. This technology is suited for the removal of those organic compounds which have a normal boiling point in the range of 100 degree to 210 degree C, or else for those which exhibit a pure component vapor pressure of at least 10 mm Hg in the 90 degree to 100 degree C temperature range. For example, perchloroethylene, dichlorobenzene, trichlorobenzene, etc. may be removed by in situ AC heating. It is planned to demonstrate the technology by heating approximately 400 tons of soil in the K-1070 Classified Burial Ground located at DOE's K-25 Site located in Oak Ridge, TN. It is estimated that the heating portion of the demonstration will take approximately 3 weeks at an average power input rate of 150 to 175 kill. IITRI expects to spend considerable time in the front end reviewing site characteristics, preparing detail design, developing Health and Safety Plans and other documents needed to obtain regulatory approval for the demonstration, arranging for site sampling, infrastructure development and document preparation. It is anticipated that site activities will begin in approximately 5 to 6 months. This contract was signed on September 30, 1993. IITRI started work on it in October 1993. It is planned to complete the demonstration and submit approved final reports by September 30, 1994. This project has 12 tasks and four major milestones. The major milestones and their planned completion dates are presented

  17. Qualification, commissioning and in situ monitoring of high heat flux plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Cismondi, F.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.L.; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Merola, M.; Tivey, R. [ITER Team, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-10-15

    Up-to-date development of actively cooled high heat flux (HHF) plasma facing components (PFC) prototypes only allows reduced margins with regards to the ITER thermal requirements. Additionally, perfect quality cannot be ensured along series manufacturing: the presence of flaws which impair the heat transfer capability of the component, in particular at the interface armour/heat sink appears to be statistically unavoidable. In order to ensure a successful series production, a qualification methodology of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components is proposed. Secondly, advanced non-destructive techniques developed for HHF PFC commissioning are detailed with definition of acceptance criteria. Finally, innovative diagnostics for in situ monitoring during plasma operations or tokamak shutdowns are investigated in order to prevent immediate damage (safety monitoring); or evaluate component degradation (health monitoring). This work takes into account the relevance to Tore Supra, and is applied to W7X and ITER Divertor HHF PFC.

  18. Qualification, commissioning and in situ monitoring of high heat flux plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escourbiac, F.; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Cismondi, F.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.L.; Schlosser, J.; Merola, M.; Tivey, R.

    2007-01-01

    Up-to-date development of actively cooled high heat flux (HHF) plasma facing components (PFC) prototypes only allows reduced margins with regards to the ITER thermal requirements. Additionally, perfect quality cannot be ensured along series manufacturing: the presence of flaws which impair the heat transfer capability of the component, in particular at the interface armour/heat sink appears to be statistically unavoidable. In order to ensure a successful series production, a qualification methodology of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components is proposed. Secondly, advanced non-destructive techniques developed for HHF PFC commissioning are detailed with definition of acceptance criteria. Finally, innovative diagnostics for in situ monitoring during plasma operations or tokamak shutdowns are investigated in order to prevent immediate damage (safety monitoring); or evaluate component degradation (health monitoring). This work takes into account the relevance to Tore Supra, and is applied to W7X and ITER Divertor HHF PFC

  19. The ISHTE [In-Situ Heat Transfer Experiment] lander: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, L.O.; Harrison, J.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the design and development of a sea floor lander constructed to support the In-Situ Heat Transfer Experiment (ISHTE). The work entailed fabricating and testing a steel space frame that would support and accurately position delicate instruments which would monitor a heat source driven into the sediments of the deep ocean. This lander is capable of being (1) transported from Seattle to Hawaii and back several times; (2) deployed from a ship at sea; (3) operated on the sea floor to field delicate experimental equipment; and (4) recovered for retrofit to support a one-year experiment on the sea floor

  20. Mechanism for microwave heating of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane characterized by in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasei, Yugo; Yamakami, Takuya; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Ushida, Kiminori; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-05-01

    Microwave heating is widely used to accelerate organic reactions and enhance the activity of enzymes. However, the detailed molecular mechanism for the effect of microwave on chemical reactions is not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of microwave heating on organic compounds, we have developed an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy. (1)H NMR spectra of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane (PCH3) in the liquid crystalline and isotropic phases were observed under microwave irradiation. When the temperature was regulated at slightly higher than the phase transition temperature (Tc=45 °C) under a gas flow temperature control system, liquid crystalline phase mostly changed to the isotropic phase. Under microwave irradiation and with the gas flow temperature maintained at 20 °C, which is 25 °C below the Tc, the isotropic phase appeared stationary as an approximately 2% fraction in the liquid crystalline phase. The temperature of the liquid crystalline state was estimated to be 38 °C according to the line width, which is at least 7 °C lower than the Tc. The temperature of this isotropic phase should be higher than 45 °C, which is considered to be a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by microwave irradiation. Microwaves at a power of 195 W were irradiated to the isotropic phase of PCH3 at 50 °C and after 2 min, the temperature reached 220 °C. The temperature of PCH3 under microwave irradiation was estimated by measurement of the chemical shift changes of individual protons in the molecule. These results demonstrate that microwave heating generates very high temperature within a short time using an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectrometer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NORDA contribution to the in-situ heat transfer experiment (ISHTE): FY84 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valent, P.J.; Bennett, R.H.; Li, H.; Burns, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) of the DOE, managed by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is studying the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes by burial in fine-grained deep-sea sediments. The thermo-mechanical response of these sediments to the thermal gradient and temperatures generated by the decaying radionucleides in a buried waste container is being determined by the SDP-supported In Situ Heat Transfer Experiment (ISHTE). The Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity (NORDA) is responsible for the development and fielding of piezometer probes for measuring the pore water pressure gradients induced by the thermal gradient in the sediment. Pore pressure gradients measured in ISHTE will permit validation of theoretical models predicting the rate of radionucleide leakage from a buried waste container to the overlying seawater column. This report of describes the results of a laboratory simulation of ISHTE, conducted at SNLA, in which sediment cracking due to probe insertion was determined to not be a problem to the experiment. Specialized equipment developed for ISHTE, in particular a pressure transducer calibrator for ambient pressures to 69 MPa (10,000 psi), is described. Preliminary results gleaned from excess pore pressure data obtained during the ISHTE component test cruise, Sept 84, confirm that sediment cracking due to probe insertion will be slight and will have an insignificant influence on the measured excess pore pressure dissipation rates. Excess preenerated by insertion of the piezometer probes vary by a factor of two. No significant faults in the NORDA piezometer system were detected either in the laboratory stimulation or in the test in 5800 m water depth north of Hawaii

  2. Beam induced heating reduction by bunch flattening

    CERN Document Server

    Argyropoulos, T; Esteban Müller, JF; Jakobsen, S; Mastoridis, T; Metral, E; Mounet, N; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E; Timko, H

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this MD was to modify the beam induced heating on some critical LHC components by flattening the bunch distribution by applying an RF phase modulation. In this way, the beam spectrum was modified so that the power spectral density is reduced at low frequencies (below 1.1 GHz), which is the band of frequencies where the beam interaction with different component impedances is most critical. We present temperature measurements showing the beneficial effect of this latter distribution on some of the monitored devices. Longitudinal peak detected Schottky spectrum was also acquired during the first part of the MD with the intention of estimating the synchrotron frequency shift due to the reactive part of the longitudinal impedance. In the second part of the MD, an attempt to cure the transverse instability during the beta-squeeze was done by reducing the RF voltage to lengthen the bunches and enhance Landau Damping.

  3. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Meuller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  4. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  5. Three-dimensional model of heat transport during In Situ Vitrification with melting and cool down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A potential technology for permanent remediation of buried wastes is the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable, glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. The magnitude of the resulting electrical resistance heating is sufficient to cause soil melting. As the molten region grows, surface heat losses cause the soil near the surface to re solidify. This paper presents numerical results obtained by considering heat transport and melting when solving the conservation of mass and energy equations using finite element methods. A local heat source is calculated by solving the electric field equation and calculating a Joule Heat source term. The model considered is a three-dimensional model of the electrodes and surrounding soil. Also included in the model is subsidence; where the surface of the melted soil subsides due to the change in density when the soil melts. A power vs. time profile is implemented for typical ISV experiments. The model agrees well with experimental data for melt volume and melt shape

  6. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wei, Chaochen [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate.

  7. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd; Wei, Chaochen; Shao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate

  8. Finite element calculation of stress induced heating of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    This research is concerned with the calculation of the amount of heat generated due to the development of mechanical stresses in superconducting composites. An emperical equation is used to define the amount of stress-induced heat generation per unit volume. The equation relates the maximum applied stress and the experimental measured hysteresis loop of the composite stress-strain diagram. It is utilized in a finite element program to calculate the total stress-induced heat generation for the superconductor. An example analysis of a solenoid indicates that the stress-induced heating can be of the same order of magnitude as eddy current effects

  9. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-29

    Mar 29, 2007 ... Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat ... the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsps) which is strictly regulated by ... The lack of Hsp synthesis in these cells was due to a failure in HSF1 DNA ...

  10. In-situ hydrocarbon delineation using laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taer, A.D.; Hastings, R.W.; Brown, A.Y.; Frend, R.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of hydrocarbons in soils was conducted at an active Shell Oil Company petroleum products terminal, located in Carson, California. An investigation approach involving Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) technologies was implemented to provide real-time, in-situ characterization of site stratigraphy, hydrocarbon distribution and importantly, hydrocarbon product differentiation. The area of investigation is located along a property boundary, where a plume of separate phase hydrocarbons has been actively recovered for several years. CPT/LIF technology was selected for the investigation since previous delineation efforts using hydrocarbon fingerprinting methods proved inconclusive. Additionally, the CPT/LIF technology had the potential to provide a cost effective solution to accomplish project objectives. Based on the information obtained during this investigation, it was determined that the plume of separate phase hydrocarbons along the northern property boundary is from a source distinctly different than any identified hydrocarbons known to be from on-site sources. In addition, the plume was determined to not be connected with any other known on-site hydrocarbon plumes. The results of this CPT/LIF investigation were consistent with the known hydrogeologic conditions. This evaluation determined that CPT/LIF technology was very effective in addressing project objectives and resulted in a significant cost savings

  11. Chelator induced phytoextraction and in situ soil washing of Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kos, Bostjan; Lestan, Domen

    2004-01-01

    In a soil column experiment, we investigated the effect of 5 mmol kg -1 soil addition of citric acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate (DTPA) and [S,S]-stereoisomer of ethylenediamine-disuccinate (EDDS) on phytoextraction of Cu from a vineyard soil with 162.6 mg kg -1 Cu, into the test plant Brassica rapa var. pekinensis. We also examined the use of a horizontal permeable barrier, composed of layers of nutrient enriched sawdust and apatite, for reduction of chelator induced Cu leaching. The addition of all chelators, except citric acid, enhanced Cu mobility and caused leaching of 19.5-23% of initial total Cu from the soil column. However, Cu plant uptake did not increase accordingly; the most effective was the EDDS treatment, in which plant Cu concentration reached 37.8±1.3 mg kg -1 Cu and increased by 3.3-times over the control treatment. The addition of none of the chelators in the concentration range from 5 to 15 mmol kg -1 exerted any toxic effect on respiratory soil microorganisms. When EDDS was applied into the columns with horizontal permeable barriers, only 0.53±0.32% of the initial total Cu was leached. Cu (36.7%) was washed from the 18 cm soil layer above the barrier and accumulated in the barrier. Our results indicate that rather than for a reduction of Cu leaching during rather ineffective chelate induced Cu phytoextraction, horizontal permeable barriers could be more effective in a new remediation technique of controlled in situ soil washing of Cu with biodegradable chelates

  12. Induction heating to trigger the nickel surface modification by in situ generated 4-carboxybenzene diazonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrotin, Bastien; Jacques, Amory; Devillers, Sébastien; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is commonly used in numerous applications and is one of the few materials that present strong ferromagnetic properties. These make it a suitable material for induction heating which can be used to activate the grafting of organic species such as diazonium salts onto the material. Diazonium compounds are often used for the modification of metals and alloys thanks to their easy chemical reduction onto the substrates and the possibility to apply a one-step in situ generation process of the diazonium species. This work focuses on the grafting of 4-aminocarboxybenzene on nickel substrates in the context of a spontaneous grafting conducted either at room temperature or by thermal assistance through conventional heating and induction heating. These modifications are also carried out with the goal of maintaining the oxides layer as much as possible unaffected. The benefits of using induction heating with respect to conventional heating are an increase of the grafting rate, a better control of the reaction and a slighter impact on the oxides layer.

  13. Methods of producing alkylated hydrocarbons from an in situ heat treatment process liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Mo, Weijian [Sugar Land, TX; Muylle, Michel Serge Marie [Houston, TX; Mandema, Remco Hugo [Houston, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX

    2009-09-01

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation.

  14. In situ heating test in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone: measurement and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conil, N.; Armand, G.; De La Vaissiere, R.; Morel, J.; Garitte, B.; Jobmann, M.; Jellouli, M.; Filippi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. To study the thermo -hydro-mechanical effects of the early thermal phase on the clay host rock of a deep repository, Andra has performed a new in-situ heating test called TED experiment. This experiment is the second one being carried out in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory The aim of the TED experiment is to measure the evolution of the temperature; deformation and pore pressure fields around several heaters and to back-analyse the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the rock. The TED experiment was also designed to estimate the overpressure generated by heat in the zero flux plan between several heaters and to study the evolution of the damaged zone due to heat. Analysis of the experimental results will help in calibrating numerical models which will be applied to the disposal cell cases. The test set-up consists of three boreholes containing the heaters and twenty one instrumented observation boreholes. Each heater is 4 m long and may generate a power of 1500 W. The distance between each heater is about 2.6 m, which is close to the ratio of the disposal cell geometry concept. The surrounding boreholes were strategically located to follow the anisotropic THM behavior of the clay-stone. There are twelve pore pressure measurement boreholes (a total of eighteen piezometers), nine temperature measurement boreholes (108 temperature sensors) and 2 strain measurement boreholes. In order to optimize the inverse problem analysis, special attention has been paid to the reduction of uncertainties regarding the sensors location in the boreholes. Possible sensors location errors were indeed found to be a problematic issue for analysis and parameter determination in the previous thermal experiment ([1]). The central heater was activated on January 25, 2010 starting with a relatively low heating power of 150 W, then the heating power was increased to 300 W and finally to 600 W. Each step was about four

  15. Application of heat stress in situ demonstrates a protective role of irradiation on photosynthetic performance in alpine plants

    OpenAIRE

    Buchner, Othmar; STOLL, Magdalena; Karadar, Matthias; Kranner, Ilse; Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The impact of sublethal heat on photosynthetic performance, photosynthetic pigments and free radical scavenging activity was examined in three high mountain species, R hododendron ferrugineum, S enecio incanus and R anunculus glacialis using controlled in situ applications of heat stress, both in darkness and under natural solar irradiation. Heat treatments applied in the dark reversibly reduced photosynthetic performance and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), which rem...

  16. Pretest parametric calculations for the heated pillar experiment in the WIPP In-Situ Experimental Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branstetter, L.J.

    1983-03-01

    Results are presented for a pretest parametric study of several configurations and heat loads for the heated pillar experiment (Room H) in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) In Situ Experimental Area. The purpose of this study is to serve as a basis for selection of a final experiment geometry and heat load. The experiment consists of a pillar of undisturbed rock salt surrounded by an excavated annular room. The pillar surface is covered by a blanket heat source which is externally insulated. A total of five thermal and ten structural calculations are described in a four to five year experimental time frame. Results are presented which include relevant temperature-time histories, deformations, rock salt stress component and effective stress profiles, and maximum stresses in anhydrite layers which are in close proximity to the room. Also included are predicted contours of a conservative post-processed measure of potential salt failure. Observed displacement histories are seen to be highly dependent on pillar and room height, but insensitive to other geometrical variations. The use of a tensile cutoff across slidelines is seen to produce more accurate predictions of anhydrite maximum stress, but to have little effect on rock salt stresses. The potential for salt failure is seen to be small in each case for the time frame of interest, and is only seen at longer times in the center of the room floor

  17. Behaviour of TEM metal grids during in-situ heating experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaoli; Su, Dangsheng

    2009-05-01

    The stability of Ni, Cu, Mo and Au transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids coated with ultra-thin amorphous carbon (alpha-C) or silicon monoxide film is examined by in-situ heating up to a temperature in the range 500-850 degrees C in a transmission electron microscope. It is demonstrated that some grids can generate nano-particles either due to the surface diffusion of metal atoms on amorphous film or due to the metal evaporation/redeposition. The emergence of nano-particles can complicate experimental observations, particularly in in-situ heating studies of dynamic behaviours of nano-materials in TEM. The most widely used Cu grid covered with amorphous carbon is unstable, and numerous Cu nano-particles start to form once the heating temperature reaches 600 degrees C. In the case of Ni grid covered with alpha-C film, a large number of Ni nano-crystals occur immediately when the temperature approaches 600 degrees C, accompanied by the graphitization of amorphous carbon. In contrast, both Mo and Au grids covered with alpha-C film exhibit good stability at elevated temperature, for instance, up to 680 and 850 degrees C for Mo and Au, respectively, and any other metal nano-particles are detected. Cu grid covered Si monoxide thin film is stable up to 550 degrees C, but Si nano-crystals appear under intensive electron beam. The generated nano-particles are well characterized by spectroscopic techniques (EDXS/EELS) and high-resolution TEM. The mechanism of nano-particle formation is addressed based on the interactions between the metal grid and the amorphous carbon film and on the sublimation of metal.

  18. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Mick Y.; Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen; Strauss, Josiah; McCabe, Matthew; Evans, Jason P.; Griffiths, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10. m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (~1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  19. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Mick Y.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10. m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (~1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  20. Heat-induced alterations in the cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampinga, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Hyperthermia may kill eukaryotic cells and may also enhance the radiosensitivity of those cells that survive the heat treatment. Clinically, the possible use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant in the radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer needs the understanding of mechanisms that underlay heat-induced cell death and radiosensitization. By in vitro heating of established human (HeLaS3) and rodent (Ehrlich Ascites Tumor and LM fibroblast) cell lines, both killing and radiosensitization were investigated. (author). 1067 refs.; 76 figs.; 19 tabs

  1. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, K.; Diao, Z.; Campanini, D.; Welp, U.; Divan, R.; Hudl, M.; Islam, Z.; Kwok, W.-K.; Rydh, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-δ crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  2. In-situ imaging of tungsten surface modification under ITER-like transient heat loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Vasilyev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research on behavior of rolled tungsten plates under intense transient heat loads generated by a powerful (a total power of up to 7 MW long-pulse (0.1–0.3ms electron beam with full irradiation area of 2 cm2 was carried out. Imaging of the sample by the fast CCD cameras in the NIR range and with illumination by the 532nm continuous-wave laser was applied for in-situ surface diagnostics during exposure. In these experiments tungsten plates were exposed to heat loads 0.5–1MJ/m2 with a heat flux factor (Fhf close to and above the melting threshold of tungsten at initial room temperature. Crack formation and crack propagation under the surface layer were observed during multiple exposures. Overheated areas with excessive temperature over surrounding surface of about 500K were found on severely damaged samples more than 5ms after beam ending. The application of laser illumination enables to detect areas of intense tungsten melting near crack edges and crack intersections.

  3. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, C; Nistor, L C; Vizireanu, S; Dinescu, G

    2011-01-01

    The smart-cut(TM) process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 deg. C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 deg. C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  4. ELM induced divertor heat loads on TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marki, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Horacek, J.; Tskhakaya, D.; TCV Team

    2009-06-01

    Results are presented for heat loads at the TCV outer divertor target during ELMing H-mode using a fast IR camera. Benefitting from a recent surface cleaning of the entire first wall graphite armour, a comparison of the transient thermal response of freshly cleaned and untreated tile surfaces (coated with thick co-deposited layers) has been performed. The latter routinely exhibit temperature transients exceeding those of the clean ones by a factor ˜3, even if co-deposition throughout the first days of operation following the cleaning process leads to the steady regrowth of thin layers. Filaments are occasionally observed during the ELM heat flux rise phase, showing a spatial structure consistent with energy release at discrete toroidal locations in the outer midplane vicinity and with individual filaments carrying ˜1% of the total ELM energy. The temporal waveform of the ELM heat load is found to be in good agreement with the collisionless free streaming particle model.

  5. ELM induced divertor heat loads on TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marki, J., E-mail: janos.marki@epfl.c [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Association Euratom - Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Pitts, R.A. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Association Euratom - Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Horacek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Association EUROATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Tskhakaya, D. [Association EURATOM-OAW, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented for heat loads at the TCV outer divertor target during ELMing H-mode using a fast IR camera. Benefitting from a recent surface cleaning of the entire first wall graphite armour, a comparison of the transient thermal response of freshly cleaned and untreated tile surfaces (coated with thick co-deposited layers) has been performed. The latter routinely exhibit temperature transients exceeding those of the clean ones by a factor approx3, even if co-deposition throughout the first days of operation following the cleaning process leads to the steady regrowth of thin layers. Filaments are occasionally observed during the ELM heat flux rise phase, showing a spatial structure consistent with energy release at discrete toroidal locations in the outer midplane vicinity and with individual filaments carrying approx1% of the total ELM energy. The temporal waveform of the ELM heat load is found to be in good agreement with the collisionless free streaming particle model.

  6. Heat stroke induced cerebellar dysfunction: A “forgotten syndrome”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgallana, Athula D; Mallik, Shreyashee; Patel, Vishal; Beran, Roy G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of heat stroke induced acute cerebellar dysfunction, a rare neurological disease characterized by gross cerebellar dysfunction with no acute radiographic changes, in a 61 years old ship captain presenting with slurred speech and gait ataxia. A systematic review of the literature on heat stroke induced cerebellar dysfunction was performed, with a focus on investigations, treatment and outcomes. After review of the literature and detailed patient investigation it was concluded that this patient suffered heat stroke at a temperature less than that quoted in the literature. PMID:24340279

  7. Geothermal waste heat utilization from in situ thermal bitumen recovery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakevska, Nevenka; Schincariol, Robert A; Dehkordi, S Emad; Cheadle, Burns A

    2015-01-01

    In situ thermal methods for bitumen extraction introduce a tremendous amount of energy into the reservoirs raising ambient temperatures of 13 °C to as high as 200 °C at the steam chamber edge and 50 °C along the reservoir edge. In essence these operations have unintentionally acted as underground thermal energy storage systems which can be recovered after completion of bitumen extraction activities. Groundwater flow and heat transport models of the Cold Lake, Alberta, reservoir, coupled with a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) model, allowed for investigating the use of closed-loop geothermal systems for energy recovery. Three types of BHEs (single U-tube, double U-tube, coaxial) were tested and analyzed by comparing outlet temperatures and corresponding heat extraction rates. Initial one year continuous operation simulations show that the double U-tube configuration had the best performance producing an average temperature difference of 5.7 °C, and an average heat extraction of 41 W/m. Given the top of the reservoir is at a depth of 400 m, polyethylene piping provided for larger extraction gains over more thermally conductive steel piping. Thirty year operation simulations illustrate that allowing 6 month cyclic recovery periods only increases the loop temperature gain by a factor of 1.2 over continuous operation. Due to the wide spacing of existing boreholes and reservoir depth, only a small fraction of the energy is efficiently recovered. Drilling additional boreholes between existing wells would increase energy extraction. In areas with shallower bitumen deposits such as the Athabasca region, i.e. 65 to 115 m deep, BHE efficiencies should be larger. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Chlorophyll loss associated with heat-induced senescence in bentgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, David; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Bingru

    2016-08-01

    Heat stress-induced leaf senescence is characterized by the loss of chlorophyll from leaf tissues. The objectives of this study were to examine genetic variations in the level of heat-induced leaf senescence in hybrids of colonial (Agrostis capillaris)×creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) contrasting in heat tolerance, and determine whether loss of leaf chlorophyll during heat-induced leaf senescence was due to suppressed chlorophyll synthesis and/or accelerated chlorophyll degradation in the cool-season perennial grass species. Plants of two hybrid backcross genotypes ('ColxCB169' and 'ColxCB190') were exposed to heat stress (38/33°C, day/night) for 28 d in growth chambers. The analysis of turf quality, membrane stability, photochemical efficiency, and chlorophyll content demonstrated significant variations in the level of leaf senescence induced by heat stress between the two genotypes, with ColXCB169 exhibiting a lesser degree of decline in chlorophyll content, photochemical efficiency and membrane stability than ColXCB190. The assays of enzymatic activity or gene expression of several major chlorophyll-synthesizing (porphobilinogen deaminase, Mg-chelatase, protochlorophyllide-reductase) and chlorophyll-degrading enzymes (chlorophyllase, pheophytinase, and chlorophyll-degrading peroxidase) indicated heat-induced decline in leaf chlorophyll content was mainly due to accelerated chlorophyll degradation, as manifested by increased gene expression levels of chlorophyllase and pheophytinase, and the activity of pheophytinase (PPH), while chlorophyll-synthesizing genes and enzymatic activities were not differentially altered by heat stress in the two genotypes. The analysis of heat-induced leaf senescence of pph mutants of Arabidopsis further confirmed that PPH could be one enzymes that plays key roles in regulating heat-accelerated chlorophyll degradation. Further research on enzymes responsible in part for the loss of chlorophyll during heat-induced

  9. Methodology for in situ synchrotron X-ray studies in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezouar, M.; Giampaoli, R.; Garbarino, G.

    2017-01-01

    A review of some important technical challenges related to in situ diamond anvil cell laser heating experimentation at synchrotron X-ray sources is presented. The problem of potential chemical reactions between the sample and the pressure medium or the carbon from the diamond anvils is illustrated...

  10. In-situ TEM investigation of microstructural evolution in magnetron sputtered Al-Zr and Al-Zr-Si coatings during heat treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Rechendorff, Kristian; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2016-01-01

    The magnetron sputtered Al–Zr and Al–Zr–Si coatings were heat treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope as well as ex-situ to observe their annealing behaviour and phase transformations. The samples were heated up to a temperature of 550 °C and then cooled to room temperature. A layer...

  11. Microseism Induced by Transient Release of In Situ Stress During Deep Rock Mass Excavation by Blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2013-07-01

    During deep rock mass excavation with the method of drill and blast, accompanying the secession of rock fragments and the formation of a new free surface, in situ stress on this boundary is suddenly released within several milliseconds, which is termed the transient release of in situ stress. In this process, enormous strain energy around the excavation face is instantly released in the form of kinetic energy and it inevitably induces microseismic events in surrounding rock masses. Thus, blasting excavation-induced microseismic vibrations in high-stress rock masses are attributed to the combined action of explosion and the transient release of in situ stress. The intensity of stress release-induced microseisms, which depends mainly on the magnitude of the in situ stress and the dimension of the excavation face, is comparable to that of explosion-induced vibrations. With the methods of time-energy density analysis, amplitude spectrum analysis, and finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter, microseismic vibrations induced by the transient release of in situ stress were identified and separated from recorded microseismic signals during a blast of deep rock masses in the Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that the low-frequency component in the microseismic records results mainly from the transient release of in situ stress, while the high-frequency component originates primarily from explosion. In addition, a numerical simulation was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of microseismic events by the transient release of in situ stress, and the results seem to have confirmed fairly well the separated vibrations from microseismic records.

  12. A MEMS-based heating holder for the direct imaging of simultaneous in-situ heating and biasing experiments in scanning/transmission electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Luigi; Konings, Stan; Dona, Pleun; Evertz, Francis; Mitterbauer, Christoph; Faber, Pybe; Schampers, Ruud; Jinschek, Joerg R

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of scanning/transmission electron microscopes (S/TEM) with sub-Angstrom resolution as well as fast and sensitive detection solutions support direct observation of dynamic phenomena in-situ at the atomic scale. Thereby, in-situ specimen holders play a crucial role: accurate control of the applied in-situ stimulus on the nanostructure combined with the overall system stability to assure atomic resolution are paramount for a successful in-situ S/TEM experiment. For those reasons, MEMS-based TEM sample holders are becoming one of the preferred choices, also enabling a high precision in measurements of the in-situ parameter for more reproducible data. A newly developed MEMS-based microheater is presented in combination with the new NanoEx™-i/v TEM sample holder. The concept is built on a four-point probe temperature measurement approach allowing active, accurate local temperature control as well as calorimetry. In this paper, it is shown that it provides high temperature stability up to 1,300°C with a peak temperature of 1,500°C (also working accurately in gaseous environments), high temperature measurement accuracy (in-situ S/TEM imaging experiments, but also elemental mapping at elevated temperatures using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Moreover, it has the unique capability to enable simultaneous heating and biasing experiments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The microwave heating mechanism of N-(4-methoxybenzyliden)-4-butylaniline in liquid crystalline and isotropic phases as determined using in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasei, Yugo; Tanigawa, Fumikazu; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-04-14

    Microwave heating effects are widely used in the acceleration of organic, polymerization and enzymatic reactions. These effects are primarily caused by the local heating induced by microwave irradiation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms associated with microwave heating effects on the chemical reactions are not yet well understood. This study investigated the microwave heating effect of N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline (MBBA) in liquid crystalline and isotropic phases using in situ microwave irradiation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, by obtaining (1)H NMR spectra of MBBA under microwave irradiation. When heated simply using the temperature control unit of the NMR instrument, the liquid crystalline MBBA was converted to the isotropic phase exactly at its phase transition temperature (Tc) of 41 °C. The application of microwave irradiation at 130 W for 90 s while maintaining the instrument temperature at 20 °C generated a small amount of isotropic phase within the bulk liquid crystal. The sample temperature of the liquid crystalline state obtained during microwave irradiation was estimated to be 35 °C by assessing the linewidths of the (1)H NMR spectrum. This partial transition to the isotropic phase can be attributed to a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by the microwave irradiation. The application of microwave at 195 W for 5 min to isotropic MBBA while maintaining an instrument temperature of 50 °C raised the sample temperature to 160 °C. In this study, the MBBA temperature during microwave irradiation was estimated by measuring the temperature dependent chemical shifts of individual protons in the sample, and the different protons were found to indicate significantly different temperatures in the molecule. These results suggest that microwave heating polarizes bonds in polar functional groups, and this effect may partly explain the attendant acceleration of organic reactions.

  14. Practical Considerations for Thermal Stresses Induced by Surface Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid surface heating can induce large stresses in solids. A relatively simple model, assuming full constraint in two dimensions and no constraint in the third dimension, can adequately model stresses in a wide variety of situations. This paper derives this simple model, and supports it with criteria for its validity. Phenomena that are considered include non-zero penetration depths for the heat deposition, spatial non-uniformity in the surface heating, and elastic waves. Models for each of these cases, using simplified geometries, are used to develop quantitative limits for their applicability

  15. Concept of heat-induced inkless eco-printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinxiang; Wang, Yong; Xie, Juan; Meng, Chuang; Wu, Gang; Zu, Qiao

    2012-07-01

    Existing laser and inkjet printers often produce adverse effects on human health, the recycling of printing paper and the environment. Therefore, this paper examines the thermogravimetry curves for printer paper, analyzes the discoloration of paper using heat-induction, and investigates the relationship between paper discoloration and the heat-inducing temperature. The mechanism of heat-induced printing is analyzed initially, and its feasibility is determined by a comparative analysis of heat-induced (laser ablation) printing and commercial printing. The innovative concept of heat-induced inkless eco-printing is proposed, in which the required text or graphics are formed on the printing paper via yellowing and blackening produced by thermal energy. This process does not require ink during the printing process; thus, it completely eliminates the aforementioned health and environmental issues. This research also contributes to related interdisciplinary research in biology, laser technology, photochemistry, nano-science, paper manufacturing and color science. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of heat stress in situ demonstrates a protective role of irradiation on photosynthetic performance in alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Stoll, Magdalena; Karadar, Matthias; Kranner, Ilse; Neuner, Gilbert

    2015-04-01

    The impact of sublethal heat on photosynthetic performance, photosynthetic pigments and free radical scavenging activity was examined in three high mountain species, Rhododendron ferrugineum, Senecio incanus and Ranunculus glacialis using controlled in situ applications of heat stress, both in darkness and under natural solar irradiation. Heat treatments applied in the dark reversibly reduced photosynthetic performance and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv /Fm), which remained impeded for several days when plants were exposed to natural light conditions subsequently to the heat treatment. In contrast, plants exposed to heat stress under natural irradiation were able to tolerate and recover from heat stress more readily. The critical temperature threshold for chlorophyll fluorescence was higher under illumination (Tc (')) than in the dark (Tc). Heat stress caused a significant de-epoxidation of the xanthophyll cycle pigments both in the light and in the dark conditions. Total free radical scavenging activity was highest when heat stress was applied in the dark. This study demonstrates that, in the European Alps, heat waves can temporarily have a negative impact on photosynthesis and, importantly, that results obtained from experiments performed in darkness and/or on detached plant material may not reliably predict the impact of heat stress under field conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  18. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  19. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  20. Radiation-induced autologous in situ tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) has been used as a definitive treatment for many solid tumors. While tumoricidal properties of RT are instrumental for standard clinical application, irradiated tumors can potentially serve as a source of tumor antigens in vivo, where dying tumor cells would release tumor antigens and danger signals and serve as autologous in situ tumor vaccines. Using murine tumor models of prostate, metastatic lung cancer and melanoma, we have demonstrated evidence of radiation-enhanced tumor-specific immune response that resulted in improved primary tumor control and reduction in systemic metastasis and cure. We will discuss the immunogenic properties of RT and determine how immunotherapeutic approaches can synergize with RT in boosting immune cells cell function. (author)

  1. EM-SAGD/EM-GD : electromagnetic heating method : sustainable improvement of in-situ bitumen recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, B.; Diehl, D.; Huber, N.; Torlak, M.; Koolman, M. [Siemens AG, Munich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described an electro-magnetic heating technology for the in situ recovery of bitumen. Studies have indicated that the technology promises a higher yield of bitumen with a smaller surface footprint than other bitumen production technologies. A laboratory study conducted with an inductor loop embedded in a 1 meter{sup 3} sand-box demonstrated that the technology is technically feasible. A series of field tests were then conducted by Siemens in a conductive subsurface later in Deggendorf, Germany. The field test included remotely operated surface equipment that was tested under down-scaled field conditions over a period of 6 months. New fiber optic sensors were used to obtain underground temperature readings. The field tests demonstrated a rise in temperature caused by the induction of eddy currents through electromagnetic fields in the conductive sub-surface. Results of the study will be used at an oil sands reservoir in 2011. The process can be combined with steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) processes. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Heat transfer in tube bundles of heat exchangers with flow baffles induced forced mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuRomia, M.M.; Chu, A.W.; Cho, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers is being investigated through geometric modeling of the unit configuration in addition to considering the heat transfer processes taking place within the tube bundle. The governing equations that characterize the heat transfer from the shell side fluid to the tube side fluid across the heat transfer tubewalls are indicated. The equations account for the heat transfer due to molecular conduction, turbulent thermal diffusion, and forced fluid mixing among various shell side fluid channels. The analysis, though general in principle, is being applied to the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant-Intermediate Heat Exchanger, which utilizes flow baffles appropriately designed for induced forced fluid mixing in the tube bundle. The results of the analysis are presented in terms of the fluid and tube wall temperature distributions of a non-baffled and baffled tube bundle geometry. The former case yields axial flow in the main bundle region while the latter is associated with axial/cross flow in the bundle. The radial components of the axial/cross flow yield the necessary fluid mixing that results in reducing the thermal unbalance among the heat transfer to the allowable limits. The effect of flow maldistribution, present on the tube or shell sides of the heat exchangers, in altering the temperature field of tube bundles is also noted

  3. Spin Heat Accumulation Induced by Tunneling from a Ferromagnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Marun, I.J.; Wees, B.J. van; Jansen, R.

    2014-01-01

    An electric current from a ferromagnet into a nonmagnetic material can induce a spin-dependent electron temperature. Here, it is shown that this spin heat accumulation, when created by tunneling from a ferromagnet, produces a non-negligible voltage signal that is comparable to that due to the

  4. Photo-induced-heat localization on nanostructured metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Ceren; Kahler, Niloofar; Grave de Peralta, Luis; Kumar, Golden; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2017-09-01

    Materials with large photo-thermal energy conversion efficiency are essential for renewable energy applications. Photo-excitation is an effective approach to generate controlled and localized heat at relatively low excitation optical powers. However, lateral heat diffusion to the surrounding illuminated areas accompanied by low photo-thermal energy conversion efficiency remains a challenge for metallic surfaces. Surface nanoengineering has proven to be a successful approach to further absorption and heat generation. Here, we show that pronounced spatial heat localization and high temperatures can be achieved with arrays of amorphous metallic glass nanorods under infrared optical illumination. Thermography measurements revealed marked temperature contrast between illuminated and non-illuminated areas even under low optical power excitation conditions. This attribute allowed for generating legible photo-induced thermal patterns on textured metallic glass surfaces.

  5. Spin heat accumulation induced by tunneling from a ferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Marun, I J; van Wees, B J; Jansen, R

    2014-02-07

    An electric current from a ferromagnet into a nonmagnetic material can induce a spin-dependent electron temperature. Here, it is shown that this spin heat accumulation, when created by tunneling from a ferromagnet, produces a non-negligible voltage signal that is comparable to that due to the coexisting electrical spin accumulation and can give a different Hanle spin precession signature. The effect is governed by the spin polarization of the Peltier coefficient of the tunnel contact, its Seebeck coefficient, and the spin heat resistance of the nonmagnetic material, which is related to the electrical spin resistance by a spin-Wiedemann-Franz law. Moreover, spin heat injection is subject to a heat conductivity mismatch that is overcome if the tunnel interface has a sufficiently large resistance.

  6. Using geothermal energy to heat a portion of a formation for an in situ heat treatment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterson, Roelof; Boyles, Joseph Michael; Diebold, Peter Ulrich

    2010-06-08

    Methods of using geothermal energy to treat subsurface formations are described herein. Methods for using geothermal energy to treat a subsurface treatment area containing or proximate to hydrocarbons may include producing geothermally heated fluid from at least one subsurface region. Heat from at least a portion of the geothermally heated fluid may be transferred to the subsurface treatment area to heat the subsurface treatment area. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Cathode-Control Alloying at an Au-ZnSe Nanowire Contact via in Situ Joule Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Ya-Ping; Qu Bai-Hua; Yu Hong-Chun; Wang Yan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Controllable interfacial alloying is achieved at a Au-ZnSe nanowire (M-S) contact via in situ Joule heating inside transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM inspection reveals that the Au electrode is locally molten at the M-S contact and the tip of the ZnSe nanowire is covered by the Au melting. Experimental evidences confirm that the alloying at the reversely biased M-S contact is due to the high resistance of the Schottky barrier at this M-S contact, coincident to cathode-control mode. Consequently, in situ Joule heating can be an effective method to improve the performance of nanoelectronics based on a metal-semiconductor-metal nanostructure. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  8. Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.A.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Pearce, F.; Lawrence, Z.; Menq, F.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    [1] It is well known that soil sites have a profound effect on ground motion during large earthquakes. The complex structure of soil deposits and the highly nonlinear constitutive behavior of soils largely control nonlinear site response at soil sites. Measurements of nonlinear soil response under natural conditions are critical to advancing our understanding of soil behavior during earthquakes. Many factors limit the use of earthquake observations to estimate nonlinear site response such that quantitative characterization of nonlinear behavior relies almost exclusively on laboratory experiments and modeling of wave propagation. Here we introduce a new method for in situ characterization of the nonlinear behavior of a natural soil formation using measurements obtained immediately adjacent to a large vibrator source. To our knowledge, we are the first group to propose and test such an approach. Employing a large, surface vibrator as a source, we measure the nonlinear behavior of the soil by incrementally increasing the source amplitude over a range of frequencies and monitoring changes in the output spectra. We apply a homodyne algorithm for measuring spectral amplitudes, which provides robust signal-to-noise ratios at the frequencies of interest. Spectral ratios are computed between the receivers and the source as well as receiver pairs located in an array adjacent to the source, providing the means to separate source and near-source nonlinearity from pervasive nonlinearity in the soil column. We find clear evidence of nonlinearity in significant decreases in the frequency of peak spectral ratios, corresponding to material softening with amplitude, observed across the array as the source amplitude is increased. The observed peak shifts are consistent with laboratory measurements of soil nonlinearity. Our results provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies of strong ground motion during earthquakes.

  9. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-01-01

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC's and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow

  10. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  11. Improvement of boiling heat transfer by radiation induced boiling enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Yasuyuki; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki; Takamasa, Tomoji

    2003-01-01

    For nuclear reactor systems, the critical heat flux (CHF) data is very important because it limits reactor efficiency. Improvement of CHF requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. In our previous study, we confirmed that the surface wettability changed significantly or that highly hydrophilic conditions were achieved, after irradiation of 60 Co gamma ray, by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of RISA on boiling phenomena, surface wettability in a high-temperature environment and critical heat flux (CHF) of metal oxides irradiated by gamma rays were investigated. A CHF experiment in the pool boiling condition was carried out under atmospheric pressure. The heating test section made of titanium was 0.2 mm in thickness, 3 mm in height, and 60 mm in length. Oxidation of the surface was carried out by plasma jetting for 40 seconds. The test section was irradiated by 60 Co gamma ray with predetermined radiation intensity and period. The CHF of oxidized titanium was improved up to 100 percent after 800 kGy 60 Co gamma ray irradiation. We call this effect Radiation Induced Boiling Enhancement (RIBE). Before we conducted the CHF experiment, contact angles of the test pieces were measured to show the relationship between wettability and CHF. The CHF in the present experiment increases will surface wettability in the same manner as shown by Liaw and Dhir's results. (author)

  12. Improvement of boiling heat transfer by radiation induced boiling enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Madarame, H.; Takamasa, T.

    2003-01-01

    For nuclear reactor systems, the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) data is very important because it limits reactor efficiency. Improvement of CHF requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. In our previous study, we confirmed that the surface wettability changed significantly or that highly hydrophilic conditions were achieved, after irradiation of 60Co gamma ray, by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of RISA on boiling phenomena, surface wettability in a high-temperature environment and Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of metal oxides irradiated by gamma rays were investigated. A CHF experiment in the pool boiling condition was carried out under atmospheric pressure. The heating test section made of titanium was 0.2mm in thickness, 3mm in height, and 60mm in length. Oxidation of the surfaces was carried out by plasma jetting for 40 seconds. The test section was irradiated by 60Co gamma ray with predetermined radiation intensity and period. The CHF of oxidized titanium was improved up to 100 percent after 800kGy 60Co gamma ray irradiation. We call this effect Radiation Induced Boiling Enhancement (RIBE). Before we conducted the CHF experiment, contact angles of the test pieces were measured to show the relationship between wettability and CHF. The CHF in the present experiment increases with surface wettability in the same manner as shown by Liaw and Dhir's results

  13. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  14. Development of an in-situ heat transfer experiment (ISHTE) for illite clays of MPG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, L.O.; Ewart, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    During 1979 the Applied Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington has been working on the design and development of components for an In-Situ Heat Transfer Experiment (ISHTE). The goal of the experiment is to test the validity of using laboratory experiments and analytical studies to predict the thermal response of red clay sediments in the deep ocean. All areas of the conceptual ISHTE developed during 1978 have been investigated this year at some level, with the greatest emphasis on the key components. Because the platform tracking and acoustic communication system is the most crucial component of the experiment, the major effort has been spent on developing this equipment. Hardware and software for the system are nearly operational. Some preliminary testing to evaluate transducers has been performed in Puget Sound and at shallow ocean depths. The transducers purchased initially were not adequate, but units from another company have been purchased and tested with good results. Deep ocean transponder tests will be run in the spring of 1980, and tests of the full tracking system will be conducted in July of 1980 at MPG-1. Several other hardware systems developed this year were an electric heater to simulate the isotope heatsource for system testing, the heater implantment arm, the heater's thermal sensor system, the thermal sensors for the sediment, and a 1/5 scale model of the planned ISHTE platform for visulization of component interaction. The hydrostatic corers are being designed but no construction will be started on prototypes until late 1980. No severe problems have been found thus far with the conceptualized system for the ISHTE platform, and work is progressing on building and testing all of these component systems before the seafloor platform is designed in detail. Present plans are to start designing the platform in FY 81

  15. Maximum skin hyperaemia induced by local heating: possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Kim M; Hannemann, Michael M; Tooke, John E; Clough, Geraldine F; Shore, Angela C

    2006-01-01

    Maximum skin hyperaemia (MH) induced by heating skin to > or = 42 degrees C is impaired in individuals at risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Interpretation of these findings is hampered by the lack of clarity of the mechanisms involved in the attainment of MH. MH was achieved by local heating of skin to 42-43 degrees C for 30 min, and assessed by laser Doppler fluximetry. Using double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study designs, the roles of prostaglandins were investigated by inhibiting their production with aspirin and histamine, with the H1 receptor antagonist cetirizine. The nitric oxide (NO) pathway was blocked by the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esther (L-NAME), and enhanced by sildenafil (prevents breakdown of cGMP). MH was not altered by aspirin, cetirizine or sildenafil, but was reduced by L-NAME: median placebo 4.48 V (25th, 75th centiles: 3.71, 4.70) versus L-NAME 3.25 V (3.10, 3.80) (p = 0.008, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Inhibition of NO production (L-NAME) resulted in a more rapid reduction in hyperaemia after heating (p = 0.011), whereas hyperaemia was prolonged in the presence of sildenafil (p = 0.003). The increase in skin blood flow was largely confined to the directly heated area, suggesting that the role of heat-induced activation of the axon reflex was small. NO, but not prostaglandins, histamine or an axon reflex, contributes to the increase in blood flow on heating and NO is also a component of the resolution of MH after heating. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Analysis of laser-induced heating in optical neuronal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Christian L.; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to control the growth direction of neuronal growth cones by stimulation with weak laser light; an effect dubbed optical neuronal guidance. The effect exists for a broad range of laser wavelengths, spot sizes, spot intensities, optical intensity...... profiles and beam modulations, but it is unknown which biophysical mechanisms govern it. Based on thermodynamic modeling and simulation using published experimental parameters as input, we argue that the guidance is linked to heating. Until now, temperature effects due to laser-induced heating...

  17. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul, E-mail: sohel0991@gmail.com; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000. Bangladesh (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  18. Monitoring of high temperature area by resistivity tomography during in-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature, mechanical conditions or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50 m. The well with a diameter of 30 cm and 60 cm of height, was drilled and filled with groundwater. The heater was installed in the well for heating the surrounding rock mass. During the heating, temperature and deformation around the well were measured. To evaluate the influence of heating on sedimentary soft rocks, it is important to monitor the extent of heated area. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature area. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heating test. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heating well decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. The decreasing rate of resistivity on temperature is correlated to that of laboratory experimental result and existing empirical formula between aqueous solution resistivity and temperature. Resistivity is changed by many other factors, but it is expected that resistivity change by other factors is very few in this test. This suggests that high temperature area is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the area heated by nuclear waste. (author)

  19. Flow-excursion-induced dryout at low-heat-flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Cazzoli, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    Flow-excursion-induced dryout at low-heat-flux natural-convection boiling, typical of liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, is addressed. Steady-state calculations indicate that low-quality boiling is possible up to the point of Ledinegg instability leading to flow excursion and subsequent dryout in agreement with experimental data. A flow-regime-dependent dryout heat flux relationship based upon saturated boiling criterion is also presented. Transient analysis indicates that premature flow excursion can not be ruled out and sodium boiling is highly transient dependent. Analysis of a high-heat-flux forced convection, loss-of-flow transient shows a significantly faster flow excursion leading to dryout in excellent agreement with parallel calculations using the two-dimensional THORAX code. 17 figures

  20. Flow induced vibration in shell and tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, B.M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Assessing heat exchanger designs, from the standpoint of flow induced vibration, is becoming increasingly important as shell side flow velocities are increased in a quest for better thermal performance. This paper reviews the state of the art concerning the main sources of vibration excitation, i.e. vortex shedding resonance, turbulent buffeting, fluidelastic instability and acoustic resonance, as well as the structural dynamics of the tubes. It is concluded that there are many areas which require further investigation but there are sufficient data available at present to design, with reasonable confidence, units that will be free from flow induced vibration. Topics which are considered to be key areas for further work are listed

  1. Sex specific effects of heat induced hormesis in Hsf-deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J G; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Kristensen, K V

    2007-01-01

    In insects mild heat stress early in life has been reported to increase life span and heat resistance later in life, a phenomenon termed hormesis. Here, we test if the induction of the heat shock response by mild heat stress is mediating hormesis in longevity and heat resistance at older age...... line, seemingly mediated by the production of heat shock proteins (Hsps). The results indicate that heat inducible Hsps are important for heat induced hormesis in longevity and heat stress resistance. However, the results also suggest that other processes are involved and that different mechanisms...... might have marked sex specific impact...

  2. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Under Tensile Loading of Powder-in-Tube Cu/Nb$_{3}$Sn Composite Wires Effect of Reaction Heat Treatment on Texture, Internal Stress State and Load Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Thilly, L

    2007-01-01

    The strain induced degradation of Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductors can hamper the performance of high field magnets. We report elastic strain measurements in the different phases of entire non-heat treated and fully reacted Nb$_{3}$Sn composite strands as a function of uniaxial stress during in-situ deformation under neutron beam. After the reaction heat treatment the Cu matrix loses entirely its load carrying capability and the applied stress is transferred to the remaining Nb-Ta alloy and to the brittle (Nb-Ta)3Sn phase, which exhibits a preferential grain orientation parallel to the strand axis.

  3. In-situ observations of stress-induced thin film failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.B., E-mail: zzhao@firstsolar.co [Delphi Research Labs, 51786 Shelby Parkway, Shelby Twp., MI 48315 (United States); Hershberger, J. [Laird Technologies, 4707 Detroit Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, 44102 (United States); Bilello, J.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the failure modes of thin films under thermo-mechanical treatments were observed via in-situ white beam X-ray topography. The in-situ experiments were carried out using an experimental setup on Beamline 2-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Magnetron sputtered polycrystalline thin films of Ta and CrN on Si substrates were selected for the present study due to their disparate states of intrinsic residual stresses: the Ta film was anisotropically compressive and the CrN film was isotropically tensile. Under a similar heating-cooling cycle in air, the two types of films exhibited distinct failure modes, which were observed in-situ and in a quasi-real-time fashion. The failures of the samples have been interpreted based on their distinctive growth stress states, superimposed on the additional stress development associated with different forms of thermal instabilities upon heating. These included the formation of oxide for the Ta/Si sample, which led to an increase in compressive stress, and a phase change for the CrN/Si sample, which caused the isotropic stress in the film to become increasingly tensile.

  4. In-situ observations of stress-induced thin film failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z.B.; Hershberger, J.; Bilello, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the failure modes of thin films under thermo-mechanical treatments were observed via in-situ white beam X-ray topography. The in-situ experiments were carried out using an experimental setup on Beamline 2-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Magnetron sputtered polycrystalline thin films of Ta and CrN on Si substrates were selected for the present study due to their disparate states of intrinsic residual stresses: the Ta film was anisotropically compressive and the CrN film was isotropically tensile. Under a similar heating-cooling cycle in air, the two types of films exhibited distinct failure modes, which were observed in-situ and in a quasi-real-time fashion. The failures of the samples have been interpreted based on their distinctive growth stress states, superimposed on the additional stress development associated with different forms of thermal instabilities upon heating. These included the formation of oxide for the Ta/Si sample, which led to an increase in compressive stress, and a phase change for the CrN/Si sample, which caused the isotropic stress in the film to become increasingly tensile.

  5. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A., E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  6. An Efficient Heat Exchanger for In Situ Resource Utilization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is essential for several of NASA's future flagship missions. Currently envisioned ISRU plants include production of oxygen from...

  7. Effect of heat treatment of whole cottonseed on in vitro, in situ and in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Amino acid flow, heat treatment, protein degradation, whole cononseed. * Author to whom ... heat-treated soybearu were compared with raw soybeans, it was found that ... et al., 1985; Faldet & Sarter, 1989) while milk fat percenrage.

  8. Nick translation detection in situ of cellular DNA strand break induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maehara, Y.; Anai, H.; Kusumoto, T.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Sugimachi, K.

    1989-01-01

    DNA strand break in HeLa cells induced by radiation was detected using the in situ nick translation method. The cells were exposed to radiation of 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 Gy in Lab-Tek tissue culture chamber/slides and were fixed with ethanol/acetic acid on the slide glass. The break sites in DNA were translated artificially in the presence of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and [ 3 H]-labeled dTTP. Autoradiographic observation was made of the level of break sites in the DNA. The DNA strand break appeared even with a 3 Gy exposure, increased 8.6 times at 24 Gy compared with the control cells, and this level correlated reciprocally to change in cell viability. This nick translation method provides a rapid in situ assay for determining radiation-induced DNA damage of cultured cells, in a semi-quantitative manner

  9. Analysis of flow induced vibration in heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, A.W. van [Institute for Mechanical Constructions TNO, Delft (Netherlands)

    1977-12-01

    A description will be given of three different types of heat exchangers developed by the Dutch Nuclear Industry Group ''Neratoom'' in cooperation with TNO for the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor SNR-300 at Kalkar. Moreover, the research related with flow induced vibrations carried out by TNO (Organization for Applied Scientific Research) will be presented. The flow induced forces on the tubes of the straight-tube steam generators were measured at the inlet and outlet section where partial crossflow occurs. With the measured flow induced forces the response of a tube was calculated as a function of the tube-to-supportbush clearances taking into account the non-linear damping effects from the sodium. The theoretical results showed that for this particular design no tube impact damage is to be expected which was confirmed later by a full scale experiment. Special attention will be devoted to the steam generator with helical-coil tube-bundles, where the sodium flows in a counter cross-flow over the tube-bundle. Extensive measurements of the power spectra of the flow induced forces were carried out since no information could be found in the literature. The vibration analysis will be presented and vibration modes of the entire bundle will be compared with experimentally obtained results. Finally a description of the vibration tests to be carried out on the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) will be presented. (author)

  10. Analysis of flow induced vibration in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beek, A.W. van

    1977-01-01

    A description will be given of three different types of heat exchangers developed by the Dutch Nuclear Industry Group ''Neratoom'' in cooperation with TNO for the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor SNR-300 at Kalkar. Moreover, the research related with flow induced vibrations carried out by TNO (Organization for Applied Scientific Research) will be presented. The flow induced forces on the tubes of the straight-tube steam generators were measured at the inlet and outlet section where partial crossflow occurs. With the measured flow induced forces the response of a tube was calculated as a function of the tube-to-supportbush clearances taking into account the non-linear damping effects from the sodium. The theoretical results showed that for this particular design no tube impact damage is to be expected which was confirmed later by a full scale experiment. Special attention will be devoted to the steam generator with helical-coil tube-bundles, where the sodium flows in a counter cross-flow over the tube-bundle. Extensive measurements of the power spectra of the flow induced forces were carried out since no information could be found in the literature. The vibration analysis will be presented and vibration modes of the entire bundle will be compared with experimentally obtained results. Finally a description of the vibration tests to be carried out on the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) will be presented. (author)

  11. Racemization of Valine by Impact-Induced Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Takase, Atsushi; Sekine, Toshimori; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi

    2018-03-01

    Homochirality plays an important role in all living organisms but its origin remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether such chiral molecules survived terrestrial heavy impact events. Impacts of extraterrestrial objects on early oceans were frequent and could have affected the chirality of oceanic amino acids when such amino acids accumulated during impacts. This study investigated the effects of shock-induced heating on enantiomeric change of valine with minerals such as olivine ([Mg0.9, Fe0.1]2SiO4), hematite (Fe2O3), and calcite (CaCO3). With a shock wave generated by an impact at 0.8 km/s, both d- and l-enriched valine were significantly decomposed and partially racemized under all experimental conditions. Different minerals had different shock impedances; therefore, they provided different P-T conditions for identical impacts. Furthermore, the high pH of calcite promoted the racemization of valine. The results indicate that in natural hypervelocity impacts, amino acids in shocked oceanic water would have decomposed completely, since impact velocity and the duration of shock compression and heating are typically greater in hypervelocity impact events than those in experiments. Even with the shock wave by the impact of small and decelerated projectiles in which amino acids survive, the shock heating may generate sufficient heat for significant racemization in shocked oceanic water. However, the duration of shock induced heating by small projectiles is limited and the population of such decelerated projectiles would be limited. Therefore, even though impacts of asteroids and meteorites were frequent on the prebiotic Earth, impact events would not have significantly changed the ee of proteinogenic amino acids accumulated in the entire ocean.

  12. Advantages of the in-situ LTP distortion profile test on high-heat-load mirrors and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, S.; Jark, W.; Sostero, G.; Gambitta, A.; Mazzolini, F.; Savoia, A.

    1996-01-01

    The first in-situ distortion profile measurement of a high heat load mirror by use of the penta-prism LTP is presented. A maximum height distortion of 0.47 micron in tangential direction over a length of 180 mm was measured for an internally water-cooled mirror of a undulator beam line at ELETTRA while exposed to a total emitted power of 600 W (undulator gap 30 mm and current 180 mA). The experiment has an accuracy and repeatability of 0.04 micron. The test schematic and the test equipment are presented. Two measuring methods to scan a penta-prism being installed either outside or inside the vacuum chamber are introduced. Advantages and some possible applications of adopting the penta-prism LTP to make the in-situ profile test are explained

  13. Standard practice for in situ examination of ferromagnetic Heat-Exchanger tubes using remote field testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes procedures to be followed during remote field examination of installed ferromagnetic heat-exchanger tubing for baseline and service-induced discontinuities. 1.2 This practice is intended for use on ferromagnetic tubes with outside diameters from 0.500 to 2.000 in. [12.70 to 50.80 mm], with wall thicknesses in the range from 0.028 to 0.134 in. [0.71 to 3.40 mm]. 1.3 This practice does not establish tube acceptance criteria; the tube acceptance criteria must be specified by the using parties. 1.4 Units—The values stated in either inch-pound units or SI units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in nonconformance with the standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this practice to establ...

  14. Irradiation-induced creep in metallic nanolaminates characterized by In situ TEM pillar nanocompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Shen J., E-mail: sdillon@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bufford, Daniel C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Jawaharram, Gowtham S.; Liu, Xuying; Lear, Calvin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Averback, Robert S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    This work reports on irradiation-induced creep (IIC) measured on nanolaminate (Cu-W and Ni-Ag) and nanocrystalline alloys (Cu-W) at room temperature using a combination of heavy ion irradiation and nanopillar compression performed concurrently in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Appreciable IIC is observed in multilayers with 50 nm layer thicknesses at high stress, ≈½ the yield strength, but not in multilayers with only 5 nm layer thicknesses.

  15. In Situ Heating of the 2007 May 19 CME Ejecta Detected by STEREO/PLASTIC and ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Cara E. Rakowski,1 J. Martin Laming2 & Maxim Lyutikov3 ABSTRACT In situ measurements of ion charge states can provide unique insight into the heating...2010) found ideal self-similar solutions for expanding spheromak, with electric fields E = r c α̇ α er ×B (2) – 6 – (dot denotes differentiation with...the electric field should be related to the cur- rent density through Ohm’s law. Formally, the procedure described below breaks down the assumption of

  16. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to

  17. Solvent exchange-induced in situ forming gel comprising ethyl cellulose-antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Mahadlek, Jongjan

    2015-10-15

    Solvent-exchanged in situ forming gel is a drug delivery system which is in sol form before administration. When it contacts with the body fluid, then the water miscible organic solvent dissipates and water penetrates into the system, leading the polymer precipitation as in situ gel at the site of injection. The aim of this research was to study the parameters affecting the gel properties, drug release and antimicrobial activities of the in situ forming gels prepared from ethyl cellulose (EC) dissolved in N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) to deliver the antimicrobial agents (doxycycline hyclate, metronidazole and benzyl peroxide) for periodontitis treatment. The gel appearance, pH, viscosity, rheology, syringeability, gel formation, rate of water diffusion into the gels, in vitro degradation, drug release behavior and antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyrommonas gingivalis were determined. Increasing the amount of EC increased the viscosity of system while still exhibiting Newtonian flow and increased the work of syringeability whereas decreased the releasing of drug. The system transformed into the rigid gel formation after being injected into the simulated gingival crevicular fluid. The developed systems containing 5% w/w antimicrobial agent showed the antimicrobial activities against all test bacteria. Thus the developed solvent exchange-induced in situ forming gels comprising EC-antimicrobial drugs exhibited potential use for periodontitis treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of heating rates on in situ resistance measurements of a bronze route Nb-Sn-Cu-Ta multifilamentary conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, K.S.; Hopkins, S.C.; Glowacki, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    The superconducting properties of a bronze process multifilamentary conductor are controlled by the structure, dimensions and composition of the intermetallic layers, which are strongly influenced by the details of the heat treatments applied to the conductor. It has previously been reported that the electrical resistivity of a Vacuumschmelze bronze process conductor varies during heat treatment, and that analysis of the conductor as a set of parallel resistors allows the features of the resistivity variation to be assigned to the progress of Nb 3 Sn intermetallic phase formation. The behaviour of NSP2 Nb-Sn-Cu-Ta bronze process multifilamentary conductors (Imperial Metal Industries) is now reported as a function of the heating rate, in preparation for more complex non-isothermal heat treatment procedures. It is shown that the resistance of the wire measured in situ by an alternating current (AC) technique can be used to observe the progress of the formation of Nb 3 Sn, and that the comparison of resistometric measurements at different heating rates can give an indication of other processes (such as recovery and recrystallisation) occurring at lower temperatures during the heating up process prior to isothermal annealing. In addition, this wire containing only about 1% of copper was carefully chosen because of the broken tantalum barriers around individual copper filaments. Therefore, the resistometric measurements were used to attempt to detect the diffusion of tin from the bronze matrix into the copper filaments at lower temperatures without noticeable influence on Nb 3 Sn phase formation. Treating the NSP2 wire as a set of parallel resistors also permits estimates to be made of the intermetallic layer thicknesses from resistometric measurements, and these are shown to be in good agreement with estimates from scanning electron microscopy. The difference in critical temperature, T c , between wires heated at different rates, with the presence of the bronze matrix

  19. Loop Heat Pipe Temperature Oscillation Induced by Gravity Assist and Reservoir Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Robinson, Frank; Ottenstein, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Laser Thermal Control System (LCTS) for the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) to be installed on NASA's Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) consists of a constant conductance heat pipe and a loop heat pipe (LHP) with an associated radiator. During the recent thermal vacuum testing of the LTCS where the LHP condenser/radiator was placed in a vertical position above the evaporator and reservoir, it was found that the LHP reservoir control heater power requirement was much higher than the analytical model had predicted. Even with the control heater turned on continuously at its full power, the reservoir could not be maintained at its desired set point temperature. An investigation of the LHP behaviors found that the root cause of the problem was fluid flow and reservoir temperature oscillations, which led to persistent alternate forward and reversed flow along the liquid line and an imbalance between the vapor mass flow rate in the vapor line and liquid mass flow rate in the liquid line. The flow and temperature oscillations were caused by an interaction between gravity and reservoir heating, and were exacerbated by the large thermal mass of the instrument simulator which modulated the net heat load to the evaporator, and the vertical radiator/condenser which induced a variable gravitational pressure head. Furthermore, causes and effects of the contributing factors to flow and temperature oscillations intermingled.

  20. heat-induced biological changes as heat tolerance indices related to growth performance in buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldes, M.Z.N.

    2004-01-01

    the main objective of this study was to predict new heat tolerance indices related to hot summer growth performance, depending on heat - induced changes in some physiological and biochemical parameters of young water buffalo calves. the present study was carried out on 8 egyptian male buffalo calves of 6 months old and 106.8 kg mean body weight (B W), and on the same animals of 12 months old and 179.5 kg mean B W. the animals were maintained in a climatic chamber of the egyptian atomic energy authority. the animals were maintained in metabolic cages inside a climatic chamber for 3 weeks under mild climate (20-24 c and 50-60% Rh, equivalent to 62-72 THI) for 6 hours daily as adjustment period,followed by 5 and 7 days in the 6- and 12-month old calves, respectively at the same climatic conditions as a control period.this was followed by 6 hours of acute heat exposure period (33-43 c and 40-60% Rh, equivalent to 85-93 Thi), then by chronic heat exposure period of the same climatic conditions for 5 and 7 days in the 6- and 12- month old calves, respectively.Rectal temperature (RT) and respiration rate (RR) were estimated daily, whereas BW was estimated at the beginning and the end of each exposure period

  1. Heat-induced electron emission in paraelectric phase of triglycine sulfate heated with great rate

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorkin, A A; Rogazinskaya, O V; Milovidova, S D

    2002-01-01

    One recorded experimentally heat-induced electron emission in ferroelectric triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystal within temperature range exceeding the Curie point by 10-15 K. One studied cases of q = dT/dt various rates of linear heating of specimens of TGS nominally pure crystal and TGS crystal with chromium impurity. Increase of heating rate is shown to result in increase of emission current density within the whole investigated range of temperatures. Temperature of emission occurrence depends on q rate negligibly. At the same time, temperature of emission disappearance monotonically increases with q growth. At q below 1 K/min it is localized below the Curie point. At q = 4-5 K/min the mentioned temperature reaches 60-65 deg C. In TGS crystal with chromium impurity the temperature of emission occurrence is close to the case of pure TGS. In this case, the range of emission drawing in paraphase here is by about 2 times narrower in contrast to the case of pure TGS heated with the same rate

  2. Transformation Heat Treatment of Rapidly Quenched Nb3A1 Precursor Monitored in situ by High Energy Synchrotron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Di Michiel, M; Jin, X; Takeuchi, T; Kikuchi, A; Tsuchiya, K; Nakagawa, K; Nakamoto, T

    2013-01-01

    Nb3Al superconductors are studied for use in high field magnets. Fine grained Nb3Al with nearly stoichiometric Al content is obtained by a Rapid Heating Quenching and Transformation (RHQT) process. We describe a non destructive in situ study of the transformation process step of a RHQ Nb3Al precursor wire with ramp rates of either 120 °C/h or 800 °C/h. High energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements show the transformation from a Nb(Al)SS supersaturated solid solution into Nb3Al. When heating with a ramp rate of 120 °C/h a strong reduction of the Nb(Al)SS (110) diffraction peak component is observed when the temperature exceeds 660 °C. Additional diffraction peaks are detectable in the approximate temperature interval 610 °C - 750 °C and significant Nb3Al growth is observed above 730 °C.

  3. Chaos of radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Hikaru; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    We are intensively studying the chaos via the period-doubling bifurcation cascade in radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability by analytical methods based on dynamical systems theory and complex networks. Significant changes in flame front dynamics in the chaotic region, which cannot be seen in the bifurcation diagrams, were successfully extracted from recurrence quantification analysis and nonlinear forecasting and from the network entropy. The temporal dynamics of the fuel concentration in the well-developed chaotic region is much more complicated than that of the flame front temperature. It exhibits self-affinity as a result of the scale-free structure in the constructed visibility graph.

  4. Effect of heat treatment on in situ rumen degradability and in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fat soyabean (FFSB) and solvent extracted soyabean meal (SBM) on the in situ dry matter (DM) and protein degradability, and in vitro gas production kinetics of the protein sources. Ruminal disappearance of DM and crude protein (CP), and in ...

  5. Assessing phase stability and element distribution in Co-base superalloys at elevated temperatures by in situ TEM heating experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggeler, Yolita; Mueller, Julian; Spiecker, Erdmann [Lehrstuhl fuer Mikro- und Nanostrukturforschung and Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy (CENEM), Department Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Co-based alloys, of a composition of Co-12Al-9W, form a stable two phase γ/γ{sup '} microstructure at 900 C. γ{sup '} cubes, consisting of the L12 crystal structure are coherently embedded in a solid solution fcc (A1) γ matrix. To ensure precipitate hardening at temperatures, which are relevant to practical applications, 700-1100 C, as experienced in gas turbine applications, the stability of the γ/γ{sup '} phases is of fundamental importance. In this analysis in situ TEM studies with chip-based heating systems (by DENS solution) are applied on new Co-based superalloys. After in situ heating at apr. 900 C and controlled quenching with different quenching rates the elemental distribution at the γ/γ{sup '} interface is measured using ChemiSTEM EDX. Exploiting the driving force for interface movement resulting from temperature-dependent volume fraction of γ and γ{sup '} insight into the diffusion of individual alloying elements and the relationship between local chemistry and ordering can be gained from transient phenomena. The experimental results will be compared with theoretical calculations. This work has been carried out within the framework of the SFB-TR 103 ''Single Crystal Superalloys''.

  6. Monitoring and characterisation of bacteria in corroding district heating systems using fluorescence in situ hybridisation and microautoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellerup, B.V. [Danish Technological Institute, Teknologiparken (Denmark). Dept. of Environment; Aalborg University (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Engineering; Olesen, B.H.; Frolund, B. [Danish Technological Institute, Teknologiparken (Denmark). Dept. of Environment; Nielsen, J.L.; Nielsen, P.H. [Aalborg University (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Engineering; Odum, S. [CTR I/S, Frederiksberg (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    Presence of biofilm and biocorrosion has been observed in Danish district heating (DH) systems despite very good water quality that was expected to prevent significant microbial growth. The microbiological water quality was investigated in order to identify the dominating bacterial groups on surfaces with corrosion problems. Water samples from 29 DH systems were investigated for the total number of bacteria and presence of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRBs). SRBs were found to be present in more than 80% of the DH systems. The microbial population in samples from 2 DH systems (biofilm from a test coupon and an in situ sample from a heat exchanger) was investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and the results showed significant differences in population composition. Betaproteobacteria was the dominant population in both samples. SRBs were present in both samples but were most numerous in the biofilm from the test coupon. Examination of functional groups based on uptake of radiolabelled acetate (microautoradiography) showed presence of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria despite the fact that oxygen is not anticipated in DH systems. (author)

  7. Bioventing in the subarctic: Field scale implementation of soil heating to allow in situ vadose zone biodegradation throughout the year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oram, D.E.; Winters, A.T.; Winsor, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    Bioventing is a technique of in situ bioremediation of contaminants in unsaturated zone soils that has advantages over other technologies such as soil vapor extraction. At locations where off-gas treatment would be required, bioventing can be a more cost-effective method of remediation. Using bioventing to remediate petroleum hydrocarbons in the vadose zone soils in extremely cold climates may be augmented by heating the subsurface soils. The US Air Force has conducted a bioventing feasibility study at Eielson Air Force Base since 1991. The feasibility study evaluated different methods of heating soils to maintain biodegradation rates through the winter. Results from this study were used to optimize the design of a full-scale bioventing system that incorporated a soil heating system. The system installed consists of the typical components of a bioventing system including an air injection blower, a system to distribute air in the vadose zone, and a monitoring system. To maintain biodegradation at a constant rate throughout the year, soil heating and temperature monitoring systems were also installed. Results to date indicate that summer soil temperatures and biodegradation of hydrocarbons have been maintained through the winter

  8. In situ radio-frequency heating for soil remediation at a former service station: case study and general aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huon, G.; Simpson, T.; Maini, G. [Ecologia Environmental Solutions Ltd., Sittingbourne, Kent (United Kingdom); Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.D.; Roland, U. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Engineering, Leipzig (Germany); Will, F. [Total UK, Watford (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    In situ radio-frequency heating (ISRFH) was successfully applied during remediation of a former petrol station. Using a three-electrode array in combination with extraction wells for soil vapor extraction (SVE), pollution consisting mainly of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and mineral oil hydrocarbons (in total about 1100 kg) was eliminated from a chalk soil in the unsaturated zone. Specially designed rod electrodes allowed selective heating of a volume of approximately 480 m{sup 3}, at a defined depth, to a mean temperature of about 50 C. The heating drastically increased the extraction rates. After switching off ISRFH, SVE remained highly efficient for some weeks due to the heat-retaining properties of the soil. Comparison of an optimized regime of ISRFH/SVE with conventional ''cold'' SVE showed a reduction of remediation time by about 80 % while keeping the total energy consumption almost constant. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Energy saving potential of heat insulation solar glass: Key results from laboratory and in-situ testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuce, Erdem; Cuce, Pinar Mert; Young, Chin-Huai

    2016-01-01

    HISG (heat insulation solar glass) is a recently developed multi-functional glazing technology to mitigate energy consumption of buildings. HISG can generate electricity similar to conventional PV (photovoltaic) glazing products when exposed to sunlight, however it differs from them by having some extraordinary characteristic features such as thermal insulation, which is competitive with Argon filled triple glazed windows, acoustic comfort, remarkable energy saving potential and self-cleaning ability owing to TiO_2 nano coating. Within the scope of this research, latest results from laboratory and in-situ testing of HISG are presented in terms of its key role in mitigating heating and cooling demand of buildings as well as clean energy generation. Lighting and thermal comfort related parameters such as shading coefficient, UV, IR and visible light intensity are also investigated through the tests conducted in real operating conditions. It is achieved from the results that instant electricity generation of HISG is 16% higher than that of standard PV glazing owing to its nano layer reflective film. Shading coefficient of HISG is only 0.136, which provides almost 80% reduction in solar heat gain compared to ordinary glazing. Indoor air temperature measured from HISG test house in summer time is very close to the ambient temperature, whereas it is found to be 14.7 °C higher in ordinary glass test house due to greenhouse effect. Annual heating and cooling demand tests indicate that HISG provides 38 and 48% energy saving in heating and cooling season, respectively. - Highlights: • Nano layer reflective film of HISG enables 16% more power generation. • 80% of undesired outdoor thermal radiation is prevented by HISG. • HISG has a 100% UV blocking rate. • The shading coefficient of HISG is 0.136. • HISG provides 38 and 48% energy saving in heating and cooling season.

  10. Heating induced microstructural changes in graphene/Cu nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solá, F; Niu, J; Xia, Z H

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic heating experiments on graphene/Cu nanocomposites by in situ scanning electron microscopy were conducted to observe the evolution of the morphology and size of the Cu nanoparticles. Microstructural characterization showed that the graphene/Cu nanocomposites system consists of graphene sheets decorated with Cu-based nanoparticles with different chemistries (Cu, Cu 2 O), shapes (cube, rod, triangle, etc) and sizes. Evidence of neck evolution, coalescence, sublimation and Ostwald ripening were observed. Interestingly, some of the events occurred at the edges of the graphene sheets. The quantitative data of necking evolution deviates from the classical continuum theory indicating that intrinsic faceting and the shape of the nanoparticles played an important role in the necking process. This was supported by molecular dynamics simulations. Experimental data of liquid-spherical nanoparticles on graphene suggested that Cu did not wet graphene. Based on sublimation experiments and surface stability, we propose that graphene decorated with Cu nanoparticles enclosed by {111} facets are the most stable nanocomposite at high temperatures. The growth mechanism of nanoparticles on graphene is discussed.

  11. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Newmark, Robin L.; Udell, Kent; Buetnner, Harley M.; Aines, Roger D.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

  12. Crystallization of TiO2 Nanotubes by In Situ Heating TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto; Lamberti, Andrea; Stassi, Stefano; Falqui, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    nanotubes was heated looking at their electron diffraction pattern change versus temperature, in order to determine both the initial temperature of crystallization and the corresponding crystalline phases. Second, the experiment was repeated on groups of few

  13. Development of a laser-based heating system for in situ synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, Julie L., E-mail: julie.fife@psi.ch [Laboratory for Synchrotron Radiation, Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Computational Materials Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Rappaz, Michel [Computational Materials Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Pistone, Mattia [Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Celcer, Tine [Laboratory for Synchrotron Radiation, Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); The Centre of Excellence for Biosensors, Instrumentation and Process Control, Solkan (Slovenia); Mikuljan, Gordan [Laboratory for Synchrotron Radiation, Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Stampanoni, Marco [Laboratory for Synchrotron Radiation, Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-05-01

    A laser-based heating system has been developed at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source for in situ observations of moderate-to-high-temperature applications of materials. Understanding the formation of materials at elevated temperatures is critical for determining their final properties. Synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy is an ideal technique for studying such processes because high spatial and temporal resolutions are easily achieved and the technique is non-destructive, meaning additional analyses can take place after data collection. To exploit the state-of-the-art capabilities at the tomographic microscopy and coherent radiology experiments (TOMCAT) beamline of the Swiss Light Source, a general-use moderate-to-high-temperature furnace has been developed. Powered by two diode lasers, it provides controlled localized heating, from 673 to 1973 K, to examine many materials systems and their dynamics in real time. The system can also be operated in various thermal modalities. For example, near-isothermal conditions at a given sample location can be achieved with a prescribed time-dependent temperature. This mode is typically used to study isothermal phase transformations; for example, the formation of equiaxed grains in metallic systems or to nucleate and grow bubble foams in silicate melts under conditions that simulate volcanic processes. In another mode, the power of the laser can be fixed and the specimen moved at a constant speed in a user-defined thermal gradient. This is similar to Bridgman solidification, where the thermal gradient and cooling rate control the microstructure formation. This paper details the experimental set-up and provides multiple proofs-of-concept that illustrate the versatility of using this laser-based heating system to explore, in situ, many elevated-temperature phenomena in a variety of materials.

  14. First in situ operation performance test of ground source heat pump in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naili, Nabiha; Attar, Issam; Hazami, Majdi; Farhat, Abdelhamid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluate the geothermal energy in Tunisia. • Study of the performance of GSHP system for cooling space. • GSHP is a promising alternative for building cooling in Tunisia. - Abstract: The main purpose of this paper is to study the energetic potential of the deployment in Tunisia of the Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) system for cooling mode application. Therefore, a pilot GSHP system using horizontal Ground Heat Exchanger (GHE) was installed and experimented in the Research and Technology Center of Energy (CRTEn), Borj Cédria. The experiment is conducted in a test room with a floor area of about 12 m 2 . In the floor of the tested room is integrated a polyethylene exchanger (PEX) used as a radiant floor cooling (RFC) system. The experimental setup mainly includes the ground temperature, the temperature and flow rate of water circulating in the heat pump and the GHE, as well as the power consumption of the heat pump and circulating pumps. These experimental data are essentially used to evaluate the coefficient of performance of the heat pump (COP hp ) and the overall system (COP sys ) for continuous operation mode. The COP hp and the COP sys were found to be 4.25 and 2.88, respectively. These results reveal that the use of the ground source heat pump is very appropriate for Tunisian building cooling

  15. In situ AFM investigation of electrochemically induced surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Yu, Bo; Zhou, Feng

    2013-02-12

    Electrochemically induced surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization is traced by in situ AFM technology for the first time, which allows visualization of the polymer growth process. It affords a fundamental insight into the surface morphology and growth mechanism simultaneously. Using this technique, the polymerization kinetics of two model monomers were studied, namely the anionic 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMA) and the cationic 2-(metharyloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (METAC). The growth of METAC is significantly improved by screening the ammonium cations by the addition of ionic liquid electrolyte in aqueous solution. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A combined model of heat and mass transfer for the in situ extraction of volatile water from lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, P.

    2018-05-01

    Chemical analysis of lunar soil samples often involves thermal processing to extract their volatile constituents, such as loosely adsorbed water. For the characterization of volatiles and their bonding mechanisms it is important to determine their desorption temperature. However, due to the low thermal diffusivity of lunar regolith, it might be difficult to reach a uniform heat distribution in a sample that is larger than only a few particles. Furthermore, the mass transport through such a sample is restricted, which might lead to a significant delay between actual desorption and measurable outgassing of volatiles from the sample. The entire volatiles extraction process depends on the dynamically changing heat and mass transfer within the sample, and is influenced by physical parameters such as porosity, tortuosity, gas density, temperature and pressure. To correctly interpret measurements of the extracted volatiles, it is important to understand the interaction between heat transfer, sorption, and gas transfer through the sample. The present paper discusses the molecular kinetics and mechanisms that are involved in the thermal extraction process and presents a combined parametrical computation model to simulate this process. The influence of water content on the gas diffusivity and thermal diffusivity is discussed and the issue of possible resorption of desorbed molecules within the sample is addressed. Based on the multi-physical computation model, a case study for the ProSPA instrument for in situ analysis of lunar volatiles is presented, which predicts relevant dynamic process parameters, such as gas pressure and process duration.

  17. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willa, K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Diao, Z. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Laboratory of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Halmstad University, P.O. Box 823, SE-301 18 Halmstad, Sweden; Campanini, D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Welp, U. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Divan, R. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Hudl, M. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Islam, Z. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Kwok, W. -K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Rydh, A. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-delta crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  18. An improved model of heat-induced hyperalgesia--repetitive phasic heat pain causing primary hyperalgesia to heat and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and light touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Tim P; Sawatzki, Alexander; Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; May, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a modified experimental model of heat-induced hyperalgesia, which improves the efficacy to induce primary and secondary hyperalgesia and the efficacy-to-safety ratio reducing the risk of tissue damage seen in other heat pain models. Quantitative sensory testing was done in eighteen healthy volunteers before and after repetitive heat pain stimuli (60 stimuli of 48°C for 6 s) to assess the impact of repetitive heat on somatosensory function in conditioned skin (primary hyperalgesia area) and in adjacent skin (secondary hyperalgesia area) as compared to an unconditioned mirror image control site. Additionally, areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were mapped, and time course of hyperalgesia determined. After repetitive heat pain conditioning we found significant primary hyperalgesia to heat, and primary and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and to light touch (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Acetaminophen (800 mg) reduced pain to heat or pinpricks only marginally by 11% and 8%, respectively (n.s.), and had no effect on heat hyperalgesia. In contrast, the areas of flare (-31%) and in particular of secondary hyperalgesia (-59%) as well as the magnitude of hyperalgesia (-59%) were significantly reduced (all pheat pain induces significant peripheral sensitization (primary hyperalgesia to heat) and central sensitization (punctate hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia). These findings are relevant to further studies using this model of experimental heat pain as it combines pronounced peripheral and central sensitization, which makes a convenient model for combined pharmacological testing of analgesia and anti-hyperalgesia mechanisms related to thermal and mechanical input.

  19. In-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rock. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Hirano, Kouhei; Tani, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Various researches have been conducted on high level radioactive waste geological disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. It is noted that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, in-situ heater test was conducted in an underground cavern at a depth of 50 m for the purpose of improving thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled analysis code. This report presents the test result demonstrating the changes of temperature and strain distributions with time at the elevated temperature of the heater up to 90degC. (author)

  20. Radiation as an inducer of in-situ autologous vaccine in the treatment of solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is conventionally used for local tumor control. Although local control of the primary tumor can prevent the development of subsequent systemic metastases, tumor irradiation is not effective in controlling pre-existing systemic disease. The concept of radiation-enhanced antigen presentation and immunomodulation allows the harnessing of tumor cell death induced by radiation as a potential source of tumor antigens for immunotherapy. Immunomodulation using RT is a novel strategy of in situ tumor vaccination where primary tumor irradiation can contribute to the control of pre-existing systemic metastatic disease. The absence of systemic immunosuppression (often associated with chemotherapy) and the generally lower toxicity makes radiation a desirable adjuvant regimen for immunotherapy and tumor vaccination strategies. Increased understanding of tumor immunology and the biology of radiation-mediated immune modulation should enhance the efficacy of combining these therapeutic modalities. Here we aim to provide an overview of the biology of radiation-induced immune modulation. (author)

  1. In situ heating experiments in hard rock: their objectives and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Of the many alternatives that are being considered for the disposal of nuclear wastes, deep underground burial is favored. The wealth of experience concerning the design and construction of underground excavations does not include the unique effects of heating excavations by radioactive decay, nor the issue of long-term isolation. The effects of heating are important in establishing the feasibility of this method of disposal, and are essential for the design of an underground repository. Near-field phenomena around individual canisters can be studied by full-scale experiments, using electrical heaters. The thermal diffusivity of rock is so low that information concerning the interaction between full-scale heaters and of the effects of heating a large volume of rock cannot be measured in full-scale experiments lasting less than a few decades. To overcome this difficulty, a time-scaled heating experiment has been developed in which a reduction in linear scale is accompanied by an acceleration of the time scale to the second power. In this experiment, the linear scale is about a third, so that the time scale is about ten fold

  2. In situ heating experiments in hard rock: their objectives and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1978-01-01

    Of the many alternatives that are being considered for the disposal of nuclear wastes, deep underground burial is favored. The wealth of experience concerning the design and construction of underground excavations does not include the unique effects of heating excavations by radioactive decay, nor the issue of long-term isolation. The effects of heating are important in establishing the feasibility of this method of disposal and are essential for the design of an underground repository. Near-field phenomena around individual canisters can be studied by full-scale experiments, using electrical heaters. The thermal diffusivity of rock is so low that information concerning the interaction between full-scale heaters and of the effects of heating a large volume of rock cannot be measured in full-scale experiments lasting less than a few decades. To overcome this difficulty, a time-scaled heating experiment has been developed in which a reduction in linear scale is accompanied by an acceleration of the time scale to the second power. In this experiment, the linear scale is about a third, so that the time scale is about ten fold

  3. Colloid electrochemistry of conducting polymer: towards potential-induced in-situ drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankoh, Supannee; Vagin, Mikhail Yu.; Sekretaryova, Alina N.; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed electrode potential induced an in-situ drug release from dispersion of conducting polymer microcapsules. • Fast detection of the released drug within the colloid microenvironment. • Improved the efficiency of localized drug release at the electrode interface. - Abstract: Over the past decades, controlled drug delivery system remains as one of the most important area in medicine for various diseases. We have developed a new electrochemically controlled drug release system by combining colloid electrochemistry and electro-responsive microcapsules. The pulsed electrode potential modulation led to the appearance of two processes available for the time-resolved registration in colloid microenvironment: change of the electronic charge of microparticles (from 0.5 ms to 0.1 s) followed by the drug release associated with ionic equilibration (1–10 s). The dynamic electrochemical measurements allow the distinction of drug release associated with ionic relaxation and the change of electronic charge of conducting polymer colloid microparticles. The amount of released drug (methylene blue) could be controlled by modulating the applied potential. Our study demonstrated a surface-potential driven controlled drug release of dispersion of conducting polymer carrier at the electrode interfaces, while the bulk colloids dispersion away from the electrode remains as a reservoir to improve the efficiency of localized drug release. The developed new methodology creates a model platform for the investigations of surface potential-induced in-situ electrochemical drug release mechanism.

  4. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Weirich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID. It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt–C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me3. For W(CO6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques.

  5. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  6. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  7. Kinetically controlled fabrication of gold nanorods and investigation of their thermal stability via in-situ TEM heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chankhunthod, N.; Aslam, Z.; Critchley, K.; Evans, S. D.; Brydson, R.

    2017-09-01

    Size controlled CTAB-capped AuNRs with various aspect ratios (ARs) ranging from 1.63±0.13 to 4.12±0.25 were synthesized following a modified seed-mediated method. Their thermal stability was examined by in-situ TEM heating. The results revealed a structural change from rods to spheres with increasing temperature. At lower temperatures 600ºC, particles became increasingly spherical. This behaviour occurred at temperatures lower than the melting point of bulk gold supporting a surface diffusion mechanism with material diffusing from the tips and redepositing at the middle of the rods. The rate of change in AR appeared to increase for thinner AuNRs.

  8. In situ X-ray diffraction study of irradiation-induced lattice expansion in Al foils by MeV-energy heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minagawa, Hideaki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Tsuchida, Hidetsugu, E-mail: tsuchida@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Murase, Ryu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Itoh, Akio [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    Using in situ X-ray diffraction measurements, we investigate lattice deformations of a free-standing aluminum foil induced by irradiation with MeV-energy heavy projectiles (C, O, and Si ions). The dependence of the ion-beam flux on the lattice expansion is analyzed in terms of two types of irradiation effects: (i) electronic excitation collision-induced lattice heating and (ii) elastic collision-induced displacement damage. We observe that the change in the lattice parameter is proportional to the energy in lattice heating, irrespective of projectile species. This result is in good agreement with a model calculation for thermal lattice expansion caused by beam heating. Moreover, with the correlation between lattice expansion and displacement damage, we consider a simple model for lattice expansion originating from the accumulation of Frenkel defects. From the model, we obtained the relationship between the relative changes in lattice parameter and the value of displacement per atom (dpa) rate. A comparison of the results from model calculations and experiments shows that the dpa rate calculated from the model, which takes account of athermal defect-recombination, is strongly correlated with the change in lattice parameter. This result suggests that the concentration of surviving defects under irradiation diminishes because of spontaneous recombination of defects produced.

  9. In situ generated CdS nanostructure induced enhanced photoluminescence from Dy{sup 3+} ions doped dielectric nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2017-08-15

    We report CdS nanostructure induced enhanced photoluminescence (PL) from Dy{sup +3}:CdS co-doped dielectric-nanocomposites synthesized by the conventional melt-quench technique. CdS nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized as in situ within the dielectric medium and their growth was controlled by heat treatment duration. Nanoparticles were investigated with absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The experimentally obtained sizes of the NCs are found to increase from 5-11 nm to 50-80 nm. Bandgap enhancement for the carrier confinement was found to alter within the range of 0.20-0.38 eV. Phonon confinement effect has been confirmed by blue shifting of Raman peak for CdS NCs at 303 cm{sup -1}. Enhanced highly intense sharp PL peak at 576 nm was detected, and different parameters associated with the PL enhancement including energy transfer from CdS NCs to Dy{sup 3+} ions have been studied. This PL enhancement was steered by varying CdS NC sizes. Enhanced PL of these nanocomposites finds their potential applications as gain medium in the field of solid state lasers. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1991-07-01

    Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs

  11. Electron microscopic in situ study of phase and defect formation in Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy single crystals in heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.A.; Ignat'eva, E.Yu.; Osip'yan, Yu.A.; Suvorov, Eh.V.

    1997-01-01

    The nonthermal effect of electron irradiation on generating of new phases and structural defects has been uncovered during the investigation of structural variations of monocrystals Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y on heating in situ. The stability of the modulated structure and the package defects to heating under the electron beam action and in the absence of the irradiation has been studied

  12. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Chemical Expansion in PrxCe1-xO2-δ during In Situ Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Jessica G; Lee, Ja Kyung; Defferriere, Thomas; Hughes, Gareth M; Raja, Shilpa N; Tuller, Harry L; Warner, Jamie H; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2018-02-27

    Thin film nonstoichiometric oxides enable many high-temperature applications including solid oxide fuel cells, actuators, and catalysis. Large concentrations of point defects (particularly, oxygen vacancies) enable fast ionic conductivity or gas exchange kinetics in these materials but also manifest as coupling between lattice volume and chemical composition. This chemical expansion may be either detrimental or useful, especially in thin film devices that may exhibit enhanced performance through strain engineering or decreased operating temperatures. However, thin film nonstoichiometric oxides can differ from bulk counterparts in terms of operando defect concentrations, transport properties, and mechanical properties. Here, we present an in situ investigation of atomic-scale chemical expansion in Pr x Ce 1-x O 2-δ (PCO), a mixed ionic-electronic conducting oxide relevant to electrochemical energy conversion and high-temperature actuation. Through a combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy with in situ heating, we characterized chemical strains and changes in oxidation state in cross sections of PCO films grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) at temperatures reaching 650 °C. We quantified, both statically and dynamically, the nanoscale chemical expansion induced by changes in PCO redox state as a function of position and direction relative to the film-substrate interface. Additionally, we observed dislocations at the film-substrate interface, as well as reduced cation localization to threading defects within PCO films. These results illustrate several key aspects of atomic-scale structure and mechanical deformation in nonstoichiometric oxide films that clarify distinctions between films and bulk counterparts and that hold several implications for operando chemical expansion or "breathing" of such oxide films.

  13. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs

  14. In Situ Experiment and Numerical Model Validation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger in Shallow Hard Crystalline Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Janiszewski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and fast numerical modelling of the borehole heat exchanger (BHE is required for simulation of long-term thermal energy storage in rocks using boreholes. The goal of this study was to conduct an in situ experiment to validate the proposed numerical modelling approach. In the experiment, hot water was circulated for 21 days through a single U-tube BHE installed in an underground research tunnel located at a shallow depth in crystalline rock. The results of the simulations using the proposed model were validated against the measurements. The numerical model simulated the BHE’s behaviour accurately and compared well with two other modelling approaches from the literature. The model is capable of replicating the complex geometrical arrangement of the BHE and is considered to be more appropriate for simulations of BHE systems with complex geometries. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the proposed model have shown that low thermal conductivity, high density, and high heat capacity of rock are essential for maximising the storage efficiency of a borehole thermal energy storage system. Other characteristics of BHEs, such as a high thermal conductivity of the grout, a large radius of the pipe, and a large distance between the pipes, are also preferred for maximising efficiency.

  15. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  16. In situ semi-quantitative analysis of polluted soils by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaël, Amina; Bousquet, Bruno; Michel-Le Pierrès, Karine; Travaillé, Grégoire; Canioni, Lionel; Roy, Stéphane

    2011-05-01

    Time-saving, low-cost analyses of soil contamination are required to ensure fast and efficient pollution removal and remedial operations. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been successfully applied to in situ analyses of polluted soils, providing direct semi-quantitative information about the extent of pollution. A field campaign has been carried out in Brittany (France) on a site presenting high levels of heavy metal concentrations. Results on iron as a major component as well as on lead and copper as minor components are reported. Soil samples were dried and prepared as pressed pellets to minimize the effects of moisture and density on the results. LIBS analyses were performed with a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, 60 mJ per 10 ns pulse, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with a diameter of 500 μm on the sample surface. Good correlations were obtained between the LIBS signals and the values of concentrations deduced from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This result proves that LIBS is an efficient method for optimizing sampling operations. Indeed, "LIBS maps" were established directly on-site, providing valuable assistance in optimizing the selection of the most relevant samples for future expensive and time-consuming laboratory analysis and avoiding useless analyses of very similar samples. Finally, it is emphasized that in situ LIBS is not described here as an alternative quantitative analytical method to the usual laboratory measurements but simply as an efficient time-saving tool to optimize sampling operations and to drastically reduce the number of soil samples to be analyzed, thus reducing costs. The detection limits of 200 ppm for lead and 80 ppm for copper reported here are compatible with the thresholds of toxicity; thus, this in situ LIBS campaign was fully validated for these two elements. Consequently, further experiments are planned to extend this study to other chemical elements and other

  17. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  18. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  19. Multiphase, multi-electrode Joule heat computations for glass melter and in situ vitrification simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1991-02-01

    Waste glass melter and in situ vitrification (ISV) processes represent the combination of electrical thermal, and fluid flow phenomena to produce a stable waste-from product. Computational modeling of the thermal and fluid flow aspects of these processes provides a useful tool for assessing the potential performance of proposed system designs. These computations can be performed at a fraction of the cost of experiment. Consequently, computational modeling of vitrification systems can also provide and economical means for assessing the suitability of a proposed process application. The computational model described in this paper employs finite difference representations of the basic continuum conservation laws governing the thermal, fluid flow, and electrical aspects of the vitrification process -- i.e., conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge. The resulting code is a member of the TEMPEST family of codes developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy). This paper provides an overview of the numerical approach employed in TEMPEST. In addition, results from several TEMPEST simulations of sample waste glass melter and ISV processes are provided to illustrate the insights to be gained from computational modeling of these processes. 3 refs., 13 figs

  20. In-Situ Measurements of the Performance of Thermosyphon Solar Water Heating Systems in Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdunnabi, M. I. R.; Loveday, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a project carried out by the Centre for Solar Energy Research and Studies (CSERS) to familiarize Libyan people with solar water heating technologies. Around 100 solar water heaters have been installed in the domestic sector and selected systems were equipped with monitoring instruments required to evaluate thermal performance. The paper presents the results of data collected over a one year period from a system installed in a family residence situated in a village located 90 km south of Tripoli (Libyan capital). The results showed that the system solar fraction was 55.8% of the average amount of daily hot water withdrawn (144 liters) at an average withdrawal temperature of 46.6 °. The total energy withdrawn during the whole year was 1557 kWl1. It is concluded that such a system is not adequate in terms of cost effectiveness for the current installed situation. It is recommended that the annual solar fraction for any solar water heating system should be over 70° in order to achieve cost—effectiveness and to help wide spread take—up of this technology.(author)

  1. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvan Catton; Dhir, Vijay K.; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

    2004-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers

  2. In situ reactive compatibilization of natural rubber/acrylic-bentonite composites via peroxide-induced vulcanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Lihua; Lei, Zhiwen; Xu, Chuanhui; Chen, Yukun

    2016-01-01

    To achieve good interfacial interaction between fillers and rubber matrix is always a hot topic in rubber reinforcing industry. In this paper, acid activated bentonite (Bt) was alkalified to be alkaline calcium-bentonite (ACBt), then acrylic acid (AA) was employed to modify ACBt to obtain acrylic-bentonite (ABt). The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) illustrated that acrylate groups were chemically boned onto the surface of Bt and the layer spacing of Bt was increased. During peroxide-induced vulcanization, in situ compatibilization of ABt was realized via the reaction between the unsaturated bonds of acrylate groups on the surface of Bt and the natural rubber (NR) chains. This resulted in an enhanced cross-linked network which contributed to the improved mechanical properties of NR/ABt composites. - Highlights: • Acrylate groups were chemically boned onto the surface of bentonite. • In situ compatibilization was realized via the reaction of acrylate group and NR. • ABt particles participated in forming the NR crosslink network. • A potential reinforcing material options for “white” rubber products.

  3. In situ reactive compatibilization of natural rubber/acrylic-bentonite composites via peroxide-induced vulcanization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Lihua; Lei, Zhiwen [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Resource Processing and Process Intensification Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Xu, Chuanhui, E-mail: xuhuiyee@gxu.edu.cn [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Resource Processing and Process Intensification Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Yukun, E-mail: cyk@scut.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering, Ministry of Education, China(South China University of Technology), Guangzhou, 510640 (China)

    2016-02-15

    To achieve good interfacial interaction between fillers and rubber matrix is always a hot topic in rubber reinforcing industry. In this paper, acid activated bentonite (Bt) was alkalified to be alkaline calcium-bentonite (ACBt), then acrylic acid (AA) was employed to modify ACBt to obtain acrylic-bentonite (ABt). The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) illustrated that acrylate groups were chemically boned onto the surface of Bt and the layer spacing of Bt was increased. During peroxide-induced vulcanization, in situ compatibilization of ABt was realized via the reaction between the unsaturated bonds of acrylate groups on the surface of Bt and the natural rubber (NR) chains. This resulted in an enhanced cross-linked network which contributed to the improved mechanical properties of NR/ABt composites. - Highlights: • Acrylate groups were chemically boned onto the surface of bentonite. • In situ compatibilization was realized via the reaction of acrylate group and NR. • ABt particles participated in forming the NR crosslink network. • A potential reinforcing material options for “white” rubber products.

  4. In Situ Gelation-Induced Death of Cancer Cells Based on Proteinosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuting; Song, Jianmin; Wang, Lei; Xue, Xuting; Liu, Xiaoman; Xie, Hui; Huang, Xin

    2017-08-14

    Hydrogels are an excellent type of material that can be utilized as a platform for cell culture. However, when a bulky hydrogel forms on the inside of cancer cells, the result would be different. In this study, we demonstrate a method for in situ gelation inside cancer cells that can efficiently induce cell death. Glutathione-responsive proteinosomes with good biocompatibility were prepared as carriers for sodium alginate to be endocytosed by cancer cells, where the chelation between sodium alginate and free calcium ions in the culture medium occurs during the diffusion process. The uptake of the hydrogel-loaded proteinosomes into the cancer cells, and then the triggered release of hydrogel with concomitant aggregation, was well-confirmed by monitoring the change of the Young's modulus of the cells based on AFM force measurements. Accordingly, when a large amount of hydrogel formed in cells, the cell viability would be inhibited by ∼90% by MTT assay at a concentration of 5.0 μM of hydrogel-loaded proteinosomes after 48 h incubation, which clearly proves the feasibility of the demonstrated method for killing cancer cells. Although more details regarding the mechanism of cell death should be conducted in the near future, such a demonstrated method of in situ gelation inside cells provides another choice for killing cancer cells.

  5. In situ measurements of fuel retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy in TEXTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Stoschus, H.; Brezinsek, S.; Samm, U.; TEXTOR Team

    2011-12-01

    In future fusion devices such as ITER tritium retention due to tritium co-deposition in mixed material layers can be a serious safety problem. Laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) can measure the hydrogen content of hydrogenic carbon layers locally on plasma-facing components, while hydrogen is used as a tritium substitute. For several years, this method has been applied in the TEXTOR tokamak in situ during plasma operation to monitor the hydrogen content in space and time. This work shows the LIDS signal reproducibility and studies the effects of different plasma conditions, desorption distances from the plasma and different laser energies using a dedicated sample with constant hydrogen amount. Also the LIDS signal evaluation procedure is described in detail and the detection limits for different conditions in the TEXTOR tokamak are estimated.

  6. Real time in situ spectroscopic characterization of radiation induced cationic polymerization of glycidyl ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascioni, Matteo; Sands, James M.; Palmese, Giuseppe R.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation curable polymeric materials suffer from relatively poor mechanical properties. Moreover, the curing behavior of such systems (i.e. the exact relationship between chemical kinetics and key processing variables) is not fully understood. In order to design improved epoxy based electron beam (EB) curable systems, and in order to develop appropriate process models, a detailed knowledge of the kinetics of epoxy cationic polymerization induced by ultraviolet (UV) or EB irradiation is required. In this work, we present our development of a technique based on real time near infrared (RTIR) spectroscopy for performing in situ kinetic analysis of radiation induced cationic polymerization of epoxy systems. To our knowledge this is the first time such data have been collected and presented for high-energy EB (10 MeV) induced polymerization. A demonstration of the technique for deterministic evaluation of degree of cure is shown using model glycidyl ether (phenyl glycidyl ether and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) resins and isothermal curing conditions. The impact of initiation rate on polymerizations with UV and EB for the cationic initiator is directly evident by comparative analysis. The sensitivity of the RTIR method and ability to produce quantitative data evidence of reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. The type of data presented in this work forms the basis for cure models being developed

  7. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of potassium for in-situ geochronology on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipe, Christopher B., E-mail: stipec@seattleu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Guevara, Edward; Brown, Jonathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Rossman, George R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is explored for the development of an in-situ K-Ar geochronology instrument for Mars. Potassium concentrations in standard basaltic glasses and equivalent rock samples in their natural form are quantified using the potassium doublet at 766.49 and 769.90 nm. Measurement precision varies from 0.5 to 5.5 (% RSD) over the 3.63% to 0.025% potassium by weight for the standard samples, and little additional precision is achieved above 20 laser shots at 5 locations. For the glass standards, the quantification limits are 920 and 66 ppm for non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. For the basaltic rocks, the quantification limits are 2650 and 328 ppm for the non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. The heterogeneity of the rock samples leads to larger variations in potassium signal; however, normalizing the potassium peak by base area at 25 locations on the rock improved calibration accuracy. Including only errors in LIBS measurements, estimated age errors for the glasses range from approximately {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma samples to {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma samples. For the basaltic rocks, the age errors are approximately {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma samples and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of basaltic glasses and rocks by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of potassium for K-Ar dating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an instrument for in-situ geochronology on Mars. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limit is 35 ppm, relative standard deviations range from 0.5% to 5.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated errors for the glass standards range from {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma; estimated errors for the basaltic rocks range from {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma.

  8. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  9. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y.; Tang, Y.; Chen, B.; Sun, X.; Su, L.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  10. An Improved Model of Heat-Induced Hyperalgesia—Repetitive Phasic Heat Pain Causing Primary Hyperalgesia to Heat and Secondary Hyperalgesia to Pinprick and Light Touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; May, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a modified experimental model of heat-induced hyperalgesia, which improves the efficacy to induce primary and secondary hyperalgesia and the efficacy-to-safety ratio reducing the risk of tissue damage seen in other heat pain models. Quantitative sensory testing was done in eighteen healthy volunteers before and after repetitive heat pain stimuli (60 stimuli of 48°C for 6 s) to assess the impact of repetitive heat on somatosensory function in conditioned skin (primary hyperalgesia area) and in adjacent skin (secondary hyperalgesia area) as compared to an unconditioned mirror image control site. Additionally, areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were mapped, and time course of hyperalgesia determined. After repetitive heat pain conditioning we found significant primary hyperalgesia to heat, and primary and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and to light touch (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Acetaminophen (800 mg) reduced pain to heat or pinpricks only marginally by 11% and 8%, respectively (n.s.), and had no effect on heat hyperalgesia. In contrast, the areas of flare (−31%) and in particular of secondary hyperalgesia (−59%) as well as the magnitude of hyperalgesia (−59%) were significantly reduced (all pheat pain induces significant peripheral sensitization (primary hyperalgesia to heat) and central sensitization (punctate hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia). These findings are relevant to further studies using this model of experimental heat pain as it combines pronounced peripheral and central sensitization, which makes a convenient model for combined pharmacological testing of analgesia and anti-hyperalgesia mechanisms related to thermal and mechanical input. PMID:24911787

  11. Observations of Bathymetry-Induced Ocean Roughness Modulation in In-situ Surface Slope Measurements and Coincident Airborne SAR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommenginger, C.P.; Robinson, I.S.; Willoughby, J.; Greidanus, H.S.F.; Taylor, V.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical results from a field experiment in the southern North Sea have demonstrated the possibility to detect bathymetry-induced sea surface roughness modulation in the coastal zone using high frequency in-situ slope measurements provided by the Towed Laser Slopemeter. A strong correlation between

  12. Geldanamycin induces heat shock protein 70 and protects against MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hai-Ying; He, Jin-Cai; Wang, Yumei; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2005-12-02

    As key molecular chaperone proteins, heat shock proteins (HSPs) represent an important cellular protective mechanism against neuronal cell death in various models of neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated the effect as well as the molecular mechanism of geldanamycin (GA), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on 1-methyl-4-pheny-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity, a mouse model of Parkinson disease. Neurochemical analysis showed that pretreatment with GA (via intracerebral ventricular injection 24 h prior to MPTP treatment) increased residual dopamine content and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum 24 h after MPTP treatment. To dissect out the molecular mechanism underlying this neuroprotection, we showed that the GA-mediated protection against MPTP was associated with a reduction of cytosolic Hsp90 and an increase in Hsp70, with no significant changes in Hsp40 and Hsp25 levels. Furthermore, in parallel with the induction of Hsp70, striatal nuclear HSF1 levels and HSF1 binding to heat shock element sites in the Hsp70 promoter were significantly enhanced by the GA pretreatment. Together these results suggested that the molecular cascade leading to the induction of Hsp70 is critical to the neuroprotection afforded by GA against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in the brain and that pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for Parkinson disease.

  13. In-situ heating TEM observation of microscopic structural changes of size-controlled metallic copper/gelatin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narushima, Takashi; Hyono, Atsushi; Nishida, Naoki; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2012-10-01

    Copper/gelatin composite particles with controlled sizes were prepared at room temperature from cupric sulfate pentahydrate in the presence of gelatin as a protective reagent by using hydrazine monohydrate as a reducing agent. The formed particles with the size between 190-940 nm were secondary aggregated particles which were composed of smaller nanosized particles ("particle-in-particle"), the presence of which was established by XRD patterns and a cross-sectional TEM image. The sintering behavior of these copper/gelatin composite particles was demonstrated by in-situ heating TEM under a high vacuum (approximately 10(-5) Pa) and separately with the oxygen partial pressure controlled at the 10(-4) Pa level. It was established that the particles began to sinter at about 330 degrees C with the oxygen and that they sublimate above 450 degrees C both in the vacuum and oxygen conditions. This result shows that the introduction of an adequate amount of oxygen was effective to remove the gelatin surrounding the particles. It can also be concluded that the sintering of the copper/gelatin composite particles occurred even in the absence of a reducing agent such as hydrogen gas.

  14. Highly textured fresnoite thin films synthesized in situ by pulsed laser deposition with CO2 laser direct heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Michael; Stölzel, Marko; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Grundmann, Marius; De Pablos-Martin, Araceli; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Fresnoite Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 (BTS) thin films were grown and crystallized in situ using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with CO 2 laser direct heating of the a-plane sapphire (1 1 0) substrates up to 1250 °C. Starting with 775 °C growth temperature, (0 0 1)- and (1 1 0)-textured BTS and BaTiO 3 phases, respectively, could be assigned in the films, and the typical fern-like BTS crystallization patterns appear. For higher process temperatures of 1100 to 1250 °C, atomically smooth, terraced surface of the films was found, accompanied by crystalline high-temperature phases of Ba–Ti–Si oxides. HAADF micrographs taken in both scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry mode show details of morphology and elemental distribution inside the films and at the interface. To balance the inherent Si deficiency of the BTS films, growth from glassy BTS × 2 SiO 2 and BTS × 2.5 SiO 2 targets was considered as well. The latter targets are ideal for PLD since the employed glasses possess 100% of the theoretical density and are homogeneous at the atomic scale. (paper)

  15. In situ study of heavy ion induced radiation damage in NF616 (P92) alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topbasi, Cem; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The ferritic–martensitic alloy NF616 was irradiated in situ with 1 MeV Kr ions at 50 K and 473 K. ► The defect cluster density increases with dose and saturates at ∼6 dpa at 50 K and 473 K. ► The defect size distributions do not change with dose at this temperature range. ► Results indicate that defect cluster formation and destruction is governed by cascade impact. - Abstract: NF616 is a nominal 9Cr ferritic–martensitic steel that is amongst the primary candidates for cladding and duct applications in the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. In this study, an in situ investigation of the microstructure evolution in NF616 under heavy ion irradiation has been conducted. NF616 was irradiated to 8.4 dpa at 50 K and to 7.6 dpa at 473 K with 1 MeV Kr ions. Nano-sized defects first appeared as white dots in dark-field TEM images and their areal density increased until saturation (∼6 dpa). Dynamic observations at 50 K and 473 K showed appearance and disappearance of TEM-visible defect clusters under irradiation that continued above saturation dose. Quantitative analysis showed no significant change in the average size (∼3–4 nm) and distribution of defect clusters with increasing dose at 50 K and 473 K. These results indicate a cascade-driven process of microstructure evolution under irradiation in these alloys that involves both the formation of TEM-visible defect clusters by various degrees of cascade overlap and cascade induced defect cluster elimination. According to this mechanism, saturation of defect cluster density is reached when the rate of defect cluster formation by overlap is equal to the rate of cluster elimination during irradiation.

  16. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  17. [Suppressive Effects of Extract of Cedar Wood on Heat-induced Expression of Cellular Heat Shock Protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Junji; Matsubara, Eri; Narita, Eijiro; Koyama, Shin; Shimizu, Yoko; Kawai, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

     In recent years, highly antimicrobial properties of cedar heartwood essential oil against the wood-rotting fungi and pathogenic fungi have been reported in several papers. Antimicrobial properties against oral bacteria by hinokitiol contained in Thujopsis have been also extensively studied. The relation of naturally derived components and human immune system has been studied in some previous papers. In the present study, we focused on Japanese cedar, which has the widest artificial afforestation site in the country among various tree species. Extract oil was obtained from mixture of sapwood and heartwood of about 40-year cedar grown in Oguni, Kumamoto, Japan. We examined the influence of extract components from Japanese cedar woods on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) during heating, and on the micronucleus formation induced by the treatment of bleomycin as a DNA damaging agent. Cell lines used in this study were human fetal glial cells (SVGp12) and human glioma cells (MO54). Remarkable suppression of the Hsp70 expression induced by heating at 43°C was detected by the treatment of cedar extract in both SVGp12 and MO54 cells. We also found that cedar extract had an inhibitory tendency to reduce the micronucleus formation induced by bleomycin. From these results, the extract components from Japanese cedar woods would have an inhibitory effect of the stress response as a suppression of the heat-induced Hsp70 expression, and might have a reductive effect on carcinogenicity.

  18. Weak light emission of soft tissues induced by heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Durando, Giovanni; Boschi, Federico

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to show that soft tissue interaction with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or direct heating leads to a weak light emission detectable using a small animal optical imaging system. Our results show that the luminescence signal is detectable after 30 min of heating, resembling the time scale of delayed luminescence. The imaging of a soft tissue after heating it using an HIFU field shows that the luminescence pattern closely matches the shape of the cone typical of the HIFU beam. We conclude that heating a soft tissue using two different sources leads to the emission of a weak luminescence signal from the heated region with a decay half-life of a few minutes (4 to 6 min). The origin of such light emission needs to be further investigated.

  19. Temperature-Induced Desorption of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Confined on ZSM-5: An In Situ Synchrotron XRD Powder Diffraction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Rodeghero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-induced desorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE from aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic ZSM-5 was studied by in situ synchrotron powder diffraction and chromatographic techniques. This kind of information is crucial for designing and optimizing the regeneration treatment of such zeolite. The evolution of the structural features monitored by full profile Rietveld refinements revealed that a monoclinic (P21/n to orthorhombic (Pnma phase transition occurred at about 100 °C. The MTBE desorption process caused a remarkable change in the unit-cell parameters. Complete MTBE desorption was achieved upon heating at about 250 °C. Rietveld analysis demonstrated that the desorption process occurred without any significant zeolite crystallinity loss, but with slight deformations in the channel apertures.

  20. Buoyancy induced convective flow in porous media with heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I.T.

    1978-01-01

    An unbounded fluid layer in a porous medium with an internal heat source and uniformly heated from below is studied. The layer is in the gravitational field. Linear theory predicts that the disturbances of infinitesimal amplitude will start to grow when the Rayleigh number exceeds its critical value. These disturbances do not grow without limit; but by advecting heat and momentum, the disturbances alter their forms to achieve a finite amplitude. Just like infinitesimal amplitude disturbances the degeneracies of possible solutions persist for finite amplitude solutions. This study evaluates these various forms of solutions. The small parameter method of Poincare is used to treat the problem in successive order

  1. The effect of clustering on the mobility of dislocations during aging in Nb-microalloyed strip cast steels: In situ heating TEM observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Sachin L.; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Ringer, Simon P.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Smith, David R.; Killmore, Chris R.; Cairney, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Cluster-strengthened Nb-microalloyed strip cast steels are of interest as clustering during aging leads to an enhancement in strength without compromising ductility, resulting in desirable mechanical properties. However, the precise strengthening mechanism is not well understood. Using in situ heating transmission electron microscopy, clustering was found to impede the movement of dislocations during aging. The attractive combination of ductility and strength was attributed to the effects of recovery and the restricted movement of dislocations through clustering

  2. Inlet effect induced ''upstream'' critical heat flux in smooth tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitto, J.B. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An unusual form of ''upstream'' critical heat flux (CHF) has been observed and directly linked to the inlet flow pattern during an experimental study of high pressure (17 - 20 MPa) water flowing through a vertical 38.1 mm ID smooth bore tube with uniform axial and nonuniform circumferential heating. These upstream CHF data were characterized by temperature excursions which initially occurred at a relatively fixed axial location in the middle of the test section while the outlet and inlet heated lengths experienced no change. A rifled tube inlet flow conditioner could be substituted for a smooth tube section to generate the desired swirling inlet flow pattern. The upstream CHF data were found to match data from a uniformly heated smooth bore tube when the comparison was made using the peak local heat flux. The mechanism proposed to account for the upstream CHF observations involves the destructive interference between the decaying swirl flow and the secondary circumferential liquid flow field resulting from the one-sided heating

  3. Heat-induced whey protein isolate fibrils: Conversion, hydrolysis, and disulphide bond formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Vasbinder, A.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Fibril formation of individual pure whey proteins and whey protein isolate (WPI) was studied. The heat-induced conversion of WPI monomers into fibrils at pH 2 and low ionic strength increased with heating time and protein concentration. Previous studies, using a precipitation method, size-exclusion

  4. CELLS OVEREXPRESSING HSP27 SHOW ACCELERATED RECOVERY FROM HEAT-INDUCED NUCLEAR-PROTEIN AGGREGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMPINGA, HH; BRUNSTING, JF; STEGE, GJJ; KONINGS, AWT; LANDRY, J

    1994-01-01

    Protein denaturation/aggregation upon cell exposure to heat shock is a likely cause of cell death. in the nucleus, protein aggregation has often been correlated to inhibition of nuclear located processes and heat-induced cell killing. in Chinese hamster 023 cells made thermotolerant by a prior

  5. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  6. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  7. Continuous in-situ measurements of fission fragment irradiation induced void swelling in Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefakis, H.

    1980-01-01

    A novel simulation technique has been developed to study the early stages of irradiation induced void formation in metals. The technique makes use of fission fragment irradiation produced by doping with 235 U and irradiating in a thermal neutron flux under highly controlled irradiation-environmental conditions. Employment of a computer and a high temperature radiation resistant LVDT resulted in a high volumetric sensitivity and the production of continuous, in-situ void swelling data for bulk specimens. Results for Ni, used as a test-metal served to corroborate the technique in a number of ways including comparisons with (a) reactor data, (b) direct post-irradiation specimen length measurements and (c) TEM examinations of irradiated samples. The technique has several unique advantages and, in conjunction with other conventional methods, it offers the possibility of detailed evaluation of void nucleation and growth theories. In view of the present results no definitive answer may be given on the issue of the incubation period while checks with two theoretical models have yielded an order-of-magnitude agreement

  8. Detailing Radio Frequency Heating Induced by Coronary Stents: A 7.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Davide; Winter, Lukas; Müller, Alexander; Vogt, Julia; Renz, Wolfgang; Özerdem, Celal; Grässl, Andreas; Tkachenko, Valeriy; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR) holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF) power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF) simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR) limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study. PMID:23185498

  9. Detailing radio frequency heating induced by coronary stents: a 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Santoro

    Full Text Available The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study.

  10. Numerical Study of Heat Transfer during Artificial Ground Freezing Combined with Groundwater Flow based on in-situ Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, R.; Liu, Q.

    2016-12-01

    For civil engineering projects, especially in the subsurface with groundwater, the artificial ground freezing (AGF) method has been widely used. Commonly, a refrigerant is circulated through a pre-buried pipe network to form a freezing wall to support the construction. In many cases, the temperature change is merely considered as a result of simple heat conduction. However, the influence of the water-ice phase change on the flow properties should not be neglected, if large amount of groundwater with high flow velocities is present. In this work, we perform a 2D modelling (software: Comsol Multiphysics) of an AFG project of a metro tunnel in Southern China, taking groundwater flow into account. The model is validated based on in-situ measurement of groundwater flow and temperature. We choose a cross section of this horizontal AGF project and set up a model with horizontal groundwater flow normal to the axial of the tunnel. The Darcy velocity is a coupling variable and related to the temperature field. During the phase change of the pore water and the decrement of permeability in freezing zone, we introduce a variable of effective hydraulic conductivity which is described by a function of temperature change. The energy conservation problem is solved by apparent heat capacity method and the related parameter change is described by a step function (McKenzie, et. al. 2007). The results of temperature contour maps combined with groundwater flow velocity at different times indicate that the freezing wall appears in an asymmetrical shape along the groundwater flow direction. It forms slowly and on the upstream side the thickness of the freezing wall is thinner than that on the downstream side. The closure time of the freezing wall increases at the middle of the both up and downstream sides. The average thickness of the freezing wall on the upstream side is mostly affected by the groundwater flow velocity. With the successful validation of this model, this numerical

  11. ATF1 Modulates the Heat Shock Response by Regulating the Stress-Inducible Heat Shock Factor 1 Transcription Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Tan, Ke; Takaki, Eiichi; Hayashida, Naoki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock response is an evolutionally conserved adaptive response to high temperatures that controls proteostasis capacity and is regulated mainly by an ancient heat shock factor (HSF). However, the regulation of target genes by the stress-inducible HSF1 transcription complex has not yet been examined in detail in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that HSF1 interacted with members of the ATF1/CREB family involved in metabolic homeostasis and recruited them on the HSP70 promoter in response to heat shock. The HSF1 transcription complex, including the chromatin-remodeling factor BRG1 and lysine acetyltransferases p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP), was formed in a manner that was dependent on the phosphorylation of ATF1. ATF1-BRG1 promoted the establishment of an active chromatin state and HSP70 expression during heat shock, whereas ATF1-p300/CBP accelerated the shutdown of HSF1 DNA-binding activity during recovery from acute stress, possibly through the acetylation of HSF1. Furthermore, ATF1 markedly affected the resistance to heat shock. These results revealed the unanticipated complexity of the primitive heat shock response mechanism, which is connected to metabolic adaptation. PMID:25312646

  12. Preliminary results of in situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnostics on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Li, Cong; Xiao, Qingmei; Liu, Ping; Fang, Ding; Mao, Hongmin; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Dongye; Ding, Hongbin; Luo, Guang-Nan; EAST Team

    2017-02-01

    Post-mortem methods cannot fulfill the requirement of monitoring the lifetime of the plasma facing components (PFC) and measuring the tritium inventory for the safety evaluation. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed as a promising method for the in situ study of fuel retention and impurity deposition in a tokamak. In this study, an in situ LIBS system was successfully established on EAST to investigate fuel retention and impurity deposition on the first wall without the need of removal tiles between plasma discharges. Spectral lines of D, H and impurities (Mo, Li, Si, … ) in laser-induced plasma were observed and identified within the wavelength range of 500-700 nm. Qualitative measurements such as thickness of the deposition layers, element depth profile and fuel retention on the wall are obtained by means of in situ LIBS. The results demonstrated the potential applications of LIBS for in situ characterization of fuel retention and co-deposition on the first wall of EAST. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB105002, 2015GB109001, and 2013GB109005), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575243, 11605238, 11605023), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ765), and Korea Research Council of Fundamental Science and Technology (KRCF) under the international collaboration & research in Asian countries (PG1314).

  13. Measurement of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed in which a suitably tuned CO2 laser, frequency doubled by a Tl3AsSe37 crystal, was brought into resonance with a P-line or two R-lines in the fundamental vibration spectrum of CO. Cooling or heating produced by absorption in CO was measured in a gas-thermometer arrangement. P-line cooling and R-line heating could be demonstrated, measured, and compared. The experiments were continued with CO mixed with N2 added in partial pressures from 9 to 200 Torr. It was found that an efficient collisional resonance energy transfer from CO to N2 existed which increased the cooling effects by one to two orders of magnitude over those in pure CO. Temperature reductions in the order of tens of degrees Kelvin were obtained by a single pulse in the core of the irradiated volume. These measurements followed predicted values rather closely, and it is expected that increase of pulse energies and durations will enhance the heat pump effects. The experiments confirm the feasibility of quasi-isentropic engines which convert laser power into work without the need for heat rejection. Of more immediate potential interest is the possibility of remotely powered heat pumps for cryogenic use, such applications are discussed to the extent possible at the present stage.

  14. Remote in-situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Brian James

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) using optical fibers. Studies were performed to determine the optimal excitation and collection parameters for remote LIBS measurements of glasses, soils and paint. A number of fiber-optic LIBS probes were developed and used to characterize various samples by plasma emission spectroscopy. A novel method for launching high-power laser pulses into optical fibers without causing catastrophic failure is introduced. A systematic study of a number of commercially available optical fibers was performed to determine which optical fibers were best suited for delivering high-power laser pulses. The general design of an all fiber-optic LIBS probe is described and applied to the determination of Pb in soil. A fiber-optic probe was developed for the microanalysis of solid samples remotely by LIBS, Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging. The design of the probe allows for real-time sample imaging in-situ using coherent imaging fibers. This allows for precise atomic emission and Raman measurements to be performed remotely on samples in hostile or inaccessible environments. A novel technique was developed for collecting spectral plasma images using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The spatial and temporal characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of delay time. From the plasma images the distribution of Pb emission could be determined and fiber-optic designs could be optimized for signal collection. The performance of a two fiber LIBS probe is demonstrated for the determination of the amount of lead in samples of dry paint. It is shown that dry paint samples can be analyzed for their Pb content in-situ using a fiber-optic LIBS probe with detection limits well below the levels currently regulated by the Consumer Products Safety Commission. It is also shown that these measurements can be performed on both latex and enamel paints, and

  15. Prostaglandin E synthase interacts with inducible heat shock protein 70 after heat stress in bovine primary dermal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Constanze; Viergutz, Torsten; Schwerin, Manfred; Weitzel, Joachim M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress in dairy cows leads to undesired side effects that are reflected by complex alterations in endocrine parameters, such as reduced progesterone, estradiol, and thyroid hormone concentrations. These endocrine maladaptation leads to failure to resume cyclicity, a poor uterine environment and inappropriate immune responses in postpartum dairy cows. Prostaglandins (PG's) are lipid mediators, which serve as signal molecules in response to various external stimuli as well as to cell-specific internal signal molecules. A central role in PG synthesis plays prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) that catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2 to PGE2 .The present study was conducted to investigate heat stress associated PGES expression. Expression of PGES and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), as a putative chaperonic protein, was studied in bovine primary fibroblasts under different heat shock conditions. Bovine primary fibroblasts produce PGE2 at homoiothermical norm temperature (38.5°C in bovine), but reduce PGE2 production rates under extreme heat stress (at 45°C for 6 h). By contrast, PGE2 production rates are maintained after a milder heat stress (at 41.5°C for 6 h). PGE2 synthesis is abolished by application of cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating de novo synthesis. Heat stress increases HSP70 but not PGES protein concentrations. HSP70 physically interacts with PGES and the PGES-HSP70 complex did not dissociate upon heat stress at 45°C even after returning the cells to 37°C. The PGE2 production negatively correlates with the portion of PGES-HSP70 complex. These results suggest a protein interaction between HSP70 and PGES in dermal fibroblast cells. Blockage of PGES protein by HSP70 seems to interfere with the regulatory processes essential for cellular adaptive protection. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  16. Mechanical Anisotropy and Pressure Induced Structural Changes in Piroxicam Crystals Probed by In Situ Indentation and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimunda, Praveena; Hintsala, Eric; Asif, Syed; Mishra, Manish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The ability to correlate mechanical and chemical characterization techniques in real time is both lacking and powerful tool for gaining insights into material behavior. This is demonstrated through use of a novel nanoindentation device equipped with Raman spectroscopy to explore the deformation-induced structural changes in piroxicam crystals. Mechanical anisotropy was observed in two major faces ( 0bar{1}1 ) and (011), which are correlated to changes in the interlayer interaction from in situ Raman spectra recorded during indentation. The results of this study demonstrate the considerable potential of an in situ Raman nanoindentation instrument for studying a variety of topics, including stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms, mechanochemistry, and solid state reactivity under mechanical forces that occur in molecular and pharmaceutical solids.

  17. Heat-Induced Changes in Heat Shock Protein Genes Expression in Crossbred and Baladi Pregnant Cows and Their Offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, W.K.B.; Nessim, M.Z.; El- Masry, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    The experiment was carried out during August (hot climate) on twelve pregnant cows of six crossbred (50% native Baladi and 50% Brown Swiss) and six native Baladi pregnant cows in the same age and the second parity during their mid-pregnancy as detected by rectal palpation. The experiment was repeated during December (mild climate) on similar twelve pregnant cows. Blood sample was obtained from each cow at the end of August (first group) and at the end of December (second group) to obtain heat shock protein genes expression (HSP72, HSP70.01, HSP70, HSP47, k Dalton and Actin) in pregnant cows under mild and hot climate to find out, which breed is more tolerant to heat stress and to estimate offspring birth weight and their growth performances during suckling period. Comparison was made between hot climate cows group and mild climate cows group to estimate heat- induced changes in both breeds in expression level of the Hsp genes and to compare with their neonate birth weight and growth performances during suckling period. The results revealed that expression level of the Hsp genes (Hsp72, Hsp70.1, Hsp70 and Hsp 47) was higher (p<0.01) in hot season compared to that of mild season. Expression level of the Hsp genes (Hsp70.1, Hsp70 and Hsp 47) was higher (p<0.05) in crossbred cows than in Baldi cows under summer hot season. This indicates that crossbred cows are less heat tolerant than Baladi cows under heat stress climate. Heat induced decrease (p<0.01) in offspring birth weight in Baladi and crossbred by 18.1% and 25%, respectively, in weaning weight by 14.61% and 23.14%, respectively and in body weight gain by 14.61% and 21.18%, respectively

  18. Facile graft polystyrene onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes via in situ thermo-induced radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Peng

    2009-01-01

    A facile procedure was developed for the grafting of polystyrene onto the surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) via the in situ thermo-induced bulk radical polymerization of styrene at the different polymerizing temperatures, in the presence of MWNTs without any initiator added. The grafting products were validated by the dispersibility, TEM, TGA, FT-IR, and Raman analysis. The TGA results also showed the lower polymerizing temperature was propitious to the free radical addition reactions.

  19. Radiation-induced polymerization monitored in situ by time-resolved fluorescence of probe molecules in methyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahn, Mark S.; Abellon, Ruben D.; Luthjens, Leonard H.; Vermeulen, Martien J.W.; Warman, John M.

    2003-01-01

    A technique is presented for monitoring radiation-induced polymerizations in situ based on the measurement of the fluorescence lifetime of molecular probes dissolved in the polymerizing medium. This method is illustrated with results on methyl methacrylate (MMA) using two fluorogenic probe molecules; N-(2-anthracene)methacrylamide (AnMA) and maleimido-fluoroprobe (MFP), a molecule which has a highly dipolar excited state

  20. Compositional and structural changes in TiB2 films induced by bias, in situ and post-deposition annealing, respectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelleg, Joshua; Sade, G.; Sinder, M.; Mogilyanski, D.

    2006-01-01

    Structural changes in TiB 2 films were induced at relatively low temperatures by the application of bias and in situ annealing or by post-deposition heat treatment of samples subjected to bias with simultaneous in situ annealing. In situ annealing by itself evoked only partial crystallization. Application of bias by itself only modified the composition of the as deposited film. A simple model is presented to explain the variation of the composition when RF bias is applied to a cold substrate. The crystallized films had a (0001) texture. A model has been suggested to explain the observed preferred orientation, based on the contribution of surface and strain energies. Both, the surface energy and strain energy are direction dependent. These were evaluated for two film orientations reported in the literature, namely, the (0001) and (101-bar 1)orientations. The preferred orientation of the film is determined by the lowest overall free energy resulting from the competition between the surface energy and the strain energy on different lattice planes. The surface energy is not film thickness dependent while the strain energy is thickness dependent and increases with it. For small film thickness, as in this work, the surface energy term is significant and (0001) orientation with a minimum surface energy is preferred. At large film thicknesses the strain energy becomes dominant and the (101-bar 1) preferred orientation is observed. Under certain experimental conditions strain energy effects may tip the preferred orientation to (101-bar 1). The elastic moduli in the (0001) and (101-bar 1) directions were determined as 435 and 538GPa, respectively

  1. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO 3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples. - Highlights: ► Did the detection of strontium, cerium, and cesium in CaCO 3 and graphite matrices. ► The detection of these elements was performed in a systematic manner. ► Univariate calibration curves were used to determine strontium detection. ► Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis built improved statistical models. ► Limits of detection are comparable or better in case of cerium and cesium.

  2. Assessing the potential of spectral induced polarization to detect in situ changes in iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, C. L.; Price, A.; Sharma, S.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The near surface geophysical technique Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP), provides promise as an effective method measuring in situ biofilm formation/development. Yet, potential mechanisms responsible for observed shifts in SIP response due to biofilm are not clearly understood. In order to address possible mechanisms we assessed the influence of Shewanella oneidensis (MR1) cell density (colony forming units; CFU), biofilm production (Bradford assay) and iron reduction metabolism (colorimetric assay) on SIP response. Laboratory measurements were collected over three months on columns packed with either iron-coated or iron-free sands and amended with artificial ground water and acetate in order to stimulate biofilm production and microbial iron reduction. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to confirm the presence of S. oneidensis cells and biofilm. Our results suggest that during early/initial stage (75 days) of column incubation, SIP measurements revealed that phase and imaginary conductivity responses decreased as the concentration of reduced iron decreased below 2.0 mM. In contrast, we observed only a moderate increase in phase and imaginary conductivity ( 30%) within iron-free columns as a result of increases in S. oneidensis cells (CFU 1.5 x 1011) and biofilm production (7.0 mg ml-1). SEM analysis confirmed the presence of biofilm and cells within both iron-coated and iron-free columns. We hypothesize that the production of microbial metabolic byproducts is a potential mechanism explaining large phase shits observed in previous studies ( 50 mrads) rather than the conductivity of cells or biofilm. Our findings provide support for the following: i) ratio of cells to biofilm production only moderately influences both phase and imaginary conductivity response and ii) largest phase and imaginary conductivity response resulted from microbial metabolism (i.e. iron reduction) and potentially biofilm trapping of conductive materials (i

  3. In Situ Observations of Snow Metamorphosis Acceleration Induced by Dust and Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A. M.; Flanner, M.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrate the dependence of shortwave infrared (SWIR) reflectance on snow specific surface area (SSA) and others examine the direct darkening effect dust and black carbon (BC) deposition has on snow and ice-covered surfaces. The extent to which these light absorbing aerosols (LAAs) accelerate snow metamorphosis, however, is challenging to assess in situ as measurement techniques easily disturb snowpack. Here, we use two Near-Infrared Emitting Reflectance Domes (NERDs) to measure 1300 and 1550nm bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) of natural snow and experimental plots with added dust and BC. We obtain NERD measurements and subsequently collect and transport snow samples to the nearby U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab for micro computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. Snow 1300 (1550) nm BRFs evolve from 0.6 (0.15) in fresh snow to 0.2 (0.03) after metamorphosis. Hourly-scale time evolving snow surface BRFs and SSA estimates from micro-CT reveal more rapid SWIR darkening and snow metamorphosis in contaminated versus natural plots. Cloudiness and high wind speeds can completely obscure these results if LAAs mobilize before absorbing enough radiant energy. These findings verify experimentally that dust and BC deposition can accelerate snow metamorphosis and enhance snow albedo feedback in sunny, calm weather conditions. Although quantifying the enhancement of snow albedo feedback induced by LAAs requires further surface temperature, solar irradiance, and impurity concentration measurements, this study provides experimental verification of positive feedback occurring where dust and BC accelerate snow metamorphosis.

  4. Excision of x-ray-induced thymine damage in chromatin from heated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed to distinguish between two possible modes of hyperthermia-induced inhibition of thymine base damage excision from the DNA of CHO cells: (1) heat denaturation of excision enzyme(s) or (2) heat-induced alteration of the substrate for damage excision (chromatin). While hyperthermia (45 0 C, 15 min) had no apparent effect on the capacity of the excision enzymes to excise damage from DNA it had a dramatic effect (ca. 80% inhibition) on the ability of chromatin to serve as a substrate for unheated enzymes. These results suggest that hyperthermia-induced radiosensitization of CHO cells may be due primarily to lesions in the cellular chromatin

  5. Comparison of the heat shock response induced by conventional heating and two methods of delivery of pulsed radiofrequency energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, J.A.; University of Sydney, NSW; McKenzie, D.R.; Veas, L.; French, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 2001, we published a (hypothetical) mechanism by which radiofrequency (RF) radiation from mobile phones could induce cancer, via the chronic induction of the heat shock response (HSR). This hypothesis provides the focus for our research. Other groups have reported induction of the HSR by RF at apparently non thermal levels. The aim of this study was to determine whether the HSR induced by RF is (a) truly non thermal and (b) quantitatively or qualitatively different from that induced by conventional heating of cells. A rat mast cell line, RBL-2H3, was chosen as the target RBL-2H3 cells were exposed in an air incubator at 41.1 deg C for 45 minutes and 75 minutes, and then returned to a 37 deg C incubator. Sham exposures were performed in the same air incubator at 37 deg C. Cells were exposed for 1 hour in the two pulsed RF exposure systems. The first was a converted 750W microwave oven that emits a short burst of 2.45GHz pulses at the start of each contiguous six minute period. This exposes cells to an average specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of 20W/kg. The second system was a TEM cell, which simulates. GSM pulses - the earner frequency is 0.9GHz pulse modulated at 217Hz. The SAR was approx 0.1W/kg. Both of these exposure systems are housed in incubators maintained at 37 deg C. Sham exposures were performed in the two systems with the same conditions but with no RF radiation present. Cell samples for the conventional heating and microwave exposures were taken 0, 2. 5, 5 and 20 hours after exposure, and expression of heat shock proteins hsp 110, 90, 70, 60 and 56 were determined by Western Blotting and compared between exposures

  6. Validation of satellite-derived tropical cyclone heat potential with in situ observations in the North Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagamani, P.V.; Ali, M.M.; Goni, G.J.; Dinezio, P.N.; Pezzullo, J.C.; UdayaBhaskar, T.V.S.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Nisha, K.

    validation with in situ estimations for quantification of their reliability and consistency. Once the validation has been carried out, the satellite-derived TCHP values with their improved tempo- ral and spatial properties can be conveniently used...

  7. Influences of buoyancy and thermal boundary conditions on heat transfer with naturally-induced flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.; Li, J.

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental study is reported of heat transfer from a vertical heated tube to air which is induced naturally upwards through it by the action of buoyancy. Measurements of local heat transfer coefficient were made using a specially designed computer-controlled power supply and measurement system for conditions of uniform wall temperature and uniform wall heat flux. The effectiveness of heat transfer proved to be much lower than for conditions of forced convection. It was found that the results could be correlated satisfactorily when presented in terms of dimensionless parameters similar to those used for free convection heat transfer from vertical surfaces provided that the heat transfer coefficients were evaluated using local fluid bulk temperature calculated utilising the measured values of flow rate induced through the system. Additional experiments were performed' with pumped flow. These covered the entire mixed convection region. It was found that the data for naturally-induced flow mapped onto the pumped flow data when presented in terms of Nusselt number ratio (mixed to forced) and buoyancy parameter. Computational simulations of the experiments were performed using an advanced computer code which incorporated a buoyancy-influenced, variable property, developing wall shear flow formulation and a low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence model. These reproduced observed behaviour quite well. (author)

  8. Testosterone Depletion by Castration May Protect Mice from Heat-Induced Multiple Organ Damage and Lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruei-Tang Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When the vehicle-treated, sham-operated mice underwent heat stress, the fraction survival and core temperature at +4 h of body heating were found to be 5 of 15 and 34.4∘C±0.3∘C, respectively. Castration 2 weeks before the start of heat stress decreased the plasma levels of testosterone almost to zero, protected the mice from heat-induced death (fraction survival, 13/15 and reduced the hypothermia (core temperature, 37.3∘C. The beneficial effects of castration in ameliorating lethality and hypothermia can be significantly reduced by testosterone replacement. Heat-induced apoptosis, as indicated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl- transferase- mediatedαUDP-biotin nick end-labeling staining, were significantly prevented by castration. In addition, heat-induced neuronal damage, as indicated by cell shrinkage and pyknosis of nucleus, to the hypothalamus was also castration-prevented. Again, the beneficial effects of castration in reducing neuronal damage to the hypothalamus as well as apoptosis in multiple organs during heatstroke, were significantly reversed by testosterone replacement. The data indicate that testosterone depletion by castration may protect mice from heatstroke-induced multiple organ damage and lethality.

  9. Complexity of MRI induced heating on metallic leads: Experimental measurements of 374 configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza Gonzalo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI induced heating on PM leads is a very complex issue. The widely varying results described in literature suggest that there are many factors that influence the degree of heating and that not always are adequately addressed by existing testing methods. Methods We present a wide database of experimental measurements of the heating of metallic wires and PM leads in a 1.5 T RF coil. The aim of these measurements is to systematically quantify the contribution of some potential factors involved in the MRI induced heating: the length and the geometric structure of the lead; the implant location within the body and the lead path; the shape of the phantom used to simulate the human trunk and its relative position inside the RF coil. Results We found that the several factors are the primary influence on heating at the tip. Closer locations of the leads to the edge of the phantom and to the edge of the coil produce maximum heating. The lead length is the other crucial factor, whereas the implant area does not seem to have a major role in the induced temperature increase. Also the lead structure and the geometry of the phantom revealed to be elements that can significantly modify the amount of heating. Conclusion Our findings highlight the factors that have significant effects on MRI induced heating of implanted wires and leads. These factors must be taken into account by those who plan to study or model MRI heating of implants. Also our data should help those who wish to develop guidelines for defining safe medical implants for MRI patients. In addition, our database of the entire set of measurements can help those who wish to validate their numerical models of implants that may be exposed to MRI systems.

  10. In situ transmission electron microscope studies of ion irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced phase changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Motivated at least initially by materials needs for nuclear reactor development, extensive irradiation effects studies employing transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have been performed for several decades, involving irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced microstructural changes, including phase transformations such as precipitation, dissolution, crystallization, amorphization, and order-disorder phenomena. From the introduction of commercial high voltage electron microscopes (HVEM) in the mid-1960s, studies of electron irradiation effects have constituted a major aspect of HVEM application in materials science. For irradiation effects studies two additional developments have had particularly significant impact; the development of TEM specimen holder sin which specimen temperature can be controlled in the range 10-2200 K and the interfacing of ion accelerators which allows in situ TEM studies of irradiation effects and the ion beam modification of materials within this broad temperature range. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies of electron and ion beam-induced and enhanced phase changes and presents two case studies involving in situ experiments performed in an HVEM to illustrate the strategies of such an approach of the materials research of irradiation effects

  11. Heat Stress-Induced PI3K/mTORC2-Dependent AKT Signaling Is a Central Mediator of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Survival to Thermal Ablation Induced Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Thompson

    Full Text Available Thermal ablative therapies are important treatment options in the multidisciplinary care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but lesions larger than 2-3 cm are plagued with high local recurrence rates and overall survival of these patients remains poor. Currently no adjuvant therapies exist to prevent local HCC recurrence in patients undergoing thermal ablation. The molecular mechanisms mediating HCC resistance to thermal ablation induced heat stress and local recurrence remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the HCC cells with a poor prognostic hepatic stem cell subtype (Subtype HS are more resistant to heat stress than HCC cells with a better prognostic hepatocyte subtype (Subtype HC. Moreover, sublethal heat stress rapidly induces phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR dependent-protein kinase B (AKT survival signaling in HCC cells in vitro and at the tumor ablation margin in vivo. Conversely, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2-dependent AKT phosphorylation or direct inhibition of AKT function both enhance HCC cell killing and decrease HCC cell survival to sublethal heat stress in both poor and better prognostic HCC subtypes while mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1-inhibition has no impact. Finally, we showed that AKT isoforms 1, 2 and 3 are differentially upregulated in primary human HCCs and that overexpression of AKT correlates with worse tumor biology and pathologic features (AKT3 and prognosis (AKT1. Together these findings define a novel molecular mechanism whereby heat stress induces PI3K/mTORC2-dependent AKT survival signaling in HCC cells and provide a mechanistic rationale for adjuvant AKT inhibition in combination with thermal ablation as a strategy to enhance HCC cell killing and prevent local recurrence, particularly at the ablation margin.

  12. Heat shock induced change in protein ubiquitination in Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimogawara, K.; Muto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Ubiquitin was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its antibody was produced. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody cross-reacted with ubiquitins from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a brown alga Laminaria angustata and a red alga Porphyridium cruentum but not with ubiquitin from a blue-green alga Synechococcus sp. In Chlamydomonas, the antibody also reacted with some ubiquitinated proteins including 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides. The isoelectric points of Chlamydomonas ubiquitin and the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins were 8.0, 8.9 and 10.3, respectively. The ubiquitinated proteins, including the 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides were detected after in vitro ATP-dependent ubiquitination of Chlamydomonas cell extract with l25 I-labeled bovine ubiquitin. Heat treatment of Chlamydomonas cells (>40°C) caused drastic increase of ubiquitinated proteins with high mol wt (>60kDa), and coordinated redistribution or decrease of other ubiquitinated proteins and free ubiquitin. Quantitative analysis revealed that the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins showed different responses against heat stress, i.e. the former being more sensitive than the latter. (author)

  13. In-situ heating test in the sedimentary soft rock. Part 3. Monitoring of the extent of high temperature zone by resistivity tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of high temperature zone. So resistivity tomography was conducted during the heating. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heater well was decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. Resistivity of rock is proportional to that of pore water which is known to decrease with increasing temperature. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the heated area by nuclear waste. (author)

  14. Palm kernel cake extract exerts hepatoprotective activity in heat-induced oxidative stress in chicken hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abdullah, Norhani; Idrus, Zulkifli; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Goh, Yong Meng; Shakeri, Majid; Oskoueian, Armin

    2014-10-02

    Palm kernel cake (PKC), the most abundant by-product of oil palm industry is believed to contain bioactive compounds with hepatoprotective potential. These compounds may serve as hepatoprotective agents which could help the poultry industry to alleviate adverse effects of heat stress on liver function in chickens. This study was performed to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of PKC extract in heat-induced oxidative stress in chicken hepatocytes. The nature of the active metabolites and elucidation of the possible mechanism involved were also investigated. The PKC extract possessed free radical scavenging activity with values significantly (p < 0.05) lower than silymarin as the reference antioxidant. Heat-induced oxidative stress in chicken hepatocyte impaired the total protein, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity significantly (p < 0.05). Treatment of heat-induced hepatocytes with PKC extract (125 μg/ml) and silymarin as positive control increased these values significantly (p < 0.05). The real time PCR and western blot analyses revealed the significant (p < 0.05) up-regulation of oxidative stress biomarkers including TNF-like, IFN-γ and IL-1β genes; NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS and Hsp70 proteins expression upon heat stress in chicken hepatocytes. The PKC extract and silymarin were able to alleviate the expression of all of these biomarkers in heat-induced chicken hepatocytes. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of PKC extract showed the presence of fatty acids, phenolic compounds, sugar derivatives and other organic compounds such as furfural which could be responsible for the observed hepatoprotective activity. Palm kernel cake extract could be a potential agent to protect hepatocytes function under heat induced oxidative stress.

  15. Oncostatin M induces heat hypersensitivity by gp130-dependent sensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langeslag Michiel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncostatin M (OSM is a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family and regulates eg. gene activation, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. OSM binds to a receptor complex consisting of the ubiquitously expressed signal transducer gp130 and the ligand binding OSM receptor subunit, which is expressed on a specific subset of primary afferent neurons. In the present study, the effect of OSM on heat nociception was investigated in nociceptor-specific gp130 knock-out (SNS-gp130-/- and gp130 floxed (gp130fl/fl mice. Subcutaneous injection of pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of OSM into the hind-paw of C57BL6J wild type mice significantly reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat stimulation. In contrast to gp130fl/fl mice, OSM did not induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo in SNS-gp130-/- mice. OSM applied at the receptive fields of sensory neurons in in vitro skin-nerve preparations showed that OSM significantly increased the discharge rate during a standard ramp-shaped heat stimulus. The capsaicin- and heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, expressed on a subpopulation of nociceptive neurons, has been shown to play an important role in inflammation-induced heat hypersensitivity. Stimulation of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons with OSM resulted in potentiation of capsaicin induced ionic currents. In line with these recordings, mice with a null mutation of the TRPV1 gene did not show any signs of OSM-induced heat hypersensitivity in vivo. The present data suggest that OSM induces thermal hypersensitivity by directly sensitizing nociceptors via OSMR-gp130 receptor mediated potentiation of TRPV1.

  16. Structural study on Ni nanowires in an anodic alumina membrane by using in situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Quan; Chen Xing; Chen Zhongjun; Wang Wei; Mo Guang; Wu Zhonghua; Zhang Junxi; Zhang Lide; Pan Wei

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline Ni nanowires have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in an anodic alumina membrane template with a nanopore size of about 60 nm. In situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to probe the atomic structures. The nanowires are identified as being mixtures of nanocrystallites and amorphous phase. The nanocrystallites have the same thermal expansion coefficient, of 1.7 x 10 -5 K -1 , as Ni bulk; however, the amorphous phase has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient of 3.5 x 10 -5 K -1 . Details of the Ni nanowire structures are discussed in this paper

  17. Time-resolved x-ray laser induced photoelectron spectroscopy of isochoric heated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Dunn, J.; Hunter, J.; Widmann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the nonsteady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultrathin (50 nm) copper. A metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500x700 μm 2 spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8x10 12 W cm -2 intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra are presented showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These picosecond x-ray laser induced time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultrathin Cu foil show dynamic changes in the electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials

  18. Fluid induced structural vibrations in steam generators and heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catton, I.; Adinolfi, P.; Alquaddoomi, O.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid-elastic instability (FEI) in tube bundle heat exchangers was studied experimentally. The motion of an array of 15 stainless steel vibrating tubes (Φ 25.4mm) in water cross-flow, suspended using stainless steel piano wire has been recorded with a CCD camera. The individual motion and relative motion of the tubes are reported and can be used for computational model validation. The relative displacement of the tubes allows identification of the most potentially damaging patterns of tube bundle vibration. A critical reduced velocity may be determined by specification of an allowable limit on tube motion amplitude. Measurements were made for various tube array configurations, tube natural frequencies and flow conditions. (author)

  19. Continuous fever-range heat stress induces thermotolerance in odontoblast-lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotomi, Takahiko; Kitamura, Chiaki; Okinaga, Toshinori; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Sakagami, Ryuji; Anan, Hisashi

    2014-07-01

    Heat shock during restorative procedures can trigger damage to the pulpodentin complex. While severe heat shock has toxic effects, fever-range heat stress exerts beneficial effects on several cells and tissues. In this study, we examined whether continuous fever-range heat stress (CFHS) has beneficial effects on thermotolerance in the rat clonal dental pulp cell line with odontoblastic properties, KN-3. KN-3 cells were cultured at 41°C for various periods, and the expression level of several proteins was assessed by Western blot analysis. After pre-heat-treatment at 41°C for various periods, KN-3 cells were exposed to lethal severe heat shock (LSHS) at 49°C for 10min, and cell viability was examined using the MTS assay. Additionally, the expression level of odontoblast differentiation makers in surviving cells was examined by Western blot analysis. CFHS increased the expression levels of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) in KN-3 cells, and induced transient cell cycle arrest. KN-3 cells, not pre-heated or exposed to CFHS for 1 or 3h, died after exposure to LSHS. In contrast, KN-3 cells exposed to CFHS for 12h were transiently lower on day 1, but increased on day 3 after LSHS. The surviving cells expressed odontoblast differentiation markers, dentine sialoprotein and dentine matrix protein-1. These results suggest that CFHS for 12h improves tolerance to LSHS by inducing HSPs expression and cell cycle arrest in KN-3 cells. The appropriate pretreatment with continuous fever-range heat stress can provide protection against lethal heat shock in KN-3 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Flow-induced vibration analysis of heat exchanger and steam generator designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, M.J.; Sylvestre, Y.; Campagna, A.O.

    1977-08-01

    Tube and shell heat exchange components such as steam generators, heat exchangers and condensers are essential parts of CANDU nuclear power stations. Excessive flow-induced vibration may cause tube failures by fatigue or more likely by fretting-wear. Such failures may lead to station shutdowns that are very undesirable in terms of lost production. Hence good performance and reliability dictate a thorough flow-induced vibration analysis at the design stage. This paper presents our approach and techniques in this respect. (author)

  1. A statistical method for estimating wood thermal diffusivity and probe geometry using in situ heat response curves from sap flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Miller, Gretchen R; Rubin, Yoram; Baldocchi, Dennis D

    2012-12-01

    The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux through plants; it works by using the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system to infer the velocity of water through a porous medium. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity, e.g., wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtain the correct transpiration flux density from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale and subsequently to upscale tree-level water fluxes to canopy and landscape scales. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework for sampling and simultaneously estimating the tree's thermal diffusivity and probe spacing from in situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of a heat ratio measurement device. Conditioned on the time traces of wood temperature following a heat pulse, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique, based on the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not require knowledge of probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that repeated tests using the same apparatus are essential for obtaining reliable and accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests can be obtained in different seasons and can be automated using the existing data logging system. Empirical factors are introduced to account for the influence of non-ideal probe geometry on the estimation of heat pulse velocity, and are estimated in this study as well. The proposed methodology may be tested for its applicability to realistic field conditions, with an ultimate goal of calibrating heat ratio sap flow systems in practical applications.

  2. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles.

  3. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Woll, Karsten [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute of Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); LaVan, David A., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  4. Heat Shock Protein 70 Neutralizes Apoptosis-Inducing Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Kroemer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (apoptosis is the physiological process responsible for the demise of superfluous, aged, damaged, mutated, and ectopic cells. Its normal function is essential both for embryonic development and for maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Deficient apoptosis participates in cancerogenesis, whereas excessive apoptosis leads to unwarranted cell loss accounting for disparate diseases including neurodegeneration and AIDS. One critical step in the process of apoptosis consists in the permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes, leading to the release of proteins which normally are secluded behind the outer mitochondrial membrane[1]. For example, cytochrome c, which is normally confined to the mitochondrial intermembrane space, is liberated from mitochondria and interacts with a cytosolic protein, Apaf-1, causing its oligomerization and constitution of the so-called apoptosome, a protein complex which activates a specific class of cysteine proteases, the caspases[2]. Another example concerns the so-called apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, another mitochondrial intermembrane protein which can translocate to the nucleus where it induces chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation[3].

  5. Experimental investigation of natural convection induced by internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Y; Kudoh, Y; Takeda, Y; Yanagisawa, T

    2005-01-01

    Dilatation of a convection cell with respect to its Rayleigh number, one of the problems in internally heated convection, was quantitatively investigated by analyzing temperature field in a cell. The temperature field visualized by a thermo-chromic liquid crystal (TLC) expresses the cell dilatation. A calibration system was developed to convert the visualized photographs of the temperature field to the temperature field. A calibration curve correlating color information extracted from the photograph and temperature was determined from the approximately linear temperature distribution in the horizontal fluid layer using the hue method. Photos taken at various internal Rayleigh numbers were converted to the temperature field by the obtained curve. Extracting individual cells from a temperature field achieves a quantitative expression of the cell dilatation as the variation of the wavenumber of the cell with Rayleigh number increases. The temperature profile in a cell shows that high temperature areas appear at the apexes of the cell, largely different from the profile obtained by linear theory

  6. Infrared thermography based studies on mobile phone induced heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2015-07-01

    Here, we report the skin temperature rise due to the absorption of radio frequency (RF) energy from three handheld mobile phones using infrared thermography technique. Experiments are performed under two different conditions, viz. when the mobile phones are placed in soft touch with the skin surface and away from the skin surface. Additionally, the temperature rise of mobile phones during charging, operation and simultaneous charging and talking are monitored under different exposure conditions. It is observed that the temperature of the cheek and ear regions monotonically increased with time during the usage of mobile phones and the magnitude of the temperature rise is higher for the mobile phone with higher specific absorption rate. The increase in skin temperature is higher when the mobile phones are in contact with the skin surface due to the combined effect of absorption of RF electromagnetic power and conductive heat transfer. The increase in the skin temperature in non-contact mode is found to be within the safety limit of 1 °C. The measured temperature rise is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The empirical equation obtained from the temperature rise on the cheek region of the subjects correlates well with the specific absorption rate of the mobile phones. Our study suggests that the use of mobile phones in non-contact mode can significantly lower the skin temperature rise during its use and hence, is safer compared to the contact mode.

  7. Direct Observations of Oxygen-induced Platinum Nanoparticle Ripening Studied by In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the sintering mechanism of Pt nanoparticles dispersed on a planar, amorphous Al2O3 support as a model system for a catalyst for automotive exhaust abatement. By means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the model catalyst was monitored during the exposure to 10...

  8. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  9. Heat-processed ginseng saponin ameliorates the adenine-induced renal failure in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Jin; Oh, Hyun-A; Choi, Hyuck Jai; Park, Jeong Hill; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Nam Jae

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the saponin of heat-processed ginseng (Sun ginseng, SG), we investigated the protective effect of SG total saponin fraction against adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. SG saponin significantly decreased the levels of urea nitrogen and creatinine in the serum, but increased the urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and creatinine, indicating an improvement of renal function. SG saponin also inhibited adenine-induced kidney hypertrophy and edema. SG saponin red...

  10. MRI-induced heating of deep brain stimulation leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, Syed A; Sheikh, Noor M; Saeed, Usman

    2008-01-01

    The radiofrequency (RF) field used in magnetic resonance imaging is scattered by medical implants. The scattered field of a deep brain stimulation lead can be very intense near the electrodes stimulating the brain. The effect is more pronounced if the lead behaves as a resonant antenna. In this paper, we examine the resonant length effect. We also use the finite element method to compute the near field for (i) the lead immersed in inhomogeneous tissue (fat, muscle, and brain tissues) and (ii) the lead connected to an implantable pulse generator. Electric field, specific absorption rate and induced temperature rise distributions have been obtained in the brain tissue surrounding the electrodes. The worst-case scenario has been evaluated by neglecting the effect of blood perfusion. The computed values are in good agreement with in vitro measurements made in the laboratory.

  11. Growth of micro-crystals in solution by in-situ heating via continuous wave infrared laser light and an absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Shashank; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Thamizhavel, A.; Mathur, Deepak; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    We report on growth of micro-crystals such as sodium chloride (NaCl), copper sulphate (CuSO4), potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) and glycine (NH2CH2COOH) in solution by in-situ heating using continuous wave Nd:YVO4 laser light. Crystals are grown by adding single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The SWNTs absorb 1064 nm light and act as an in-situ heat source that vaporizes the solvent producing microcrystals. The temporal dynamics of micro-crystal growth is investigated by varying experimental parameters such as SWNT bundle size and incident laser power. We also report crystal growth without SWNT in an absorbing medium: copper sulphate in water. Even though the growth dynamics with SWNT and copper sulphate are significantly different, our results indicate that bubble formation is necessary for nucleation. Our simple method may open up new vistas for rapid growth of seed crystals especially for examining the crystallizability of inorganic and organic materials.

  12. Microcapsules Containing pH-Responsive, Fluorescent Polymer-Integrated MoS2: An Effective Platform for in Situ pH Sensing and Photothermal Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Ho; Lee, Sangmin; Pornnoppadol, Ghasidit; Nam, Yoon Sung; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2018-03-14

    We report the design of a novel microcapsule platform for in situ pH sensing and photothermal heating, which involves the encapsulation of pH-responsive polymer-coated molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) nanosheets (NSs) in microcapsules with an aqueous core and a semipermeable polymeric shell. The MoS 2 NSs were functionalized with pH-responsive polymers having fluorescent groups at the distal end to provide pH-sensitive Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect. The pH-responsive polymers were carefully designed to produce a dramatic change in the polymer conformation, which translated to a change in the FRET efficiency near pH 7.0 in response to subtle pH changes, enabling the detection of cancer cells. The pH-sensitive MoS 2 NSs were microfluidically encapsulated within semipermeable membranes to yield microcapsules with a uniform size and composition. The microcapsules retained the MoS 2 NSs without leakage while allowing the diffusion of small ions and water through the membrane. At the same time, the membranes excluded adhesive proteins and lipids in the surrounding media, protecting the encapsulated MoS 2 NSs from deactivation and enabling in situ pH monitoring. Moreover, the encapsulated MoS 2 NSs showed high-performance photothermal heating, rendering the dual-functional microcapsules highly suitable for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  14. Noxious heat and scratching decrease histamine-induced itch and skin blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosipovitch, Gil; Fast, Katharine; Bernhard, Jeffrey D

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of thermal stimuli or distal scratching on skin blood flow and histamine-induced itch in healthy volunteers. Twenty-one healthy volunteers participated in the study. Baseline measurements of skin blood flow were obtained on the flexor aspect of the forearm. These measurements were compared with skin blood flow after various stimuli: heating the skin, cooling the skin, noxious cold 2 degrees C, noxious heat 49 degrees C, and scratching via a brush with controlled pressure. Afterwards histamine iontophoresis was performed and skin blood flow and itch intensity were measured immediately after the above-mentioned stimuli. Scratching reduced mean histamine-induced skin blood flow and itch intensity. Noxious heat pain increased basal skin blood flow but reduced histamine-induced maximal skin blood flow and itch intensity. Cold pain and cooling reduced itch intensity, but neither affected histamine-induced skin blood flow. Sub-noxious warming the skin did not affect the skin blood flow or itch intensity. These findings suggest that heat pain and scratching may inhibit itch through a neurogenic mechanism that also affects skin blood flow.

  15. Prostaglandins with antiproliferative activity induce the synthesis of a heat shock protein in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, M.G.; Garaci, E.; Amici, C.

    1989-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)A 1 and J 2 were found to potently suppress the proliferation of human K562 erythroleukemia cells and to induce the synthesis of a 74-kDa protein (p74) that was identified as a heat shock protein related to the major 70-kDa heat shock protein group. p74 synthesis was stimulated at doses of PGA 1 and PGJ 2 that inhibited cell replication, and its accumulation ceased upon removal of the PG-induced proliferation block. PGs that did not affect K562 cell replication did not induce p74 synthesis. p74 was found to be localized mainly in the cytoplasm of PG-treated cells, but moderate amounts were found also in dense areas of the nucleus after PGJ 2 treatment. p74 was not necessarily associated with cytotoxicity or with inhibition of cell protein synthesis. The results described support the hypothesis that synthesis of the 70-kDa heat shock proteins is associated with changes in cell proliferation. The observation that PGs can induce the synthesis of heat shock proteins expands our understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds whose regulatory role is well known in many physiological phenomena, including the control of fever production

  16. Heat- and radiation-induced radio- and thermo-tolerance of Zea mays seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gikoshvili, T.I.; Vagabova, M.Eh.; Vilenchik, M.M.; Kuzin, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    It was shown that γ-irradiation of Zea mays seedlings with low doses (1-3 Gy) induced thermotolerance, and preheating up to 43 deg C increased their radioresistance and thermotolerance. A hypothesis of the formation of common protective proteins after exposure to low - level radiation and heat is discussed

  17. Circulating antibodies to inducible heat shock protein 70 in patients with uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smet, M. D.; Ramadan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Heat shock proteins with molecular weight 70 kDa (hsp70) are highly conserved immunogenic intracellular molecules. There are two main subtypes: one is expressed constitutively (hsc70), while the other is induced under stressful conditions (ihsp70). Using an ELISA directed against recombinant human

  18. Code ACTIVE for calculation of the transmutation, induced activity and decay heat in neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioki, Kimihiro; Harada, Yuhei; Asami, Naoto.

    1976-03-01

    The computer code ACTIVE has been prepared for calculation of the transmutation rate, induced activity and decay heat. Calculations are carried out with activation chain and spatial distribution of neutron energy spectrum. The spatial distribution of secondary gamma-ray source due to the unstable nuclides is also obtainable. Special attension is paid to the short life decays. (auth.)

  19. Determination of Heating Value of Estonian Oil Shale by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aints

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS combined with multivariate regression analysis of measured data were utilised for determination of the heating value and the chemical composition of pellets made from Estonian oil shale samples with different heating values. The study is the first where the oil shale heating value is determined on the basis of LIBS spectra. The method for selecting the optimal number of spectral lines for ordinary multivariate least squares regression model is presented. The correlation coefficient between the heating value predicted by the regression model, and that measured by calorimetric bomb, was R2=0.98. The standard deviation of prediction was 0.24 MJ/kg. Concentrations of oil shale components predicted by the regression model were compared with those measured by ordinary methods.

  20. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  1. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreault, E; Hazel, B; Côté, J; Godin, S

    2014-01-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated C A6NM . This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named S compi . This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions

  2. In situ probing of the evolution of irradiation-induced defects in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Hattar, K.; Misra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Through in situ Cu 3+ ion irradiation at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), we have investigated the evolution of defect clusters as a function of the radiation dose at different distances from the 3 {1 1 2} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu. Post in situ ion irradiation, high resolution TEM was used to explore the types of defects, which are composed of a high-density of vacancy stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and sparsely distributed interstitial Frank loops. During irradiation, defect clusters evolve through four stages: (i) incubation, (ii) non-interaction, (iii) interaction and (iv) saturation; and the corresponding density was observed to initially increase with irradiation dose and then approach saturation. No obvious denuded zone is observed along the 3 {1 1 2} ITB and the configuration of defects at the boundary displays as truncated SFTs. Several defect evolution models have been proposed to explain the observed phenomena

  3. Report on the Installation and Preparedness of a Protochips Fusion in-situ Heating Holder for TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, Philip D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This brief report documents the procurement and installation of a Protochips Fusion (formerly Aduro) high-temperature, high stability transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder that allows for the high spatial resolution characterization of material specimens at high temperature in situ of an electron microscope. This specimen holder was specifically procured for use with The FEI Talos F200X Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) Laboratory. The Protochips Fusion holder will enable high-resolution structural and chemical analysis of irradiated materials at high temperature, becoming a unique capability worldwide, and would encourage high-quality in situ experiments to be conducted on irradiated materials.

  4. Application of neutron-induced gamma ray spectrometry for in situ assessment of coal quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, E.; Leutsoa Makhabane, J.

    1990-01-01

    The physical principles of the spectrometric neutron capture borehole logging method and spectrometric neutron activation borehole logging method are presented. Nuclear parameters of major elemental constituents of coal are given. Statistical multiple correlation results of coal core samples assessment are presented for coal quality parameters. The results of in situ spectrometric measurements in a coal field are also given. 7 figs., 11 tabs., 15 refs. (author)

  5. Oriented heat release in asphalt pavement induced by high-thermal-conductivity rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yinfei; Wang, Shengyue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new principle of using aligned high-thermal-conductivity rods to enhance the oriented heat conduction in asphalt pavement was proposed. The results showed that the designed structure absorbed more heat during the day. The heat flow in the designed structure presented a non-uniform horizontal distribution. At the depth of 4 cm, the horizontal and vertical heat fluxes through steel rods were thirteen and ten times higher than those through asphalt mixture, respectively. The maximum temperature of the designed structure reduced by 3.6 °C–6.5 °C at the depth of 4 cm. The results of indoor irradiation test showed a trend consistent with those of numerical simulation. After 500 thousand times of standard axis load were applied, the rutting depth of the designed structure reduced by 43.4%. The principle proposed is expected to be used to induce an oriented heat release accumulated in asphalt pavement and reduce pavement temperature and rutting. - Highlights: • Steel rods were inserted in the middle and bottom layers to build thermal channels. • Steel rods absorbed heat from asphalt mixture and rapidly released them to subgrade. • The heat flux through asphalt mixture decreased and pavement temperature reduced.

  6. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-situ and real-time electrochemical monitoring of flow-induced corrosion of Mg alloy is designed in a vascular bioreactor. • Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products is analyzed. • Flow accelerates mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. • Flow increases not only the thickness of uniform corrosion product layer, but the removal rate of localized corrosion products. • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provide a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. - Abstract: An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  7. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) diagnostic for in situ monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis in a high-pressure arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatom, Shurik; Vekselman, Vladislav; Mitrani, James; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    A DC arc discharge is commonly used for synthesis of carbon nanoparticles, including buckyballs, carbon nanotubes, and graphene flakes. In this work we show the first results of nanoparticles monitored during the arc discharge. The graphite electrode is vaporized by high current (60 A) in a buffer Helium gas leading to nanoparticle synthesis in a low temperature plasma. The arc was shown to oscillate, which can possibly influence the nano-synthesis. To visualize the nanoparticles in-situ we employ the LII technique. The nanoparticles with radii >50 nm, emerging from the arc area are heated with a short laser pulse and incandesce. The resulting radiation is captured with an ICCD camera, showing the location of the generated nanoparticles. The images of incandescence are studied together with temporally synchronized fast-framing imaging of C2 emission, to connect the dynamics of arc instabilities, C2 molecules concentration and nanoparticles. The time-resolved incandescence signal is analyzed with combination of ex-situ measurements of the synthesized nanoparticles and LII modeling, to provide the size distribution of produced nanoparticles. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  8. Differences in heat-induced cell killing as determined in three mammalian cell lines do not correspond with the extent of heat radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampinga, H.H.; Jorritsma, J.B.M.; Burgman, P.; Konings, A.W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Three different cell lines, Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells, HeLa S 3 cells and LM mouse fibroblasts, were used to investigate whether or not the extent of heat killing (44 0 C) and heat radio-sensitization (44 0 C before 0-6 Gy X-irradiation) are related. Although HeLa cells were the most heat-resistant cell line and showed the least heat radiosensitization, we found that the most heat-sensitive EAT cells (D 0 , EAT = 8.0 min; D 0 , LM = 10.0 min; D 0 , HeLa = 12.5 min) showed less radiosensitization than the more heat-resistant LM fibroblasts (TERsub(HeLa)< TERsub(EAT)< TERsub(LM)). Therefore, it is concluded that the routes leading to heat-induced cell death are not identical to those determining heat radiosensitization. Furthermore the inactivation of DNA polymerase α and β activities by heat seemed not to correlate with heat survival alone but showed a positive relationship to heat radiosensitization. The possibility of these enzymes being a determinant in heat radiosensitization is discussed. (author)

  9. Heat deposition on the first wall due to ICRF-induced loss of fast ions in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Y.; Tobita, K.; Kimura, H.; Hamamatsu, K.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, M.; Saigusa, M.; Moriyama, S.; Tani, K.; Koide, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Nishitani, T.; Ushigusa, K.

    1995-01-01

    In JT-60U, the heat deposition on the first wall due to the ICRF-induced loss of fast ions was investigated by changing the position of the resonance layer in the ripple-trapping region. A heat spot appears on the first wall of the same major radius as the resonance layer of the ICRF waves. The broadening of the heat spot in the major radius direction is consistent with that of the resonance layer due to the Doppler broadening. The heat spot is considered to be formed by the ICRF-induced ripple-trapped loss of fast ions. Although the total ICRF-induced loss power to the heat spot is as low as 2% of the total ICRF power, the additional heat flux will become a new issue because of the localized heat deposition on the first wall. ((orig.))

  10. A modified wake oscillator model for predicting vortex induced vibration of heat exchanger tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhipeng; Zang Fenggang; Zhang Yixiong; Ye Xianhui

    2014-01-01

    Base on the classical wake oscillator model, a new modified wake oscillator model is proposed, for predicting vortex induced vibration of heat exchanger tube in uniform current. The comparison between the new wake oscillator model and experimental show that the present model can simulate the characteristics of vortex induced vibration of tube. Firstly, the research shows that the coupled fluid-structure dynamical system should be modeled by combined displacement and acceleration mode. Secondly, the empirical parameter in wake oscillator model depends on the material properties of the structure, instead of being a universal constant. Lastly, the results are compared between modified wake oscillator model and fluid-structure interaction numerical model. It shows the present, predicted results are compared to the fluid-structure interaction numerical data. The new modified wake oscillator model can predict the vortex induced heat exchanger tube vibration feasibly. (authors)

  11. Assessment of Laser Induced Ablation Spectroscopy (LIAS) as a method for quantitative in situ surface diagnostic in plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, Niels Hannes Gustav

    2014-01-01

    In this work Laser Induced Ablation Spectroscopy (LIAS) is investigated as an in situ plasma surface interaction diagnostic for fusion reactors and fusion experiments. In LIAS an intensive laser pulse is used to ablate the material under investigation during plasma operation. Ablation products penetrate into the edge region of the plasma and are excited and ionized. In case of molecules and clusters additionally dissociation occurs. The emitted line radiation is observed by radiometric calibrated spectroscopy. Results from LIAS of W/C/Al/D-mixed layers and amorphous hydrocarbon layers are presented. Using a fast camera system time resolved measurements of the LIAS.process could be performed, allowing investigation of the temporal behavior of excitation, dissociation and ionization processes. For Tungsten, 90% of the LIAS light is observed within 10±3 μs after the laser pulse. In case of carbon within 20±3 μs. Additionally separation in time of LIAS emission and the LIBS emission caused by the laser pulse at the surface within single measurements was demonstrated. This allows the separate analysis of both processes in a coaxial setup which is foreseen for future experiments. The inverse photon efficiency of the Balmer D_α-emission from LIAS of a-C:D-layers was found to be [(D)/(XB)]"a"-"C":"D""L""I""A""S"_→"D_D__α=71±7. The plasma perturbation due to LIAS was investigated by laser energy density variation when ablating W/C/Al/D.mixed layers. Local plasma perturbation is found to increase with laser energy density. Balmer H_γ/H_δ - line intensity ratio measurements only show for ohmic discharges and the case of the lowest central density signs of local plasma perturbation in LIAS of graphite samples. A simple analytical model for local plasma perturbation during LIAS is introduced and evaluated. Qualitative agreement between the model and the above reported experimental observations is found; a stronger influence on local conditions is found by tungsten

  12. Insights into the Molecular Events That Regulate Heat-Induced Chilling Tolerance in Citrus Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, María T; Establés-Ortíz, Beatriz; González-Candelas, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Low non-freezing temperature may cause chilling injury (CI), which is responsible for external quality deterioration in many chilling-sensitive horticultural crops. Exposure of chilling-sensitive citrus cultivars to non-lethal high-temperature conditioning may increase their chilling tolerance. Very little information is available about the molecular events involved in such tolerance. In this work, the molecular events associated with the low temperature tolerance induced by heating Fortune mandarin, which is very sensitive to chilling, for 3 days at 37°C prior to cold storage is presented. A transcriptomic analysis reveals that heat-conditioning has an important impact favoring the repression of genes in cold-stored fruit, and that long-term heat-induced chilling tolerance is an active process that requires activation of transcription factors involved in transcription initiation and of the WRKY family. The analysis also shows that chilling favors degradation processes, which affect lipids and proteins, and that the protective effect of the heat-conditioning treatment is more likely to be related to the repression of the genes involved in lipid degradation than to the modification of fatty acids unsaturation, which affects membrane permeability. Another major factor associated with the beneficial effect of the heat treatment on reducing CI is the regulation of stress-related proteins. Many of the genes that encoded such proteins are involved in secondary metabolism and in oxidative stress-related processes.

  13. Phenylephrine-induced elevations in arterial blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans, blood pressure was elevated via steady-state infusion of three doses of phenylephrine HCl in 10 healthy subjects in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature by 0.5 degrees C, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, and cardiac output and decreased total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR; all P blood pressure (MAP; P > 0.05). At the highest dose of phenylephrine, the increase in MAP and TPR from predrug baselines was significantly attenuated during the heat stress [DeltaMAP 8.4 +/- 1.2 mmHg; DeltaTPR 0.96 +/- 0.85 peripheral resistance units (PRU)] compared with normothermia (DeltaMAP 15.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg, DeltaTPR 7.13 +/- 1.18 PRU; all P blood pressure, as well as the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure, respectively, was similar between thermal conditions (each P > 0.05). These data suggest that phenylephrine-induced elevations in MAP are attenuated in heat-stressed humans without affecting baroreflex control of MSNA or heart rate.

  14. Insights into the Molecular Events That Regulate Heat-Induced Chilling Tolerance in Citrus Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María T. Lafuente

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low non-freezing temperature may cause chilling injury (CI, which is responsible for external quality deterioration in many chilling-sensitive horticultural crops. Exposure of chilling-sensitive citrus cultivars to non-lethal high-temperature conditioning may increase their chilling tolerance. Very little information is available about the molecular events involved in such tolerance. In this work, the molecular events associated with the low temperature tolerance induced by heating Fortune mandarin, which is very sensitive to chilling, for 3 days at 37°C prior to cold storage is presented. A transcriptomic analysis reveals that heat-conditioning has an important impact favoring the repression of genes in cold-stored fruit, and that long-term heat-induced chilling tolerance is an active process that requires activation of transcription factors involved in transcription initiation and of the WRKY family. The analysis also shows that chilling favors degradation processes, which affect lipids and proteins, and that the protective effect of the heat-conditioning treatment is more likely to be related to the repression of the genes involved in lipid degradation than to the modification of fatty acids unsaturation, which affects membrane permeability. Another major factor associated with the beneficial effect of the heat treatment on reducing CI is the regulation of stress-related proteins. Many of the genes that encoded such proteins are involved in secondary metabolism and in oxidative stress-related processes.

  15. Development of a Compact, Deep-Penetrating Heat Flow Instrument for Lunar Landers: In-Situ Thermal Conductivity System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagihara, S.; Zacny, K.; Hedlund, M.; Taylor, P. T.

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow is obtained as a product of the geothermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of the vertical soil/rock/regolith interval penetrated by the instrument. Heat flow measurements are a high priority for the geophysical network missions to the Moon recommended by the latest Decadal Survey and previously the International Lunar Network. One of the difficulties associated with lunar heat flow measurement on a robotic mission is that it requires excavation of a relatively deep (approx 3 m) hole in order to avoid the long-term temporal changes in lunar surface thermal environment affecting the subsurface temperature measurements. Such changes may be due to the 18.6-year-cylcle lunar precession, or may be initiated by presence of the lander itself. Therefore, a key science requirement for heat flow instruments for future lunar missions is to penetrate 3 m into the regolith and to measure both thermal gradient and thermal conductivity. Engineering requirements are that the instrument itself has minimal impact on the subsurface thermal regime and that it must be a low-mass and low-power system like any other science instrumentation on planetary landers. It would be very difficult to meet the engineering requirements, if the instrument utilizes a long (> 3 m) probe driven into the ground by a rotary or percussive drill. Here we report progress in our efforts to develop a new, compact lunar heat flow instrumentation that meets all of these science and engineering requirements.

  16. The evolution of amorphous grain boundaries during in-situ heating experiments in Lu-Mg doped Si3N4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Subramaniam, Anandh; Koch, Christoph T.; Cannon, Rowland M.; Ruehle, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The presence of 1-2 nm wide intergranular glassy films (IGFs) found in ceramics such as Si 3 N 4 and SiC strongly influences the properties of the material, including its fracture and creep behaviour. It is therefore important to know the evolution of the film as a function of temperature. Experiments, wherein liquid phase sintered Si 3 N 4 samples were quenched from high temperatures, have been carried out before and shown intriguing results. In the current investigation, in-situ heating experiments have been conducted in 120 kV and 400 kV microscopes, in order to separate beam irradiation from temperature effects. Based on the literature, it was expected that no changes would occur to the IGF below 1000 deg. C. However, it was surprising to note that the thickness measured at 950 deg. C was higher than that at room temperature. The correlation in trends observed in both microscopes shows that electron radiation has a minimal contribution to the change in IGF width at 950 deg. C. No change to the thickness was observed when heating up to 650 deg. C. After cooling back to room temperature there is a reduction in the thickness and thus a tendency to regain the original value of the thickness before heating. We conclude from these observations that certain material transport processes could be active at rather low temperatures (for Si 3 N 4 ). Possible mechanisms and sources of artifacts are also discussed

  17. Nanoimprinted polymer chips for light induced local heating of liquids in micro- and nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    A nanoimprinted polymer chip with a thin near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating (LILH) of liquids inside micro- and nanochannels is presented. An infrared laser spot and corresponding hot-spot could be scanned across the device. Large temperature gradients yield...... a 785 nm laser diode was focused from the backside of the chip to a spot diameter down to 5 ..m in the absorber layer, yielding a localized heating (Gaussian profile) and large temperature gradients in the liquid in the nanochannels. A laser power of 38 mW yielded a temperature of 40°C in the center...

  18. 3D numerical modeling of coupled phenomena in induced processes of heat treatment with malice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwong Peeteenut

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a multi-method Malice package for three dimension coupled phenomena in induced processes of heat treatment by an algorithm weakly coupled with the Migen package integral method defining the electromagnetic model and the Flux-Expert package finite element method defining the thermal model. The integral method is well suited to inductive systems undergoing sinusoidal excitation at midrange or high frequency. The unknowns of both models are current density, scalar potential and temperature. Joule power in the electromagnetic model is generated by Eddy currents. It becomes the heat source in the thermal model.

  19. In-situ TEM study on structural change and light emission of a multiwall carbon nanotube during Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.; Asaka, K.; Nakahara, H.; Saito, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Structure changes of a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) during Joule heating were studied with simultaneous measurement of light emission spectra. The outer shells of the MWNT peeled off one by one because of excessive heating. All the peeled outer shells finally disappeared and inner shells whose tips were closed emerged, i.e., a new MWNT was formed. Each diameter of the shells comprising the MWNT decreased compared with those before the fracture. Light emission spectra during Joule heating of an MWNT were composed of both the blackbody radiation and characteristic peaks. The peaks in the light emission spectra shifted to higher energies in accordance with shrinkage of the inner shells. The energies of the peaks in the spectra corresponded to energy gaps between van Hove singularities calculated from the diameters of the shells, indicating that the peaks in the spectra are attributed to the interband electron transition in the MWNT.

  20. Fast in situ X-ray diffraction phase and stress analysis during complete heat treatment cycles of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A. da S.; Hirsch, T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained with a method for time and temperature resolved analysis of changes in phase composition and stresses/residual stresses during complete heat treatment cycles of steel, including quenching. Sample temperatures of up to 930 deg. C could be reached with a specially designed furnace, where fast cooling of the samples was realized by gas quenching. Measurements for phase and stress analysis could be performed with an acquisition rate of at least one value every 3 s. Results concerning residual stress relaxation during heating, and stress/residual stress development during quenching are presented and discussed for AISI E52100 ball bearing steel. The observed stress development during quenching followed the expected transformation behavior with some deviations that could be explained through the effects of surface decarburization. The system developed proved to be a suitable tool for characterizing phase and stress changes that occur during heat treatment of steels, as a function of time and temperature

  1. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Cella, L.; Greco, O.; George, K.; Yang, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  2. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M [Univ. ` ` Federico II` ` , Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; [INFN, Naples (Italy); Cella, L; Greco, O [Univ. ` ` Federico II` ` , Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Furusawa, Y [NIRS, Chiba (Japan); George, K; Yang, T C [NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  3. Heat-induced accumulation and futile cycling of trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hottiger, T.; Schmutz, P.; Wiemken, A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat shock resulted in rapid accumulation of large amounts of trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In cultures growing exponentially on glucose, the trehalose content of the cells increased from 0.01 to 1 g/g of protein within 1 h after the incubation temperature was shifted from 27 to 40 0 C. When the temperature was readjusted to 27 0 C, the accumulated trehalose was rapidly degraded. In parallel, the activity of the trehalose-phosphate synthase, the key enzyme of trehalose biosynthesis, increased about six fold during the heat shock and declined to normal level after readjustment of the temperature. Surprisingly, the activity of neutral trehalase, the key enzyme of trehalose degradation, also increased about threefold during the heat shock and remained almost constant during recovery of the cells at 27 0 C. In pulse-labeling experiments with [ 14 C] glucose, trehalose was found to be turned over rapidly in heat-shocked cells, indicating that both anabolic and catabolic enzymes of trehalose metabolism were active in vivo. Possible functions of the heat-induced accumulation of trehalose and its rapid turnover in an apparently futile cycle during heat shock are discussed

  4. Structural and chemical reactivity modifications of a cobalt perovskite induced by Sr-substitution. An in situ XAS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso, Jose L.; Holgado, Juan P.; Pereñíguez, Rosa; Gonzalez-DelaCruz, V.M.; Caballero, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    LaCoO 3 and La 0.5 Sr 0.5 CoO 3−δ perovskites have been studied by in situ Co K-edge XAS. Although the partial substitution of La(III) by Sr(II) species induces an important increase in the catalytic oxidation activity and modifies the electronic state of the perovskite, no changes could be detected in the oxidation state of cobalt atoms. So, maintaining the electroneutrality of the perovskite requires the generation of oxygen vacancies in the network. The presence of these vacancies explains that the substituted perovskite is now much more reducible than the original LaCoO 3 perovskite. As detected by in situ XAS, after a consecutive reduction and oxidation treatment, the original crystalline structure of the LaCoO 3 perovskite is maintained, although in a more disordered state, which is not the case for the Sr doped perovskite. So, the La 0.5 Sr 0.5 CoO 3−δ perovskite submitted to the same hydrogen reduction treatment produces metallic cobalt, while as determined by in situ XAS spectroscopy the subsequent oxidation treatment yields a Co(III) oxide phase with spinel structure. Surprisingly, no Co(II) species are detected in this new spinel phase. - Highlights: • A Sr-substituted lanthanum cobalt perovskite has been prepared by spray pyrolysis. • It has been established that Co(III) cations are present in both perovskites. • LaCoO 3 is a less reducible phase than the substituted La 0.5 Sr 0.5 CoO 3−δ . • After reoxidation of reduced La 0.5 Sr 0.5 CoO 3−δ , a 100% Co(III) spinel is obtained

  5. Preliminary analysis of NAPL behavior in soil-heated vapor extraction for in-situ environmental restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.W.; Phelan, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Simulations of soil-heated vapor extraction have been performed to evaluate the NAPL removal performance as a function of borehole vacuum. The possibility of loss of NAPL containment, or NAPL migration into the unheated soil, is also evaluated in the simulations. A practical warning sign indicating migration of NAPL into the unheated zone is discussed

  6. Development of in situ Brillouin spectroscopy at high pressure and high temperature with synchrotron radiation and infrared laser heating system: Application to the Earth's deep interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Motohiko; Asahara, Yuki; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa; Hirose, Kei

    2009-05-01

    Seismic wave velocity profiles in the Earth provide one of the strongest constraints on structure, mineralogy and elastic properties of the Earth's deep interior. Accurate sound velocity data of deep Earth materials under relevant high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, therefore, are essential for interpretation of seismic data. Such information can be directly obtained from Brillouin scattering measurement. Here we describe an in situ Brillouin scattering system for measurements at high pressure and high temperature using a laser heated diamond anvil cell and synchrotron radiation for sample characterization. The system has been used with single-crystal and polycrystalline materials, and with glass and fluid phase. It provided high quality sound velocity and elastic data with X-ray diffraction data at high pressure and/or high temperature. Those combined techniques can potentially offer the essential information for resolving many remaining issues in mineral physics.

  7. In situ investigations on the impact of heat production and gamma radiation with regard to high-level radioactive waste disposal in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.

    1986-01-01

    Deep geological formations especially rock salt formations, are considered worldwide as suitable media for the final disposal of radioactive high-level waste (HLW). In the Federal Republic of Germany, the Institut fur Tieflagerung of the Gesellschaft fur Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Munchen operates the Asse Salt Mine as a pilot facility for testing the behavior of an underground nuclear waste repository. The tests are performed using heat and radiation sources to simulate disposed HLW canisters. The measured data obtained since 1965 show that the thermomechanical response of the salt formation and the physical/chemical changes in the vicinity of disposal boreholes are not a serious concern and that their long-term consequences can be estimated based on theoretical considerations and in-situ investigations

  8. SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Todd C.

    2014-06-09

    Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

  9. Analysis of the beam induced heat loads on the LHC arc beam screens during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    During Run 2 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been routinely operated with 25 ns bunch spacing. In these conditions large heat loads have been measured on the beam screens of the superconducting magnets, together with other observations indicating that an electron cloud develops in the beam chambers. The analysis of these heat loads has revealed several interesting features allowing to pinpoint peculiar characteristics of the observed beam-induced heating. This document describes the main findings of this analysis including the evolution taking place during the run, the observed dependence on the beam conditions and the results from special tests and dedicated instrumentation. The differences observed in the behavior of the eight LHC arcs are also discussed.

  10. Painful tonic heat stimulation induces GABA accumulation in the prefrontal cortex in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Danielsen, Else R; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known on pain-induced neurotransmitter release in the human cerebral cortex. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) during tonic painful heat stimulation to test the hypothesis of increases in both glutamate and GABA, two neurotransmitters with a key role...... that GABA is released in the human cerebral cortex during painful stimulation. The results are in line with animal findings on the role of GABA in pain processing and with studies in humans showing analgesic efficacy of GABA-related drugs in clinical pain conditions....... in pain processing. Using a 3T MR scanner, we acquired spectra from the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) in 13 healthy right-handed subjects at rest and during painful heat stimulation. The painful stimulus consisted of a suprathreshold painful tonic heat pulse, which was delivered to the right...

  11. Fast switching of alkali atom dispensers using laser-induced heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.F.; Weatherill, K.J.; Adams, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    We show that by using an intense laser source to locally heat an alkali atom dispenser, one can generate a high flux of atoms followed by fast recovery (<100 ms) of the background pressure when the laser is extinguished. For repeated heating pulses a switch-on time for the atomic flux of 200 ms is readily attainable. This technique is suited to ultracold atom experiments using simple ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chambers. Laser-induced heating provides a fast repetition of the experimental cycle, which, combined with low atom loss due to background gas collisions, is particularly useful for experiments involving far-off resonance optical traps, where sufficient laser power (0.5-4 W) is readily available

  12. Measurement of heat treatment induced residual stresses by using ESPI combined with hole-drilling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, residual stresses in heat treated specimen were measured by using ESPI (Electronic Speckle-Pattern Interferometry combined with the hole-drilling method. The specimen, made of SUS 304 austenitic stainless steel, was quenched and water cooled to room temperature. Numerical simulation using a hybrid FDM/FEM package was also carried out to simulate the heat treatment process. As a result, the thermal stress fields were obtained from both the experiment and the numerical simulation. By comparision of stress fields, results from the experimental method and numerical simulation well agreed to each other, therefore, it is proved that the presented experimental method is applicable and reliable for heat treatment induced residual stress measurement.

  13. Supramolecular Assembly of Comb-like Macromolecules Induced by Chemical Reactions that Modulate the Macromolecular Interactions In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongwei; Fu, Hailin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shih, Kuo-Chih; Ren, Yuan; Anuganti, Murali; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Cheng, Jianjun; Lin, Yao

    2017-08-16

    Supramolecular polymerization or assembly of proteins or large macromolecular units by a homogeneous nucleation mechanism can be quite slow and require specific solution conditions. In nature, protein assembly is often regulated by molecules that modulate the electrostatic interactions of the protein subunits for various association strengths. The key to this regulation is the coupling of the assembly process with a reversible or irreversible chemical reaction that occurs within the constituent subunits. However, realizing this complex process by the rational design of synthetic molecules or macromolecules remains a challenge. Herein, we use a synthetic polypeptide-grafted comb macromolecule to demonstrate how the in situ modulation of interactions between the charged macromolecules affects their resulting supramolecular structures. The kinetics of structural formation was studied and can be described by a generalized model of nucleated polymerization containing secondary pathways. Basic thermodynamic analysis indicated the delicate role of the electrostatic interactions between the charged subunits in the reaction-induced assembly process. This approach may be applicable for assembling a variety of ionic soft matters that are amenable to chemical reactions in situ.

  14. Role of clove oil in solvent exchange-induced doxycycline hyclate-loaded Eudragit RS in situ forming gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thawatchai Phaechamud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Solvent exchange induced in situ forming gel (ISG is the promising drug delivery system for periodontitis treatment owing to the prospect of maintaining an effective high drug level in the gingival crevicular fluid. In the present study, the influence of clove oil (CO on the characteristics of doxycycline hyclate (DH-loaded ISG comprising Eudragit RS (ERS was investigated including viscosity/rheology, syringeability, in vitro gel formation/drug release, matrix formation/solvent diffusion and antimicrobial activities. CO could dissolve ERS and increase the viscosity of ISG and its hydrophobicity could also retard the diffusion of solvent and hinder the drug diffusion; thus, the minimization of burst effect and sustained drug release were achieved effectively. All the prepared ISGs comprising CO could expel through the 27-gauge needle for administration by injection and transform into matrix depot after exposure to the simulated gingival crevicular fluid. The antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis were increased when the ratio of CO and N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP was decreased from 1:1 to 1:10 owing to higher diffusion of DH except that for C. albicans was increased as CO amount was higher. Therefore, CO could minimize the burst while prolonging the drug release of DH-loaded ERS ISG for use as a local drug delivery system for periodontitis treatment. Keywords: In situ forming gel, Eudragit RS, Clove oil, Doxycycline hyclate, Periodonditis, Burst release

  15. In situ deuterium inventory measurements of a-C:D layers on tungsten in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, N; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Huber, A; Laengner, M; Möller, S; Nonhoff, M; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Xiao, Q; Zlobinski, M; Samm, U; Giesen, T F

    2014-01-01

    Laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) is a diagnostic to provide temporally and spatially resolved in situ measurements of tritium retention and material migration in order to characterize the status of the first wall in future fusion devices. In LIAS, a ns-laser pulse ablates the first nanometres of the first wall plasma-facing components into the plasma edge. The resulting line radiation by plasma excitation is observed by spectroscopy. In the case of the full ionizing plasma and with knowledge of appropriate photon efficiencies for the corresponding line emission the amount of ablated material can be measured in situ. We present the photon efficiency for the deuterium Balmer α-line resulting from ablation in TEXTOR by performing LIAS on amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:D) layers deposited on tungsten substrate of thicknesses between 0.1 and 1.1 μm. An experimental inverse photon efficiency of [(D/(XB))] D α (EXP) a-C:D→ LIAS D =75.9±23.4 was determined. This value is a factor 5 larger than predicted values from the ADAS database for atomic injection of deuterium under TEXTOR plasma edge conditions and about twice as high, assuming normal wall recycling and release of molecular deuterium and break-up of D 2 via the molecular ion which is usually observed at the high temperature tokamak edge (T e  > 30 eV). (paper)

  16. Pressure-induced amorphization and reactivity of solid dimethyl acetylene probed by in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiwen; Daljeet, Roshan; Kieran, Arielle; Song, Yang

    2018-06-01

    Conjugated polymers are prominent semiconductors that have unique electric conductivity and photoluminescence. Synthesis of conjugated polymers under high pressure is extremely appealing because it does not require a catalyst or solvent used in conventional chemical methods. Transformation of acetylene and many of its derivatives to conjugated polymers using high pressure has been successfully achieved, but not with dimethyl acetylene (DMA). In this work, we present a high-pressure study on solid DMA using a diamond anvil cell up to 24.4 GPa at room temperature characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that solid DMA exists in a phase II crystal structure and is stable up to 12 GPa. Above this pressure, amorphization was initiated and the process was completed at 24.4 GPa. The expected polymeric transformation was not evident upon compression, but only observed upon decompression from a threshold compression pressure (e.g. 14.4 GPa). In situ florescence measurements suggest excimer formation via crystal defects, which induces the chemical reactions. The vibrational spectral analysis suggests the products contain the amorphous poly(DMA) and possibly additional amorphous hydrogenated carbon material.

  17. Identification of proteins whose synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is induced by DNA damage and heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gailit, James

    1990-01-01

    Protein synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of pulse-labelled proteins. The synthesis of 12 distinct proteins was induced by treatment with UV doses of 10-200 J/m 2 . The induced proteins differed in minimum dose necessary for induction, maximum dose at which induction still occurred and constitutive level present in unirradiated cells. A chemical mutagen, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, induced synthesis of the same proteins. Induction after UV treatment was observed in seven different yeast strains, including three mutants deficient in DNA repair. Synthesis of five of the proteins was also induced by brief heat shock treatment. These five may be members of a family of proteins whose synthesis is regulated by two different pathways responding to different types of stress. (author)

  18. Intermediate heat exchanger tube vibration induced by cross and parallel mixed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Koji

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of pool type LMFBR intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) tube vibrations induced by cross and parallel mixed flow were basically investigated. Secondary coolant in IHX tube bundle is mixed flow of parallel jit flow along the tube axis through flow holes in baffle plates and cross flow. By changing these two flow rate, flow distributions vary in the tube bundle. Mixed flow also induces vibrations which cause fretting wear and fatigue of tube. It is therefore very important to evaluate the tube vibration characteristics for estimating the tube integrity. The results show that the relationships between tube vibrations and flow distributions in the tube bundle were cleared, and mixed flow induced tube vibration could be evaluated on the base of the characteristics of both parallel and cross flow induced vibration. From these investigations it could be concluded that the characteristics of tube vibration for various flow distributions can be systematically evaluated. (author)

  19. Light induced cooling of a heated solid immersed in liquid helium I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lezak, D.; Brodie, L.C.; Semura, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter investigates the marked enhancement in the transient heat transfer from the heater-thermometer to the liquid helium immediately following the application of a flash of visible light. This ''light effect'' is associated with increased bubble activity, and it is possible that the light induces a rapid nucleation of bubbles in the superheated liquid at or near the heater surface. A summary of the light effect is presented and some potential uses to which this effect could be applied are suggested. Quantification of the light effect and properties of the light effect are discussed. It is determined that the light effect is an additional cooling due to a light induced enhancement of boiling in superheated liquid helium I. The effect could be applied in practical cryogenic engineering and for the acquisition of fundamental knowledge of boiling heat transfer and nucleation in cryogenic liquids

  20. [Heat shock protein 90--modulator of TNFalpha-induced apoptosis of Jurkat tumor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaĭgorodova, E V; Riazantseva, N V; Novitskiĭ, V V; Moroshkina, A N; Belkina, M V; Iakushina, V D

    2011-01-01

    rTNFalpha-induced programmed death of Jurkat tumor cells cultured with 17-AAG, a selective inhibitor of heat shock protein (Hsp90), was studied by fluorescent microscopy with the use of FITC-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Caspase-3 and -8 activities were determined by spectrophotometry using a caspase- 3 and -8 colorimetric assay kit. It was shown that inhibition of Hsp90 leads to activation of Jurkat cell apoptosis while Hsp90 itself suppresses this process. 17-AAG enhances rTNFa-induced apoptosis of tumor cells.

  1. Heat priming induces trans-generational tolerance to high temperature stress in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH, the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1 which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  2. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  3. Influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Simone, E-mail: simone.moretti@usal.es; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo [University of Salamanca, Plaza de los Caidos, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2016-06-07

    The domain wall depinning from a notch in a Permalloy nanostrip on top of a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate is studied theoretically under application of static magnetic fields and the injection of short current pulses. The influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning is explored self-consistently by coupling the magnetization dynamics in the ferromagnetic strip to the heat transport throughout the system. Our results indicate that Joule heating plays a remarkable role in these processes, resulting in a reduction in the critical depinning field and/or in a temporary destruction of the ferromagnetic order for typically injected current pulses. In agreement with experimental observations, similar pinning-depinning phase diagrams can be deduced for both current polarities when the Joule heating is taken into account. These observations, which are incompatible with the sole contribution of spin transfer torques, provide a deeper understanding of the physics underlying these processes and establish the real scope of the spin transfer torque. They are also relevant for technological applications based on current-induced domain-wall motion along soft strips.

  4. Flow induced vibration characteristics in 2X3 bundle critical heat flux experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hun; Chang, Soon Heung

    2005-01-01

    Above a certain heat flux, the liquid can no longer permanently wet the heater surface. This situation leads to an inordinate decrease in the surface heat transfer. This heat flux is commonly referred to as the critical heat flux (CHF). The CHF in nuclear reactors is one of the important thermal hydraulic parameters limiting the available power. Flow induced vibration (FIV) is the vibration caused by a fluid flowing around a body. In the fluid flowing system, FIV occurred by structures and flow condition. Many structures in nuclear power plant system are designed to prevent from structure failure due to FIV. Recently, Hibiki and Ishii (1998) carried out an experimental investigation on the effect of flow-induced vibration (FIV) on two-phase flow structure in vertical tube and reported that the FIV drastically changed the void fraction profiles. The void fraction profiles is one of the important parameter for determining CHF. Therefore, the investigation on the effect of FIV on CHF are needed. The research on FIV characteristics detection during CHF experiment in 2X3 bundle using R-134a has been carried out in KAIST. Using the results new FIV correlation in 2-pahse turbulent flow are suggested after finding out relation between CHF and dynamic pressure fluctuation value

  5. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment

  6. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor J., E-mail: tjwoehl@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jungjohann, Katherine L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Evans, James E. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Arslan, Ilke [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ristenpart, William D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment.

  7. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. PMID:28626241

  8. In Situ Monitoring of RAFT Polymerization by Tetraphenylethylene-Containing Agents with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shunjie; Cheng, Yanhua; Zhang, Haoke; Qiu, Zijie; Kwok, Ryan T K; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2018-05-22

    A facile and efficient approach is demonstrated to visualize the polymerization in situ. A group of tetraphenylethylene (TPE)-containing dithiocarbamates were synthesized and screened as agents for reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerizations. The spatial-temporal control characteristics of photochemistry enabled the RAFT polymerizations to be ON and OFF on demand under alternating visible light irradiation. The emission of TPE is sensitive to the local viscosity change owing to its aggregation-induced emission characteristic. Quantitative information could be easily acquired by the naked eye without destroying the reaction system. Furthermore, the versatility of such a technique was well demonstrated by 12 different polymerization systems. The present approach thus demonstrated a powerful platform for understanding the controlled living radical polymerization process. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Light-Induced Local Heating for Thermophoretic Manipulation of DNA in Polymer Micro- and Nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Larsen, Niels Bent; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for making polymer chips with a narrow-band near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating of liquids inside fluidic micro- and nanochannels fabricated by thermal imprint in polymethyl methacrylate. We have characterized the resulting liquid temperature...... profiles in microchannels using the temperature dependent fluorescence of the complex [Ru(bpy)3]2+. We demonstrate thermophoretic manipulation of individual YOYO-1 stained T4 DNA molecules inside micro- and nanochannels....

  10. Unsteady free convection MHD flow between two heated vertical parallel plates in induced magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Borkakati, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady viscous incompressible free convection flow of an electrically conducting fluid between two heated vertical parallel plates is considered in presence of a uniform magnetic field applied transversely to the flow. The approximate analytical solutions for velocity, induced field and temperature distributions are obtained for small and large magnetic Reynolds number. The skin-friction on the two plates are obtained and plotted graphically. The problem is extended for thermometric case. (author)

  11. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eWeth

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P. It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/µl, 106/µl, 107/µl and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1-/-, S1P3-/-. Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralisation of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P.

  12. Tempo enhances heat-induced apoptosis by mitochondrial targeting of Bax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.-L.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2003-01-01

    A stable membrane-permeable nitroxide, Tempo, exerts an SOD-like antioxidant activity against ROS. Reportedly, Tempo inhibits ROS-induced thymocyte apoptosis, while 10 mM Tempo activates JNK1 to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We have observed that nontoxic 5 mM Tempo enhances suboptimal hyperthermia (44 deg C/10 min)-induced apoptosis in U937 cells. Here we report the enhancing mechanism, focusing on activation and targeting of Bax to mitochondria and cytochrome c release. Methods: U937 cells were treated with either Tempo (5 mM, 37 deg C/10 min), heating (44 deg C/10 min), or Tempo-plus-heating, washed and incubated for various times up to 6 h, until assessing apoptosis, mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ>), and amount of superoxide by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC/PI, TMRM, and dihydroethidium, respectively. Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, and cytochrome c were detected by western blotting, activated Bax was by immunoprecipitation, and ATP was by a luciferase assay. Bax targeting to and cytochrome c release from mitochorndria were also detected immunocytochemically under fluorescent microscopy. Results and Discussion: Treatment of U937 cells with 5 mM Tempo for 10 min at 37 deg C or suboptimal heating (44 deg C/ 10 min) alone did not induce apoptosis. The combined treatment with 5 mM Tempo and 44 deg C for 10 min dramatically induced ∼90% apoptosis in 6 h, as did the 44 deg C/30 min heating. During the enhanced apoptosis, cytochrome c release progressed. Although signals of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax in cell lysates were not altered, Bax was specifically activated and translocated to mitochondria after the combined treatment. Further, loss of ΔΨ>and decreases in superoxide and ATP progressed after the combined treatment, suggesting that the treatment may disturb mitochondrial electron transport. Thus, Tempo sensitizes the heat-induced apoptosis through (1) targeting of Bax to mitochondria and releasing cytochrome c, and (2) mitochondrial dysfunction

  13. Electronic excitation induced defect dynamics in HfO2 based MOS devices investigated by in-situ electrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikanthababu, N.; Vajandar, S.; Arun, N.; Pathak, A. P.; Asokan, K.; Osipowicz, T.; Basu, T.; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.

    2018-03-01

    In-situ I-V and C-V characterization studies were carried out to determine the device quality of atomic layer deposited HfO2 (2.7 nm)/SiO2 (0.6 nm)/Si-based metal oxide semiconductor devices during 120 MeV Ag ion irradiation. The influence of various tunneling mechanisms has been investigated by analyzing the I-V characteristics as a function of ion fluence. The nature of the defects created is tentatively identified by the determination of the significant tunneling processes. While the ion induced annealing of defects is observed at lower fluences, ion induced intermixing and radiation damage is found to be significant at higher fluences. The C-V characteristics also reveal significant changes at the interface and oxide trap densities: an increase in the oxide layer thickness occurs through the formation of an HfSiO interlayer. The interlayer is due to the swift heavy ion induced intermixing, which has been confirmed by X-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements.

  14. Influence of in situ steam formation by radio frequency heating on thermodesorption of hydrocarbons from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Ulf; Bergmann, Sabine; Holzer, Frank; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2010-12-15

    Thermal desorption of a wide spectrum of organic contaminants, initiated by radio frequency (RF) heating, was studied at laboratory and pilot-plant scales for an artificially contaminated soil and for an originally contaminated soil from an industrial site. Up to 100 °C, moderate desorption rates were observed for light aromatics such as toluene, chlorobenzene, and ethylbenzene. Desorption of the less volatile contaminants was greatly enhanced above 100 °C, when fast evaporation of soil-water produced steam for hydrocarbon stripping (steam-distillation, desorption rates increased by more than 1 order of magnitude). For hydrocarbons with low water solubility (e.g., aliphatic hydrocarbons), the temperature increase above 100 °C after desiccation of soil again led to a significant increase of the removal rates, thus showing the impact of hydrocarbon partial pressure. RF heating was shown to be an appropriate option for thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, leading to efficient cleaning of contaminated soils.

  15. The impact of urban morphology and land cover on the sensible heat flux retrieved by satellite and in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawuc, L.; Łobocki, L.; Kaminski, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key parameter in various applications for urban environments research. However, remotely-sensed radiative surface temperature is not equivalent to kinetic nor aerodynamic surface temperature (Becker and Li, 1995; Norman and Becker, 1995). Thermal satellite observations of urban areas are also prone to angular anisotropy which is directly connected with the urban structure and relative sun-satellite position (Hu et al., 2016). Sensible heat flux (Qh) is the main component of surface energy balance in urban areas. Retrieval of Qh, requires observations of, among others, a temperature gradient. The lower level of temperature measurement is commonly replaced by remotely-sensed radiative surface temperature (Chrysoulakis, 2003; Voogt and Grimmond, 2000; Xu et al., 2008). However, such replacement requires accounting for the differences between aerodynamic and radiative surface temperature (Chehbouni et al., 1996; Sun and Mahrt, 1995). Moreover, it is important to avoid micro-scale processes, which play a major role in the roughness sublayer. This is due to the fact that Monin-Obukhov similarity theory is valid only in dynamic sublayer. We will present results of the analyses of the impact of urban morphology and land cover on the seasonal changes of sensible heat flux (Qh). Qh will be retrieved by two approaches. First will be based on satellite observations of radiative surface temperature and second will be based on in-situ observations of kinetic road temperature. Both approaches will utilize wind velocity, and air temperature observed in-situ. We will utilize time series of MODIS LST observations for the period of 2005-2014 as well as simultaneous in-situ observations collected by road weather network (9 stations). Ground stations are located across the city of Warsaw, outside the city centre in low-rise urban structure. We will account for differences in urban morphology and land cover in the proximity of ground stations. We will

  16. Renoprotective effect of virgin coconut oil in heated palm oil diet-induced hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisah, Yusof; Ang, Shu-Min; Othman, Faizah; Nurul-Iman, Badlishah Sham; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad

    2016-10-01

    Virgin coconut oil, rich in antioxidants, was shown to attenuate hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effects of virgin coconut oil on blood pressure and related parameters in kidneys in rats fed with 5-times-heated palm oil (5HPO). Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Two groups were fed 5HPO (15%) diet and the second group was also given virgin coconut oil (1.42 mL/kg, oral) daily for 16 weeks. The other 2 groups were given basal diet without (control) and with virgin coconut oil. Systolic blood pressure was measured pre- and post-treatment. After 16 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and kidneys were harvested. Dietary 5HPO increased blood pressure, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and nitric oxide contents, but decreased heme oxygenase activity. Virgin coconut oil prevented increase in 5HPO-induced blood pressure and renal nitric oxide content as well as the decrease in renal heme oxygenase activity. The virgin coconut oil also reduced the elevation of renal TBARS induced by the heated oil. However, neither dietary 5HPO nor virgin coconut oil affected renal histomorphometry. In conclusion, virgin coconut oil has a potential to reduce the development of hypertension and renal injury induced by dietary heated oil, possibly via its antioxidant protective effects on the kidneys.

  17. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The kinetics of removal of heat-induced excess nuclear protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roti, J.L.R.; Uygur, N.; Higashikubo, R.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the role of protein content, temperature and heating time in the removal of heat-induced excess protein associated with the isolated nucleus, the kinetics of protein removal was monitored for 6 to 8 hours following exposure to 7 hyperthermic protocols. Four of these (47 0 C-7.5 min., 46 0 C-15 min., 45 0 C-30 min., and 44 0 C-60 min.) resulted in a nuclear protein content approximately twice that of nuclei from unheated cells (2.05 +- .14) following heat exposure. Three protocols (45 0 C-15 min., 44 0 C-30 min. and 43 0 C-60 min.) resulted in a nuclear protein content approximately 1.6 times normal (1.63 +- .12). If nuclear protein content were the only determinant in the recovery rate, then the same half time for nuclear protein removal would be expected within each group of protocols. Rate constants for nuclear protein removal were obtained by regression analysis. The half-time for nuclear protein removal increased with decreasing temperature and increasing heating time for the same nuclear protein content. This result suggests that the heating time and temperature are more of a determinant in the removal kinetics than protein content alone. Extended kinetics of recovery (to 36 hours) showed incomplete recovery and a secondary increase in protein associated with the isolated nucleus. These results were due to cell-cycle rearrangement (G/sub 2/ block) and unbalanced growth

  19. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyu, M.K. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  20. Beam-induced heating / bunch length / RF and lessons for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metral, E.

    2012-01-01

    Beam-induced heating has been observed here and there during the 2011 run when the bunch/beam intensity was increased and/or the bunch length was reduced. These observations are first reviewed before mentioning the recent news/work performed during the shutdown. In fact, several possible sources of heating exist and only the RF heating (i.e. coming from the real part of the longitudinal impedance of the machine components) is discussed in some detail in the present paper: 1) comparing the case of a Broad-Band (BB) vs. a Narrow-Band (NB) impedance; 2) discussing the beam spectrum; 3) reminding the usual solutions to avoid/minimize the RF heating; 4) reviewing the different heat transfer mechanisms; 5) mentioning that the synchronous phase shift is a measurement of the power loss and effective impedance. The three current 'hot' topics for the LHC performance, which are the VMTSA, TDI and MKI, are then analyzed in detail and some lessons for 2012 (and after) are finally drawn

  1. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  2. In-situ cyclic pulse annealing of InN on AlN/Si during IR-lamp-heated MBE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Bungi, Yu; Araki, Tsutomu; Nanishi, Yasushi; Mori, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    To improve crystal quality of InN, an in-situ cyclic rapid pulse annealing during growth was carried out using infrared-lamp-heated molecular beam epitaxy. A cycle of 4 min growth of InN at 400 °C and 3 s pulse annealing at a higher temperature was repeated 15 times on AlN on Si substrate. Annealing temperatures were 550, 590, 620, and 660 °C. The back of Si was directly heated by lamp irradiation through a quartz rod. A total InN film thickness was about 200 nm. With increasing annealing temperature up to 620 °C, crystal grain size by scanning electron microscope showed a tendency to increase, while widths of X-ray diffraction rocking curve of (0 0 0 2) reflection and E 2 (high) mode peak of Raman scattering spectra decreased. A peak of In (1 0 1) appeared in X-ray diffraction by annealing higher than 590 °C, and In droplets were found on the surface by annealing at 660 °C.

  3. Secondary phases in Al_xCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloys: An in-situ TEM heating study and thermodynamic appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary phases, either introduced by alloying or heat treatment, are commonly present in most high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Understanding the formation of secondary phases at high temperatures, and their effect on mechanical properties, is a critical issue that is undertaken in the present paper, using the Al_xCoCrFeNi (x = 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7) as a model alloy. The in-situ transmission-electron-microscopy (TEM) heating observation, an atom-probe-tomography (APT) study for the reference starting materials (Al_0_._3 and Al_0_._5 alloys), and thermodynamic calculations for all three alloys, are performed to investigate (1) the aluminum effect on the secondary-phase fractions, (2) the annealing-twinning formation in the face-centered-cubic (FCC) matrix, (3) the strengthening effect of the secondary ordered body-centered-cubic (B2) phase, and (4) the nucleation path of the σ secondary phase thoroughly. Finally, the present work will substantially optimize the alloy design of HEAs and facilitate applications of HEAs to a wide temperature range.

  4. Exercise-induced heat stress disrupts the shear-dilatory relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Stephen J; Lefferts, Wesley K; Wharton, Margret; Fehling, Patricia C; Smith, Denise L

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although heat stress is known to increase cardiovascular strain, no study, to date, had explored the potential impact of exercise-induced heat stress on vascular function. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that acute exercise tended to reduce flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), owing in part to reduced reactive hyperaemia/shear stimulus; thus, when FMD is normalized to shear no postexercise deficit exists. Exercise-induced heat stress increased reactive hyperaemia, shear rate, coupled with a sustained FMD postexercise, suggests that exercise-induced heat stress increases the amount of shear stimulus to elicit a similar response, indicating reduced vascular responsiveness, or reserve, which might increase cardiovascular susceptibility. Heat stress increases cardiovascular strain and is of particular concern in occupations, such as firefighting, in which individuals are required to perform strenuous work while wearing personal protective equipment. Sudden cardiac events are associated with strenuous activity and are the leading cause of duty-related death among firefighters, accounting for ∼50% of duty-related fatalities per year. Understanding the acute effects of exercise-induced heat stress (EIHS) on vascular endothelial function may provide insight into the mechanisms precipitating acute coronary events in firefighters. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the effects of EIHS on vascular endothelial function. Using a balanced crossover design, 12 healthy men performed 100 min of moderate-intensity, intermittent exercise with and without EIHS (personal protective equipment or cooling vest, respectively). Measurements of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), reactive hyperaemia and shear rate area under the curve (SR AUC ) were performed pre- and postexercise. During EIHS, core temperature was significantly higher (38 ± 0.1 versus 37 ± 0.1°C). Postexercise FMD tended to be suppressed

  5. Selective activation of human heat shock gene transcription by nitrosourea antitumor drugs mediated by isocyanate-induced damage and activation of heat shock transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, R A; Abravaya, K; Seidenfeld, J; Morimoto, R I

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of cultured human tumor cells with the chloroethylnitrosourea antitumor drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) selectively induces transcription and protein synthesis of a subset of the human heat shock or stress-induced genes (HSP90 and HSP70) with little effect on other stress genes or on expression of the c-fos, c-myc, or beta-actin genes. The active component of BCNU and related compounds appears to be the isocyanate moiety that causes carbamoylation of proteins and nucleic acids. Transcriptional activation of the human HSP70 gene by BCNU is dependent on the heat shock element and correlates with the level of heat shock transcription factor and its binding to the heat shock element in vivo. Unlike activation by heat or heavy metals, BCNU-mediated activation is strongly dependent upon new protein synthesis. This suggests that BCNU-induced, isocyanate-mediated damage to newly synthesized protein(s) may be responsible for activation of the heat shock transcription factor and increased transcription of the HSP90 and HSP70 genes. Images PMID:2052560

  6. Intergenic sequence between Arabidopsis caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic/heat shock protein100 and choline kinase genes functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position -517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Defect-induced Au precipitation in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Langelaan, G.; Brück, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Dijk, N.H. van

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale Au precipitation in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys has been studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering during isothermal aging at 550 °C and complementary ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The high temperature precipitation behavior in samples having received different degrees of cold deformation has been studied to explore the potential self-healing of deformation-induced defects by Au precipitation. It is found that dislocations induced by prior plastic deformation strongly facilitate the formation of Au precipitates, as no significant precipitation is observed for undeformed samples. Defect-induced Au precipitates are formed both at dislocations and along grain boundaries where the defect density is high. The fact that the Au atoms only precipitate on deformation-induced defects demonstrates that solute gold atoms act as efficient self-healing agents in the ferrous matrix. The addition of B and N is found to retard the Au precipitation

  8. Welding of 3D-printed carbon nanotube–polymer composites by locally induced microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Charles B.; Lackey, Blake A.; Pospisil, Martin J.; Achee, Thomas C.; Hicks, Victoria K.; Moran, Aaron G.; Teipel, Blake R.; Saed, Mohammad A.; Green, Micah J.

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing through material extrusion, often termed three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a burgeoning method for manufacturing thermoplastic components. However, a key obstacle facing 3D-printed plastic parts in engineering applications is the weak weld between successive filament traces, which often leads to delamination and mechanical failure. This is the chief obstacle to the use of thermoplastic additive manufacturing. We report a novel concept for welding 3D-printed thermoplastic interfaces using intense localized heating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave irradiation. The microwave heating of the CNT-polymer composites is a function of CNT percolation, as shown through in situ infrared imaging and simulation. We apply CNT-loaded coatings to a 3D printer filament; after printing, microwave irradiation is shown to improve the weld fracture strength by 275%. These remarkable results open up entirely new design spaces for additive manufacturing and also yield new insight into the coupling between dielectric properties and radio frequency field response for nanomaterial networks. PMID:28630927

  9. Welding of 3D-printed carbon nanotube-polymer composites by locally induced microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Charles B; Lackey, Blake A; Pospisil, Martin J; Achee, Thomas C; Hicks, Victoria K; Moran, Aaron G; Teipel, Blake R; Saed, Mohammad A; Green, Micah J

    2017-06-01

    Additive manufacturing through material extrusion, often termed three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a burgeoning method for manufacturing thermoplastic components. However, a key obstacle facing 3D-printed plastic parts in engineering applications is the weak weld between successive filament traces, which often leads to delamination and mechanical failure. This is the chief obstacle to the use of thermoplastic additive manufacturing. We report a novel concept for welding 3D-printed thermoplastic interfaces using intense localized heating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave irradiation. The microwave heating of the CNT-polymer composites is a function of CNT percolation, as shown through in situ infrared imaging and simulation. We apply CNT-loaded coatings to a 3D printer filament; after printing, microwave irradiation is shown to improve the weld fracture strength by 275%. These remarkable results open up entirely new design spaces for additive manufacturing and also yield new insight into the coupling between dielectric properties and radio frequency field response for nanomaterial networks.

  10. Morphological changes in Scenedesmus induced by infochemicals released in situ from zooplankton grazers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.; Van Donk, E.

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical substances released from Daphnia galeata induced colony formation in the green alga Scenedesmus acutus. Normally this strain consisted mainly of single cells in cultures. However, if exposed for 48 h to either water with live Daphnia or to O.1-mu m filtered water from a culture with

  11. Time and temperature dependence of cascade induced defect production in in situ experiments and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1993-01-01

    Understanding of the defect production and annihilation processes in a cascade is important in modelling of radiation damage for establishing irradiation correlation. In situ observation of heavy ion radiation damage has a great prospect in this respect. Time and temperature dependence of formation and annihilation of vacancy clusters in a cascade with a time resolution of 30 ms has been studied with a facility which comprises a heavy ion accelerator and an electron microscope. Formation and annihilation rates of defect clusters have been separately measured by this technique. The observed processes have been analysed by simple kinetic equations, taking into account the sink effect of surface and the defect clusters themselves together with the annihilation process due to thermal emission of vacancies from the defect clusters. Another tool to study time and temperature dependence of defect production in a cascade is computer simulation. Recent results of molecular dynamics calculations on the temperature dependence of cascade evolution are presented, including directional and temperature dependence of the lengths of replacement collision sequences, temperature dependence of the process to reach thermal equilibrium and so on. These results are discussed under general time frame of radiation damage evolution covering from 10 -15 to 10 9 s, and several important issues for the general understanding have been identified. (orig.)

  12. In situ X-ray diffraction study of crystallization process of GeSbTe thin films during heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naohiko [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)]. E-mail: e0957@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Konomi, Ichiro [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Seno, Yoshiki [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2005-05-15

    The crystallization processes of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film used for PD and DVD-RAM were studied in its realistic optical disk film configurations for the first time by X-ray diffraction using an intense X-ray beam of a synchrotron orbital radiation facility (SPring-8) and in situ quick detection with a Position-Sensitive-Proportional-Counter. The dependence of the amorphous-to-fcc phase-change temperature T{sub 1} on the rate of temperature elevation R{sub et} gave an activation energy E{sub a}: 0.93 eV much less than previously reported 2.2 eV obtained from a model sample 25-45 times thicker than in the real optical disks. The similar measurement on the Ge{sub 4}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 5} film whose large reflectance change attains the readability by CD-ROM drives gave E{sub a}: 1.13 eV with larger T{sub 1} than Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films at any R{sub et} implying a lower sensitivity in erasing as well as a better data stability of the phase-change disk.

  13. In situ X-ray diffraction study of crystallization process of GeSbTe thin films during heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Naohiko; Konomi, Ichiro; Seno, Yoshiki; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization processes of the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film used for PD and DVD-RAM were studied in its realistic optical disk film configurations for the first time by X-ray diffraction using an intense X-ray beam of a synchrotron orbital radiation facility (SPring-8) and in situ quick detection with a Position-Sensitive-Proportional-Counter. The dependence of the amorphous-to-fcc phase-change temperature T 1 on the rate of temperature elevation R et gave an activation energy E a : 0.93 eV much less than previously reported 2.2 eV obtained from a model sample 25-45 times thicker than in the real optical disks. The similar measurement on the Ge 4 Sb 1 Te 5 film whose large reflectance change attains the readability by CD-ROM drives gave E a : 1.13 eV with larger T 1 than Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin films at any R et implying a lower sensitivity in erasing as well as a better data stability of the phase-change disk

  14. Temperature-dependency analysis and correction methods of in-situ power-loss estimation for crystalline silicon modules undergoing potential-induced degradation stress testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of in-situ characterization of the photovoltaic module power at standard test conditions using superposition of the dark current-voltage (I-V) curve measured at elevated stress temperature during potential-induced degradation (PID) testing. PID chamber studies were performed o...

  15. In situ detection of a heat-shock regulatory element binding protein using a soluble short synthetic enhancer sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harel-Bellan, A; Brini, A T; Farrar, W L [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (USA); Ferris, D K [Program Resources, Inc., Frederick, MD (USA); Robin, P [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    1989-06-12

    In various studies, enhancer binding proteins have been successfully absorbed out by competing sequences inserted into plasmids, resulting in the inhibition of the plasmid expression. Theoretically, such a result could be achieved using synthetic enhancer sequences not inserted into plasmids. In this study, a double stranded DNA sequence corresponding to the human heat shock regulatory element was chemically synthesized. By in vitro retardation assays, the synthetic sequence was shown to bind specifically a protein in extracts from the human T cell line Jurkat. When the synthetic enhancer was electroporated into Jurkat cells, not only the enhancer was shown to remain undegraded into the cells for up to 2 days, but also its was shown to bind intracellularly a protein. The binding was specific and was modulated upon heat shock. Furthermore, the binding protein was shown to be of the expected molecular weight by UV crosslinking. However, when the synthetic enhancer element was co-electroporated with an HSP 70-CAT reporter construct, the expression of the reporter plasmid was consistently enhanced in the presence of the exogenous synthetic enhancer.

  16. Heat-induced accumulation of protein synthesis elongation factor 1A indicates an important role in heat tolerance in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat stress substantially reduces crop productivity worldwide, and will become more severe due to global warming. Identification of proteins involved in heat stress response may help develop varieties for heat tolerance. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is a cytosolic, multifunctional protei...

  17. Simultaneous Propagation of Heat Waves Induced by Sawteeth and Electron-Cyclotron Heating Power Modulation in the Rtp Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorini, G.; Mantica, P.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; De Luca, F.; Jacchia, A.; Konings, J. A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Peters, M.

    1993-01-01

    The incremental electron heat diffusivity chi(inc) is determined in Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project plasmas by measurements of simultaneous heat pulses due to (1) the sawtooth instability and (2) modulated electron cyclotron heating. No systematic difference is observed between the two measured chi(inc)

  18. A study on the flow induced vibration in two phase flow under heating and non-heating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hun

    2007-02-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement devices, like a spacer grid with mixing vane, cause flow-induced vibration (FIV) due to turbulence made by structural resistance. CHF enhancement and FIV reduction are usually studied separately. The main purpose of this article is to investigate the relationship between CHF and FIV. Information of flow-induced vibration due to wire coil design, is experimentally presented in this study by detecting flow-induced vibration under the two-phase flow condition with wire coil inserts. CHF experiments were performed in an upward vertical annulus tube under controlled vibration conditions to determine the effect of vibration on CHF. FIV was measured in an upward vertical tube with various wire coil inserts using air-water as flow material. CHF experiments were performed at one atmosphere with mechanically controlled vibration. A quartz tube (inner diameter of 17 mm, thickness of 2mm and length of 0.72 m) was used for outer tube and a SUS-304 tube (outer diameter of 6.35 mm, thickness of 0.89 mm and length of 0.7 m) was used for the inner heater. Vibration of the heater tube with an amplitude range of 0.1 mm to 0.5 mm and a frequency range of 10 Hz to 50 Hz was carried out at a mass flux of 115 kg/m 2 s and 215 kg/m 2 s. CHF was enhanced by vibration with a maximum ratio of 16.4 %. CHF was increased with increased amplitude and quality. The CHF correlation was developed with R (coefficient of correlation) of 0.903. FIV measuring experiments were performed at one atmosphere by changing the inserted wire coil type. An acrylic tube was used for the test section with inner diameter of 25 mm, thickness of 10 mm and length of 0.5 m. Four types of wire coil, which have a thickness of between 2 mm and 3 mm and pitch length of between 25 mm and 50 mm, were used. FIV and dynamic pressure were detected in water mass flux range of 100 ∼ 3060 kg/m 2 s and air mass flux range of 5.02 ∼ 60.3 kg/m 2 s. Vibration increased along with mass flux and

  19. Universal Multifunctional Nanoplatform Based on Target-Induced in Situ Promoting Au Seeds Growth to Quench Fluorescence of Upconversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiongqiong; Chen, Hongyu; Fang, Aijin; Wu, Xinyang; Liu, Meiling; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-12-22

    Construction of a new multifunctional chemo/biosensing platform for small biomolecules and tumor markers is of great importance in analytical chemistry. Herein, a novel universal multifunctional nanoplatform for biomolecules and enzyme activity detection was proposed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and target-inducing enlarged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reductive molecule such as H 2 O 2 can act as the reductant to reduce HAuCl 4 , which will make the Au seeds grow. The enlarged AuNPs can effectively quench the fluorescence of UCNPs owing to the good spectral overlap between the absorption band of the AuNPs and the emission band of the UCNPs. Utilizing the FRET between the UCNPs and enlarged AuNPs, good linear relationship between the fluorescence of UCNPs and the concentration of H 2 O 2 can be found. Based on this strategy, H 2 O 2 related molecules such as l-lactate, glucose, and uric acid can also be quantified. On the basis of UCNPs and PVP/HAuCl 4 , a general strategy for other reductants such as ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), or enzyme activity can be established. Therefore, the universal multifunctional nanoplatform based on UCNPs and the target-inducing in situ enlarged Au NPs will show its potential as a simple method for the detection of some life related reductive molecules, enzyme substrates, as well as enzyme activity.

  20. Assessment of flow induced vibration in a sodium-sodium heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, V. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India)], E-mail: prakash@igcar.gov.in; Thirumalai, M.; Prabhakar, R.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-01-15

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under construction at Kalpakkam. It is a liquid metal sodium cooled pool type fast reactor with all primary components located inside a sodium pool. The heat produced due to fission in the core is transported by primary sodium to the secondary sodium in a sodium to sodium Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX), which in turn is transferred to water in the steam generator. PFBR IHX is a shell and tube type heat exchanger with primary sodium on shell side and secondary sodium in the tube side. Since IHX is one of the critical components placed inside the radioactive primary sodium, trouble-free operation of the IHX is very much essential for power plant availability. To validate the design and the adequacy of the support system provided for the IHX, flow induced vibration (FIV) experiments were carried out in a water test loop on a 60 deg. sector model. This paper discusses the flow induced vibration measurements carried out in 60 deg. sector model of IHX, the modeling criteria, the results and conclusion.

  1. Investigation of the radiation properties of magnetospheric ELF waves induced by modulated ionospheric heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhao, Shufan; Zhao, Guangxin; Wang, Min

    2017-05-01

    Electromagnetic extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play an important role in modulating the Earth's radiation belt electron dynamics. High-frequency (HF) modulated heating of the ionosphere acts as a viable means to generate artificial ELF waves. The artificial ELF waves can reside in two different plasma regions in geo-space by propagating in the ionosphere and penetrating into the magnetosphere. As a consequence, the entire trajectory of ELF wave propagation should be considered to carefully analyze the wave radiation properties resulting from modulated ionospheric heating. We adopt a model of full wave solution to evaluate the Poynting vector of the ELF radiation field in the ionosphere, which can reflect the propagation characteristics of the radiated ELF waves along the background magnetic field and provide the initial condition of waves for ray tracing in the magnetosphere. The results indicate that the induced ELF wave energy forms a collimated beam and the center of the ELF radiation shifts obviously with respect to the ambient magnetic field with the radiation power inversely proportional to the wave frequency. The intensity of ELF wave radiation also shows a weak correlation with the size of the radiation source or its geographical location. Furthermore, the combination of ELF propagation in the ionosphere and magnetosphere is proposed on basis of the characteristics of the ELF radiation field from the upper ionospheric boundary and ray tracing simulations are implemented to reasonably calculate magnetospheric ray paths of ELF waves induced by modulated ionospheric heating.

  2. Transient, heat-induced thermal resistance in the small intestine of mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.L.

    1980-01-01

    Heat-induced thermal resistance has been investigated in mouse jejunum by assaying crypt survival 24 h after treatment. Hyperthermia was achieved by immersing an exteriorized loop of intestine in a bath of Krebs-Ringer solution. Two approaches have been used. In the first, thermal survival curves were obtained following single hyperthermal treatments at temperatures in the range 42 to 44 0 C. Transient thermal resistance, inducted by a plateau in the crypt survival curve, developed during heating at temperatures around 42.5 0 C after 60 to 80 min. In the second series of experiments, a priming heat treatment (40.0, 41.0, 41.5, or 42.0 0 C for 60 min) was followed at varying intervals by a test treatment at 43.0 0 C. A transient resistance to the second treatment was induced, the extent and time of development being dependent upon the priming treatment. Crypt survival curves for thermally resistant intestine showed an increase in thermal D 0 and a decrease in n compared with curves from previously unheated intestine

  3. Heat Stress Nephropathy From Exercise-Induced Uric Acid Crystalluria: A Perspective on Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Barregard, Lars; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Wesseling, Catharina; Harra, Tamara; Aragón, Aurora; Grases, Felix; Jarquin, Emmanuel R; González, Marvin A; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN), an epidemic in Central America, is a chronic kidney disease of unknown cause. In this article, we argue that MeN may be a uric acid disorder. Individuals at risk for developing the disease are primarily male workers exposed to heat stress and physical exertion that predisposes to recurrent water and volume depletion, often accompanied by urinary concentration and acidification. Uric acid is generated during heat stress, in part consequent to nucleotide release from muscles. We hypothesize that working in the sugarcane fields may result in cyclic uricosuria in which uric acid concentrations exceed solubility, leading to the formation of dihydrate urate crystals and local injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, we present pilot data documenting the common presence of urate crystals in the urine of sugarcane workers from El Salvador. High end-of-workday urinary uric acid concentrations were common in a pilot study, particularly if urine pH was corrected to 7. Hyperuricemia may induce glomerular hypertension, whereas the increased urinary uric acid may directly injure renal tubules. Thus, MeN may result from exercise and heat stress associated with dehydration-induced hyperuricemia and uricosuria. Increased hydration with water and salt, urinary alkalinization, reduction in sugary beverage intake, and inhibitors of uric acid synthesis should be tested for disease prevention. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Salinization in a stratified aquifer induced by heat transfer from well casings

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan; Cirkel, D. Gijsbert; Raoof, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The temperature inside wells used for gas, oil and geothermal energy production, as well as steam injection, is in general significantly higher than the groundwater temperature at shallower depths. While heat loss from these hot wells is known to occur, the extent to which this heat loss may result in density-driven flow and in mixing of surrounding groundwater has not been assessed so far. However, based on the heat and solute effects on density of this arrangement, the induced temperature contrasts in the aquifer due to heat transfer are expected to destabilize the system and result in convection, while existing salt concentration contrasts in an aquifer would act to stabilize the system. To evaluate the degree of impact that may occur under field conditions, free convection in a 50-m-thick aquifer driven by the heat loss from penetrating hot wells was simulated using a 2D axisymmetric SEAWAT model. In particular, the salinization potential of fresh groundwater due to the upward movement of brackish or saline water in a stratified aquifer is studied. To account for a large variety of well applications and configurations, as well as different penetrated aquifer systems, a wide range of well temperatures, from 40 to 100 °C, together with a range of salt concentration (1-35 kg/m3) contrasts were considered. This large temperature difference with the native groundwater (15 °C) required implementation of a non-linear density equation of state in SEAWAT. We show that density-driven groundwater flow results in a considerable salt mass transport (up to 166,000 kg) to the top of the aquifer in the vicinity of the well (radial distance up to 91 m) over a period of 30 years. Sensitivity analysis showed that density-driven groundwater flow and the upward salt transport was particularly enhanced by the increased heat transport from the well into the aquifer by thermal conduction due to increased well casing temperature, thermal conductivity of the soil, as well as decreased

  5. Spectroscopic analysis of the role of extractives on heat-induced discoloration of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Yongming Fan; Jianmin Gao; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Nicole M. Stark

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of extractives on heat-induced discoloration of wood, samples of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) wood flour were extracted with various solvents prior to heat-treatment. Analysis of their color parameters and chromophoric structures showed that the chroma value of the unextracted sample decreased while that of the...

  6. In situ observation of the reaction of tantalum with nitrogen in a laser heated diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Alexandra, E-mail: friedrich@kristall.uni-frankfurt.d [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Winkler, Bjoern; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Juarez Arellano, Erick A. [Universidad del Papaloapan, Circuito Central 200, Parque Industrial, Tuxtepec 68301 (Mexico); Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Biehler, Jasmin; Schroeder, Florian [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Yan, Jinyuan; Clark, Simon M. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS6R2100, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8226 (United States)

    2010-07-16

    Tantalum nitrides were formed by reaction of the elements at pressures between 9(1) and 12.7(5) GPa and temperatures >1600-2000 K in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The incorporation of small amount of nitrogen in the tantalum structure was identified as the first reaction product on weak laser irradiation. Subsequent laser heating led to the formation of hexagonal {beta}-Ta{sub 2}N and orthorhombic {eta}-Ta{sub 2}N{sub 3}, which was the stable phase at pressures up to 27 GPa and high temperatures. No evidence was found for the presence of {epsilon}-TaN, {theta}-TaN, {delta}-TaN, Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}-I or Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}-II, which was predicted to be the stable phase at P>17 GPa and T=2800 K, at the P,T-conditions of this experiment. The bulk modulus of {eta}-Ta{sub 2}N{sub 3} was determined to be B{sub 0}=319(6) GPa from a 2nd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state fit to the experimental data, while quantum mechanical calculations using the density functional theory gave a bulk modulus of B{sub 0}=348.0(9) GPa for a 2nd-order fit or B{sub 0}=339(1) GPa and B{sup '}=4.67(9) for a 3rd-order fit. The values show the large incompressibility of this high-pressure phase. From the DFT data the structural compression mechanism could be determined.

  7. Reversible Heat-Induced Inactivation of Chimeric β-Glucuronidase in Transgenic Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoguera, Concepción; Rojas, Anabel; Jordano, Juan

    2002-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of two chimeric genes: a translational fusion to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and a transcriptional fusion, both with the same promoter and 5′-flanking sequences of Ha hsp17.7 G4, a small heat shock protein (sHSP) gene from sunflower (Helianthus annuus). We found that immediately after heat shock, the induced expression from the two fusions in seedlings was similar, considering chimeric mRNA or GUS protein accumulation. Surprisingly, we discovered that the chimeric GUS protein encoded by the translational fusion was mostly inactive in such conditions. We also found that this inactivation was fully reversible. Thus, after returning to control temperature, the GUS activity was fully recovered without substantial changes in GUS protein accumulation. In contrast, we did not find differences in the in vitro heat inactivation of the respective GUS proteins. Insolubilization of the chimeric GUS protein correlated with its inactivation, as indicated by immunoprecipitation analyses. The inclusion in another chimeric gene of the 21 amino-terminal amino acids from a different sHSP lead to a comparable reversible inactivation. That effect not only illustrates unexpected post-translational problems, but may also point to sequences involved in interactions specific to sHSPs and in vivo heat stress conditions. PMID:12011363

  8. Heterogeneously Nd3+ doped single nanoparticles for NIR-induced heat conversion, luminescence, and thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Lukasz; Pilch, Aleksandra; Arabasz, Sebastian; Jin, Dayong; Bednarkiewicz, Artur

    2017-06-22

    The current frontier in nanomaterials engineering is to intentionally design and fabricate heterogeneous nanoparticles with desirable morphology and composition, and to integrate multiple functionalities through highly controlled epitaxial growth. Here we show that heterogeneous doping of Nd 3+ ions following a core-shell design already allows three optical functions, namely efficient (η > 72%) light-to-heat conversion, bright NIR emission, and sensitive (S R > 0.1% K -1 ) localized temperature quantification, to be built within a single ca. 25 nm nanoparticle. Importantly, all these optical functions operate within the transparent biological window of the NIR spectral region (λ exc ∼ 800 nm, λ emi ∼ 860 nm), in which light scattering and absorption by tissues and water are minimal. We find NaNdF 4 as a core is efficient in absorbing and converting 808 nm light to heat, while NaYF 4 :1%Nd 3+ as a shell is a temperature sensor based on the ratio-metric luminescence reading but an intermediate inert spacer shell, e.g. NaYF 4 , is necessary to insulate the heat convertor and thermometer by preventing the possible Nd-Nd energy relaxation. Moreover, we notice that while temperature sensitivity and luminescence intensity are optically stable, increased excitation intensity to generate heat above room temperature may saturate the sensing capacity of temperature feedback. We therefore propose a dual beam photoexcitation scheme as a solution for possible light-induced hyperthermia treatment.

  9. Heat-induced symmetry breaking in ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae escape behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Kai Chung

    Full Text Available The collective egress of social insects is important in dangerous situations such as natural disasters or enemy attacks. Some studies have described the phenomenon of symmetry breaking in ants, with two exits induced by a repellent. However, whether symmetry breaking occurs under high temperature conditions, which are a common abiotic stress, remains unknown. In our study, we deposited a group of Polyrhachis dives ants on a heated platform and counted the number of escaping ants with two identical exits. We discovered that ants asymmetrically escaped through two exits when the temperature of the heated platform was >32.75°C. The degree of asymmetry increased linearly with the temperature of the platform. Furthermore, the higher the temperature of heated platform was, the more ants escaped from the heated platform. However, the number of escaping ants decreased for 3 min when the temperature was higher than the critical thermal limit (39.46°C, which is the threshold for ants to endure high temperature without a loss of performance. Moreover, the ants tended to form small groups to escape from the thermal stress. A preparatory formation of ant grouping was observed before they reached the exit, indicating that the ants actively clustered rather than accidentally gathered at the exits to escape. We suggest that a combination of individual and grouping ants may help to optimize the likelihood of survival during evacuation.

  10. Evaluation of induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distribution after shutdown in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Koichi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Research Lab.; Satoh, Satoshi; Hayashi, Katsumi; Yamada, Koubun; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1997-03-01

    Induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distributions after shutdown were estimated for 1MWa/m{sup 2} operation in ITER. The activity in the inboard blanket one day after shutdown is 1.5x10{sup 11}Bq/cm{sup 3}, and the average decay heating rate 0.01w/cm{sup 3}. The dose rate outside the 120cm thick concrete biological shield is two order higher than the design criterion of 5{mu}Sv/h. This indicates that the biological shield thickness should be enhanced by 50cm in concrete, that is, total thickness 170cm for workers to enter the reactor room and to perform maintenance. (author)

  11. Heat transfer enhancement induced by electrically generated convection in a plane layer of dielectric liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traoré, P; Wu, J; Romat, H; Louste, C; Perez, A; Koulova, D

    2012-01-01

    The electro-thermo-convective motion in a plane horizontal dielectric liquid layer subjected to simultaneous action of electric field and thermal gradient is numerically investigated. We consider the case of a strong unipolar charge injection C = 10 from above or below. Therefore in this context, we only take into account the Coulomb force, disregarding the dielectric one. The effect of the electric field on the heat transfer is analyzed through the characterization of the time history of the Nusselt number as well as its evolution according to the characteristic dimensionless electric parameter T. It is demonstrated that the electric effects dominate the buoyancy ones resulting in an electrically induced convection which significantly enhance the heat transfer.

  12. Heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataria N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To find out heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India, blood samples were collected to harvest the serum during moderate and extreme hot ambiences. The metabolic enzymes determined were sorbitol dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase, gammaglutamayl transferase, 5’nucleotidase, glucose-6-phosphatase, arginase, and aldolase. The mean values of all the serum enzymes increased significantly (p≤0.05 during hot ambience as compared to respective values during moderate ambience. It was concluded that increased activity of all the enzymes in the serum was due to modulation of metabolic reactions to combat the effect of hot ambience on the animals. Activation of gluconeogenesis along with hexose monophosphate shunt and urea cycle probably helped the animals to combat the heat stress.

  13. Comparison of two mathematical models for describing heat-induced cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roti Roti, J.L.; Henle, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer-based minimization algorithm is utilized to obtain the optimum fits of two models to hyperthermic cell killing data. The models chosen are the multitarget, single-hit equation, which is in general use, and the linear-quadratic equation, which has been applied to cell killing by ionizing irradiation but not to heat-induced cell killing. The linear-quadratic equation fits hyperthermic cell killing data as well as the multitarget, single-hit equation. Both parameters of the linear-quadratic equation obey the Arrhenius law, whereas only one of the two parameters of the multitarget, single-hit equation obeys the Arrhenius law. Thus the linear-quadratic function can completely define cell killing as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, the linear-quadratic model will provide a simplified approach to the study of the synergism between heat and X irradiation

  14. Note: A novel method for in situ loading of gases via x-ray induced chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Park, Changyong; Liu, Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan (UNLV); (CIW)

    2011-12-14

    We have developed and demonstrated a novel method to load oxygen in a sealed diamond anvil cell via the x-ray induced decomposition of potassium chlorate. By irradiating a pressurized sample of an oxidizer (KClO{sub 3}) with either monochromatic or white beam x-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at ambient temperature and variable pressure, we succeeded in creating a localized region of molecular oxygen surrounded by unreacted sample which was confirmed via Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate that this technique will be useful in loading even more challenging, difficult-to-load gases such as hydrogen and also to load multiple gases.

  15. Note: A novel method for in situ loading of gases via x-ray induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Park, Changyong; Liu, Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan

    2011-10-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a novel method to load oxygen in a sealed diamond anvil cell via the x-ray induced decomposition of potassium chlorate. By irradiating a pressurized sample of an oxidizer (KClO3) with either monochromatic or white beam x-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at ambient temperature and variable pressure, we succeeded in creating a localized region of molecular oxygen surrounded by unreacted sample which was confirmed via Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate that this technique will be useful in loading even more challenging, difficult-to-load gases such as hydrogen and also to load multiple gases.

  16. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  17. Foraminiferal survival after long-term in situ experimentally induced anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Geslin, E.; Baal, C.; Metzger, E.; Lejzerowicz, F.; Riedel, B.; Zuschin, M.; Pawlowski, J.; Stachowitsch, M.; Jorissen, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    Anoxia was successfully induced in four benthic chambers installed at 24 m depth on the northern Adriatic seafloor from 9 days to 10 months. To accurately determine whether benthic foraminifera can survive experimentally induced prolonged anoxia, the CellTrackerTM Green method was applied and calcareous and agglutinated foraminifera were analyzed. Numerous individuals were found living at all sampling times and at all sampling depths (to 5 cm), supported by a ribosomal RNA analysis that revealed that certain benthic foraminifera were active after 10 months of anoxia. The results show that benthic foraminifera can survive up to 10 months of anoxia with co-occurring hydrogen sulfides. However, foraminiferal standing stocks decrease with sampling time in an irregular manner. A large difference in standing stock between two cores sampled under initial conditions indicates the presence of a large spatial heterogeneity of the foraminiferal faunas. An unexpected increase in standing stocks after one month is tentatively interpreted as a reaction to increased food availability due to the massive mortality of infaunal macrofaunal organisms. After this, standing stocks decrease again in cores sampled after 2 months of anoxia to then attain a minimum in the cores sampled after 10 months. We speculate that the trend of overall decrease of standing stocks is not due to the adverse effects of anoxia and hydrogen sulfides but rather due to a continuous diminution of labile organic matter.

  18. Thermal Stability of Woolly Erionite-K and Considerations about the Heat-Induced Behaviour of the Erionite Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ballirano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behavior of a woolly erionite-K sample (Lander County, NV, USA, chemical formula (Ca2.03Na0.73K2.52Mg0.26[Al8.22Si27.78O71.80]·35.94H2O, was investigated in the 303–1173 K thermal range by in situ X-ray powder diffraction. Present data suggest a general thermally-induced volume contraction whose magnitude increases as S i S i + A l ratio becomes smaller. An inverse correlation between S i S i + A l ratio and Tdehydr is observed because higher S i S i + A l ratio values are associated to lower dehydration temperatures. A positive dependence exists between S i S i + A l ratio and Tbreak. A higher Si content results in a greater thermal stability, in agreement with the general trend observed in zeolites. On the contrary, no correlation has been found between Tbreak and weighted ionic potential (Z/rwt as suggested by reference data. Heating produces a general depletion of the Ca1, Ca2, Ca3, and K1 sites, which is counterbalanced by an increase of the K2 site scattering, even though the latter is not populated at RT. No “internal ion exchange” mechanism was apparently acting in the present sample differently from other erionite samples analysed in the past. At 303 K approximately 20 e− allocated at the OW H2O sites might be assigned to (extra-framework EF cations. Such fraction increases due to their migration from the extra-framework cation sites following the same mechanism reported in reference data.

  19. Inhibition of inducible heat shock protein-70 (hsp72 enhances bortezomib-induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qi

    Full Text Available The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade is a promising new agent for bladder cancer therapy, but inducible cytoprotective mechanisms may limit its potential efficacy. We used whole genome mRNA expression profiling to study the effects of bortezomib on stress-induced gene expression in a panel of human bladder cancer cell lines. Bortezomib induced strong upregulation of the inducible HSP70 isoforms HSPA1A and HSPA1B isoforms of Hsp72 in 253J B-V and SW780 (HSPA1A(high cells, but only induced the HSPA1B isoform in UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 (HSPA1A(low cells. Bortezomib stimulated the binding of heat shock factor-1 (HSF1 to the HSPA1A promoter in 253JB-V but not in UM-UC13 cells. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that the HSPA1A promoter was methylated in the HSPA1A(low cell lines (UM-UC10 and UM-UC13, and exposure to the chromatin demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored HSPA1A expression. Overexpression of Hsp72 promoted bortezomib resistance in the UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 cells, whereas transient knockdown of HSPA1B further sensitized these cells to bortezomib, and exposure to the chemical HSF1 inhibitor KNK-437 promoted bortezomib sensitivity in the 253J B-V cells. Finally, shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of Hsp72 in 253J B-V promoted sensitivity to bortezomib in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. Together, our results provide proof-of-concept for using Hsp72 inhibitors to promote bortezomib sensitivity in bladder cancers and suggest that selective targeting of HSPA1B could produce synthetic lethality in tumors that display HSPA1A promoter methylation.

  20. Calculation of heat fluxes induced by radio frequency heating on the actively cooled protections of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid (LH) antennas in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, G., E-mail: Guillaume.ritz@gmail.com [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Corre, Y., E-mail: Yann.corre@cea.fr [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rault, M.; Missirlian, M. [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Portafaix, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Martinez, A.; Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Guilhem, D.; Salami, M.; Loarer, T. [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The heat flux generated by radiofrequency (RF) heating was calculated using Tore Supra's heating antennas. ► The highest heat flux value, generated by ions accelerated in RF-rectified sheath potentials, was 5 MW/m{sup 2}. ► The heat flux on the limiters of antennas was in the same order of magnitude as that on the toroidal pumping limiter. -- Abstract: Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are recognized as important auxiliary heating and current drive methods for present and next step fusion devices. However, these radio frequency (RF) systems generate a heat flux up to several MW/m{sup 2} on the RF antennas during plasma operation. This paper focuses on the determination of the heat flux deposited on the lateral protections of the RF antennas in Tore Supra. The heat flux was calculated by finite element method (FEM) using a model of the lateral protection. The FEM calculation was based on surface temperature measurements using infrared cameras monitoring the RF antennas. The heat flux related to the acceleration of electrons in front of the LHCD grills (LHCD active) and to the acceleration of ions in RF-rectified sheath potentials (ICRH active) were calculated. Complementary results on the heat flux related to fast ions (ICRH active with a relatively low magnetic field) are also reported in this paper.

  1. Anomalous plasma heating induced by modulation of the current-density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    1985-05-01

    The usual plasma heating in a tokamak needs additional heating to reach ignition temperature (approx. 10 8 K). The method used in the TORTUR III experiment is to induce anomalous plasma resistivity by applying a short (10 microseconds) high-voltage pulse. A sharp rise of the plasma temperature is found almost simultaneously, but this effect, though considerable, is too short-lived to be of interest for a thermonuclear chain reaction. A second pulse gives a second rise of temperature, but this time a slow one, extending over several milliseconds. The mechanism of this delayed heating and the reservoir within the plasma supplying the energy are subjects of investigation in the TORTUR III experiments. Some conclusions concerning the plasma heating mechanism are presented. The conclusion is reached that the application of the high-voltage pulse results in a modulation of the current-density profile: the (normally already peaked) profile sharpens, the current concentrates in the centre of the plasma column. This is a non-equilibrium situation. It relaxes to the noraml current distribution within approximately 2 milliseconds. As long as this relaxation process is not finished, the dissipation is on an enhanced level and anomalous plasma heating is observed. Many plasma parameters are surveyed and evaluated: temperature (both of the ions and the electrons), density, emission spectrum (from microwaves to hard X-rays) and the fluctuation spectrum. Main subject of this report is the measurement and interpretation of the X-rays of the emission spectrum. Experimental results are presented and discussed

  2. Surface properties of heat-induced soluble soy protein aggregates of different molecular masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengxian; Xiong, Youling L; Qin, Fang; Jian, Huajun; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Jie

    2015-02-01

    Suspensions (2% and 5%, w/v) of soy protein isolate (SPI) were heated at 80, 90, or 100 °C for different time periods to produce soluble aggregates of different molecular sizes to investigate the relationship between particle size and surface properties (emulsions and foams). Soluble aggregates generated in these model systems were characterized by gel permeation chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat treatment increased surface hydrophobicity, induced SPI aggregation via hydrophobic interaction and disulfide bonds, and formed soluble aggregates of different sizes. Heating of 5% SPI always promoted large-size aggregate (LA; >1000 kDa) formation irrespective of temperature, whereas the aggregate size distribution in 2% SPI was temperature dependent: the LA fraction progressively rose with temperature (80→90→100 °C), corresponding to the attenuation of medium-size aggregates (MA; 670 to 1000 kDa) initially abundant at 80 °C. Heated SPI with abundant LA (>50%) promoted foam stability. LA also exhibited excellent emulsifying activity and stabilized emulsions by promoting the formation of small oil droplets covered with a thick interfacial protein layer. However, despite a similar influence on emulsion stability, MA enhanced foaming capacity but were less capable of stabilizing emulsions than LA. The functionality variation between heated SPI samples is clearly related to the distribution of aggregates that differ in molecular size and surface activity. The findings may encourage further research to develop functional SPI aggregates for various commercial applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Heat pretreatment-induced activation of gadolinium surfaces towards the initial precipitation of hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, G.; Schweke, D.; Shamir, N.; Zalkind, S.; Livneh, T.; Danon, A.; Kimmel, G.; Mintz, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    A vacuum heat pretreatment is applied, in order to enhance the reactivity of hydride-forming metals towards hydrogen reaction. For gadolinium, as for other rare-earth metals and some actinides, pretreatment temperatures of about 470 K are sufficient to induce such activation. The different factors that may be involved in that activation mechanism are identified and analyzed for gadolinium and their role is evaluated. It is concluded that the most prominent effect is desorption of surface hydroxyl groups, which impede the dissociative chemisorptions of hydrogen.

  4. HEAT INDUCIBLE EXPRESSION OF ANTIFREEZE PROTEIN GENES FROM THE BEETLES Tenebrio molitor AND Microdera punctipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieqiong; Ma, Wenjing; Ma, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) play important roles in protecting poikilothermic organisms from cold damage. The expression of AFP genes (afps) is induced by low temperature. However, it is reported that heat can influence the expression of afps in the desert beetle Microdera punctipennis. To further detect whether heat also induce the expression of afps in other insects, and to determine the expression profiling of insect afps at different temperatures. The expression of antifreeze protein genes in the two beetles, Microdera punctipennis and Tenebrio molitor that have quite different living environment, under different temperatures were studied by using real-time quantitative PCR. Mild low temperatures (5~15 degree C), high temperature (38~47 degree C for M. punctipennis, or 37~42 degree C for T. molitor) and temperature difference (10~30 degree C) all stimulated strongly to the expression of AFP genes (Mpafps) in M. punctipennis which lives in the wild filed in desert. The mRNA level of Mpafps after M. punctipennis were exposed to these temperatures for 1h~5h was at least 30-fold of the control at 25 degree C. For T. molitor which is breeding in door with wheat bran all these temperatures stimulated significantly to the expression of Tmafps, while the extent and degree of the temperature stimulation on Tmafps expression were much lower than on Mpafps. After T. molitor were exposed to 5 degree C and 15 degree C for 1h~5h, the mRNA level of Tmafps was over 6-fold and 45-fold of the control at 25 degree C. High temperature (37~42 degree C) for 1h~3h treatments increased Tmafps mRNA level 4.8-fold of the control. Temperature difference of 10 degree C was effective in stimulating Tmafps expression. The expression of insect antifreeze protein genes both in M. punctipennis and T. molitor was induced by heat, suggesting that this phenomenon may be common in insects; the extent and degree of the influence differ in species that have different living conditions. The heat

  5. Kinetics of heat-induced color change of a tuna-vegetable mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Erika; Sandoval, Aleida J; Barreiro, José A

    2009-01-01

    Heat induced color change kinetics in a tuna-vegetable mixture was evaluated by measuring color parameter "L" (Hunter-Lab) and 5-hydroxi-methyl-furfural (5-HMF) accumulation. For this purpose small reusable stainless steel TDT cans were used and the kinetic studies performed in a temperature range characteristic of thermal processing of low acid canned foods (110-125°C). The color parameter L was better described by a pseudo zero order while a pseudo first order reaction was found for 5-HMF a...

  6. Heat-shock-induced enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated Herpesvirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yager, J.D.; Zurlo, J.; Penn, A.L.

    1985-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the ability of heat shock (HS) with that of another type of cellular stress, UV irradiation, to cause the induction of enhanced viral reactivation, a process that may represent an SOS-type repair process in mammalian cells. These results indicate that, like UV irradiation, HS at levels inhibitory to cell growth induced enhanced viral reactivation in Vero cells. The results also suggest that at least two proteins in the HS protein family are not necessary for this response to occur. (Auth.). 27 refs.; 5 figs.

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pořízka, P.; Demidov, A.; Kaiser, J.; Keivanian, J.; Gornushkin, I.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pořízka, P. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Demidov, A. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Keivanian, J. [Institute for Mining, Technical University Clausthal, Erzstraße 18, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gornushkin, I. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, U. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Chemistry Department, Humboldt Univerisät zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Straße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Riedel, J., E-mail: jens.riedel@bam.de [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  9. In situ and real-time small-angle neutron scattering studies of living anionic polymerization process and polymerization-induced self-assembly of block copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Yamauchi, K.; Hasegawa, H.; Miyamoto, N.; Koizumi, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied a simultaneous living anionic polymerization process of isoprene and deuterated styrene in deuterated benzene with sec-buthyl lithium as an initiator into polyisoprene-block-poly(styrene-d 8 ) and the polymerization-induced self-assembling process. This polymerization-induced self-assembling process was directly observed by an in situ and real-time small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. The time-resolved SANS studies enabled us to explore a time evolution of hierarchical structures induced by a time evolution of the primary structure (linear sequential connection of two monomers)

  10. The reduction of optimal heat treatment temperature and critical current density enhancement of ex situ processed MgB2 tapes using ball milled filling powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwanade, Akio; Kawada, Satoshi; Kitaguchi, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    The optimal heat treatment temperature (Topt) at which best performance in the critical current density (Jc) property at 4.2 K is obtained is influenced by the quality or reactivity of the filling powder in ex situ processed MgB2 tapes. Using a controlled fabrication process, the Topt decreases to 705-735 °C, which is lower than previously reported by more than 50 °C. The Topt decrease is effective to suppress both the decomposition of MgB2 and hence the formation of impurities such as MgB4, and the growth of crystallite size which decreases upper critical filed (Hc2). These bring about the Jc improvement and the Jc value at 4.2 K and 10 T reaches 250 A/mm2. The milling process also decreases the critical temperature (Tc) below 30 K. The milled powder is easily contaminated in air and thus, the Jc property of the contaminated tapes degrades severely. The contamination can raise the Topt by more than 50 °C, which is probably due to the increased sintering temperature required against contaminated surface layer around the grains acting as a barrier.

  11. Transport and Application of Heat-Activated Persulfate for In-situ Chemical Oxidation of Residual Trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quig, L.; Johnson, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    characterizing the overall transport behavior and application of persulfate/heat-activated persulfate in a natural porous media for the ISCO of residual nonaqueous phase liquid, this work aids in improving the implementation of persulfate ISCO systems.

  12. In Situ Measurement of Seeking Speed and Seeking Induced Head-Disk Interface Instability in Hard Disk Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the instability of head-disk interface caused by the voice coil motor (VCM end crashing the crash stop during the seeking of magnetic head. To make the whole process of that clear, an in situ measurement method based on maximum likelihood estimation and extended Kalman filter for seeking speed at component level was developed first and was then calibrated by a high speed camera. Given a crash between VCM end and crash stop that may be a consequence of the continuous increasing seeking speed, the seeking speed was carefully controlled by using our developed method to find a critical value that may induce vigorous head-disk interface instability. Acoustic emission sensor and laser Doppler vibrometer were used to capture the transient dynamic behaviors of magnetic head when the crash is happening. Damage analysis and mode identification were carried out to reveal the relationship between the damage patterns on disk surface and head dynamics. The results of this study are helpful to optimize the track seeking profile during the HDD operation, as well as the design of components such as head and head arm.

  13. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural origins for the electric field-induced phenomena in ferroelectric perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hanzheng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Ferroelectrics are important materials due to their extensive technological applications, such as non-volatile memories, field-effect transistors, ferroelectric tunneling junctions, dielectric capacitors, piezoelectric transducers, sensors and actuators. As is well known, the outstanding dielectric, piezoelectric, and ferroelectric properties of these functional oxides originate from their ferroelectric domain arrangements and the corresponding evolution under external stimuli (e.g. electric field, stress, and temperature). Electric field has been known as the most efficient stimulus to manipulate the ferroelectric domains through polarization switching and alignment. Therefore, direct observation of the dynamic process of electric field-induced domain evolution and crystal structure transformation is of significant importance to understand the microstructural mechanisms for the functional properties of ferroelectrics. In this dissertation, electric field in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique was employed to monitor the real-time evolution of the domain morphology and crystal structure during various electrical processes: (1) the initial poling process, (2) the electric field reversal process, and (3) the electrical cycling process. Two types of perovskite-structured ceramics, normal ferroelectrics and relaxor ferroelectrics, were used for this investigation. In addition to providing the microscopic insight for some wellaccepted phase transformation rules, discoveries of some new or even unexpected physical phenomena were also demonstrated.

  14. Radiation induced wheat-rye chromosomal translocations in triticale. Optimizing the dose using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Comeau, A.; Chen, Q.; Collin, J.; St-Pierre, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was utilized to monitor the level of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co source) in their ability to cause intra- and intergeneric chromosomal aberrations in triticale seeds. Seeds were irradiated with 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy doses. The root growth of irradiated seeds was greatly inhibited at 200 Gy and above. Various types of aberrations including wheat-rye, wheat-wheat, rye-rye, wheat-rye-wheat, rye-wheat-rye translocations and acentric fragments with or without translocations were observed. There was a consistent increase in proportion of aberrations per cell with an increase in radiation dose. It was concluded that for an optimal level of chromosomal translocation and least number of acentric fragments, a 20 Gy dose was quite sufficient for inducing a desirable level of wheat-rye chromosomal translocations. The excellent efficiency and importance of utilizing FISH in such studies of alien-introgression via chromosomal translocations are discussed. (author)

  15. Synthesis and Study of Shape-Memory Polymers Selectively Induced by Near-Infrared Lights via In Situ Copolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyu Fang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shape-memory polymers (SMPs selectively induced by near-infrared lights of 980 or 808 nm were synthesized via free radical copolymerization. Methyl methacrylate (MMA monomer, ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA as a cross-linker, and organic complexes of Yb(TTA2AAPhen or Nd(TTA2AAPhen containing a reactive ligand of acrylic acid (AA were copolymerized in situ. The dispersion of the organic complexes in the copolymer matrix was highly improved, while the transparency of the copolymers was negligibly influenced in comparison with the pristine cross-linked PMMA. In addition, the thermal resistance of the copolymers was enhanced with the complex loading, while their glass transition temperature, cross-linking level, and mechanical properties were to some extent reduced. Yb(TTA2AAPhen and Nd(TTA2AAPhen provided the prepared copolymers with selective photothermal effects and shape-memory functions for 980 and 808 nm NIR lights, respectively. Finally, smart optical devices which exhibited localized transparency or diffraction evolution procedures were demonstrated based on the prepared copolymers, owing to the combination of good transparency and selective light wavelength responsivity.

  16. 3D Bioprinting Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Constructs for In Situ Cell Proliferation and Successive Multilineage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2017-09-01

    The ability to create 3D tissues from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is poised to revolutionize stem cell research and regenerative medicine, including individualized, patient-specific stem cell-based treatments. There are, however, few examples of tissue engineering using iPSCs. Their culture and differentiation is predominantly planar for monolayer cell support or induction of self-organizing embryoids (EBs) and organoids. Bioprinting iPSCs with advanced biomaterials promises to augment efforts to develop 3D tissues, ideally comprising direct-write printing of cells for encapsulation, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, such a method, employing a clinically amenable polysaccharide-based bioink, is described as the first example of bioprinting human iPSCs for in situ expansion and sequential differentiation. Specifically, we have extrusion printed the bioink including iPSCs, alginate (Al; 5% weight/volume [w/v]), carboxymethyl-chitosan (5% w/v), and agarose (Ag; 1.5% w/v), crosslinked the bioink in calcium chloride for a stable and porous construct, proliferated the iPSCs within the construct and differentiated the same iPSCs into either EBs comprising cells of three germ lineages-endoderm, ectoderm, and mesoderm, or more homogeneous neural tissues containing functional migrating neurons and neuroglia. This defined, scalable, and versatile platform is envisaged being useful in iPSC research and translation for pharmaceuticals development and regenerative medicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Radiation induced wheat-rye chromosomal translocations in triticale. Optimizing the dose using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, F. [Brandon Univ., Manitoba (Canada); Comeau, A.; Chen, Q.; Collin, J.; St-Pierre, C.A.

    2000-03-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was utilized to monitor the level of ionizing radiation ({sup 60}Co source) in their ability to cause intra- and intergeneric chromosomal aberrations in triticale seeds. Seeds were irradiated with 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy doses. The root growth of irradiated seeds was greatly inhibited at 200 Gy and above. Various types of aberrations including wheat-rye, wheat-wheat, rye-rye, wheat-rye-wheat, rye-wheat-rye translocations and acentric fragments with or without translocations were observed. There was a consistent increase in proportion of aberrations per cell with an increase in radiation dose. It was concluded that for an optimal level of chromosomal translocation and least number of acentric fragments, a 20 Gy dose was quite sufficient for inducing a desirable level of wheat-rye chromosomal translocations. The excellent efficiency and importance of utilizing FISH in such studies of alien-introgression via chromosomal translocations are discussed. (author)

  18. Self-consistent modelling of lattice strains during the in-situ tensile loading of twinning induced plasticity steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brown, Donald W.; Tomé, Carlos N.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of lattice strains in a fully recrystallised Fe–24Mn–3Al–2Si–1Ni–0.06C TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steel subjected to uniaxial tensile loading up to a true strain of ∼35% was investigated via in-situ neutron diffraction. Typical of fcc elastic and plastic anisotropy, the {111} and {200} grain families record the lowest and highest lattice strains, respectively. Using modelling cases with and without latent hardening, the recently extended Elasto-Plastic Self-Consistent model successfully predicted the macroscopic stress–strain response, the evolution of lattice strains and the development of crystallographic texture. Compared to the isotropic hardening case, latent hardening did not have a significant effect on lattice strains and returned a relatively faster development of a stronger 〈111〉 and a weaker 〈100〉 double fibre parallel to the tensile axis. Close correspondence between the experimental lattice strains and those predicted using particular orientations embedded within a random aggregate was obtained. The result suggests that the exact orientations of the surrounding aggregate have a weak influence on the lattice strain evolution

  19. In situ Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy as a tool to discriminate volcanic rocks and magmatic series, Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, C.P.M., E-mail: clement.roux@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Rakovský, J.; Musset, O. [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Monna, F. [Laboratoire ARTéHIS, UMR 6298 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon (France); Buoncristiani, J.-F.; Pellenard, P.; Thomazo, C. [Laboratoire Biogéosciences, UMR 6282 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon (France)

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the potentialities of a lab-made pLIBS (portable Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) to sort volcanic rocks belonging to various magmatic series. An in-situ chemical analysis of 19 atomic lines, including Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Si, Sr and Ti, from 21 sampled rocks was performed during a field exploration in Iceland. Iceland was chosen both for the various typologies of volcanic rocks and the rugged conditions in the field in order to test the sturdiness of the pLIPS. Elemental compositions were also measured using laboratory ICP-AES measurements on the same samples. Based on these latter results, which can be used to identify three different groups of volcanic rocks, a classification model was built in order to sort pLIBS data and to categorize unknown samples. Using a reliable statistical scheme applied to LIBS compositional data, the classification capability of the pLIBS system is clearly demonstrated (90–100% success rate). Although this prototype does not provide quantitative measurements, its use should be of particular interest for future geological field investigations. - Highlights: • Portable LIBS applied to field geology • Fast semi-quantitative geochemical analysis of volcanic rocks and magmatic series • Discriminant analysis and statistical treatments for LIBS compositional data.

  20. 3D characterization of coal strains induced by compression, carbon dioxide sorption, and desorption at in-situ stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pone, J. Denis N.; Halleck, Phillip M.; Mathews, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is an option to combat climate change and an opportunity to enhance coalbed methane production. Prediction of sequestration potential in coal requires characterization of porosity, permeability, sorption capacity and the magnitude of swelling due to carbon dioxide uptake or shrinkage due to methane and water loss. Unfortunately, the majority of data characterizing coal-gas systems have been obtained from powdered, unconfined coal samples. Little is known about confined coal behavior during carbon dioxide uptake and methane desorption. The present work focuses on the characterization of lithotype specific deformation, and strain behavior during CO 2 uptake at simulated in-situ stress conditions. It includes the evaluation of three-dimensional strain induced by the confining stress, the sorption, and the desorption of carbon dioxide. X-ray computed tomography allowed three-dimensional characterization of the bituminous coal deformation samples under hydrostatic stress. The application of 6.9 MPa of confining stress contributes an average of - 0.34% volumetric strain. Normal strains due to confining stress were - 0.08%, - 0.15% and - 0.11% along the x, y and z axes respectively. Gas injection pressure was 3.1 MPa and the excess sorption was 0.85 mmol/g. Confined coal exposed to CO 2 for 26 days displays an average volumetric expansion of 0.4%. Normal strains due to CO 2 sorption were 0.11%, 0.22% and 0.11% along x, y and z axes. Drainage of the CO 2 induced an average of - 0.33% volumetric shrinkage. Normal strains due to CO 2 desorption were - 0.23%, - 0.08% and - 0.02% along x, y and z axes. Alternating positive and negative strain values observed along the sample length during compression, sorption and desorption respectively emphasized that both localized compression/compaction and expansion of coal will occur during CO 2 sequestration. (author)

  1. Reduction in heat-induced gastrointestinal hyperpermeability in rats by bovine colostrum and goat milk powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, C; Stelwagen, K; Cummins, R; Guerin, P; Gill, N; Milne, C

    2004-02-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three dietary groups [standard diet (Cont; n = 8), standard diet plus bovine colostrum powder (BColost 1.7 g/kg; n = 8), or goat milk powder (GMilk 1.7 g/kg; n = 8)] to determine the ability of these supplements to reduce gastrointestinal hyperpermeability induced by heat. Raising core body temperature of rats to 41.5 degrees C increased transfer of (51)Cr-EDTA from gut into blood 34-fold relative to the ambient temperature value (P transferred into the blood of rats in either the BColost (27% of Cont) or GMilk group (10% of Cont) after heating, showing that prior supplementation with either bovine colostrum or goat milk powder significantly reduced the impact of heat stress on gastrointestinal permeability. The changes in the BColost group were not significantly different than those of the GMilk group. The potential mechanism of the protective effect of bovine colostrum and goat milk powders may involve modulation of tight junction permeability, because both powders were able to maintain transepithelial resistance in Madin Darby canine kidney cells challenged with EGTA compared with cells maintained in media only. The results show that bovine colostrum powder can partially alleviate the effects of hyperthermia on gastrointestinal permeability in the intact animal. Moreover, goat milk powder was equally as effective as bovine colostrum powder, and both may be of benefit in other situations where gastrointestinal barrier function is compromised.

  2. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...... degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock...

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 is essential for cisplatin-induced heat hyperalgesia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlton Susan M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is primarily used for treatment of ovarian and testicular cancer. Oxaliplatin is the only effective treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Both are known to cause dose related, cumulative toxic effects on the peripheral nervous system and thirty to forty percent of cancer patients receiving these agents experience painful peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms underlying painful platinum-induced neuropathy remain poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated important roles for TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1 in inflammation and nerve injury induced pain. Results In this study, using real-time, reverse transcriptase, polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1 induced by cisplatin or oxaliplatin in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro studies, cultured E15 rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons were treated for up to 48 hours with cisplatin or oxaliplatin. For in vivo studies, trigeminal ganglia (TG were isolated from mice treated with platinum drugs for three weeks. We show that cisplatin and oxaliplatin-treated DRG neurons had significantly increased in TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 mRNA expression. TG neurons from cisplatin treated mice had significant increases in TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression while oxaliplatin strongly induced only TRPA1. Furthermore, compared to the cisplatin-treated wild-type mice, cisplatin-treated TRPV1-null mice developed mechanical allodynia but did not exhibit enhancement of noxious heat- evoked pain responses. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that cisplatin-treated mice had no change in the proportion of the TRPV1 immunopositive TG neurons. Conclusion These results indicate that TRPV1 and TRPA1 could contribute to the development of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia following cisplatin-induced painful neuropathy but that TRPV1 has a crucial role in cisplatin-induced thermal hyperalgesia in vivo.

  4. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M; Rowe, John J

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 microg/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 μg/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  6. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n') gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC 2 -2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations

  7. Joule heating induced stream broadening in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debashis

    2018-03-01

    The use of an electric field in free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) automatically leads to Joule heating yielding a higher temperature at the center of the separation chamber relative to that around the channel walls. For small amounts of heat generated, this thermal effect introduces a variation in the equilibrium position of the analyte molecules due to the dependence of liquid viscosity and analyte diffusivity on temperature leading to a modification in the position of the analyte stream as well as the zone width. In this article, an analytic theory is presented to quantitate such effects of Joule heating on FFZE assays in the limit of small temperature differentials across the channel gap yielding a closed form expression for the stream position and zone variance under equilibrium conditions. A method-of-moments approach is employed to develop this analytic theory, which is further validated with numerical solutions of the governing equations. Interestingly, the noted analyses predict that Joule heating can drift the location of the analyte stream either way of its equilibrium position realized in the absence of any temperature rise in the system, and also tends to reduce zone dispersion. The extent of these modifications, however, is governed by the electric field induced temperature rise and three Péclet numbers evaluated based on the axial pressure-driven flow, transverse electroosmotic and electrophoretic solute velocities in the separation chamber. Monte Carlo simulations of the FFZE system further establish a time and a length scale over which the results from the analytic theory are valid. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Holmlid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0 give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0 of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at <1 mbar pressure is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  9. Radiofrequency heating and magnetically induced displacement of dental magnetic attachments during 3.0 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, K; Hasegawa, M; Abe, Y; Tabuchi, T; Namiki, T; Ishigami, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of injury from dental magnetic attachments due to their radiofrequency (RF) heating and magnetically induced displacement during 3.0 T MRI. Methods To examine the magnetic attachments, we adopted the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-02a and F2052-06 standards in two MRI systems (Achieva 3.0 T Nova Dual; Philips, Tokyo, Japan, and Signa HDxt 3.0 T; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). The temperature change was measured in a cylindrical keeper (GIGAUSS D600; GC, Tokyo, Japan) with coping of the casting alloy and a keeper with a dental implant at the maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) for 20 min. To measure the magnetically induced displacement force, three sizes of keepers (GIGAUSS D400, D600 and D1000) were used in deflection angle tests conducted at the point of the maximum magnetic field strength. Results Temperature elevations of both coping and implant were higher in the Signa system than in the Achieva system. The highest temperature changes in the keeper with implant and keeper with coping were 0.6 °C and 0.8 °C in the Signa system, respectively. The temperature increase did not exceed 1.0 °C at any location. The deflection angle (α) was not measurable because it exceeded 90°. GIGAUSS D400 required an extra 3.0 g load to constrain the deflection angle to less than 45°; GIGAUSS D600 and D1000 required 5.0 and 9.0 g loads, respectively. Conclusions Dental magnetic attachments pose no risk due to RF heating and magnetically induced displacement at 3.0 T MRI. However, it is necessary to confirm that these keepers are securely attached to the prosthesis before imaging. PMID:22499128

  10. 14-3-3σ induces heat shock protein 70 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chia-Chia; Wang, John; Shyue, Song-Kun; Sung, Li-Ying; Liou, Jun-Yang; Jan, Yee-Jee; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Wu, Yao-Ming; Liang, Shu-Man; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Lee, Yen-Ming; Liu, Tzu-An; Chang, Tzu-Ching

    2014-01-01

    14-3-3σ is implicated in promoting tumor development of various malignancies. However, the clinical relevance of 14-3-3σ in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor progression and modulation and pathway elucidation remain unclear. We investigated 14-3-3σ expression in 109 HCC tissues by immunohistochemistry. Overexpression and knockdown experiments were performed by transfection with cDNA or siRNA. Protein expression and cell migration were determined by Western blot and Boyden chamber assay. In this study, we found that 14-3-3σ is abundantly expressed in HCC tumors. Stable or transient overexpression of 14-3-3σ induces the expression of heat shock factor-1α (HSF-1α) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in HCC cells. Moreover, expression of 14-3-3σ significantly correlates with HSF-1α/HSP70 in HCC tumors and both 14-3-3σ and HSP70 overexpression are associated with micro-vascular thrombi in HCC patients, suggesting that 14-3-3σ/HSP70 expression is potentially involved in cell migration/invasion. Results of an in vitro migration assay indicate that 14-3-3σ promotes cell migration and that 14-3-3σ-induced cell migration is impaired by siRNA knockdown of HSP70. Finally, 14-3-3σ-induced HSF-1α/HSP70 expression is abolished by the knockdown of β-catenin or activation of GSK-3β. Our findings indicate that 14-3-3σ participates in promoting HCC cell migration and tumor development via β-catenin/HSF-1α/HSP70 pathway regulation. Thus, 14-3-3σ alone or combined with HSP70 are potential prognostic biomarkers for HCC

  11. Stress-induced martensitic transformations in a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Gemperlová, Juliana; Gärtnerová, Viera; Gemperle, Antonín

    481-482, č. 5 (2008), s. 457-461 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/2016; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : in situ TEM straining * CuAlNi shape memory alloy * stress -induced formation of martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  12. Resveratrol induces antioxidant and heat shock protein mRNA expression in response to heat stress in black-boned chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L L; He, J H; Xie, H B; Yang, Y S; Li, J C; Zou, Y

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary resveratrol at 0, 200, 400, or 600 mg/kg of diet on the performance, immune organ growth index, serum parameters, and expression levels of heat shock protein (Hsp) 27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, and spleen of 42-d-old female black-boned chickens exposed to heat stress at 37 ± 2°C for 15 d. The results showed that heat stress reduced daily feed intake and BW gain; decreased serum glutathione (GSH), growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels; and inhibited GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities compared with birds subjected to thermo-neutral circumstances. Chickens that were fed diets supplemented with resveratrol exhibited a linear increase in feed intake and BW gain (P stress. In contrast, serum malonaldehyde concentrations were decreased (P stress also reduced (P stress and coincided with an increase in supplemental resveratrol levels. The expression of Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in the bursa of Fabricius and spleen were increased (P stress compared with no heat stress. Resveratrol attenuated the heat stress-induced overexpression of Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in the bursa of Fabricius and spleen and increased the low expression of Hsp27 and Hsp90 mRNA in thymus upon heat stress. The results suggest that supplemental resveratrol improves growth performance and reduces oxidative stress in heat-stressed black-boned chickens by increasing serum growth hormone concentrations and modulating the expression of heat shock genes in organs of the immune system.

  13. Planetary-scale circulations in the presence of climatological and wave-induced heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salby, Murry L; Garcia, Rolando R.; Hendon, Harry H.

    1994-01-01

    Interaction between the large-scale circulation and the convective pattern is investigated in a coupled system governed by the linearized primitive equations. Convection is represented in terms of two components of heating: A 'climatological component' is prescribed stochastically to represent convection that is maintained by fixed distributions of land and sea and sea surface temperature (SST). An 'induced component' is defined in terms of the column-integrated moisture flux convergence to represent convection that is produced through feedback with the circulation. Each component describes the envelope organizing mesoscale convective activity. As SST on the equator is increased, induced heating amplifies in the gravest zonal wavenumbers at eastward frequencies, where positive feedback offsets dissipation. Under barotropic stratification, a critical SST of 29.5 C results in positive feedback exactly cancelling dissipation in wavenumber 1 for an eastward phase speed of 6 m/s. Sympathetic interaction between the circulation and the induced heating is the basis for 'frictional wave-Conditional Instability of the Second Kind (CISK)', which is distinguished from classical wave-CISK by rendering the gravest zonal dimensions most unstable. Under baroclinic stratification, the coupled system exhibits similar behavior. The critical SST is only 26.5 C for conditions representative of equinox, but in excess of 30 C for conditions representative of solstice. Having the form of an unsteady Walker circulation, the disturbance produced by frictional wave-CISK compares favorably with the observed life cycle of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). SST above the critical value produces an amplifying disturbance in which enhanced convection coincides with upper-tropospheric westerlies and is positively correlated with temperature and surface convergence. Conversely, SST below the critical value produces a decaying disturbance in which enhanced convection coincides with upper

  14. PCB-induced changes of a benthic community and expected ecosystem recovery following in situ sorbent amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Elisabeth M.-L.; Thompson, Janet K.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Luthy, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    The benthic community was analyzed to evaluate pollution-induced changes for the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated site at Hunters Point (HP) relative to 30 reference sites in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. An analysis based on functional traits of feeding, reproduction, and position in the sediment shows that HP is depauperate in deposit feeders, subsurface carnivores, and species with no protective barrier. Sediment chemistry analysis shows that PCBs are the major risk drivers at HP (1,570 ppb) and that the reference sites contain very low levels of PCB contamination (9 ppb). Different feeding traits support the existence of direct pathways of exposure, which can be mechanistically linked to PCB bioaccumulation by biodynamic modeling. The model shows that the deposit feeder Neanthes arenaceodentata accumulates approximately 20 times more PCBs in its lipids than the facultative deposit feeder Macoma balthica and up to 130 times more than the filter feeder Mytilus edulis. The comparison of different exposure scenarios suggests that PCB tissue concentrations at HP are two orders of magnitude higher than at the reference sites. At full scale, in situ sorbent amendment with activated carbon may reduce PCB bioaccumulation at HP by up to 85 to 90% under favorable field and treatment conditions. The modeling framework further demonstrates that such expected remedial success corresponds to exposure conditions suggested as the cleanup goal for HP. However, concentrations remain slightly higher than at the reference sites. The present study demonstrates how the remedial success of a sorbent amendment, which lowers the PCB availability, can be compared to reference conditions and traditional cleanup goals, which are commonly based on bulk sediment concentrations.

  15. In situ observation of ultrasonic cavitation-induced fragmentation of the primary crystals formed in Al alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry; Mi, Jiawei; Connolley, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The cavitation-induced fragmentation of primary crystals formed in Al alloys were investigated for the first time by high-speed imaging using a novel experimental approach. Three representative primary crystal types, Al 3 Ti, Si and Al 3 V with different morphologies and mechanical properties were first extracted by deep etching of the corresponding Al alloys and then subjected to ultrasonic cavitation processing in distilled water. The dynamic interaction between the cavitation bubbles and primary crystals was imaged in situ and in real time. Based on the recorded image sequences, the fragmentation mechanisms of primary crystals were studied. It was found that there are three major mechanisms by which the primary crystals were fragmented by cavitation bubbles. The first one was a slow process via fatigue-type failure. A cyclic pressure exerted by stationary pulsating bubbles caused the propagation of a crack pre-existing in the primary crystal to a critical length which led to fragmentation. The second mechanism was a sudden process due to the collapse of bubbles in a passing cavitation cloud. The pressure produced upon the collapse of the cloud promoted rapid monotonic crack growth and fast fracture in the primary crystals. The third observed mechanism was normal bending fracture as a result of the high pressure arising from the collapse of a bubble cloud and the crack formation at the branch connection points of dendritic primary crystals. The fragmentation of dendrite branches due to the interaction between two freely moving dendritic primary crystals was also observed. A simplified fracture analysis of the observed phenomena was performed. The specific fragmentation mechanism for the primary crystals depended on their morphology and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of an ylide intermediate in the electrochemically-induced Stevens rearrangement of an ammonium salt by in situ UV–vis spectroelectrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capobianco, Amedeo; Caruso, Tonino; Palombi, Laura; Peluso, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanistic insights of the electro-induced Stevens rearrangement are provided. ► The reduction of PhCOCH 2 N + (CH 3 ) 2 CH 2 Ph is ascribed to a one-electron transfer process. ► An electrogenerated ammonium ylide has been detected by UV-spectroelectrochemistry. -- Abstract: The electrochemically-induced Stevens rearrangement of 2-(benzyldimethyl)ammonium acetophenone has been investigated by in situ UV–vis spectroelectrochemistry. Voltammetric analysis and absorption spectra recorded during the potentiostatic reduction indicate that the reaction proceeds via a one-electron transfer with a Platinum cathode and generation of an ammonium ylide intermediate

  17. Investigation of the growth and in situ heating transmission electron microscopy analysis of Ag2S-catalyzed ZnS nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Jong Gu; Song, Junghyun; Bae, Tae-Sung; Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak; Pang, Yoonsoo; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Chung, Hee-Suk

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the semiconductor-catalyzed formation of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) - silver sulfide (Ag2S)-catalyzed zinc sulfide (ZnS) NWs - based on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism through metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with a Ag thin film. The Ag2S-catalyzed ZnS NWs were confirmed to have a wurtzite structure with a width and length in the range of ∼30 nm to ∼80 nm and ∼1 μm, respectively. Using extensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses from plane and cross-sectional viewpoints, the ZnS NWs were determined to have a c-axis, [0001] growth direction. In addition, the catalyst at the top of the ZnS NWs was determined to consist of a Ag2S phase. To support the Ag2S-catalyzed growth of the ZnS NWs by a VLS reaction, an in situ heating TEM experiment was conducted from room temperature to 840 °C. During the experiment, the melting of the Ag2S catalyst in the direction of the ZnS NWs was first observed at approximately 480 °C along with the formation of a carbon (C) shell. Subsequently, the Ag2S catalyst melted completely into the ZnS NWs at approximately 825 °C. As the temperature further increased, the Ag2S and ZnS NWs continuously melted and vaporized up to 840 °C, leaving only the C shell behind. Finally, a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the structural and chemical investigations.

  18. Exposure to contaminated sediments induces alterations in the gill epithelia in juvenile Solea senegalensis: a comparative in situ and ex situ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Martins

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The loss of biodiversity in aquatic ecosystems is a major problem for society, with very significant ecological and economic deleterious effects. Estuaries, as the Sado Estuary (SW Portugal, are fragile ecosystems always associated to multiple anthropogenic stressors, such as heavy industry, shipping and agricultural activities, which can affect biodiversity and, therefore, environmental health, as well as the local economy, through its impact on fisheries. In the Sado Estuary there are many important commercial fish species that support a significant part of the local communities. As such, fish population are continuously exposed to pollutants that can have repercussions in the animals’ physiology and survival. This estuary is characterized by its multiple sources of toxicants, which is reflected onto a complex pattern of sediment contamination. In order to evaluate the physiological effects onto an important commercial species in the Sado Estuary, juvenile Solea senegalensis were subjected to a series of in and ex situ sediment-based bioassays, since this flatfish, being benthic, is particularly exposed to sediment-bound pollutants. Histological alterations in gill epithelia were taken as the main endpoint, since this is the main apical entry organ of toxicants. Sediment contaminants, mostly adsorbed to fine particles and organic matter, namely organochlorides, PAHs and same metals, presented a relation with alterations in gill epithelia. Even though no significant gross histopathological lesions were found, the animals exposed to sediments from the most polluted sites presented physiological alterations, when compared to those exposed to sediments from a reference site. These alterations were particularly related to the number of mucous cells and hypertrophied chloride cells per interlamellar space. These changes imply physiological hampering of normal gill functions and, therefore, affect the health status of animals exposed to

  19. 3D characterization of coal strains induced by compression, carbon dioxide sorption, and desorption at in-situ stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pone, J. Denis N.; Halleck, Phillip M.; Mathews, Jonathan P. [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering and The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is an option to combat climate change and an opportunity to enhance coalbed methane production. Prediction of sequestration potential in coal requires characterization of porosity, permeability, sorption capacity and the magnitude of swelling due to carbon dioxide uptake or shrinkage due to methane and water loss. Unfortunately, the majority of data characterizing coal-gas systems have been obtained from powdered, unconfined coal samples. Little is known about confined coal behavior during carbon dioxide uptake and methane desorption. The present work focuses on the characterization of lithotype specific deformation, and strain behavior during CO{sub 2} uptake at simulated in-situ stress conditions. It includes the evaluation of three-dimensional strain induced by the confining stress, the sorption, and the desorption of carbon dioxide. X-ray computed tomography allowed three-dimensional characterization of the bituminous coal deformation samples under hydrostatic stress. The application of 6.9 MPa of confining stress contributes an average of - 0.34% volumetric strain. Normal strains due to confining stress were - 0.08%, - 0.15% and - 0.11% along the x, y and z axes respectively. Gas injection pressure was 3.1 MPa and the excess sorption was 0.85 mmol/g. Confined coal exposed to CO{sub 2} for 26 days displays an average volumetric expansion of 0.4%. Normal strains due to CO{sub 2} sorption were 0.11%, 0.22% and 0.11% along x, y and z axes. Drainage of the CO{sub 2} induced an average of - 0.33% volumetric shrinkage. Normal strains due to CO{sub 2} desorption were - 0.23%, - 0.08% and - 0.02% along x, y and z axes. Alternating positive and negative strain values observed along the sample length during compression, sorption and desorption respectively emphasized that both localized compression/compaction and expansion of coal will occur during CO{sub 2} sequestration. (author)

  20. The Vibration Analysis of Tube Bundles Induced by Fluid Elastic Excitation in Shell Side of Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Minle; Wang, Lu; Li, Wenyao; Gao, Tianze

    2017-09-01

    Fluid elastic excitation in shell side of heat exchanger was deduced theoretically in this paper. Model foundation was completed by using Pro / Engineer software. The finite element model was constructed and imported into the FLUENT module. The flow field simulation adopted the dynamic mesh model, RNG k-ε model and no-slip boundary conditions. Analysing different positions vibration of tube bundles by selecting three regions in shell side of heat exchanger. The results show that heat exchanger tube bundles at the inlet of the shell side are more likely to be failure due to fluid induced vibration.

  1. Study of the effect induced by heating and irradiation stress on Salmonella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazouani, Sarra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of exposure to a temperature of 55 degree for 30 min and to 2 kGy gamma irradiation dose (100 Gy/min) on the viability and gene expression of Salmonella. Our results indicate that the exposure to heat and irradiation showed levels of stress vary from one type of stress to another, a different serovars and even there is variability within the same serovars of different origins and isolation. They were able to induce a decrease in viability. The analysis of the differential expression of 16S rRNA genes by RT-PCR after exposure to stress showed that the level of mRNA expression of 16S rRNA is unstable during the exhibition, and may not be used as reference gene for the analysis of differential expression of genes of Salmonella.

  2. Numerical study on flow induced vibration characteristics of heat transfer tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhipeng; Zang Fenggang; Zhang Yixiong

    2014-01-01

    The model presents a fully coupled approach with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model were solved by the finite volume approach and the heat transfer structure was solved by finite element method combined with moving mesh control technique. The dynamic equilibrium equation was discretized according to the finite element theory and the mesh update was achieved by the dynamic mesh technology. Based on this model, flow induced vibration responses of the tube were thus investigated using response branch, phase angle, Lissajou diagram, trajectory, phase portrait and Poincare section mapping. Meanwhile, the limit cycle and bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement were analyzed. The results reveal that a quasi-upper branch is found in the fluid-structure interaction system, and there is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow. (authors)

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 regulates heat and cold pain sensitivity and persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanngiesser, Maike; Mair, Norbert; Lim, Hee-Young; Zschiebsch, Katja; Blees, Johanna; Häussler, Annett; Brüne, Bernhard; Ferreiròs, Nerea; Kress, Michaela; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2014-06-01

    The present study assessed the functions of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in sensory neurons in models of acute, inflammatory, ischemic, and neuropathic pain. The alpha subunit, HIF1α, was specifically deleted in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia by mating HIF1α(fl/fl) mice with SNScre mice. SNS-HIF1α(-/-) mice were more sensitive to noxious heat and cold pain stimulation than were HIF1α(fl/fl) control mice. They also showed heightened first-phase nociceptive responses in the formalin and capsaicin tests with increased numbers of cFos-positive neurons in the dorsal horn, and intensified hyperalgesia in early phases after paw inflammation and hind limb ischemia/reperfusion. The behavioral cold and heat pain hypersensitivity was explained by increased calcium fluxes after transient receptor potential channel activation in primary sensory neurons of SNS-HIF1α(-/-) mice and lowered electrical activation thresholds of sensory fibers. SNS-HIF1α(-/-) mice however, developed less neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve injury, which was associated with an abrogation of HIF1-mediated gene up-regulation. The results suggest that HIF1α is protective in terms of acute heat and cold pain but in case of ongoing activation in injured neurons, it may promote the development of neuropathic pain. The duality of HIF1 in pain regulation may have an impact on the side effects of drugs targeting HIF1, which are being developed, for example, as anticancer agents. Specifically, in patients with cancer neuropathy, however, temporary HIF1 inhibition might provide a welcome combination of growth and pain reduction.

  4. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on experimentally induced heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaksen, Per M; Vasylenko, Olena; Fagerlund, Asbjørn J

    2014-06-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulatory technique that can affect human pain perception. Placebo effects are present in most treatments and could therefore also interact with treatment effects in tDCS. The present study investigated whether short-term tDCS reduced heat pain intensity, stress, blood pressure and increased heat pain thresholds in healthy volunteers when controlling for placebo effects. Seventy-five (37 females) participants were randomized into three groups: (1) active tDCS group receiving anodal tDCS (2 mA) for 7 min to the primary motor cortex (M1), (2) placebo group receiving the tDCS electrode montage but only active tDCS stimulation for 30 s and (3) natural history group that got no tDCS montage but the same pain stimulation as the active tDCS and the placebo group. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode attached to the left forearm. Pain intensity was significantly lower in the active tDCS group when examining change scores (pretest-posttest) for the 47 °C condition. The placebo group displayed lower pain compared with the natural history group, displaying a significant placebo effect. In the 43 and 45 °C conditions, the effect of tDCS could not be separated from placebo effects. The results revealed no effects on pain thresholds. There was a tendency that active tDCS reduced stress and systolic blood pressure, however, not significant. In sum, tDCS had an analgesic effect on high-intensity pain, but the effect of tDCS could not be separated from placebo effects for medium and low pain.

  5. Cellular stress induces cancer stem-like cells through expression of DNAJB8 by activation of heat shock factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, Hiroki; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Nishizawa, Satoshi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Yasuda, Kazuyo; Murai, Aiko; Takaya, Akari; Mori, Takashi; Kubo, Terufumi; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Kondo, Toru; Sato, Noriyuki; Hara, Isao; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study, we found that DNAJB8, a heat shock protein (HSP) 40 family member is expressed in kidney cancer stem-like cells (CSC)/cancer-initiating cells (CIC) and that it has a role in the maintenance of kidney CSC/CIC. Heat shock factor (HSF) 1 is a key transcription factor for responses to stress including heat shock, and it induces HSP family expression through activation by phosphorylation. In the present study, we therefore examined whether heat shock (HS) induces CSC/CIC. We treated the human kidney cancer cell line ACHN with HS, and found that HS increased side population (SP) cells. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR showed that HS increased the expression of DNAJB8 and SOX2. Gene knockdown experiments using siRNAs showed that the increase in SOX2 expression and SP cell ratio depends on DNAJB8 and that the increase in DNAJB8 and SOX2 depend on HSF1. Furthermore, treatment with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, temsirolimus, decreased the expression of DNAJB8 and SOX2 and the ratio of SP cells. Taken together, the results indicate that heat shock induces DNAJB8 by activation of HSF1 and induces cancer stem-like cells. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain.

  7. Small heat shock proteins protect against α-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2006-01-01

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). α-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are ∼2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by ∼80% in a culture model while αB-crystallin reduces toxicity by ∼20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model

  8. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  9. Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 Ameliorates Ultraviolet-Induced Photokeratitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Horie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ultraviolet (UV B exposure causes photokeratitis and induces apoptosis in corneal cells. Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA is an acyclic polyisoprenoid that induces expression of heat shock protein (HSP70, a soluble intracellular chaperone protein expressed in various tissues, protecting cells against stress conditions. We examined whether induction of HSP70 has therapeutic effects on UV-photokeratitis in mice. C57 BL/6 mice were divided into four groups, GGA-treated (500 mg/kg/mouse and UVB-exposed (400 mJ/cm2, GGA-untreated UVB-exposed (400 mJ/cm2, GGA-treated (500 mg/kg/mouse but not exposed and naive controls. Eyeballs were collected 24 h after irradiation, and corneas were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL. HSP70, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and protein kinase B (Akt expression were also evaluated. Irradiated corneal epithelium was significantly thicker in the eyes of mice treated with GGA compared with those given the vehicle alone (p < 0.01. Significantly fewer TUNEL-positive cells were observed in the eyes of GGA-treated mice than controls after irradiation (p < 0.01. Corneal HSP70 levels were significantly elevated in corneas of mice treated with GGA (p < 0.05. ROS signal was not affected by GGA. NF-κB activation was reduced but phospho-(Ser/Ther Akt substrate expression was increased in corneas after irradiation when treated with GGA. GGA-treatment induced HSP70 expression and ameliorated UV-induced corneal damage through the reduced NF-κB activation and possibly increased Akt phosphorilation.

  10. Heat induced fracturing of rock in an existing uniaxial stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.; Stephansson, O.; Bjarnason, B.; Hakami, H.; Herdocia, A.; Mattila, U.; Singh, U.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated under the premise that it may be possible to determine the state of stress in the earth's crust by heat induced fracturing of the rock surrounding a borehole. The theory involved is superficially simple, involving the superposition of the stress field around a borehole due to the existing virgin stresses and the uniform stress field of thermally loaded rock as induced by a heater. Since the heat stress field is uniform, varying only in magnitude and gradient as a function of heater input, fracturing should be controlled by the non-uniform virgin stress field. To determine if the method was, in fact, feasible, a series of laboratory test were conducted. These tests consisted of physically loading center drilled cubes of rock, 0.3 m on a side, uniaxially from 0 to 25 MPa. The blocks were then thermally loaded with a nominally rated 3.7 kW heater until failure occurred. Results from these laboratory tests were then compared to analytical studies of the problem, i.e., finite element and discrete theoretical analysis. Overall, results were such that the method is likely eliminated as a stress measurement technique. The immediate development of a thermal compressive zone on the borehole wall overlaps the tensile zone created by the uniaxial stress field, forcing the failure is thus controlled largely by the power input of the heater, being retarded by the small compressive stresses genrated by the uniaxial stress field. This small retardation effect is of such low magnitude that the retardation effect is of such low magnitude that the fracture time is relatively insensitive to the local virgin stress field. (authors)

  11. An alternatively spliced heat shock transcription factor, OsHSFA2dI, functions in the heat stress-induced unfolded protein response in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q; Zhou, Y; Liu, Z; Zhang, L; Song, G; Guo, Z; Wang, W; Qu, X; Zhu, Y; Yang, D

    2015-03-01

    As sessile organisms, plants have evolved a wide range of defence pathways to cope with environmental stress such as heat shock. However, the molecular mechanism of these defence pathways remains unclear in rice. In this study, we found that OsHSFA2d, a heat shock transcriptional factor, encodes two main splice variant proteins, OsHSFA2dI and OsHSFA2dII in rice. Under normal conditions, OsHSFA2dII is the dominant but transcriptionally inactive spliced form. However, when the plant suffers heat stress, OsHSFA2d is alternatively spliced into a transcriptionally active form, OsHSFA2dI, which participates in the heat stress response (HSR). Further study found that this alternative splicing was induced by heat shock rather than photoperiod. We found that OsHSFA2dI is localised to the nucleus, whereas OsHSFA2dII is localised to the nucleus and cytoplasm. Moreover, expression of the unfolded protein response (UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE) sensors, OsIRE1, OsbZIP39/OsbZIP60 and the UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE marker OsBiP1, was up-regulated. Interestingly, OsbZIP50 was also alternatively spliced under heat stress, indicating that UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE signalling pathways were activated by heat stress to re-establish cellular protein homeostasis. We further demonstrated that OsHSFA2dI participated in the unfolded protein response by regulating expression of OsBiP1. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  13. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Downs

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex, usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2 s(-1 PAR at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  14. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ~25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and the

  15. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, B B; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ∼25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and

  16. Role of peroxynitrite in the responses induced by heat stress in tobacco BY-2 cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2018-07-01

    Temperatures above the optimum are sensed as heat stress (HS) by all living organisms and represent one of the major environmental challenges for plants. Plants can cope with HS by activating specific defense mechanisms to minimize damage and ensure cellular functionality. One of the most common effects of HS is the overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). The role of ROS and RNS in the regulation of many plant physiological processes is well established. On the contrary, in plants very little is known about the physiological role of peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), the RNS species generated by the interaction between NO and O 2 - . In this work, the role of ONOO - on some of the stress responses induced by HS in tobacco BY-2 cultured cells has been investigated by measuring these responses both in the presence and in the absence of 2,6,8-trihydroxypurine (urate), a specific scavenger of ONOO - . The obtained results suggest a potential role for ONOO - in some of the responses induced by HS in tobacco cultured cells. In particular, ONOO - seems implicated in a form of cell death showing apoptotic features and in the regulation of the levels of proteins involved in the response to stress.

  17. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, attenuates thioacetamide induced liver fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Elsaad, Nashwa M; Serrya, Marwa S; El-Karef, Amr M; Ibrahim, Tarek M

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is proposed to be involved in liver disorders. This study was conducted to test effect of 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on attenuating thioacetamide induced liver fibrosis in vivo. Four groups of Swiss albino male mice (CD-1 strain) were used as follows: control group; thioacetamide group (received 100mg/kg thioacetamide, ip injection, 3 times/week for 8 weeks); thioacetamide plus 17-AAG groups (received 100mg/kg thioacetamide, ip injection, 3 times/week for 8 weeks plus 25 or 50mg/kg 17-AAG, ip injection, 5 days/week along the last 4 weeks). Fibrosis was quantified by measuring hydroxyproline level and by morphometry and oxidative stress biomarkers were assigned. Relative hepatic mRNA expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen-1-alpha-1 (Col1A1) and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Levels of the apoptotic markers caspase-3, factor related apoptosis (Fas) and Hsp-90 were assigned in tissue homogenate. 17-AAG (50mg/kg) significantly decreased fibrosis percentage significantly (pAAG (50mg/kg) compared to other groups. The Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, can attenuate thioacetamide hepatotoxicity through oxidative stress counterbalance, reducing stellate cells activity and inducing apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Topography induced spatial variations in diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Tol, C.; Dolman, A. J.; Waterloo, M. J.; Raspor, K.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study is to explain topography induced spatial variations in the diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest. Spatial variations of the fluxes are caused by variations in weather conditions and in vegetation characteristics. Weather conditions reflect short-term effects of climate, whereas vegetation characteristics, through adaptation and acclimation, long-term effects of climate. In this study measurements of plant physiology and weather conditions are used to explain observed differences in the fluxes. A model is used to study which part of the differences in the fluxes is caused by weather conditions and which part by vegetation characteristics. Data were collected at four experimental sub-Mediterranean deciduous forest plots in a heterogeneous terrain with contrasting aspect, soil water availability, humidity and temperature. We used a sun-shade model to scale fluxes from leaf to canopy, and calculated the canopy energy balance. Parameter values were derived from measurements of light interception, leaf chamber photosynthesis, leaf nitrogen content and 13C isotope discrimination in leaf material. Leaf nitrogen content is a measure of photosynthetic capacity, and 13C isotope discrimination of water use efficiency. For validation, sap-flux based measurements of transpiration were used. The model predicted diurnal cycles of transpiration and stomatal conductance, both their magnitudes and differences in afternoon stomatal closure between slopes of different aspect within the confidence interval of the validation data. Weather conditions mainly responsible for the shape of the diurnal cycles, and vegetation parameters for the magnitude of the fluxes. Although the data do not allow for a quantification of the two effects, the differences in vegetation parameters and weather among the plots and the sensitivity of the fluxes to them suggest that the diurnal cycles were more strongly affected by spatial variations in

  19. Topography induced spatial variations in diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Tol

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explain topography induced spatial variations in the diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest. Spatial variations of the fluxes are caused by variations in weather conditions and in vegetation characteristics. Weather conditions reflect short-term effects of climate, whereas vegetation characteristics, through adaptation and acclimation, long-term effects of climate. In this study measurements of plant physiology and weather conditions are used to explain observed differences in the fluxes. A model is used to study which part of the differences in the fluxes is caused by weather conditions and which part by vegetation characteristics. Data were collected at four experimental sub-Mediterranean deciduous forest plots in a heterogeneous terrain with contrasting aspect, soil water availability, humidity and temperature. We used a sun-shade model to scale fluxes from leaf to canopy, and calculated the canopy energy balance. Parameter values were derived from measurements of light interception, leaf chamber photosynthesis, leaf nitrogen content and 13C isotope discrimination in leaf material. Leaf nitrogen content is a measure of photosynthetic capacity, and 13C isotope discrimination of water use efficiency. For validation, sap-flux based measurements of transpiration were used. The model predicted diurnal cycles of transpiration and stomatal conductance, both their magnitudes and differences in afternoon stomatal closure between slopes of different aspect within the confidence interval of the validation data. Weather conditions mainly responsible for the shape of the diurnal cycles, and vegetation parameters for the magnitude of the fluxes. Although the data do not allow for a quantification of the two effects, the differences in vegetation parameters and weather among the plots and the sensitivity of the fluxes to them suggest that the diurnal cycles were more strongly affected by spatial

  20. Effect of a Traditional Herbal Prescription, Kyung-Ok-Ko, on Male Mouse Spermatogenic Ability after Heat-Induced Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deok-Sang Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kyung-Ok-Ko (KOK, a well-known traditional Korean medicinal formula, has long been used to invigorate the essential qi. This use of KOK may be associated with reproductive ability as a more modern concept. The protective effect of KOK was evaluated against deterioration of testicular function induced by heat exposure in male mice. Male fertility was disrupted by scrotal heat stress at 43°C for 5 weeks. KOK (0.25, 0.50, and 2.00 g/kg/day was administered orally at 3 h after the stress. To evaluate the protective effect of KOK, body weight, testicular weight, sperm count, sperm motility, and histopathological changes in the testes were evaluated. KOK-treated mice significantly recovered their general health, as evidenced by body weight. KOK-treated mice also showed significantly higher testes weights, sperm counts, and sperm motility than did the heat stress group. KOK-treated mice significantly recovered the morphological appearance of the seminiferous tubules and seminiferous epithelium. Furthermore, KOK-treated mice significantly increased antioxidant enzyme activities and reduced the protein expressions of apoptosis in the testes. KOK significantly protects against heat-induced damage to testicular function in male mice by inhibiting oxidative stress and apoptosis, indicating that KOK may be an effective agent for treatment of heat-induced male infertility.

  1. Psychosocial Stress-Induced Analgesia: An Examination of Effects on Heat Pain Threshold and Tolerance and of Neuroendocrine Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaab, Jens; Jiménez, Julia; Voneschen, Livia; Oschwald, Daniel; Meyer, Andrea H; Nater, Urs M; Krummenacher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced analgesia (SIA) is an adaptive response of reduced nociception following demanding acute internal and external stressors. Although a psychobiological understanding of this phenomenon is of importance for stress-related psychiatric and pain conditions, comparably little is known about the psychobiological mechanisms of SIA in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on heat pain perception and its possible neuroendocrine mediation by salivary cortisol levels and α-amylase activity in healthy men. Employing an intra-individual assessment of heat pain parameters, acute psychosocial stress did not influence heat pain threshold but significantly, albeit slightly, increased heat pain tolerance. Using linear mixed-model analysis, this effect of psychosocial stress on heat pain tolerance was not mediated by increases of salivary cortisol and state anxiety levels or by the activity of α-amylase. These results show that while psychosocial stress is selectively analgesic for heat pain tolerance, this observed effect is not mediated by stress-induced increases of salivary cortisol and α-amylase activity, as proxies of both the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and the autonomic nervous system activation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. TCNQ-induced in-situ electrochemical deposition for the synthesis of silver nanodendrites as efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhengyan; Li, Congling; Ni, Yangyang; Kong, Fantao; Zhang, Yongbo; Kong, Aiguo; Shan, Yongkui

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Silver nanodendrites with superior electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen peroxide detection were synthesized by electrodeposition method using organic semiconductor 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as the inducer. - Highlights: • AgNDs were obtained by electrodepositing route under the induction of TCNQ. • The AgNDs-TCNQ/GCE showed superior activity comparable to Pt/C for ORR. • The AgNDs-TCNQ/GCE exhibited highly catalytic activity toward H_2O_2 detection. • A novel pathway for synthesizing bifunctional Ag-based electrocatalyst. - Abstract: Sliver (Ag) nanodendrites (AgNDs) directly growing on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were obtained by an in-situ electrodepositing route under the induction of organic semiconductor 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The morphology of the Ag nanostructures can be controlled by the electrodepositing time, applied potentials, and the concentrations of Ag ions. The AgNDs/TCNQ/GCE obtained at the optimized conditions displays the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) onset potential of 0.98 V, which is the same as that over Pt/C-JM catalyst (0.98 V). It demonstrated that AgNDs possessed the highest electrocatalytic activity for ORR among the various Ag-based electrocatalysts reported in literature in alkaline electrolyte. At the same time, the performance of AgNDs/TCNQ/GCE toward hydrogen peroxide detection was investigated in a range of the concentration from 10 μM to 17 mM. It also showed the higher catalytic activity for hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction with the hydrogen peroxide detection limit reaching 0.47 μM level. The Tafel polarization curve, electrochemically active surface area, and the electrochemical impedance were measured to understand and explore the catalytic behavior of the prepared AgNDs/TCNQ/GCE. The enhanced performance of AgNDs for ORR and hydrogen peroxide detection can be ascribed to the special tree-like morphology with highly

  3. Geothermal in situ experiments in the Asse salt-mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopietz, J.; Jung, R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents design and results of in situ experiments carried out by the Bundesanstat fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, F.R. of Germany) in the Asse salt-mine. With reference to model calculations of the temperature field which is produced in salt formations by radioactive waste, temperature measurements in the area of electrical heating elements and in situ measurements of thermal conductivity have been performed. The measured temperatures are in good accordance with the theoretical prediction. Preliminary results of the thermal conductivity measurements correspond with the data of single NaCl crystals published by Birch and Clark. At present a heating experiment is being conducted in the Asse mine to investigate thermo-mechanical effects of a cylindrical heat source upon the surrounding rock salt. Possible thermal induced fractures monitored by permeability changes and seismoacoustical phenomena are the main objects of this experiment

  4. In-situ kinetics of modifications induced by swift heavy ions in Al2O3: Colour centre formation, structural modification and amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygiel, C.; Moisy, F.; Sall, M.; Lebius, H.; Balanzat, E.; Madi, T.; Been, T.; Marie, D.; Monnet, I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper details in-situ studies of modifications induced by swift heavy ion irradiation in α-Al2O3. This complex behaviour is intermediary between the behaviour of amorphizable and non-amorphizable materials, respectively. A unique combination of irradiation experiments was performed at the IRRSUD beam line of the GANIL facility, with three different characterisation techniques: in-situ UV–Vis absorption, in-situ grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction and ex-situ transmission electron microscopy. This allows a complete study of point defects, and by depth profile of structural and microstructural modifications created on the trajectory of the incident ion. The α-Al2O3 crystals have been irradiated by 92 MeV Xenon and 74 MeV Krypton ions, the irradiation conditions have been chosen rather similar with an energy range where the ratio between electronic and nuclear stopping power changes dramatically as function of depth penetration. The main contribution of electronic excitation, above the threshold for track formation, is present beneath the surface to finally get almost only elastic collisions at the end of the projected range. Amorphization kinetics by the overlapping of multiple ion tracks is observed. In the crystalline matrix, long range strains, unit-cell swelling, local microstrain, domain size decrease, disordering of oxygen sublattice as well as colour centre formation are found. This study highlights the relationship between ion energy losses into a material and its response. While amorphization requires electronic stopping values above a certain threshold, point defects are predominantly induced by elastic collisions, while some structural modifications of the crystalline matrix, such as unit-cell swelling, are due to contribution of both electronic and nuclear processes.

  5. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic PreconditioningCraig...

  6. Effects of a heat shock protein inducer on the atrial fibrillation substrate caused by acute atrial ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Maguy, Ange; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Fujiki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    Aims Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of endogenous cytoprotective factors activated by various pathological conditions. This study addressed the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an orally active HSP inducer, on the atrial fibrillation (AF) substrate associated with acute atria( ischaemia

  7. Quantitative analysis of stress-induced martensites by in situ transmission electron microscopy superelastic tests in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, M.L.; Ibarra, A.; Caillard, D.; San Juan, J.

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced martensite nucleation and further growing, in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys, have been studied during in situ superelastic tests in the transmission electron microscope. Two kinds of martensite, β 3 ' and γ 3 ' , are induced and can coexist under stress, both exhibiting in a high density of stacking faults. The interface plane and the orientation relationships between the different variants of such martensites have been determined, and the atomic configurations of the lattices across the interface have been described. Finally, in light of the results, selection rules for the stress-induced promoted martensites at the nano-scale have been established, being determined by the shear direction and the basal plane of the martensite lattice.

  8. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of metastable intermediates of beta-lactoglobulin isolated after heat-induced aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrotta, R.; Arleth, L.; Pedersen, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering was used for studying intermediate species, isolated after heat-induced aggregation of the A variant of bovine P-lactoglobulin. The intermediates were separated in two fractions, the heated metastable dimer and heated metastable oligomers larger than the dimer. The pa...

  9. Tolerence for work-induced heat stress in men wearing liquidcooled garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, W. V.; Roth, H. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of the heat tolerance in men unable to dispose of metabolic heat as fast as it is produced within the body is discussed. Examinations were made of (a) the effect of work rate (metabolic rate) on tolerance time when body heat storage rate is a fixed quantity, and (b) tolerance time as a function of metabolic rate when heat loss is terminated after a thermal quasi-equilibrium was attained under comfortable conditions of heat transfer. The nature of the physiological mechanisms involved in such heat stress situations, and the possibility of using prediction techniques to establish standard procedures in emergencies involving cooling system failures are also discussed.

  10. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Rapid insight into heating-induced phase transformations in the solid state of the calcium salt of atorvastatin using multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Peter Aae; Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Kwok, Kaho

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the heating-induced dehydration and melting behavior of the trihydrate phase of the calcium salt of atorvastatin.......To investigate the heating-induced dehydration and melting behavior of the trihydrate phase of the calcium salt of atorvastatin....

  12. A DOUBLE KNOCKOUT; A NOVEL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING STRESS-INDUCIBLE 70 KDA HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS (HSP70S) ON DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat and chemical toxicants which disrupt spermatogenesis and cause male infertility are thought to induce the expression of Hsp70-1 and 70-3, the major inducible heat shock proteins of the 70kDa family. Previous studies from several laboratories including our own have characteri...

  13. SPRINT-INTERVAL TRAINING INDUCES HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 72 IN RAT SKELETAL MUSCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ogura

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that endurance exercise training increases the level of heat shock proteins (HSPs in skeletal muscles. However, little attention has been drawn to the effects of high intensity-short duration exercise, or sprint- interval training (SIT on HSP72 level in rat skeletal muscles. This study performed to test the hypothesis that the SIT would induce the HSP72 in fast and slow skeletal muscles of rats. Young male Wistar rats (8 weeks old were randomly assigned to a control (CON or a SIT group (n = 8/group. Animals in the SIT group were trained (1 min/sprint, 6~10 sets/day and 5~6 days/week on a treadmill for 9 weeks. After the training period, HSP72 levels in the plantaris (fast and soleus (slow muscles were analyzed by Western blotting method. Enzyme activities (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and citrate synthase and histochemical properties (muscle fiber type compositions and cross sectional area in both muscles were also determined. The SIT resulted in significantly (p < 0.05 higher levels of HSP72 in both the plantaris and soleus muscles compared to the CON group, with the plantaris producing a greater HSP72 increase than the soleus (plantaris; 550 ± 116%, soleus; 26 ± 8%, p < 0.05. Further, there were bioenergetic improvements, fast-to-slow shift of muscle fiber composition and hypertrophy in the type IIA fiber only in the plantaris muscle. These findings indicate that the SIT program increases HSP72 level of the rat hindlimb muscles, and the SIT-induced accumulation of HSP72 differs between fast and slow muscles

  14. FLZ Attenuates α-Synuclein-Induced Neurotoxicity by Activating Heat Shock Protein 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease. The pathology of PD is caused by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and is characterized by the presence of intracellular inclusions known as Lewy bodies, composed mainly of α-synuclein. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are crucial in protein quality control in cells. HSP70 in particular prevents the aggregation of protein aggregation, such as α-synuclein, providing a degree of protection against PD. The compound FLZ has been shown to protect several PD models in previous studies and was reported as an HSP inducer to protect against MPP + -induced neurotoxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of FLZ-mediated HSP70 induction in α-synuclein transgenic mice and cells. FLZ treatment alleviated motor dysfunction and improved dopaminergic neuronal function in α-synuclein transgenic mice. HSP70 protein expression and transcriptional activity were increased by FLZ treatment, eliciting a reduction of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity. The inhibition of HSP70 by quercetin or HSP70 siRNA markedly attenuated the neuroprotective effects of FLZ, confirming that FLZ exerted a neuroprotective effect through HSP70. We revealed that FLZ directly bound to and increased the expression of Hip, a cochaperone of HSP70, which in turn enhanced HSP70 activity. In conclusion, we defined a critical role for HSP70 and its cochaperones activated by FLZ in preventing neurodegeneration and proposed that targeting the HSP70 system may represent a potential therapy for α-synuclein-related diseases, such as PD.

  15. Involvement of DNA-PK and ATM in radiation- and heat-induced DNA damage recognition and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and hyperthermia results in important biological consequences, e.g. cell death, chromosomal aberrations, mutations, and DNA strand breaks. There is good evidence that the nucleus, specifically cellular DNA, is the principal target for radiation-induced cell lethality. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most serious type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. On the other hand, verifiable mechanisms which can lead to heat-induced cell death are damage to the plasma membrane and/or inactivation of heat-labile proteins caused by protein denaturation and subsequent aggregation. Recently, several reports have suggested that DSBs can be induced after hyperthermia because heat-induced phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci formation can be observed in several mammalian cell lines. In mammalian cells, DSBs are repaired primarily through two distinct and complementary mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), and homologous recombination (HR) or homology-directed repair (HDR). DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are key players in the initiation of DSB repair and phosphorylate and/or activate many substrates, including themselves. These phosphorylated substrates have important roles in the functioning of cell cycle checkpoints and in cell death, as well as in DSB repair. Apoptotic cell death is a crucial cell suicide mechanism during development and in the defense of homeostasis. If DSBs are unrepaired or misrepaired, apoptosis is a very important system which can protect an organism against carcinogenesis. This paper reviews recently obtained results and current topics concerning the role of DNA-PK and ATM in heat- or radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. (author)

  16. In situ TEM observation of stress-induced martensitictransformations and twinning processes in CuAlNi single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Gemperlová, Juliana; Gemperle, Antonín; Dlabáček, Zdeněk; Šittner, Petr; Novák, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 15 (2010), s. 5109-5119 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : CuAlNi shape memory alloy * martensitic transformation * in situ TEM straining Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2010

  17. In-situ investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation kinetics in an austenitic stainless steel by inductive measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso de Celada Casero, C.; Kooiker, Harm; Groen, Manso; Post, J; San Martin, D

    2017-01-01

    An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite

  18. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billiet, Marijn; De Schampheleire, Sven; Huisseune, Henk; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 ∘C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 ∘C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink. PMID:28793601

  19. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Billiet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 °C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 °C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink.

  20. Direct in situ transmission electron microscopy observation of Al push up during early stages of the Al-induced layer exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birajdar, B.I.; Antesberger, T.; Butz, B.; Stutzmann, M.; Spiecker, E.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of Al transport during Al-induced layer exchange and crystallization of amorphous Si (a-Si) has been investigated by in situ and analytical transmission electron microscopy. Significant grain boundary realignment and coarsening of Al grains close to the Si crystallization growth front as well as push up of excess Al into the a-Si layer at distances even a few micrometers away from the crystallization front were observed. Stress-mediated diffusion of Al is postulated to explain the experimental observations.

  1. Frequency of reciprocal translocations and dicentrics induced in human blood lymphocytes by X-irradiation as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Nakashima, E.; Pawel, D.; Kodama, Y.; Awa, A.

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to test the scoring efficiency of reciprocal translocations and dicentrics induced by X-irradiation in vitro using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. An excess was found in the frequencies of reciprocal translocations relative to those of dicentrics by measurement with FISH at the first cell division after irradiation (translocation:dicentric ≅ 60:40). However, when the same metaphases were also evaluated sequentially by a conventional staining method, the ratio of about 50:50 was restored. This was due in part to misclassification of certain dicentrics as reciprocal translocations by the FISH technique. (author)

  2. Influence of Alpha Tocopherol on Heat Stress-Induced Changes in the Reproductive Function of Swiss Albino Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlEnazi, Maher M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the influence of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) on heat stress-induced changes in the reproduction of Swiss albino mice. The evaluated parameters include: the estrous cycle, fertility, post-implantation losses of fetuses and estimation of progesterone levels in the serum. Eight groups of experimental mice (10 each) were used. Groups 1-4 (24 degree C) consisted of a control and alpha-tocopherol (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) treated groups. Groups 5-8 (42 degree C) consisted of a positive control and alpha-tocopherol (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) treated group. Heat-stress reduced significantly (p > 0.001) the number of fetuses and corpora lutea. There was also a significant decrease in the mean weights of fetuses (p > 0.001) and placenta (p > 0.01) in the heat-stress group with a decrease in their serum progesterone levels (p > 0.01). Heat-stress groups treated with high doses of alpha-tocopherol 200 and 400 mg/kg, showed protection against heat-stress related abnormalities. The results showed that alpha-tocopherol plays a role in protection against hyperthermia induced changes in the estrous cycle length, infertility, post-implantation losses and depletion in the serum level of progesterone. (author)

  3. Sensitization by wortmannin of heat- or X-ray induced cell death in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Suzuki, Norio; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Hirano, Kazuya; Umeda, Noriko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Here we found that wortmannin sensitized Chinese hamster V79 cells to hyperthermic treatment at 44.0 deg C as determined either by colony formation assay or by dye exclusion assay. Wortmannin enhanced heat-induced cell death accompanying cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP). Additionally, the induction of heat shock protein HSP70 was suppressed and delayed in wortmannin-treated cells. Heat sensitizing effect of wortmannin was obvious at more than 5 or 10 μM of final concentrations, while radiosensitization was apparent at 5 μM. Requirement for high concentration of wortmannin, i.e., order of μM, suggests a possible role of certain protein kinases, such as DNA-PK and/or ATM among PI3-kinase family. The sensitization was minimal when wortmannin was added at the end of heat treatment. This was similar to the case of X-ray. Since heat-induced cell death and PARP cleavage preceded HSP70 induction phenomenon, the sensitization to the hyperthermic treatment was considered mainly caused by enhanced apoptotic cell death rather than secondary to suppression or delay by wortmannin of HSP70 induction. Further, in the present system radiosensitization by wortmannin was also at least partly mediated through enhancement of apoptotic cell death. (author)

  4. Diffusion induced nuclear reactions in metals: a possible source of heat in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, V.M.; Iyer, S.S.S.

    1989-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that diffusion of light nuclei in metals can give rise to unusual electrical charge distributions in their lattice structures, inducing thereby certain nuclear reactions that are otherwise uncommon. In the light of these results we advance the hypothesis that such nuclear reactions take place in the metal rich core of the earth, based on following observations: 1 - The solubility of hydrogen in metals is relatively high compared to that in silicates. 2 - Studies of rare gas samples in intraplate volcanos and diamonds show that 3 He/ He ratio increases with depth in the mantle. 3 - There are indications that He is positively correlated with enrichment of metals in lavas. We propose that hydrogen incorporated into metallic phases at the time of planetary accretion was carried to the core by downward migration of metal rich melts during the early states of proto-earth. Preliminary estimates suggest that cold fusion reactions can give rise to an average rate of heat generation of 8.2x10 12 W and may thus serve as a supplementary source of energy for the geomagnetic dynamo. (author)

  5. Heat-induced-radiolabeling and click chemistry: A powerful combination for generating multifunctional nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushan Yuan

    Full Text Available A key advantage of nanomaterials for biomedical applications is their ability to feature multiple small reporter groups (multimodality, or combinations of reporter groups and therapeutic agents (multifunctionality, while being targeted to cell surface receptors. Here a facile combination of techniques for the syntheses of multimodal, targeted nanoparticles (NPs is presented, whereby heat-induced-radiolabeling (HIR labels NPs with radiometals and so-called click chemistry is used to attach bioactive groups to the NP surface. Click-reactive alkyne or azide groups were first attached to the nonradioactive clinical Feraheme (FH NPs. Resulting "Alkyne-FH" and "Azide-FH" intermediates, like the parent NP, tolerated 89Zr labeling by the HIR method previously described. Subsequently, biomolecules were quickly conjugated to the radioactive NPs by either copper-catalyzed or copper-free click reactions with high efficiency. Synthesis of the Alkyne-FH or Azide-FH intermediates, followed by HIR and then by click reactions for biomolecule attachment, provides a simple and potentially general path for the synthesis of multimodal, multifunctional, and targeted NPs for biomedical applications.

  6. Heat-induced reorganization of the structure of photosystem II membranes: role of oxygen evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busheva, Mira; Tzonova, Iren; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Andreeva, Atanaska

    2012-12-05

    The sensitivity of the green plants' photosystem II (PSII) to high temperatures is investigated in PSII enriched membranes and in membranes, from which the oxygen evolving complex is removed. Using steady-state 77 K fluorescence and resonance Raman spectroscopy we analyze the interdependency between the temperature-driven changes in structure and energy distribution in the PSII supercomplex. The results show that the heat treatment induces different reduction of the 77 K fluorescence emission in both types of investigated membranes: (i) an additional considerable decrease of the overall fluorescence emission in Tris-washed membranes as compared to the native membranes; (ii) a transition point at 42°C(,) observed only in native membranes; (iii) a sharp reduction of the PSII core fluorescence in Tris-washed membranes at temperatures higher than 50°C; (iv) a 3 nm red-shift of F700 band's maximum in Tris-washed membranes already at 20°C and its further shift by 1 nm at temperature increase. Both treatments intensified their action by increasing the aggregation and dissociation of the peripheral light harvesting complexes. The oxygen-evolving complex, in addition to its main function to produce O(2), increases the thermal stability of PSII core by strengthening the connection between the core and the peripheral antenna proteins and by keeping their structural integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Caffeine Induces the Stress Response and Up-Regulates Heat Shock Proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Gong, Joomi; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine has both positive and negative effects on physiological functions in a dose-dependent manner. C. elegans has been used as an animal model to investigate the effects of caffeine on development. Caffeine treatment at a high dose (30 mM) showed detrimental effects and caused early larval arrest. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis to investigate the mode of action of high-dose caffeine treatment in C. elegans and found that the stress response proteins, heat shock protein (HSP)-4 (endoplasmic reticulum [ER] chaperone), HSP-6 (mitochondrial chaperone), and HSP-16 (cytosolic chaperone), were induced and their expression was regulated at the transcriptional level. These findings suggest that high-dose caffeine intake causes a strong stress response and activates all three stress-response pathways in the worms, including the ER-, mitochondrial-, and cytosolic pathways. RNA interference of each hsp gene or in triple combination retarded growth. In addition, caffeine treatment stimulated a food-avoidance behavior (aversion phenotype), which was enhanced by RNAi depletion of the hsp-4 gene. Therefore, up-regulation of hsp genes after caffeine treatment appeared to be the major responses to alleviate stress and protect against developmental arrest.

  8. Robust heat-inducible gene expression by two endogenous hsp70-derived promoters in transgenic Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenetti, Tiffany L. G.; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2011-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is an important vector of the viruses that cause dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and yellow fever. Reverse genetic approaches to the study of gene function in this mosquito have been limited by the lack of a robust inducible promoter to allow precise temporal control over a protein-encoding or hairpin RNA transgene. Likewise, investigations into the molecular and biochemical basis of vector competence would benefit from the ability to activate an anti-pathogen molecule at specific times during infection. We have characterized the ability of genomic sequences derived from two Ae. aegypti hsp70 genes to drive heat-inducible expression of a reporter in both transient and germline transformation contexts. AaHsp70-luciferase transcripts accumulated specifically after heat shock, and displayed a pattern of rapid induction and decay similar to endogenous AaHsp70 genes. Luciferase expression in transgenic Ae. aegypti increased by ∼25-50 fold in whole adults by four hours after heat-shock, with significant activity (∼20 fold) remaining at 24 hr. Heat-induced expression was even more dramatic in midgut tissues, with one strain showing a ∼2500-fold increase in luciferase activity. The AaHsp70 promoters described could be valuable for gene function studies as well as for the precise timing of the expression of anti-pathogen molecules. PMID:22142225

  9. Effects of rare sugar d-allulose on heat-induced gelation of surimi prepared from marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masahiro; Inoue, Masaki; Hayakawa, Shigeru; O'Charoen, Siwaporn; Ogawa, Makiko

    2017-11-01

    d-Allulose (Alu), the C3-epimer of d-fructose, is a non-caloric sweetener (0.39 kcal g -1 ) with a suppressive effect on postprandial blood glucose elevation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Alu used as a sweetener and gel improver instead of sucrose on heat-induced gelation of surimi. The puncture test of a heat-induced surimi gel showed that with 50 g kg -1 Alu the gel had 15% and 6% higher gel strength than the corresponding gel with sucrose (Suc) and with sorbitol (Sor), respectively. In addition, Alu-gel had 26% and 25% higher water-holding capacity (WHC) than Suc- and Sor-gel. Heating of myofibrillar protein with Alu, unlike Suc and Sor, facilitated the formation of both disulfide and non-disulfide crosslinks that might be associated with the mechanical properties and WHC of Alu-gel. Alu improves the mechanical properties and WHC of the heat-induced surimi gel. Furthermore, Alu is low in calories compared with Suc (4.0 kcal g -1 ) and Sor (3.0 kcal g -1 ). Thus Alu will be an alternative of Suc or Sor for developing surimi-based products with health benefits. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Effects of Pressure, Temperature, Treatment Time, and Storage on Rheological, Textural, and Structural Properties of Heat-Induced Chickpea Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Alvarez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure-induced gelatinization of chickpea flour (CF was studied in combination with subsequent temperature-induced gelatinization. CF slurries (with 1:5 flour-to-water ratio and CF in powder form were treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP, temperature (T, and treatment time (t at three levels (200, 400, 600 MPa; 10, 25, 50 °C; 5, 15, 25 min. In order to investigate the effect of storage (S, half of the HHP-treated CF slurries were immediately analyzed for changes in oscillatory rheological properties under isothermal heating at 75 °C for 15 min followed by cooling to 25 °C. The other half of the HHP-treated CF slurries were refrigerated (at 4 °C for one week and subsequently analyzed for changes in oscillatory properties under the same heating conditions as the unrefrigerated samples. HHP-treated CF in powder form was analyzed for changes in textural properties of heat-induced CF gels under isothermal heating at 90 °C for 5 min and subsequent cooling to 25 °C. Structural changes during gelatinization were investigated using microscopy. Pressure had a more significant effect on rheological and textural properties, followed by T and treatment t (in that order. Gel aging in HHP-treated CF slurries during storage was supported by rheological measurements.

  11. Suppression of insolation heating induced by electromagnetic scatteringdue to fine spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, J.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Manaka, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Ashida, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, i.e., the greatest earthquake in the Japanese history, and the successive disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant have caused a fatal electric power shortage problem in summer in 2011. It is of key importance to reduce electricity demand and to save the energy. About one third of the total electricity demand at the peak consumption in summer is for the air-conditioning in the household and office sectors in Japan. It is, therefore, necessary to think deliberately of the reduction of electric power demand for air-conditioning. In fact, the temperature of materials rises when they are exposed to the sunlight (insolation heating) in particular in summer and the air-conditioning would become necessary for restoring the comfort in insolated housings. The energy for the air-conditioning is spent to pump out the heat changed in the materials of the insolated housings and would be proportional to the temperature to lower down. It is, therefore, clear that the reduction of the energy for the air-conditioning would strongly depend on relaxation of temperature rise or the insulation of insolated materials. Insolation heating could be suppressed when the materials are coated with paint admixed with fine silica spheres (insulating paint). By coating buildings' walls and roofs with such paint, the temperature of interior rooms could be kept lower without air-conditioning. These insulation effects are well known and have been utilized in the past, but have hardly been analyzed theoretically yet. Theoretical analysis would greatly enhance the effects of the suppression of insolation heating. In preceding studies, Ohkawa et al.(2009; 2011) and Mikada et al.(2011) focused on the electromagnetic wave scattering induced by fine spheres and developed the analytical method using superposition of scattered waves from each sphere (the first Born approximation), and indicated that the size of the spheres is one of the

  12. Live and Heat-Killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 May Induce Modulatory Cytokines Profiles on Macrophages RAW 264.7

    OpenAIRE

    Jorj?o, Adeline Lacerda; de Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Le?o, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Carvalho, Cl?udio Antonio Talge; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and/or its products to induce the synthesis of cytokines (TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12) by mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). Three microorganism preparations were used: live L. rhamnosus (LLR) suspension, heat-killed L. rhamnosus (HKLR) suspension, and the supernatant of a heat-killed L. rhamnosus (SHKLR) suspension, which were cultured with macrophages (37?C, 5% CO2) for 2?h and 30?min. After that, cells were cul...

  13. Electron heating mode transition induced by mixing radio frequency and ultrahigh frequency dual frequency powers in capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-01-01

    Electron heating mode transitions induced by mixing the low- and high-frequency power in dual-frequency nitrogen discharges at 400 mTorr pressure are presented. As the low-frequency (13.56 MHz) power decreases and high-frequency (320 MHz) power increases for the fixed power of 200 W, there is a transition of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) from Druyvesteyn to bi-Maxwellian type characterized by a distinguished warm electron population. It is shown that this EEDF evolution is attributed to the transition from collisional to collisionless stochastic heating of the low-energy electrons.

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural origins for the electric field-induced phenomena in ferroelectric perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanzheng

    Ferroelectrics are important materials due to their extensive technological applications, such as non-volatile memories, field-effect transistors, ferroelectric tunneling junctions, dielectric capacitors, piezoelectric transducers, sensors and actuators. As is well known, the outstanding dielectric, piezoelectric, and ferroelectric properties of these functional oxides originate from their ferroelectric domain arrangements and the corresponding evolution under external stimuli (e.g. electric field, stress, and temperature). Electric field has been known as the most efficient stimulus to manipulate the ferroelectric domains through polarization switching and alignment. Therefore, direct observation of the dynamic process of electric field-induced domain evolution and crystal structure transformation is of significant importance to understand the microstructural mechanisms for the functional properties of ferroelectrics. In this dissertation, electric field in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique was employed to monitor the real-time evolution of the domain morphology and crystal structure during various electrical processes: (1) the initial poling process, (2) the electric field reversal process, and (3) the electrical cycling process. Two types of perovskite-structured ceramics, normal ferroelectrics and relaxor ferroelectrics, were used for this investigation. In addition to providing the microscopic insight for some well-accepted phase transformation rules, discoveries of some new or even unexpected physical phenomena were also demonstrated. For the initial poling process, microstructural origins for the piezoelectricity development in the three most promising lead-free piezoceramic systems were investigated. For the non-ergodic relaxor ferroelectric compositions ( x = 6% - 9%) in the (1-x)(Bi1/2Na 1/2)TiO3-xBaTiO3 system, well-developed piezoelectricity was realized at poling fields far below the coercive field and phase transition field. Such

  15. Expression of three sHSP genes involved in heat pretreatment-induced chilling tolerance in banana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-hong; Chen, Jian-ye; Kuang, Jian-fei; Lu, Wang-jin

    2012-07-01

    Banana fruit is highly susceptible to chilling injury. In previous research it was shown that heat pretreatment of banana fruit at 38 °C for 3 days before storage at a chilling temperature of 8 °C for 12 days prevented increases in visible chilling injury index, electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde content and also decreases in lightness and chroma, indicating that heat pretreatment could effectively alleviate chilling injury of banana fruit. However, little is known about the role of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) in postharvest chilling tolerance of banana fruit. In the present study, three cytosolic sHSP expression profiles in peel and pulp tissues of banana fruit during heat pretreatment and subsequent chilled storage (8 °C) were investigated in relation to heat pretreatment-induced chilling tolerance. Three full-length cDNAs of cytosolic sHSP genes, including two class I sHSP (CI sHSP) and one class II sHSP (CII sHSP) cDNAs, named Ma-CI sHSP1, Ma-CI sHSP2 and Ma-CII sHSP3 respectively, were isolated and characterised from harvested banana fruit. Accumulation of Ma-CI sHSP1 mRNA transcripts in peel and pulp tissues and Ma-CII sHSP3 mRNA transcripts in peel tissue increased during heat pretreatment. Expression of all three Ma-sHSP genes in peel and pulp tissues was induced during subsequent chilled storage. Furthermore, Ma-CI sHSP1 and Ma-CII sHSP3 mRNA transcripts in pulp tissue and Ma-CI sHSP2 mRNA transcripts in peel and pulp tissues were obviously enhanced by heat pretreatment at days 6 and 9 of subsequent chilled storage. These results suggested that heat pretreatment enhanced the expression of Ma-sHSPs, which might be involved in heat pretreatment-induced chilling tolerance of banana fruit. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. In-Situ Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation Kinetics in an Austenitic Stainless Steel by Inductive Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Celada-Casero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ to martensite (α′ phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite has been found by comparing the results to the ex-situ characterization by magnetization measurements, light optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor has allowed for the observation of the stepwise transformation behavior, a not-well-understood phenomena that takes place in large regions of the bulk material and that so far had only been observed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  17. Frequencies of X-ray and fast neutron induced chromosome translocations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes as detected by in situ hybridization using chromosome specific DNA libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Darroudi, F.; Vermeulen, S.; Wiegant, J.

    1992-01-01

    DNA libraries of six human chromosomes were used to detect translocations in human lymphocytes induced by different doses of X-rays and fast neutrons. Results show that with X-rays, one can detect about 1.5 to 2.0 fold more translocations in comparison to dicentrics, whereas following fast neutron irradiation, the difference between these two classes of aberrations are significantly different at high doses. In addition, triple fluorescent in situ hybridization technique was used to study the frequencies of radiation-induced translocations involving a specific chromosome. Chromosome number 1 was found to be involved in translocations more frequently than chromosomes number 2, 3, 4, 8 and X. (author). 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. Mass-induced sea level variations in the Red Sea from GRACE, steric-corrected altimetry, in situ bottom pressure records, and hydrographic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, W.; Lemoine, J.-M.; Zhong, M.; Hsu, H. T.

    2014-08-01

    An annual amplitude of ∼18 cm mass-induced sea level variations (SLV) in the Red Sea is detected from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and steric-corrected altimetry from 2003 to 2011. The annual mass variations in the region dominate the mean SLV, and generally reach maximum in late January/early February. The annual steric component of the mean SLV is relatively small (mass-induced SLV. In situ bottom pressure records at the eastern coast of the Red Sea validate the high mass variability observed by steric-corrected altimetry and GRACE. In addition, the horizontal water mass flux of the Red Sea estimated from GRACE and steric-corrected altimetry is validated by hydrographic observations.

  19. In situ visualizing the evolution of the light-induced refractive index change of Mn:KLTN crystal with digital holographic interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxin Han

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The light-induced refractive index change in Mn:KLTN crystal, illuminated by focused light sheet, is visualized in situ and quantified by digital holographic interferometry. By numerically retrieving a series of sequential phase maps from recording digital holograms, the spatial distribution of the induced refractive index change can be visualized and estimated readily. This technique enables the observation of the temporal evolution of the refractive index change under different recording situations such as writing laser power, applied voltage, and temperature, and the photoconductivity of Mn:KLTN crystal can be calculated as well, the experimental results are in good agreement with the theory. The research results suggest that the presented method is successful and feasible.

  20. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitor (17-AAG) Induces Apoptosis and Decreases Cell Migration/Motility of Keloid Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, In Sik; Lee, Mi Hee; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lew, Dae Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won Jai

    2015-07-01

    The regulation of apoptosis, proliferation, and migration of fibroblasts is altered in keloids. The 90-kDa heat shock protein (heat shock protein 90) is known to play a key role in such regulation. Therefore, the authors investigated whether the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could induce apoptosis and attenuate keloid fibroblast proliferation and migration. The authors evaluated heat shock protein 90 expression in keloid tissues with immunohistochemistry. The authors used cell viability [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assays and annexin V/propidium iodide staining for apoptosis, a wound healing model and cell tracking system to assess cell migration, and Akt Western blotting analysis in keloid fibroblasts after inhibition of heat shock protein 90 with 17-allylaminodemethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). The expression of heat shock protein 90 in keloid tissues was significantly increased compared with normal tissues. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts showed significantly decreased proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and decreased expression of Akt. Furthermore, a dose-dependent decrease in cell migration was noted after 17-AAG treatment of keloid fibroblasts. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts had less directionality to the wound center and migrated a shorter distance. The authors confirmed that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could promote apoptosis and attenuate proliferation and migration of keloid fibroblasts. Therefore, the authors think that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 is a key factor in the regulation of biological processes in keloids. With further preclinical study, the authors will be able to apply these results clinically for keloid treatment.

  1. Effect of patchouli alcohol on the regulation of heat shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua; Chen, Yuping; Xu, Lei; Li, Deyin; Ma, Yunfei; Li, Huanrong; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-08-01

    Purpose Patchouli alcohol (PA) is used to treat gastrointestinal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the function of PA in the regulated process of oxidative stress in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Materials and methods Oxidative stress was stimulated by exposing IEC-6 cells to heat shock (42 °C for 3 h). IEC-6 cells in treatment groups were pretreated with various concentrations of PA (10, 40, and 80 ng/mL) for 3 h before heat shock. Results Heat shock caused damage to the morphology of IEC-6 cells, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression by target genes related to oxidative stress in heat shock were also altered. Specifically, the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, GSH-px, NRF2 nd HO-1were all increased, and Nrf2 and Keap1 protein expression were increased after heat shock. However, pretreatment with PA weakened the level of damage to the cellular morphology, and decreased the MDA content caused by heat shock, indicating PA had cytoprotective activities. Pretreatment with PA at high dose significantly increased generation of intracellular ROS. Compared with the heat shock group alone, PA pretreatment significantly decreased the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, SOD, CAT, GSH-px, KEAP1 and HO-1. Furthermore, the high dose of PA significantly increased Nrf2 protein expression, while both the intermediate and high dose of PA significantly increased HO-1 protein expression. Conclusion Heat-shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells, and PA could alleviate the Nrf2-Keap1 cellular oxidative stress responses.

  2. Remarkable efficiency of phosphate removal: Ferrate(VI)-induced in situ sorption on core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralchevska, Radina P; Prucek, Robert; Kolařík, Jan; Tuček, Jiří; Machala, Libor; Filip, Jan; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-10-15

    Despite the importance of phosphorus as a nutrient for humans and its role in ecological sustainability, its high abundance, resulting in large part from human activities, causes eutrophication that negatively affects the environment and public health. Here, we present the use of ferrate(VI) as an alternative agent for removing phosphorus from aqueous media. We address the mechanism of phosphate removal as a function of the Fe/P mass ratio and the pH value of the solution. The isoelectric point of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, formed as dominant Fe(VI) decomposition products, was identified to play a crucial role in predicting their efficiency in removing of phosphates. Importantly, it was found that the removal efficiency dramatically changes if Fe(VI) is added before (ex-situ conditions) or after (in-situ conditions) the introduction of phosphates into water. Removal under in-situ conditions showed remarkable sorption capacity of 143.4 mg P per gram of ferric precipitates due to better accessibility of active surface sites on in-situ formed ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides. At pH = 6.0-7.0, complete removal of phosphates was observed at a relatively low Fe/P mass ratio (5:1). The results show that phosphates are removed from water solely by sorption on the surface of γ-Fe2O3/γ-FeOOH core/shell nanoparticles. The advantages of Fe(VI) utilization include its environmentally friendly nature, the possibility of easy separation of the final product from water by a magnetic field or by natural settling, and the capacity for successful phosphate elimination at pH values near the neutral range and at low Fe/P mass ratios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of Membrane-Induced Particle Immobilization on Seeded Growth Monitored by In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Chen, Dennis P; Unocic, Raymond R; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2016-05-01

    In situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy probes seeded growth in real time. The growth of Pd on Au nanocubes is monitored as a model system to compare growth within a liquid cell and traditional colloidal synthesis. Different growth patterns are observed due to seed immobilization and the highly reducing environment within the liquid cell. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurlow, M. E., E-mail: thurlow@huarp.harvard.edu; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Co, D. T. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center and Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States); O' Brien, A. S. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hanisco, T. F. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 614, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10{sup 12}. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ′} = 2) ← X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ″} = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  5. (001) 3C SiC/Ni contact interface: In situ XPS observation of annealing induced Ni2Si formation and the resulting barrier height changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengeler, Sven; Kaiser, Bernhard; Chaussende, Didier; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2017-04-01

    The electronic states of the (001) 3C SiC/Ni interface prior and post annealing are investigated via an in situ XPS interface experiment, allowing direct observation of the induced band bending and the transformation from Schottky to ohmic behaviour for the first time. A single domain (001) 3C SiC sample was prepared via wet chemical etching. Nickel was deposited on the sample in multiple in situ deposition steps via RF sputtering, allowing observation of the 3C SiC/Ni interface formation. Over the course of the experiments, an upward band bending of 0.35 eV was observed, along with defect induced Fermi level pinning. This indicates a Schottky type contact behaviour with a barrier height of 0.41 eV. The subsequent annealing at 850 °C for 5 min resulted in the formation of a Ni2Si layer and a reversal of the band bending to 0.06 eV downward. Thus explaining the ohmic contact behaviour frequently reported for annealed n-type 3C SiC/Ni contacts.

  6. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10 12 . The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A 2 Π 3/2 (v ′ = 2) ← X 2 Π 3/2 (v ″ = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America

  7. The Development and Deployment of a Ground-Based, Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument for the In Situ Detection of Iodine Monoxide Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Hanisco, T. F.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 1012. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A23/2 (v = 2) ? X23/2 (v = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  8. The Correlation Analysis between Corneal Biomechanical Properties and the Surgically Induced Corneal High-Order Aberrations after Small Incision Lenticule Extraction and Femtosecond Laser In Situ Keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate the correlation between corneal biomechanics and the surgically induced corneal high-order aberrations (HOAs after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK. Methods. A total of 150 right myopic eyes that underwent SMILE or FS-LASIK surgery were included in this retrospective study, 75 eyes in each group. The corneal hysteresis (CH and the corneal resistance factor (CRF with the corneal HOAs of the anterior, posterior, and total cornea were assessed preoperatively and three months postoperatively. Multivariate linear regression was applied to determine the correlations. Results. The preoperative CRF was significantly correlated with the induced 3rd–6th-order HOAs and spherical aberration of the anterior surface and the total cornea after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgeries (P<0.05, postoperatively. The CRF was significantly correlated with the induced vertical coma of the anterior and posterior surfaces and the total cornea after SMILE surgery (P<0.05. There was a significant correlation between the CRF and the induced posterior corneal horizontal coma after FS-LASIK surgery (P=0.013. Conclusions. The corneal biomechanics affect the surgically induced corneal HOAs after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgery, which may be meaningful for screening the patients preoperatively and optimizing the visual qualities postoperatively.

  9. In-situ studies of stress- and magnetic-field-induced phase transformation in a polymer-bonded Ni-Co-Mn-In composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.M.; Nie, Z.H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.D.; Brown, D.E.; Pearson, J.; Liaw, P.K.; Ren, Y.

    2010-01-01

    A polymer-bonded Ni 45 Co 5 Mn 36.6 In 13.4 ferromagnetic shape-memory composite was fabricated, having magnetic-field-driven shape recovery properties. The thermo-magnetization curves of the composite suggested that the magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation occurs in the composite. The effects of temperature, stress, and magnetic-field on the phase transformation properties were systematically investigated using an in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. A temperature-induced reversible martensitic phase transformation was confirmed within the composite, showing a broad phase transformation interval. Stress-induced highly textured martensite was observed in the composite during uniaxial compressive loading, with a residual strain after unloading. The origin of the textured martensite can be explained by the grain-orientation-dependent Bain distortion energy. A recovery strain of ∼1.76% along the compression direction was evidenced in the pre-strained composite with an applied magnetic-field of 5 T. This recovery was caused by the magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic phase transformation. The phase transformation properties of the ferromagnetic shape-memory composite, different from its bulk alloys, can be well explained by the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The large magnetic-field-induced strain, together with good ductility and low cost, make the polymer-bonded Ni-Co-Mn-In composites potential candidates for magnetic-field-driven actuators.

  10. Phorbol ester tumor promoter induced the synthesis of two major cytoplasmic proteins: identity with two proteins induced under heat-shocked and glucose-starved conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Chen, K.Y.; Liu, A.Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of specific protein synthesis by the phorbol ester tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), was evaluated using the L-8 and C-2 myoblast and the 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell cultures. TPA increased, by 2-4 fold, the synthesis rates of two cytoplasmic proteins with apparent molecular weights of 89,000 and 74,000 as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The concentration of TPA and the time of incubation needed to elicit this induction was determined to be 10 μg/ml and 20 hrs, respectively. Increasing the concentration of TPA to 100, 200, and 500 ng/ml did not result in a greater magnitude of induction. The possibility that these two TPA-induced proteins may be identical to proteins with similar molecular weights induced under heat-shocked or glucose-starved conditions was evaluated by 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Results provided evidence that the TPA-induced 89,000- and 74,000-dalton proteins were identical to hsp 89 and hsp 74, 2 out of a set of 8-9 proteins induced under heat shocked conditions. Furthermore, they are identical to two of the set of glucose-regulated proteins induced under a glucose-starved condition

  11. Direct measurements of sample heating by a laser-induced air plasma in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Janna; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Angel, S Michael

    2012-08-01

    Direct measurements of temperature changes were made using small thermocouples (TC), placed near a laser-induced air plasma. Temperature changes up to ~500 °C were observed. From the measured temperature changes, estimates were made of the amount of heat absorbed per unit area. This allowed calculations to be made of the surface temperature, as a function of time, of a sample heated by the air plasma that is generated during orthogonal pre-ablation spark dual-pulse (DP) LIBS measurements. In separate experiments, single-pulse (SP) LIBS emission and sample ablation rate measurements were performed on nickel at sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to the maximum surface temperature that was calculated using the TC measurement results (500 °C). A small, but real sample temperature-dependent increase in both SP LIBS emission and the rate of sample ablation was found for nickel samples heated up to 500 °C. Comparison of DP LIBS emission enhancement values for bulk nickel samples at room temperature versus the enhanced SP LIBS emission and sample ablation rates observed as a function of increasing sample temperature suggests that sample heating by the laser-induced air plasma plays only a minor role in DP LIBS emission enhancement.

  12. Development of linear projecting in studies of non-linear flow. Acoustic heating induced by non-periodic sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelomova, Anna [Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, ul. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: anpe@mif.pg.gda.pl

    2006-08-28

    The equation of energy balance is subdivided into two dynamics equations, one describing evolution of the dominative sound, and the second one responsible for acoustic heating. The first one is the famous KZK equation, and the second one is a novel equation governing acoustic heating. The novel dynamic equation considers both periodic and non-periodic sound. Quasi-plane geometry of flow is supposed. Subdividing is provided on the base of specific links of every mode. Media with arbitrary thermic T(p,{rho}) and caloric e(p,{rho}) equations of state are considered. Individual roles of thermal conductivity and viscosity in the heating induced by aperiodic sound in the ideal gases and media different from ideal gases are discussed.

  13. Development of linear projecting in studies of non-linear flow. Acoustic heating induced by non-periodic sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelomova, Anna

    2006-08-01

    The equation of energy balance is subdivided into two dynamics equations, one describing evolution of the dominative sound, and the second one responsible for acoustic heating. The first one is the famous KZK equation, and the second one is a novel equation governing acoustic heating. The novel dynamic equation considers both periodic and non-periodic sound. Quasi-plane geometry of flow is supposed. Subdividing is provided on the base of specific links of every mode. Media with arbitrary thermic T(p,ρ) and caloric e(p,ρ) equations of state are considered. Individual roles of thermal conductivity and viscosity in the heating induced by aperiodic sound in the ideal gases and media different from ideal gases are discussed.

  14. Development of linear projecting in studies of non-linear flow. Acoustic heating induced by non-periodic sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perelomova, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The equation of energy balance is subdivided into two dynamics equations, one describing evolution of the dominative sound, and the second one responsible for acoustic heating. The first one is the famous KZK equation, and the second one is a novel equation governing acoustic heating. The novel dynamic equation considers both periodic and non-periodic sound. Quasi-plane geometry of flow is supposed. Subdividing is provided on the base of specific links of every mode. Media with arbitrary thermic T(p,ρ) and caloric e(p,ρ) equations of state are considered. Individual roles of thermal conductivity and viscosity in the heating induced by aperiodic sound in the ideal gases and media different from ideal gases are discussed

  15. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation

  16. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Lowell [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Raju, Selva Vennila [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); HiPSEC, Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Williams, Quentin [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})O in Run3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  17. Planetary circulations in the presence of transient and self-induced heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salby, Murry L.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    1993-01-01

    . In these calculations, frictional convergence near the equator emerges as a key to feedback between the circulation and the convective pattern. At low latitudes, nearly geostrophic balance in the boundary layer gives way to frictional balance. This shifts the wave-induced convection into phase with the temperature anomaly and allows the attending heating to feed back positively onto the circulation. The calculations successfully reproduce the salient features of the MJO. They are being used to understand the growth and decay phases of the composite lifecycle and the conditions that favor amplification of the MJO.

  18. Wheat chloroplast targeted sHSP26 promoter confers heat and abiotic stress inducible expression in transgenic Arabidopsis Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetika Khurana

    Full Text Available The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs have been found to play a critical role in physiological stress conditions in protecting proteins from irreversible aggregation. To characterize the hloroplast targeted sHSP26 promoter in detail, deletion analysis of the promoter is carried out and analysed via transgenics in Arabidopsis. In the present study, complete assessment of the importance of CCAAT-box elements along with Heat shock elements (HSEs in the promoter of sHSP26 was performed. Moreover, the importance of 5' untranslated region (UTR has also been established in the promoter via Arabidopsis transgenics. An intense GUS expression was observed after heat stress in the transgenics harbouring a full-length promoter, confirming the heat-stress inducibility of the promoter. Transgenic plants without UTR showed reduced GUS expression when compared to transgenic plants with UTR as was confirmed at the RNA and protein levels by qRT-PCR and GUS histochemical assays, thus suggesting the possible involvement of some regulatory elements present in the UTR in heat-stress inducibility of the promoter. Promoter activity was also checked under different abiotic stresses and revealed differential expression in different deletion constructs. Promoter analysis based on histochemical assay, real-time qPCR and fluorimetric analysis revealed that HSEs alone could not transcribe GUS gene significantly in sHSP26 promoter and CCAAT box elements contribute synergistically to the transcription. Our results also provide insight into the importance of 5`UTR of sHsp26 promoter thus emphasizing the probable role of imperfect CCAAT-box element or some novel cis-element with respect to heat stress.

  19. Heat-induced changes to lipid molecular structure in Vimy flaxseed: Spectral intensity and molecular clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav

    2011-06-01

    Autoclaving was used to manipulate nutrient utilization and availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize any changes of the functional groups mainly associated with lipid structure in flaxseed ( Linum usitatissimum, cv. Vimy), that occurred on a molecular level during the treatment process using infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included lipid CH 3 asymmetric (ca. 2959 cm -1), CH 2 asymmetric (ca. 2928 cm -1), CH 3 symmetric (ca. 2871 cm -1) and CH 2 symmetric (ca. 2954 cm -1) functional groups, lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group (ca. 1745 cm -1), lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (ca. 3010 cm -1) as well as their ratios. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were conducted to identify molecular spectral differences. Flaxseed samples were kept raw for the control or autoclaved in batches at 120 °C for 20, 40 or 60 min for treatments 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Molecular spectral analysis of lipid functional group ratios showed a significant decrease ( P 0.05) on lipid carbonyl C dbnd O ester group and lipid unsaturation group (CH attached to C dbnd C) (with average spectral peak area intensities of 138.3 and 68.8 IR intensity units, respectively). Multivariate molecular spectral analyses, CLA and PCA, were unable to make distinctions between the different treatment original spectra at the CH 3 and CH 2 asymmetric and symmetric region (ca. 2988-2790 cm -1). The results indicated that autoclaving had an impact to the mid-infrared molecular spectrum of flaxseed to identify heat-induced changes in lipid conformation. A future study is needed to quantify the relationship between lipid molecular structure changes and functionality/availability.

  20. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Chan-Gi, E-mail: changipack@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sang-Gun [Dept. of Pathology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  1. Pressure effects on the structure, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of heat-induced aggregation of protein studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Y [Applied Chemistry Department, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Okuno, A [Research Department 3, Central Research, Bridgestone Co. Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8531 (Japan); Kato, M, E-mail: taniguti@sk.ritsumei.ac.j [Pharmaceutical Sciences Department, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Pressure can retrain the heat-induced aggregation and dissociate the heat-induced aggregates. We observed the aggregation-preventing pressure effect and the aggregates-dissociating pressure effect to characterize the heat-induced aggregation of equine serum albumin (ESA) by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results suggest the {alpha}-helical structure collapses at the beginning of heat-induced aggregation through the swollen structure, and then the rearrangement of structure to the intermolecular {beta}-sheet takes place through partially unfolded structure. We determined the activation volume for the heat-induced aggregation ({Delta}V'' = +93 ml/mol) and the partial molar volume difference between native state and heat-induced aggregates ({Delta}V=+32 ml/mol). This positive partial molar volume difference suggests that the heat-induced aggregates have larger internal voids than the native structure. Moreover, the positive volume change implies that the formation of the intermolecular {beta}-sheet is unfavorable under high pressure.

  2. The effect of air permeability characteristics of protective garments on the induced physiological strain under exercise-heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Yoram; Heled, Yuval; Ketko, Itay; Muginshtein, Jeni; Yanovich, Ran; Druyan, Amit; Moran, Daniel S

    2013-08-01

    The high values of thermal resistance (Rct) and/or vapor resistance (Ret) of chemical protective clothing (CPC) induce a considerable thermal stress. The present study compared the physiological strain induced by CPCs and evaluates the relative importance of the fabrics' Rct, Ret, and air permeability in determining heat strain. Twelve young (20-30 years) healthy, heat-acclimated male subjects were exposed fully encapsulated for 3h daily to an exercise-heat stress (35°C and 30% relative humidity, walking on a motor-driven treadmill at a pace of 5 km h(1) and a 4% inclination, in a work-rest cycle of 45 min work and 15 min rest). Two bipack CPCs (PC1 and PC2) were tested and the results were compared with those attained by two control suits-a standard cotton military BDU (CO1) and an impermeable material suit (CO2). The physiological burden imposed by the two bilayer garments was within the boundaries set by the control conditions. Overall, PC2 induced a lower strain, which was closer to CO1, whereas PC1 was closer to CO2. Air permeability of the PC2 cloth was almost three times higher than that of PC1, enabling a better heat dissipation and consequently a lower physiological strain. Furthermore, air permeability characteristic of the fabrics, which is associated with its construction and weave, significantly correlated with the physiological strain, whereas the correlation with Rct, Ret, and weight was poor. The results emphasize the importance of air permeability in reducing the physiological strain induced by CPCs.

  3. Application of X-ray phase-contrast tomography in quantative studies of heat induced structural changes in meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miklos, R.; Nielsen, M. S.; Einarsdottir, Hildur

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is increasingly used in the studies of food structure. This paper describes the perspectives of use of phase contrast computed tomography in studies of heat induced structural changes in meat. From the data it was possible to obtain reconstructed images of the sample...... structure for visualization and qualitative studies of the sample structure. Further data segmentation allowed structural changes to be quantified....

  4. In situ study of the effect of ground source heat pump on shallow ground-water quality in the late Pleistocene terrace area of Tokyo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, T.; Uemura, K.; Akiba, Y.; Ota, M.

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems has rapidly increased around the world, since they reduce carbon dioxide emissions and save electric energy. The GSHP system transfer heat into the geosphere zone when air conditioners are used to cool rooms or buildings. However, the effects of temperature increase on the quality of underground water has yet to be fully investigated. In order to reduce the risks of ground-water pollution by the installed GSHPs, it is important to evaluate the effect of temperature change on the ground-water quality. In this study, we installed a closed loop GSHP system on a heat exchange well along with a monitoring well drilled to measure ground-water quality and temperature. The monitoring well was drilled at 0.1cm away from the heat exchange well. We observed that changes of temperature in the heat exchange well affected the water quality, especially turbidity, in gravelly layer.

  5. Yeast cell inactivation related to local heating induced by low-intensity electric fields with long-duration pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Stéphane; Ferret, Eric; Boehm, Jean-Baptiste; Gervais, Patrick

    2007-01-25

    The effects of electric field (EF) treatments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability were investigated using a PG200 electroporator (Hoefer Scientific Instrument, San Fransisco, CA, USA) with specific attention to induced thermal effects on cell death. Lethal electric fields (1.5 kV cm(-1) for 5 s) were shown to cause heat variations in the cell suspension medium (water+glycerol), while corresponding classical thermal treatments at equivalent temperatures had no effect on the cells viability. Variations of the electrical conductivity of the intra- and extracellular matrix caused by ions and solutes transfer across the membrane were shown to be involved in the observed heating. The results permitted to build a theoretical model for the temperature variations induced by electric fields. Using this model and the electrical conductivity of the different media, a plausible explanation of the cell death induced by low-intensity electric fields with long-duration pulses has been proposed. Indeed, cell mortality could in part be caused by direct and indirect effects of electric fields. Direct effects are related to well known electromechanical phenomena, whereas indirect effects are related to secondary thermal stress caused by plasma membrane thermoporation. This thermoporation was attributed to electrical conductivity variations and the corresponding intracellular heating.

  6. Live and Heat-Killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 May Induce Modulatory Cytokines Profiles on Macrophages RAW 264.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorjão, Adeline Lacerda; de Oliveira, Felipe Eduardo; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and/or its products to induce the synthesis of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12) by mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). Three microorganism preparations were used: live L. rhamnosus (LLR) suspension, heat-killed L. rhamnosus (HKLR) suspension, and the supernatant of a heat-killed L. rhamnosus (SHKLR) suspension, which were cultured with macrophages (37°C, 5% CO2) for 2 h and 30 min. After that, cells were cultured for 16 h. The supernatants were used for the quantitation of cytokines, by ELISA. The results were compared with the synthesis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and analysed, using ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%. LLR and HKLR groups were able to significantly increase the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 (P 0.05). All the L. rhamnosus suspensions were not able to produce detectable levels of IL-1β or significant levels of IL-4 and IL-12 (P > 0.05). In conclusion, live and heat-killed L. rhamnosus suspensions were able to induce the synthesis of different cytokines with proinflammatory (TNF-α and IL-6) or regulatory (IL-10) functions, suggesting the role of strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 in the modulation or in the stimulation of immune responses.

  7. Live and Heat-Killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 May Induce Modulatory Cytokines Profiles on Macrophages RAW 264.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Lacerda Jorjão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and/or its products to induce the synthesis of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 by mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7. Three microorganism preparations were used: live L. rhamnosus (LLR suspension, heat-killed L. rhamnosus (HKLR suspension, and the supernatant of a heat-killed L. rhamnosus (SHKLR suspension, which were cultured with macrophages (37°C, 5% CO2 for 2 h and 30 min. After that, cells were cultured for 16 h. The supernatants were used for the quantitation of cytokines, by ELISA. The results were compared with the synthesis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and analysed, using ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%. LLR and HKLR groups were able to significantly increase the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 (P0.05. All the L. rhamnosus suspensions were not able to produce detectable levels of IL-1β or significant levels of IL-4 and IL-12 (P>0.05. In conclusion, live and heat-killed L. rhamnosus suspensions were able to induce the synthesis of different cytokines with proinflammatory (TNF-α and IL-6 or regulatory (IL-10 functions, suggesting the role of strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 in the modulation or in the stimulation of immune responses.

  8. Effect of heat-induced pain stimuli on pulse transit time and pulse wave amplitude in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Kortekaas, Minke C; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G; Stolker, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pain is commonly assessed subjectively by interpretations of patient behaviour and/or reports from patients. When this is impossible the availability of a quantitative objective pain assessment tool based on objective physiological parameters would greatly benefit clinical practice and research beside the standard self-report tests. Vasoconstriction is one of the physiological responses to pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) decrease in response to this vasoconstriction when caused by heat-induced pain. The PTT and PWA were measured in healthy volunteers, on both index fingers using photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. Each subject received 3 heat-induced pain stimuli using a Temperature-Sensory Analyzer thermode block to apply a controlled, increasing temperature from 32.0 °C to 50.0 °C to the skin. After reaching 50.0 °C, the thermode was immediately cooled down to 32.0 °C. The study population was divided into 2 groups with a time-interval between the stimuli 20s or 60s. The results showed a significant (p  Heat-induced pain causes a decrease of PTT and PWA. Consequently, it is expected that, in the future, PTT and PWA may be applied as objective indicators of pain, either beside the standard self-report test, or when self-report testing is impossible.

  9. Climate change-induced heat risks for migrant populations working at brick kilns in India: a transdisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren-Kownacki, Karin; Kjellberg, Siri M.; Gooch, Pernille; Dabaieh, Marwa; Anandh, Latha; Venugopal, Vidhya

    2018-03-01

    During the summer of 2015, India was hit by a scorching heat wave that melted pavements in Delhi and caused thousands of deaths, mainly among the most marginalized populations. One such group facing growing heat risks from both occupational and meteorological causes are migrant brick kiln workers. This study evaluates both current heat risks and the potential future impacts of heat caused by climate change, for the people working at brick kilns in India. A case study of heat stress faced by people working at brick kilns near Chennai, India, is the anchor point around which a transdisciplinary approach was applied. Around Chennai, the situation is alarming since occupational heat exposure in the hot season from March to July is already at the upper limits of what humans can tolerate before risking serious impairment. The aim of the study was to identify new pathways for change and soft solutions by both reframing the problem and expanding the solution space being considered in order to improve the quality of life for the migrant populations at the brick kilns. Technical solutions evaluated include the use of sun-dried mud bricks and other locally "appropriate technologies" that could mitigate the worsening of climate change-induced heat. Socio-cultural solutions discussed for empowering the people who work at the brick kilns include participatory approaches such as open re-localization, and rights-based approaches including the environmental sustainability and the human rights-based approach framework. Our analysis suggests that an integrative, transdisciplinary approach could incorporate a more holistic range of technical and socio-culturally informed solutions in order to protect the health of people threatened by India's brick kiln industry.

  10. Heat-induced chemical and color changes of extractive-free Black Locust (Rosinia Pseudoacacia) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Nicole M. Stark

    2012-01-01

    To investigate chemical and color changes of the polymeric constituents of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) wood during heat treatment, extractive-free wood flour was conditioned to 30% initial moisture content (MC) and heated for 24 h at 120 °C in either an oxygen or nitrogen atmosphere. The color change was measured using the CIELAB color system. Chemical changes...

  11. Modelling the formation of heat-induced contaminants during thermal processing of food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Many of our food products have undergone a heat-treatment before consumption, either at home or at the food industry. Heat treatments not only bring out desired characteristics of the food products such as flavour, texture, taste and safety aspects but also leads to the formation of undesired

  12. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  13. Salinization in a stratified aquifer induced by heat transfer from well casings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lopik, J.H.; Hartog, N.; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan; Cirkel, D. Gijsbert; Raoof, A.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature inside wells used for gas, oil and geothermal energy production, as well as steam injection, is in general significantly higher than the groundwater temperature at shallower depths. While heat loss from these hot wells is known to occur, the extent to which this heat loss may result

  14. Effects of mantle rheologies on viscous heating induced by glacial isostatic adjustment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Ping Ping; Wu, Patrick; van der Wal, W.

    2018-01-01

    It has been argued that viscous dissipation from mantle flow in response to surface loading during glacial cycles can result in short-term heating and thus trigger transient volcanism or changes in mantle properties, which may in turn affect mantle dynamics. Furthermore, heating near the Earth's

  15. Plasmon-induced photoelectrochemical biosensor for in situ real-time measurement of biotin-streptavidin binding kinetics under visible light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jingchun; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Ueno, Kosei; Shi, Xu; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We developed a localized surface plasmon-induced visible light-responsive photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor using a titanium dioxide (TiO_2) photoelectrode loaded with gold nanoislands (AuNIs) for in situ real-time measurement of biotin-streptavidin association. As a proof of concept, self-assembled thiol-terminated biotin molecules bound on a AuNIs/TiO_2 photoelectrode were successfully utilized to explore the photocurrent response to streptavidin-modified gold nanoparticle (STA-AuNP) solutions. This plasmon-induced PEC biosensor is simple and easy to miniaturize. Additionally, the PEC biosensor achieves highly sensitive measurements under only visible light irradiation and prevents the UV-induced damage of samples. Furthermore, a novel approach has been proposed to realize the real-time monitoring of biotin-STA binding affinities and kinetics by analyzing the PEC sensing characteristics. This PEC biosensor and novel analysis method could provide a new approach for the specific electrical detection and real-time kinetic measurements for clinical diagnostics and drug development. - Highlights: • A plasmon-induced visible light-responsive photoelectrochemical biosensor is developed and the system can be miniaturized.

  16. Plasmon-induced photoelectrochemical biosensor for in situ real-time measurement of biotin-streptavidin binding kinetics under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jingchun; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Ueno, Kosei; Shi, Xu [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Misawa, Hiroaki, E-mail: misawa@es.hokudai.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry & Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-08

    We developed a localized surface plasmon-induced visible light-responsive photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor using a titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) photoelectrode loaded with gold nanoislands (AuNIs) for in situ real-time measurement of biotin-streptavidin association. As a proof of concept, self-assembled thiol-terminated biotin molecules bound on a AuNIs/TiO{sub 2} photoelectrode were successfully utilized to explore the photocurrent response to streptavidin-modified gold nanoparticle (STA-AuNP) solutions. This plasmon-induced PEC biosensor is simple and easy to miniaturize. Additionally, the PEC biosensor achieves highly sensitive measurements under only visible light irradiation and prevents the UV-induced damage of samples. Furthermore, a novel approach has been proposed to realize the real-time monitoring of biotin-STA binding affinities and kinetics by analyzing the PEC sensing characteristics. This PEC biosensor and novel analysis method could provide a new approach for the specific electrical detection and real-time kinetic measurements for clinical diagnostics and drug development. - Highlights: • A plasmon-induced visible light-responsive photoelectrochemical biosensor is developed and the system can be miniaturized.

  17. The dimethylthiourea-induced attenuation of cisplatin nephrotoxicity is associated with the augmented induction of heat shock proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Takayuki; Kato, Akihiko; Yasuda, Hideo; Miyaji, Takehiko; Luo, Jinghui; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Ito, Hideaki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Hishida, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a potent hydroxyl radical scavenger, affords protection against cisplatin (CDDP)-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Since the suppression of oxidative stress and the enhancement of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are both reported to protect against CDDP-induced renal damage, we tested whether increased HSP expression is involved in the underlying mechanisms of the DMTU-induced renal protection. We examined the effect of DMTU treatment on the expression of HSPs in the kidney until day 5 following a single injection of CDDP (5 mg/kg BW). DMTU significantly inhibited the CDDP-induced increments of serum creatinine, the number of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive tubular cells, and tubular damage score (p < 0.05). CDDP significantly increased renal abundances of HO-1, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90 at days 1, 3, and 5. DMTU significantly augmented only the expression of HSP60 expression mainly in the cytoplasm of the proximal tubular cells at days 1 and 3 in CDDP-induced ARF. DMTU also inhibited the CDDP-induced increment of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, in the fraction of organelles/membranes at day 3. The findings suggest that DMTU may afford protection against CDDP-induced ARF, partially through the early induction of cytoplasmic HSP60, thereby preventing the Bax-mediated apoptosis in renal tubular cells

  18. An in-situ stimulation experiment in crystalline rock - assessment of induced seismicity levels during stimulation and related hazard for nearby infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischig, Valentin; Broccardo, Marco; Amann, Florian; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Esposito, Simona; Krietsch, Hannes; Doetsch, Joseph; Madonna, Claudio; Wiemer, Stefan; Loew, Simon; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    A decameter in-situ stimulation experiment is currently being performed at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland by the Swiss Competence Center for Energy Research - Supply of Electricity (SCCER-SoE). The underground research laboratory lies in crystalline rock at a depth of 480 m, and exhibits well-documented geology that is presenting some analogies with the crystalline basement targeted for the exploitation of deep geothermal energy resources in Switzerland. The goal is to perform a series of stimulation experiments spanning from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments in an experimental volume approximately 30 m in diameter. The experiments will contribute to a better understanding of hydro-mechanical phenomena and induced seismicity associated with high-pressure fluid injections. Comprehensive monitoring during stimulation will include observation of injection rate and pressure, pressure propagation in the reservoir, permeability enhancement, 3D dislocation along the faults, rock mass deformation near the fault zone, as well as micro-seismicity. The experimental volume is surrounded by other in-situ experiments (at 50 to 500 m distance) and by infrastructure of the local hydropower company (at ~100 m to several kilometres distance). Although it is generally agreed among stakeholders related to the experiments that levels of induced seismicity may be low given the small total injection volumes of less than 1 m3, detailed analysis of the potential impact of the stimulation on other experiments and surrounding infrastructure is essential to ensure operational safety. In this contribution, we present a procedure how induced seismic hazard can be estimated for an experimental situation that is untypical for injection-induced seismicity in terms of injection volumes, injection depths and proximity to affected objects. Both, deterministic and probabilistic methods are employed to estimate that maximum possible and the maximum expected induced

  19. Enhanced Cyclability of Lithium-Oxygen Batteries with Electrodes Protected by Surface Films Induced via In-Situ Electrochemical Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Wu; Tao, Jinhui; Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lu, Dongping; Wang, Chongmin; Zhang, Jiguang

    2018-04-16

    Although the rechargeable lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have extremely high theoretical specific energy, the practical application of these batteries is still limited by the instability of their carbon-based air-electrode, Li metal anode, and electrolytes towards reduced oxygen species. Here we demonstrate a simple one-step in-situ electrochemical pre-charging strategy to generate thin protective films on both carbon nanotubes (CNTs) air-electrode and Li metal anode simultaneously under an inert atmosphere. Li-O2 cells after such pre-treatment demonstrate significantly extended cycle life of 110 and 180 cycles under the capacity-limited protocol of 1000 mAh g-1 and 500 mAh g-1, respectively, which is far more than those without pre-treatment. The thin-films formed from decomposition of electrolyte during in-situ electrochemical pre-charging process in an inert environment can protect both CNTs air-electrode and Li metal anode prior to conventional Li-O2 discharge/charge cycling where reactive reduced oxygen species are formed. This work provides a new approach for protections of carbon-based air-electrode and Li metal anode in practical Li-O2 batteries, and may also be applied to other battery systems.

  20. Effect of the heating rate on the microstructure of in situ Al2O3 particle-reinforced Al matrix composites prepared via displacement reactions in an Al/CuO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ge; Shi, Zhiming; Ta, Na; Ji, Guojun; Zhang, Ruiying

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The heating rate has a significant effect on the microstructures of composites. • The microstructure is determined by the diffusion rate of O and Cu in the heating stage. • The diffusion of Cu and O atoms is influenced by the heating rate. • With increasing heating rate, the Al 2 O 3 particle distribution becomes more uniformly. • With increasing heating rate, the form of Al 2 Cu changes from network to block-like. - Abstract: In this study, an in situ Al 2 O 3 particle-reinforced Al(Cu) matrix composite was successfully synthesized using a displacement reaction between Al and CuO powders. The powders were mixed at a weight ratio of 4:1 Al to CuO, cold-pressed and holding time at 900 °C for 1 h using varying heating rates. The effects of the heating rate on the microstructures of the composites were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (MO), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results indicate that all of the composites contain Al, Al 2 O 3 particles and Al 2 Cu phases. Although the heating rate does not significantly affect the phase compositions of the composites, it has a significant effect on their microstructures, most likely because it strongly influences the diffusion rates of the Cu and O atoms. As the heating rate is increased, the Al 2 O 3 particles become more dispersed, and they have a more uniform particle size distribution. Meanwhile, the Al 2 Cu structure transforms from the network (Al + Al 2 Cu) eutectic to the block-like Al 2 Cu phase. The ∼2 μm Al 2 O 3 particles and the block-like Al 2 Cu phase are distributed uniformly in the Al matrix when the sample is placed directly into a 900 °C furnace. This sample has a relative higher Rockwell hardness B (HRB) value of 87

  1. High-precision methods and devices for in situ measurements of thermally induced aberrations in optical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenogorsky, Victor V.; Solovyov, Alexander A.; Kozhevatov, Ilya E.; Kamenetsky, Eugene E.; Rudenchik, Eugene A.; Palashov, Oleg V.; Silin, Dmitry E.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2006-01-01

    An optical system that comprises two devices for remote measurements, a broadband optical interferometer and a scanning Hartmann sensor, is described. The results of simultaneous measurements with both devices and the results of numerical modeling of sample surface heating are presented

  2. In situ visualization of thermal distortions of synchrotron radiation optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, P.; Kazimirov, A.; Bazarov, I.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new in situ method to measure heating-induced distortions of the surface of the first monochromator crystal exposed to high-power white synchrotron radiation beam. The method is based on recording the image of a stationary grid of dots captured by a CCD camera as reflected from the surface of a crystal with and without a heat load. The three-dimensional surface profile (heat bump) is then reconstructed from the distortions of the original pattern. In experiments performed at the CHESS A2 wiggler beam line we measured the heat bumps with the heights of up to 600 nm produced by a wiggler beam with total power in the range of 15-60 W incident on the (1 1 1) Si crystal at various angles between 3 deg. and 15 deg

  3. Laser induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.): in situ and remote detection of life in Antarctic and Alaskan ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Sattler, Birgit

    2009-08-01

    Once thought to be a barren desert devoid of life, it now appears that Earth's cryosphere is an ice ecosystem harbouring a rich community of metabolically active microorganisms inhabiting ice, snow, water, and lithic environments. The ability to rapidly survey this ecosystem during in situ and orbital missions is of considerable interest for monitoring Earth's carbon budget and for efficiently searching for life on Mars or any exoplanet with an analogous cryosphere. Laser induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) imaging and spectroscopy using excitation in ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths have been proposed as non-destructive astrobiological survey tools to search for amino acids, nucleic acids, microbial life, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) deep in the Mars regolith. However, the technique is easily adapted to search for larger, more complex biomolecular targets using longer wavelength sources. Of particular interest is the ability for excitation at blue, green, and red wavelengths to produce visible and near infrared fluorescence of photosynthetic pigments in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial communities populating the ice of alpine, Arctic, and Antarctic lakes, glaciers, ice sheets, and even the supercooled water-ice droplets of clouds. During the Tawani 2008 International Antarctic Expedition we tested the in situ use of the technique as part of a field campaign in the Dry Valleys of Schirmacher Oasis and Lake Untersee, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. In the spring of 2009, we performed airborne remote sensing tests of the technology in Alaska. In this paper we review our in situ laser detection experiments and present for the first time preliminary results on our efforts to detect cryosphere L.I.F.E. from an airborne platform.

  4. In situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on the cotton fabrics modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization of acrylic acid for durable multifunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.X., E-mail: cxwang@mail.dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building, Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu, 226019 (China); Ren, Y. [School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu, 226019 (China); Lv, J.C.; Zhou, Q.Q.; Ma, Z.P.; Qi, Z.M.; Chen, J.Y.; Liu, G.L.; Gao, D.W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Lu, Z.Q. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building, Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu, 224051 (China); Zhang, W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu, 224003 (China); Jin, L.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201204 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A new means for multifunctional cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA and AgNPs synthesis. • Surface modification by PIVPGP of AA had a positive effect on AgNPs loading. • Antibacterial, self-cleaning and thermal stability were greatly improved. • AgNP loaded cotton fabric exhibited excellent laundering durability. • Mechanism of AgNPs in situ synthesis on cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA was proposed. - Abstract: A practical and ecological method for preparing the multifunctional cotton fabrics with excellent laundering durability was explored. Cotton fabrics were modified by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization (PIVPGP) of acrylic acid (AA) and subsequently silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were in situ synthesized on the treated cotton fabrics. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability, respectively. SEM observation and EDX, XPS and XRD analysis demonstrated the much more AgNPs deposition on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA. The AgNP loaded cotton fabrics also exhibited better antibacterial activity, self-cleaning activity, thermal stability and laundering durability. It was concluded that the surface modification of the cotton fabrics by PIVPGP of AA could increase the loading efficiency and binding fastness of AgNPs on the treated cotton fabrics, which could fabricate the cotton fabrics with durable multifunction. In addition, the mechanism of in situ synthesis of AgNPs on the cotton fabrics modified by PIVPGP of AA was proposed.

  5. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzet, N.; Richaud, C.; Deveaux, Y.; Kazmaier, M.; Gagnon, J.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indicatio